Sample records for tri bu tion

  1. Try This

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activities Explore Science Explore Explore these Topics Activities Videos Cool Links Favorite Q&A invisible utility element Try This Exercise your science muscles Look around you;...

  2. commercializaTion office Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Technology commercializaTion office Agriculture ·Biotechnology ·Blueberries ·Cotton ·Forages Utilization, Renewable Energy ·Algalbiofuels ·Biodiesel ·Biomassengineering ·Biomasspre,skincare,andwoundhealing ·Vaccines Information Technology ·Bioinformaticstools ·Imagerenderingandenhancement ·3

  3. being activate tion Email tha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaughlin, Richard M.

    and Fall 201 n on logging t, search for c mer I and II 2 2014 term: M ment nter. her the Open nd click Review the being activate tion Email tha r to view your t is helpful to cheduled term cheduled term Check your o to your Con ocate the Enr epending on nk. Click on t elect the term ppointment d Tips for O

  4. BU BRAIN Self Service GRADING PROCEDURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    1 BU BRAIN Self Service GRADING PROCEDURES FOR FACULTY Updated May 2014/PD #12;2 Table of Contents BRAIN Self Service icon on left side of page: #12;4 Entering Grades: Once in BU BRAIN Self Service, go BRAIN Self Service; Registered student registered through the department). Grade: Student's grade

  5. BOSTON UNIVERSITY Policy BU 000-001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Frank

    : Security Management Process Policy ID: BU 000-001 HIPAA Section: 164.308(a)(3) Version: 1.1 Effective Date of these processes and controls. See the Risk Management Policy [BU 000-001B]. 2.3. Sanctions Policy [164.308(a)(1 process for applying appropriate sanctions against workforce members who do not comply with the security

  6. BOSTON UNIVERSITY Policy BU-100-001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Frank

    to extreme heat or cold or other potentially harmful environmental conditions. Protect the equipment from theft. 2.5.3. For policies regarding remote access to Boston University's information resources, see Remote Access Policy [BU 100-001A]. #12;

  7. Tri-Lab Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z Site MapTrends, Discovery, &Tri-Lab

  8. Roadmap: Finance Bachelor of Business Administration [BU-BBA-FIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Finance Bachelor of Business Administration [BU-BBA-FIN] College of Business Administration Department of Finance Catalog Year: 20132014 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 8-Nov-13/JSK Finance 3 C MIS 34060 Operations Management 3 Kent Core Requirement 3 See Kent Core Summary on page 2

  9. Roadmap: Finance Bachelor of Business Administration [BU-BBA-FIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Finance Bachelor of Business Administration [BU-BBA-FIN] College of Business Administration Department of Finance Catalog Year: 20122013 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 30-Aug-12/LNHD Finance 3 C MIS 34060 Operations Management 3 Kent Core Requirement 3 See Kent Core Summary on page 2

  10. Feeding TEL: Building an Ecosystem Around BuRST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    Feeding TEL: Building an Ecosystem Around BuRST to Convey Publication Metadata Peter Kraker1, Austria {pkraker, afessl, phoefler, slind}@know-center.at Abstract. In this paper we present an ecosystem of this ecosystem, semantically enriched RSS feeds are used for dissemination. These feeds are complemented

  11. ccsd00001676, Epitaxy and growth of titanium bu er layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd00001676, version 1 16 Jun 2004 Epitaxy and growth of titanium bu#11;er layers on Al 2 O 3 de Lourmel, 75015 Paris, France Abstract The structure and growth of thin #12;lms of titanium on #11 [2110] and Ti[1010] k Al 2 O 3 [1100] epitaxy of the #11; phase of titanium reported before for thick

  12. It's Good to The BU alumni social network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    -800-3466 Just two decades ago, staying connected after graduation meant swapping home phone numbers information, cre- ativity, wisdom, and more. The BU alumni community brings together almost 300,000 smart. Google+ is not only another effective social platform; it can also help you measure your marketing

  13. Undergraduate Summer 2013 Federal Work-Study www.bu.edu/seo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Frank

    Undergraduate Summer 2013 Federal Work-Study www.bu.edu/seo General Information Submit your for a FICA rebate. For FICA rebate criteria, go to the Student Employment website, http://www.bu.edu/seo: 617-353-9200 www.bu.edu/seo #12;Summer 2013 Undergraduate Federal Work-Study Application Priority

  14. INteRNatIONal BuSINeSS BuSINeSS adMINIStRatION Students will gain critical insights into business operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    MINORS INteRNatIONal BuSINeSS BuSINeSS adMINIStRatION Students will gain critical insights into business operations and strategy from accounting, finance, management and marketing coursework. The Business Administration Minor will provide students with fundamental knowledge and exposure to key business

  15. Exploiting Hysteresis in a CMOS Bu er Radu M. Secareanu, Victor Adler, and Eby G. Friedman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Eby G.

    tapered bu ers 2 6 have been proposed. Approaches for driving highly resis- tive RC lines for optimal placement, sizing, and power dissipation. A CMOS in- verter driving a distributed RC line is shown@ece.rochester.edu, adler@ece.rochester.edu, friedman@ece.rochester.edu Abstract| A high drive CMOS bu er circuit character

  16. BU Physics Department 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 http://physics.bu.edu/ office@physics.bu.edu T: 617-353-2600 F: 617-353-9393 June 20, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @physics.bu.edu · T: 617-353-2600 · F: 617-353-9393 June 20, 2014 FACULTY/LECTURERS Ahlen, Steve (ahlen) O: PRB 275, 3-8940 L: PRB 463/465 Averitt, Richard (raveritt) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . O: SCI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . O: PRB 371, 8-6241 Bose, Tulika (tulika) O: PRB 369, 3-6027 Brecher, Kenneth (brecher

  17. TRI-MENTORING OFFERS AN EDUCATION BEYOND TRADITIONAL UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TRI-MENTORING OFFERS AN EDUCATION BEYOND TRADITIONAL UNIVERSITY ENGINEERING CURRICULUM Donna L an education in topics such as these through the recently established Tri-Mentoring Program. The Tri-Mentoring and initial outcomes specifically for the UBC Engineering Tri-Mentoring Program, one of eight tri-mentoring

  18. Tri-Generation Success Story: World's First Tri-Gen EnergyStation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Department, the Fountain Valley energy station is the world's first tri-generation hydrogen energy and electrical power station to provide transportation fuel to the public...

  19. TriWo AG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, Indiana (UtilityTri-State Electric Member Corp Jump to:TriWo AG Jump

  20. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples Timothy J.Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples Timothy J.Introduction Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing

  1. tion des environs par quatre groupes prin-cipaux de polluants : i) les hydrocarbures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    tion des environs par quatre groupes prin- cipaux de polluants : i) les hydrocarbures aromatiques simples; ii) les hydrocarbures aliphatiques ; iii) les hydrocarbures aroma- tiques polycycliques (HAP

  2. Roadmap: Managerial Marketing Bachelor of Business Administration [BU-BBA-MMTG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Managerial Marketing Bachelor of Business Administration [BU-BBA-MMTG] College | Last Updated: 8-Nov-13/JSK This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study General Electives (lower or upper division) 6 See note 5 on page 2 #12;Roadmap: Managerial Marketing

  3. co n t r i bu t i o n s Losing the Culture of Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellend, Mark

    compared with modeling, meta-analysis, and data mining in some areas of ecological research. For exampleco n t r i bu t i o n s Losing the Culture of Ecology David B. Lindenmayer Fenner School reflection on the culture of our field, ecology. Ecology grew from deep roots in natural history, taxonomy

  4. Roadmap: Business Management Bachelor of Business Administration [BU-BBA-BMGT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Business Management ­ Bachelor of Business Administration [BU-BBA-BMGT] College of Business Administration Department of Management and Information Systems Catalog Year: 2013­2014 Page 1 Div. Min. Grade Major GPA Important Notes Semester One: [16 Credit Hours] BUS 10123 Exploring Business

  5. Roadmap: Business Management Bachelor of Business Administration [BU-BBA-BMGT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Business Management ­ Bachelor of Business Administration [BU-BBA-BMGT] College of Business Administration Department of Management and Information Systems Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 Div. Min. Grade Major GPA Important Notes Semester One: [16 Credit Hours] BUS 10123 Exploring Business

  6. The titanium tris-anilide cation [Ti(N[[superscript t]Bu]Ar)[subscript 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spinney, Heather A.

    This work explores the reduction of 4,4?-bipyridine using two equivalents of the titanium(III) complex Ti(N[[superscript t]Bu]Ar)[subscript 3] resulting in formation of a black, crystalline complex, (4,4?-bipy){Ti(N[[superscript ...

  7. Using the Expertise Web Site http://www.bumc.bu.edu/expertise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    ;_________________________________Search Term Enter your search term in this textbox Using the Expertise Web Site : Basic Search http searches are project terms from NIH Reporter data and are BU specific Using the Expertise Web Site a Basic Search Updating your Expertise Profile Performing an Advanced Search #12

  8. Using the Expertise Web Site http://www.bumc.bu.edu/expertise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    ;_________________________________Search Term Enter your search term in this textbox Using the Expertise Web Site : Basic Search http searches are project terms from NIH Reporter data and are BU specific Using the Expertise Web Site a Basic Search Establishing and Updating your Expertise Profile Performing an Advanced Search #12

  9. Tri Global Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas, Texas Zip: 75248 Sector: Services,

  10. Tri State Biodiesel LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas, Texas Zip: 75248 Sector:

  11. Tri Alpha Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTown ofTownNote-BangladeshTri Alpha Energy

  12. Tri Power Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTown ofTownNote-BangladeshTri Alpha

  13. EFRIGERATION OF FISH -PART 4 PRE PARA TION, FRE EZI NG,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART 4 PRE PARA TION, FRE EZI NG, AND COLD STORAGE OF FISH, SHELLFISH Washington 25, D. C. 1956 REFRI GERATION OF FISH: PART FOUR PREPARATION, FREEZING, AND COLD STORAGE OF FISH

  14. Characterization of Tri-lab Tantalum Plate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchheit, Thomas E.; Cerreta, Ellen K.; Deibler, Lisa Anne; Chen, Shu-Rong; Michael, Joseph R.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a detailed characterization Tri-lab Tantalum (Ta) plate jointly purchased from HCStark Inc. by Sandia, Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Data in this report was compiled from series of material and properties characterization experiments carried out at Sandia (SNL) and Los Alamos (LANL) Laboratories through a leveraged effort funded by the C2 campaign. Results include microstructure characterization detailing the crystallographic texture of the material and an increase in grain size near the end of the rolled plate. Mechanical properties evaluations include, compression cylinder, sub-scale tension specimen, micohardness and instrumented indentation testing. The plate was found to have vastly superior uniformity when compare with previously characterized wrought Ta material. Small but measurable variations in microstructure and properties were noted at the end, and at the top and bottom edges of the plate.

  15. lthough proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers are widely used in the process indus-try, their effectiveness is often limited due to poor tuning. The manual tuning of PID controllers,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krstic, Miroslav

    A lthough proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers are widely used in the process indus- try, their effectiveness is often limited due to poor tuning. The manual tuning of PID controllers, and it is not desirable to open the process loop for system identifica- tion. Thus, a method for tuning PID parameters

  16. DIGITAL CHROMATOGRAPHY AND THE FORMA-TION OF HETEROGENEOUS DROPLET LIBRARIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Amar S.

    DIGITAL CHROMATOGRAPHY AND THE FORMA- TION OF HETEROGENEOUS DROPLET LIBRARIES USING University, Detroit MI, USA ABSTRACT Generating chemical libraries in droplet form is vital to the adoption in droplets (FD), a method for generating heterogeneous droplet libraries using standard separation processes

  17. Hand gestures for medical applica-tions provide an expressive, natural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wachs, Juan

    members to increasingly interact with medical equipment and computer systems. These advances haveHand gestures for medical applica- tions provide an expressive, natural and intuitive way reviews the highlights of a novel gesture-based system for medical image browsing in the OR called Gestix

  18. Calorimetric investigations on thermoregula-tion and growth of wax moth larvae (Galleria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Calorimetric investigations on thermoregula- tion and growth of wax moth larvae (Galleria mellonella) The larvae of the wax moth Galleria mellonella are living in honeybee colonies where they feed on wax, honey, pollen and other organic matter. Mass-invasions of larvae can occur in weak bee colonies

  19. maintenance. This research is relevant to opera-tions and maintenance challenges facing aging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the need for preventive maintenance or other diagnostic activities on the physical system. Simulationsmaintenance. This research is relevant to opera- tions and maintenance challenges facing aging-benefit of extending the time between overhauls. reducing the probability of a failure in the field. and preventive

  20. China For all ages a MulTi-generaTional exPloraTion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowley, Clarence W.

    China For all ages a MulTi-generaTional exPloraTion The greaT Wall, TerraCoTTa Warriors & The MighCTuresque China Experience the Delights of a Well-Crafted Family Tour Dear Princetonian, Join Princeton Journeys, June 27 July 9, 2013, for a comprehensive tour of China designed with families in mind. Explore

  1. Tri-Cities Index of Innovation and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Richard A.; Scott, Michael J.; Butner, Ryan S.

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2001 and 2004, the Economic Development Office of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory published companion reports to the Washington Technology Center Index studies that provided additional information on the Tri-Cities (Kennewick-Richland-Pasco) area of the state, its technology businesses, and important advantages that the Tri-Cities have as places to live and do business. These reports also compared the Tri-Cities area to other technology-based metropolitan areas in the Pacific Northwest and nation along critical dimensions known to be important to technology firms. This report updates the material in these earlier reports, and highlights a growing Tri-Cities metropolitan area.

  2. Tri-National Agricultural Accord Rural Development Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    Tri-National Agricultural Accord Rural Development Workshop Overview of Canadian Provinces April 14. Structure Structures: Federal and provincial government organization Municipal / County Community / Regional

  3. BUSINESS SENSITIVE 1 Tri-Cities Research District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BUSINESS SENSITIVE 1 Tri-Cities Research District Speaker Series: Advancing Research Parks from National Developers Strategies for Pro-active Outreach Marketing #12;BUSINESS SENSITIVE 5

  4. WSU TRI-CITIES BE PART OF A COMMUNITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    challenges, and your goals for the future. Fall 2012 #12;WSU TRI-CITIES GO COUGS! STAY CLOSE. GO FAR. Photo

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: indus-try best practices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    indus-try best practices Sandia-Electric Power Research Institute Partnership Publishes Photovoltaic Reliability Report On January 21, 2014, in Energy, Facilities, Grid...

  6. Self-AssembledMonolayersof AlkanethiolatesPresentingTri(propylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    pr NE CffiM SOCIEry' Self-AssembledMonolayersof AlkanethiolatesPresentingTri(propylene sulloxidel.5136-5137 Self-AssembledMonolayersof Alkanethiolates PresentingTri(propylene sulfoxide)Groups Resist chose oligomers of the propylene sulfoxide group [-CH2CH2CH2S(O)-I ascandidatesthat shared

  7. PECIAL REPORS T Tri-County Health Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PECIAL REPORS T Tri-County Health Department in Colorado Does More Than Just Review and benefits of land use choices and improve the quality of land use decision making. Background Tri-County counties of the metropolitan Denver area, has offered development review services to its jurisdictions

  8. TFC-0004- In the Matter of Tri-Valley CARES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tri-Valley CARES filed an Appeal from a determination that the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) issued on June 2, 2010. In that determination, NNSA denied in part a request for information that Tri-Valley CARES had submitted on September 8, 2008, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. 552.

  9. Search for b?u transitions in B?[K????]DK decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu.?G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu.?I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K.?Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Buenger, C.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schrder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Santoro, V.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Vavra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the decays B?DK with D mesons reconstructed in the K????? or K????? final states, where D indicates a D? or a D0 meson. Using a sample of 47410? BB pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e?e? collider at SLAC, we measure the ratios R?((?(B?[K????]DK))/((?(B?[K????]DK)). We obtain R?=(5?12?10(stat)?2?4(syst))10? and R?=(12?12?10(stat)?3?5(syst))10?, from which we extract the upper limits at 90% probability: R?B of the magnitudes of the b?u and b?c amplitudes rB<0.13 at 90% probability.

  10. Information Security Policy http://www.bu.edu/policies/pdf/Info_Security_Policy_02-17-10.pdf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xia, Yu "Brandon"

    1 Information Security Policy http://www.bu.edu/policies/pdf/Info_Security_Policy_02-17-10.pdf Information properly and securely. Reason for Policy / Implication Statement Boston University is committed to collecting, handling, storing and using Sensitive Information properly and securely. This Policy establishes

  11. DARS is a BU Brain program that provides you with a report of your progress toward completing your degree.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    DARS is a BU Brain program that provides you with a report of your progress toward completing your degree. DARS shows you what classes you have taken and how they fulfill degree requirements. It also shows you what classes fulfill degree requirements. You can use DARS to track your progress

  12. Tri-County Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTownTri-County ElectricTri-CountyTri-County

  13. We welcome your application for internal transfer/dual degree to the Decker School of Nursing, and encourage you to obtain more information and academic advising before you complete the online application via BU BRAIN.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    application via BU BRAIN. APPLICATION PROCESS Applications for IUT or DD admission must be submitted online via the BU BRAIN to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions by March 15 for fall admission. Decker does and Physiology II ACADEMIC QUESTIONS? Before completing the online application via BU BRAIN, please direct your

  14. Tri-State Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas, Texas Zip: 75248 Sector:Tri-State

  15. Tri-County Elec Member Corp (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTown ofTownNote-BangladeshTriTri-County Elec

  16. Tri-County Electric Coop, Inc (Florida) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTownTri-County Electric CoopTri-County

  17. Tri-County Electric Coop, Inc (Oklahoma) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTownTri-County ElectricTri-County Electric

  18. Tri-County Electric Coop, Inc (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTownTri-County ElectricTri-County

  19. TriEagle Energy, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTownTri-CountyTri-State Electric Member

  20. REQUEST FOR SPECIAL HOUSING CONSIDERATIONS TRI CO-OP HOUSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    REQUEST FOR SPECIAL HOUSING CONSIDERATIONS TRI CO-OP HOUSING STUDENT'S NAME: __________________________ SENDER'S FAX NUMBER: ___________________ To submit a Request for Special Housing Considerations: Complete the form below. Submit (FAX, mail or email) the completed forms to the UC Davis Student Housing

  1. 2004 INDEX OF INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY TRI-CITIES, WASHINGTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as traffic congestion and high cost of living o Has two factors impeding its technology-based economic Tax Burden 14 Labor Costs 15 Growth 16 Employment in Technology Firms 17 Growth in Startups 172004 INDEX OF INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY TRI-CITIES, WASHINGTON JULY 2004 #12;PNNL-SA-42092 2004

  2. UNL/OSU Researchers Try Promising Technique to Remove Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    UNL/OSU Researchers Try Promising Technique to Remove Groundwater Contamination Under Former Oklahoma State University have joined to test promising new methods of removing longstanding groundwater into specially drilled injection wells, where it mixes with contaminants in the groundwater under the former

  3. Tri-Met's Experience With Automatic Passenger Counter and Automatic Vehicle Location Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    on an earlier draft. #12;Introduction The Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation District of Oregon (TriTri-Met's Experience With Automatic Passenger Counter and Automatic Vehicle Location Systems James State University Portland, OR 97207 This report is benefited from interviews of Tri-Met staff involved

  4. Formation of ordered films of axially bridged aluminum phthalocyanine [(tBu){sub 4}PcAl]{sub 2}O via magnetic field-induced reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basova, Tamara, E-mail: basova@niic.nsc.ru; Berezin, Aleksei; Nadolinny, Vladimir [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Lavrentiev Pr., 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)] [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Lavrentiev Pr., 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Peisert, Heiko; Chass, Thomas [Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Auf der Morgenstelle 18, 72076 Tbingen (Germany)] [Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Auf der Morgenstelle 18, 72076 Tbingen (Germany); Banimuslem, Hikmat; Hassan, Aseel [Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom)] [Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The ?-(oxo)bis[tetra-tert-butylphthalocyaninato] aluminum(III) [(tBu){sub 4}PcAl]{sub 2}O films with the crystallites oriented preferably in one direction were obtained via chemical transformation of tetra-tert-butylsubstituted chloroaluminum(III) phthalocyanine (tBu){sub 4}PcAlCl film upon its annealing in magnetic field. A comparative analysis of the influence of post-deposition annealing process without and under applied magnetic field of 1 T, on the orientation and morphology of (tBu){sub 4}PcAlCl and [(tBu){sub 4}PcAl]{sub 2}O films, has been carried out by the methods of UV-vis, Infrared and Raman spectroscopies, XRD as well as atomic force microscopy. The formation of [(tBu){sub 4}PcAl]{sub 2}O films with elongated crystallites having preferential orientation was observed upon heating of the films in magnetic field while annealing without magnetic field under the same conditions does not demonstrate any effect on the structure and morphology of these films. The reasons of the sensitivity of this reaction to the presence of such magnetic field is discussed and studied by electronic paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  5. he Web, as we know it, is a collec-tion of human-readable pages that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Bin

    of languages such as the Resource Description Framework (RDF), DAML+OIL, and the more recent Web OntologyT he Web, as we know it, is a collec- tion of human-readable pages that are virtually Web and proposed industry standards for Web services. The SemanticWeb forWeb Services One objective

  6. tions (Fig. 4). The layer thicknesses observed (a 0.90 m for the 400-m fibers; a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romanowicz, Barbara

    geometry. References and Notes 1. P. Yeh, A. Yariv, E. Marom, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 68, 1196 (1978). 2. J. W. D. Joannopoulos, Opt. Lett. 23, 1573 (1998). 7. P. Yeh, A. Yariv, C. Hong, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 67, 423tions (Fig. 4). The layer thicknesses observed (a 0.90 m for the 400- m fibers; a 0.45 m

  7. Tri-functional cannula for retinal endovascular surgery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A tri-functional cannula combines the functions of tissue Plasminogen Activator (tPA) solution delivery, illumination and venous pressure measurement. The cannula utilizes a tapered hollow-core optical fiber having an inlet for tPA solution, an attached fiber optic splitter configured to receive illumination light from an optical source such and a LED. A window in the cannula transmits the light to and from a central retinal vein. The return light is coupled to an optical detector to measure the pressure within the vein and determine whether an occlusion has been removed.

  8. TRI State Motor Transit to Resume Shipping Waste to WIPP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGE Creating a Geologic Play- EnergyTri-State Motor

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Try Street Terminal - PA 14

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K LeDowntown SiteTracerlab Inc -Try Street

  10. Tri State Electric Membership Corporation Smart Grid Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTown ofTownNote-BangladeshTri

  11. Tri-County Electric Coop (Michigan) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTownTri-County Electric Coop (Michigan) Jump

  12. Tri-County Electric Coop Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTownTri-County Electric Coop (Michigan)

  13. Tri-County Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTownTri-County Electric Coop

  14. Tri-County Electric Coop, Inc (Illinois) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTownTri-County Electric

  15. Tri-County Rural Elec Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTownTri-County

  16. Tri-State Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, Indiana (UtilityTri-State Electric Member Corp Jump to: navigation,

  17. High Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H2...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H2 from Biogas High Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H2 from Biogas Success story about using waste water...

  18. Fuel Cell Tri-Generation System Case Study using the H2A Stationary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System Economics and Performance Analysis Tri-Generation Success Story: World's First Tri-Gen Energy Station-Fountain Valley Expanding the Use of Biogas with Fuel Cell Technologies...

  19. World's First Tri-Generation Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Fueling Station...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    World's First Tri-Generation Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Fueling Station World's First Tri-Generation Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Fueling Station April 18, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis EERE...

  20. The option to try again : valuing a sequence of dependent trials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, James L.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In various fields of economic endeavor, agents enjoy the option to ?try, try again.? Failure in a particular pursuit often brings renewed effort to finally succeed. Many areas of R&D could be characterized in this fashion. ...

  1. a4-based tri-bimaximal mixing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    W. Grimus; L. Lavoura 2009-02-24 20 Tri-bimaximal neutrino mixing and neutrinoless double beta decay HEP - Phenomenology (arXiv) Summary: We present a tri-bimaximal lepton...

  2. An Analysis of Client Satisfaction and Company Efficiency at Tri Lake Consultants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sunde, Christopher Nathan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    meetings. County of Riverside In the past, Tri Lake providedTri Lake currently has contracts with the Cities of Perris, San Jacinto, Canyon Lake, Menifee, and the CountyCounty Sheriff Department. The low level of interaction and impact between Tri

  3. Aspects of Cooling at the TRI$?$P Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Willmann; G. P. Berg; U. Dammalapati; S. De; P. Dendooven; O. Dermois; K. Jungmann; A. Mol; C. J. G. Onderwater; A. Rogachevskiy; M. Sohani; E. Traykov; H. W. Wilschut

    2006-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tri$\\mu$P facility at KVI is dedicated to provide short lived radioactive isotopes at low kinetic energies to users. It comprised different cooling schemes for a variety of energy ranges, from GeV down to the neV scale. The isotopes are produced using beam of the AGOR cyclotron at KVI. They are separated from the primary beam by a magnetic separator. A crucial part of such a facility is the ability to stop and extract isotopes into a low energy beamline which guides them to the experiment. In particular we are investigating stopping in matter and buffer gases. After the extraction the isotopes can be stored in neutral atoms or ion traps for experiments. Our research includes precision studies of nuclear $\\beta$-decay through $\\beta$-$\

  4. Hanford Diversification and the Tri-Cities Economy FY 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCOTT, M.J.

    2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The missions of the U.S. Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office (DOE/RL) are to safely manage the Hanford Site, to manage and clean up its legacy wastes, and to develop and deploy new science and technology in the environmental and energy fields. Collectively, DOE/RL and its contractors are the most important single entity in the Tri-Cities local economy (Pasco, Kennewick, and Richland, Washington, and the surrounding area). Although the relevant economic region affected by DOE/RL and its contractors actually embraces a geographic area reaching from Yakima in the west to Walla Walla in the east and from Moses Lake in the north to Pendleton, Oregon, in the south, over 90% of economic impacts likely occur in Benton and Franklin Counties. These two counties are defined as the ''local'' Tri-Cities economy for purposes of this study. In the federal fiscal year (FY) 1999 (October 1, 1998 through September 30, 1999), the total impact of DOE'S local $1.59 billion budget was felt through payrolls of $542 million and local purchases of goods and services of $226 million. The total local spending of $768 million was up slightly from the FY 1998 total of $765 million. Taking into account the multiplier effects of this spending, the DOE/RL budget sustained an estimated 32% of all local employment (28,250 out of 88,100 jobs) and about 35% of local earned income (almost $1.08 billion out of $3.08 billion). The decrease in these percentages from last year's report reflects an update of the model's economic structure based on the 1997 economic census year, a correction of a programming error in the model found during the update, and a broader definition of earnings that includes proprietor income, not just wages (see the Appendix for revisions to the previous forecasts). DOE budget increases in FY 2000 are expected to result in no change to the number of local DOE contractor jobs and about a $29 million increase in direct local spending.

  5. Pressure Build-Up During the Fire Test in Type B(U) Packages Containing Water - 13280

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldkamp, Martin; Nehrig, Marko; Bletzer, Claus; Wille, Frank [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 44, 12205 Berlin (Germany)] [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 44, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safety assessment of packages for the transport of radioactive materials with content containing liquids requires special consideration. The main focus is on water as supplementary liquid content in Type B(U) packages. A typical content of a Type B(U) package is ion exchange resin, waste of a nuclear power plant, which is not dried, normally only drained. Besides the saturated ion exchange resin, a small amount of free water can be included in these contents. Compared to the safety assessment of packages with dry content, attention must be paid to some more specific issues. An overview of these issues is provided. The physical and chemical compatibility of the content itself and the content compatibility with the packages materials must be demonstrated for the assessment. Regarding the mechanical resistance the package has to withstand the forces resulting from the freezing liquid. The most interesting point, however, is the pressure build-up inside the package due to vaporization. This could for example be caused by radiolysis of the liquid and must be taken into account for the storage period. If the package is stressed by the total inner pressure, this pressure leads to mechanical loads to the package body, the lid and the lid bolts. Thus, the pressure is the driving force on the gasket system regarding the activity release and a possible loss of tightness. The total pressure in any calculation is the sum of partial pressures of different gases which can be caused by different effects. The pressure build-up inside the package caused by the regulatory thermal test (30 min at 800 deg. C), as part of the cumulative test scenario under accident conditions of transport is discussed primarily. To determine the pressure, the temperature distribution in the content must be calculated for the whole period from beginning of the thermal test until cooling-down. In this case, while calculating the temperature distribution, conduction and radiation as well as evaporation and condensation during the associated process of transport have to be considered. This paper discusses limiting amounts of water inside the cask which could lead to unacceptable pressure and takes into account saturated steam as well as overheated steam. However, the difficulties of assessing casks containing wet content will be discussed. From the authority assessment point of view, drying of the content could be an effective way to avoid the above described pressure build-up and the associated difficulties for the safety assessment. (authors)

  6. Yukawa and Tri-scalar Processes in Electroweak Baryogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirigliano, V; Ramsey-Musolf, M J; Tulin, S; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Lee, Christopher; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.; Tulin, Sean

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the contributions to the quantum transport equations for electroweak baryogenesis due to decays and inverse decays induced by tri-scalar and Yukawa interactions. In the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), these contributions give rise to couplings between Higgs and fermion supermultiplet densities, thereby communicating the effects of CP-violation in the Higgs sector to the baryon sector. We show that the decay and inverse decay-induced contributions that arise at zeroth order in the strong coupling, \\alpha_s, can be substantially larger than the O(\\alpha_s) terms that are generated by scattering processes and that are usually assumed to dominate. We revisit the often-used approximation of fast Yukawa-induced processes and show that for realistic parameter choices it is not justified. We solve the resulting quantum transport equations numerically with special attention on the impact of Yukawa rates and study the dependence of the baryon-to-entropy ratio Y_B on MSSM parameters.

  7. Try-A Global Database of Plant Traits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Peter E [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant traits the morphological, anatomical, physiological, biochemical and phenological characteristics of plants and their organs determine how primary producers respond to environmental factors, affect other trophic levels, influence ecosystem processes and services and provide a link from species richness to ecosystem functional diversity. Trait data thus represent the raw material for a wide range of research from evolutionary biology, community and functional ecology to biogeography. Here we present the global database initiative named TRY, which has united a wide range of the plant trait research community worldwide and gained an unprecedented buy-in of trait data: so far 93 trait databases have been contributed. The data repository currently contains almost three million trait entries for 69 000 out of the world s 300 000 plant species, with a focus on 52 groups of traits characterizing the vegetative and regeneration stages of the plant life cycle, including growth, dispersal, establishment and persistence. A first data analysis shows that most plant traits are approximately log-normally distributed, with widely differing ranges of variation across traits. Most trait variation is between species (interspecific), but significant intraspecific variation is also documented, up to 40% of the overall variation. Plant functional types (PFTs), as commonly used in vegetation models, capture a substantial fraction of the observed variation but for several traits most variation occurs within PFTs, up to 75% of the overall variation. In the context of vegetation models these traits would better be represented by state variables rather than fixed parameter values. The improved availability of plant trait data in the unified global database is expected to support a paradigm shift from species to trait-based ecology, offer new opportunities for synthetic plant trait research and enable a more realistic and empirically grounded representation of terrestrial vegetation in Earth system models.

  8. Atomistic Study of the Migration of Di- and Tri-Interstitials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    silicon is performed using classical molecular dynamics simulations with a Stillinger-Weber potential. At first the structures and energetics of the di- and the tri-interstitial...

  9. Tri-County solid waste-to-fuel production project feasibility study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis and preliminary findings of refuse-derived fuel and recovered components markets are presented. Other topics covered are: municipal solid waste composition, quantity and constraints; technical assessment and capital cost assessment; economic feasibility of burning process residue to generate steam; review of commercially available equipment for the densification of refuse-derived fuel; final pre-feasibility analysis for the Tri-County Municipal Solid Waste to Fuel Production Project; preliminary economic and sensitivity analysis for the Tri-County Project; risks assessment for the Tri-County Project; and environmental, health, safety, and socioeconomic assessment for the Tri-County Project. (MHR)

  10. Tri-Laboratory Linux Capacity Cluster 2007 SOW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seager, M

    2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program (formerly know as Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative, ASCI) has led the world in capability computing for the last ten years. Capability computing is defined as a world-class platform (in the Top10 of the Top500.org list) with scientific simulations running at scale on the platform. Example systems are ASCI Red, Blue-Pacific, Blue-Mountain, White, Q, RedStorm, and Purple. ASC applications have scaled to multiple thousands of CPUs and accomplished a long list of mission milestones on these ASC capability platforms. However, the computing demands of the ASC and Stockpile Stewardship programs also include a vast number of smaller scale runs for day-to-day simulations. Indeed, every 'hero' capability run requires many hundreds to thousands of much smaller runs in preparation and post processing activities. In addition, there are many aspects of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) that can be directly accomplished with these so-called 'capacity' calculations. The need for capacity is now so great within the program that it is increasingly difficult to allocate the computer resources required by the larger capability runs. To rectify the current 'capacity' computing resource shortfall, the ASC program has allocated a large portion of the overall ASC platforms budget to 'capacity' systems. In addition, within the next five to ten years the Life Extension Programs (LEPs) for major nuclear weapons systems must be accomplished. These LEPs and other SSP programmatic elements will further drive the need for capacity calculations and hence 'capacity' systems as well as future ASC capability calculations on 'capability' systems. To respond to this new workload analysis, the ASC program will be making a large sustained strategic investment in these capacity systems over the next ten years, starting with the United States Government Fiscal Year 2007 (GFY07). However, given the growing need for 'capability' systems as well, the budget demands are extreme and new, more cost effective ways of fielding these systems must be developed. This Tri-Laboratory Linux Capacity Cluster (TLCC) procurement represents the ASC first investment vehicle in these capacity systems. It also represents a new strategy for quickly building, fielding and integrating many Linux clusters of various sizes into classified and unclassified production service through a concept of Scalable Units (SU). The programmatic objective is to dramatically reduce the overall Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) of these 'capacity' systems relative to the best practices in Linux Cluster deployments today. This objective only makes sense in the context of these systems quickly becoming very robust and useful production clusters under the crushing load that will be inflicted on them by the ASC and SSP scientific simulation capacity workload.

  11. The SpallaTion

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems Analysis Success StoriesInvestigationsTheDepartmentTheDecember 31,The

  12. CUSSSFIC4TION CMUXLLq

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertowni5W 95.5x-L* d! CT NC0 - i

  13. Campus Sustainability Planetary Health Ecological Design Social and Environmental Enterprise Incuba-tion EcoVillages Sustainable Food Systems Ecoliteracy Solutions Journal Campus Systems Model Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Villages Sustainable Food Systems Ecoliteracy Solutions Journal Campus Systems Model Energy Conservation, Efficiency1 Campus Sustainability Planetary Health Ecological Design Social and Environmental Enterprise Incuba- tion EcoVillages Sustainable Food Systems Ecoliteracy Solutions Journal Campus Systems Model

  14. Final Characterization Report for Corrective Action Unit 109: Area 2 U-2BU Crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ITLV

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 109, Area 2 U-2bu Crater, is an inactive Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part A Permit disposal unit located in Area 2 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The Corrective Action Unit has been characterized under the requirements of the Nevada Test Site Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part A Permit (NDEP, 1995) and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 265 (CFR, 1996). The site characterization was performed under the RCRA Part A Permit Characterization Plan for the U-2bu Subsidence Crater (DOE/NV, 1998c), as approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (Liebendorfer, 1998). The primary objective of the site characterization activities was to evaluate the presence, concentration, and extent of any Resource Conservation and Recovery Act contaminants in the crater. Surface soil samples were collected on April 22, 1998, and subsurface soil samples and geotechnical samples were collected from April 27-29, 1998. Soil samples were collected using a hand auger or a piston-type drive hammer to advance a 5-centimeter (2-inch) diameter steel sampling tool into the ground. The permit for the Nevada Test Site requires that Corrective Action Unit 109 be closed under 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265 Subpart G and 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 265.310 (CFR, 1996). Analysis of the data collected during the characterization effort indicates that lead was detected in Study Area 1 at 5.7 milligrams per liter, above the regulatory level in 40 Code of Federal Regulations 261.24 of 5.0 milligrams per liter. Except for the lead detection at a single location within the crater, the original Resource Conservation Recovery Act constituents of potential concern determined between the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office and the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection during the Data Quality Objectives process (DOE/NV, 1998b) were not found to be present at Corrective Action Unit 109 above regulatory levels of concern. The single lead detection that exceeded regulatory limits was discovered at a depth of 1.2 meters (4 feet) in Study Area 1. Total petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in Study Area 4 at two locations at concentrations of 130 and 190 milligrams per kilogram. These concentrations exceed the 100 milligram per kilogram action level established in Nevada Administrative Code 445A.2272 (NAC, 1996). The primary conceptual model identified during the Data Quality Objectives process appears to have been substantiated by the analytical results from site characterization; migration of contaminants of potential concern does not appear to be occurring, as none were detected in a significant percentage of the characterization samples. Based on the results of the characterization, clean closure by removal and disposal of impacted soil will be evaluated in the closure plan to address Study Area 1. An (a) through (k) analysis, as specified in Nevada Administrative Code 445A.227, should be used to evaluate total petroleum hydrocarbon contamination within Study Area 4. Study Areas 2, 3, and 5 should be clean closed without further assessment or remediation (see Figures 2-1 and 5-1 in the Characterization Report).

  15. Self-Assembled Monolayers of Alkanethiolates Presenting Tri(propylene sulfoxide) Groups Resist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mrksich, Milan

    Self-Assembled Monolayers of Alkanethiolates Presenting Tri(propylene sulfoxide) Groups Resist-assembled mono- layers (SAMs) of alkanethiolates on gold that present tri- (propylene sulfoxide) groups prevent. We chose oligomers of the propylene sulfoxide group [-CH2CH2CH2S(O)-] as candidates that shared

  16. Tri-County High School Exhibition Call for Entries Wayne State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Tri-County High School Exhibition Call for Entries Wayne State University James Pearson Duffy for its Tri-County High School Exhibition. The exhibition dates are March 2 ­ March 23, 2012 counties. ABOUT THE GALLERY The Art Department Gallery hosts annual undergraduate exhibitions, provides

  17. CEMP-EC 13 February 1995 TRI-SERVICE MILITARY CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM (MCP) INDEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    CEMP-EC 13 February 1995 TABLE IV TRI-SERVICE MILITARY CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM (MCP) INDEX FOR FY 1996 for projection beyond FY 2001. 2. Tri-Service MCP Index (1,000) = 1 October 1979 ENR Historical Building Cost THRU FY 2001 PROGRAMS ESCALATION PERCENTAGE DATE INDEX FOR FISCAL YEAR 1 OCT 1992 ------------- 1825

  18. Technology transfer and commercialization initiatives at TRI/Austin: Resources and examples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matzkanin, G.A.; Dingus, M.L. [Texas Research Institute, Austin, Inc., TX (United States). Nondestructive Testing Information Analysis Center

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Located at TRI/Austin, and operated under a Department of Defense contract, is the Nondestructive Testing Information Analysis Center (NTIAC). This is a full service Information Analysis Center sponsored by the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC), although services of NTIAC are available to other government agencies, government contractors, industry and academia. The principal objective of NTIAC is to help increase the productivity of the nation`s scientists, engineers, and technical managers involved in, or requiring, nondestructive testing by providing broad information analysis services of technical excellence. TRI/Austin is actively pursuing commercialization of several products based on results from outside funded R and D programs. As a small business, TRI/Austin has limited capabilities for large scale fabrication, production, marketing or distribution. Thus, part of a successful commercialization process involves making appropriate collaboration arrangements with other organizations to augment TRI/Austin`s capabilities. Brief descriptions are given here of two recent commercialization efforts at TRI/Austin.

  19. GL Report BU 355

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15 4 11 13 15 - - - - - - - - Conserv & Renew Energy NFJCR CAREM 5 2 1 1 5 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ...

  20. GL Report BU 355

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29 5 16 22 29 - - - - - - - - Conserv & Renew Energy NFGCR CAREM 4 3 3 11 9 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ...

  1. GL Report BU 355

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Conserv & Renew Energy NFLCR CAREM 135 110 168 122 166 16 12 28 4 6 24 28 - - - - - - ...

  2. Velarde students score in RoboRAVE International at first try

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    score in RoboRAVE International at first try Competitors came from as far away as China and the Czech Republic June 1, 2015 Dylan Valdez, Aubriana Duran, Caitlin Hice and...

  3. CON'TRI BUTION TO THE BIOLOGY OF THE KING CRAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CON'TRI BUTION TO THE BIOLOGY OF THE KING CRAB ( Paralithodes eam t sehat iea Tilesius during moulting. Classifioat ion of speo iea . Weight of orabs and their distribution

  4. Vacuum misalignment corrections to tri-bimaximal mixing and form dominance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen F. King

    2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Tri-bimaximal neutrino mixing may arise from see-saw models based on family symmetry which is spontaneously broken by flavons with particular vacuum alignments. However recent analyses hint that tri-bimaximal mixing may be insensitive to the precise form of vacuum alignment. In this paper we derive approximate analytic results which express the deviations from tri-bimaximal neutrino mixing due to vacuum misalignment. We also relate vacuum misalignment to departures from form dominance, corresponding to deviations from the real orthogonal $R$ matrix, where such corrections are necessary to allow for successful leptogenesis. The analytic results show that the corrections to tri-bimaximal mixing and form dominance depend on the pattern of the vacuum misalignment, with the two effects being uncorrelated.

  5. The Fourier method for tri-atomic systems in the search for the optimal coordinate system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiri, Yehuda

    The Fourier method for tri-atomic systems in the search for the optimal coordinate system Gil Katz, the Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 Received 20 September 2001; accepted 12 December 2001 The Fourier grid

  6. Tri-County Electric Cooperative- Energy Efficient Water Heater Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tri-County Electric Cooperative offers a $75 rebate on the purchase of energy-efficient electric water heaters. The rebate is valid for new or replacement units which have an Energy Factor Rating...

  7. Molecular Structures and Energetics of the (TiO?)n (n = 1-4) Clusters and Their Anions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Shenggang; Dixon, David A.

    2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The (TiO?)n clusters and their anions for n ) 1-4 have been studied with coupled cluster theory [CCSD(T)] and density functional theory (DFT). For n > 1, numerous conformations are located for both the neutral and anionic clusters, and their relative energies are calculated at both the DFT and CCSD(T) levels. The CCSD(T) energies are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit for the monomer and dimer and calculated up to the triple-? level for the trimer and tetramer. The adiabatic and vertical electron detachment energies of the anionic clusters to the ground and first excited states of the neutral clusters are calculated at both levels and compared with the experimental results. The comparison allows for the definitive assignment of the groundstate structures of the anionic clusters. Anions of the dimer and tetramer are found to have very closely lying conformations within 2 kcal/mol at the CCSD(T) level, whereas that of the trimer does not. In addition, accurate clustering energies and heats of formation are calculated for the neutral clusters and compared with the available experimental data. Estimates of the titanium-oxygen bond energies show that they are stronger than the group VIB transition metal-oxygen bonds except for tungsten. The atomization energies of these clusters display much stronger basis set dependence than the clustering energies. This allows the calculation of more accurate heats of formation for larger clusters on the basis of calculated clustering energies.

  8. The sequence and characterization of TRI1, a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase involved in T-2 toxin biosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meek, Isaac Burton

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    % 22 P1 hyg B 900 bp 300 bp TRI1 pIKE9 FIG. 5. The TRI1 complementation vector. The plasmid plKE9, contains a 3. 2 kb genomic fragment of TRI1, which is flanked by the P1:hyg B cassette. 23 Novozyme 234 (InterSpex Products), 1 /o driselase...

  9. This paper proposes a method for classification and discrimina-tion of textures based on the energies of image subbands. We

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-Fu

    , the dimension of the discriminant space and number of energy mea- sures used for classification. We hopeAbstract This paper proposes a method for classification and discrimina- tion of textures based on the energies of image subbands. We show that even with this relatively simple feature set, effective texture

  10. RE SONANT PHO NON -A 8 8 IS TE D 6E NE HA TION. . . not observed, presumably because either the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glyde, Henry R.

    , for example, A. Yariv, Quantum Electronics (Wiley, New York, 1967), Chap. 21; N. Bloembergen, Nonlinear OpticsRE SONANT PHO NON -A 8 8 IS TE D 6E NE HA TION. . . not observed, presumably because either cussions. *Present address: Hasler A. G. , Bern, Switzerland. ~P. A. Franken, A. E. Hill, C. %'. Peters

  11. Towards an InTerdIscIplInary approach To nexT-GeneraTIon BIofuels EnvironmEntal, tEchno-Economic, and GovErnancE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Towards an InTerdIscIplInary approach To nexT-GeneraTIon BIofuels EnvironmEntal, t. 2010. The Ecological Impact of Biofuels. Pages 351-377 in D. J. Futuyma, H. B. Shafer, and D. Huffer, S., Roche, C.M., Blanch, H.W., and Clark, D.S. (2012). Escherichia coli for biofuel production

  12. Hanford and the tri-cities economy: Review and outlook, March 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, M.J.; Belzer, D.B.; March, S.J.; Beck, D.M.; Schultz, R.W.; Harkreader, S.A.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The economy of the Tri-Cities, Washington area (primarily, Benton and Franklin Counties) is in transition due to major changes in two Department of Energy programs at Hanford---the abrupt ending of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) in December 1987 and the placing of the N Reactor in ''cold standby'' status in February 1988. This report reviews the economic situation in the Tri-Cities during 1988 and presents forecasts for key economic indicators for 1989. This report will be updated about every six months to review the changes in the area economy and forecast the near-term outlook. 6 figs., 33 tabs.

  13. Hanford and the Tri-Cities Economy: Historical Trends 1970-2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Richard A.; Scott, Michael J.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This white paper examines the effect that the Hanford Site has had on the Tri-Cities economy from 1970-2008. Total area employment levels, population, and the real estate market are compared to DOE contractor employment and funding levels, which tended to follow each other until the mid-1990s. Since 1994, area employment, total incomes, population and the real estate market have increased significantly despite very little changes in Hanford employment levels. The data indicate that in recent history, the Tri-Cities economy has become increasingly independent of Hanford.

  14. Tri-County Elec Member Corp (North Carolina) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTown ofTownNote-BangladeshTriTri-County

  15. Tri-State Electric Member Corp (North Carolina) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTownTri-CountyTri-State Electric Member Corp

  16. How to Obtain Your DARS to Declare the BA Economics Major Once you've logged into the BU Brain and entered your B#, you will need to do the following

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    How to Obtain Your DARS to Declare the BA Economics Major Once you've logged into the BU Brain DARS" The following screen prints will show you how to run the pre-declaration DARS for Economics the "Economics Pre-Declaration" DARS appears. Click "Economics Pre-Declaration" to open. Print the entire

  17. Flexible inverted polymer solar cells with an indium-free tri-layer cathode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Hajj, Ahmad; Lucas, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.lucas@unilim.fr; Schirr-Bonnans, Martin; Ratier, Bernard [XLIM-CNRS 7252, Universit de Limoges, 123 avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges (France); Kraft, Thomas M. [XLIM-CNRS 7252, Universit de Limoges, 123 avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges (France); Department of Chemistry, Chernoff Hall, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Torchio, Philippe [Institut Matriaux Microlectronique Nanosciences de Provence, Aix-Marseille Universit, IM2NP-CNRS 7334, Domaine Universitaire de Saint-Jrme, Service 231, 13 397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Indium tin oxide (ITO)-free inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs) have been fabricated without the need of an additional electron transport layer. The indium-free transparent electrode consists of a tri-layer stack ZnO (30?nm)/Ag (14?nm)/ZnO (30?nm) deposited on glass and plastic substrates via ion-beam sputtering. The tri-layer electrodes exhibit similar physical properties to its ITO counterpart, specifically yielding high transmittance and low resistivity (76.5% T at 550?nm, R{sub sq} of 8 ?/?) on plastic substrates. The novel tri-layer electrode allows for the fabrication of inverted PSCs without the additional ZnO interfacial layer commonly deposited between ITO and the photoactive layer. This allows for the preparation of thinner plastic solar cells using less material than conventional architectures. Initial studies involving the newly realized architecture (tri-layer electrode/P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:PSS/Ag) have shown great promise for the transition from ITO to other viable electrodes in organic electronics.

  18. Bosnia-Herzegovina: Trying to Build a Federal State on Paradoxes Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wintner, Shuly

    1 Bosnia-Herzegovina: Trying to Build a Federal State on Paradoxes Jens Woelk Introduction The basis for federalism in Bosnia-Herzegovina1 is rather peculiar due to the unique complexity. This was to be accomplished by physical reconstruction as well as by preserving Bosnia and Herzegovina as one country

  19. Contact Resistance of Tri-layer Graphene Side Contacted with Nickel Jason Giuliani,1-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UG-34 Contact Resistance of Tri-layer Graphene Side Contacted with Nickel Electrodes.S.A. High contact resistance is a key problem in graphene-type device performance. In order to create, the contact properties of graphene devices requires further research. Nickel's high work-function and contact

  20. Trying to make the connection: soil Ni speciation and plant accumulation. (S02-mcnearjr.415428-oral)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Trying to make the connection: soil Ni speciation and plant accumulation. (S02-mcnearjr.415428-oral. To ascertain the effect of soil speciation on plant accumulation, a combination of micro-XRF, micro accumulation will help when making decisions as to how to remediate a site enriched with heavy metals. Speaker

  1. How to search resources If you are looking for an article, try

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McPhee-Shaw, Erika

    or journal title within the library holdings. 3) Search for the source (i.e. journal title) by entering all/any of your search terms. Click `GO'. #12;Browse Search: 1) To browse the catalog clickHow to search resources If you are looking for an article, try: Google Scholar: This search engine

  2. 23rd Annual Tri-County Pesticide Update Lake Butler Community Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    23rd Annual Tri-County Pesticide Update Lake Butler Community Center Lake Butler, FL Tuesday, CED, Union County 5:55 Pesticide Safety Barton Wilder, UF/IFAS, Extension Agent Alachua County 6:00 Update on Weed Control Barton Wilder, UF/IFAS Extension Agent Alachua County 7:25 CORE: Law & Rule

  3. Analysis of a Third-Generation Princeton Tri-leaflet Mechanical Heart Valve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Analysis of a Third-Generation Princeton Tri-leaflet Mechanical Heart Valve Michael Hsu Advisor heart valve Static analysis of leaflet under uniform pressure of 10 MPa Summer Objectives Find Heart valve disease Over 5 million affected Over 225,000 valve- replacement surgeries performed

  4. Fractally deforested landscape: Pattern and process in a tri-national Amazon frontier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fractally deforested landscape: Pattern and process in a tri-national Amazon frontier Jing Sun a 32611, USA Keywords: Amazon Deforestation Fractal analysis Fixed-grid scans Bottom-up plan Configuration of deforestation at a pixel level from 1986 to 2010 in the study region. The evolving pattern of development

  5. In Proceedings of TriComm '91 Delay Jitter Control for Real-Time Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hui

    In Proceedings of TriComm '91 Delay Jitter Control for Real-Time Communication in a Packet study the feasibil- ity of bounding the delay jitter for real-time channels in a packet-switched store show that the scheme is capable of providing a significant reduction in delay jitter

  6. In Proceedings of TriComm '91 Delay Jitter Control for RealTime Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hui

    In Proceedings of TriComm '91 Delay Jitter Control for RealTime Communication in a Packet study the feasibil ity of bounding the delay jitter for realtime channels in a packetswitched store show that the scheme is capable of providing a significant reduction in delay jitter

  7. Bridging Domains with Words: Opinion Analysis with Matrix Tri-factorizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tao

    Bridging Domains with Words: Opinion Analysis with Matrix Tri-factorizations Tao Li Vikas Sindhwani Chris Ding Yi Zhang Abstract With the explosion of user-generated web2.0 content in the form of blogs manual effort? We outline a novel sentiment transfer mechanism based on constrained non-negative matrix

  8. Diffusion and Catalytic Cracking of 1,3,5 Tri-iso-propyl-benzene in FCC Catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman

    1 Diffusion and Catalytic Cracking of 1,3,5 Tri-iso- propyl-benzene in FCC Catalysts S.Al-Khattaf1 describes catalytic cracking experiments developed in a novel CREC Riser Simulator using 1,3,5-Tri-iso

  9. Close-in blasting at the TRI-MET light rail tunnels in Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revey, G.F.; Painter, D.Z.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Frontier/Traylor Joint Venture is presently constructing a section of the Tri-County Metropolitan Transit District of Oregon`s (TRI-MET) Westside Light Rail System. This new section will extend Portland`s existing transit system to the western suburbs of Beaverton and Hillsboro. The drill-blast excavations at this project include 10,000 feet of 20 foot tunnel, 18 cross passages, three shafts, an underground railway station, and a U-wall open cut. From a blast designer`s perspective, this job has been extremely challenging. Blast vibration is limited to 0.5 ips at 200 feet or at the nearest structure, and airblast is limited to 129 dB--linear peak and 96 dB--C scale. The tunnels pass under heavily built up areas and have top of tunnel to surface cover distances as low as 70 feet. Surface blasting in the 26,000 cubic yard U-wall excavation was limited to five short nighttime periods due to its proximity to the very busy highway 26. This paper describes the techniques that were used to develop safe blasting designs for the TRI-MET Surface blasts and tunnel rounds. It also discusses the measures that were necessary to mitigate noise, vibration, and flyrock.

  10. First analysis of eight Algol-type systems: V537 And, GS Boo, AM CrB, V1298 Her, EL Lyn, FW Per, RU Tri, and WW Tri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zasche, P

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyzing available photometry from the Super WASP and other databases, we performed the very first light curve analysis of eight eclipsing binary systems V537 And, GS Boo, AM CrB, V1298 Her, EL Lyn, FW Per, RU Tri, and WW Tri. All of these systems were found to be detached ones of Algol-type, having the orbital periods of the order of days. 722 new times of minima for these binaries were derived and presented, trying to identify the period variations caused by the third bodies in these systems.

  11. 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer as the ultimate copper diffusion barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba-Son [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jen-Fin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Perng, Dung-Ching, E-mail: dcperng@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics and Electrical Engineering Department, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the thinnest ever reported Cu diffusion barrier, a 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra show that the graphene is thermally stable at up to 750?C against Cu diffusion. Transmission electron microscopy images show that there was no inter-diffusion in the Cu/graphene/Si structure. Raman analyses indicate that the graphene may have degraded into a nanocrystalline structure at 750?C. At 800?C, the perfect carbon structure was damaged, and thus the barrier failed. The results of this study suggest that graphene could be the ultimate Cu interconnect diffusion barrier.

  12. Science.gov? Try ciencia.science.gov | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG -EnergyProcess|2 (TextScienceScience.gov? Try

  13. TRI-STATE GENERATION AND TRANSMISSION ASSOCIATION, INC. HEADQUARTERS: P.O

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,ZaleskiThis Decision considers anExercise32 DATE:Features:TRI-STATE

  14. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers Print

  15. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

  16. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block

  17. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-BlockResonant Soft

  18. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-BlockResonant

  19. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-BlockResonantResonant

  20. Tri-State G & T Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, Indiana (UtilityTri-State Electric Member Corp Jump to:

  1. CLASSIFICdTION CAWXL~ DAm

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertowni5W 95.5 L'COLUMBIA+. ,..-

  2. The transverse space-charge force in tri-gaussian distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In tracking, the transverse space-charge force can be represented by changes in the horizontal and vertical divergences, {Delta}x{prime} and {Delta}y{prime} at many locations around the accelerator ring. In this note, they are going to list some formulas for {Delta}x{prime} and {delta}y{prime} arising from space-charge kicks when the beam is tri-Gaussian distributed. They will discuss separately a flat beam and a round beam. they are not interested in the situation when the emittance growth arising from space charge becomes too large and the shape of the beam becomes weird. For this reason, they can assume the bunch still retains its tri-Gaussian distribution, with its rms sizes {sigma}{sub x}, {sigma}{sub y}, and {sigma}{sub z} increasing by certain factors. Thus after each turn, {sigma}{sub x}, {sigma}{sub y}, and {sigma}{sub z} can be re-calculated.

  3. Green alternatives to toxic release inventory (TRI) chemicals in the process industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, I.; Baron, J.; Hamilton, C. [Booz-Allen & Hamilton Inc., McLean, VA (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Driven by TRI reporting requirements, the chemical process industry is searching for innovative ways to reduce pollution at the source. Distinct environmental advantages of biobased green chemicals (biochemicals) mean are attractive alternatives to petrochemicals. Biochemicals are made from renewable raw materials in biological processes, such as aerobic and anaerobic fermentation, that operate at ambient temperatures and pressures, and produce only nontoxic waste products. Key TRI chemicals and several classes of commodity and intermediate compounds, used on consumer end-products manufacturing, are examined and alternatives are suggested. Specific substitution options for chlorofluorocarbons, industrial solvents, and commodity organic and inorganic chemicals are reviewed. Currently encouraged pollution prevention alternatives in the manufacturing sector are briefly examined for their long-term feasibility such as bioalternatives to bleaching in the pulp & paper industry, solvent cleaning in the electronics and dry cleaning industries, and using petroleum-based feedstocks in the plastics industry. Total life cycle and cost/benefit analyses are employed to determine whether biochemicals are environmentally feasible and commercially viable as pollution prevention tools. Currently available green chemicals along with present and projected costs and premiums are also presented. Functional compatibility of biochemicals with petrochemicals and bioprocessing systems with conventional chemical processing methods are explored. This review demonstrates that biochemicals can be used cost effectively in certain industrial chemical operations due to their added environmental benefits.

  4. Production and trapping of radioactive atoms at the TRI\\muP facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Traykov; U. Dammalapati; S. De; O. C. Dermois; L. Huisman; K. Jungmann; W. Kruithof; A. J. Mol; C. J. G. Onderwater; A. Rogachevskiy; M. da Silva e Silva; M. Sohani; O. Versolato; L. Willmann; H. W. Wilschut

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The structures for the TRI$\\mu$P facility have been completed and commissioned. At the facility radioactive nuclides are produced to study fundamental interactions and symmetries. An important feature is the possibility to trap radioactive atoms in order to obtain and hold a pure substrate-free sample for precision measurements. In the TRI$\\mu$P facility a production target is followed by a magnetic separator, where radioactive isotopes are produced in inverse reaction kinematics. Separation up to 99.95% could be achieved for $^{21}$Na. A novel transmitting thermal ionizing device was developed to stop the energetic isotopes. Some 50% of stopped $^{21}$Na could be extracted and transported as low energy singly charged ions into a radio frequency quadrupole cooler and buncher with 35% transmission efficiency. The ions are transported lossless via a drift tube and a low energy electrostatic beam line into the experimental setup. Such ions can be neutralized on hot metal foils and the resulting atoms can be stored in a magneto-optical trap. The functioning of that principle was demonstrated with stable Na extracted from the thermal ionizer, radioactive beams will follow next.

  5. Webinar: 2011-2012 Hydrogen Student Design Contest Winners: On-Campus Tri-Generation Fuel Cell Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, 2011-2012 Hydrogen Student Design Contest Winners: On-Campus Tri-Generation Fuel Cell Systems, originally presented on September 4, 2012.

  6. Extraction of Plutonium into 30 Percent Tri-Butyl Phosphate from Nitric Acid Solution Containing Fluoride, Aluminum, and Boron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyser, E.A.

    2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This work consists of experimental batch extraction data for plutonium into 30 volume-percent tri-butyl phosphate at ambient temperature from such a solution matrix and a model of this data using complexation constants from the literature.

  7. Tri-City Herald OpEd: Electric Vehicles are a smart choice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, Peter C.; Haas, Anne M.

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Why are so many of us at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, a national thought leader in power industry issues located right here in the Tri-Cities, so bullish on the future of EVs? And why do we think it's so important that this country, especially THIS part of the country, be leaders in the adoption of EVs? Is it that we all just happen to like driving polluting golf carts? The answer is that, like most everyone else, most of us here at PNNL drive to work every day, and like most people, we care about the cost of gasoline and the impact that burning imported oil has on the environment and on our foreign policy. The reality is that electric vehicles are simply more efficient, pollute much less, use locally-generated energy, and cost MUCH less to drive.

  8. Possible deviation from the tri-bimaximal neutrino mixing in a seesaw model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Sin Kyu; Xing Zhizhong; Zhou Shun [School of Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-734 (Korea, Republic of); CCAST (World Laboratory), P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080 (China) and Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a simple but suggestive seesaw model with two phenomenological conjectures: three heavy (right-handed) Majorana neutrinos are degenerate in mass in the symmetry limit and three light Majorana neutrinos have the tri-bimaximal mixing pattern V{sub 0}. We show that a small mass splitting between the first generation and the other two generations of heavy Majorana neutrinos is responsible for the deviation of the solar neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 12} from its initial value 35.3 deg. given by V{sub 0}, and the slight breaking of the mass degeneracy between the second and third generations of heavy Majorana neutrinos results in a small mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} and a tiny departure of the atmospheric neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 23} from 45 deg. It turns out that a normal hierarchy of the light neutrino mass spectrum is favored in this seesaw scenario.

  9. SO(3) Gauge Symmetry and Nearly Tri-bimaximal Neutrino Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yue-Liang Wu

    2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In this note I mainly focus on the neutrino physics part in my talk and report the most recent progress made in \\cite{YLW0}. It is seen that the Majorana features of neutrinos and SO(3) gauge flavor symmetry can simultaneously explain the smallness of neutrino masses and nearly tri-bimaximal neutrino mixing when combining together with the mechanism of approximate global U(1) family symmetry. The mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ and CP-violating phase are in general nonzero and testable experimentally at the allowed sensitivity. The model also predicts the existence of vector-like Majorana neutrinos and charged leptons as well as new Higgs bosons, some of them can be light and explored at the LHC and ILC.

  10. Chemical pressure and hidden one-dimensional behavior in rare earth tri-telluride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sacchetti, A.; Degiorgi, L.; /Zurich, ETH; Giamarchi, T.; /Geneva U.; Ru, N.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first optical measurements of the rare-earth tri-telluride charge-density-wave systems. Our data, collected over an extremely broad spectral range, allow us to observe both the Drude component and the single-particle peak, ascribed to the contributions due to the free charge carriers and to the charge-density-wave gap excitation, respectively. The data analysis displays a diminishing impact of the charge-density-wave condensate on the electronic properties with decreasing lattice constant across the rare-earth series. We propose a possible mechanism describing this behavior and we suggest the presence of a one-dimensional character in these two-dimensional compounds. We also envisage that interactions and umklapp processes might play a relevant role in the formation of the charge-density-wave state in these compounds.

  11. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Iowa, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  12. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Delaware, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  13. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Colorado, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  14. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Massachusetts, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  15. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Illinois, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  16. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Florida, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  17. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Wisconsin, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  18. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Kentucky, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off-site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  19. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Connecticut, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility; the first nine digit alphanumeric number a facility holds under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems.

  20. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Ohio, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  1. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Utah, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  2. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Hawaii, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  3. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Missouri, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  4. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Minnesota, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  5. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Michigan, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  6. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Georgia, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  7. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Arkansas, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  8. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Kansas, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off-site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  9. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Nevada, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  10. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Nebraska, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  11. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Maryland, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  12. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Oklahoma, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  13. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Arizona, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  14. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Louisiana, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  15. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Montana, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  16. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Indiana, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  17. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Alaska, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year.Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  18. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Pennsylvania, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility; the first nine digit alphanumeric number a facility holds under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems.

  19. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Oregon, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  20. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Vermont, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  1. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Mssissippi, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  2. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Tennessee, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  3. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), California, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  4. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Washington, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  5. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Wyoming, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  6. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Idaho, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  7. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Alabama, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year.Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  8. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Texas, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  9. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Maine, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  10. Tri-county pre-commercial analysis of converting wastes to marketable products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frolich, M. [Integrated Resource Development, Gardnerville, NV (United States); Munk, G. [Nevada Bio-Serv, Lovelock, NV (United States); McArthur, K. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Open field burning of harvest residues is an effective, low cost method of controlling diseases, insects and weeds in many agricultural operations. Restrictions have been imposed against this practice in several areas and these restrictions are expected to increase in the near future. The agricultural community in the Tri-County area of Nevada recognized that eventually burning would be an unacceptable practice of disposal. A biomass inventory was jointly funded by the area seed producers and Western Regional Biomass Energy Program that revealed a sufficient biomass resource to justify further work to answer the question: Can economic alternative methods of disposal be developed either through export of biomass or through conversion technologies in the local area? Technically the answer is yes. Several methods are available, either singly or in combination, capable of converting the difficult residues into energy or commodity products. Economically, the answer is not clear. There are many assumptions made in the financial analyses reported by the process developers that combine with a lack of concrete markets resulting in the conclusion that economic viability cannot be attained at the present time.

  11. Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume II. Middle United States: TRY data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 22 cities in the continental United States using Test Reference Year (TRY) source weather data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

  12. On the ambiguities in the tri-bimaximal mixing matrix and corresponding charged lepton corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duarah, Chandan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two negative signs naturally appear in the $U_{\\mu 1}$ and $U_{\\tau 2}$ elements of the Tri-bimaximal (TBM) matrix for positive values of the mixing angles $\\theta_{12}$ and $\\theta_{23}$. Apart from this, in other TBM matrices negative signs are shifted to other elements in each case. They account for positive as well as negative values of $\\theta_{12}$ and $\\theta_{23}$. We discuss the sign ambiguity in the TBM matrix and find that the TBM matrices, in fact, can be divided into two groups under certain circumstances. Interestingly, this classification of TBM matrices is accompanied by two different $\\mu-\\tau$ symmetric mass matrices which can separately be related to the groups. To accommodate non-zero value of $\\theta_{13}$ and deviate $\\theta_{23}$ towards first octant, we then perturb the TBM mixing ansatz with the help of charged lepton correction. The diagonalizing matrices for charged lepton mass matrices also possess sign ambiguity and respect the grouping of TBM matrices. They are parametrized in te...

  13. A new TriBeam system for three-dimensional multimodal materials analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echlin, McLean P.; Mottura, Alessandro; Torbet, Christopher J.; Pollock, Tresa M. [Materials Department, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93101 (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The unique capabilities of ultrashort pulse femtosecond lasers have been integrated with a focused ion beam (FIB) platform to create a new system for rapid 3D materials analysis. The femtosecond laser allows for in situ layer-by-layer material ablation with high material removal rates. The high pulse frequency (1 kHz) of ultrashort (150 fs) laser pulses can induce material ablation with virtually no thermal damage to the surrounding area, permitting high resolution imaging, as well as crystallographic and elemental analysis, without intermediate surface preparation or removal of the sample from the chamber. The TriBeam system combines the high resolution and broad detector capabilities of the DualBeam{sup TM} microscope with the high material removal rates of the femtosecond laser, allowing 3D datasets to be acquired at rates 4-6 orders of magnitude faster than 3D FIB datasets. Design features that permit coupling of laser and electron optics systems and positioning of a stage in the multiple analysis positions are discussed. Initial in situ multilayer data are presented.

  14. View the newsletter at caeo.unlv.edu UNLV Celebrates National TRiO/GEAR UP Day

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    March 2013 View the newsletter at caeo.unlv.edu UNLV Celebrates National TRiO/GEAR UP Day Adult Educational Services Educational Talent Search Family Support Services GEAR UP McNair ScholarsO and GEAR UP participants both past and present. Shortly after 5 p.m., there were only a few seats empty

  15. 926 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 53, NO. 5, MAY 2006 Tri-Polar Concentric Ring Electrode Development for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besio, Walter G.

    for approximating the analytical Laplacian based on a nine-point finite difference method (NPM). For direct comparison, the FPM, quasi-bipolar method (a hybrid NPM), and NPM were calculated over a 400 400 mesh with 1, and the results were verified with tank experiments. The tri-polar configuration and the NPM were found to have

  16. Tri-Lateral Noor al Salaam High Concentration Solar Central Receiver Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackmon, James B

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the efforts conducted primarily under the Noor al Salaam (Light of Peace) program under DOE GRANT NUMBER DE-FC36-02GO12030, together with relevant technical results from a closely related technology development effort, the U.S./Israel Science and Technology Foundation (USISTF) High Concentration Solar Central Receiver program. These efforts involved preliminary design, development, and test of selected prototype power production subsystems and documentation of an initial version of the system definition for a high concentration solar hybrid/gas electrical power plant to be built in Zaafarana, Egypt as a first step in planned commercialization. A major part of the planned work was halted in 2007 with an amendment in October 2007 requiring that we complete the technical effort by December 31, 2007 and provide a final report to DOE within the following 90 days. This document summarizes the work conducted. The USISTF program was a 50/50 cost-shared program supported by the Department of Commerce through the U.S./Israel Science and Technology Commission (USISTC). The USISTC was cooperatively developed by President Clinton and the late Prime Minister Rabin of Israel "to encourage technological collaboration" and "support peace in the Middle East through economic development". The program was conducted as a follow-on effort to Israel's Magnet/CONSOLAR Program, which was an advanced development effort to design, fabricate, and test a solar central receiver and secondary optics for a "beam down" central receiver concept. The status of these hardware development programs is reviewed, since they form the basis for the Noor al Salaam program. Descriptions are provided of the integrated system and the major subsystems, including the heliostat, the high temperature air receiver, the power conversion unit, tower and tower reflector, compound parabolic concentrator, and the master control system. One objective of the USISTF program was to conduct marketing research, identify opportunities for use of this technology, and to the extent possible, secure an agreement leading to a pre-commercialization demonstration or prototype plant. This was accomplished with the agreement to conduct the Noor al Salaam program as a tri-lateral project between Egypt, Israel, and the U.S. The tri-lateral project was led by the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH); this included the Egyptian New and Renewable Energy Authority and the Israeli USISTC participants. This project, known was Noor al Salaam, was funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) through the Department of Energy (DOE). The Egyptian activity was under the auspices of the Egyptian Ministry of Energy and Electricity, New and Renewable Energy Authority (NREA) as part of Egypt's plans for renewable energy development. The objective of the Noor al Salaam project was to develop the conditions necessary to obtain funding and construct and operate an approximately 10 to 20 Megawatt hybrid solar/natural gas demonstration power plant in Zaafarana, Egypt that could serve both as a test bed for advanced solar technology evaluations, and as a forerunner to commercial plant designs. This plant, termed Noor Al Salaam, or Light of Peace, reached the initial phase of system definition before being curtailed, in part by changes in USAID objectives, coupled with various delays that were beyond the scope of the program to resolve. The background of the USISTF technology development and pre-commercialization effort is provided in this report, together with documentation of the technology developments conducted under the Noor al Salaam program. It should be noted that only a relatively small part of the Noor al Salaam funding was expended over the approximately five years for which UAH was prime contractor before the program was ordered closed (Reference 1) so that the remaining funds could be returned to USAID.

  17. quera que le coefficient )'2 de la formule (2) n'a pas la mme significa-tion que ~ de la formule (1). ~,z n'existe que s'il y a chute de tempra-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    ~~~ia- tion. Ces observations prouvent que l'effet Peltier au contact Bi-Cu n'est pas modifi par le champ and available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/jphystap:0190100100069101 #12;692 que celles de la rflexion totale

  18. Bogs are a specialized wetland community with saturated, acidic, peat soils that have low concentra-tions of minerals (e.g., calcium, magnesium) and essential nutrients (phosphorus, nitrogen). They

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    , acidic, peat soils that have low concentra- tions of minerals (e.g., calcium, magnesium) and essential of living Sphagnum mosses growing over a layer of saturated, acidic peat. Sedges, forbs and/or the low), pitcher plant (Sarracenia purpurea) and sundew (Drosera rotundifolia). SOILS: Fibric peat (Histosols

  19. Molecular Simulation of Water Extraction into a Tri-n-Butyl-Phosphate/n-Dodecane Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Almeida, Valmor F [ORNL] [ORNL; Ye, Xianggui [ORNL] [ORNL; Cui, Shengting [ORNL] [ORNL; Khomami, Bamin [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate water extraction into a solution of 30 vol% tri-n-butyl-phosphate (TBP) in n-dodecane. This solvent extraction mixture is commonly used in hydrometallurgical and nuclear fuel recycling operations for recovering metals from aqueous streams. It is known that water is coextracted in the organic phase and that it competes with metal ions for the available extractant agent (TBP). Therefore investigating pure water extraction provides a realistic prototype to test molecular simulation methods for the first time in this area. Our computational results indicate that the TBP electric dipole moment has a significant effect on the predicted water solubility. A larger TBP dipole moment decreases the aqueous-organic interfacial tension, leading to increased roughness of the aqueous-organic interface. Interfacial roughness has a significant effect on disrupting the interfacial water hydrogen bonding structure, resulting in a greater number of dangling water molecules at the interface. This enhances the probability of water molecules to break away from the aqueous phase and to migrate into the bulk of the organic phase. Therefore, the magnitude of the TBP dipole moment is a crucial factor in controlling water hydrogen bond breaking at the aqueous-organic interface. By slightly lowering the atomic partial charges of the TBP atoms, to produce a dipole moment that better agrees with experimental data, we were able to predict water solubility in close agreement with experimental measurements. Hence we demonstrate that a molecular modeling and simulation approach may provide quantitative support to experimental programs in this area. In addition, our simulation results shed light into the molecular mechanism of water extraction, the critical role of TBP, and the structural forms of water molecules both at the interface and in the bulk of the organic phase. Specifically, it is found that water molecules are extracted either as single molecules or as clusters. Furthermore, within the organic phase, the extracted water forms clusters with up to 20 water molecules, however, more than 70% of these water clusters contain less than 5 water molecules when the water extraction process reaches saturation.

  20. Design and synthesis of a novel, orally active, brain penetrant, tri-substituted thiophene based JNK inhibitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowers, Simeon; Truong, Anh P.; Neitz, R. Jeffrey; Neitzel, Martin; Probst, Gary D.; Hom, Roy K.; Peterson, Brian; Galemmo, Jr., Robert A.; Konradi, Andrei W.; Sham, Hing L.; Tth, Gergley; Pan, Hu; Yao, Nanhua; Artis, Dean R.; Brigham, Elizabeth F.; Quinn, Kevin P.; Sauer, John-Michael; Powell, Kyle; Ruslim, Lany; Ren, Zhao; Bard, Frdrique; Yednock, Ted A.; Griswold-Prenner, Irene (Elan)

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The SAR of a series of tri-substituted thiophene JNK3 inhibitors is described. By optimizing both the N-aryl acetamide region of the inhibitor and the 4-position of the thiophene we obtained single digit nanomolar compounds, such as 47, which demonstrated an in vivo effect on JNK activity when dosed orally in our kainic acid mouse model as measured by phospho-c-jun reduction.

  1. Superfund explanation of significant difference for the record of decision (EPA Region 5): Tri-County Landfill/Waste Management Illinois, South Elgin, IL, April 23, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tri-County/Elgin Landfill Superfund Site (TCLF) encompasses both the Tri-County and Elgin Landfills. The purpose of this ESD is to explain why the design for the landfill cap component of the remedy differs from that set forth in the ROD (PB93-964133) and to address the cost differentials associated with the change.

  2. Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium Risk Assessment during the Production of Marinated Beef Inside Skirts and Tri-tip Roasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muras, Tiffany Marie

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    and 18 tri-tips were used during this study. Both inside skirts and tri-tips were vacuum tumbled for a total of 1 h. Samples of products were tested immediately following tumbling (day 0), or were vacuum packaged and stored in the cooler (approximately 2...

  3. Tri-State Synfuels Project Review: Volume 12. Fluor project status. [Proposed Henderson, Kentucky coal to gasoline plant; engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document and summarize activities associated with Fluor's efforts on the Tri-State Synfuels Project. The proposed facility was to be coal-to-transport fuels facility located in Henderson, Kentucky. Tri-State Synfuels Company was participating in the project as a partner of the US Department of Energy per terms of a Cooperative Agreement resulting from DOE's synfuel's program solicitation. Fluor's initial work plan called for preliminary engineering and procurement services to the point of commitment for construction for a Sasol Fischer-Tropsch plant. Work proceeded as planned until October 1981 when results of alternative coal-to-methanol studies revealed the economic disadvantage of the Synthol design for US markets. A number of alternative process studies followed to determine the best process configuration. In January 1982 Tri-State officially announced a change from Synthol to a Methanol to Gasoline (MTG) design basis. Further evaluation and cost estimates for the MTG facility eventually led to the conclusion that, given the depressed economic outlook for alternative fuels development, the project should be terminated. Official announcement of cancellation was made on April 13, 1982. At the time of project cancellation, Fluor had completed significant portions of the preliminary engineering effort. Included in this report are descriptions and summaries of Fluor's work during this project. In addition location of key project data and materials is identified and status reports for each operation are presented.

  4. Driving conditions dependence of magneto-electroluminescence in tri-(8-hydroxyquinoline)-aluminum based organic light emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Qiming; Li, Xianjie; Li, Mingliang; Li, Feng

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    we investigated the magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) in tri-(8-hydroxyquinoline)-aluminum based organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) through the steady-state and transient method simultaneously. The MELs show the great different behaviors when we turn the driving condition from a constant voltage to a pulse voltage. For devices driven by the constant voltage, the MELs are similar with the literature data; for devices driven by the pulse voltage, the MELs are quite different, they firstly increase to a maximum then decrease as the magnetic field increases continuously. Negative MELs can be seen when both the magnetic field and driving voltage are high enough.

  5. EA-1915: Conveyance of Approximately 1,641 Acres of Unimproved Land to the Tri-City Development Council, the Local Community Reuse Organization, Richland, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of conveyance of approximately 1,641 acres of unimproved land at DOEs Hanford Site, Richland, Washington to the Tri-City Development Council (TRIDEC), the local community reuse organization (CRO).

  6. Recent developments of the ion sources at Tri University Meson Factory/Isotope Separator and ACcelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bricault, P. G.; Ames, F.; Dombsky, M.; Labrecque, F.; Lassen, J.; Mjos, A.; Minor, G. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Tigelhoefer, A. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department Of Physics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the recent progresses concerning the on-line ion source at the Tri University Meson Factory/Isotope Separator and ACcelerator (TRIUMF/ISAC) Radioactive Ion-Beam Facility; description of the new design of the surface-ion-source for improved stability of the beam intensity, description of the transport path to the east target station at ISAC, description of the new brazing techniques that solved recurrent problems with water leaks on the target/ion source assembly in the vacuum system, finally, recent developments concerning the Forced Electron Beam Induced Arc Discharge (FEBIAD) ion source are reported. In particular, a study on the effect of the plasma chamber volume on the ionization efficiency was completed.

  7. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Puerto Rico, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  8. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Kansas, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  9. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Nebraska, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  10. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Hampshire, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  11. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Montana, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  12. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Utah, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  13. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Texas, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  14. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Idaho, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  15. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Rhode Island, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  16. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Florida, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  17. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Hampshire, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  18. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Oklahoma, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  19. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), West Virginia, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  20. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), South Dakota, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  1. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Missouri, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  2. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Mexico, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  3. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Washington, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  4. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Maryland, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  5. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), North Dakota, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  6. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Arizona, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  7. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), American Samoa, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  8. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Alaska, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  9. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Connecticut, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  10. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), vVrginia, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  11. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Puerto Rico, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  12. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Pennsylvania, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  13. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Minnesota, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  14. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Iowa, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  15. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), South Carolina, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  16. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Oregon, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  17. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Georgia, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  18. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Wyoming, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  19. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), North Dakota, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  20. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Arkansas, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  1. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Louisiana, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  2. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), United States and Territories, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year.Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility; the first nine digit alphanumeric number a facility holds under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems.

  3. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), North Carolina 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  4. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Virgin Islands, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  5. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Indiana, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  6. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), California, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  7. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Virgin Islands, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  8. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Jersey, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  9. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Vermont, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  10. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Wisconsin, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  11. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Maine, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  12. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), West Virginia, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  13. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Illinois, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  14. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Jersey, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  15. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Rhode Island, 1991 and 1992 (in dbase iii plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  16. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Virginia, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  17. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Mexico, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  18. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), South Dakota, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  19. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Tennessee, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  20. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Massachusetts, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  1. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Ohio, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  2. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), American Samoa, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  3. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New York, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  4. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Alabama, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  5. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Hawaii, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  6. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), South Carolina, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  7. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Mississippi, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  8. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Delaware, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  9. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Michigan, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  10. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Kentucky, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  11. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Nevada, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  12. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), North Carolina, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  13. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Colorado, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  14. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New York, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  15. explorations The Train STaTion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernes, Peter J.

    Music by Yevgeny Simkin Many thanks to Yevgeny Simkin, peter lichtenfels, Bella Merlin and the wonderful

  16. UTICA 4, NEW YORK COFIPOR~TION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;IDEC. i'JournalDROf fORGE

  17. Try This: Household Magnets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliancesTrending:Schedule FYHousehold Magnets

  18. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Tri-City Disposal Company, operable unit 2, Bullitt County, Brooks, KY, March 29, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document presents the decision made by the U.S. Environmental protection Agency (USEPA) for the second phase of remedial action (Operable Unit No. 2) at the Tri-City Industrial Disposal Site. Based on the results of additional sampling at Tri-City, monitoring reports, and risk evaluation, no further remedial action is necessary at the site to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This decision is the final remedial action for the site. Although EPA has determined that no additional Superfund action is warranted for the second operable unit, treatment and monitoring of contaminated groundwater (OU1) (PB92-964004) will continue at the site as necessary.

  19. Model-Independent Analysis of Tri-bimaximal Mixing: A Softly-Broken Hidden or an Accidental Symmetry?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albright, Carl H.; /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab; Rodejohann, Werner; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To address the issue of whether tri-bimaximal mixing (TBM) is a softly-broken hidden or an accidental symmetry, we adopt a model-independent analysis in which we perturb a neutrino mass matrix leading to TBM in the most general way but leave the three texture zeros of the diagonal charged lepton mass matrix unperturbed. We compare predictions for the perturbed neutrino TBM parameters with those obtained from typical SO(10) grand unified theories with a variety of flavor symmetries. Whereas SO(10) GUTs almost always predict a normal mass hierarchy for the light neutrinos, TBM has a priori no preference for neutrino masses. We find, in particular for the latter, that the value of |U{sub e3}| is very sensitive to the neutrino mass scale and ordering. Observation of |U{sub e3}|{sup 2} > 0.001 to 0.01 within the next few years would be incompatible with softly-broken TBM and a normal mass hierarchy and would suggest that the apparent TBM symmetry is an accidental symmetry instead. No such conclusions can be drawn for the inverted and quasi-degenerate hierarchy spectra.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Tri-n-butyl-phosphate/n-Dodecane Mixture: Thermophysical Properties and Molecular Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Almeida, Valmor F [ORNL; Cui, Shengting [ORNL; Khomami, Bamin [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular dynamics simulations of tri-n-butyl-phosphate (TBP)/n-dodecane mixture in the liquid phase have been carried out using two recently developed TBP force field models (J. Phys. Chem. B 2012, 116, 305) in combination with the all-atom optimized potentials for liquid simulations (OPLS-AA) force field model for n-dodecane. Specifically, the electric dipole moment of TBP, mass density of the mixture, and the excess volume of mixing were computed with TBP mole fraction ranging from 0 to 1. It is found that the aforementioned force field models accurately predict the mass density of the mixture in the entire mole fraction range. Commensurate with experimental measurements, the electric dipole moment of the TBP was found to slightly increase with the mole fraction of TBP in the mixture. Also, in accord with experimental data, the excess volume of mixing is positive in the entire mole fraction range, peaking at TBP mole fraction range 0.3 0.5. Finally, a close examination of the spatial pair correlation functions between TBP molecules, and between TBP and n-dodecane molecules, revealed formation of TBP dimers through self-association at close distance, a phenomenon with ample experimental evidence.

  1. m303f-BU.tex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    d) \\ds {1}/{s2}(s+e-2s-e-5s(1-2s)) e) None of the above. 6. If a differential equation has a regular singular point at x=0 and its indicial equation has roots \\ds r1 = 3...

  2. bu.edu/eng4 ACCESS DENIED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Deutsche Telekom and Raytheon BBN Technologies; and one academic partner, Warwick University. The ECE

  3. Tri-axial magnetic anisotropies in RE{sub 2}Ba{sub 4}Cu{sub 7}O{sub 15?y} superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horii, Shigeru, E-mail: horii.shigeru.7e@kyoto-u.ac.jp; Doi, Toshiya [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Okuhira, Shota; Yamaki, Momoko [Department of Environmental Systems Engineering, Kochi University of Technology, Tosa-Yamada, Kami-shi, Kochi 782-8502 (Japan); Kishio, Kohji; Shimoyama, Jun-ichi [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a novel quantification method of tri-axial magnetic anisotropy in orthorhombic substances containing rare earth (RE) ions using tri-axial magnetic alignment and tri-axial magnetic anisotropies depending on the type of RE in RE-based cuprate superconductors. From the changes in the axes for magnetization in magnetically aligned powders of (RE?{sub 1?x}RE?{sub x}){sub 2}Ba{sub 4}Cu{sub 7}O{sub y} [(RE?,RE?)247] containing RE ions with different single-ion magnetic anisotropies, the ratios of three-dimensional magnetic anisotropies between RE?247 and RE?247 could be determined. The results in (Y,Er)247, (Dy,Er)247, (Ho,Er)247, and (Y,Eu)247 systems suggest that magnetic anisotropies largely depended on the type of RE? (or RE?), even in the heavy RE ions with higher magnetic anisotropies. An appropriate choice of RE ions in RE-based cuprate superconductors enables the reduction of the required magnetic field for the production of their bulks and thick films based on the tri-axial magnetic alignment technique using modulated rotation magnetic fields.

  4. Solid-state infrared photoacoustic spectra of group 6B metal mixed carbonyl-t-butylisocyanide complexes, M(CO)[sub 6[minus]n](CN[sup t]Bu)[sub n](M = Cr, Mo, W; n = 1-3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hongqi; Butler, I.S. (McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-state mid- and near-IR photoacoustic (PA) spectra have been measured at room temperature for the group 6B metal(0) mixed carbonyl-t-butylisocryanide complexes M(CO)[sub 6[minus]n](CN[sup t]Bu)[sub n] (M = Cr, Mo, W; n= 1-3). Vibrational assignments are proposed for many of the observed bands. The PA spectra in the near-IR region (4600-3600 cm[sup [minus]1]), where the binary v(CN) and v(CO) overtones and combinations absorb, are useful spectral fingerprints for these organometallic complexes. 20 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Tri County/Elgin Landfill Site, Elgin, IL. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The 66-acre Tri County Landfill (TCL) site comprises two former landfills the Tri County Landfill and the Elgin Landfill, located near the junction of Kane, Cook and DuPage Counties, Illinois. The two disposal operations overlapped to the point where the two landfills were indistinguishable. Land use in the area is predominantly agricultural. The local residents and businesses use private wells as their drinking water supply. Prior to the 1940's, both landfills were used for gravel mining operations. From 1968 to 1976, the TCL received liquid and industrial waste. State and county inspection reports revealed that open dumping, area filling, and dumping into the abandonded gravel quarry had occurred at the site. In addition, confined dumping, inadequate daily cover, blowing litter, fires, lack of access restrictions, and leachate flows were typical problems reported. In 1981, the landfill was closed with a final cover.

  6. Synergetic effects of II-VI sensitization upon TiO{sub 2} for photoelectrochemical water splitting; a tri-layered structured scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mumtaz, Asad, E-mail: asad-032@yahoo.com [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, University Teknologi PETRONAS (Malaysia); Mohamed, Norani Muti, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my [Centre of Innovative Nanostructures and Nanodevices (COINN), Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    World's energy demands are growing on a higher scale increasing the need of more reliable and long term renewable energy resources. Efficient photo-electrochemical (PEC) devices based on novel nano-structured designs for solar-hydrogen generation need to be developed. This study provides an insight of the tri-layered-TiO2 based nanostructures. Observing the mechanism of hydrogen production, the comparison of the structural order during the synthesis is pronounced. The sequence in the tri-layered structure affects the photogenerated electron (e{sup ?}) and hole (h{sup +}) pair transfer and separation. It is also discussed that not only the semiconductors band gaps alignment is important with respect to the water redox potential but also the interfacial regions. Quasi-Fermi-level adjustment at the interfacial regions plays a key role in deciding the solar to hydrogen efficiency. More efficient multicomponent semiconductor nano-design (MCSN) could be developed with the approach given in this study.

  7. Metal alkoxides. Models for metal oxides. 15. Carbon-carbon and carbon-hydrogen bond activation in the reactions between ethylene and ditungsten hexaalkoxides: W sub 2 (OCH sub 2 -t-Bu) sub 6 (. eta. sup 2 -C sub 2 H sub 4 ) sub 2 , W sub 2 (OR) sub 6 (CH sub 2 ) sub 4 (. eta. sup 2 -C sub 2 H sub 4 ), and W sub 2 (OR) sub 6 (. mu. -CCH sub 2 CH sub 2 CH sub 2 ) (where r = CH sub 2 -t-Bu, i-Pr, c-C sub 5 h sub 9 , and c-C sub 6 H sub 11 ). Preparations, properties, structures, and reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisholm, M.H.; Huffman, J.C.; Hampden-Smith, M.J. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (USA))

    1989-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    W{sub 2}(OR){sub 6} (M {triple bond}M) compounds and ethylene (1 atm, 22{degree}C) react in alkane and aromatic hydrocarbon solvents to give W{sub 2}(OR){sub 6}({mu}-CCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}) compounds and ethane, where R = i-Pr, c-C{sub 5}H{sub 9}, c-C{sub 6}H{sub 11}, and CH{sub 2}-t-Bu. Under comparable conditions, W{sub 2}(O-t-Bu){sub 6} and ethylene fail to react. In the formation of W{sub 2}(OR){sub 6}({mu}-CCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}) compounds, the intermediates W{sub 2}(OCH{sub 2}-t-Bu){sub 6}({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2} and W{sub 2}(OR){sub 6}(CH{sub 2}){sub 4}({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}), where R = C-C{sub 5}H{sub 9}, i-Pr, and CH{sub 2}-t-Bu, have been characterized. For R = i-Pr and CH{sub 2}-t-Bu, the intermediates are shown to be formed reversibly from W{sub 2}(OR){sub 6} and ethylene. The compound W{sub 2}(O-i-Pr){sub 6}(CH{sub 2}){sub 4}({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) has been fully characterized by an X-ray study and found to contain a metallacyclopentane ring and a W-{eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4} moiety, one at each metal center. The pyridine adduct W{sub 2}(O-i-Pr){sub 6}({mu}-CCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}ch{sub 2})(py) has been fully characterized and shown to contain a novel 1,6-dimetallabicyclo(3.1.0)hex-1(5)-ene organometallic core. All compounds have been characterized by {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR studies. Various aspects of the reaction pathway have been probed by the use of isotopically labeled ethylenes, and a proposed general scheme is compared to previous studies of ethylene activation at mononuclear metal centers and carbonyl dinuclear and cluster compounds.

  8. TriBITS lifecycle model. Version 1.0, a lean/agile software lifecycle model for research-based computational science and engineering and applied mathematical software.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willenbring, James M.; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Heroux, Michael Allen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Software lifecycles are becoming an increasingly important issue for computational science and engineering (CSE) software. The process by which a piece of CSE software begins life as a set of research requirements and then matures into a trusted high-quality capability is both commonplace and extremely challenging. Although an implicit lifecycle is obviously being used in any effort, the challenges of this process - respecting the competing needs of research vs. production - cannot be overstated. Here we describe a proposal for a well-defined software lifecycle process based on modern Lean/Agile software engineering principles. What we propose is appropriate for many CSE software projects that are initially heavily focused on research but also are expected to eventually produce usable high-quality capabilities. The model is related to TriBITS, a build, integration and testing system, which serves as a strong foundation for this lifecycle model, and aspects of this lifecycle model are ingrained in the TriBITS system. Here, we advocate three to four phases or maturity levels that address the appropriate handling of many issues associated with the transition from research to production software. The goals of this lifecycle model are to better communicate maturity levels with customers and to help to identify and promote Software Engineering (SE) practices that will help to improve productivity and produce better software. An important collection of software in this domain is Trilinos, which is used as the motivation and the initial target for this lifecycle model. However, many other related and similar CSE (and non-CSE) software projects can also make good use of this lifecycle model, especially those that use the TriBITS system. Indeed this lifecycle process, if followed, will enable large-scale sustainable integration of many complex CSE software efforts across several institutions.

  9. Johns, R. H., D. W. Burgess, C. A. Doswell III, M. S. Gilmore, J. A. Hart, and S. F. Piltz, 2013: The 1925 Tri-State tornado damage path and associated storm system. Electronic J. Severe Storms Meteor., 8 (2), 133.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doswell III, Charles A.

    mi) east-northeast of the apparent end of the Tri- State tornado damage path in Pike County, IN: The 1925 Tri- State tornado damage path and associated storm system. Electronic J. Severe Storms Meteor., 8 (2), 1­33. 1 The 1925 Tri-State Tornado Damage Path and Associated Storm System ROBERT H. JOHNS

  10. Public health assessment for tri-county landfill waste management of Illinois, South Elgin, Kane County, Illinois, Region 5. Cerclis No. ILD048306183. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tri-County and Elgin Landfills pose a public health hazard because the concentrations of lead in downgradient private wells are high enough to be a long-term health concern. Completed exposure pathways include the exposure to contaminated water from on- and off-site private wells (inhalation, ingestion, dermal contact; past, present, future). Contaminants of concern in on-site groundwater include bis(2-chloroethyl)ether, vinyl chloride, antimony, arsenic, barium, cadmium, fluoride, lead, manganese, nickel, nitrate + nitrite, and thallium. Chemicals of concern in on-site surface soil and sediments include PCBs, arsenic, cadmium, and nickel. Contaminants of concern in on-site subsurface soil include PCBs, arsenic, cadmium, lead, and nickel. This public health assessment recommends health professionals education and community health education be conducted for the community impacted by the landfills.

  11. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), United States and Territories, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  12. Tri-Generation Success World's First Tri-Gen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    station uses anaerobically digested biogas from the municipal wastewater treatment plant as the fuel SAE protocols for rapid 3-minute complete tank refueling. Gas or Biogas H2 is produced at anode Gas Electrolyte Cathode Anode Anaerobic digester gas fuel is cleaned and then sent to a molten carbonate fuel cell

  13. Tri-State Synfuels Project Review: Volume 8. Commercial status of licensed process units. [Proposed Henderson, Kentucky coal to gasoline plant; licensed commercial processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document demonstrates the commercial status of the process units to be used in the Tri-State Synfuels Project at Henderson, Kentucky. The basic design philosophy as established in October, 1979, was to use the commercial SASOL II/III plants as a basis. This was changed in January 1982 to a plant configuration to produce gasoline via a methanol and methanol to gasoline process. To accomplish this change the Synthol, Oil workup and Chemical Workup Units were eliminated and replaced by Methanol Synthesis and Methanol to Gasoline Units. Certain other changes to optimize the Lurgi liquids processing eliminated the Tar Distillation and Naphtha Hydrotreater Units which were replaced by the Partial Oxidation Unit. The coals to be gasified are moderately caking which necessitates the installation of stirring mechanism in the Lurgi Dry Bottom gasifier. This work is in the demonstration phase. Process licenses either have been obtained or must be obtained for a number of processes to be used in the plant. The commercial nature of these processes is discussed in detail in the tabbed sections of this document. In many cases there is a list of commercial installations at which the licensed equipment is used.

  14. Effect of the substrate temperature on the physical properties of molybdenum tri-oxide thin films obtained through the spray pyrolysis technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, H.M. [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia)] [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia); Torres, J., E-mail: njtorress@unal.edu.co [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia); Lopez Carreno, L.D. [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia)] [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia); Rodriguez-Garcia, M.E. [Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Juriquilla, Queretaro, Qro., Mexico (Colombia)] [Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Juriquilla, Queretaro, Qro., Mexico (Colombia)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycrystalline molybdenum tri-oxide thin films were prepared using the spray pyrolysis technique; a 0.1 M solution of ammonium molybdate tetra-hydrated was used as a precursor. The samples were prepared on Corning glass substrates maintained at temperatures ranging between 423 and 673 K. The samples were characterized through micro Raman, X-ray diffraction, optical transmittance and DC electrical conductivity. The species MoO{sub 3} (H{sub 2}O){sub 2} was found in the sample prepared at a substrate temperature of 423 K. As the substrate temperature rises, the water disappears and the samples crystallize into {alpha}-MoO{sub 3}. The optical gap diminishes as the substrate temperature rises. Two electrical transport mechanisms were found: hopping under 200 K and intrinsic conduction over 200 K. The MoO{sub 3} films' sensitivity was analyzed for CO and H{sub 2}O in the temperature range 160 to 360 K; the results indicate that CO and H{sub 2}O have a reduction character. In all cases, it was found that the sensitivity to CO is lower than that to H{sub 2}O. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A low cost technique is used which produces good material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin films are prepared using ammonium molybdate tetra hydrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The control of the physical properties of the samples could be done. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A calculation method is proposed to determine the material optical properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MoO{sub 3} thin films prepared by spray pyrolysis could be used as gas sensor.

  15. Neutronic Analysis of the Burning of Transuranics in Fully Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Tri-Isotropic Particle-Fuel in a PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Pope; R. Sonat Sen; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Gilles Youinou; Brian Boer

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculations have been performed to assess the neutronic behavior of pins of Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel in otherwise-conventional Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel pins. The FCM fuel contains transuranic (TRU) only oxide fuel in tri-isotropic (TRISO) particles with the TRU loading coming from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Use of the TRISO particle fuel would provide an additional barrier to fission product release in the event of cladding failure. Depletion calculations were performed to evaluate reactivity-limited burnup of the TRU-only FCM fuel. These calculations showed that due to relatively little space available for fuel, the achievable burnup with these pins alone is quite small. Various reactivity parameters were also evaluated at each burnup step including moderator temperature coefficient (MTC), Doppler, and soluble boron worth. These were compared to reference UO2 and MOX unit cells. The TRU-only FCM fuel exhibits degraded MTC and Doppler coefficients relative to UO2 and MOX. Also, the reactivity effects of coolant voiding suggest that the behavior of this fuel would be similar to a MOX fuel of very high plutonium fraction, which are known to have positive void reactivity. In general, loading of TRU-only FCM fuel into an assembly without significant quantities of uranium presents challenges to the reactor design. However, if such FCM fuel pins are included in a heterogeneous assembly alongside LEU fuel pins, the overall reactivity behavior is dominated by the uranium pins while attractive TRU destruction performance levels in the TRU-only FCM fuel pins is. From this work, it is concluded that use of heterogeneous assemblies such as these appears feasible from a preliminary reactor physics standpoint.

  16. Changes in the cytosolic concentra-tions of Ca2+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenny, Paraic

    -malignant cells. Knockdown of SPCA2 in MCF-7 cells (a human breast adenocarcinoma cell line) led to inhibition+ levels in SPCA2-knockdown MCF-7 cells were reduced com- pared with control MCF-7 cells that SPCA2 localizes to the plasma membrane in MCF-7 cells, suggesting that it might interact with plasma

  17. he Bush administra-tion has listed myriad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Nuclear Security Ad- ministration (NNSA), a division of the Energy Department, to scrutinize the nuclear and reduce the destructive yield of nu- clear weapons. A review of NNSA statements over the years on plutonium aging reveals a slowly evolving change in its position. In 2002, NNSA spokesman Bryan Wilkes

  18. 48 Extracurricular Activities Sec-tion, Student Division2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    musical instrument] [acoustic music] Egoist Dancers [dance] KUES [music] [chorus] [matsuri dance] [city pollution study] R [environment network] [environment] [machine study] E.S.S. [English Speaking

  19. Post-translational histone modifica-tions influence gene regulation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    , and their transmission across cell generations remains a matter of debate. This paper presents a novel method histone methyltransferases. In this way, HP1 is thought to propa- gate H3K9me3 modifications to mediate rights reserved #12;

  20. SANDIA COKPOK4TION SANDIA BASE, .QLDUQUERQUE. N. M.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8B100B100WWNA Monthly;623SANDIA

  1. Splitting a C-O bond in dialkylethers with bis(1,2,4-tri-t-butylcyclopentadienyl) cerium-hydride does not occur by a sigma-bond metathesis pathway: a combined experimental and DFT computational study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werkema, Evan; Yahia, Ahmed; Maron, Laurent; Eisenstein, Odile; Andersen, Richard

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Addition of diethylether to [1,2,4(Me3C)3C5H2]2CeH, abbreviated Cp'2CeH, gives Cp'2CeOEt and ethane. Similarly, di-n-propyl- or di-n-butylether gives Cp'2Ce(O-n-Pr) and propane or Cp'2Ce(O-n-Bu) and butane, respectively. Using Cp'2CeD, the propane and butane contain deuterium predominantly in their methyl groups. Mechanisms, formulated on the basis of DFT computational studies, show that the reactions begin by an alpha or beta-CH activation with comparable activation barriers but only the beta-CH activation intermediate evolves into the alkoxide product and an olefin. The olefin then inserts into the Ce-H bond forming the alkyl derivative, Cp'2CeR, that eliminates alkane. The alpha-CH activation intermediate is in equilibrium with the starting reagents, Cp'2CeH and the ether, which accounts for the deuterium label in the methyl groups of the alkane. The one-step sigma-bond metathesis mechanism has a much higher activation barrier than either of the two-step mechanisms.

  2. areva nc bu: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DC 392 Link between the Potentially Hazardous Asteroid (86039) 1999 NC43 and the Chelyabinsk meteoroid tenuous CERN Preprints Summary: We explored the statistical and...

  3. One BU: Unlocking the Undergraduate Experience Task Force Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finzi, Adrien

    Opportunities for Innovation and Entrepreneurial Studies Moving from Magnet to Radiant Model Accessing the Arts of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering Hugh O'Donnell Professor of Painting, College of Fine Arts

  4. NOUVEAUTES BU SCIENCES ET TECHNIQUES SEPTEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2012 INFORMATIQUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sart, Remi

    LEF Le Frapper, Olivier 005.43 LINU FIC ITIL : mise en oeuvre de la dmarche ITIL en entreprise Mesdon

  5. BOSTON UNIVERSITY Policy BU 000-001A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Frank

    to the information systems that store, process, transmit, or receive electronic Protected Health Information (e a formal, documented risk analysis process to identify, rate, and document risks to the information systems.1.3. Identification of security safeguards (procedures and controls) used to protect the confidentiality, integrity

  6. GL Report BU 355 CRSP CONSOLIDATED BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT RECAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONSOLIDATED BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT RECAP JANUARY 2015 ( IN THOUSANDS) FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 FY 15 FY 15 REGION ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS BUDGET ACTUALS ACTUAL TARGET O&M...

  7. NOUVEAUTES BU SCIENCES ET TECHNIQUES SEPTEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2012 INFORMATIQUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sart, Remi

    LEF Le Frapper, Olivier 005.43 LINU FIC ITIL : mise en oeuvre de la démarche ITIL en entreprise Mesdon

  8. 4 BOSTONIA Fall 2011 COMMONWEALTH NEWS FROM BU AND BEYOND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    for those with severe motion impairments to Corey Petitt of Boston. CYDNEYSCOTT #12;Fall 2011 BOSTONIA 5 Two the 2011 Science Day Graduate School of Arts & Sciences Dean's Award and is already free online

  9. GL Report BU 355 CRSP CONSTRUCTION, TRUST, REIMBURSABLE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONSTRUCTION, TRUST, REIMBURSABLE ( IN THOUSANDS) BUDGET FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 FY 15 TOTAL ACTIVITY ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS BUDGET OBS EXPEND OBS OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR...

  10. BOSTON UNIVERSITY Study Abroad BU Washington Academic Center Spring 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutyra, Lucy R.

    important decisions while crafting U.S. foreign policy. The course will cover specific presidential are the media's impact on the presidency, and presidential elections surrounding the Office over the years of the atom bomb, drones, pre-emptive invasions, etc.). Time permitting, the course will include a guest

  11. r: Dr. James P B327 Clark Bu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the course skills interact sis PLEMENTAL d electronica 8 AGRIB nline are welcom s for another ompetencies

  12. GL Report BU 355 CRSP CONSTRUCTION, TRUST, REIMBURSABLE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONSTRUCTION, TRUST, REIMBURSABLE ( IN THOUSANDS) BUDGET FY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 TOTAL ACTIVITY ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS BUDGET OBS EXPEND OBS OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR...

  13. Haskel/BuTech/PPI | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEN TO THEHudson YearHarvesting the Sun at

  14. Niobium-mediated generation of P-P multiply bonded intermediates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piro, Nicholas A. (Nicholas Anthony)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The diphosphaazide complex (MesNPP)Nb(N[CH2 tBu]Ar)3, 1 (Mes = 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenyl, Ar = 3,5-dimethylphenyl), releases a P2 unit upon heating to form MesNNb(N[CH2 tBu]Ar)3, 2, in a first-order process. The chemistry ...

  15. Specific-Heat of the Organic Metal Bis(tetrathiotetracene) Tri-Iodide from 20-K to 100-K, the Vicinity of the Metal-Nonmetal Phase-Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CORT, B.; Naugle, Donald G.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    selenium ana- log, the transition-metal complex KCP, ' and tetrathiofulvalenium-thiocyanate [TTF(SCN) 0588] and its selenium analog' which are similar to the organic metal studied in this work. That the metallic state is stabilized by impurities...PHYSICAL REVIEW B VOLUME 24, NUMBER 7 1 OCTOBER 1981 Specific heat of the organic metal bis(tetrathiotetracene) tri-iodide from 20 to 100 K, the vicinity of the metal-nonmetal phase transition B. Cort' and D. G. Naugle Department of Physics...

  16. *Tri-Generation is a novel technology that was conceived by the National Fuel Cell Research Center in 2001 to simultaneously generate electricity, hydrogen, and heat. It was developed into the first prototype in collaboration with FuelCell Energy, Inc., a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    and fuel cell electric vehicles), there are still emissions associated with the upstream processes Electric Vehicles Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles #12;*Tri-Generation is a novel technology that was conceived by the National Fuel Cell Research Center

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of the thermal dissociation of O,O'-bis(1,3,5-TRI-tert-butyl-4-oxo-2,5-cyclo-hexadienyl)-p-benzoquinone dioxime in solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khizhnyi, V.A.; Danilova, T.A.; Goloverda, G.Z.; Dobronravova, Z.A.

    1987-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetics and mechanism of the thermal dissociation of O,O'-bis(1,3,5-tri-tert-butyl-4-oxo-2,5-cyclohexadienyl)-p-benzoquinone dioxime (quinol ether) in solutions in nonpolar solvents were investigated. The dissociation of the quinol ether is reversible two-stage process and involves the formation of an intermediate radical. In relation to the reaction conditions (initial concentration, temperature) the dissociation rate of the quinol ether obeys the kinetic equations omega = k/sub eff/ x c/sup 1/2/ or omega = k/sub 1/c. The change in the reaction order is due to the ratio of the rates of dissociation of the intermediate radical and of its reaction with the phenoxyl radical. The ESR spectra were recorded on a Varian E-9 radiospectrometer with high-frequency modulation of 100 kHz.

  18. Absorption Heat Pumping- Have You Tried It?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, R. C.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of a thermal powered absorption heat pump is not a new or revolutionary idea. It has been successfully demonstrated in the lab and prototypes have been installed in the field. Units have been successfully applied in a number...

  19. Constrained tri-sphere kinematic positioning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Viola, Robert J (Jackson, WY)

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A scalable and adaptable, six-degree-of-freedom, kinematic positioning system is described. The system can position objects supported on top of, or suspended from, jacks comprising constrained joints. The system is compatible with extreme low temperature or high vacuum environments. When constant adjustment is not required a removable motor unit is available.

  20. Tri-modality small animal imaging system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kundu, B.K.; Stolin, A.V.; Pole, J.; Baumgart, L.; Fontaine, M.; Wojcik, R.; Kross, B.; Zorn, C.; Majewski, S.; Williams, M.B.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our group is developing a scanner that combines x-ray, single gamma, and optical imaging on the same rotating gantry. Two functional modalities (SPECT and optical) are included because they have different strengths and weaknesses in terms of spatial and temporal decay lengths in the context of in vivo imaging, and because of the recent advent of multiple reporter gene constructs. The effect of attenuation by biological tissue on the detected intensity of the emitted signal was measured for both gamma and optical imaging. Attenuation by biological tissue was quantified for both the bioluminescent emission of luciferace and for the emission light of the near infrared fluorophore cyanine 5.5, using a fixed excitation light intensity. Experiments were performed to test the feasibility of using either single gamma or x-ray imaging to make depth-dependent corrections to the measured optical signal. Our results suggest that significant improvements in quantitation of optical emission are possible using straightforward correction techniques based on information from other modalities. Development of an integrated scanner in which data from each modality are obtained with the animal in a common configuration will greatly simplify this process.

  1. -A Science &Feature ? TRY THE WEATHER ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mountain is decked with a white cloud tablacloth, it is an indication of coming rain. The air overOUNTAIN CLOUD PROGNOSTICS A number of proverbs advise US t h a t when a mountain wears a cloud cap, O r a table at corresponding levels, and 80 clouds are very a p t t o appaar first Over O r Qn the mountains; the height, form

  2. Summon [ try out ] How to use Summon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franssen, Michael

    '). The terms you enter may occur in the publication loose from one another. Put your search terms between: advanced search: enter search terms as words from publication titles #12;3 Type * to search for all endings: advanced search: enter search terms in specific search boxes Full-text linking in Summon Clicking

  3. (ura avio teleco-mandado no tri-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    mapas vão permitir fazer a cartografia dos diferentes tipos de vegeta- ção no solo. Os dados estão agora a ser tratados antes de serem divulgados. A equipa portuguesa ficou 'hospedada' desta vez numa base de portugueses ficaram numa base sul-coreana para 70 pessoas tigação sul-coreana - a esco- lha da base depende da

  4. TriBITS Developers Guide and Reference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z Site MapTrends, Discovery,TWC-focusedof

  5. Absorption Heat Pumping- Have You Tried It?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, R. C.

    The concept of a thermal powered absorption heat pump is not a new or revolutionary idea. It has been successfully demonstrated in the lab and prototypes have been installed in the field. Units have been successfully applied in a number...

  6. Tri-Party Agreement - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program The NIF andPointsThrust 1:Travel

  7. Tri-Party Agreement Project Manager's List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliancesTrending: Metal Oxo Bonds

  8. Proposed Tri-Party Agreement Modifications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News,Program90803 Responsiveness Summary

  9. Effect of Tb{sup 3+} concentration on the optical and vibrational properties of YBO{sub 3} tri-doped with Eu{sup 3+}, Ce{sup 3+}, and Tb{sup 3+}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohal, S.; Hassanzadeh, E.; Huang, J. Y. [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University and Nano Tech Center, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Nazari, M.; Holtz, M., E-mail: mark.holtz@txstate.edu [Department of Physics, Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas 78666 (United States); Zhang, X.; Chaudhuri, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Kuryatkov, V. V. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Nano Tech Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Hope-Weeks, L. J. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural and optical studies are reported of yttrium orthoborate YBO{sub 3} when tri-doped with Eu{sup 3+}, Ce{sup 3+}, and Tb{sup 3+}, focusing on the role of terbium concentration. Incorporation of Tb{sup 3+} affects emission properties for photoluminescence (PL) excited by near ultraviolet light. For constant cerium and europium concentrations, increasing the Tb{sup 3+} results in diminished PL from the Ce{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} color centers. Simultaneously, the PL excitation bands related to both Ce{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} increase in intensity for red emission from the Eu{sup 3+}. Results are consistent with a Ce{sup 3+}???(Tb{sup 3+}){sub n}???Eu{sup 3+} energy transfer scheme, where (Tb{sup 3+}){sub n} denotes a chain incorporating n terbium ions. A high red to orange PL intensity ratio is obtained, ranging from 1.34 to 2.09. Raman vibrational bands show a systematic change, with Tb{sup 3+} concentration, in the B{sub 3}O{sub 9} ring terminal oxygen bending mode coordinated with the yttrium site where dopant ions substitute. The structural changes are interpreted as variations in the local neighborhood of these sites in the YBO{sub 3}:Ce{sup 3+},Tb{sup 3+},Eu{sup 3+} crystal structure.

  10. Tri-Party Agreement Template and Sample Tri-Party Agreement ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Operations and Maintenance in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts Data Center Optimization Plan Investment-Grade Audit Kickoff Meeting With ESCO - Sample Agenda...

  11. Tri-Generation Success Story: World's First Tri-Gen Energy Station - Fountain Valley

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|IndustrialCenter GetsEnergySpecification:Donofrio

  12. Tri-Generation Success Story: World's First Tri-Gen Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartmentTest forTechnologies »Contractor Conversion

  13. The Tri-Party Agencies want your input on proposed changes to the Tri-Party

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2Dand WaterTheManagementTheThe Top Quark,

  14. Measurement of BR(Bu to phi K)/BR(Bu to J/psi K) at the collider detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napora, Robert A

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents evidence for the decay mode B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using (120 {+-} 7)pb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). This signal is then used to measure the branching ratio relative to the decay mode B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}. The measurement starts from reconstructing the two decay modes: B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}}, where {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}, where J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. The measurement yielded 23 {+-} 7 B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} events, and 406 {+-} 26 B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} events. The fraction of B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} events where the J/{psi} subsequently decayed to two muons (as opposed to two electrons) was found to be f{sub {mu}{mu}} = 0.839 {+-} 0.066. The relative branching ratio of the two decays is then calculated based on the equation: BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}})/BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}) = N{sub {phi}K}/N{sub {psi}K} {center_dot}f{sub {mu}{mu}} BR(J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -})/BR({phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}) {epsilon}{sub {mu}{mu}}K/{epsilon}KKK R({epsilon}{sub iso}). The measurement finds BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}})/BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}) = 0.0068 {+-} 0.0021(stat.) {+-} 0.0007(syst.). The B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} branching ratio is then found to be BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}}) = [6.9 {+-} 2.1(stat.) {+-} 0.8(syst.)] x 10{sup -6}. This value is consistent with similar measurements reported by the e{sup +}e{sup -} collider experiments BaBar[1], Belle[2], and CLEO[3].

  15. Efficient Clustering Algorithms for Self-Organizing Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starobinski, David

    Efficient Clustering Algorithms for Self-Organizing Wireless Sensor Networks Rajesh Krishnan BBN@bu.edu Abstract Self-organization of wireless sensor networks, which involves network decomposi- tion-organization in wireless sensor networks. We first present a novel approach for message-efficient clustering, in which

  16. Neural adaptation to non-symbolic number and visual shape: An electrophysiological study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soltsz, Fruzsina; Sz?cs, Dnes

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    discriminable from, the us m e P2p yde st rec tasks res o mbo tude nds tion dapt le, in und l for l, 201 ; Geb 013) are the st rface of n s in ee G whi ction 007) was stud ies a ntan gms n, Br nds f to inin mbo udy whic rate para play g bu er...

  17. A Bayesian Approach for TCP to Distinguish Congestion from Wireless Losses #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Bayesian Approach for TCP to Distinguish Congestion from Wireless Losses # Dhiman Barman,matta}@cs.bu.edu Technical Report BUCS­2003­030 Abstract. The Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) has been the protocol approach to infer at the source host the reason of a packet loss, whether conges­ tion or wireless

  18. A LOW COST BRUSH DEFLECTION SYSTEM FOR BANK STABILIZA-TION AND REVEGETATION1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    and gravel bars and potential obstacles, and provides revegetation while re- quiring periodic maintenance sedimentation and bank stability. Lo- cally available biological materials were used and labor was provided in the urban area has experienced increasing amounts of runoff and a long history of gravel mining, degrading

  19. NOISE AND CHA RA C TERIZA TION. INFLUENCE OF THE EPILAYER PROPERTIES ON BREAKDOWN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ], whereas the inlaid of n+ regions below the drain and source contacts reduces the leading resistances region and low field values below the drain contact. The insertion of the buffer layer also reduces after saturation, indicating the beginning of burnout, is due to avalanche breakdown of the back side

  20. Social housing policies under changing framework condi-tions in Santiago de Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borsdorf, Axel

    unifamiliares en modalidad de autoconstrucción o bloques de viviendas plurifamiliares. Con ello los campamentos de vi- viendas irregulares disminuyeron considerablemente. La política de vivienda social fue

  1. tion. Human or mouse intestinal epithelial cells that express the poly-Ig receptor were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . Antibodies specific for Clostrid- ium difficile toxin A and Helicobacter pylori urease have been generated, Glauser M et al (1995) Oral immunization with Helicobacter pylori urease as a treatment against Helicobacter infection. Gas- troenterology (in press) Haneberg B, Kendall D, Amerongen HM, Apter FM

  2. The Beverley Taylor SorenSon arTS & educaTion complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    . & Patricia W. Child Taft & Mary Jane Price Pat & Boyer Jarvis The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Heath Gary E. & Patti A. Moore Mark & Marcia Webber Brent & Bonnie Jean Beesley Foundation Katie Eccles

  3. RESOLUTION NO. 2013 -110 RESOLUTION AMENDING THE TURLOCK IRRIGA TION DISTRICT'S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owned Electric Utilities and the Turlock Irrigation District Renewable Resources Procurement Plan. NOW) with the TID Renewable Resources Procurement Plan. The TID Renewable Resources Procurement Plan, at minimum Compliance Period 1, January 1, 2011 to December 31,2013, TID shall procure renewable energy resources

  4. 2013NatureAmerica,Inc.Allrightsreserved. nature immunology aDVaNCE ONLINE PUBLICaTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelb, Michael

    . 6Core Technology and Research Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, Japan signals leading to the release of allergic mediators that induce immediate hypersensitivity1. Anaphylaxis including the respiratory and circulatory systems, often leading to life-threatening episodes

  5. JANUARY 2006 VOL. 19, NO. 1 tion of numerous specialists in various mammalian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    computer technology and database man- agement strategies, so that it would be easier to alter and correct Museum of Natural His- tory. With funding from the Department of Energy, the group began with the mammal

  6. DEFECTS AND CHARACTERIZA TION Il. -MINORITY CARRIERS LIFETIME DEGRADATION DURING ION IMPLANTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    cost [1, 2]. With regard to this point it sufficies to observe that the ion implanted solar cell SILICON SOLAR CELL PROCESSING (*) M. FINETTI (**), P. OSTOJA, S. SOLMI and G. SONCINI Laboratorio LAMEL In this work a silicon solar cell fabrication process based on ion implantation follow- ed by low temperature

  7. tion in Mugil cephalus Lin. Compo Biochem. Physio!. 51A:125-131.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    examined the effect of a thermal dis- charge from a coastal steam-electric power plant on reproduction in M. VLYMEN III. 1978. The relation between heat generation, conservation and the swimming energetics of tunas Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, B.C. V6T lW5, Canada 498 EFFECTS OF A THERMAL DISCHARGE ON REPRODUCTIVE CYCLES

  8. Impact On SOcIety The DNA of InnovaTIon: volume Iv

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    , Architecture and Civil Engineering Renewable energy: seeking community acceptance Professor Brian Falzon School innovation 60 Professor Mchel Mainnn School of Modern Languages The place names that reveal our shared of Politics, International Studies and Philosophy Influencing the lives of future generations 16 Professor

  9. Drones (Apis mellifera) can change direc-tion during flight to congregation area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    . Rutt- ner, Z. Bienenforsch. 8 (1966) 332-336 ; et Z. Bienenforsch. 10 (1968) 259-265), il est fait tat'on suit les hypothses de Rutt- ner, les mles auraient d voler d'abord vers une dpression de l

  10. Tentative topics for oral examination "Introduc-tion to Extreme Value Theory", January 23 and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikosch, Thomas

    Characterizations of F MDA(H) and their normalizing and centering constants. Examples of distributions in the different MDAs. Show that von Mises functions are in MDA(). Ex- istence of moments in MDA() and in MDA(). 4 (Theorem 3.4.5, equivalence between (a) and (b)) result in the case MDA(). 5. Order statistics

  11. The PneumaTic hybridizaTion concePT for downsizing and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lygeros, John

    that are based on exotic energy carriers. Compared to conventional fuels, pressu- rized air exhibits an extremely

  12. More than 200 effects in growth, reproduc-tion, osmoregulation, and immunology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allman, John M.

    documented for prolactin (PRL). Although PRL seems to be an omnipotent hor- mone ("omnipotin"), it is best known for its role in the production of milk proteins. However, PRL is not only essential for 2 days show maternal care and an increase in plasma PRL level (13). Nulliparous, hypophysec- tomized

  13. AMENDMENT OF SOLICIT ATION/MODIFICA TION OF CONTRACT 1. CONTRACTID CODE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TO BE RECEIVED AT THE PLACE DESIGNATED FOR THE RECEIPT OF OFFERS PRIOR TO THE HOUR

  14. Keywords: Agents, Cellular models, Discrete event simula-tion, DEVS, human agent models, Mediterranean landscape.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - plained by climate change or human-caused degradation of the landscape. Finally, by placing model villages, Mediterranean landscape. ABSTRACT The Mediterranean Landscape Dynamics (MEDLAND) pro- ject seeks to better an- other while providing flexibility for either model to be changed in a systematic fashion

  15. tion at higher temperatures. Imre et al. (p. 205; see the Perspective by Cowburn) fabricated and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    , molecules in gas or solution phase are in constant, random motion. Thus, the Plasmons in Optoelectronics have revealed precisely in what order, and at what rate, individual bonds are made and broken. However

  16. The DNA of InnovaTIon: volume III ConneCtions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    of MI6 secrets Professor Andrew Mills School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Smart Inks: shining by the surname of the researchers interviews: Keith Baker Photography: Marketing and Creative Services, Queen and Enterprise Directorate, Queen's University Belfast: www.qub.ac.uk/home/Researchandenterprise tel. 00 44 (0

  17. MEMORANDUM FOR SCOTI L. SAMUELSON MANAGER OFFICE OF RIVER PROTE~TION ~

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, In this3, BPAEn~rgy

  18. A study of the relationship between distance transported to school and attendance, grades, and participation in extra-curricular activities of Burleson County, Texas high school students, 1952

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Robert Jim

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ' Relationship 'Jet+san Tr r tioi: tion in h+h Sohool-Sponsored. Cln&s snd, Organiaat iona ani . rane-, ort tion 'selationshiI Between rattiolpation ih Hoes Community Ct. ups an~ 'rganisatlons snd Tr@n sf. o!'tw 't 1 on ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ '. ~elationsnip ~etwe...pation in Athlstios af Transported sn4 tion-Tr~nsnnrtsi', Bu?lemon County High sohool Stuuents, 19~~ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ?3 Average iiursusr of i:. s;, . berships ln Sohool- Sponsored Clubs an& O". rani~ations of Trans- ports& ann Son...

  19. Search for b-->u transitions in B- --> DK- and B- --> D*K- Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The BABAR Collaboration; P. del Amo Sanchez et al.

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results from an updated study of the suppressed decays B- to D K- and B- to D* K- followed by D to K+pi-, where D(*) indicates a D(*)0 or an anti-D(*)0 meson, and D* decays to D pi0 or D gamma. These decays are sensitive to the CKM unitarity triangle angle gamma, due to interference between the b to c transition B- to D(*)0K- followed by the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay D0 to K+pi-, and the b to u transition B- to anti-D(*)0K- followed by the Cabibbo-favored decay anti-D0 to K+pi-. We also report an analysis of the decay B- to D(*)pi- with the D decaying into the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed mode D to K+pi-. Our results are based on 467 million Upsilon (4S) to B anti-B decays collected with the BaBar detector at SLAC. We measure the ratios R(*) of the suppressed ([K+pi-]_D K-/pi-) to favored ([K-pi+]_D K-/pi-) branching fractions as well as the CP asymmetries A(*) of those modes. We see indications of signals for the B- to D K- and B- to D*K-, D*->D pi0 suppressed modes, with statistical significances of 2.1 and 2.2 sigma, respectively, and we measure: R_{DK} = (1.1\\pm 0.6 \\pm 0.2)\\times 10^{-2}, A_{DK} = -0.86 \\pm 0.47 \\ ^{+0.12}_{-0.16}, R*_{(D pi0)K} = (1.8\\pm 0.9 \\pm 0.4)\\times 10^{-2}, A*_{(D pi0)K} = +0.77 \\pm 0.35\\pm 0.12, R*_{(D gamma)K} = (1.3\\pm 1.4\\pm 0.8 )\\times 10^{-2}, A*_{(D gamma)K} = +0.36 \\pm 0.94\\ ^{+0.25}_{-0.41}, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We use a frequentist approach to obtain the magnitude of the ratio r_B = |A(B- to anti-D0 K-) / A(B- to D0K-)|= (9.5^{+5.1}_{-4.1})%, with r_BK- we find r*_B = |A(B^- to anti-D*0 K-)/A(B- to D*0 K-)|=(9.6^{+3.5}_{-5.1})%, with r*_B<15.0% at 90% confidence level.

  20. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14009: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Backup Power (BuP)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program record from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office provides information about fuel cell backup power deployed by industry.

  1. Search for exclusive b?u semileptonic decays of B mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1993-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    VOLUME 70, NUMBER 18 PH YSICAL REVIEW LETTERS 3 MA+ 1993 Search for Exclusive b = u Semileptonic Decays of 8 Mesons A. Bean, ' J. Gronberg, ' R. Kutschke, ' S. Menary, ' R. J. Morrison, ' H. N. Nelson, ' J. D. Richman, ' H. Tajima, ' D. Schmidt, ' D..., due to production of the Y(4S), and a nonresonant (continuum) component that is about 3 times larger. To study the continuum background, we use a 416 pb ' data sample accumulated at vs =10.52 GeV. For 8 p(co)l v, quark models predict that the spec...

  2. LORRAINE A. DELHORNE, M.S. EMAIL: delhorne@bu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Frank

    EDUCATION Ashland College, Ashland, OH B.A. Speech and Hearing Washington University, St. Louis, MO M

  3. Boston University School of Social Work www.bu.edu/ssw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Responsible Social Work Practice | State Health Policy | Disability | Children and Youth with Special Health about how best to solve real-world social and behavioral problems. As an institution, we are committed. We recognize the changing demands on the social work profession, and are striving to meet them

  4. BU Department of Chemistry 1 of 4 2013 Undergraduate Research Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . James Park, who did his HONORS research with Prof. Corey Stephenson and his with Associate Dean, Prof. Geoffrey Cooper, Biology Elizabeth describing her work of cariomyocytes" Dean Cooper (behind Professors Straub and Abrams) listening

  5. On the Skew-Bounded Minimum-Bu er Routing Tree Problem Christoph Albrecht,y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zelikovsky, Alexander

    self-heating in inter- connects 8 , and facilitate technology migration since designs are more balanced@cs.gsu.edu Abstract|Bounding the load capacitance at gate outputs is a standard element in today's electrical cor outputs is a standard element in to- day's electrical correctness methodologies. Bounds on load caps

  6. GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S.MajorMarketsNov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15 Feb-15

  7. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil ElectricityUsing EIA'sAa AA In3BOE

  8. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil ElectricityUsing EIA'sAa AA

  9. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil ElectricityUsing EIA'sAa AALiquids

  10. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S.5AreOil andMarketW W W WBOE

  11. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S.5AreOil andMarketW W W WBOEGas

  12. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S.5AreOil andMarketW W W

  13. BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S.5AreOil andMarketW W WRU315

  14. BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S.5AreOil andMarketW W WRU315

  15. GEORGE WATTS HILL ALUMNI CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    BR IN KH O U S- BU LLITT CHILLER BUILDING F KENAN STADIUM GEORGE WATTS HILL ALUMNI CENTER EHRINGHAUS FIELD DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY C AR PEN TRY SH O P CHILLER BUILDING NEURO SCIENCES WATER TOWER ITS MANNING CHILLER BUILDING PUBLIC SAFETY BLDG. MORRISON RIDGEROAD EHRINGHAUS BOSHAMER BASEBALL STADIUM

  16. Metered Visitor Motorcycle Pkg.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    acNIDER M EDICINE BER RYH ILL BR IN KH O U S- BU LLITT CHILLER BUILDING F KENAN STADIUM GEORGE WATTS HILL ALUMNI CENTER EHRINGHAUS FIELD DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY C AR PEN TRY SH O P CHILLER BUILDING NEURO SCIENCES WATER TOWER ITS MANNING CHILLER BUILDING PUBLIC SAFETY BLDG. MORRISON RIDGEROAD

  17. Disabled Visitor Parking Only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    SCIENCES LIBRARY M acNIDER M EDICINE BER RYH ILL BR IN KH O U S- BU LLITT CHILLER BUILDING F KENAN STADIUM GEORGE WATTS HILL ALUMNI CENTER EHRINGHAUS FIELD DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY C AR PEN TRY SH O P CHILLER BUILDING NEURO SCIENCES WATER TOWER ITS MANNING CHILLER BUILDING PUBLIC SAFETY BLDG. MORRISON RIDGEROAD

  18. Density functional theory study on the interstitial chemical shifts of main-group-element centered hexazirconium halide clusters; synthetic control of speciation in [(Zr6ZCl12)] (Z = B, C)-based mixed ligand complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jingyi

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    substitution of terminal chlorides on [(Zr6CCl12)Cl6]4-cluster by tri(n-butyl)-phosphine oxide (Bu3PO) was conducted with the aid of TlPF6. Composition of the reaction mixtures was analyzed by use of both 13C and 31P NMR. A preliminary scheme for synthesis...

  19. Characterization of the Tri10 gene from Fusarium sporotrichioides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tag, Andrew George

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    events. Novozyme 234 (InterSpex Products), 1% driselase (Sigma) and 0.025% chitinase (Sigma). The germlings were then incubated at 28C for 20-60 min with gentle shaking (75-90 rpm) until most of the culture had been converted to protoplasts...

  20. (TWST = Tri-Cities West Building) West Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    PNNL OFFICE 122 PNNL OFFICE 121 PNNL OFFICE 120 PNNL OFFICE 119 PNNL OFFICE 118 PNNL OFFICE 117 PNNL OFFICE 116 PNNL OFFICE 115 PNNL OFFICE 114 PNNL OFFICE 113 PNNL OFFICE 112 PNNL OFFICE 111 PNNL OFFICE 110 LOBBY ELEV 100EL ALCOVE 161C B161ESAHC SHWR 163 PNNL 160 PNNL 168 PNNL 168A PNNL 168B PNNL EQMT

  1. Tri-Party Agreement for Energy Savings Performance Contract ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for resolution. (O&M) recognizes that there will be costs associated with performing preventive maintenance on equipment delivered and installed by (ESCO) and agrees that all...

  2. Tri-Party Agreement for Energy Savings Performance Contract ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to the following responsibilities: |ECM|Warranty Labor|Warranty Material|Operations |Preventive Maintenance|Repair and Replacement| ||| | |Controls|Panels Equipment| |...

  3. Math 741 Final RULES. Try to write efficiently and succinctly.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Passman, Donald S.

    is essential in V , and write W ess V , if W X = 0 for all nonzero submodules X of V . 1. If W ess V and U is a submodule of V , prove that (W U) ess U. 2. If W1 and W2 are essential in V , show that (W1 W2) ess V . 3. Suppose W is a submodule of V . Prove that there exists a submodule W of V such that (W W ) ess V . 4

  4. Testing tri-state and pass transistor circuit structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parikh, Shaishav Shailesh

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    will cause some lines in the circuit to float and take unknown values. A stuck-on control line can cause fighting when the two drivers connected to the same node drive different values. This thesis develops new gate level fault models and dynamic test...

  5. The Value of Green Tri-City Speaker Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tone of coal equivalent annually Avoiding the emission of 78 million tons of CO2 Materials,000 member companies Boston Properties General Electric Corporation Wells Fargo Number of major banks

  6. When alcohol-dependent people try to stop drink-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    some form of treatment. If you or someone you care about may have an alcohol problem, help is available--so they may drink some more, and it becomes a vicious cycle. "Addiction has 3 major problems: You lose your researcher studying new alcoholism treatments. "People develop an alcohol disorder National Institutes

  7. TRI-CITIES, WASHINGTON INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY INDEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of growth such as traffic congestion and high cost of living o Has two factors impeding its technology Government Services and Functions 12 Tax Burden 13 Labor Costs 14 Growth 15 Employment in Technology Firms 16. Nurturing technology firms is thought to be a more cost-effective way of reaching development goals

  8. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas is placed in a sample, then the sample is flooded with water and cooled [Priest et al., 2009]. We have performed a number of tests in which hydrate was formed and the uniformity of the hydrate formation was examined. These tests have primarily used a variety of modifications of the excess gas method to make the hydrate, although we have also used a version of the excess water technique. Early on, we found difficulties in creating uniform samples with a particular sand/ initial water saturation combination (F-110 Sand, {approx} 35% initial water saturation). In many of our tests we selected this combination intentionally to determine whether we could use a method to make the samples uniform. The following methods were examined: Excess gas, Freeze/thaw/form, Freeze/pressurize/thaw, Excess gas followed by water saturation, Excess water, Sand and kaolinite, Use of a nucleation enhancer (SnoMax), and Use of salt in the water. Below, each method, the underlying hypothesis, and our results are briefly presented, followed by a brief conclusion. Many of the hypotheses investigated are not our own, but were presented to us. Much of the data presented is from x-ray CT scanning our samples. The x-ray CT scanner provides a three-dimensional density map of our samples. From this map and the physics that is occurring in our samples, we are able to gain an understanding of the spatial nature of the processes that occur, and attribute them to the locations where they occur.

  9. TRiPoD (Temporal Relationalism incorporating Principles of Dynamics)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward Anderson

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Temporal Relationalism is that there is no time for the universe as a whole at the primary level. Time emerges rather at a secondary level; one compelling idea for this is Mach's: that time is to be abstracted from change. Temporal Relationalism leads to, and better explains, the well-known Frozen Formalism Problem encountered in GR and other background-independent theories at the quantum level. Abstraction from change is then a type of emergent time resolution of this. Moreover, the Frozen Formalism Problem is but one of the many Problem of Time facets, which are notoriously interconnected. The current article concerns modifications of physical formalism which ensure that once Temporal Relationalism is resolved, it stays incorporated. At the classical level, this involves modifying much of the Principles of Dynamics. I first introduce the anti-Routhian to complete the Legendre square of Lagrangian, Hamiltonian and Routhian. I next pass from velocities $\\dot{Q}\\mbox{}^{A}$ to changes d$Q^{A}$. Then Lagrangians are supplanted by Jacobi arc elements, Euler--Lagrange equations by Jacobi--Mach ones, and momentum requires redefining but actions remain unchanged. A differential (d) version of the Hamiltonian is required, giving rise to a variant of the Dirac approach based on a d-almost Hamiltonian subcase of the d-anti Routhian. On the other hand, the forms of the constraints themselves, and of Hamilton--Jacobi theory, remain unaltered.

  10. Which LED Lighting Products Would You Consider Trying? | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell DirectorThe&ManagementEfficiencyEnergy On

  11. Tri-Party Agreement Agencies Annual Hanford Public Involvement Survey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z Site MapTrends, Discovery,TWC-focusedof 17

  12. Quantum Mechanics of a Simulated Tri-hydrogen Dication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. L. Glasser

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Schroedinger equation is solved exactly within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for a simulacrum of the $H_3^{++}$-ion. The ion is assumed to form an isosceles triangle and the ground state energy is obtained over its geometrical parameter space. No multi-center molecular integrations are required. We indicate how the approximation to the actual molecule can be improved systematically.

  13. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    permeability measurements of gas hydrate-bearing sediments,International Conference on Gas Hydrates, edited, p. 1058,2009), Influence of gas hydrate morphology on the seismic

  14. Characterization of the Tri10 gene from Fusarium sporotrichioides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tag, Andrew George

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The trichothecene mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by a variety of fungal genera including Fusarium, Myrothecium, Trichothecium, and Stachybotyris, that are toxic to humans and animals that ingest them by ...

  15. Have You Ever Tried Composting? | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of Energy Completing the OfficeHarris

  16. Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization Tri-Fold |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMake YourDepartment ofC TEnergyosdbu/961641 Office

  17. TriLateral Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector:Shreniksource History View New Pages Recent

  18. A Heart of Gold? Try Platinum | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy:Whether you're a16-17, 2015 |7 Energy

  19. Tri-Party Agreement for Energy Savings Performance Contracts | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergyTransportation Work Package ReportsSouthernof Energy

  20. Tri-Lab Directors' statement on the nuclear posture review

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliancesTrending: Metal Oxo Bonds PrintStatement

  1. Tri-Party Agreement Hanford Public Involvement Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliancesTrending: Metal Oxo Bonds PrintStatement

  2. Microsoft Word - Tri-State Case Study.docx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions forCheneyNovemberi CONTENTSSTATEMENT OF DAVID GEISERFriday,

  3. Name: Lisa Anderson Organization: Tri-City Railroad Company

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck PlatooningJefferson7593 LECTIJHES ONThe Role9085023 Name:

  4. Microsoft Word - Application for Leave Tri-Form.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your HomeOverviewCleanupShipping Form3 AH4University

  5. Tri-County Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTown

  6. A Heart of Gold? Try Platinum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHEEnergyReliability2015GrossA Few Simple Steps forAAAAAAA

  7. Tri State Generation and Transmission Association Inc | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, Indiana (Utility Company)LibraryDatasetsElectricRiverTrexa

  8. Tri-County Elec Member Corp (Tennessee) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, Indiana (Utility Company)LibraryDatasetsElectricRiverTrexaCounty

  9. Tri-State Electric Member Corp (Tennessee) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, Indiana (Utility

  10. Hawkeye Tri-County El Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | Open Energy Information HanergyHarneysource History View

  11. TRI-PARTY AGREEMENT HANFORD PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT PLAN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D Alloys &

  12. InsideIllinoisApril 7, 2005 Vol. 24, No. 18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Jennifer

    was a reporter and columnist for the Chicago Tri- bune from 1972-1980. Geist served as a combat photographer Forrest Assistant Editor Representatives of the American Federa- tion of State County and Municipal Employ

  13. Enhancing the Commissioning Process on Multi-Building Projects with Six Sigma Tools/Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buck, L.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    En ha nc ing Th e C om mi ss ion ing Pr oc es s On Mu lti- Bu ild ing Pr oje cts En ha nc ing Th e C om mi ss ion ing Pr oc es s On Mu lti- Bu ild ing Pr oje cts W ith S ix Si gm a T oo ls/ Te ch niq ue s W ith S ix Si gm a T oo ls/ Te... ari ati on 1. C om mo n C au se Ra nd om /C ha nc e 2. S pe cia l C au se No t R an do m -- As sig na ble Ta rg et Ke y f ac to rs w hic h c on tri bu te to va ria tio n an d a re fe as ibl e t o d ete ct, id en tif y & eli mi na te...

  14. Full field investigation of salt deformation at room temperature: coopera-tion of crystal plasticity and grain sliding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Halite has been extensively studied both as a rock forming mineral with industrial applications (storage) and cyclic loading, owing to a new projected use of salt cavities as storage for com- pressed air, which of pure laboratory salt powder (99,9 %). First, the pow- der was cold pressed during 48 hours

  15. thorie, rnais plutt l'emploi des tubes qui modifient les condi-tions de l'vaporation. E. HAUDI.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    possible l'effet Peltier ; elles ont conlirm la loi de Thomson. Celles de NI. Jahn, au contraire, duraient loi de Thomson relative l'effet Peltier dans le cas de deux mtaux diffrentes, d'un mtal et d semblable celui qui a t dj dcrit (1 ). Les valeurs moyennes de l'efl'et Peltier, lorsqu'on fait

  16. The beaver is nature's original wetland creation and restora-tion expert. Stimulated by the sound of running water, the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Beschta 2008; Diefenderfer and Montgomery 2009), southeastern U.S. blackwater streams (Snodgrass and Meffe

  17. ment of robust recognition in diverse environmental condi-tions through the formulation of a series of speech enhance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Dallas, University of

    of a series of speech enhance Speech Recognition System ment and stress compensationpreprocessingalgorithms iterative speech enhancement [1,2]. Stress compensation al- gorithms are based on formant location, bandwidth, and in- tensity. Enhancement preprocessingincreases recognition by +34% for neutral speech, 18

  18. absorption properties of leaf with minimum scattering contribu-tion. In order to minimize the scattering contribution due to air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bass, Hank W.

    , FLORIDA Florida State University Tom Thumb, a useful popcorn --Bass, HW, Kang, LC, Eyzaguirre, A We have mother cells and found them to be suitable for FISH and immunocytochemical analysis of meiotic prophase. Figure 2 shows that telomeres and several knobs can be detected by 3D FISH carried out as previously

  19. Inverse problem for the identification of Chaos representa-tions of random fields using experimental vibrational tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    to be identified by using an experimental database constituted of vibrational tests related to 100 speci- mens in the frequency band [0-50]kHz. There are 60 sensors measuring accelerations. All the specimens are excited

  20. 10.1 Introdm:tion 10.2 Materi.l, and me,hOO, . 366

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauder, George V.

    , ~;:'ji1 if, .,~ If I"li~~ Fig. I. High_speed cinematography (200-frames sec-I) of feeding Sa/volinus fon

  1. The newesT addiTion To The UniversiTy of MinnesoTa's BioMedical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    Hitecture Minnesotanovember/december 2011 Magnetic personality #12;The glass-walled public areas of the University as a sculptural piece, can be glimpsed through the layered glass walls of a main corridor. 1 lobby 2 clinical in the U's Biomedical Discovery District. "The brick, precast concrete, and curtain wall vocabulary

  2. Summary Human activities are increasing the concentra-tions of atmospheric carbon dioxide ([CO2]) and tropospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to forest soils. Because the quality and quantity of labile and recalcitrant carbon (C) com- pounds, soluble phenolics and condensed tannins. Elevated [CO2] significantly increased lit- ter biomass] and tropospheric [O3] that we observed, combined with changes in litter biomass production, could significantly

  3. Tableau de bord des formaTions de l'universiT de franche-comT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeanjean, Louis

    la formation d'infirmier partir de 2009 en- trane une intgration progressive des lves dans les

  4. nparticulier consulte un architecte pour la construc-tion d'une maison. Plusieurs options lui sont offertes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monasson, Rémi

    sont offertes : une maison de plain-pied ou à un étage, un patio, une terrasse et un garage. Ses goûts et son ban- quier lui dictent plusieurs contraintes : il faut qu'il y ait un étage ou une terrasse, mais pas les deux ; il faut qu'il y ait un garage ou un patio, mais pas les deux ; s'il y a un patio

  5. FIGURE 1 Map of Britain and Ireland showing the main islands men-tioned in the text.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillespie, Rosemary

    Publishing Group). Rautner, M., M. Hardiono, and R.J. Alfred. 2005. Borneo: Treasure Island at risk. Status

  6. tion using complexes formed with 32 mRNA and found that the mRNA segregated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockman, Matthew

    , and thereby contribute to ribosome recycling during termination. Treatment of termi- nation complexes (with 35 S-Metlabeled peptidyl- tRNA) with catalytically inactive eRF1(AGQ): eRF3 led to the formation specificity, taking place only when a stop codon was presented in the A site (Fig. 4C). Canonical recycling

  7. aaltfc tbyatcw tmymi l i n t BU#-M-ir72 Bla Mrttoaal Laboratory April 1*71

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ifaykiar-Mlalam t al. Avallaola on roqoaat froo Itla# Library, Jtiaa national Laboratory (JUa* ibllotak within 50 km from the release point, and it comprises the following types of calcu- lations : a from Ris Library, Rise National Laboratory (Ris Bibliotek, Foregsanlsg Rise), DK-Jfooo Roskilde

  8. alreadydescribed in northern populationsof Alpine Amntor. bu1it is interestingto m a r k it in a Mediterranean population.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donzar, Jos A.

    -131. MARTI,R., A. G~MEZ-MANUNEQUEy J. A. PERALES(1988). lnvernada del Acentor Alpino lPrunelIa colluris Scop. PERALESY A. G~MEZ-MANuNEQUE(1986). Notas sobre la dieta del pollo de Acentor Alpino (Pnmella collaris Scop. G~MEZ-MANZANEQU J. A. PERALES Departamentode Zoologia, C-XV. Facultad de Ciencias. Universidad

  9. Polymer Bulletin 52, 259-266 (2004) DO1 10.1007/~00289-004-0289-6 Polymer BuIletin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Julie P.

    composite materials. #12;260 Both types of carbon nanotubes have unpurified components known as soot. Soot carbon nanotubes was provided by NASA Ames Research Center. The composites were compression molded-wall carbon nanotube composites indicate that soot composites possess lower radiation resistance. Introduction

  10. Search for b->u Transitions inB- -> D0 K- and B- -> D*0 K-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

    2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors search for B{sup -} {yields} {tilde D}{sup 0}K{sup -} and B{sup -} {yields} {tilde D}*{sup 0}K{sup -}, with {tilde D}*{sup 0} {yields} {tilde D}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} or {tilde D}*{sup 0} {yields} {tilde D}{sup 0}{gamma}, and {tilde D}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} (and charge conjugates). These final states can be reached through the b {yields} c transition B{sup -} {yields} D{sup (*)0}K{sup -} followed by the doubly CKM-suppressed D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, or the b {yields} u transition B{sup -} {yields} {bar D}{sup (*)0}K{sup -} followed by the CKM-favored {bar D}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The interference of these two amplitudes is sensitive to the angle {gamma} of the unitarity triangle. The results are based on 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at SLAC. They find no significant evidence for these decays. They set a limit r{sub B} {triple_bond} |A(B{sup -} {yields} {bar D}{sup 0}K{sup -})/A(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}K{sup -})| < 0.23 at 90% C.L. using the most conservative assumptions on the values of the CKM angle {gamma} and the strong phases in the B and D decay amplitudes. In the case of the D* they set a 90% C.L. limit r*{sub B}{sup 2} {triple_bond} |A(B{sup -} {yields} {bar D}*{sup 0}K{sup -})/A(B{sup -} {yields} D*{sup 0} K{sup -})|{sup 2} < (0.16){sup 2} which is independent of assumptions on {gamma} and strong phases.

  11. J. Am. Chem. SOC.1995,117, 3643-3644 i. s-BuLi,TMEDA, THF, -9OOC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudlicky, Tomas

    in ovarian sarcoma and lymphotic leukemia.2c Its natural abundance is low (0.039%of the dry weight of ground. Tetrahedron Lett. 1994, 35, 8295. (0 In additionto our efforts in this area, we are aware, by personal with the protected diene diol 7,which contains the cis- diol unit common to all of the compounds. The trans-diol unit

  12. Nottingham Trent University, Burton Street, Nottingham, NG1 4BU Tel: +44 (0)115 941 8418. 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    (to help digestion and to fill you up without fattening you), water (to contribute to your 2 litres and weight gain Beans, lentils and pulses like chickpeas, kidney beans and baked beans High in fibre. Release

  13. A new triangular finite element for fiber-reinforced composite plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finkel, Herbert Leslie

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3'( + ? = ? + ? -z (2 ? + ? + y) xy 3y 3x 3y 3x BxBy By Bx MZDPLANE NORMAL 3w u 0 ~ DEFORMED NORMAL Figure 1 ? Assumed Deformation Mode for Normals to the Midplane Bu 3w Y ~ + = V xz Bz Bx x Bv 3w V = ? + ? =-Y yz 3z 3y y The stresses in a..., and two shear rotations), one d. o. f. per mid-side node ( transverse deflec- tion), and three d. o. f. at the centroidal node (transverse deflection and two total rotations) . The polynomial ~ 7 6 1 NODES 1 2 3 4 5 7 u', v , w', (t(. , $ , Y , Y...

  14. The non-Gaussian character of gravity wave displacements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickett, Robert E. Lee

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?, it is insuf- fioiscct for the dosysr insight tuto tho process that we recydre. " S. ~ (15) U RAPTER I INEROPUUFXog In Hovsabsr 196l a severe storm ~ ARGUS XKMD Boeosroh Tower ~ 22 vCllss soccthwost of ~ During this stern mcvos up to AA feet in hckght... 14. 5 16 5 7C 17. 5 . 06 2 2 7 15 26 62 -5 93 82 93 C6 83 21 85 81 44 '1 5 18 )7 15 6 6 4 1 1 1200 Ths seoond rex lists the ~ of seconds a Q3n3saian ~bu- tion with the ease mean and warianos weald have spent in ~ble...

  15. A MILD OXIDJ.TION OF ALDEHYDES TO ir,B-LMATURATEU ALDEHYDES David K. Willm~s"' and Klyoshl Nishltani

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, David R.

    led to mixtures. - Notably enol acetates and ethers have been recognized as excellent substrates-hydroxy selenldes which are conven- iently transformed into vinyl selenides, epoxldes, olefins, and allylic alcohols

  16. Hydrolysis of DFP and the Nerve Agent (S)-Sarin by DFPase Proceeds Along Two Different Reaction Pathways: Implica-tions for Engineering Bioscavengers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wymore, Troy W [ORNL] [ORNL; Langan, Paul [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL] [ORNL; Field, Martin J. [Institut de Biologie Structurale Jean-Pierre Ebel] [Institut de Biologie Structurale Jean-Pierre Ebel; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents such as (S)-sarin are among the most highly toxic compounds that have been synthesized. Engineering enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of nerve agents ( bioscavengers ) is an emerging prophylactic approach to diminishing their toxic effects. Although its native function is not known, diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase) from Loligo vulgaris catalyzes the hydrolysis of OP compounds. Here, we investigate the mechanisms of diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) and (S)-sarin hydrolysis by DFPase with quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) umbrella sampling simulations. We find that the mechanism for hydrolysis of DFP involves nucleophilic attack by Asp229 on phosphorus to form a pentavalent intermediate. P F bond dissociation then yields a phosphoacyl enzyme intermediate in the rate-limiting step. The simulations suggest that a water molecule, coordinated to the catalytic Ca2+, donates a proton to Asp121 and then attacks the tetrahedral phosphoacyl intermediate to liberate the diisopropylphosphate product. In contrast, the calculated free energy barrier for hydrolysis of (S)-sarin by the same mechanism is highly unfavorable, primarily due to the instability of the pentavalent phosphoenzyme species. Instead, simulations suggest that hydrolysis of (S)-sarin proceeds by a mechanism in which Asp229 could activate an intervening water molecule for nucleophilic attack on the substrate. These findings may lead to improved strategies for engineering DFPase and related six-bladed -propeller folds for more efficient degradation of OP compounds.

  17. inverter. He is the author or co-author of more than 300 publica-tions in his research fields including the book `Control in Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simes, Marcelo Godoy

    is connected to the grid or to other sources or storage, it can easily approach 100 kW [1]. Very specialized and custom-made wound- rotor schemes enable even higher power. More recently, power electronics and micro supple- ments, and asynchronous injection of power into the grid. Generator Selection for Wind Energy

  18. REPORTSVol. 15, No. 18/0ct. 9, 1969lVancwver8, B.C. RTS CAMPUS EDfTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    tothe Main Mall. These towers will divide the glass curtain walls that will face out onto students now have on topof the Main Mall. To add to visual orientation and empathy, a glass

  19. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. BME-23, NO. 3, MAY 1976 tion of Bayluscide and sodium Pentachlorophenate in the Egypt-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    power sources. Nuclear batteries, biogalvanic fuel cells, and improved chemical cells all show promise-64, 1973. An In Vivo Study of Cardiac Pacemaker Optimization by Pulse Shape Modification RICHARD D. KLAFTER

  20. Charge Transfer in Single Chains of a DonorAcceptor Conjugated Tri-Block Copolymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hooley, Emma N.; Jones, David J.; Greenham, Neil C.

    2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    .; Jung, S.; Huettner, S.; Johnson, K.; Kohn, P.; Sommer, M.; Allard, S.; Scherf, U.; Greenham, N. C. Nano Lett. 2011, 11, 48464851. (9) Bicciocchi, E.; Chen, M.; Rizzardo, E.; Ghiggino, K. P. Polym. Chem. 2012, 4, 5356. (10) Guo, C.; Lin, Y... .-H.; Witman, M. D.; Smith, K. A.; Wang, C.; Hexemer, A.; Strzalka, J.; Gomez, E. D.; Verduzco, R. Nano Lett. 2013, 13, 29572963. (11) Sommer, M.; Huettner, S.; Thelakkat, M. J. Mater. Chem. 2010, 20, 1078810797. (12) Morteani, A. C.; Sreearunothai, P...

  1. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the importance of RSoXS as a unique, powerful tool for examining complex, multi-component systems that could not be characterized with conventional methods. An X-Ray Probe for Soft...

  2. Try an Issue of Business 2.0 Free! Six Technologies That Will Change the World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

    : Haile's solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is more compact and efficient than the direct methanol fuel cell often hailed as the power source of the future. Ronney's "Swiss roll" heat exchanger circulates the SOFC

  3. Assembly and substrate recognition properties of human CCT subunits of the TRiC chaperonin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergeeva, Oksana A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Group II chaperonins are large multi-subunit complexes that fold cytosolic proteins to their native structures. They are composed of two back-to-back rings of 7-9 subunits. The eukaryotic cytosolic type II chaperonin ...

  4. Students try out PPPL plasma physics experiment that can be accessed...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to produce magnetic fusion as a clean and abundant source of energy for generating electricity. "There's nothing like it in the world," said Andrew Zwicker, head of the...

  5. Tri-Cities Research District A place to do business and thrive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Port of Benton, and other economic development partners have of land surrounding the PNNL campus Currently home to 80+ tenants that employ more than 8,000 people-mail: Gary.Spanner@pnnl.gov http://www.pnnl.gov/edo/opportunities/research_ district.stm November 2012 PNNL

  6. Targeted Support Program Attracting outside businesses to the Tri-City region with free service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    What it's all about Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Targeted Support Program (TSP the potential newcomer three staff-hours of PNNL support for each permanent, full-time job brought is eligible for one staff-week of additional laboratory support annually under PNNL's Technology Assistance

  7. Safe conditions for contacting nitric acid or nitrates with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyder, M.L

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request from DOE-SR, the current state of knowledge of the reactions between TBP and aqueous nitrate solutions is critically reviewed, and recommendations are made for the safe operation of SRS separations equipment in which this combination of chemicals may be present. The existing limits for evaporation are validated. Guidelines are presented for cases in which general limits do not apply. The rate of reaction between nitric acid and TBP appears to be controlled by the rate of TBP hydrolysis. The hydrolysis reaction produces dibutyl phosphate and n-butanol. The hydrolysis rate is a strong function of temperature, and becomes very fast at temperatures in the range 130{degrees} to 150{degrees}C. The resulting n-butanol is volatile at high temperatures, boiling at 117.5{degrees}C, but is also subject to exothermic oxidation by nitric acid or nitrates. If oxidation occurs before the n-butanol evaporates, the heat of oxidation may exceed local cooling by convection. The resulting heating will further accelerate the reaction, leading to an energetic runaway and possibly (in confined systems) an explosion. Extensive experiments and practice have shown that in a well-mixed and well-vented aqueous system such as an evaporator, at moderate acidities and temperatures below 130{degrees}C, the heat of reaction is adequately removed by vaporization of steam. In general, the heating will be so slow that natural processes provide adequate cooling at temperatures below 80{degrees}C. Above this temperature, care should be taken to ensure that adequate cooling is available for the amount of TBP that may be present. Experiments suggest that in well-ventilated systems n-butanol evaporation and convective cooling are sufficient to control the reaction at temperatures up to 120{degrees}C.

  8. PREFERENCE QUESTIONNAIRE This year, the REU is trying something new: graduate student volunteers will

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, J. Peter

    time obligations, the groups will be split according to which program students are in (Apprentice, YSP, Sesame). Students in the Apprentice program are expected to attend Block 1 and students in YSP

  9. Reviewer Institution Ahring, Birgitte Kiaer Washington State University Tri-Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Central Washington University Kaplan, Daniel I Savannah River National Laboratory Kayani, Asghar Nawaz National Laboratory Bennett, Brian NMN Medical College of Wisconsin Berhe, Asmeret Asefaw University National Laboratory Goodlett, David R University of Washington Gorman, Brian P Colorado School of Mines

  10. Reach Zones Try this experiment: Place one of your arms out in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , doc- ument stand, folders, staplers, books and other resources that you access regularly. The Tertiary, binders and office resources. Workplace Health and Wellness Monthly Issue Includes Cholesterol Reach Zones oil Olive oil contains antioxidants that can lower your "bad" (LDL) cholesterol but leave your "good

  11. In Sweden, as in many other coun-tries Ethanol is the most wide-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and small and medium sized enterprises is supported from the refinery. The total energy effi- ciency in the bio-energy combined cycle is about 75%. This is almost the same as an oil refinery, in which about 85

  12. Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Buildings at Tri-City Corporate Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Rongxin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    5 Schedules of Lighting and Plug Power Densities onCalibrated Schedules of Lighting and Plug Power Densities onSchedules of Lighting and Plug Power Densities on Weekend

  13. To be more explicit on number 4) below, she wants to try to get...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    meet the emergency and serve the public interest. 1 The Secretary, to ensure that the lights stay on or are restored more quickly in cases of emergency, may order a generator to...

  14. Tri-trophic Analyses of Rice, the Sugarcane Borer, and Putative Biological Control Agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lv, Jiale

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . flavipes. Alam (1980) reported the introduction of C. flavipes and Lixophaga diatraeae (Townsend) (Diptera: Tachinidae), two larval parasitoids, succesfully reduced sugarcane borer injury to sub-economic levels in Barbados. The succesful control...

  15. WSU Tri-Cities Phone Directory Last Name Acker-Hocevar, Michele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    27190 Acker-Hocevar, Michele Aebersold, Andrea Aebersold, Simon Aguilar, Victoria Ahamed, Aftab Ahring

  16. During the past two decades, dozens of coun-tries around the world have implemented

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Kim

    --OOrriieenntteedd IInnffrraassttrruuccttuurree RReeffoorrmm,, 11997777­­11999999 Witold J. Henisz Bennet A. Zelner University of Pennsylvania

  17. Try Beta Log in / create account Thalidomide -Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Daowen

    as an effective tranquiliser and painkiller and was proclaimed as a "wonder drug" for insomnia, coughs, colds

  18. Development of a Robust Tri-Carbide Fueled Reactor for Multimegawatt Space Power and Propulsion Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samim Anghaie; Travis W. Knight; Johann Plancher; Reza Gouw

    2004-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative reactor core design based on advanced, mixed carbide fuels was analyzed for nuclear space power applications. Solid solution, mixed carbide fuels such as (U,Zr,Nb)c and (U,Zr, Ta)C offer great promise as an advanced high temperature fuel for space power reactors.

  19. Tri-City Herald: Japanese Officials See How Hanford Does It

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On opposite sides of the Pacific Ocean, similar work to clean up radioactive contamination is planned to be carried out during the next 40 years. Thursday, officials from the Tokyo Electric Power Co., the utility that operated the Fukushima, Japan, nuclear reactors, toured Hanford to see how work is being done there to clean up contamination from the past production of plutonium for the nation's nuclear weapons program.

  20. California's The state tries afirst-in-the-nationapproach to attackin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Susan L.

    . A Ijevy of bikes at the busy Southern l'.icific Depot in Davis, California--a city that's ahead reinforces good planning concepts." Intleed, the low-carbon lievelopment pattern is nearly identical

  1. Second biennial tri-laboratory engineering conference on modeling and simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference was divided into eight sessions. Session one covered the following topics: material behavior and characterization; computation heat transfer; computational fluid dynamics; and hydrodynamics. Topics covered in session two were: structural dynamics; manufacturing process modeling; solid and structural mechanics; and electromagnetics. Session three topics were: materials behavior and characterization; computational heat transfer; computational fluid dynamics; neutron generators and gas transfer systems applications. Topics for session four were: mesh generation and visualization; validation and verification; and pit manufacturing. Session five covered the following: ALE techniques and applications; solid and structural mechanical; and system applications. The three topics of session six were: optimization methods; manufacturing process modeling; and weapon response in hostile environments. Session covered: material behavior and characterization; computational heat transfer; solid and structural mechanics; and mesh generation and visualization. And finally, the topics of session 8 were: manufacturing and process modeling; solid and structural mechanics; uncertainty analysis; and structural dynamics. Paper covered a range of applications, many of which were weapons and weapon systems.

  2. asc tri-lab environment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CiteSeer Summary: The Inscape Environment is an integrated software development enviroment for building large software systems by large groups of developers. It provides...

  3. Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Buildings at Tri-City Corporate Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Rongxin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Nonresidential Buildings, 1987, 1988, 1992, 1995, 1998,2006. The Application of Building Energy Simulation andTwo High-rise Commercial Buildings in Shanghai, Proceedings

  4. Want to Finance a Wind Farm Project in Your Community? Try Crowdfunding |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartment of Energy ThisWanda

  5. Tri-Party Agreement U.S. Department of Energy Washington State Department of Ecology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z Site MapTrends, Discovery,TWC-focusedof 17

  6. Compositions of doped, co-doped and tri-doped semiconductor materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lynn, Kelvin (Pullman, WA; , Jones, Kelly (Colfax, WA); Ciampi, Guido (Watertown, MA)

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Semiconductor materials suitable for being used in radiation detectors are disclosed. A particular example of the semiconductor materials includes tellurium, cadmium, and zinc. Tellurium is in molar excess of cadmium and zinc. The example also includes aluminum having a concentration of about 10 to about 20,000 atomic parts per billion and erbium having a concentration of at least 10,000 atomic parts per billion.

  7. Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Buildings at Tri-City Corporate Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Rongxin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    funded Demand Response Research Center, a building energyto maximize demand response savings for these buildings. Theapply the demand response strategies in the building on the

  8. Fuel Cell Tri-Generation System Case Study using the H2A Stationary Model |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologies Program (FCTP)Overview FuelStorage, andAgency

  9. NNSA Small Business Week Day 3: Tri-State General Contracting Group, Inc. |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14 FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTHN N E

  10. Students try out high-tech equipment at ASM Materials Camp | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14 FEDERALAmericaAdministration |Security

  11. Advice #231, Proposed Changes to the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) for Central Plate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA, a highly active and stable231,

  12. Lab has a 70th anniversary app-give it a try

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s -Labgrants Decision SciencesLab has a

  13. Tri-fold - Agencies Assisting with EEOICPA and the Former worker Program |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015 - JanuaryTankToledo,Contractor Conversion Rates TrendsDepartment of

  14. Students try out PPPL plasma physics experiment that can be accessed from

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer SolarStructureChallenge

  15. Companhia Energ tica de A car e lcool do Tri ngulo Mineiro Ltda CMAA | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCityCoatedCommunityCompacTec Jump to:AgricolaEnergy

  16. Let's Try That Again: Selling the Teapot Dome Oil Field | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »of EnergyLearningMarch 2015Keep Talking: Women in

  17. $300,000 Block Grant Awarded to Tri-City Industrial Development Council

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of Bad CholesteroliManage#AskEnergySaver: LEDEDTSaving onNew

  18. Science.gov? Try ciencia.science.gov | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 <Department ofDepartment| DepartmentScaleDepartment

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  10. eurohealth Vol 11 No 317 CITIZEN EMPOWERMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    implemented a number of different health system reforms in order to try and halt the inexorable increase in health care costs. This has lead to the strengthening of constraints on funding and the introduc- tion moved to implement a different approach to health care policy based on a system of setting health

  11. Structure and Stability of Matter Tian Ma and Shouhong Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shouhong

    4 4. Interaction Potentials 5 4.1. Gravitational force 5 4.2. Coulomb law 6 4.3. Strong interaction of this article is to try to address such ques- tions as why our universe is as it is from the smallest elementary objective of this article is to offer our view on the structure and stability of matter, and to introduce

  12. STRUCTURE AND STABILITY OF MATTER TIAN MA AND SHOUHONG WANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shouhong

    4 4. Interaction Potentials 5 4.1. Gravitational force 5 4.2. Coulomb law 6 4.3. Strong interaction of this article is to try to address such ques- tions as why our universe is as it is from the smallest elementary objective of this article is to offer our view on the structure and stability of matter, and to introduce

  13. Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also connected to surface waters, and maintains the flow of rivers and streams and the level of wetlands- tion of those along Lake Michigan, most communi- ties, farms and industries still rely on ground water

  14. pdf file

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 30, 2003 ... In this paper we propose a new framework for global exploration which tries ... original problem to observe the transformed function L in a single point. ...... linkage: a family of acceptance/rejection algorithms for global optimisa- tion. ... timization by basin-hopping and the lowest energy structures of lennard-.

  15. Non-linear adaptive robust control of electro-hydraulic systems driven by double-rod actuators BIN YAO{*. FANPING BU{ and GEORGE T. C. CHIU{

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Bin

    Non-linear adaptive robust control of electro-hydraulic systems driven by double-rod actuators BIN may be subjected to non-smooth and discontinuous non- linearities due to control input saturation of hydraulic dynamics which demands the use of non-linear control, hydraulic servosystems also have large

  16. The e ect of router bu er size on the TCP performance K.E. Avrachenkov , U. Ayesta ;y E. Altman ;z , P.Nain , C. Barakat ;x

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .E.S.I.M.O. Centro de Simulacion y Modelos Universidad de Los Andes (U.L.A.) Facultad de Ingeneria, Av. Tulio Febres

  17. Nutritional and Feeding Management of Broodmares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbs, Pete G.; Potter, Gary D.; Vogelsang, M. M.

    2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    performance and abil i ty to moth er strong, healthy foals. Eco nom ic sur viv al often hinges on mares foaling early in the year, rebreeding quickly and nursing a grow ing foal that de vel ops sound- ly. While achiev ing these goals in a herd... of broodmares is dependent upon many factors, nutritional well-be ing is an im por tant part of an effective broodmare op er a tion. Broodmares have specifi c nu tri - tion al re quire ments that differ from other class es of horses. There are differences...

  18. LETTER Communicated by Robert E. Kass The Dependence of Spike Field Coherence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Mark A.

    Kyle Q. Lepage lepage@math.bu.edu Mark A. Kramer mak@bu.edu Uri T. Eden tzvi@math.bu.edu Department also be estimated to assess the relationship between neu- ral spike trains and fields (Jarvis & Mitra

  19. Name Phone Number E-Mail Address Building/Room Department ASWSU, Tri-Cities 509-372-7128 aswsu@tricity.wsu.edu West 136A Associated Students of Washington State University Tri-Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Development Center Ahamed, Aftab 509-372-7697 ahameda@tricity.wsu.edu BSEL 125 Laboratory Coordinator, WSU

  20. BOSTON UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutyra, Lucy R.

    Boston, MA 02215 Phone: (617) 353-3318 Email: mco@bu.edu Web: www.bu.edu/applied-linguistics Program