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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Try This  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Activities Explore Science Explore Explore these Topics Activities Videos Cool Links Favorite Q&A invisible utility element Try This Exercise your science muscles Look around you;...

2

Kentucky & Tennessee TOBACCOProduc tion Guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009-2010 Kentucky & Tennessee TOBACCOProduc tion Guide ID-160 F KENTUCKY COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. University of Kentucky Authors Kenny Seebold, Editor Department of Plant Pathology Bob Pearce, Co of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering 2009-2010 Kentucky & Tennessee TOBACCO Produc tion Guide University

Tennessee, University of

3

commercializaTion office Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology commercializaTion office Agriculture ·Biotechnology ·Blueberries ·Cotton ·Forages Utilization, Renewable Energy ·Algalbiofuels ·Biodiesel ·Biomassengineering ·Biomasspre,skincare,andwoundhealing ·Vaccines Information Technology ·Bioinformaticstools ·Imagerenderingandenhancement ·3

Arnold, Jonathan

4

ument provi d project bu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

project bu trative Costs s and Admin ral support e objectives o d award. Ou on our F&A F&A rate re ty appropriate F&A rate should be applied to a project's Modified Total Direct Cost (MTDC) base. MTDC is usually with rental costs included in the budget and at least 51% of the project must take place in an off

Kelly, Scott David

5

BOSTON UNIVERSITY Policy BU 000-001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Security Management Process Policy ID: BU 000-001 HIPAA Section: 164.308(a)(3) Version: 1.1 Effective Date of these processes and controls. See the Risk Management Policy [BU 000-001B]. 2.3. Sanctions Policy [164.308(a)(1 process for applying appropriate sanctions against workforce members who do not comply with the security

Guenther, Frank

6

BU BRAIN Self Service GRADING PROCEDURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 BU BRAIN Self Service GRADING PROCEDURES FOR FACULTY Updated May 2014/PD #12;2 Table of Contents BRAIN Self Service icon on left side of page: #12;4 Entering Grades: Once in BU BRAIN Self Service, go BRAIN Self Service; Registered ­ student registered through the department). Grade: Student's grade

Suzuki, Masatsugu

7

BOSTON UNIVERSITY Policy BU-100-001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to extreme heat or cold or other potentially harmful environmental conditions. Protect the equipment from theft. 2.5.3. For policies regarding remote access to Boston University's information resources, see Remote Access Policy [BU 100-001A]. #12;

Guenther, Frank

8

nanofabricaTion A Resource for Nanoscience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nanofabricaTion cenTer A Resource for Nanoscience and Technology WorKinG WiTh US be appropriate. These projects are directed to more fundamental nanoscience issues, and provide a basis

Blanchette, Robert A.

9

Sandia National Laboratories: hydrocarbon combus-tion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1development Sandia,evaluatingfullhigher-performance spar caphydrocarbon combus-tion

10

The Tri--Methane Rearrangement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Tri--Methane Rearrangement #12;Cirkva, Vladimir; Zuraw, Michael J.; Zimmerman, Howard E.* Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 #12;INTRODUCTION The tri--methane of a cyclopentene 5a, but only in crystalline medium. However, in the solution photochemistry of tri--methane system

Cirkva, Vladimir

11

The Tri--Methane Rearrangement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Tri--Methane Rearrangement #12;Církva, Vladimír; Zuraw, Michael J.; Zimmerman, Howard E.* Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 #12;INTRODUCTION The tri--methane of a cyclopentene 5a, but only in crystalline medium. However, in the solution photochemistry of tri--methane system

Cirkva, Vladimir

12

Rituels aux divinites locales de Kheng 'Bu li (Bhoutan central)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'ai reu beaucoup de donations en nature".18Padma gling pa ne mentionne donc pas dans sa biographie qu'il a "ouvertla porte" de 'Bu li, pays cach (sbas yul) comme le veut la tradition locale. Or,s'il avait accompli une action aussi prestigieuse... lha de 'Bu li29 et est marie au btsan (skyeslha). Tous les villageois doivent tre propres et sans pollution (grib), ce quiexclut les femmes en priode de menstruations et les personnes ayant eu undcs dans leur maison. Ce lac est en fait le bla...

Pommaret, Franoise

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Roadmap: Finance Bachelor of Business Administration [BU-BBA-FIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Finance ­ Bachelor of Business Administration [BU-BBA-FIN] College of Business Administration Department of Finance Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 30-Aug-12/LNHD Finance 3 C MIS 34060 Operations Management 3 Kent Core Requirement 3 See Kent Core Summary on page 2

Sheridan, Scott

14

Roadmap: Finance Bachelor of Business Administration [BU-BBA-FIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Finance ­ Bachelor of Business Administration [BU-BBA-FIN] College of Business Administration Department of Finance Catalog Year: 2013­2014 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 8-Nov-13/JSK Finance 3 C MIS 34060 Operations Management 3 Kent Core Requirement 3 See Kent Core Summary on page 2

Sheridan, Scott

15

Undergraduate Summer 2013 Federal Work-Study www.bu.edu/seo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Undergraduate Summer 2013 Federal Work-Study www.bu.edu/seo General Information Submit your for a FICA rebate. For FICA rebate criteria, go to the Student Employment website, http://www.bu.edu/seo: 617-353-9200 www.bu.edu/seo #12;Summer 2013 Undergraduate Federal Work-Study Application Priority

Guenther, Frank

16

Haskel/BuTech/PPI | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground SourceHBLEDFriendsHaskel/BuTech/PPI

17

INteRNatIONal BuSINeSS BuSINeSS adMINIStRatION Students will gain critical insights into business operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MINORS INteRNatIONal BuSINeSS BuSINeSS adMINIStRatION Students will gain critical insights into business operations and strategy from accounting, finance, management and marketing coursework. The Business Administration Minor will provide students with fundamental knowledge and exposure to key business

Maxwell, Bruce D.

18

SANDIA COKPOK4TION SANDIA BASE, .QLDUQUERQUE. N. M.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*.MSE&.17- I1/066/04SANDIA COKPOK4TION

19

Mitigating Bu er Over ows by Operating System Randomization 1 Monica Chew Dawn Song  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Bu#11;er Over ow A di#11;erent approach can be used to solve each of the three necessary conditions for successful exploits. These approaches were chosen with the goal of increasing the work factor for successful

Song, Dawn

20

Tri-Generation Success Story: World's First Tri-Gen EnergyStation...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Department, the Fountain Valley energy station is the world's first tri-generation hydrogen energy and electrical power station to provide transportation fuel to the public...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Using the Expertise Web Site http://www.bumc.bu.edu/expertise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;_________________________________Search Term Enter your search term in this textbox Using the Expertise Web Site : Basic Search http searches are project terms from NIH Reporter data and are BU specific Using the Expertise Web Site a Basic Search Establishing and Updating your Expertise Profile Performing an Advanced Search #12

Spence, Harlan Ernest

22

Using the Expertise Web Site http://www.bumc.bu.edu/expertise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;_________________________________Search Term Enter your search term in this textbox Using the Expertise Web Site : Basic Search http searches are project terms from NIH Reporter data and are BU specific Using the Expertise Web Site a Basic Search Updating your Expertise Profile Performing an Advanced Search #12

Spence, Harlan Ernest

23

Roadmap: Managerial Marketing Bachelor of Business Administration [BU-BBA-MMTG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Managerial Marketing ­ Bachelor of Business Administration [BU-BBA-MMTG] College | Last Updated: 8-Nov-13/JSK This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study General Electives (lower or upper division) 6 See note 5 on page 2 #12;Roadmap: Managerial Marketing

Sheridan, Scott

24

Roadmap: Business Management Bachelor of Business Administration [BU-BBA-BMGT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Business Management ­ Bachelor of Business Administration [BU-BBA-BMGT] College of Business Administration Department of Management and Information Systems Catalog Year: 2013­2014 Page 1 Div. Min. Grade Major GPA Important Notes Semester One: [16 Credit Hours] BUS 10123 Exploring Business

Sheridan, Scott

25

Roadmap: Business Management Bachelor of Business Administration [BU-BBA-BMGT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Business Management ­ Bachelor of Business Administration [BU-BBA-BMGT] College of Business Administration Department of Management and Information Systems Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 Div. Min. Grade Major GPA Important Notes Semester One: [16 Credit Hours] BUS 10123 Exploring Business

Sheridan, Scott

26

DuCxyBu;Axx +=+=&Consider the system: Given x(0) and u(t) for t 0. The solution is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the solution is: Du[k]Bu[m]CAx[0]CAy[k] Bu[m]Ax[0]Ax[k] 1k 0m 1mkk 1k 0m 1mkk ++= += - = -- - = -- The main

Hu, Tingshu

27

EFRIGERATION OF FISH -PART 4 PRE PARA TION, FRE EZI NG,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART 4 PRE PARA TION, FRE EZI NG, AND COLD STORAGE OF FISH, SHELLFISH Washington 25, D. C. 1956 REFRI GERATION OF FISH: PART FOUR PREPARATION, FREEZING, AND COLD STORAGE OF FISH

28

Testing tri-state and pass transistor circuit structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tri-state structures are used to implement multiplexers and buses because these structures are faster than AND/OR logic structures. But testing of tri-state structures has some issues associated with it. A stuck open control line of a tri-state gate...

Parikh, Shaishav Shailesh

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Characterization of Tri-lab Tantalum Plate.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed characterization Tri-lab Tantalum (Ta) plate jointly purchased from HCStark Inc. by Sandia, Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Data in this report was compiled from series of material and properties characterization experiments carried out at Sandia (SNL) and Los Alamos (LANL) Laboratories through a leveraged effort funded by the C2 campaign. Results include microstructure characterization detailing the crystallographic texture of the material and an increase in grain size near the end of the rolled plate. Mechanical properties evaluations include, compression cylinder, sub-scale tension specimen, micohardness and instrumented indentation testing. The plate was found to have vastly superior uniformity when compare with previously characterized wrought Ta material. Small but measurable variations in microstructure and properties were noted at the end, and at the top and bottom edges of the plate.

Buchheit, Thomas E.; Cerreta, Ellen K.; Deibler, Lisa Anne; Chen, Shu-Rong; Michael, Joseph R.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

lthough proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers are widely used in the process indus-try, their effectiveness is often limited due to poor tuning. The manual tuning of PID controllers,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A lthough proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers are widely used in the process indus- try, their effectiveness is often limited due to poor tuning. The manual tuning of PID controllers, and it is not desirable to open the process loop for system identifica- tion. Thus, a method for tuning PID parameters

Krstic, Miroslav

31

maintenance. This research is relevant to opera-tions and maintenance challenges facing aging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the need for preventive maintenance or other diagnostic activities on the physical system. Simulationsmaintenance. This research is relevant to opera- tions and maintenance challenges facing aging-benefit of extending the time between overhauls. reducing the probability of a failure in the field. and preventive

32

Tag der InnovaTIon Fokus WerksToFFWIssenschaFTen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tag der InnovaTIon Fokus WerksToFFWIssenschaFTen auFTakTveransTalTung zur MITarbe erfolg. ein beitrag dazu soll der,,Tag der Innovation ­ Fokus Werkstoffwissenschaften" sein, der am 26 des zentralinstitutes für neue Materialien und Prozesstechnik und des Fraunhofer-Institutes ezr

Fiebig, Peter

33

China For all ages a MulTi-generaTional exPloraTion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

China For all ages a MulTi-generaTional exPloraTion The greaT Wall, TerraCoTTa Warriors & The MighCTuresque China Experience the Delights of a Well-Crafted Family Tour Dear Princetonian, Join Princeton Journeys, June 27 ­ July 9, 2013, for a comprehensive tour of China designed with families in mind. Explore

Rowley, Clarence W.

34

SEASONAL V A R IA TIONS IN STRUCTURE AND CIRCULATION IN THE RED SEA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEASONAL V A R IA TIONS IN STRUCTURE AND CIRCULATION IN THE RED SEA A DISSERTATION SUBMITTE D and surface circulation in the Red Sea, occur r ing along the north-south axis of the Sea and extending fr om on in the northern Red Sea is frorn the nor th-northwest throughout the year' during the winter ( fr om October

Luther, Douglas S.

35

Harvesting, Curing, Stripping, and Marketing 8 2008 Burley ToBacco ProducTion Guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harvesting, Curing, Stripping, and Marketing 8 2008 Burley ToBacco ProducTion Guide HARVESTING, CURING, STRIPPING, AND MARkETING Danny R. Peek, Extension Specialist, Burley Tobacco Harvesting Growers should only harvest mature, ripe tobacco. Burley tobac- co usually matures and is ready for harvest three

Liskiewicz, Maciej

36

Cooperative Spectrum Sensing and Localiza-tion in Cognitive Radio Systems using Com-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooperative Spectrum Sensing and Localiza- tion in Cognitive Radio Systems using Com- pressed features in cog- nitive radio systems (CRS): spectrum sensing and location awareness in a single compressed implementing a cognitive radio system. The major problem for spectrum sensing arises in wideband radio, when

Gesbert, David

37

Tri-Cities Index of Innovation and Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2001 and 2004, the Economic Development Office of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory published companion reports to the Washington Technology Center Index studies that provided additional information on the Tri-Cities (Kennewick-Richland-Pasco) area of the state, its technology businesses, and important advantages that the Tri-Cities have as places to live and do business. These reports also compared the Tri-Cities area to other technology-based metropolitan areas in the Pacific Northwest and nation along critical dimensions known to be important to technology firms. This report updates the material in these earlier reports, and highlights a growing Tri-Cities metropolitan area.

Fowler, Richard A.; Scott, Michael J.; Butner, Ryan S.

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

38

BUSINESS SENSITIVE 1 Tri-Cities Research District  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUSINESS SENSITIVE 1 Tri-Cities Research District Speaker Series: Advancing Research Parks networking. Shady Grove Life Sciences Park (Montgomery County, MD) Research Triangle Park Live

39

Tri-Party Agreement Template and Sample Tri-Party Agreement | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyThe EnergyDepartment7 thFuel27, 2008,Inc.Energy Tri-Party

40

PECIAL REPORS T Tri-County Health Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PECIAL REPORS T Tri-County Health Department in Colorado Does More Than Just Review and benefits of land use choices and improve the quality of land use decision making. Background Tri-County counties of the metropolitan Denver area, has offered development review services to its jurisdictions

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

(TWST = Tri-Cities West Building) West Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elevator (TWST = Tri-Cities West Building) West Building 1st Floor Stage to parking lot Nursing TV Parking Lot and Cougar Garden Admissions Elevator Elevator Commons To the East Building Mac Lab Vet Center Professional Programs Student Affairs Nursing Lab Media Services Lobby West Building 2nd Floor (TWST = Tri

Collins, Gary S.

42

TFC-0004- In the Matter of Tri-Valley CARES  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Tri-Valley CARES filed an Appeal from a determination that the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) issued on June 2, 2010. In that determination, NNSA denied in part a request for information that Tri-Valley CARES had submitted on September 8, 2008, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. 552.

43

The Tri--methane Rearrangement: Mechanistic and Exploratory Organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Tri--methane Rearrangement: Mechanistic and Exploratory Organic Photochemistry1 Howard E zimmerman@bert.chem.wisc.edu Received May 31, 2000 ABSTRACT The di--methane rearrangement is firmly established as a mode of synthesizing three-membered-ring compounds. We now report the tri-- methane

Cirkva, Vladimir

44

Search for b?u transitions in B?[K????]DK decays  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We present a study of the decays B?DK with D mesons reconstructed in the K????? or K????? final states, where D indicates a D? or a D0 meson. Using a sample of 47410? BB pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e?e? collider at SLAC, we measure the ratios R?((?(B?[K????]DK))/((?(B?[K????]DK)). We obtain R?=(5?12?10(stat)?2?4(syst))10? and R?=(12?12?10(stat)?3?5(syst))10?, from which we extract the upper limits at 90% probability: R?B of the magnitudes of the b?u and b?c amplitudes rB<0.13 at 90% probability.

Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu.?G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu.?I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K.?Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Buenger, C.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schrder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Santoro, V.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Vavra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

DARS is a BU Brain program that provides you with a report of your progress toward completing your degree.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DARS is a BU Brain program that provides you with a report of your progress toward completing your degree. DARS shows you what classes you have taken and how they fulfill degree requirements. It also shows you what classes fulfill degree requirements. You can use DARS to track your progress

Suzuki, Masatsugu

46

We welcome your application for internal transfer/dual degree to the Decker School of Nursing, and encourage you to obtain more information and academic advising before you complete the online application via BU BRAIN.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

application via BU BRAIN. APPLICATION PROCESS Applications for IUT or DD admission must be submitted online via the BU BRAIN to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions by March 15 for fall admission. Decker does and Physiology II ACADEMIC QUESTIONS? Before completing the online application via BU BRAIN, please direct your

Suzuki, Masatsugu

47

Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers Print Wednesday, 30 May 2012 00:00 In principle, tri-block copolymers...

48

Tri-Cities research may help biofuels take flight  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monthly economic diversity column for the Tri-City Herald. Excerpt: If you stop and think about it, some pretty interesting stuff has roots in the Tri-Cities, but reaches far beyond. Many Tri-Citians have gone on to be professional athletes, entertainers, scientists and engineers, doctors, lawyers, and humanitarians to name just a few. And a lot of groundbreaking discoveries - many born of strategic collaborations resulting from purposeful economic development efforts - have emerged from work at our local national laboratory. Just recently, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory entered into a $2M collaboration with Seattle biofuel producer Imperium Renewables and other partners to develop a new method to make renewable jet fuels. Successful development of the catalytic process, which converts biomass-based alcohols into renewable drop-in jet fuels, could lead to additional renewable jet fuel production facilities being built and operated in the Pacific Northwest.

Madison, Alison L.

2011-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

49

RENEWAL THEORY IN ANALYSIS OF TRIES AND SVANTE JANSON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RENEWAL THEORY IN ANALYSIS OF TRIES AND STRINGS SVANTE JANSON To my colleague and friend Allan Gut on the occasion of his retirement Abstract. We give a survey of a number of simple applications of renewal theory been realized that renewal theory is a useful tool in the study of random strings and related

Janson, Svante

50

Tri-Met's Experience With Automatic Passenger Counter and Automatic Vehicle Location Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on an earlier draft. #12;Introduction The Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation District of Oregon (TriTri-Met's Experience With Automatic Passenger Counter and Automatic Vehicle Location Systems James State University Portland, OR 97207 This report is benefited from interviews of Tri-Met staff involved

Bertini, Robert L.

51

he Web, as we know it, is a collec-tion of human-readable pages that  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of languages such as the Resource Description Framework (RDF), DAML+OIL, and the more recent Web OntologyT he Web, as we know it, is a collec- tion of human-readable pages that are virtually Web and proposed industry standards for Web services. The SemanticWeb forWeb Services One objective

Yu, Bin

52

Summary We examined the effects of increased transpira-tion demand on xylem hydraulic conductivity and vulnerabil-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in response to high evaporative demand and prevent xylem tensions from reaching values that cause catastrophicSummary We examined the effects of increased transpira- tion demand on xylem hydraulic conductivity potential and water potential differences between the soil and the shoot were similar for desert and montane

Maherali, Hafiz

53

The newesT addiTion To The UniversiTy of MinnesoTa's BioMedical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The newesT addiTion To The UniversiTy of MinnesoTa's BioMedical discovery disTricT is designed The BUilding's collegial and physical relaTionship To neighBoring faciliTies in The U's BioMedical discovery in the U's Biomedical Discovery District. "The brick, precast concrete, and curtain wall vocabulary

Weiblen, George D

54

Eclipse mapping of RW Tri in the low luminosity state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyzed the eclipse light curve of the nova-like star RW Tri in its low luminosity state. During approximately 150 days, RW Tri was about one magnitude fainter than in its usual state. Our eclipse map shows that the brightness temperature in the disc ranges from 19000 K near the white dwarf to 8700 at the disc edge. For the inner parts of accretion disc, the radial temperature distribution is flatter than that predicted from the steady state models, and for the outer parts, it is close to the R^(-3/4) law. Fitting of the temperature distribution with one for the steady state disc model gives a mean accretion rate of (3.85+-0.19) 10^{-9} M year^(-1). The hotspot in the disc is placed at a distance of 0.17a from the white dwarf, where a is the orbital separation.

A. V. Halevin; A. A. Henden

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

55

Tri-County Electric Coop, Inc (Florida) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformationKentucky) Jump to:Tri-County

56

Formation of ordered films of axially bridged aluminum phthalocyanine [(tBu){sub 4}PcAl]{sub 2}O via magnetic field-induced reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ?-(oxo)bis[tetra-tert-butylphthalocyaninato] aluminum(III) [(tBu){sub 4}PcAl]{sub 2}O films with the crystallites oriented preferably in one direction were obtained via chemical transformation of tetra-tert-butylsubstituted chloroaluminum(III) phthalocyanine (tBu){sub 4}PcAlCl film upon its annealing in magnetic field. A comparative analysis of the influence of post-deposition annealing process without and under applied magnetic field of 1 T, on the orientation and morphology of (tBu){sub 4}PcAlCl and [(tBu){sub 4}PcAl]{sub 2}O films, has been carried out by the methods of UV-vis, Infrared and Raman spectroscopies, XRD as well as atomic force microscopy. The formation of [(tBu){sub 4}PcAl]{sub 2}O films with elongated crystallites having preferential orientation was observed upon heating of the films in magnetic field while annealing without magnetic field under the same conditions does not demonstrate any effect on the structure and morphology of these films. The reasons of the sensitivity of this reaction to the presence of such magnetic field is discussed and studied by electronic paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

Basova, Tamara, E-mail: basova@niic.nsc.ru; Berezin, Aleksei; Nadolinny, Vladimir [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Lavrentiev Pr., 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)] [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Lavrentiev Pr., 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Peisert, Heiko; Chass, Thomas [Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Auf der Morgenstelle 18, 72076 Tbingen (Germany)] [Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Auf der Morgenstelle 18, 72076 Tbingen (Germany); Banimuslem, Hikmat; Hassan, Aseel [Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom)] [Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom)

2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

57

Tri-Party Agreement databases, access mechanism and procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the information required for the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to access databases related to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order [also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA)] (Ecology et al. 1992). It identifies the procedure required to obtain access to the Hanford computer networks and the TPA related databases. It addresses security requirements, access methods, database availability dates, database access procedures, and the minimum computer hardware and software configurations required to operate within the Hanford networks.

Brulotte, P.J.; Christensen, K.C.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

TRI State Motor Transit to Resume Shipping Waste to WIPP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign Object DamageSystemsU.S.EnergyTri-State Motor Transit

59

Tri-Party Agreement Agencies Annual Hanford Public Involvement Survey  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2TopoPortal Hydrogen andTrent Tuckerof 17 Tri-Party

60

Tri-County Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformationKentucky) Jump to: navigation,Tri-County

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Tri-County Electric Coop Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformationKentucky) Jump to:Tri-County Electric

62

Tri-County Electric Coop, Inc (Oklahoma) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformationKentucky) Jump to:Tri-CountyOklahoma)

63

Tri-County Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformationKentucky) Jump to:Tri-CountyOklahoma)Inc

64

High Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H2...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H2 from Biogas High Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H2 from Biogas Success story about using waste water...

65

An Analysis of Client Satisfaction and Company Efficiency at Tri Lake Consultants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

meetings. County of Riverside In the past, Tri Lake providedTri Lake currently has contracts with the Cities of Perris, San Jacinto, Canyon Lake, Menifee, and the CountyCounty Sheriff Department. The low level of interaction and impact between Tri

Sunde, Christopher Nathan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The Behaviour of STeel ColumnS in fire Material -Cross-seCtional CapaCity -ColuMn BuCkling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Behaviour of STeel ColumnS in fire Material - Cross-seCtional CapaCity - ColuMn BuIch december 2012 #12;#12;Structural stability and the general behaviour of steel structures can be described during a fire influence the behaviour of steel structures markedly. Significant advances have been made

Giger, Christine

67

Hanford Diversification and the Tri-Cities Economy FY 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The missions of the U.S. Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office (DOE/RL) are to safely manage the Hanford Site, to manage and clean up its legacy wastes, and to develop and deploy new science and technology in the environmental and energy fields. Collectively, DOE/RL and its contractors are the most important single entity in the Tri-Cities local economy (Pasco, Kennewick, and Richland, Washington, and the surrounding area). Although the relevant economic region affected by DOE/RL and its contractors actually embraces a geographic area reaching from Yakima in the west to Walla Walla in the east and from Moses Lake in the north to Pendleton, Oregon, in the south, over 90% of economic impacts likely occur in Benton and Franklin Counties. These two counties are defined as the ''local'' Tri-Cities economy for purposes of this study. In the federal fiscal year (FY) 1999 (October 1, 1998 through September 30, 1999), the total impact of DOE'S local $1.59 billion budget was felt through payrolls of $542 million and local purchases of goods and services of $226 million. The total local spending of $768 million was up slightly from the FY 1998 total of $765 million. Taking into account the multiplier effects of this spending, the DOE/RL budget sustained an estimated 32% of all local employment (28,250 out of 88,100 jobs) and about 35% of local earned income (almost $1.08 billion out of $3.08 billion). The decrease in these percentages from last year's report reflects an update of the model's economic structure based on the 1997 economic census year, a correction of a programming error in the model found during the update, and a broader definition of earnings that includes proprietor income, not just wages (see the Appendix for revisions to the previous forecasts). DOE budget increases in FY 2000 are expected to result in no change to the number of local DOE contractor jobs and about a $29 million increase in direct local spending.

SCOTT, M.J.

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

68

Yukawa and Tri-scalar Processes in Electroweak Baryogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive the contributions to the quantum transport equations for electroweak baryogenesis due to decays and inverse decays induced by tri-scalar and Yukawa interactions. In the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), these contributions give rise to couplings between Higgs and fermion supermultiplet densities, thereby communicating the effects of CP-violation in the Higgs sector to the baryon sector. We show that the decay and inverse decay-induced contributions that arise at zeroth order in the strong coupling, \\alpha_s, can be substantially larger than the O(\\alpha_s) terms that are generated by scattering processes and that are usually assumed to dominate. We revisit the often-used approximation of fast Yukawa-induced processes and show that for realistic parameter choices it is not justified. We solve the resulting quantum transport equations numerically with special attention on the impact of Yukawa rates and study the dependence of the baryon-to-entropy ratio Y_B on MSSM parameters.

Cirigliano, V; Ramsey-Musolf, M J; Tulin, S; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Lee, Christopher; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.; Tulin, Sean

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Pressure Build-Up During the Fire Test in Type B(U) Packages Containing Water - 13280  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The safety assessment of packages for the transport of radioactive materials with content containing liquids requires special consideration. The main focus is on water as supplementary liquid content in Type B(U) packages. A typical content of a Type B(U) package is ion exchange resin, waste of a nuclear power plant, which is not dried, normally only drained. Besides the saturated ion exchange resin, a small amount of free water can be included in these contents. Compared to the safety assessment of packages with dry content, attention must be paid to some more specific issues. An overview of these issues is provided. The physical and chemical compatibility of the content itself and the content compatibility with the packages materials must be demonstrated for the assessment. Regarding the mechanical resistance the package has to withstand the forces resulting from the freezing liquid. The most interesting point, however, is the pressure build-up inside the package due to vaporization. This could for example be caused by radiolysis of the liquid and must be taken into account for the storage period. If the package is stressed by the total inner pressure, this pressure leads to mechanical loads to the package body, the lid and the lid bolts. Thus, the pressure is the driving force on the gasket system regarding the activity release and a possible loss of tightness. The total pressure in any calculation is the sum of partial pressures of different gases which can be caused by different effects. The pressure build-up inside the package caused by the regulatory thermal test (30 min at 800 deg. C), as part of the cumulative test scenario under accident conditions of transport is discussed primarily. To determine the pressure, the temperature distribution in the content must be calculated for the whole period from beginning of the thermal test until cooling-down. In this case, while calculating the temperature distribution, conduction and radiation as well as evaporation and condensation during the associated process of transport have to be considered. This paper discusses limiting amounts of water inside the cask which could lead to unacceptable pressure and takes into account saturated steam as well as overheated steam. However, the difficulties of assessing casks containing wet content will be discussed. From the authority assessment point of view, drying of the content could be an effective way to avoid the above described pressure build-up and the associated difficulties for the safety assessment. (authors)

Feldkamp, Martin; Nehrig, Marko; Bletzer, Claus; Wille, Frank [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 44, 12205 Berlin (Germany)] [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 44, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Campus Sustainability Planetary Health Ecological Design Social and Environmental Enterprise Incuba-tion EcoVillages Sustainable Food Systems Ecoliteracy Solutions Journal Campus Systems Model Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Villages Sustainable Food Systems Ecoliteracy Solutions Journal Campus Systems Model Energy Conservation, Efficiency1 Campus Sustainability Planetary Health Ecological Design Social and Environmental Enterprise Incuba- tion EcoVillages Sustainable Food Systems Ecoliteracy Solutions Journal Campus Systems Model

Hayden, Nancy J.

71

CUSSSFIC4TION CMUXLLq  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -MiamiYVE r.x-L* d! CT NC0 - i

72

The SpallaTion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Energy TechnicalFlowNationTheDepartmentDepartmentGrid:

73

Try-A Global Database of Plant Traits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plant traits the morphological, anatomical, physiological, biochemical and phenological characteristics of plants and their organs determine how primary producers respond to environmental factors, affect other trophic levels, influence ecosystem processes and services and provide a link from species richness to ecosystem functional diversity. Trait data thus represent the raw material for a wide range of research from evolutionary biology, community and functional ecology to biogeography. Here we present the global database initiative named TRY, which has united a wide range of the plant trait research community worldwide and gained an unprecedented buy-in of trait data: so far 93 trait databases have been contributed. The data repository currently contains almost three million trait entries for 69 000 out of the world s 300 000 plant species, with a focus on 52 groups of traits characterizing the vegetative and regeneration stages of the plant life cycle, including growth, dispersal, establishment and persistence. A first data analysis shows that most plant traits are approximately log-normally distributed, with widely differing ranges of variation across traits. Most trait variation is between species (interspecific), but significant intraspecific variation is also documented, up to 40% of the overall variation. Plant functional types (PFTs), as commonly used in vegetation models, capture a substantial fraction of the observed variation but for several traits most variation occurs within PFTs, up to 75% of the overall variation. In the context of vegetation models these traits would better be represented by state variables rather than fixed parameter values. The improved availability of plant trait data in the unified global database is expected to support a paradigm shift from species to trait-based ecology, offer new opportunities for synthetic plant trait research and enable a more realistic and empirically grounded representation of terrestrial vegetation in Earth system models.

Thornton, Peter E [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biomolecular materials to structured electrolytes for lithum-ion batteries and supercapacitors. Drawings of 12 possible morphologies Varying morphologies of linear tri-block...

75

Atomistic Study of the Migration of Di- and Tri-Interstitials...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

silicon is performed using classical molecular dynamics simulations with a Stillinger-Weber potential. At first the structures and energetics of the di- and the tri-interstitial...

76

Tri-County solid waste-to-fuel production project feasibility study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analysis and preliminary findings of refuse-derived fuel and recovered components markets are presented. Other topics covered are: municipal solid waste composition, quantity and constraints; technical assessment and capital cost assessment; economic feasibility of burning process residue to generate steam; review of commercially available equipment for the densification of refuse-derived fuel; final pre-feasibility analysis for the Tri-County Municipal Solid Waste to Fuel Production Project; preliminary economic and sensitivity analysis for the Tri-County Project; risks assessment for the Tri-County Project; and environmental, health, safety, and socioeconomic assessment for the Tri-County Project. (MHR)

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Tri-Laboratory Linux Capacity Cluster 2007 SOW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program (formerly know as Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative, ASCI) has led the world in capability computing for the last ten years. Capability computing is defined as a world-class platform (in the Top10 of the Top500.org list) with scientific simulations running at scale on the platform. Example systems are ASCI Red, Blue-Pacific, Blue-Mountain, White, Q, RedStorm, and Purple. ASC applications have scaled to multiple thousands of CPUs and accomplished a long list of mission milestones on these ASC capability platforms. However, the computing demands of the ASC and Stockpile Stewardship programs also include a vast number of smaller scale runs for day-to-day simulations. Indeed, every 'hero' capability run requires many hundreds to thousands of much smaller runs in preparation and post processing activities. In addition, there are many aspects of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) that can be directly accomplished with these so-called 'capacity' calculations. The need for capacity is now so great within the program that it is increasingly difficult to allocate the computer resources required by the larger capability runs. To rectify the current 'capacity' computing resource shortfall, the ASC program has allocated a large portion of the overall ASC platforms budget to 'capacity' systems. In addition, within the next five to ten years the Life Extension Programs (LEPs) for major nuclear weapons systems must be accomplished. These LEPs and other SSP programmatic elements will further drive the need for capacity calculations and hence 'capacity' systems as well as future ASC capability calculations on 'capability' systems. To respond to this new workload analysis, the ASC program will be making a large sustained strategic investment in these capacity systems over the next ten years, starting with the United States Government Fiscal Year 2007 (GFY07). However, given the growing need for 'capability' systems as well, the budget demands are extreme and new, more cost effective ways of fielding these systems must be developed. This Tri-Laboratory Linux Capacity Cluster (TLCC) procurement represents the ASC first investment vehicle in these capacity systems. It also represents a new strategy for quickly building, fielding and integrating many Linux clusters of various sizes into classified and unclassified production service through a concept of Scalable Units (SU). The programmatic objective is to dramatically reduce the overall Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) of these 'capacity' systems relative to the best practices in Linux Cluster deployments today. This objective only makes sense in the context of these systems quickly becoming very robust and useful production clusters under the crushing load that will be inflicted on them by the ASC and SSP scientific simulation capacity workload.

Seager, M

2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

78

Tri-County High School Exhibition Call for Entries Wayne State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tri-County High School Exhibition Call for Entries Wayne State University James Pearson Duffy for its Tri-County High School Exhibition. The exhibition dates are March 2 ­ March 23, 2012 counties. ABOUT THE GALLERY The Art Department Gallery hosts annual undergraduate exhibitions, provides

Berdichevsky, Victor

79

Final Characterization Report for Corrective Action Unit 109: Area 2 U-2BU Crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit 109, Area 2 U-2bu Crater, is an inactive Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part A Permit disposal unit located in Area 2 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The Corrective Action Unit has been characterized under the requirements of the Nevada Test Site Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part A Permit (NDEP, 1995) and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 265 (CFR, 1996). The site characterization was performed under the RCRA Part A Permit Characterization Plan for the U-2bu Subsidence Crater (DOE/NV, 1998c), as approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (Liebendorfer, 1998). The primary objective of the site characterization activities was to evaluate the presence, concentration, and extent of any Resource Conservation and Recovery Act contaminants in the crater. Surface soil samples were collected on April 22, 1998, and subsurface soil samples and geotechnical samples were collected from April 27-29, 1998. Soil samples were collected using a hand auger or a piston-type drive hammer to advance a 5-centimeter (2-inch) diameter steel sampling tool into the ground. The permit for the Nevada Test Site requires that Corrective Action Unit 109 be closed under 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265 Subpart G and 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 265.310 (CFR, 1996). Analysis of the data collected during the characterization effort indicates that lead was detected in Study Area 1 at 5.7 milligrams per liter, above the regulatory level in 40 Code of Federal Regulations 261.24 of 5.0 milligrams per liter. Except for the lead detection at a single location within the crater, the original Resource Conservation Recovery Act constituents of potential concern determined between the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office and the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection during the Data Quality Objectives process (DOE/NV, 1998b) were not found to be present at Corrective Action Unit 109 above regulatory levels of concern. The single lead detection that exceeded regulatory limits was discovered at a depth of 1.2 meters (4 feet) in Study Area 1. Total petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in Study Area 4 at two locations at concentrations of 130 and 190 milligrams per kilogram. These concentrations exceed the 100 milligram per kilogram action level established in Nevada Administrative Code 445A.2272 (NAC, 1996). The primary conceptual model identified during the Data Quality Objectives process appears to have been substantiated by the analytical results from site characterization; migration of contaminants of potential concern does not appear to be occurring, as none were detected in a significant percentage of the characterization samples. Based on the results of the characterization, clean closure by removal and disposal of impacted soil will be evaluated in the closure plan to address Study Area 1. An (a) through (k) analysis, as specified in Nevada Administrative Code 445A.227, should be used to evaluate total petroleum hydrocarbon contamination within Study Area 4. Study Areas 2, 3, and 5 should be clean closed without further assessment or remediation (see Figures 2-1 and 5-1 in the Characterization Report).

ITLV

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Technology transfer and commercialization initiatives at TRI/Austin: Resources and examples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Located at TRI/Austin, and operated under a Department of Defense contract, is the Nondestructive Testing Information Analysis Center (NTIAC). This is a full service Information Analysis Center sponsored by the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC), although services of NTIAC are available to other government agencies, government contractors, industry and academia. The principal objective of NTIAC is to help increase the productivity of the nation`s scientists, engineers, and technical managers involved in, or requiring, nondestructive testing by providing broad information analysis services of technical excellence. TRI/Austin is actively pursuing commercialization of several products based on results from outside funded R and D programs. As a small business, TRI/Austin has limited capabilities for large scale fabrication, production, marketing or distribution. Thus, part of a successful commercialization process involves making appropriate collaboration arrangements with other organizations to augment TRI/Austin`s capabilities. Brief descriptions are given here of two recent commercialization efforts at TRI/Austin.

Matzkanin, G.A.; Dingus, M.L. [Texas Research Institute, Austin, Inc., TX (United States). Nondestructive Testing Information Analysis Center

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

GL Report BU 355  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MC BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT ( IN THOUSANDS) CRSP MC CRSP MC BUDGET BUDGET FY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 TOTAL DESCRIPTION ACTIVITY ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGET OBS EXPEND OBS...

82

GL Report BU 355  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RMR BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT ( IN THOUSANDS) RMR RMR BUDGET BUDGET FY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 Total DESCRIPTION ACTIVITY ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS BUDGET OBS EXPEND OBS OCT...

83

GL Report BU 355  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DSW BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT ( IN THOUSANDS) DSW DSW BUDGET BUDGET FY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 Total DESCRIPTION ACTIVITY ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS BUDGET OBS EXPEND OBS OCT...

84

GL Report BU 355  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

15 4 11 13 15 - - - - - - - - Conserv & Renew Energy NFJCR CAREM 5 2 1 1 5 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ...

85

GL Report BU 355  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

29 5 16 22 29 - - - - - - - - Conserv & Renew Energy NFGCR CAREM 4 3 3 11 9 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ...

86

GL Report BU 355  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - Conserv & Renew Energy NFLCR CAREM 135 110 168 122 166 16 12 28 4 6 24 28 - - - - - - ...

87

GL Report BU 355  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun with Big SkyDIII-D PerformanceGEGE,1|ResearchMC

88

GL Report BU 355  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun with Big SkyDIII-D

89

GL Report BU 355  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun with Big SkyDIII-DRMR BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT ($ IN

90

Towards an InTerdIscIplInary approach To nexT-GeneraTIon BIofuels EnvironmEntal, tEchno-Economic, and GovErnancE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards an InTerdIscIplInary approach To nexT-GeneraTIon BIofuels EnvironmEntal, t. 2010. The Ecological Impact of Biofuels. Pages 351-377 in D. J. Futuyma, H. B. Shafer, and D. Huffer, S., Roche, C.M., Blanch, H.W., and Clark, D.S. (2012). Escherichia coli for biofuel production

Iglesia, Enrique

91

This paper proposes a method for classification and discrimina-tion of textures based on the energies of image subbands. We  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the dimension of the discriminant space and number of energy mea- sures used for classification. We hopeAbstract This paper proposes a method for classification and discrimina- tion of textures based on the energies of image subbands. We show that even with this relatively simple feature set, effective texture

Chang, Shih-Fu

92

Tri-County Electric Cooperative- Energy Efficient Water Heater Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Tri-County Electric Cooperative offers a $75 rebate on the purchase of energy-efficient electric water heaters. The rebate is valid for new or replacement units which have an Energy Factor Rating...

93

The sequence and characterization of TRI1, a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase involved in T-2 toxin biosynthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% 22 P1 hyg B 900 bp 300 bp TRI1 pIKE9 FIG. 5. The TRI1 complementation vector. The plasmid plKE9, contains a 3. 2 kb genomic fragment of TRI1, which is flanked by the P1:hyg B cassette. 23 Novozyme 234 (InterSpex Products), 1 /o driselase...

Meek, Isaac Burton

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Tri-party agreement databases, access mechanism and procedures. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the information required for the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to access databases related to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). It identifies the procedure required to obtain access to the Hanford Site computer networks and the Tri-Party Agreement related databases. It addresses security requirements, access methods, database availability dates, database access procedures, and the minimum computer hardware and software configurations required to operate within the Hanford Site networks. This document supersedes any previous agreements including the Administrative Agreement to Provide Computer Access to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Administrative Agreement to Provide Computer Access to Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), agreements that were signed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) in June 1990, Access approval to EPA and Ecology is extended by RL to include all Tri-Party Agreement relevant databases named in this document via the documented access method and date. Access to databases and systems not listed in this document will be granted as determined necessary and negotiated among Ecology, EPA, and RL through the Tri-Party Agreement Project Managers. The Tri-Party Agreement Project Managers are the primary points of contact for all activities to be carried out under the Tri-Party Agreement. Action Plan. Access to the Tri-Party Agreement related databases and systems does not provide or imply any ownership on behalf of Ecology or EPA whether public or private of either the database or the system. Access to identified systems and databases does not include access to network/system administrative control information, network maps, etc.

Brulotte, P.J.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Hanford and the Tri-Cities Economy: Historical Trends 1970-2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This white paper examines the effect that the Hanford Site has had on the Tri-Cities economy from 1970-2008. Total area employment levels, population, and the real estate market are compared to DOE contractor employment and funding levels, which tended to follow each other until the mid-1990s. Since 1994, area employment, total incomes, population and the real estate market have increased significantly despite very little changes in Hanford employment levels. The data indicate that in recent history, the Tri-Cities economy has become increasingly independent of Hanford.

Fowler, Richard A.; Scott, Michael J.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

How to Obtain Your DARS to Declare the BA Economics Major Once you've logged into the BU Brain and entered your B#, you will need to do the following  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How to Obtain Your DARS to Declare the BA Economics Major Once you've logged into the BU Brain DARS" The following screen prints will show you how to run the pre-declaration DARS for Economics the "Economics Pre-Declaration" DARS appears. Click "Economics Pre-Declaration" to open. Print the entire

Suzuki, Masatsugu

97

TRI-M]AL ELECTRIC FIELD I'MASIJRN$NTS FOR DETERMII.IINGDEEP OCEANWATERMOTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRI-M]AL ELECTRIC FIELD I'MASIJRN$NTS FOR DETERMII.IINGDEEP OCEANWATERMOTIONS: TECHNIQUESAND A PREL OF THE by G e o r g e H . S u t t o n #12;I \\ t ABSTRACT Deep ocean electric field neasureEents provide information on oceanic water uotions and on the electrical conductivity sEructure of the earthrs crust

Luther, Douglas S.

98

23rd Annual Tri-County Pesticide Update Lake Butler Community Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

23rd Annual Tri-County Pesticide Update Lake Butler Community Center Lake Butler, FL Tuesday, CED, Union County 5:55 Pesticide Safety Barton Wilder, UF/IFAS, Extension Agent Alachua County 6:00 Update on Weed Control Barton Wilder, UF/IFAS Extension Agent Alachua County 7:25 CORE: Law & Rule

Hill, Jeffrey E.

99

Fractally deforested landscape: Pattern and process in a tri-national Amazon frontier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fractally deforested landscape: Pattern and process in a tri-national Amazon frontier Jing Sun a 32611, USA Keywords: Amazon Deforestation Fractal analysis Fixed-grid scans Bottom-up plan Configuration of deforestation at a pixel level from 1986 to 2010 in the study region. The evolving pattern of development

100

Analysis of a Third-Generation Princeton Tri-leaflet Mechanical Heart Valve  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of a Third-Generation Princeton Tri-leaflet Mechanical Heart Valve Michael Hsu Advisor heart valve · Static analysis of leaflet under uniform pressure of 10 MPa Summer Objectives · Find Heart valve disease · Over 5 million affected · Over 225,000 valve- replacement surgeries performed

Petta, Jason

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

How to search resources If you are looking for an article, try  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the search box. -You can also perform an advanced search on Google scholar by clicking on `Advanced Scholar to title or author by using `Advanced Scholar Search'. Searching for articles at MHow to search resources If you are looking for an article, try: Google Scholar: This search engine

McPhee-Shaw, Erika

102

Bosnia-Herzegovina: Trying to Build a Federal State on Paradoxes Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Bosnia-Herzegovina: Trying to Build a Federal State on Paradoxes Jens Woelk Introduction The basis for federalism in Bosnia-Herzegovina1 is rather peculiar due to the unique complexity. This was to be accomplished by physical reconstruction as well as by preserving Bosnia and Herzegovina as one country

Wintner, Shuly

103

Diffusion and Catalytic Cracking of 1,3,5 Tri-iso-propyl-benzene in FCC Catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Diffusion and Catalytic Cracking of 1,3,5 Tri-iso- propyl-benzene in FCC Catalysts S.Al-Khattaf1 describes catalytic cracking experiments developed in a novel CREC Riser Simulator using 1,3,5-Tri-iso

Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman

104

My Generation--The Who People try to put us d-down  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

My Generation--The Who Intro: G F People try to put us d-down G F G(once) Talkin' 'bout my generation Just because we get around G F G(once) Talkin' 'bout my generation Things they do look awful cold G F G(once) Talkin' 'bout my generation I hope I die before I get old G F G(once) Talkin' 'bout my

Reiners, Peter W.

105

Close-in blasting at the TRI-MET light rail tunnels in Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Frontier/Traylor Joint Venture is presently constructing a section of the Tri-County Metropolitan Transit District of Oregon`s (TRI-MET) Westside Light Rail System. This new section will extend Portland`s existing transit system to the western suburbs of Beaverton and Hillsboro. The drill-blast excavations at this project include 10,000 feet of 20 foot tunnel, 18 cross passages, three shafts, an underground railway station, and a U-wall open cut. From a blast designer`s perspective, this job has been extremely challenging. Blast vibration is limited to 0.5 ips at 200 feet or at the nearest structure, and airblast is limited to 129 dB--linear peak and 96 dB--C scale. The tunnels pass under heavily built up areas and have top of tunnel to surface cover distances as low as 70 feet. Surface blasting in the 26,000 cubic yard U-wall excavation was limited to five short nighttime periods due to its proximity to the very busy highway 26. This paper describes the techniques that were used to develop safe blasting designs for the TRI-MET Surface blasts and tunnel rounds. It also discusses the measures that were necessary to mitigate noise, vibration, and flyrock.

Revey, G.F.; Painter, D.Z.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

CLASSIFICdTION CAWXL~ DAm  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -MiamiYVE r. awC'COLUMBIA$f

107

First analysis of eight Algol-type systems: V537 And, GS Boo, AM CrB, V1298 Her, EL Lyn, FW Per, RU Tri, and WW Tri  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analyzing available photometry from the Super WASP and other databases, we performed the very first light curve analysis of eight eclipsing binary systems V537 And, GS Boo, AM CrB, V1298 Her, EL Lyn, FW Per, RU Tri, and WW Tri. All of these systems were found to be detached ones of Algol-type, having the orbital periods of the order of days. 722 new times of minima for these binaries were derived and presented, trying to identify the period variations caused by the third bodies in these systems.

Zasche, P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Kinetic study of the interaction of hydroxide ions with some tri- and tetrasubstituted nitronaphthalenes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nitrite was assayed by pipeting 50. 00 ml of standard 0. 100N potassium permanganate, 5 ml of 1:5 sulfuric acid, and 25. 00 ml of approximately 0. 1 N sodium nitrite solution (3. 45 g per liter) into a glass-stoppered f'lask. The stoppered flask...'our nitrosubstituted i-iapi", , na", enes, 1 . . =, 5 i8- tetr?-, 1 4 . 5 . , 8-tet ra , i, 3, 8-tri - and 1, 4, 5- r i nl t' , onaphii'ial E. , ', s, w re s * u '. ", ihi . ' '"ors ' ants for formation and oecomposstion of tne interiiiediate Meiscnneirier...

Liu, Li-jen

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer as the ultimate copper diffusion barrier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate the thinnest ever reported Cu diffusion barrier, a 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra show that the graphene is thermally stable at up to 750?C against Cu diffusion. Transmission electron microscopy images show that there was no inter-diffusion in the Cu/graphene/Si structure. Raman analyses indicate that the graphene may have degraded into a nanocrystalline structure at 750?C. At 800?C, the perfect carbon structure was damaged, and thus the barrier failed. The results of this study suggest that graphene could be the ultimate Cu interconnect diffusion barrier.

Nguyen, Ba-Son [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jen-Fin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Perng, Dung-Ching, E-mail: dcperng@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics and Electrical Engineering Department, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

110

TRI-STATE GENERATION AND TRANSMISSION ASSOCIATION, INC. HEADQUARTERS: P.O  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy StrainClient updateTRI-STATE GENERATION AND TRANSMISSION

111

Generic TriBITS PRoject, Build, Test, and Install Quick Reference Guide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun withGenepoolCrystals. |Generic TriBITS PRoject,

112

Tri-Party Agreement U.S. Department of Energy Washington State Department of Ecology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2TopoPortal Hydrogen andTrent Tuckerof 17 Tri-Party

113

Extraction of Plutonium into 30 Percent Tri-Butyl Phosphate from Nitric Acid Solution Containing Fluoride, Aluminum, and Boron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work consists of experimental batch extraction data for plutonium into 30 volume-percent tri-butyl phosphate at ambient temperature from such a solution matrix and a model of this data using complexation constants from the literature.

Kyser, E.A.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

114

Webinar: 2011-2012 Hydrogen Student Design Contest Winners: On-Campus Tri-Generation Fuel Cell Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, 2011-2012 Hydrogen Student Design Contest Winners: On-Campus Tri-Generation Fuel Cell Systems, originally presented on September 4, 2012.

115

Green alternatives to toxic release inventory (TRI) chemicals in the process industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Driven by TRI reporting requirements, the chemical process industry is searching for innovative ways to reduce pollution at the source. Distinct environmental advantages of biobased green chemicals (biochemicals) mean are attractive alternatives to petrochemicals. Biochemicals are made from renewable raw materials in biological processes, such as aerobic and anaerobic fermentation, that operate at ambient temperatures and pressures, and produce only nontoxic waste products. Key TRI chemicals and several classes of commodity and intermediate compounds, used on consumer end-products manufacturing, are examined and alternatives are suggested. Specific substitution options for chlorofluorocarbons, industrial solvents, and commodity organic and inorganic chemicals are reviewed. Currently encouraged pollution prevention alternatives in the manufacturing sector are briefly examined for their long-term feasibility such as bioalternatives to bleaching in the pulp & paper industry, solvent cleaning in the electronics and dry cleaning industries, and using petroleum-based feedstocks in the plastics industry. Total life cycle and cost/benefit analyses are employed to determine whether biochemicals are environmentally feasible and commercially viable as pollution prevention tools. Currently available green chemicals along with present and projected costs and premiums are also presented. Functional compatibility of biochemicals with petrochemicals and bioprocessing systems with conventional chemical processing methods are explored. This review demonstrates that biochemicals can be used cost effectively in certain industrial chemical operations due to their added environmental benefits.

Ahmed, I.; Baron, J.; Hamilton, C. [Booz-Allen & Hamilton Inc., McLean, VA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The transverse space-charge force in tri-gaussian distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In tracking, the transverse space-charge force can be represented by changes in the horizontal and vertical divergences, {Delta}x{prime} and {Delta}y{prime} at many locations around the accelerator ring. In this note, they are going to list some formulas for {Delta}x{prime} and {delta}y{prime} arising from space-charge kicks when the beam is tri-Gaussian distributed. They will discuss separately a flat beam and a round beam. they are not interested in the situation when the emittance growth arising from space charge becomes too large and the shape of the beam becomes weird. For this reason, they can assume the bunch still retains its tri-Gaussian distribution, with its rms sizes {sigma}{sub x}, {sigma}{sub y}, and {sigma}{sub z} increasing by certain factors. Thus after each turn, {sigma}{sub x}, {sigma}{sub y}, and {sigma}{sub z} can be re-calculated.

Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Initiation Temperature for Runaway Tri-n-Butyl Phosphate/Nitric Acid Reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a review of the safety basis for solvent extraction processes at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, a question was raised concerning the safety margin associated with a postulated accident involving a runaway tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/nitric acid reaction due to the inadvertent heating of a tank. The safety margin was based on studies which showed the maximum temperature would not exceed 128 degrees Celsius compared to 130 degrees Celsius, the minimum initiation temperature for runaway reaction established in the 1950's following damaging incidents at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites. The reviewers were concerned the minimum temperature was not conservative since data for solutions containing 20 wt percent dissolved solids showed initiation temperatures at or below 130 degrees Celsius and process solutions normally contain some dissolved solids.

Rudisill, T.S.

2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

118

A thermodynamic model of nitric acid extraction by tri-n-butyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermodynamic model is presented for nitric acid extraction by tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP). This model is based on the formation of the organic phase species: TBP.HNO/sub 3/ and (TBP)/sub 2/.HNO/sub 3/. The model works successfully at TBP concentrations of 5 to 100 vol% and was found to be effective at predicting the extraction of HNO/sub 3/ from HNO/sub 3//NaNO/sub 3/ and HNO/sub 3//LiNO/sub 3/ solutions. Within the TBP concentration range of 5 to 30%, a single set of extraction constants was sufficient to fit extraction data. Stoichiometric activity coefficients of nitric acid in HNO/sub 3//NaNO/sub 3/ and HNO/sub 3//LiNO/sub 3/ mixtures were calculated using a model developed by Bromley.

Chaiko, D.J.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Tri-City Herald OpEd: Electric Vehicles are a smart choice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Why are so many of us at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, a national thought leader in power industry issues located right here in the Tri-Cities, so bullish on the future of EVs? And why do we think it's so important that this country, especially THIS part of the country, be leaders in the adoption of EVs? Is it that we all just happen to like driving polluting golf carts? The answer is that, like most everyone else, most of us here at PNNL drive to work every day, and like most people, we care about the cost of gasoline and the impact that burning imported oil has on the environment and on our foreign policy. The reality is that electric vehicles are simply more efficient, pollute much less, use locally-generated energy, and cost MUCH less to drive.

Christensen, Peter C.; Haas, Anne M.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

120

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Iowa, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Delaware, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Colorado, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Massachusetts, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Illinois, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Florida, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Wisconsin, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Kentucky, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off-site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Connecticut, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility; the first nine digit alphanumeric number a facility holds under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Ohio, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Utah, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Hawaii, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Missouri, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Minnesota, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Michigan, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Georgia, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Arkansas, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Kansas, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off-site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Nevada, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Nebraska, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Maryland, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Oklahoma, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Arizona, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Louisiana, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Montana, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Indiana, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Alaska, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year.Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Pennsylvania, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility; the first nine digit alphanumeric number a facility holds under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Oregon, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Vermont, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Mssissippi, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Tennessee, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), California, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Washington, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Wyoming, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Idaho, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Alabama, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year.Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Texas, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Maine, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

BU Medical Campus Housing Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation Close to BUMC The MBTA is Boston's public transit agency (www.mbta.com). Trains: Orange Line (at

Hutyra, Lucy R.

160

Synthesis, Structure, and Reactivity ofbis(1,2,4-tri-t-butylcyclopentadienyl) Complexes of Cerium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sterically demanding 1,2,4-tri-t-butylcyclopentadienylligand (1,2,4-(Me3C)3C5H2, hereafter Cp') has been used to preparemonomeric cerium metallocenes, Cp 2CeX (X = Cl, I, OSO2CF3), which areused to synthesize the benzyl, Cp'2CeCH2C6H5. The benzyl is a usefulstarting material for preparing other complexes in the Cp'2CeZ system (Z= BF4, F, NH2, C6H5, H). X-ray crystal structures of Cp'2CeOSO2CF3,Cp'2CeF, Cp'2CeCH2C6H5, and Cp'2CeH are presented. The benzyl slowlydecomposes in solution to toluene and a metallacycle,[Cp'][(Me3C)2C5H2(CMe2CH2)]Ce. The ring CMe3 groups of both themetallacycle and the hydride, Cp'2CeH, can be fully deuterated byprolonged exposure to C6D6, providing a useful labeling tool inmechanistic studies.The hydride activates C-F and/or C-H bonds influorobenzenes, C6HxF6-x , x = 0-5. The reactions are selective, with theselectivity depending on the presence of two fluorines ortho to thereaction site more than on the type of bond activated. Complexes of thetype Cp'2CeC6HxF5-x , x = 0-4, are formed as intermediates, which slowlydecompose in solution to Cp'2CeF and fluorobenzynes, C6HxF4-x, x = 0-4,which are trapped. The rate at which Cp'2CeC6HxF5-x complexes decomposeincreases as the number of fluorines decreases. Complexes with oneortho-fluorine decompose much faster than those with two ortho-fluorines.The metallacycle activates only C-H bonds in fluorobenzenes, permittingthe synthesis of specific Cp'2CeC6HxF5-x complexes. The crystal structureof Cp'2CeC6F5 is presented. The hydride and the metallacycle react withfluoromethanes, CH4-xFx, x = 1-3, through postulated Cp'2CeCH3-xFxintermediates to generate Cp'2CeF and other products. The other products,CH4, tri-t-butylbenzenes, tri-t-butylfluorobenzenes, and a presumedmetallocene cerium fluoride with one Cp' and one (Me2EtC)(Me3C)2C5H2ligand, suggest a decomposition pathway for Cp'2CeCH3-xFx , x = 1-3, thatinvolves carbenes or carbenoids, which are trapped. The hydridepolymerizes ethylene, but hydrogenates other olefins. The metallacycleactivates C-H bonds in olefins and aromatics to generate new complexeswith Ce-C bonds. The hydride reacts with one equivalent of CO in pentaneto generate (Cp'2Ce)2CH2O, whose crystal structure shows the presence ofa bridging dianionic formaldehyde ligand. (Cp'2Ce)2CH2O reacts H2 to givethe hydride and Cp'2CeOMe, or with a mixture of H2 and CO to generateCp'2CeOMe exclusively. (Cp'2Ce)2CH2O or the hydride can react with anadditional equivalent of CO to generate dimeric enediolate,(Cp'2CeCHO)2.

Werkema, Evan L.

2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Bogs are a specialized wetland community with saturated, acidic, peat soils that have low concentra-tions of minerals (e.g., calcium, magnesium) and essential nutrients (phosphorus, nitrogen). They  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, acidic, peat soils that have low concentra- tions of minerals (e.g., calcium, magnesium) and essential of living Sphagnum mosses growing over a layer of saturated, acidic peat. Sedges, forbs and/or the low), pitcher plant (Sarracenia purpurea) and sundew (Drosera rotundifolia). SOILS: Fibric peat (Histosols

US Army Corps of Engineers

162

quera que le coefficient )'2 de la formule (2) n'a pas la mme significa-tion que ~ de la formule (1). ~,z n'existe que s'il y a chute de tempra-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~~~ia- tion. Ces observations prouvent que l'effet Peltier au contact Bi-Cu n'est pas modifi par le champ and available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/jphystap:0190100100069101 #12;692 que celles de la rflexion totale

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

163

Effect of temperature on the extraction of uranium(VI) from nitric acid by tri-n-amyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies have been carried out on the effect of temperature on the extraction of U(VI) from nitric acid medium by tri-n-amyl phosphate/n-dodecane, measured as a function of the extractant concentration and aqueous phase acidity. The results indicate that the extraction is exothermic as in the case of tri-n-butyl phosphate. From the data available an effort has been made to calculate the equilibrium constant, the Gibbs energy change and the entropy changes of the extraction reaction. 21 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Srinivasan, T.G.; Rao, P.R.V. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Sood, D.D. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)]|[BARC, Mumbai (India)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume II. Middle United States: TRY data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 22 cities in the continental United States using Test Reference Year (TRY) source weather data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Initiation Temperature for Runaway Tri-n-Butyl Phosphate/Nitric Acid Reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During a review of the H-Canyon authorization basis, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) staff members questioned the margin of safety associated with a postulated tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/nitric acid runaway reaction due to the inadvertent heating of a canyon tank containing greater than 3000 lbs (1362 kg) of TBP. The margin of safety was partially based on experiments and calculations performed by the Actinide Technology Section (ATS) to support deletion of indication of tank agitation as a Safety Class System. In the technical basis for deletion of this system, ATS personnel conservatively calculated the equilibrium temperature distribution of a canyon tank containing TBP and nitric acid layers which were inadvertently heated by a steam jet left on following a transfer. The maximum calculated temperature (128 degrees C) was compared to the minimum initiation temperature for a runaway reaction (greater than 130 degrees C) documented by experimental work in the mid 195 0s. In this work, the initiation temperature as a function of nitric acid concentration was measured for 0 and 20 wt percent dissolved solids. The DNFSB staff members were concerned that data for 0 wt percent dissolved solids were not conservative given the facts that data for 20 wt percent dissolved solids show initiation temperatures at or below 130 degrees C and H-Canyon solutions normally contained a small amount of dissolved solids.

Rudisill, T.S.

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

166

Thorium ions transport across Tri-n-butyl phosphate-benzene based supported liquid membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transport of Th(IV) ions across tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) benzene based liquid membranes supported in microporous hydrophobic polypropylene film (MHPF) has been studied. Various parameters such as variation of nitric acid concentration in the feed, TBP concentration in the membrane, and temperature on the given metal ions transport have been investigated. The effects of nitric acid and TBP concentrations on the distribution coefficient were also studied, and the data obtained were used to determine the Th ions-TBP complex diffusion coefficient in the membrane. Permeability coefficients of Th(IV) ions were also determined as a function of the TBP and nitric acid concentrations. The optimal conditions for the transport of Th(IV) ions across the membrane are 6 mol{sm_bullet}dm{sup -3} HNO{sub 3} concentration, 2.188 mol {center_dot} dm{sup -3} TBP concentration, and 25{degrees}C. The stoichiometry of the chemical species involved in chemical reaction during the transport of Th(IV) ions has also been studied.

Rasul, G.; Chaudry, M.A. [Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Chemistry, Islamabad (Pakistan); Afzal, M. [Quaid-I-Azam Univ., Islamabad (Pakistan)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Tri-county pre-commercial analysis of converting wastes to marketable products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Open field burning of harvest residues is an effective, low cost method of controlling diseases, insects and weeds in many agricultural operations. Restrictions have been imposed against this practice in several areas and these restrictions are expected to increase in the near future. The agricultural community in the Tri-County area of Nevada recognized that eventually burning would be an unacceptable practice of disposal. A biomass inventory was jointly funded by the area seed producers and Western Regional Biomass Energy Program that revealed a sufficient biomass resource to justify further work to answer the question: Can economic alternative methods of disposal be developed either through export of biomass or through conversion technologies in the local area? Technically the answer is yes. Several methods are available, either singly or in combination, capable of converting the difficult residues into energy or commodity products. Economically, the answer is not clear. There are many assumptions made in the financial analyses reported by the process developers that combine with a lack of concrete markets resulting in the conclusion that economic viability cannot be attained at the present time.

Frolich, M. [Integrated Resource Development, Gardnerville, NV (United States); Munk, G. [Nevada Bio-Serv, Lovelock, NV (United States); McArthur, K. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume I. Eastern United States: TRY data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 23 cities in the continental United States using Test Reference Year (TRY) source weather data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

On the ambiguities in the tri-bimaximal mixing matrix and corresponding charged lepton corrections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two negative signs naturally appear in the $U_{\\mu 1}$ and $U_{\\tau 2}$ elements of the Tri-bimaximal (TBM) matrix for positive values of the mixing angles $\\theta_{12}$ and $\\theta_{23}$. Apart from this, in other TBM matrices negative signs are shifted to other elements in each case. They account for positive as well as negative values of $\\theta_{12}$ and $\\theta_{23}$. We discuss the sign ambiguity in the TBM matrix and find that the TBM matrices, in fact, can be divided into two groups under certain circumstances. Interestingly, this classification of TBM matrices is accompanied by two different $\\mu-\\tau$ symmetric mass matrices which can separately be related to the groups. To accommodate non-zero value of $\\theta_{13}$ and deviate $\\theta_{23}$ towards first octant, we then perturb the TBM mixing ansatz with the help of charged lepton correction. The diagonalizing matrices for charged lepton mass matrices also possess sign ambiguity and respect the grouping of TBM matrices. They are parametrized in te...

Duarah, Chandan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A new TriBeam system for three-dimensional multimodal materials analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The unique capabilities of ultrashort pulse femtosecond lasers have been integrated with a focused ion beam (FIB) platform to create a new system for rapid 3D materials analysis. The femtosecond laser allows for in situ layer-by-layer material ablation with high material removal rates. The high pulse frequency (1 kHz) of ultrashort (150 fs) laser pulses can induce material ablation with virtually no thermal damage to the surrounding area, permitting high resolution imaging, as well as crystallographic and elemental analysis, without intermediate surface preparation or removal of the sample from the chamber. The TriBeam system combines the high resolution and broad detector capabilities of the DualBeam{sup TM} microscope with the high material removal rates of the femtosecond laser, allowing 3D datasets to be acquired at rates 4-6 orders of magnitude faster than 3D FIB datasets. Design features that permit coupling of laser and electron optics systems and positioning of a stage in the multiple analysis positions are discussed. Initial in situ multilayer data are presented.

Echlin, McLean P.; Mottura, Alessandro; Torbet, Christopher J.; Pollock, Tresa M. [Materials Department, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93101 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Single-scattering properties of tri-axial ellipsoidal mineral dust aerosols: A database for application to radiative transfer calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single-scattering properties of tri-axial ellipsoidal mineral dust aerosols: A database Applications and Research, Camp Spring, MD 20746, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 14 Optical properties Database a b s t r a c t This paper presents a user-friendly database software package

Liou, K. N.

172

926 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 53, NO. 5, MAY 2006 Tri-Polar Concentric Ring Electrode Development for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for approximating the analytical Laplacian based on a nine-point finite difference method (NPM). For direct comparison, the FPM, quasi-bipolar method (a hybrid NPM), and NPM were calculated over a 400 400 mesh with 1, and the results were verified with tank experiments. The tri-polar configuration and the NPM were found to have

Besio, Walter G.

173

Three-Color Passive-Matrix Pixels Using Dye-Diffusion-Patterned Tri-Layer Polymer-Based LED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three-Color Passive-Matrix Pixels Using Dye-Diffusion-Patterned Tri-Layer Polymer-Based LED Ke Long of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 ABSTRACT Dry dye-printing and solvent-enhanced dye diffusion were used to locally dope a previously spin-coated poly(9-vinylcarbazole

174

View the newsletter at caeo.unlv.edu UNLV Celebrates National TRiO/GEAR UP Day  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

March 2013 View the newsletter at caeo.unlv.edu UNLV Celebrates National TRiO/GEAR UP Day Adult Educational Services Educational Talent Search Family Support Services GEAR UP McNair ScholarsO and GEAR UP participants both past and present. Shortly after 5 p.m., there were only a few seats empty

Hemmers, Oliver

175

Tri-Lateral Noor al Salaam High Concentration Solar Central Receiver Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the efforts conducted primarily under the Noor al Salaam (Light of Peace) program under DOE GRANT NUMBER DE-FC36-02GO12030, together with relevant technical results from a closely related technology development effort, the U.S./Israel Science and Technology Foundation (USISTF) High Concentration Solar Central Receiver program. These efforts involved preliminary design, development, and test of selected prototype power production subsystems and documentation of an initial version of the system definition for a high concentration solar hybrid/gas electrical power plant to be built in Zaafarana, Egypt as a first step in planned commercialization. A major part of the planned work was halted in 2007 with an amendment in October 2007 requiring that we complete the technical effort by December 31, 2007 and provide a final report to DOE within the following 90 days. This document summarizes the work conducted. The USISTF program was a 50/50 cost-shared program supported by the Department of Commerce through the U.S./Israel Science and Technology Commission (USISTC). The USISTC was cooperatively developed by President Clinton and the late Prime Minister Rabin of Israel "to encourage technological collaboration" and "support peace in the Middle East through economic development". The program was conducted as a follow-on effort to Israel's Magnet/CONSOLAR Program, which was an advanced development effort to design, fabricate, and test a solar central receiver and secondary optics for a "beam down" central receiver concept. The status of these hardware development programs is reviewed, since they form the basis for the Noor al Salaam program. Descriptions are provided of the integrated system and the major subsystems, including the heliostat, the high temperature air receiver, the power conversion unit, tower and tower reflector, compound parabolic concentrator, and the master control system. One objective of the USISTF program was to conduct marketing research, identify opportunities for use of this technology, and to the extent possible, secure an agreement leading to a pre-commercialization demonstration or prototype plant. This was accomplished with the agreement to conduct the Noor al Salaam program as a tri-lateral project between Egypt, Israel, and the U.S. The tri-lateral project was led by the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH); this included the Egyptian New and Renewable Energy Authority and the Israeli USISTC participants. This project, known was Noor al Salaam, was funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) through the Department of Energy (DOE). The Egyptian activity was under the auspices of the Egyptian Ministry of Energy and Electricity, New and Renewable Energy Authority (NREA) as part of Egypt's plans for renewable energy development. The objective of the Noor al Salaam project was to develop the conditions necessary to obtain funding and construct and operate an approximately 10 to 20 Megawatt hybrid solar/natural gas demonstration power plant in Zaafarana, Egypt that could serve both as a test bed for advanced solar technology evaluations, and as a forerunner to commercial plant designs. This plant, termed Noor Al Salaam, or Light of Peace, reached the initial phase of system definition before being curtailed, in part by changes in USAID objectives, coupled with various delays that were beyond the scope of the program to resolve. The background of the USISTF technology development and pre-commercialization effort is provided in this report, together with documentation of the technology developments conducted under the Noor al Salaam program. It should be noted that only a relatively small part of the Noor al Salaam funding was expended over the approximately five years for which UAH was prime contractor before the program was ordered closed (Reference 1) so that the remaining funds could be returned to USAID.

Blackmon, James B

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

Superfund explanation of significant difference for the record of decision (EPA Region 5): Tri-County Landfill/Waste Management Illinois, South Elgin, IL, April 23, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tri-County/Elgin Landfill Superfund Site (TCLF) encompasses both the Tri-County and Elgin Landfills. The purpose of this ESD is to explain why the design for the landfill cap component of the remedy differs from that set forth in the ROD (PB93-964133) and to address the cost differentials associated with the change.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Design and synthesis of a novel, orally active, brain penetrant, tri-substituted thiophene based JNK inhibitor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SAR of a series of tri-substituted thiophene JNK3 inhibitors is described. By optimizing both the N-aryl acetamide region of the inhibitor and the 4-position of the thiophene we obtained single digit nanomolar compounds, such as 47, which demonstrated an in vivo effect on JNK activity when dosed orally in our kainic acid mouse model as measured by phospho-c-jun reduction.

Bowers, Simeon; Truong, Anh P.; Neitz, R. Jeffrey; Neitzel, Martin; Probst, Gary D.; Hom, Roy K.; Peterson, Brian; Galemmo, Jr., Robert A.; Konradi, Andrei W.; Sham, Hing L.; Tth, Gergley; Pan, Hu; Yao, Nanhua; Artis, Dean R.; Brigham, Elizabeth F.; Quinn, Kevin P.; Sauer, John-Michael; Powell, Kyle; Ruslim, Lany; Ren, Zhao; Bard, Frdrique; Yednock, Ted A.; Griswold-Prenner, Irene (Elan)

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

178

Tri-State Synfuels Project Review: Volume 12. Fluor project status. [Proposed Henderson, Kentucky coal to gasoline plant; engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document and summarize activities associated with Fluor's efforts on the Tri-State Synfuels Project. The proposed facility was to be coal-to-transport fuels facility located in Henderson, Kentucky. Tri-State Synfuels Company was participating in the project as a partner of the US Department of Energy per terms of a Cooperative Agreement resulting from DOE's synfuel's program solicitation. Fluor's initial work plan called for preliminary engineering and procurement services to the point of commitment for construction for a Sasol Fischer-Tropsch plant. Work proceeded as planned until October 1981 when results of alternative coal-to-methanol studies revealed the economic disadvantage of the Synthol design for US markets. A number of alternative process studies followed to determine the best process configuration. In January 1982 Tri-State officially announced a change from Synthol to a Methanol to Gasoline (MTG) design basis. Further evaluation and cost estimates for the MTG facility eventually led to the conclusion that, given the depressed economic outlook for alternative fuels development, the project should be terminated. Official announcement of cancellation was made on April 13, 1982. At the time of project cancellation, Fluor had completed significant portions of the preliminary engineering effort. Included in this report are descriptions and summaries of Fluor's work during this project. In addition location of key project data and materials is identified and status reports for each operation are presented.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Driving conditions dependence of magneto-electroluminescence in tri-(8-hydroxyquinoline)-aluminum based organic light emitting diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

we investigated the magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) in tri-(8-hydroxyquinoline)-aluminum based organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) through the steady-state and transient method simultaneously. The MELs show the great different behaviors when we turn the driving condition from a constant voltage to a pulse voltage. For devices driven by the constant voltage, the MELs are similar with the literature data; for devices driven by the pulse voltage, the MELs are quite different, they firstly increase to a maximum then decrease as the magnetic field increases continuously. Negative MELs can be seen when both the magnetic field and driving voltage are high enough.

Peng, Qiming; Li, Xianjie; Li, Mingliang; Li, Feng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

EA-1915: Conveyance of Approximately 1,641 Acres of Unimproved Land to the Tri-City Development Council, the Local Community Reuse Organization, Richland, WA  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of conveyance of approximately 1,641 acres of unimproved land at DOEs Hanford Site, Richland, Washington to the Tri-City Development Council (TRIDEC), the local community reuse organization (CRO).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

UTICA 4, NEW YORK COFIPOR~TION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCTTO: FILEWAWINQTON, 0. C.JournalDROf

182

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Puerto Rico, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Kansas, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Nebraska, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Hampshire, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Montana, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Utah, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Texas, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Idaho, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Rhode Island, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Florida, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Hampshire, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Oklahoma, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), West Virginia, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), South Dakota, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Missouri, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Mexico, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Washington, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Maryland, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), North Dakota, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Arizona, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), American Samoa, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Alaska, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Connecticut, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), vVrginia, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Puerto Rico, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Pennsylvania, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Minnesota, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Iowa, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), South Carolina, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Oregon, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Georgia, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Wyoming, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), North Dakota, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Arkansas, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Louisiana, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), United States and Territories, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year.Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility; the first nine digit alphanumeric number a facility holds under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), North Carolina 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Virgin Islands, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Indiana, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), California, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Virgin Islands, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Jersey, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Vermont, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Wisconsin, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Maine, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), West Virginia, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Illinois, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Jersey, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Rhode Island, 1991 and 1992 (in dbase iii plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Virginia, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Mexico, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), South Dakota, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Tennessee, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Massachusetts, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Ohio, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), American Samoa, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New York, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Alabama, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Hawaii, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), South Carolina, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Mississippi, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Delaware, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Michigan, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Kentucky, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Nevada, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), North Carolina, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Colorado, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New York, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Try This: Household Magnets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButlerTransportation

251

Tri-Lab Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2TopoPortal Hydrogen andTrent Tucker About Us

252

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Tri-City Disposal Company, operable unit 2, Bullitt County, Brooks, KY, March 29, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document presents the decision made by the U.S. Environmental protection Agency (USEPA) for the second phase of remedial action (Operable Unit No. 2) at the Tri-City Industrial Disposal Site. Based on the results of additional sampling at Tri-City, monitoring reports, and risk evaluation, no further remedial action is necessary at the site to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This decision is the final remedial action for the site. Although EPA has determined that no additional Superfund action is warranted for the second operable unit, treatment and monitoring of contaminated groundwater (OU1) (PB92-964004) will continue at the site as necessary.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Tri-n-butyl-phosphate/n-Dodecane Mixture: Thermophysical Properties and Molecular Structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics simulations of tri-n-butyl-phosphate (TBP)/n-dodecane mixture in the liquid phase have been carried out using two recently developed TBP force field models (J. Phys. Chem. B 2012, 116, 305) in combination with the all-atom optimized potentials for liquid simulations (OPLS-AA) force field model for n-dodecane. Specifically, the electric dipole moment of TBP, mass density of the mixture, and the excess volume of mixing were computed with TBP mole fraction ranging from 0 to 1. It is found that the aforementioned force field models accurately predict the mass density of the mixture in the entire mole fraction range. Commensurate with experimental measurements, the electric dipole moment of the TBP was found to slightly increase with the mole fraction of TBP in the mixture. Also, in accord with experimental data, the excess volume of mixing is positive in the entire mole fraction range, peaking at TBP mole fraction range 0.3 0.5. Finally, a close examination of the spatial pair correlation functions between TBP molecules, and between TBP and n-dodecane molecules, revealed formation of TBP dimers through self-association at close distance, a phenomenon with ample experimental evidence.

de Almeida, Valmor F [ORNL; Cui, Shengting [ORNL; Khomami, Bamin [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Tri-axial magnetic anisotropies in RE{sub 2}Ba{sub 4}Cu{sub 7}O{sub 15?y} superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a novel quantification method of tri-axial magnetic anisotropy in orthorhombic substances containing rare earth (RE) ions using tri-axial magnetic alignment and tri-axial magnetic anisotropies depending on the type of RE in RE-based cuprate superconductors. From the changes in the axes for magnetization in magnetically aligned powders of (RE?{sub 1?x}RE?{sub x}){sub 2}Ba{sub 4}Cu{sub 7}O{sub y} [(RE?,RE?)247] containing RE ions with different single-ion magnetic anisotropies, the ratios of three-dimensional magnetic anisotropies between RE?247 and RE?247 could be determined. The results in (Y,Er)247, (Dy,Er)247, (Ho,Er)247, and (Y,Eu)247 systems suggest that magnetic anisotropies largely depended on the type of RE? (or RE?), even in the heavy RE ions with higher magnetic anisotropies. An appropriate choice of RE ions in RE-based cuprate superconductors enables the reduction of the required magnetic field for the production of their bulks and thick films based on the tri-axial magnetic alignment technique using modulated rotation magnetic fields.

Horii, Shigeru, E-mail: horii.shigeru.7e@kyoto-u.ac.jp; Doi, Toshiya [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Okuhira, Shota; Yamaki, Momoko [Department of Environmental Systems Engineering, Kochi University of Technology, Tosa-Yamada, Kami-shi, Kochi 782-8502 (Japan); Kishio, Kohji; Shimoyama, Jun-ichi [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

255

bu.edu/eng4 ACCESS DENIED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Deutsche Telekom and Raytheon BBN Technologies; and one academic partner, Warwick University. The ECE

256

BARBARA BURRINGTON OPPENHEIMER boppen@bu.edu;  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neighborhood Health Centers Speech Pathology Services (Logan International Airport, Bunker Hill Health Center Degree in Speech and Hearing Sciences Psychology and French Minor PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS Boston Sciences, Boston, MA 2006-Present Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor 2000-2006 Adjunct Clinical Assistant

Guenther, Frank

257

BOSTON UNIVERSITY Policy BU 100-000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Security Plan and controls will not prohibit building access to authorized disaster recovery personnel personnel should be logged whenever feasible. 2.2. Facility Security Plan [164.310(a)(2)(ii)] ­ CEs must, or theft. Each CE must develop a Facility Security Plan specific to its local environment. 2

Guenther, Frank

258

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Tri County/Elgin Landfill Site, Elgin, IL. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 66-acre Tri County Landfill (TCL) site comprises two former landfills the Tri County Landfill and the Elgin Landfill, located near the junction of Kane, Cook and DuPage Counties, Illinois. The two disposal operations overlapped to the point where the two landfills were indistinguishable. Land use in the area is predominantly agricultural. The local residents and businesses use private wells as their drinking water supply. Prior to the 1940's, both landfills were used for gravel mining operations. From 1968 to 1976, the TCL received liquid and industrial waste. State and county inspection reports revealed that open dumping, area filling, and dumping into the abandonded gravel quarry had occurred at the site. In addition, confined dumping, inadequate daily cover, blowing litter, fires, lack of access restrictions, and leachate flows were typical problems reported. In 1981, the landfill was closed with a final cover.

Not Available

1992-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

259

Synergetic effects of II-VI sensitization upon TiO{sub 2} for photoelectrochemical water splitting; a tri-layered structured scheme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

World's energy demands are growing on a higher scale increasing the need of more reliable and long term renewable energy resources. Efficient photo-electrochemical (PEC) devices based on novel nano-structured designs for solar-hydrogen generation need to be developed. This study provides an insight of the tri-layered-TiO2 based nanostructures. Observing the mechanism of hydrogen production, the comparison of the structural order during the synthesis is pronounced. The sequence in the tri-layered structure affects the photogenerated electron (e{sup ?}) and hole (h{sup +}) pair transfer and separation. It is also discussed that not only the semiconductors band gaps alignment is important with respect to the water redox potential but also the interfacial regions. Quasi-Fermi-level adjustment at the interfacial regions plays a key role in deciding the solar to hydrogen efficiency. More efficient multicomponent semiconductor nano-design (MCSN) could be developed with the approach given in this study.

Mumtaz, Asad, E-mail: asad-032@yahoo.com [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, University Teknologi PETRONAS (Malaysia); Mohamed, Norani Muti, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my [Centre of Innovative Nanostructures and Nanodevices (COINN), Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (Malaysia)

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

260

TriBITS lifecycle model. Version 1.0, a lean/agile software lifecycle model for research-based computational science and engineering and applied mathematical software.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Software lifecycles are becoming an increasingly important issue for computational science and engineering (CSE) software. The process by which a piece of CSE software begins life as a set of research requirements and then matures into a trusted high-quality capability is both commonplace and extremely challenging. Although an implicit lifecycle is obviously being used in any effort, the challenges of this process - respecting the competing needs of research vs. production - cannot be overstated. Here we describe a proposal for a well-defined software lifecycle process based on modern Lean/Agile software engineering principles. What we propose is appropriate for many CSE software projects that are initially heavily focused on research but also are expected to eventually produce usable high-quality capabilities. The model is related to TriBITS, a build, integration and testing system, which serves as a strong foundation for this lifecycle model, and aspects of this lifecycle model are ingrained in the TriBITS system. Here, we advocate three to four phases or maturity levels that address the appropriate handling of many issues associated with the transition from research to production software. The goals of this lifecycle model are to better communicate maturity levels with customers and to help to identify and promote Software Engineering (SE) practices that will help to improve productivity and produce better software. An important collection of software in this domain is Trilinos, which is used as the motivation and the initial target for this lifecycle model. However, many other related and similar CSE (and non-CSE) software projects can also make good use of this lifecycle model, especially those that use the TriBITS system. Indeed this lifecycle process, if followed, will enable large-scale sustainable integration of many complex CSE software efforts across several institutions.

Willenbring, James M.; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Heroux, Michael Allen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Solvent Extraction Behavior of Neptunium (IV) Ions between Nitric Acid and Diluted 30% Tri-butyl Phosphate in the Presence of Simple Hydroxamic Acids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Formo- and aceto-hydroxamic acids are very effective reagents for stripping tetravalent actinide ions such as Np(IV) and Pu(IV) ions from a tri-butyl phosphate phase into nitric acid. Distribution data for Np(IV) in the presence of these hydroxamate ions have now been accumulated and trends established. Stability constants for aceto-hydroxamate complexes of Np(IV) and Np(V) ions have also been determined in a perchlorate medium, and these reaffirm the affinity of hydroxamate ligands for actinide (IV) ions over actinyl (V,VI) ions.

Taylor, Robin J.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Choppin, Gregory R.; May, Iain

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Johns, R. H., D. W. Burgess, C. A. Doswell III, M. S. Gilmore, J. A. Hart, and S. F. Piltz, 2013: The 1925 Tri-State tornado damage path and associated storm system. Electronic J. Severe Storms Meteor., 8 (2), 133.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mi) east-northeast of the apparent end of the Tri- State tornado damage path in Pike County, IN: The 1925 Tri- State tornado damage path and associated storm system. Electronic J. Severe Storms Meteor., 8 (2), 1­33. 1 The 1925 Tri-State Tornado Damage Path and Associated Storm System ROBERT H. JOHNS

Doswell III, Charles A.

263

Modeling of the simultaneous extraction of nitric acid and uranyl nitrate with tri-n-butyl phosphate. Application to extraction operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mathematical model developed for the equilibrium HNO{sub 3}-UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}-tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)-diluent is the basis of the computation of distribution isotherms. The isotherms are used to study the influence of TBP concentration on two chosen operation parameters, distribution coefficients and number of theoretical stages, for the selected flow sheets. It is established that an increase in TBP concentration leads to a decrease in the number of theoretical stages for the extraction flow sheets but to their increase for the striping flow sheets. Given diagrams can be used to determine the efficiency of extraction processes. Agreement with available literature calculations on the number of theoretical stages supports the use of the model in the computation of distribution isotherms, of the system quoted above, in a wide range of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and TBP concentrations.

Comor, J.J.; Tolic, A.S.; Kopecni, M.M.; Petkovic, D.M. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Chemical Dynamics Lab.] [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Chemical Dynamics Lab.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Public health assessment for tri-county landfill waste management of Illinois, South Elgin, Kane County, Illinois, Region 5. Cerclis No. ILD048306183. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tri-County and Elgin Landfills pose a public health hazard because the concentrations of lead in downgradient private wells are high enough to be a long-term health concern. Completed exposure pathways include the exposure to contaminated water from on- and off-site private wells (inhalation, ingestion, dermal contact; past, present, future). Contaminants of concern in on-site groundwater include bis(2-chloroethyl)ether, vinyl chloride, antimony, arsenic, barium, cadmium, fluoride, lead, manganese, nickel, nitrate + nitrite, and thallium. Chemicals of concern in on-site surface soil and sediments include PCBs, arsenic, cadmium, and nickel. Contaminants of concern in on-site subsurface soil include PCBs, arsenic, cadmium, lead, and nickel. This public health assessment recommends health professionals education and community health education be conducted for the community impacted by the landfills.

NONE

1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

265

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), United States and Territories, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Tri-Generation Success World's First Tri-Gen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

station uses anaerobically digested biogas from the municipal wastewater treatment plant as the fuel SAE protocols for rapid 3-minute complete tank refueling. Gas or Biogas H2 is produced at anode Gas the versatility of fuel cells to utilize multiple feedstocks, such as biogas and natural gas, to produce power

267

M. M. Oppenheim Y. S. Dimant, Boston University, Center for Space Physics, Boston, MA, 02215, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M. M. Oppenheim Y. S. Dimant, Boston University, Center for Space Physics, Boston, MA, 02215, USA Corresponding author Email addresses: meerso@bu.edu (M. M. Oppenheim), dimant@bu.edu (Y. S. Dimant). Preprint and Oppenheim. This paper begins with a general discussion of E-region irregularity observa- tions, theory

Oppenheim, Meers

268

Transport study of hafnium(IV) and zirconium(IV) ions mutual separation by using Tri-n-butyl phosphate-xylene-based supported liquid membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Hf transport study through supported liquid membranes has been carried out to determine flux and permeability data for this metal ion. Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)-xylene-based liquid membranes supported in polypropylene hydrophobic microporous film have been used. These data for hafnium and the previous data for zirconium have furnished the Zr to Hf flux ratio (S) as a function of nitric acid and TBP concentrations of the order of 12 in a single stage at room temperature. Optimum conditions for the separation of these two metal ions appear to 5-6 TBP mol/dm{sup 3} HNO{sub 3}, concentrations {le} 2.93 mol/dm{sup 3}, and 10C. The value of S from an aqueous solution containing 2.4% Hf with respect to Zr has been found to be >125 at 10C and 1.78 mol/dm{sup 3} TBP concentration in the membrane. The technique appears to be feasible for purification of Zr respect to Hf or vice versa.

Chaudry, M.A.; Ahmed, B. (Pakistan Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Tri-State Synfuels Project Review: Volume 8. Commercial status of licensed process units. [Proposed Henderson, Kentucky coal to gasoline plant; licensed commercial processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document demonstrates the commercial status of the process units to be used in the Tri-State Synfuels Project at Henderson, Kentucky. The basic design philosophy as established in October, 1979, was to use the commercial SASOL II/III plants as a basis. This was changed in January 1982 to a plant configuration to produce gasoline via a methanol and methanol to gasoline process. To accomplish this change the Synthol, Oil workup and Chemical Workup Units were eliminated and replaced by Methanol Synthesis and Methanol to Gasoline Units. Certain other changes to optimize the Lurgi liquids processing eliminated the Tar Distillation and Naphtha Hydrotreater Units which were replaced by the Partial Oxidation Unit. The coals to be gasified are moderately caking which necessitates the installation of stirring mechanism in the Lurgi Dry Bottom gasifier. This work is in the demonstration phase. Process licenses either have been obtained or must be obtained for a number of processes to be used in the plant. The commercial nature of these processes is discussed in detail in the tabbed sections of this document. In many cases there is a list of commercial installations at which the licensed equipment is used.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Effect of the substrate temperature on the physical properties of molybdenum tri-oxide thin films obtained through the spray pyrolysis technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polycrystalline molybdenum tri-oxide thin films were prepared using the spray pyrolysis technique; a 0.1 M solution of ammonium molybdate tetra-hydrated was used as a precursor. The samples were prepared on Corning glass substrates maintained at temperatures ranging between 423 and 673 K. The samples were characterized through micro Raman, X-ray diffraction, optical transmittance and DC electrical conductivity. The species MoO{sub 3} (H{sub 2}O){sub 2} was found in the sample prepared at a substrate temperature of 423 K. As the substrate temperature rises, the water disappears and the samples crystallize into {alpha}-MoO{sub 3}. The optical gap diminishes as the substrate temperature rises. Two electrical transport mechanisms were found: hopping under 200 K and intrinsic conduction over 200 K. The MoO{sub 3} films' sensitivity was analyzed for CO and H{sub 2}O in the temperature range 160 to 360 K; the results indicate that CO and H{sub 2}O have a reduction character. In all cases, it was found that the sensitivity to CO is lower than that to H{sub 2}O. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A low cost technique is used which produces good material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin films are prepared using ammonium molybdate tetra hydrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The control of the physical properties of the samples could be done. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A calculation method is proposed to determine the material optical properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MoO{sub 3} thin films prepared by spray pyrolysis could be used as gas sensor.

Martinez, H.M. [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia)] [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia); Torres, J., E-mail: njtorress@unal.edu.co [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia); Lopez Carreno, L.D. [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia)] [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia); Rodriguez-Garcia, M.E. [Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Juriquilla, Queretaro, Qro., Mexico (Colombia)] [Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Juriquilla, Queretaro, Qro., Mexico (Colombia)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Micro-earthquake monitoring and tri-axial drill-bit VSP in NEDO {open_quotes}Deep-seated geothermal reservoir survey{close_quotes} in Kakkonda, Japan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization has been drilling well WD-1 and employing micro-earthquake monitoring and tri-axial drill-bit VSP as the exploration techniques for the deep geothermal reservoir in the Kakkonda geothermal field, Japan. The results of them are as follows: (1) More than 1000 micro-earthquakes were observed from December 23, 1994 to July 1, 1995 in the Kakkonda geothermal field. Epicenters are distributed NW-SE from a macroscopic viewpoint; they distribute almost in the same areas as the fractured zone in the Kakkonda shallow reservoir as pointed out by Doi et al. (1988). They include three groups trending NE-SW. Depths of hypocenters range from the ground surface to about -2.5 km Sea level; they seem to be deeper in the western part. (2) Well WD-1 drilled into a swarm of micro-earthquakes at depths 1200 to 2200 m and encountered many lost circulations in those depths. However, these earthquakes occurred before well WD-1 reached those depths. (3) The bottom boundary of micro-earthquake distribution has a very similar shape to that of the top of the Kakkonda granite, though all of the micro-earthquakes are plotted 300 m shallower than the top of the granite. (4) The TAD VSP shows a possibility of existence of seismic reflectors at sea levels around -2.0, -2.2 and -2.6 km. These reflectors seem to correspond to the top of the Pre-Tertiary formation, the top of the Kakkonda granite and reflectors within the Kakkonda granite.

Takahashi, M.; Kondo, T.; Suzuki, I. [Japan Metals and Chemicals Co., Ltd., Iwate (Japan)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Changes in the cytosolic concentra-tions of Ca2+  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-malignant cells. Knockdown of SPCA2 in MCF-7 cells (a human breast adenocarcinoma cell line) led to inhibition+ levels in SPCA2-knockdown MCF-7 cells were reduced com- pared with control MCF-7 cells that SPCA2 localizes to the plasma membrane in MCF-7 cells, suggesting that it might interact with plasma

Kenny, Paraic

273

Post-translational histone modifica-tions influence gene regulation,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methylation at Oct4. This system, which is called chromatin in vivo assay (CiA), enables inductionK9me3 domains in the mouse genome. The authors propose that their novel CiA system is adaptable

Richardson, David

274

48 Extracurricular Activities Sec-tion, Student Division2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

musical instrument] [acoustic music] Egoist Dancers [dance] KUES [music] [chorus] [matsuri dance] [city pollution study] R [environment network] [environment] [machine study] E.S.S. [English Speaking

Takada, Shoji

275

he Bush administra-tion has listed myriad  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURVEILLANCE: By dissembling random nuclear weapons in the stockpile and closely inspecting and testing explosives and nuclear materials at the Nevada Test Site to gather diagnostic information about weapons Nuclear Security Ad- ministration (NNSA), a division of the Energy Department, to scrutinize the nuclear

Rhoads, James

276

Sandia National Laboratories: pretreatment for biomass deconstruc-tion of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbine bladelifetimepower-to-gas applications

277

Splitting a C-O bond in dialkylethers with bis(1,2,4-tri-t-butylcyclopentadienyl) cerium-hydride does not occur by a sigma-bond metathesis pathway: a combined experimental and DFT computational study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Addition of diethylether to [1,2,4(Me3C)3C5H2]2CeH, abbreviated Cp'2CeH, gives Cp'2CeOEt and ethane. Similarly, di-n-propyl- or di-n-butylether gives Cp'2Ce(O-n-Pr) and propane or Cp'2Ce(O-n-Bu) and butane, respectively. Using Cp'2CeD, the propane and butane contain deuterium predominantly in their methyl groups. Mechanisms, formulated on the basis of DFT computational studies, show that the reactions begin by an alpha or beta-CH activation with comparable activation barriers but only the beta-CH activation intermediate evolves into the alkoxide product and an olefin. The olefin then inserts into the Ce-H bond forming the alkyl derivative, Cp'2CeR, that eliminates alkane. The alpha-CH activation intermediate is in equilibrium with the starting reagents, Cp'2CeH and the ether, which accounts for the deuterium label in the methyl groups of the alkane. The one-step sigma-bond metathesis mechanism has a much higher activation barrier than either of the two-step mechanisms.

Werkema, Evan; Yahia, Ahmed; Maron, Laurent; Eisenstein, Odile; Andersen, Richard

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

278

Niobium-mediated generation of P-P multiply bonded intermediates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The diphosphaazide complex (MesNPP)Nb(N[CH2 tBu]Ar)3, 1 (Mes = 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenyl, Ar = 3,5-dimethylphenyl), releases a P2 unit upon heating to form MesNNb(N[CH2 tBu]Ar)3, 2, in a first-order process. The chemistry ...

Piro, Nicholas A. (Nicholas Anthony)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

NOUVEAUTES BU SCIENCES ET TECHNIQUES SEPTEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2012 INFORMATIQUE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LEF Le Frapper, Olivier 005.43 LINU FIC ITIL : mise en oeuvre de la démarche ITIL en entreprise Mesdon

Sart, Remi

280

GL Report BU 355 CRSP CONSOLIDATED BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT RECAP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CONSOLIDATED BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT RECAP MAY 2014 ( IN THOUSANDS) FY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 FY 14 REGION ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS BUDGET ACTUALS ACTUAL TARGET O&M CRSP...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

For details or to reserve: http://bu.orbridge.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adventure. Overnight: Omni San Francisco (R) Day 2: Sonoma / Lake Tahoe This morning, cross the Golden Gate Bridge and head to California's wine country, where you'll enjoy a guided wine tour and a tasting

Spence, Harlan Ernest

282

BOSTON UNIVERSITY Policy BU 000-001A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the information systems that store, process, transmit, or receive electronic Protected Health Information (e a formal, documented risk analysis process to identify, rate, and document risks to the information systems.1.3. Identification of security safeguards (procedures and controls) used to protect the confidentiality, integrity

Guenther, Frank

283

GL Report BU 355 CRSP CONSOLIDATED BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT RECAP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CONSOLIDATED BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT RECAP JANUARY 2015 ( IN THOUSANDS) FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 FY 15 FY 15 REGION ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS BUDGET ACTUALS ACTUAL TARGET O&M...

284

4 BOSTONIA Fall 2011 COMMONWEALTH NEWS FROM BU AND BEYOND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for those with severe motion impairments to Corey Petitt of Boston. CYDNEYSCOTT #12;Fall 2011 BOSTONIA 5 Two the 2011 Science Day Graduate School of Arts & Sciences Dean's Award and is already free online

Spence, Harlan Ernest

285

Combined Transistor Sizing with Bu er Insertion for Timing Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, to achieve bet- ter power-delay and area-delay tradeo s. The delay model incorporates placement-based information and the e ect of input slew rates on gate delays. The re- sults obtained by using the new method gate Gi is mod- eled by an equivalent inverter. The relation between the gate sizes in the equivalent

Sapatnekar, Sachin

286

Hadronic B_u and B_d decays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present latest measurements from the B factories of branching fractions for B meson decays to hadronic two- and three-body final states. These include the rate of doubly Cabibbo-suppressed charge states of charmed mesons in two-body decays, charmed baryons and other structure seen in baryonic B decays, and charmless mesonic two-body decays in comparison with estimates from theory.

W. T. Ford

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

287

GL Report BU 355 CRSP CONSOLIDATED BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT RECAP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun with Big SkyDIII-DRMR BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT ($

288

GL Report BU 355 CRSP CONSTRUCTION, TRUST, REIMBURSABLE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CONSTRUCTION, TRUST, REIMBURSABLE ( IN THOUSANDS) BUDGET FY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 TOTAL ACTIVITY ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS BUDGET OBS EXPEND OBS OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR...

289

Specific-Heat of the Organic Metal Bis(tetrathiotetracene) Tri-Iodide from 20-K to 100-K, the Vicinity of the Metal-Nonmetal Phase-Transition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

selenium ana- log, the transition-metal complex KCP, ' and tetrathiofulvalenium-thiocyanate [TTF(SCN) 0588] and its selenium analog' which are similar to the organic metal studied in this work. That the metallic state is stabilized by impurities...PHYSICAL REVIEW B VOLUME 24, NUMBER 7 1 OCTOBER 1981 Specific heat of the organic metal bis(tetrathiotetracene) tri-iodide from 20 to 100 K, the vicinity of the metal-nonmetal phase transition B. Cort' and D. G. Naugle Department of Physics...

CORT, B.; Naugle, Donald G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Kinetics and mechanism of the thermal dissociation of O,O'-bis(1,3,5-TRI-tert-butyl-4-oxo-2,5-cyclo-hexadienyl)-p-benzoquinone dioxime in solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kinetics and mechanism of the thermal dissociation of O,O'-bis(1,3,5-tri-tert-butyl-4-oxo-2,5-cyclohexadienyl)-p-benzoquinone dioxime (quinol ether) in solutions in nonpolar solvents were investigated. The dissociation of the quinol ether is reversible two-stage process and involves the formation of an intermediate radical. In relation to the reaction conditions (initial concentration, temperature) the dissociation rate of the quinol ether obeys the kinetic equations omega = k/sub eff/ x c/sup 1/2/ or omega = k/sub 1/c. The change in the reaction order is due to the ratio of the rates of dissociation of the intermediate radical and of its reaction with the phenoxyl radical. The ESR spectra were recorded on a Varian E-9 radiospectrometer with high-frequency modulation of 100 kHz.

Khizhnyi, V.A.; Danilova, T.A.; Goloverda, G.Z.; Dobronravova, Z.A.

1987-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

291

Absorption Heat Pumping- Have You Tried It?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The concept of a thermal powered absorption heat pump is not a new or revolutionary idea. It has been successfully demonstrated in the lab and prototypes have been installed in the field. Units have been successfully applied in a number...

Davis, R. C.

292

Tri-modality small animal imaging system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our group is developing a scanner that combines x-ray, single gamma, and optical imaging on the same rotating gantry. Two functional modalities (SPECT and optical) are included because they have different strengths and weaknesses in terms of spatial and temporal decay lengths in the context of in vivo imaging, and because of the recent advent of multiple reporter gene constructs. The effect of attenuation by biological tissue on the detected intensity of the emitted signal was measured for both gamma and optical imaging. Attenuation by biological tissue was quantified for both the bioluminescent emission of luciferace and for the emission light of the near infrared fluorophore cyanine 5.5, using a fixed excitation light intensity. Experiments were performed to test the feasibility of using either single gamma or x-ray imaging to make depth-dependent corrections to the measured optical signal. Our results suggest that significant improvements in quantitation of optical emission are possible using straightforward correction techniques based on information from other modalities. Development of an integrated scanner in which data from each modality are obtained with the animal in a common configuration will greatly simplify this process.

Kundu, B.K.; Stolin, A.V.; Pole, J.; Baumgart, L.; Fontaine, M.; Wojcik, R.; Kross, B.; Zorn, C.; Majewski, S.; Williams, M.B.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Constrained tri-sphere kinematic positioning system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A scalable and adaptable, six-degree-of-freedom, kinematic positioning system is described. The system can position objects supported on top of, or suspended from, jacks comprising constrained joints. The system is compatible with extreme low temperature or high vacuum environments. When constant adjustment is not required a removable motor unit is available.

Viola, Robert J (Jackson, WY)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

294

(ura avio teleco-mandado no tri-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mapas vão permitir fazer a cartografia dos diferentes tipos de vegeta- ção no solo. Os dados estão agora a ser tratados antes de serem divulgados. A equipa portuguesa ficou 'hospedada' desta vez numa base de portugueses ficaram numa base sul-coreana para 70 pessoas tigação sul-coreana - a esco- lha da base depende da

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

295

1 Get Onto Matlab 2 Try This....  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATLAB is an interactive, matrix-based system for scienti c and engineering ... matrix analysis, solver for ordinary and partial di erential equations, graph plotter

2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

296

Summon [ try out ] How to use Summon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'). The terms you enter may occur in the publication loose from one another. Put your search terms between: advanced search: enter search terms as words from publication titles #12;3 Type * to search for all endings: advanced search: enter search terms in specific search boxes Full-text linking in Summon Clicking

Franssen, Michael

297

Trying to make an unwanted facility palatable  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Finding suitable accommodations for the temporary storage and permanent disposal of this: nation`s low- and high-level radioactive waste is proving an ever more difficult task in this era of volatile technology and science debate over the merits of the nuclear fuel cycle. Local constituencies become deeply immersed in the complex debate whether the site is chosen through a technical site selection process or is a voluntary entry. Rural communities with candidate sites need to initially shift their focus away from this, often acrimonious, debate; instead, the first discussion priority for such rural communities should be to develop a dynamic vision of their own economic and environmental future. The second discussion priority should be to determine if the array of accompanying incentives and benefits hosting this facility would afford the community the opportunity for vision fulfillment. If so, total focus should, then, be given to understanding and resolving to the satisfaction of the constituents issues related to nuclear technology, isolation of radioactive materials, management of risk, storage and disposal facility need, perceived and actual risk, oversight and power sharing authority, engineered safety barriers, and public trust.

Metz, W.C.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Tri-Party Agreement Project Manager's List  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButlerTransportation From modelingTrending: Metal OxoStatement

299

Tri-Party Agreement - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System BurstLongTitan Titan isTravel

300

Tri Global Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective:Toyo AluminiumCity Light &TresGlobal Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Tri State Biodiesel LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective:Toyo AluminiumCity Light &TresGlobal

302

TriBITS Developers Guide and Reference  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2TopoPortal Hydrogen andTrent Tuckerof 17

303

Tri Power Systems Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformation WaynesvilleTracy,LtdTrenton

304

TriWo AG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,LtdInformation DixieTraverse Electric Coop,Trenton,CorpJump

305

*Tri-Generation is a novel technology that was conceived by the National Fuel Cell Research Center in 2001 to simultaneously generate electricity, hydrogen, and heat. It was developed into the first prototype in collaboration with FuelCell Energy, Inc., a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

*Tri-Generation is a novel technology that was conceived by the National Fuel Cell Research Center prototype in collaboration with FuelCell Energy, Inc., and Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. The first and fuel cell electric vehicles), there are still emissions associated with the upstream processes

Mease, Kenneth D.

306

Please cite this article in press as: Gould, M., et al., Judgments of approach speed for motorcycles across different lighting levels and the effect of an improved tri-headlight configuration. Accid. Anal. Prev. (2012), doi:10.1016/j.aap.2012.02.002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for motorcycles across different lighting levels and the effect of an improved tri-headlight configuration. Accid. Anal. Prev. (2012), doi:10.1016/j.aap.2012.02.002 Judgments of approach speed for motorcycles across under low levels of luminance. We investigated drivers' judgments of motorcycle and car approach speeds

Royal Holloway, University of London

307

Tri-Generation Success Story: World's First Tri-Gen Energy Station - Fountain Valley  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyThe EnergyDepartment7 thFuel27, 2008,Inc.

308

Tri-Generation Success Story: World's First Tri-Gen Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of EnergyThe SunMelissaStation-Fountain Valley | Department of

309

Measurement of BR(Bu to phi K)/BR(Bu to J/psi K) at the collider detector at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis presents evidence for the decay mode B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using (120 {+-} 7)pb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). This signal is then used to measure the branching ratio relative to the decay mode B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}. The measurement starts from reconstructing the two decay modes: B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}}, where {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}, where J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. The measurement yielded 23 {+-} 7 B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} events, and 406 {+-} 26 B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} events. The fraction of B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} events where the J/{psi} subsequently decayed to two muons (as opposed to two electrons) was found to be f{sub {mu}{mu}} = 0.839 {+-} 0.066. The relative branching ratio of the two decays is then calculated based on the equation: BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}})/BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}) = N{sub {phi}K}/N{sub {psi}K} {center_dot}f{sub {mu}{mu}} BR(J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -})/BR({phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}) {epsilon}{sub {mu}{mu}}K/{epsilon}KKK R({epsilon}{sub iso}). The measurement finds BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}})/BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}) = 0.0068 {+-} 0.0021(stat.) {+-} 0.0007(syst.). The B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} branching ratio is then found to be BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}}) = [6.9 {+-} 2.1(stat.) {+-} 0.8(syst.)] x 10{sup -6}. This value is consistent with similar measurements reported by the e{sup +}e{sup -} collider experiments BaBar[1], Belle[2], and CLEO[3].

Napora, Robert A

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Agronomic Information 2008 Burley ToBacco ProducTion Guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an adequate water supply and protected by windbreaks on the north and west sides. 2. Seed 75 to 100 square The production of an ample supply of uniform, healthy plants that are available reasonably early inches higher than the surrounding area. In the later stages of plant-bed preparation, do not use heavy

Liskiewicz, Maciej

311

WATER QUALITY DATA AND COLLECTION SUMMARY Water Monitorin site Descri tion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-ionized ammonia nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen, Total ~jeldahl Nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, pH, total phosphorous seasonal concentrations were reported for carbon dioxide and six for bicarbonate alkalinity. Graphs were alkalinity, biochemical oxygen demand, carbon dioxide, chlo- rophyll a, chlorophyll b, chloride, color

Soerens, Thomas

312

More than 200 effects in growth, reproduc-tion, osmoregulation, and immunology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

documented for prolactin (PRL). Although PRL seems to be an omnipotent hor- mone ("omnipotin"), it is best known for its role in the production of milk proteins. However, PRL is not only essential for 2 days show maternal care and an increase in plasma PRL level (13). Nulliparous, hypophysec- tomized

Allman, John M.

313

2010 shanghai ExPo EDiTion soCiology graDUaTE Daisy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

life for all. #12;1 06 13 ConTEnTs 02 BUilDing BriDgEs To China: Professor John hearn writes about Goodman's research into German adventurers in China, including architect Walther Frey who designed some at the Shanghai expo 16 whaT nExT for China: Chinese Ambassador Zhang Junsai and historian John Wong write about

Du, Jie

314

STATEMENT OF C01 SIDER.!;.TIONS RE Q UE ST BY INVENTOR FOR THE...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pc itio n and in 'Je w or th objectives and con;-; idcrat ions set forth in I 0 CFR 784, all of wl-:: ch have 'JCcn considered . it is n:commendcd that the requested...

315

STATEMENT OF CON SID ERA TIONS REQUEST BY ABENGOA SOLAR INC....  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of the waiver petition and in view of the objectives and considerations set forth in 10 CFR 784, all of which have been considered, it is recommended that the requested waiver be...

316

The end of the book offers recommenda-tions and suggestions for running and docu-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

also use this book to ana- lyze the impact of innovations in their soft- ware development practices at the Fraunhofer Institute for Experimental Software Engineering in Kaiserslautern. Germany. Contact her at lopez of application systems tailored toward a particular prob- lem domain. We can express variability within

van Deursen, Arie

317

THE CETACEAN EAR: FORM, FREQUENCY, AND EVOLuTION Darlene R. Ketten  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

condylarths, a cat-like, hooved carnivore, during the mammalian radiation, an explosive period of species, navigating, and finding mates. Once protocetes entered the ocean, these functions had to be accomplished

318

the YD triggered an equatorward reorganiza-tion of zonal circulation over North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, which they in- terpret as a glacial advance and then correlate it to the Waiho Loop sequence. Carbon isotope data show strong revegetation at about 13,000 radio- carbon years ago with no signal of a YD

Miyashita, Yasushi

319

RESOLUTION NO. 2013 -110 RESOLUTION AMENDING THE TURLOCK IRRIGA TION DISTRICT'S  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Owned Electric Utilities and the Turlock Irrigation District Renewable Resources Procurement Plan. NOW) with the TID Renewable Resources Procurement Plan. The TID Renewable Resources Procurement Plan, at minimum Compliance Period 1, January 1, 2011 to December 31,2013, TID shall procure renewable energy resources

320

FOR STUDENTS // FEbRUaRy 2012 FOR EDUCaTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

basic Search (autocomplete) 10 Full Search 11 browsing Menus 12 PERFORMING aNaLySIS 12 Navigating Functions 13 Stock/Company Screening 14 analyzing a Company 15 analyzing an Index, bond or Currency 16 Ex sectors. It features company financials, market data spanning more than 20 years, charts, statistics

Banaji,. Murad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

2013NatureAmerica,Inc.Allrightsreserved. nature immunology aDVaNCE ONLINE PUBLICaTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 6Core Technology and Research Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, Japan signals leading to the release of allergic mediators that induce immediate hypersensitivity1. Anaphylaxis including the respiratory and circulatory systems, often leading to life-threatening episodes

Gelb, Michael

322

The PneumaTic hybridizaTion concePT for downsizing and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that are based on exotic energy carriers. Compared to conventional fuels, pressu- rized air exhibits an extremely

Lygeros, John

323

AMENDMENT OF SOLICIT ATION/MODIFICA TION OF CONTRACT 1. CONTRACTID CODE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TO BE RECEIVED AT THE PLACE DESIGNATED FOR THE RECEIPT OF OFFERS PRIOR TO THE HOUR

324

Social housing policies under changing framework condi-tions in Santiago de Chile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

unifamiliares en modalidad de autoconstrucción o bloques de viviendas plurifamiliares. Con ello los campamentos de vi- viendas irregulares disminuyeron considerablemente. La política de vivienda social fue

Borsdorf, Axel

325

tion. Human or mouse intestinal epithelial cells that express the poly-Ig receptor were  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Antibodies specific for Clostrid- ium difficile toxin A and Helicobacter pylori urease have been generated, Glauser M et al (1995) Oral immunization with Helicobacter pylori urease as a treatment against Helicobacter infection. Gas- troenterology (in press) Haneberg B, Kendall D, Amerongen HM, Apter FM

Boyer, Edmond

326

Keywords: Agents, Cellular models, Discrete event simula-tion, DEVS, human agent models, Mediterranean landscape.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- plained by climate change or human-caused degradation of the landscape. Finally, by placing model villages, Mediterranean landscape. ABSTRACT The Mediterranean Landscape Dynamics (MEDLAND) pro- ject seeks to better an- other while providing flexibility for either model to be changed in a systematic fashion

327

MEMORANDUM FOR SCOTI L. SAMUELSON MANAGER OFFICE OF RIVER PROTE~TION ~  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L. Wood,3, BPADepartmentMarch

328

The Beverley Taylor SorenSon arTS & educaTion complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. & Patricia W. Child Taft & Mary Jane Price Pat & Boyer Jarvis The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Funds Michael L. Hardman & Monica Ferguson John & Andrea McDonnell Rebecca Meadows Anderson & Nathan Anderson Anonymous Anonymous Anonymous David & Susan Carlebach Willa's Workshop Ivory Homes Bill Evans

Tipple, Brett

329

High-Risk Groups The CenTer for TransporTaTion safeTy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measures of protection. Motorcyclists Ongoing careful analysis of motorcycle crash trends has provided a foundation for a statewide campaign to improve motorist awareness of motorcycles. The CTS also conducts professionals as well as motorcycle users. In the wake of these efforts, data suggest that motorcycle crashes

330

LORRAINE A. DELHORNE, M.S. EMAIL: delhorne@bu.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EDUCATION Ashland College, Ashland, OH B.A. Speech and Hearing Washington University, St. Louis, MO M

Guenther, Frank

331

EC 568: Optical Fibers and Waveguides Prof. Siddharth Ramachandran (sidr@bu.edu);  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the optical frequency) pulse over distances ranging from meters to greater than ten thousand kilometers without distortions. Fibers can also become smart light-pipes when they are intentionally designed

332

EC 568: Optical Fibers and Waveguides Prof. Siddharth Ramachandran (sidr@bu.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) pulse over distances ranging from meters to greater than ten thousand kilometers without distortions. Fibers can also become smart light-pipes when they are intentionally designed to alter, temporally shape

333

hep-th/9701191 MIT-CTP-2605 BU/HEP-97-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

space. A weakly coupled low energy description which includes all massless modes still has not been theories with spinors, both with no tree-level super- potential. Our proposed duals have the interesting feature that they are self-duals. The electric theory and its magnetic dual have identical gauge groups

Terning, John

334

E-Print Network 3.0 - areva nc bu Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Physics, Stanford University Collection: Physics 3 Heterogeneous modeling of the uranium in situ recovery: Kinetic versus solubility Jrmy. Nosa,1, 2 Summary: Tech - Centre...

335

BU Department of Chemistry 1 of 4 2013 Undergraduate Research Symposium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. James Park, who did his HONORS research with Prof. Corey Stephenson and his with Associate Dean, Prof. Geoffrey Cooper, Biology Elizabeth describing her work of cariomyocytes" Dean Cooper (behind Professors Straub and Abrams) listening

336

Search for b-->u transitions in B- --> DK- and B- --> D*K- Decays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report results from an updated study of the suppressed decays B- to D K- and B- to D* K- followed by D to K+pi-, where D(*) indicates a D(*)0 or an anti-D(*)0 meson, and D* decays to D pi0 or D gamma. These decays are sensitive to the CKM unitarity triangle angle gamma, due to interference between the b to c transition B- to D(*)0K- followed by the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay D0 to K+pi-, and the b to u transition B- to anti-D(*)0K- followed by the Cabibbo-favored decay anti-D0 to K+pi-. We also report an analysis of the decay B- to D(*)pi- with the D decaying into the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed mode D to K+pi-. Our results are based on 467 million Upsilon (4S) to B anti-B decays collected with the BaBar detector at SLAC. We measure the ratios R(*) of the suppressed ([K+pi-]_D K-/pi-) to favored ([K-pi+]_D K-/pi-) branching fractions as well as the CP asymmetries A(*) of those modes. We see indications of signals for the B- to D K- and B- to D*K-, D*->D pi0 suppressed modes, with statistical significances of 2.1 and 2.2 sigma, respectively, and we measure: R_{DK} = (1.1\\pm 0.6 \\pm 0.2)\\times 10^{-2}, A_{DK} = -0.86 \\pm 0.47 \\ ^{+0.12}_{-0.16}, R*_{(D pi0)K} = (1.8\\pm 0.9 \\pm 0.4)\\times 10^{-2}, A*_{(D pi0)K} = +0.77 \\pm 0.35\\pm 0.12, R*_{(D gamma)K} = (1.3\\pm 1.4\\pm 0.8 )\\times 10^{-2}, A*_{(D gamma)K} = +0.36 \\pm 0.94\\ ^{+0.25}_{-0.41}, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We use a frequentist approach to obtain the magnitude of the ratio r_B = |A(B- to anti-D0 K-) / A(B- to D0K-)|= (9.5^{+5.1}_{-4.1})%, with r_BK- we find r*_B = |A(B^- to anti-D*0 K-)/A(B- to D*0 K-)|=(9.6^{+3.5}_{-5.1})%, with r*_B<15.0% at 90% confidence level.

The BABAR Collaboration; P. del Amo Sanchez et al.

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

337

Released upun reucipt bu.t intended f o r use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and color o f i t s surface, tha inclination of the surface to the m f s rays and the strength of the air CU colors Were placed i n the sun but sheltered as f a r as possibl%rom the cooling influence of the wind

338

Boston University School of Social Work www.bu.edu/ssw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Responsible Social Work Practice | State Health Policy | Disability | Children and Youth with Special Health about how best to solve real-world social and behavioral problems. As an institution, we are committed. We recognize the changing demands on the social work profession, and are striving to meet them

339

Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14009 … Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Backup Power (BuP)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional ElectricalEnergy Frozen TelescopeRenewable 0 0 A N09 (Rev. 1)

340

ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone:short version)ecTotalnerr g0@3 Early ReleaseBOE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone:short version)ecTotalnerr g0@3 Early

342

ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone:short version)ecTotalnerr g0@3 EarlyLiquids

343

BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone:shortOil and Natural8U.S.NA (BarrelsBOE Reserve

344

BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone:shortOil and Natural8U.S.NA (BarrelsBOE

345

BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone:shortOil and Natural8U.S.NA (BarrelsBOELiquids

346

BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone:shortOil and Natural8U.S.NALiquids Reserve

347

BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone:shortOil and Natural8U.S.NALiquids Reserve Miles

348

GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0, 1997Environment >7,99 Diagram 4.Future:F4:GLADY

349

GEORGE WATTS HILL ALUMNI CENTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BR IN KH O U S- BU LLITT CHILLER BUILDING F KENAN STADIUM GEORGE WATTS HILL ALUMNI CENTER EHRINGHAUS FIELD DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY C AR PEN TRY SH O P CHILLER BUILDING NEURO SCIENCES WATER TOWER ITS MANNING CHILLER BUILDING PUBLIC SAFETY BLDG. MORRISON RIDGEROAD EHRINGHAUS BOSHAMER BASEBALL STADIUM

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

350

Metered Visitor Motorcycle Pkg.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

acNIDER M EDICINE BER RYH ILL BR IN KH O U S- BU LLITT CHILLER BUILDING F KENAN STADIUM GEORGE WATTS HILL ALUMNI CENTER EHRINGHAUS FIELD DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY C AR PEN TRY SH O P CHILLER BUILDING NEURO SCIENCES WATER TOWER ITS MANNING CHILLER BUILDING PUBLIC SAFETY BLDG. MORRISON RIDGEROAD

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

351

Disabled Visitor Parking Only  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCIENCES LIBRARY M acNIDER M EDICINE BER RYH ILL BR IN KH O U S- BU LLITT CHILLER BUILDING F KENAN STADIUM GEORGE WATTS HILL ALUMNI CENTER EHRINGHAUS FIELD DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY C AR PEN TRY SH O P CHILLER BUILDING NEURO SCIENCES WATER TOWER ITS MANNING CHILLER BUILDING PUBLIC SAFETY BLDG. MORRISON RIDGEROAD

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

352

Are there principles to guide eddy parameterizations? Greg Holloway  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

what ocean modelling seeks to do. If our modelling pro- ject amounts to trying to invent a steam engine would invent a steam engine based on thermodynamic func- tions, in part from empiricism and in part from

Cambridge, University of

353

InsideIllinoisApril 7, 2005 Vol. 24, No. 18  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was a reporter and columnist for the Chicago Tri- bune from 1972-1980. Geist served as a combat photographer Forrest Assistant Editor Representatives of the American Federa- tion of State County and Municipal Employ

Lewis, Jennifer

354

Tri-Party Agreement for Energy Savings Performance Contract ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

to the following responsibilities: |ECM|Warranty Labor|Warranty Material|Operations |Preventive Maintenance|Repair and Replacement| ||| | |Controls|Panels Equipment| |...

355

New ideas, tried-and-true methods boost cleaning efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Process cleaning can cut needed operating time and add to plant waste treatment and/or disposal requirements. Whether a plant takes a clean-in-place (CIP) or an open-and-clean approach, the choice of cleaning materials is important. Cleaning agents must be compatible with the process and equipment and ideally will have no adverse environmental impact. This article describes merits of three cleaning methods: CO[sub 2] as an industrial cleaner; water blasting with soluble polymers; and post-job cleanup with a water-soluble abrasive.

Hodel, A.E.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

When alcohol-dependent people try to stop drink-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

some form of treatment. If you or someone you care about may have an alcohol problem, help is available--so they may drink some more, and it becomes a vicious cycle. "Addiction has 3 major problems: You lose your researcher studying new alcoholism treatments. "People develop an alcohol disorder National Institutes

Baker, Chris I.

357

Tri-Party Agreement for Energy Savings Performance Contract ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and maintenance-specific, as well agency responsibilities. The (Agency name) will be contracting for energy services with (ESCO) under a First Task Order for and ESPC Project at...

358

Covalently linked tri and tetra compounds: Intriguing optical properties and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interconnections are realized using integrated optoelectronic devices operating at wavelengths to which silicon silicon circuits. The thin film optoelectronic devices are bonded directly to the stacked layers. devices. These optoelectronic devices operate at wavelengths to which the silicon is transparent, thus

Shyamasundar, R.K.

359

Math 741 Final RULES. Try to write efficiently and succinctly.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is essential in V , and write W ess V , if W X = 0 for all nonzero submodules X of V . 1. If W ess V and U is a submodule of V , prove that (W U) ess U. 2. If W1 and W2 are essential in V , show that (W1 W2) ess V . 3. Suppose W is a submodule of V . Prove that there exists a submodule W of V such that (W W ) ess V . 4

Passman, Donald S.

360

Tri-National Agricultural Accord Rural Development Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Infrastructure Human resource development Investment attraction Entrepreneurship / SMEs Community for integrated approach: infrastructure, diversification, human resources, health, services, technology

deYoung, Brad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Characterization of the Tri10 gene from Fusarium sporotrichioides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

events. Novozyme 234 (InterSpex Products), 1% driselase (Sigma) and 0.025% chitinase (Sigma). The germlings were then incubated at 28C for 20-60 min with gentle shaking (75-90 rpm) until most of the culture had been converted to protoplasts...

Tag, Andrew George

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

362

TRiPoD (Temporal Relationalism incorporating Principles of Dynamics)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temporal Relationalism is that there is no time for the universe as a whole at the primary level. Time emerges rather at a secondary level; one compelling idea for this is Mach's: that time is to be abstracted from change. Temporal Relationalism leads to, and better explains, the well-known Frozen Formalism Problem encountered in GR and other background-independent theories at the quantum level. Abstraction from change is then a type of emergent time resolution of this. Moreover, the Frozen Formalism Problem is but one of the many Problem of Time facets, which are notoriously interconnected. The current article concerns modifications of physical formalism which ensure that once Temporal Relationalism is resolved, it stays incorporated. At the classical level, this involves modifying much of the Principles of Dynamics. I first introduce the anti-Routhian to complete the Legendre square of Lagrangian, Hamiltonian and Routhian. I next pass from velocities $\\dot{Q}\\mbox{}^{A}$ to changes d$Q^{A}$. Then Lagrangians are supplanted by Jacobi arc elements, Euler--Lagrange equations by Jacobi--Mach ones, and momentum requires redefining but actions remain unchanged. A differential (d) version of the Hamiltonian is required, giving rise to a variant of the Dirac approach based on a d-almost Hamiltonian subcase of the d-anti Routhian. On the other hand, the forms of the constraints themselves, and of Hamilton--Jacobi theory, remain unaltered.

Edward Anderson

2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

363

2004 INDEX OF INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY TRI-CITIES, WASHINGTON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be important to technology firms. This report updates the material in the earlier report. The report shows Innovation 6 Innovation Capacity 6 Education of the Workforce 7 Technology Orientation 8 Patent Generation 9

364

Tri-Lab Directors' statement on the nuclear posture review  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButlerTransportation From modelingTrending: Metal OxoStatement

365

Tri-Party Agreement Hanford Public Involvement Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButlerTransportation From modelingTrending: Metal OxoStatement 1

366

TriLateral Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende NewSowitec do Brasil EnergiaSurPVTip forIdeas

367

A Heart of Gold? Try Platinum | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataCombinedDepartment2015 InformationA BRIEF HISTORY OF THEA Clean EnergyA

368

Which LED Lighting Products Would You Consider Trying? | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment of Energy WhileTanklessLES'NeighborhoodThis workshopofEnergy On

369

Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization Tri-Fold |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJaredOakscience-based,OHAGasandSafetyof

370

TRI-CITIES, WASHINGTON INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY INDEX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investment 19 SBIR Program Awards 20 Quality of Life 21 Weather 21 Air and Water Quality 22 Local Orientation 8 Patent Generation 9 Research and Development Expenditures and Assistance 10 Competitiveness 11

371

Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

permeability measurements of gas hydrate-bearing sediments,International Conference on Gas Hydrates, edited, p. 1058,2009), Influence of gas hydrate morphology on the seismic

Kneafsey, T.J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Tri-State Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective:Toyo AluminiumCity Light

373

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Try Street Terminal - PA 14  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site - MOTracerlab Inc - MA 11USTry

374

Sandia National Laboratories: indus-try best practices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbine blade manufacturing the viabilityindium tin oxide

375

Tri State Electric Membership Corporation Smart Grid Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformation

376

Tri-County Elec Member Corp (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformationKentucky) Jump to: navigation, search

377

Tri-County Electric Coop (Michigan) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformationKentucky) Jump to:

378

Tri-County Rural Elec Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformationKentucky) Jump

379

TriEagle Energy, LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformationKentucky) JumpCorp (North Carolina)

380

Hawkeye Tri-County El Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: EnergyPower Finance Jump737002°,HavanaEl Coop Inc Jump to:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Name: Lisa Anderson Organization: Tri-City Railroad Company  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet TestAccounts andThe Role of Mesoscale Eddies9085023

382

Microsoft Word - Application for Leave Tri-Form.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8 - Outline andPROPOSAL FACT SHEET15APPLICATION

383

Microsoft Word - Tri-State Case Study.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.eps MoreWSRC-STI-2007-00250 Rev. 05 Oak09 U . S . D e p a Department

384

Tri State Generation and Transmission Association Inc | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,LtdInformation DixieTraverse Electric Coop,Trenton, NJ)Trexa

385

Tri-County Elec Member Corp (Tennessee) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,LtdInformation DixieTraverse Electric Coop,Trenton,

386

Tri-State Electric Member Corp (Tennessee) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,LtdInformation DixieTraverse Electric Coop,Trenton,Corp

387

Tri-State Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,LtdInformation DixieTraverse Electric Coop,Trenton,CorpJump to:

388

Quantum Mechanics of a Simulated Tri-hydrogen Dication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Schroedinger equation is solved exactly within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for a simulacrum of the $H_3^{++}$-ion. The ion is assumed to form an isosceles triangle and the ground state energy is obtained over its geometrical parameter space. No multi-center molecular integrations are required. We indicate how the approximation to the actual molecule can be improved systematically.

M. L. Glasser

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

389

The Value of Green Tri-City Speaker Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

announcing commitments to "green" Wachovia had announced plans to build 300 new green branches Rationale: ­ Increased focus on corporate accountability (CSR) ­ Client/customer demand & business pressure to green in response to shareholder concerns and future carbon-related risks ­ Incorporation of climate risk

390

tions (Fig. 4). The layer thicknesses observed (a 0.90 m for the 400-m fibers; a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(1999). 17. Z. U. Borisova, Glassy Semiconductors (Plenum, New York, 1981). 18. A. K. Varshneya, J. Non (1970). 22. M. Bass, Ed., Handbook of Optics (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1995). 23. J. E. Mark, Ed., Polymer

Romanowicz, Barbara

391

tions (www.aip.org/pas). One of its pro-grams is suited for examining the phe-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in an electromagnetic analog of the spring oscillator--that is, in a series LCR circuit containing an inductor (a coil oscil- lations of a mechanical torsion-spring pendulum whose moment of inertia is subject to periodic- ments this article describes deal with a fa- miliar mechanical system--the torsion- spring oscillator

Butikov, Eugene

392

Summary Human activities are increasing the concentra-tions of atmospheric carbon dioxide ([CO2]) and tropospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to forest soils. Because the quality and quantity of labile and recalcitrant carbon (C) com- pounds, soluble phenolics and condensed tannins. Elevated [CO2] significantly increased lit- ter biomass] and tropospheric [O3] that we observed, combined with changes in litter biomass production, could significantly

393

tion (21) and protonation state (22) of TyrL162 may be important for the mechanism of electron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oxygen from water. Crystal structures of photo- system II (30) reveal that TyrZ lies between the oxygen-evolving center and the special pair in a position functionally analogous to that occupied by TyrL162 of RCvirL162 may have aided the spontaneous formation of tyrosine radicals in an ancient reaction center

Blumberg, Bruce

394

The beaver is nature's original wetland creation and restora-tion expert. Stimulated by the sound of running water, the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Beschta 2008; Diefenderfer and Montgomery 2009), southeastern U.S. blackwater streams (Snodgrass and Meffe

395

ment of robust recognition in diverse environmental condi-tions through the formulation of a series of speech enhance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a series of speech enhance Speech Recognition System ment and stress compensationpreprocessingalgorithms iterative speech enhancement [1,2]. Stress compensation al- gorithms are based on formant location, bandwidth, and in- tensity. Enhancement preprocessingincreases recognition by +34% for neutral speech, 18

Texas at Dallas, University of

396

Abstract In the present study, soil C and N mineraliza-tion and nutrient availability were compared: (1) in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

losses of SOM can only be replenished in the short-term by application of organic matter such as ma- nure

Lehmann, Johannes

397

form processing specifically for use by vision applica-tions. The most fundamental of the planned extensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, J. Brolio, A. Hanson, and E. Riseman, "The Schema System," International Journal of Computer Vision, "Detecting Runways in Complex Airport Scenes," Computer Vision, Graphics, and Image Processing, Vol. 51, No:McGraw Hill, 1975, Chapter 5. #12;Figure 10 Los Angeles International -- Excellent runway only. #12;Figure 9

Southern California, University of

398

nparticulier consulte un architecte pour la construc-tion d'une maison. Plusieurs options lui sont offertes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sont offertes : une maison de plain-pied ou à un étage, un patio, une terrasse et un garage. Ses goûts et son ban- quier lui dictent plusieurs contraintes : il faut qu'il y ait un étage ou une terrasse, mais pas les deux ; il faut qu'il y ait un garage ou un patio, mais pas les deux ; s'il y a un patio

Monasson, Rémi

399

Full field investigation of salt deformation at room temperature: coopera-tion of crystal plasticity and grain sliding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Halite has been extensively studied both as a rock forming mineral with industrial applications (storage) and cyclic loading, owing to a new projected use of salt cavities as storage for com- pressed air, which of pure laboratory salt powder (99,9 %). First, the pow- der was cold pressed during 48 hours

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

400

thorie, rnais plutt l'emploi des tubes qui modifient les condi-tions de l'vaporation. E. HAUDI.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

possible l'effet Peltier ; elles ont conlirm la loi de Thomson. Celles de NI. Jahn, au contraire, duraient loi de Thomson relative l'effet Peltier dans le cas de deux mtaux diffrentes, d'un mtal et d semblable celui qui a t dj dcrit (1 ). Les valeurs moyennes de l'efl'et Peltier, lorsqu'on fait

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

FIGURE 1 Map of Britain and Ireland showing the main islands men-tioned in the text.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Publishing Group). Rautner, M., M. Hardiono, and R.J. Alfred. 2005. Borneo: Treasure Island at risk. Status

Gillespie, Rosemary

402

tion using complexes formed with 32 mRNA and found that the mRNA segregated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and thereby contribute to ribosome recycling during termination. Treatment of termi- nation complexes (with 35 S-Metlabeled peptidyl- tRNA) with catalytically inactive eRF1(AGQ): eRF3 led to the formation specificity, taking place only when a stop codon was presented in the A site (Fig. 4C). Canonical recycling

Rockman, Matthew

403

absorption properties of leaf with minimum scattering contribu-tion. In order to minimize the scattering contribution due to air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, FLORIDA Florida State University Tom Thumb, a useful popcorn --Bass, HW, Kang, LC, Eyzaguirre, A We have mother cells and found them to be suitable for FISH and immunocytochemical analysis of meiotic prophase. Figure 2 shows that telomeres and several knobs can be detected by 3D FISH carried out as previously

Bass, Hank W.

404

A Bu ering Strategy for End-to-end Quality of Service Using the Real Time Protocol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maggiorini, Elena Pagani, Gian Paolo Rossi Dip. di Scienze dell'Informazione - Universit#18;a degli Studi di at the destination. At the sender host, RTP marks the generated messages with a timestamp and a sequence number

Pagani, Elena

405

Communiqu de presse La corde de la russite de l'UFR droit expose la BU Proudhon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Claude Nicolas Ledoux et quatre collèges, Albert Camus, Clairs soleils, Stendhal et Proudhon qui vont à sont retrouvés au collège Camus pour une matinée de conférence sur le thème du développement durable

Jeanjean, Louis

406

Polymer Bulletin 52, 259-266 (2004) DO1 10.1007/~00289-004-0289-6 Polymer BuIletin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

composite materials. #12;260 Both types of carbon nanotubes have unpurified components known as soot. Soot carbon nanotubes was provided by NASA Ames Research Center. The composites were compression molded-wall carbon nanotube composites indicate that soot composites possess lower radiation resistance. Introduction

Harmon, Julie P.

407

20 BU Engineering w w w. b u . e d u / e n g MFGDepartment of Manufacturing Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she spent several years working first as a postdoctor- al, batteries and fuel cells. Working jointly with engineering firms Foster-Miller and Fraunhofer, Zhang has of additional study. With so much power being created by such a tiny machine, the damaging effects of heat

Zhang, Xin

408

J. Am. Chem. SOC.1995,117, 3643-3644 i. s-BuLi,TMEDA, THF, -9OOC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in ovarian sarcoma and lymphotic leukemia.2c Its natural abundance is low (0.039%of the dry weight of ground. Tetrahedron Lett. 1994, 35, 8295. (0 In additionto our efforts in this area, we are aware, by personal with the protected diene diol 7,which contains the cis- diol unit common to all of the compounds. The trans-diol unit

Hudlicky, Tomas

409

"Advent and Prolepsis" A sermon by Kirk Wegter-McNelly for the BU School of Theology Weekly Chapel Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of expectation, a season of anticipation. New life is coming, and not just a single new life, but new life in a curious, temporally inverted mode of "waiting," which is not unique to Advent or even to Christianity." Anticipation turns this "not yet" into "the future," and in so doing imparts a certain kind of power

Finzi, Adrien

410

List of IHI initiated events Events where another BU Center or Institute or Department was the principal organizer and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exceptionalism," Nature'snd Classroom, Hancock, New Hampshire. Two-day roundtable of 15 IHI Faculty and Graduate-day roundtable of 13 IHI Faculty and Graduate Fellows. Nature's Classroom, Hancock, New Hampshire. IHI Faculty and Graduate Student Fellows only. Not open to the public. 10/18/11 Benjamin Runkle, House Armed Services

Spence, Harlan Ernest

411

Nottingham Trent University, Burton Street, Nottingham, NG1 4BU Tel: +44 (0)115 941 8418. 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, turkey, lean (not reconstituted) ham and beef Good sources of protein to provide brain fuel and help your. Prompts the body to store the excess as fat. Also damages cells to lead to ageing and wrinkles as well very quickly to raise blood sugar levels Hydrogenated fats (added to some processed foods) and trans

Evans, Paul

412

Fair rate assignment in interference limited multi-hop networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conclusion (Micro-Bu?ered Networks) . . . . . . . . . . .Micro-Bu?ered Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .for wdm-based micro-bu?ered networks . Figure 2.3: A sample

Arisoylu, Mustafa

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Minnesota Innovation Partnerships (MN-IP) Try and Buy MN-IP Try and Buy --for companies interested in licensing existing U of M inventions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is executed BUY (LICENSE) · Low, published royalty rate, with first $1 million of product sales royalty-free · Royalty rates based on industry comparables · Royalty rate discount for MN operating companies2 · Royalty

Minnesota, University of

414

Effect of Rail Rate Deregulation: The Case of Wheat Exports from the South Plains.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ....................................... 4 Effect of Rail Rate Deregulation: The Case of Wheat Exports from the South Plains Stephen Fuller and C.V. Shanmugham" a INTRODUCTION Agriculture is an important user of rail services for shipping products to market and for moving produc...- tion supplies to rural communities. The l e d and structure of rail rates affect returns to farmers as well as farmers' competitive positions in distant markets. Farm products tend to be buIky and heavy reIative to their value; accordingly...

Fuller, Stephen; Shanmugham, C.V

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

The purpose of this file (always under construction) is to provide correc-tions and references to further developments regarding the material in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Dammame, Allouche, Berthe, Denis takes the results further. 3. (3) (Gauss, Inv 88): (Updates) For A

Zakharov, Vladimir

416

The purpose of this file (always under construction) is to provide correc-tions and references to further developments regarding the material in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Dammame, Allouche, Berthe, Denis takes the results further. 3. (3) (Gauss, Inv 88): (Updates) For A, other volume, Anderson's papers in Duke, JNT, Dammame's thesis a

Zakharov, Vladimir

417

1197 South Lumpkin Street Athens Georgia 30602-3603 weddings@georgiacenter.uga.edu 706.542.2654 recePTion service inFormaTion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] Chef's Selection of Cookies, Brownies, and Other Bakery Sweets, Snack Baskets, Orange-Cranberry, and Sliced Fresh Strawberries. Cookies, Pretzels, Orange-Cranberry Punch, and Hot Coffee Punch service [3091] Orange-Cranberry Punch BeFore-dinner deluxe social hour wiThouT alcohol [3095] Snack Baskets, Potato

Arnold, Jonathan

418

Volume 25. tionScrvica,Univeraity of B.C., Number 21. , Vancouver, B.C. VtX 1W5,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of transport phenomena in metallurgicalprocesses." Earlier this year the institute presented him with its of the chemical engineering department. Cancer agents in food subject of UBC research UBC scientists and the establishmentof guidelines for student evaluationof courses and teaching, and for the use and distribution

Farrell, Anthony P.

419

In ~~olution, L~arning, gogn!tion, and Advanced Architectures, Y.C. Lee (Ed.). Hong Kong: World  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scientific Publishers, 1988. SPEECH PERCEPTION AND PRODUCTION BY A SELF-ORGANIZING NEURAL NETWORK Michael A perception, invariant speech perception, word superiority, and phonemic restoration. 1. The Learning of Language Units During a human's early years, an exquisitely subtle and sensitive speech recognition

Grossberg, Stephen

420

A MILD OXIDJ.TION OF ALDEHYDES TO ir,B-LMATURATEU ALDEHYDES David K. Willm~s"' and Klyoshl Nishltani  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

led to mixtures. - Notably enol acetates and ethers have been recognized as excellent substrates-hydroxy selenldes which are conven- iently transformed into vinyl selenides, epoxldes, olefins, and allylic alcohols

Williams, David R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Hydrolysis of DFP and the Nerve Agent (S)-Sarin by DFPase Proceeds Along Two Different Reaction Pathways: Implica-tions for Engineering Bioscavengers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents such as (S)-sarin are among the most highly toxic compounds that have been synthesized. Engineering enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of nerve agents ( bioscavengers ) is an emerging prophylactic approach to diminishing their toxic effects. Although its native function is not known, diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase) from Loligo vulgaris catalyzes the hydrolysis of OP compounds. Here, we investigate the mechanisms of diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) and (S)-sarin hydrolysis by DFPase with quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) umbrella sampling simulations. We find that the mechanism for hydrolysis of DFP involves nucleophilic attack by Asp229 on phosphorus to form a pentavalent intermediate. P F bond dissociation then yields a phosphoacyl enzyme intermediate in the rate-limiting step. The simulations suggest that a water molecule, coordinated to the catalytic Ca2+, donates a proton to Asp121 and then attacks the tetrahedral phosphoacyl intermediate to liberate the diisopropylphosphate product. In contrast, the calculated free energy barrier for hydrolysis of (S)-sarin by the same mechanism is highly unfavorable, primarily due to the instability of the pentavalent phosphoenzyme species. Instead, simulations suggest that hydrolysis of (S)-sarin proceeds by a mechanism in which Asp229 could activate an intervening water molecule for nucleophilic attack on the substrate. These findings may lead to improved strategies for engineering DFPase and related six-bladed -propeller folds for more efficient degradation of OP compounds.

Wymore, Troy W [ORNL] [ORNL; Langan, Paul [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL] [ORNL; Field, Martin J. [Institut de Biologie Structurale Jean-Pierre Ebel] [Institut de Biologie Structurale Jean-Pierre Ebel; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

inverter. He is the author or co-author of more than 300 publica-tions in his research fields including the book `Control in Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

W, the induction generator is favored for small hydro and wind power plants. More recently, with the widespread use Power Electronics Society NEWSLETTER 19 Induction Generators for Small Wind Energy Systems M. Godoy solution for such applications [1]. For its simplicity, robustness, and small size per generated k

Simões, Marcelo Godoy

423

Clemson University Preservation master Plan ParT I: InTroducTIon chaPTer one February 2009 JMa, Inc. 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cultural landscape as surveyed in 2008, including historic landscape and building elements. Part IV for campus-wide planning, as well as for the alteration of historic landscape and building elements. Part V: Treatment Recommendations provide specific recommended treatments and preservation maintenance practices

Duchowski, Andrew T.

424

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. BME-23, NO. 3, MAY 1976 tion of Bayluscide and sodium Pentachlorophenate in the Egypt-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sodium Pentachlorophenate in the Egypt- 49 project area," Bull. World Health Org., vol. 35, pp. 357 mansoni infections in the Egypt- 49 project area, 1. sampling techniques and procedures for mea- suring. Mallah, "The behavioural pattern of social and religious water-contact activities in the Egypt-49

425

www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 335 6 JANUARY 2012 23 NEWS&ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, which is trying to show that it is possible to create worldwide are pinned to the fortunes of the National Igni- tion Facility (NIF), a $3.5 billion laser center, revealed in an internal NIF document Science has seen, has highlighted the concerns of some in the field

426

Assessing the Trade-Off between System Building Cost and Output Quality in Data-To-Text Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

involve different combina- tions of manual and automatic techniques. Next (Section 4) we describe ten. In this paper we set about trying to find answers to these questions. We start, in the following section, by briefly describing the corpus of weather forecasts which we used in our experiments. In the next section

Belz, Anja

427

Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also connected to surface waters, and maintains the flow of rivers and streams and the level of wetlands- tion of those along Lake Michigan, most communi- ties, farms and industries still rely on ground water

Saldin, Dilano

428

eurohealth Vol 11 No 317 CITIZEN EMPOWERMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

implemented a number of different health system reforms in order to try and halt the inexorable increase in health care costs. This has lead to the strengthening of constraints on funding and the introduc- tion moved to implement a different approach to health care policy based on a system of setting health

Boyer, Edmond

429

pdf file  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 30, 2003 ... In this paper we propose a new framework for global exploration which tries ... original problem to observe the transformed function L in a single point. ...... linkage: a family of acceptance/rejection algorithms for global optimisa- tion. ... timization by basin-hopping and the lowest energy structures of lennard-.

2003-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

430

E-Print Network 3.0 - asc tri-lab environment Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

partnered with the support of the NNSA ASC program to develop ... Source: Fuerschbach, Phillip - Joining and Coating Department, Materials and Process Sciences Center, Sandia...

431

Compositions of doped, co-doped and tri-doped semiconductor materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Semiconductor materials suitable for being used in radiation detectors are disclosed. A particular example of the semiconductor materials includes tellurium, cadmium, and zinc. Tellurium is in molar excess of cadmium and zinc. The example also includes aluminum having a concentration of about 10 to about 20,000 atomic parts per billion and erbium having a concentration of at least 10,000 atomic parts per billion.

Lynn, Kelvin (Pullman, WA); Jones, Kelly (Colfax, WA); Ciampi, Guido (Watertown, MA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

432

An Analysis of Client Satisfaction and Company Efficiency at Tri Lake Consultants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

San Jacinto including some CIP design and management, plancapital improvement project (CIP) delivery as a primaryour work with you Delivering CIP projects Keeping City staff

Sunde, Christopher Nathan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Try Beta Log in / create account Thalidomide -Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as an effective tranquiliser and painkiller and was proclaimed as a "wonder drug" for insomnia, coughs, colds

Zhang, Daowen

434

During the past two decades, dozens of coun-tries around the world have implemented  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--OOrriieenntteedd IInnffrraassttrruuccttuurree RReeffoorrmm,, 11997777­­11999999 Witold J. Henisz Bennet A. Zelner University of Pennsylvania

Sharp, Kim

435

THERMODYNAMICS OF EXTRACTION OF NITRIC ACID BY TRI-n-BUTYL PHOSPHATE--HYDROCARBON DILUENT SOLUTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the mean act ivi ty coefficient T of TBP and TBP.H20 i n the acid-free, water-saturated organic phase

Wallace Davis

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Safe conditions for contacting nitric acid or nitrates with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from DOE-SR, the current state of knowledge of the reactions between TBP and aqueous nitrate solutions is critically reviewed, and recommendations are made for the safe operation of SRS separations equipment in which this combination of chemicals may be present. The existing limits for evaporation are validated. Guidelines are presented for cases in which general limits do not apply. The rate of reaction between nitric acid and TBP appears to be controlled by the rate of TBP hydrolysis. The hydrolysis reaction produces dibutyl phosphate and n-butanol. The hydrolysis rate is a strong function of temperature, and becomes very fast at temperatures in the range 130{degrees} to 150{degrees}C. The resulting n-butanol is volatile at high temperatures, boiling at 117.5{degrees}C, but is also subject to exothermic oxidation by nitric acid or nitrates. If oxidation occurs before the n-butanol evaporates, the heat of oxidation may exceed local cooling by convection. The resulting heating will further accelerate the reaction, leading to an energetic runaway and possibly (in confined systems) an explosion. Extensive experiments and practice have shown that in a well-mixed and well-vented aqueous system such as an evaporator, at moderate acidities and temperatures below 130{degrees}C, the heat of reaction is adequately removed by vaporization of steam. In general, the heating will be so slow that natural processes provide adequate cooling at temperatures below 80{degrees}C. Above this temperature, care should be taken to ensure that adequate cooling is available for the amount of TBP that may be present. Experiments suggest that in well-ventilated systems n-butanol evaporation and convective cooling are sufficient to control the reaction at temperatures up to 120{degrees}C.

Hyder, M.L

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Efficient Construction Of Variable-Stride Multibit Tries For IP Lookup Sartaj Sahni & Kun Suk Kim  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of [4], called the Lulea scheme, is es- sentially a three-level fixed-stride trie in which trie nodes

Sahni, Sartaj K.

438

Engineering a Cooler Earth: Can We Do It? Should We Try? Friday, October 30th  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Change Impacts: Motivation for Geoengineering? Thomas Karl, National Climatic Data Center, US 9:10 am Climate Cooling Potential of Different Geoengineering Options Tim Lenton, University of East Anglia 9:40 am Developing Scientific and Geopolitical Criteria to Rank Geoengineering Schemes Philip Boyd

Polz, Martin

439

Tri-City Herald: Japanese Officials See How Hanford Does It  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On opposite sides of the Pacific Ocean, similar work to clean up radioactive contamination is planned to be carried out during the next 40 years. Thursday, officials from the Tokyo Electric Power Co., the utility that operated the Fukushima, Japan, nuclear reactors, toured Hanford to see how work is being done there to clean up contamination from the past production of plutonium for the nation's nuclear weapons program.

440

Charge Transfer in Single Chains of a DonorAcceptor Conjugated Tri-Block Copolymer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the device electrodes. Bulk heterojunction solar cells made up of blends of the donor and acceptor materials go some way to solving these problems, however careful control over the morphology of the film components is necessary.6,7 In order to impose... in solution, in films and as single chains. While an additional long-wavelength emission apparent in neat films of the copolymer is attributed to inter-chain exciplex formation, no such long-wavelength emission is apparent in solution or from single...

Hooley, Emma N.; Jones, David J.; Greenham, Neil C.

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Reviewer Institution Ahring, Birgitte Kiaer Washington State University Tri-Cities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Central Washington University Kaplan, Daniel I Savannah River National Laboratory Kayani, Asghar Nawaz National Laboratory Bennett, Brian NMN Medical College of Wisconsin Berhe, Asmeret Asefaw University National Laboratory Goodlett, David R University of Washington Gorman, Brian P Colorado School of Mines

442

Assembly and substrate recognition properties of human CCT subunits of the TRiC chaperonin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Group II chaperonins are large multi-subunit complexes that fold cytosolic proteins to their native structures. They are composed of two back-to-back rings of 7-9 subunits. The eukaryotic cytosolic type II chaperonin ...

Sergeeva, Oksana A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Buildings at Tri-City Corporate Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Daily Electrical Consumption of Simulation Model vs. ActualDaily Electrical Consumption of Simulation Model vs. ActualHourly Electrical Consumption of Simulation Model vs. Actual

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

PREFERENCE QUESTIONNAIRE This year, the REU is trying something new: graduate student volunteers will  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time obligations, the groups will be split according to which program students are in (Apprentice, YSP, Sesame). Students in the Apprentice program are expected to attend Block 1 and students in YSP

May, J. Peter

445

Aegean Dendrochronology Project December 1997 Progress TRY THIS ON YOUR LOCAL TRAVEL-AGENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Great Konya Plain. Opinions, both written and verbal, on its date have ranged from Early Neolithic

Manning, Sturt

446

E-Print Network 3.0 - acaricide tri-n-butyl tin Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of California, Davis; Seybold, Steven J. - Departments of Entomology and Forest Resources, University of Minnesota Collection: Biotechnology ; Environmental Sciences and...

447

WSU Tri-Cities Phone Directory Last Name Acker-Hocevar, Michele  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

27190 Acker-Hocevar, Michele Aebersold, Andrea Aebersold, Simon Aguilar, Victoria Ahamed, Aftab Ahring

Collins, Gary S.

448

California's The state tries afirst-in-the-nationapproach to attackin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. A Ijevy of bikes at the busy Southern l'.icific Depot in Davis, California--a city that's ahead reinforces good planning concepts." Intleed, the low-carbon lievelopment pattern is nearly identical

Handy, Susan L.

449

Fancy trying a new sport? Want to pick up a sport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Racketball Beg Squash Courts 14.00­15.00 Cardio Tennis All Sports Hall 16.00­17.00 Swimfit All Pool.30­18.30 Basketball All Sports Hall 18.30­19.30 Netball All Sports Hall 19.30­20.30 Korfball All Sports Hall Studio 16.00­17.00 Learn To Swim Beg Pool Friday 16.15­17.15 Trampolining All New Gym 16

Birmingham, University of

450

To be more explicit on number 4) below, she wants to try to get...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

| 1 STATEMENT OF PATRICIA HOFFMAN ASSISTANT SECRETARY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND COMMERCE...

451

Where Are They? "There's no use trying," she said: "one can't believe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

III: Capable of harnessing the output of a galaxy. 1037 W (1011 L) Defined by energy usage. #12;Dyson.3 (+0.7, -0.3) ·L/T = 10-3 (-5, +2) ·N = 42 (from 1 (us) to 1.1x1011) N #12;N N = N* fs fGHZ fp nH fl f

Walter, Frederick M.

452

E-Print Network 3.0 - a4-based tri-bimaximal mixing Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy Collection: Physics 10 Neutrino oscillation phenomenology with fermions beyond the standard model Summary: and W. Rodejohann, "Large Ue3 and...

453

Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Buildings at Tri-City Corporate Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Nonresidential Buildings, 1987, 1988, 1992, 1995, 1998,2006. The Application of Building Energy Simulation andTwo High-rise Commercial Buildings in Shanghai, Proceedings

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Students try out PPPL plasma physics experiment that can be accessed...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to produce magnetic fusion as a clean and abundant source of energy for generating electricity. "There's nothing like it in the world," said Andrew Zwicker, head of the...

455

Fuel Cell Tri-Generation System Case Study using the H2A Stationary Model |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional ElectricalEnergy Frozen TelescopeRenewable 0Agency

456

Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories »Submitter ApropaneBacteria - GroverRefinement

457

Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories »Submitter ApropaneBacteria -

458

Want to Finance a Wind Farm Project in Your Community? Try Crowdfunding |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment of Energy While dry storageMarch|WISCONSINDrew

459

World's First Tri-Generation Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Fueling Station |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf TheViolations |Join the ChallengeWorkshop on

460

Lab has a 70th anniversary app-give it a try  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOSEngineering | JeffersonLabLab has a 70th

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Let's Try That Again: Selling the Teapot Dome Oil Field | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJared Temanson -of Energy 1 ofDavidThe

462

In Sweden, as in many other coun-tries Ethanol is the most wide-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the bio-energy combined cycle is about 75%. This is almost the same as an oil refinery, in which about 85 Fill up your tank Figure 1: The energy efficiency of the process is close to 75%: inputs of 1650 GWh. The lignin fuel can be very suitable for gas turbines and as an incineration additive, because it has low

463

Rehabilitation of soils and surface after a nuclear accident: Some techniques tried in the Chernobyl zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six years after the Chernobyl accident, the major part of deposited radio nuclides remains in the 3 or 4 cm of the topsoil of abandoned fields in the chernobyl zone. The Decontaminating Vegetal Network allows a layer of few centimeters of the top soil to be removed with a turf harvester. The efficiency observed at Chernobyl was 97% for cesium-137 and strontium-90. After scraping the soil with the turf harvester, the bare soil must be covered and re-grown in order to prevent wind erosion of the sandy soil. A trial spraying of polyacrylamide on the soil was carried out. This technique seems promising. Trials of bio-decontamination of the removed turf using anaerobic degradation were also carried out. This experiment provided an opportunity to measure in real conditions the transfer of radionuclides in the Chernobyl zone.

Jouve, A.; Maubert, H. [IPSN/CEA, Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Millan-Gomez, R. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Kutlakhamedov, Y. [Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine). Inst. of Cell Biology and Genetic Engineering

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

464

World's First Tri-Generation Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Fueling Station...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

to heat and electricity-in Fountain Valley. The system runs on natural gas and biogas generated by the Orange County Sanitation District's wastewater treatment facility....

465

$300,000 Block Grant Awarded to Tri-City Industrial Development Council  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment ofEnergy.pdfApplications:AdjustmentDepartment ofWater(TRIDEC) |

466

FIA-14-0042 - In the Matter of Tri-Valley CAREs | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstruction Management14,2 - In the Matter of355 - In7644 -2 -

467

FIA-14-0064 - In the Matter of Tri-Valley CAREs | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstruction Management14,2 - In the Matter of355 - In76442

468

Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared atEffectquestionnairesU.S.Resistive-ideal

469

Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared atEffectquestionnairesU.S.Resistive-idealResonant Soft X-Ray

470

Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared atEffectquestionnairesU.S.Resistive-idealResonant Soft

471

Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared atEffectquestionnairesU.S.Resistive-idealResonant SoftResonant

472

Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared atEffectquestionnairesU.S.Resistive-idealResonant

473

Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared atEffectquestionnairesU.S.Resistive-idealResonantResonant Soft

474

Department of Energy Awards $300,000 to Tri-City Industrial Development  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services Audit ReportNext Generation Nuclear Plants |Council in Washington

475

Department of Energy Awards $600,000 to Tri-City Industrial Development  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services Audit ReportNext Generation Nuclear Plants |CouncilEnergy

476

NNSA Small Business Week Day 3: Tri-State General Contracting Group, Inc. |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNational Nuclear SecurityNationalApplyMaintaining Approved:National NuclearNational

477

Students try out high-tech equipment at ASM Materials Camp | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNational NuclearhasAdministration go on moon walk at U.S. Space Center |Nuclear

478

Science.gov? Try ciencia.science.gov | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from the Gridwise Global Forum Round-UpSTATEof EnergyScaleScience.gov 3.0

479

Tri-County Elec Member Corp (North Carolina) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformationKentucky) Jump to: navigation,

480

Tri-State Electric Member Corp (North Carolina) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformationKentucky) JumpCorp (North Carolina) Jump

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri bu tion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

High Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H2 from Biogas |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground Hawaii HIGH PERFORMANCE andHigh Risk PlanD

482

Tri-fold - Agencies Assisting with EEOICPA and the Former worker Program |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of EnergyThe SunMelissaStation-Fountain Valley | Department

483

Students try out PPPL plasma physics experiment that can be accessed from  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystalline Gallium Oxide Thin Films.Administration go on moon

484

Tri-State G & T Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,LtdInformation DixieTraverse Electric Coop,Trenton,CorpJump to:T

485

Advice #231, Proposed Changes to the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) for Central Plate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre theAdministratorCFM LEAP AircraftAdvancing art ofCellulase231,

486

Atomistic Study of the Migration of Di- and Tri-Interstitials in Silicon. |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone byDear Friend,ArthurMaterialsRibonucleaseGallium

487

TRI-PARTY AGREEMENT OPERABLE UNITS PROJECT MANAGERS LIST AS OF DECEMBER 17, 2014  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout »LabSustainabilitySyntheticaquifer

488

TRI-PARTY AGREEMENT TREATMENT, STORAGE AND DISPOSAL UNITS PROJECT MANAGERS LIST  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout »LabSustainabilitySyntheticaquiferTREATMENT, STORAGE

489

Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Buildings at Tri-City Corporate Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

funded Demand Response Research Center, a building energyto maximize demand response savings for these buildings. Theapply the demand response strategies in the building on the

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Second biennial tri-laboratory engineering conference on modeling and simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This conference was divided into eight sessions. Session one covered the following topics: material behavior and characterization; computation heat transfer; computational fluid dynamics; and hydrodynamics. Topics covered in session two were: structural dynamics; manufacturing process modeling; solid and structural mechanics; and electromagnetics. Session three topics were: materials behavior and characterization; computational heat transfer; computational fluid dynamics; neutron generators and gas transfer systems applications. Topics for session four were: mesh generation and visualization; validation and verification; and pit manufacturing. Session five covered the following: ALE techniques and applications; solid and structural mechanical; and system applications. The three topics of session six were: optimization methods; manufacturing process modeling; and weapon response in hostile environments. Session covered: material behavior and characterization; computational heat transfer; solid and structural mechanics; and mesh generation and visualization. And finally, the topics of session 8 were: manufacturing and process modeling; solid and structural mechanics; uncertainty analysis; and structural dynamics. Paper covered a range of applications, many of which were weapons and weapon systems.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

491

E-Print Network 3.0 - amelx tri-tyrosyl domain Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of California at San Francisco Collection: Biology and Medicine 4 M.D. Coble Forensic E-symposium --miniSTRs February 28, 2006 http:www.cstl.nist.govbiotechstrbase...