Sample records for tri al ized

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: character-izing solar-power-plant...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    character-izing solar-power-plant output variability Sandia PV Team Publishes Book Chapter On January 21, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Modeling & Analysis,...

  2. Tri-Lateral Noor al Salaam High Concentration Solar Central Receiver Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackmon, James B

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the efforts conducted primarily under the Noor al Salaam (“Light of Peace”) program under DOE GRANT NUMBER DE-FC36-02GO12030, together with relevant technical results from a closely related technology development effort, the U.S./Israel Science and Technology Foundation (USISTF) High Concentration Solar Central Receiver program. These efforts involved preliminary design, development, and test of selected prototype power production subsystems and documentation of an initial version of the system definition for a high concentration solar hybrid/gas electrical power plant to be built in Zaafarana, Egypt as a first step in planned commercialization. A major part of the planned work was halted in 2007 with an amendment in October 2007 requiring that we complete the technical effort by December 31, 2007 and provide a final report to DOE within the following 90 days. This document summarizes the work conducted. The USISTF program was a 50/50 cost-shared program supported by the Department of Commerce through the U.S./Israel Science and Technology Commission (USISTC). The USISTC was cooperatively developed by President Clinton and the late Prime Minister Rabin of Israel "to encourage technological collaboration" and "support peace in the Middle East through economic development". The program was conducted as a follow-on effort to Israel's Magnet/CONSOLAR Program, which was an advanced development effort to design, fabricate, and test a solar central receiver and secondary optics for a "beam down" central receiver concept. The status of these hardware development programs is reviewed, since they form the basis for the Noor al Salaam program. Descriptions are provided of the integrated system and the major subsystems, including the heliostat, the high temperature air receiver, the power conversion unit, tower and tower reflector, compound parabolic concentrator, and the master control system. One objective of the USISTF program was to conduct marketing research, identify opportunities for use of this technology, and to the extent possible, secure an agreement leading to a pre-commercialization demonstration or prototype plant. This was accomplished with the agreement to conduct the Noor al Salaam program as a tri-lateral project between Egypt, Israel, and the U.S. The tri-lateral project was led by the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH); this included the Egyptian New and Renewable Energy Authority and the Israeli USISTC participants. This project, known was Noor al Salaam, was funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) through the Department of Energy (DOE). The Egyptian activity was under the auspices of the Egyptian Ministry of Energy and Electricity, New and Renewable Energy Authority (NREA) as part of Egypt's plans for renewable energy development. The objective of the Noor al Salaam project was to develop the conditions necessary to obtain funding and construct and operate an approximately 10 to 20 Megawatt hybrid solar/natural gas demonstration power plant in Zaafarana, Egypt that could serve both as a test bed for advanced solar technology evaluations, and as a forerunner to commercial plant designs. This plant, termed Noor Al Salaam, or “Light of Peace”, reached the initial phase of system definition before being curtailed, in part by changes in USAID objectives, coupled with various delays that were beyond the scope of the program to resolve. The background of the USISTF technology development and pre-commercialization effort is provided in this report, together with documentation of the technology developments conducted under the Noor al Salaam program. It should be noted that only a relatively small part of the Noor al Salaam funding was expended over the approximately five years for which UAH was prime contractor before the program was ordered closed (Reference 1) so that the remaining funds could be returned to USAID.

  3. Try This

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activities Explore Science Explore Explore these Topics Activities Videos Cool Links Favorite Q&A invisible utility element Try This Exercise your science muscles Look around you;...

  4. Tri-Lab Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z Site MapTrends, Discovery, &Tri-Lab

  5. TRI-MENTORING OFFERS AN EDUCATION BEYOND TRADITIONAL UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TRI-MENTORING OFFERS AN EDUCATION BEYOND TRADITIONAL UNIVERSITY ENGINEERING CURRICULUM Donna L an education in topics such as these through the recently established Tri-Mentoring Program. The Tri-Mentoring and initial outcomes specifically for the UBC Engineering Tri-Mentoring Program, one of eight tri-mentoring

  6. Diffusion and Catalytic Cracking of 1,3,5 Tri-iso-propyl-benzene in FCC Catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman

    1 Diffusion and Catalytic Cracking of 1,3,5 Tri-iso- propyl-benzene in FCC Catalysts S.Al-Khattaf1 describes catalytic cracking experiments developed in a novel CREC Riser Simulator using 1,3,5-Tri-iso

  7. Tri-Generation Success Story: World's First Tri-Gen EnergyStation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Department, the Fountain Valley energy station is the world's first tri-generation hydrogen energy and electrical power station to provide transportation fuel to the public...

  8. TriWo AG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, Indiana (UtilityTri-State Electric Member Corp Jump to:TriWo AG Jump

  9. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples Timothy J.Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples Timothy J.Introduction Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing

  10. Tri Global Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas, Texas Zip: 75248 Sector: Services,

  11. Tri State Biodiesel LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas, Texas Zip: 75248 Sector:

  12. Tri Alpha Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTown ofTownNote-BangladeshTri Alpha Energy

  13. Tri Power Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTown ofTownNote-BangladeshTri Alpha

  14. Characterization of Tri-lab Tantalum Plate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchheit, Thomas E.; Cerreta, Ellen K.; Deibler, Lisa Anne; Chen, Shu-Rong; Michael, Joseph R.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a detailed characterization Tri-lab Tantalum (Ta) plate jointly purchased from HCStark Inc. by Sandia, Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Data in this report was compiled from series of material and properties characterization experiments carried out at Sandia (SNL) and Los Alamos (LANL) Laboratories through a leveraged effort funded by the C2 campaign. Results include microstructure characterization detailing the crystallographic texture of the material and an increase in grain size near the end of the rolled plate. Mechanical properties evaluations include, compression cylinder, sub-scale tension specimen, micohardness and instrumented indentation testing. The plate was found to have vastly superior uniformity when compare with previously characterized wrought Ta material. Small but measurable variations in microstructure and properties were noted at the end, and at the top and bottom edges of the plate.

  15. Tri-Cities Index of Innovation and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Richard A.; Scott, Michael J.; Butner, Ryan S.

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2001 and 2004, the Economic Development Office of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory published companion reports to the Washington Technology Center Index studies that provided additional information on the Tri-Cities (Kennewick-Richland-Pasco) area of the state, its technology businesses, and important advantages that the Tri-Cities have as places to live and do business. These reports also compared the Tri-Cities area to other technology-based metropolitan areas in the Pacific Northwest and nation along critical dimensions known to be important to technology firms. This report updates the material in these earlier reports, and highlights a growing Tri-Cities metropolitan area.

  16. Tri-National Agricultural Accord Rural Development Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    Tri-National Agricultural Accord Rural Development Workshop Overview of Canadian Provinces April 14. Structure Structures: Federal and provincial government organization Municipal / County Community / Regional

  17. BUSINESS SENSITIVE 1 Tri-Cities Research District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BUSINESS SENSITIVE 1 Tri-Cities Research District Speaker Series: Advancing Research Parks from National Developers · Strategies for Pro-active Outreach Marketing #12;BUSINESS SENSITIVE 5

  18. WSU TRI-CITIES BE PART OF A COMMUNITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    challenges, and your goals for the future. Fall 2012 #12;WSU TRI-CITIES GO COUGS! STAY CLOSE. GO FAR. Photo

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: indus-try best practices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    indus-try best practices Sandia-Electric Power Research Institute Partnership Publishes Photovoltaic Reliability Report On January 21, 2014, in Energy, Facilities, Grid...

  20. Self-AssembledMonolayersof AlkanethiolatesPresentingTri(propylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    pr NE CffiM SOCIEry' Self-AssembledMonolayersof AlkanethiolatesPresentingTri(propylene sulloxidel.5136-5137 Self-AssembledMonolayersof Alkanethiolates PresentingTri(propylene sulfoxide)Groups Resist chose oligomers of the propylene sulfoxide group [-CH2CH2CH2S(O)-I ascandidatesthat shared

  1. PECIAL REPORS T Tri-County Health Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PECIAL REPORS T Tri-County Health Department in Colorado Does More Than Just Review and benefits of land use choices and improve the quality of land use decision making. Background Tri-County counties of the metropolitan Denver area, has offered development review services to its jurisdictions

  2. TFC-0004- In the Matter of Tri-Valley CARES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tri-Valley CARES filed an Appeal from a determination that the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) issued on June 2, 2010. In that determination, NNSA denied in part a request for information that Tri-Valley CARES had submitted on September 8, 2008, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. § 552.

  3. Tri-County Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTownTri-County ElectricTri-CountyTri-County

  4. Tri-State Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas, Texas Zip: 75248 Sector:Tri-State

  5. Tri-County Elec Member Corp (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTown ofTownNote-BangladeshTriTri-County Elec

  6. Tri-County Electric Coop, Inc (Florida) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTownTri-County Electric CoopTri-County

  7. Tri-County Electric Coop, Inc (Oklahoma) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTownTri-County ElectricTri-County Electric

  8. Tri-County Electric Coop, Inc (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTownTri-County ElectricTri-County

  9. TriEagle Energy, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTownTri-CountyTri-State Electric Member

  10. REQUEST FOR SPECIAL HOUSING CONSIDERATIONS TRI CO-OP HOUSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    REQUEST FOR SPECIAL HOUSING CONSIDERATIONS TRI CO-OP HOUSING STUDENT'S NAME: __________________________ SENDER'S FAX NUMBER: ___________________ To submit a Request for Special Housing Considerations: · Complete the form below. · Submit (FAX, mail or email) the completed forms to the UC Davis Student Housing

  11. 2004 INDEX OF INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY TRI-CITIES, WASHINGTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as traffic congestion and high cost of living o Has two factors impeding its technology-based economic Tax Burden 14 Labor Costs 15 Growth 16 Employment in Technology Firms 17 Growth in Startups 172004 INDEX OF INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY TRI-CITIES, WASHINGTON JULY 2004 #12;PNNL-SA-42092 2004

  12. UNL/OSU Researchers Try Promising Technique to Remove Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    UNL/OSU Researchers Try Promising Technique to Remove Groundwater Contamination Under Former Oklahoma State University have joined to test promising new methods of removing longstanding groundwater into specially drilled injection wells, where it mixes with contaminants in the groundwater under the former

  13. Tri-Met's Experience With Automatic Passenger Counter and Automatic Vehicle Location Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    on an earlier draft. #12;Introduction The Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation District of Oregon (TriTri-Met's Experience With Automatic Passenger Counter and Automatic Vehicle Location Systems James State University Portland, OR 97207 This report is benefited from interviews of Tri-Met staff involved

  14. Tri-functional cannula for retinal endovascular surgery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A tri-functional cannula combines the functions of tissue Plasminogen Activator (tPA) solution delivery, illumination and venous pressure measurement. The cannula utilizes a tapered hollow-core optical fiber having an inlet for tPA solution, an attached fiber optic splitter configured to receive illumination light from an optical source such and a LED. A window in the cannula transmits the light to and from a central retinal vein. The return light is coupled to an optical detector to measure the pressure within the vein and determine whether an occlusion has been removed.

  15. TRI State Motor Transit to Resume Shipping Waste to WIPP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGE Creating a Geologic Play- EnergyTri-State Motor

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Try Street Terminal - PA 14

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K LeDowntown SiteTracerlab Inc -Try Street

  17. Tri State Electric Membership Corporation Smart Grid Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTown ofTownNote-BangladeshTri

  18. Tri-County Electric Coop (Michigan) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTownTri-County Electric Coop (Michigan) Jump

  19. Tri-County Electric Coop Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTownTri-County Electric Coop (Michigan)

  20. Tri-County Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTownTri-County Electric Coop

  1. Tri-County Electric Coop, Inc (Illinois) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTownTri-County Electric

  2. Tri-County Rural Elec Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTownTri-County

  3. Tri-State Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, Indiana (UtilityTri-State Electric Member Corp Jump to: navigation,

  4. High Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H2...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H2 from Biogas High Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H2 from Biogas Success story about using waste water...

  5. Fuel Cell Tri-Generation System Case Study using the H2A Stationary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System Economics and Performance Analysis Tri-Generation Success Story: World's First Tri-Gen Energy Station-Fountain Valley Expanding the Use of Biogas with Fuel Cell Technologies...

  6. World's First Tri-Generation Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Fueling Station...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    World's First Tri-Generation Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Fueling Station World's First Tri-Generation Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Fueling Station April 18, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis EERE...

  7. The option to try again : valuing a sequence of dependent trials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, James L.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In various fields of economic endeavor, agents enjoy the option to ?try, try again.? Failure in a particular pursuit often brings renewed effort to finally succeed. Many areas of R&D could be characterized in this fashion. ...

  8. a4-based tri-bimaximal mixing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    W. Grimus; L. Lavoura 2009-02-24 20 Tri-bimaximal neutrino mixing and neutrinoless double beta decay HEP - Phenomenology (arXiv) Summary: We present a tri-bimaximal lepton...

  9. An Analysis of Client Satisfaction and Company Efficiency at Tri Lake Consultants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sunde, Christopher Nathan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    meetings. County of Riverside In the past, Tri Lake providedTri Lake currently has contracts with the Cities of Perris, San Jacinto, Canyon Lake, Menifee, and the CountyCounty Sheriff Department. The low level of interaction and impact between Tri

  10. Aspects of Cooling at the TRI$?$P Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Willmann; G. P. Berg; U. Dammalapati; S. De; P. Dendooven; O. Dermois; K. Jungmann; A. Mol; C. J. G. Onderwater; A. Rogachevskiy; M. Sohani; E. Traykov; H. W. Wilschut

    2006-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tri$\\mu$P facility at KVI is dedicated to provide short lived radioactive isotopes at low kinetic energies to users. It comprised different cooling schemes for a variety of energy ranges, from GeV down to the neV scale. The isotopes are produced using beam of the AGOR cyclotron at KVI. They are separated from the primary beam by a magnetic separator. A crucial part of such a facility is the ability to stop and extract isotopes into a low energy beamline which guides them to the experiment. In particular we are investigating stopping in matter and buffer gases. After the extraction the isotopes can be stored in neutral atoms or ion traps for experiments. Our research includes precision studies of nuclear $\\beta$-decay through $\\beta$-$\

  11. Hanford Diversification and the Tri-Cities Economy FY 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCOTT, M.J.

    2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The missions of the U.S. Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office (DOE/RL) are to safely manage the Hanford Site, to manage and clean up its legacy wastes, and to develop and deploy new science and technology in the environmental and energy fields. Collectively, DOE/RL and its contractors are the most important single entity in the Tri-Cities local economy (Pasco, Kennewick, and Richland, Washington, and the surrounding area). Although the relevant economic region affected by DOE/RL and its contractors actually embraces a geographic area reaching from Yakima in the west to Walla Walla in the east and from Moses Lake in the north to Pendleton, Oregon, in the south, over 90% of economic impacts likely occur in Benton and Franklin Counties. These two counties are defined as the ''local'' Tri-Cities economy for purposes of this study. In the federal fiscal year (FY) 1999 (October 1, 1998 through September 30, 1999), the total impact of DOE'S local $1.59 billion budget was felt through payrolls of $542 million and local purchases of goods and services of $226 million. The total local spending of $768 million was up slightly from the FY 1998 total of $765 million. Taking into account the multiplier effects of this spending, the DOE/RL budget sustained an estimated 32% of all local employment (28,250 out of 88,100 jobs) and about 35% of local earned income (almost $1.08 billion out of $3.08 billion). The decrease in these percentages from last year's report reflects an update of the model's economic structure based on the 1997 economic census year, a correction of a programming error in the model found during the update, and a broader definition of earnings that includes proprietor income, not just wages (see the Appendix for revisions to the previous forecasts). DOE budget increases in FY 2000 are expected to result in no change to the number of local DOE contractor jobs and about a $29 million increase in direct local spending.

  12. Yukawa and Tri-scalar Processes in Electroweak Baryogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirigliano, V; Ramsey-Musolf, M J; Tulin, S; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Lee, Christopher; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.; Tulin, Sean

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the contributions to the quantum transport equations for electroweak baryogenesis due to decays and inverse decays induced by tri-scalar and Yukawa interactions. In the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), these contributions give rise to couplings between Higgs and fermion supermultiplet densities, thereby communicating the effects of CP-violation in the Higgs sector to the baryon sector. We show that the decay and inverse decay-induced contributions that arise at zeroth order in the strong coupling, \\alpha_s, can be substantially larger than the O(\\alpha_s) terms that are generated by scattering processes and that are usually assumed to dominate. We revisit the often-used approximation of fast Yukawa-induced processes and show that for realistic parameter choices it is not justified. We solve the resulting quantum transport equations numerically with special attention on the impact of Yukawa rates and study the dependence of the baryon-to-entropy ratio Y_B on MSSM parameters.

  13. Try-A Global Database of Plant Traits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Peter E [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant traits the morphological, anatomical, physiological, biochemical and phenological characteristics of plants and their organs determine how primary producers respond to environmental factors, affect other trophic levels, influence ecosystem processes and services and provide a link from species richness to ecosystem functional diversity. Trait data thus represent the raw material for a wide range of research from evolutionary biology, community and functional ecology to biogeography. Here we present the global database initiative named TRY, which has united a wide range of the plant trait research community worldwide and gained an unprecedented buy-in of trait data: so far 93 trait databases have been contributed. The data repository currently contains almost three million trait entries for 69 000 out of the world s 300 000 plant species, with a focus on 52 groups of traits characterizing the vegetative and regeneration stages of the plant life cycle, including growth, dispersal, establishment and persistence. A first data analysis shows that most plant traits are approximately log-normally distributed, with widely differing ranges of variation across traits. Most trait variation is between species (interspecific), but significant intraspecific variation is also documented, up to 40% of the overall variation. Plant functional types (PFTs), as commonly used in vegetation models, capture a substantial fraction of the observed variation but for several traits most variation occurs within PFTs, up to 75% of the overall variation. In the context of vegetation models these traits would better be represented by state variables rather than fixed parameter values. The improved availability of plant trait data in the unified global database is expected to support a paradigm shift from species to trait-based ecology, offer new opportunities for synthetic plant trait research and enable a more realistic and empirically grounded representation of terrestrial vegetation in Earth system models.

  14. Atomistic Study of the Migration of Di- and Tri-Interstitials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    silicon is performed using classical molecular dynamics simulations with a Stillinger-Weber potential. At first the structures and energetics of the di- and the tri-interstitial...

  15. Tri-County solid waste-to-fuel production project feasibility study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis and preliminary findings of refuse-derived fuel and recovered components markets are presented. Other topics covered are: municipal solid waste composition, quantity and constraints; technical assessment and capital cost assessment; economic feasibility of burning process residue to generate steam; review of commercially available equipment for the densification of refuse-derived fuel; final pre-feasibility analysis for the Tri-County Municipal Solid Waste to Fuel Production Project; preliminary economic and sensitivity analysis for the Tri-County Project; risks assessment for the Tri-County Project; and environmental, health, safety, and socioeconomic assessment for the Tri-County Project. (MHR)

  16. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas is placed in a sample, then the sample is flooded with water and cooled [Priest et al., 2009]. We have performed a number of tests in which hydrate was formed and the uniformity of the hydrate formation was examined. These tests have primarily used a variety of modifications of the excess gas method to make the hydrate, although we have also used a version of the excess water technique. Early on, we found difficulties in creating uniform samples with a particular sand/ initial water saturation combination (F-110 Sand, {approx} 35% initial water saturation). In many of our tests we selected this combination intentionally to determine whether we could use a method to make the samples uniform. The following methods were examined: Excess gas, Freeze/thaw/form, Freeze/pressurize/thaw, Excess gas followed by water saturation, Excess water, Sand and kaolinite, Use of a nucleation enhancer (SnoMax), and Use of salt in the water. Below, each method, the underlying hypothesis, and our results are briefly presented, followed by a brief conclusion. Many of the hypotheses investigated are not our own, but were presented to us. Much of the data presented is from x-ray CT scanning our samples. The x-ray CT scanner provides a three-dimensional density map of our samples. From this map and the physics that is occurring in our samples, we are able to gain an understanding of the spatial nature of the processes that occur, and attribute them to the locations where they occur.

  17. Tri-Laboratory Linux Capacity Cluster 2007 SOW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seager, M

    2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program (formerly know as Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative, ASCI) has led the world in capability computing for the last ten years. Capability computing is defined as a world-class platform (in the Top10 of the Top500.org list) with scientific simulations running at scale on the platform. Example systems are ASCI Red, Blue-Pacific, Blue-Mountain, White, Q, RedStorm, and Purple. ASC applications have scaled to multiple thousands of CPUs and accomplished a long list of mission milestones on these ASC capability platforms. However, the computing demands of the ASC and Stockpile Stewardship programs also include a vast number of smaller scale runs for day-to-day simulations. Indeed, every 'hero' capability run requires many hundreds to thousands of much smaller runs in preparation and post processing activities. In addition, there are many aspects of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) that can be directly accomplished with these so-called 'capacity' calculations. The need for capacity is now so great within the program that it is increasingly difficult to allocate the computer resources required by the larger capability runs. To rectify the current 'capacity' computing resource shortfall, the ASC program has allocated a large portion of the overall ASC platforms budget to 'capacity' systems. In addition, within the next five to ten years the Life Extension Programs (LEPs) for major nuclear weapons systems must be accomplished. These LEPs and other SSP programmatic elements will further drive the need for capacity calculations and hence 'capacity' systems as well as future ASC capability calculations on 'capability' systems. To respond to this new workload analysis, the ASC program will be making a large sustained strategic investment in these capacity systems over the next ten years, starting with the United States Government Fiscal Year 2007 (GFY07). However, given the growing need for 'capability' systems as well, the budget demands are extreme and new, more cost effective ways of fielding these systems must be developed. This Tri-Laboratory Linux Capacity Cluster (TLCC) procurement represents the ASC first investment vehicle in these capacity systems. It also represents a new strategy for quickly building, fielding and integrating many Linux clusters of various sizes into classified and unclassified production service through a concept of Scalable Units (SU). The programmatic objective is to dramatically reduce the overall Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) of these 'capacity' systems relative to the best practices in Linux Cluster deployments today. This objective only makes sense in the context of these systems quickly becoming very robust and useful production clusters under the crushing load that will be inflicted on them by the ASC and SSP scientific simulation capacity workload.

  18. Self-Assembled Monolayers of Alkanethiolates Presenting Tri(propylene sulfoxide) Groups Resist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mrksich, Milan

    Self-Assembled Monolayers of Alkanethiolates Presenting Tri(propylene sulfoxide) Groups Resist-assembled mono- layers (SAMs) of alkanethiolates on gold that present tri- (propylene sulfoxide) groups prevent. We chose oligomers of the propylene sulfoxide group [-CH2CH2CH2S(O)-] as candidates that shared

  19. Tri-County High School Exhibition Call for Entries Wayne State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Tri-County High School Exhibition Call for Entries Wayne State University James Pearson Duffy for its Tri-County High School Exhibition. The exhibition dates are March 2 ­ March 23, 2012 counties. ABOUT THE GALLERY The Art Department Gallery hosts annual undergraduate exhibitions, provides

  20. CEMP-EC 13 February 1995 TRI-SERVICE MILITARY CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM (MCP) INDEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    CEMP-EC 13 February 1995 TABLE IV TRI-SERVICE MILITARY CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM (MCP) INDEX FOR FY 1996 for projection beyond FY 2001. 2. Tri-Service MCP Index (1,000) = 1 October 1979 ENR Historical Building Cost THRU FY 2001 PROGRAMS ESCALATION PERCENTAGE DATE INDEX FOR FISCAL YEAR 1 OCT 1992 ------------- 1825

  1. ALS Spectrum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship inALSALS Spectrum PrintALS

  2. Reviw Al

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-RayReview/Verify3 JuneReviw Al now ..

  3. ALS Spectrum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALSALS Reveals New StateALS

  4. ALS Visitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALSALS Reveals NewALSUsers'ALS

  5. AL. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertown Arsenal'.I Y.it ! ( , . /'-AL.

  6. Technology transfer and commercialization initiatives at TRI/Austin: Resources and examples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matzkanin, G.A.; Dingus, M.L. [Texas Research Institute, Austin, Inc., TX (United States). Nondestructive Testing Information Analysis Center

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Located at TRI/Austin, and operated under a Department of Defense contract, is the Nondestructive Testing Information Analysis Center (NTIAC). This is a full service Information Analysis Center sponsored by the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC), although services of NTIAC are available to other government agencies, government contractors, industry and academia. The principal objective of NTIAC is to help increase the productivity of the nation`s scientists, engineers, and technical managers involved in, or requiring, nondestructive testing by providing broad information analysis services of technical excellence. TRI/Austin is actively pursuing commercialization of several products based on results from outside funded R and D programs. As a small business, TRI/Austin has limited capabilities for large scale fabrication, production, marketing or distribution. Thus, part of a successful commercialization process involves making appropriate collaboration arrangements with other organizations to augment TRI/Austin`s capabilities. Brief descriptions are given here of two recent commercialization efforts at TRI/Austin.

  7. Velarde students score in RoboRAVE International at first try

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    score in RoboRAVE International at first try Competitors came from as far away as China and the Czech Republic June 1, 2015 Dylan Valdez, Aubriana Duran, Caitlin Hice and...

  8. CON'TRI BUTION TO THE BIOLOGY OF THE KING CRAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CON'TRI BUTION TO THE BIOLOGY OF THE KING CRAB ( Paralithodes eam t sehat iea Tilesius during moulting. Classifioat ion of speo iea . Weight of orabs · · · · · · · · ·and their distribution

  9. Vacuum misalignment corrections to tri-bimaximal mixing and form dominance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen F. King

    2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Tri-bimaximal neutrino mixing may arise from see-saw models based on family symmetry which is spontaneously broken by flavons with particular vacuum alignments. However recent analyses hint that tri-bimaximal mixing may be insensitive to the precise form of vacuum alignment. In this paper we derive approximate analytic results which express the deviations from tri-bimaximal neutrino mixing due to vacuum misalignment. We also relate vacuum misalignment to departures from form dominance, corresponding to deviations from the real orthogonal $R$ matrix, where such corrections are necessary to allow for successful leptogenesis. The analytic results show that the corrections to tri-bimaximal mixing and form dominance depend on the pattern of the vacuum misalignment, with the two effects being uncorrelated.

  10. The Fourier method for tri-atomic systems in the search for the optimal coordinate system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiri, Yehuda

    The Fourier method for tri-atomic systems in the search for the optimal coordinate system Gil Katz, the Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 Received 20 September 2001; accepted 12 December 2001 The Fourier grid

  11. Tri-County Electric Cooperative- Energy Efficient Water Heater Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tri-County Electric Cooperative offers a $75 rebate on the purchase of energy-efficient electric water heaters. The rebate is valid for new or replacement units which have an Energy Factor Rating...

  12. The sequence and characterization of TRI1, a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase involved in T-2 toxin biosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meek, Isaac Burton

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    % 22 P1 hyg B 900 bp 300 bp TRI1 pIKE9 FIG. 5. The TRI1 complementation vector. The plasmid plKE9, contains a 3. 2 kb genomic fragment of TRI1, which is flanked by the P1:hyg B cassette. 23 Novozyme 234 (InterSpex Products), 1 /o driselase...

  13. Hanford and the tri-cities economy: Review and outlook, March 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, M.J.; Belzer, D.B.; March, S.J.; Beck, D.M.; Schultz, R.W.; Harkreader, S.A.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The economy of the Tri-Cities, Washington area (primarily, Benton and Franklin Counties) is in transition due to major changes in two Department of Energy programs at Hanford---the abrupt ending of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) in December 1987 and the placing of the N Reactor in ''cold standby'' status in February 1988. This report reviews the economic situation in the Tri-Cities during 1988 and presents forecasts for key economic indicators for 1989. This report will be updated about every six months to review the changes in the area economy and forecast the near-term outlook. 6 figs., 33 tabs.

  14. Hanford and the Tri-Cities Economy: Historical Trends 1970-2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Richard A.; Scott, Michael J.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This white paper examines the effect that the Hanford Site has had on the Tri-Cities economy from 1970-2008. Total area employment levels, population, and the real estate market are compared to DOE contractor employment and funding levels, which tended to follow each other until the mid-1990s. Since 1994, area employment, total incomes, population and the real estate market have increased significantly despite very little changes in Hanford employment levels. The data indicate that in recent history, the Tri-Cities economy has become increasingly independent of Hanford.

  15. Tri-County Elec Member Corp (North Carolina) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTown ofTownNote-BangladeshTriTri-County

  16. Tri-State Electric Member Corp (North Carolina) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower StationTownTri-CountyTri-State Electric Member Corp

  17. Flexible inverted polymer solar cells with an indium-free tri-layer cathode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Hajj, Ahmad; Lucas, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.lucas@unilim.fr; Schirr-Bonnans, Martin; Ratier, Bernard [XLIM-CNRS 7252, Université de Limoges, 123 avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges (France); Kraft, Thomas M. [XLIM-CNRS 7252, Université de Limoges, 123 avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges (France); Department of Chemistry, Chernoff Hall, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Torchio, Philippe [Institut Matériaux Microélectronique Nanosciences de Provence, Aix-Marseille Université, IM2NP-CNRS 7334, Domaine Universitaire de Saint-Jérôme, Service 231, 13 397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Indium tin oxide (ITO)-free inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs) have been fabricated without the need of an additional electron transport layer. The indium-free transparent electrode consists of a tri-layer stack ZnO (30?nm)/Ag (14?nm)/ZnO (30?nm) deposited on glass and plastic substrates via ion-beam sputtering. The tri-layer electrodes exhibit similar physical properties to its ITO counterpart, specifically yielding high transmittance and low resistivity (76.5% T at 550?nm, R{sub sq} of 8 ?/?) on plastic substrates. The novel tri-layer electrode allows for the fabrication of inverted PSCs without the additional ZnO interfacial layer commonly deposited between ITO and the photoactive layer. This allows for the preparation of thinner plastic solar cells using less material than conventional architectures. Initial studies involving the newly realized architecture (tri-layer electrode/P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:PSS/Ag) have shown great promise for the transition from ITO to other viable electrodes in organic electronics.

  18. Bosnia-Herzegovina: Trying to Build a Federal State on Paradoxes Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wintner, Shuly

    1 Bosnia-Herzegovina: Trying to Build a Federal State on Paradoxes Jens Woelk Introduction The basis for federalism in Bosnia-Herzegovina1 is rather peculiar due to the unique complexity. This was to be accomplished by physical reconstruction as well as by preserving Bosnia and Herzegovina as one country

  19. Contact Resistance of Tri-layer Graphene Side Contacted with Nickel Jason Giuliani,1-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UG-34 Contact Resistance of Tri-layer Graphene Side Contacted with Nickel Electrodes.S.A. High contact resistance is a key problem in graphene-type device performance. In order to create, the contact properties of graphene devices requires further research. Nickel's high work-function and contact

  20. Trying to make the connection: soil Ni speciation and plant accumulation. (S02-mcnearjr.415428-oral)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Trying to make the connection: soil Ni speciation and plant accumulation. (S02-mcnearjr.415428-oral. To ascertain the effect of soil speciation on plant accumulation, a combination of micro-XRF, micro accumulation will help when making decisions as to how to remediate a site enriched with heavy metals. Speaker

  1. How to search resources If you are looking for an article, try

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McPhee-Shaw, Erika

    or journal title within the library holdings. 3) Search for the source (i.e. journal title) by entering all/any of your search terms. Click `GO'. #12;Browse Search: 1) To browse the catalog clickHow to search resources If you are looking for an article, try: Google Scholar: This search engine

  2. 23rd Annual Tri-County Pesticide Update Lake Butler Community Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    23rd Annual Tri-County Pesticide Update Lake Butler Community Center Lake Butler, FL Tuesday, CED, Union County 5:55 Pesticide Safety Barton Wilder, UF/IFAS, Extension Agent Alachua County 6:00 Update on Weed Control Barton Wilder, UF/IFAS Extension Agent Alachua County 7:25 CORE: Law & Rule

  3. Analysis of a Third-Generation Princeton Tri-leaflet Mechanical Heart Valve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Analysis of a Third-Generation Princeton Tri-leaflet Mechanical Heart Valve Michael Hsu Advisor heart valve · Static analysis of leaflet under uniform pressure of 10 MPa Summer Objectives · Find Heart valve disease · Over 5 million affected · Over 225,000 valve- replacement surgeries performed

  4. Fractally deforested landscape: Pattern and process in a tri-national Amazon frontier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fractally deforested landscape: Pattern and process in a tri-national Amazon frontier Jing Sun a 32611, USA Keywords: Amazon Deforestation Fractal analysis Fixed-grid scans Bottom-up plan Configuration of deforestation at a pixel level from 1986 to 2010 in the study region. The evolving pattern of development

  5. In Proceedings of TriComm '91 Delay Jitter Control for Real-Time Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hui

    In Proceedings of TriComm '91 Delay Jitter Control for Real-Time Communication in a Packet study the feasibil- ity of bounding the delay jitter for real-time channels in a packet-switched store show that the scheme is capable of providing a significant reduction in delay jitter

  6. In Proceedings of TriComm '91 Delay Jitter Control for RealTime Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hui

    In Proceedings of TriComm '91 Delay Jitter Control for Real­Time Communication in a Packet study the feasibil­ ity of bounding the delay jitter for real­time channels in a packet­switched store show that the scheme is capable of providing a significant reduction in delay jitter

  7. Bridging Domains with Words: Opinion Analysis with Matrix Tri-factorizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tao

    Bridging Domains with Words: Opinion Analysis with Matrix Tri-factorizations Tao Li Vikas Sindhwani Chris Ding Yi Zhang§ Abstract With the explosion of user-generated web2.0 content in the form of blogs manual effort? We outline a novel sentiment transfer mechanism based on constrained non-negative matrix

  8. Close-in blasting at the TRI-MET light rail tunnels in Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revey, G.F.; Painter, D.Z.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Frontier/Traylor Joint Venture is presently constructing a section of the Tri-County Metropolitan Transit District of Oregon`s (TRI-MET) Westside Light Rail System. This new section will extend Portland`s existing transit system to the western suburbs of Beaverton and Hillsboro. The drill-blast excavations at this project include 10,000 feet of 20 foot tunnel, 18 cross passages, three shafts, an underground railway station, and a U-wall open cut. From a blast designer`s perspective, this job has been extremely challenging. Blast vibration is limited to 0.5 ips at 200 feet or at the nearest structure, and airblast is limited to 129 dB--linear peak and 96 dB--C scale. The tunnels pass under heavily built up areas and have top of tunnel to surface cover distances as low as 70 feet. Surface blasting in the 26,000 cubic yard U-wall excavation was limited to five short nighttime periods due to its proximity to the very busy highway 26. This paper describes the techniques that were used to develop safe blasting designs for the TRI-MET Surface blasts and tunnel rounds. It also discusses the measures that were necessary to mitigate noise, vibration, and flyrock.

  9. First analysis of eight Algol-type systems: V537 And, GS Boo, AM CrB, V1298 Her, EL Lyn, FW Per, RU Tri, and WW Tri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zasche, P

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyzing available photometry from the Super WASP and other databases, we performed the very first light curve analysis of eight eclipsing binary systems V537 And, GS Boo, AM CrB, V1298 Her, EL Lyn, FW Per, RU Tri, and WW Tri. All of these systems were found to be detached ones of Algol-type, having the orbital periods of the order of days. 722 new times of minima for these binaries were derived and presented, trying to identify the period variations caused by the third bodies in these systems.

  10. 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer as the ultimate copper diffusion barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba-Son [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jen-Fin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Perng, Dung-Ching, E-mail: dcperng@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics and Electrical Engineering Department, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the thinnest ever reported Cu diffusion barrier, a 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra show that the graphene is thermally stable at up to 750?°C against Cu diffusion. Transmission electron microscopy images show that there was no inter-diffusion in the Cu/graphene/Si structure. Raman analyses indicate that the graphene may have degraded into a nanocrystalline structure at 750?°C. At 800?°C, the perfect carbon structure was damaged, and thus the barrier failed. The results of this study suggest that graphene could be the ultimate Cu interconnect diffusion barrier.

  11. Science.gov? Try ciencia.science.gov | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG -EnergyProcess|2 (TextScienceScience.gov? Try

  12. TRI-STATE GENERATION AND TRANSMISSION ASSOCIATION, INC. HEADQUARTERS: P.O

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,ZaleskiThis Decision considers anExercise32 DATE:Features:TRI-STATE

  13. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers Print

  14. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

  15. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block

  16. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-BlockResonant Soft

  17. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-BlockResonant

  18. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-BlockResonantResonant

  19. Tri-State G & T Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, Indiana (UtilityTri-State Electric Member Corp Jump to:

  20. The transverse space-charge force in tri-gaussian distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In tracking, the transverse space-charge force can be represented by changes in the horizontal and vertical divergences, {Delta}x{prime} and {Delta}y{prime} at many locations around the accelerator ring. In this note, they are going to list some formulas for {Delta}x{prime} and {delta}y{prime} arising from space-charge kicks when the beam is tri-Gaussian distributed. They will discuss separately a flat beam and a round beam. they are not interested in the situation when the emittance growth arising from space charge becomes too large and the shape of the beam becomes weird. For this reason, they can assume the bunch still retains its tri-Gaussian distribution, with its rms sizes {sigma}{sub x}, {sigma}{sub y}, and {sigma}{sub z} increasing by certain factors. Thus after each turn, {sigma}{sub x}, {sigma}{sub y}, and {sigma}{sub z} can be re-calculated.

  1. Green alternatives to toxic release inventory (TRI) chemicals in the process industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, I.; Baron, J.; Hamilton, C. [Booz-Allen & Hamilton Inc., McLean, VA (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Driven by TRI reporting requirements, the chemical process industry is searching for innovative ways to reduce pollution at the source. Distinct environmental advantages of biobased green chemicals (biochemicals) mean are attractive alternatives to petrochemicals. Biochemicals are made from renewable raw materials in biological processes, such as aerobic and anaerobic fermentation, that operate at ambient temperatures and pressures, and produce only nontoxic waste products. Key TRI chemicals and several classes of commodity and intermediate compounds, used on consumer end-products manufacturing, are examined and alternatives are suggested. Specific substitution options for chlorofluorocarbons, industrial solvents, and commodity organic and inorganic chemicals are reviewed. Currently encouraged pollution prevention alternatives in the manufacturing sector are briefly examined for their long-term feasibility such as bioalternatives to bleaching in the pulp & paper industry, solvent cleaning in the electronics and dry cleaning industries, and using petroleum-based feedstocks in the plastics industry. Total life cycle and cost/benefit analyses are employed to determine whether biochemicals are environmentally feasible and commercially viable as pollution prevention tools. Currently available green chemicals along with present and projected costs and premiums are also presented. Functional compatibility of biochemicals with petrochemicals and bioprocessing systems with conventional chemical processing methods are explored. This review demonstrates that biochemicals can be used cost effectively in certain industrial chemical operations due to their added environmental benefits.

  2. Production and trapping of radioactive atoms at the TRI\\muP facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Traykov; U. Dammalapati; S. De; O. C. Dermois; L. Huisman; K. Jungmann; W. Kruithof; A. J. Mol; C. J. G. Onderwater; A. Rogachevskiy; M. da Silva e Silva; M. Sohani; O. Versolato; L. Willmann; H. W. Wilschut

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The structures for the TRI$\\mu$P facility have been completed and commissioned. At the facility radioactive nuclides are produced to study fundamental interactions and symmetries. An important feature is the possibility to trap radioactive atoms in order to obtain and hold a pure substrate-free sample for precision measurements. In the TRI$\\mu$P facility a production target is followed by a magnetic separator, where radioactive isotopes are produced in inverse reaction kinematics. Separation up to 99.95% could be achieved for $^{21}$Na. A novel transmitting thermal ionizing device was developed to stop the energetic isotopes. Some 50% of stopped $^{21}$Na could be extracted and transported as low energy singly charged ions into a radio frequency quadrupole cooler and buncher with 35% transmission efficiency. The ions are transported lossless via a drift tube and a low energy electrostatic beam line into the experimental setup. Such ions can be neutralized on hot metal foils and the resulting atoms can be stored in a magneto-optical trap. The functioning of that principle was demonstrated with stable Na extracted from the thermal ionizer, radioactive beams will follow next.

  3. Webinar: 2011-2012 Hydrogen Student Design Contest Winners: On-Campus Tri-Generation Fuel Cell Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, 2011-2012 Hydrogen Student Design Contest Winners: On-Campus Tri-Generation Fuel Cell Systems, originally presented on September 4, 2012.

  4. Extraction of Plutonium into 30 Percent Tri-Butyl Phosphate from Nitric Acid Solution Containing Fluoride, Aluminum, and Boron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyser, E.A.

    2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This work consists of experimental batch extraction data for plutonium into 30 volume-percent tri-butyl phosphate at ambient temperature from such a solution matrix and a model of this data using complexation constants from the literature.

  5. AgriculturAl Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 SLU Global AgriculturAl ScienceS for globAl Development -- Slu's contribution #12;2 the mission of the Swedish university of Agricultural Sciences (Slu) is "to develop the understanding, management for global Development (pgu). research capacity building provision of expertise Agricultural Sciences

  6. Tri-City Herald OpEd: Electric Vehicles are a smart choice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, Peter C.; Haas, Anne M.

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Why are so many of us at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, a national thought leader in power industry issues located right here in the Tri-Cities, so bullish on the future of EVs? And why do we think it's so important that this country, especially THIS part of the country, be leaders in the adoption of EVs? Is it that we all just happen to like driving polluting golf carts? The answer is that, like most everyone else, most of us here at PNNL drive to work every day, and like most people, we care about the cost of gasoline and the impact that burning imported oil has on the environment and on our foreign policy. The reality is that electric vehicles are simply more efficient, pollute much less, use locally-generated energy, and cost MUCH less to drive.

  7. Possible deviation from the tri-bimaximal neutrino mixing in a seesaw model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Sin Kyu; Xing Zhizhong; Zhou Shun [School of Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-734 (Korea, Republic of); CCAST (World Laboratory), P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080 (China) and Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a simple but suggestive seesaw model with two phenomenological conjectures: three heavy (right-handed) Majorana neutrinos are degenerate in mass in the symmetry limit and three light Majorana neutrinos have the tri-bimaximal mixing pattern V{sub 0}. We show that a small mass splitting between the first generation and the other two generations of heavy Majorana neutrinos is responsible for the deviation of the solar neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 12} from its initial value 35.3 deg. given by V{sub 0}, and the slight breaking of the mass degeneracy between the second and third generations of heavy Majorana neutrinos results in a small mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} and a tiny departure of the atmospheric neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 23} from 45 deg. It turns out that a normal hierarchy of the light neutrino mass spectrum is favored in this seesaw scenario.

  8. SO(3) Gauge Symmetry and Nearly Tri-bimaximal Neutrino Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yue-Liang Wu

    2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In this note I mainly focus on the neutrino physics part in my talk and report the most recent progress made in \\cite{YLW0}. It is seen that the Majorana features of neutrinos and SO(3) gauge flavor symmetry can simultaneously explain the smallness of neutrino masses and nearly tri-bimaximal neutrino mixing when combining together with the mechanism of approximate global U(1) family symmetry. The mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ and CP-violating phase are in general nonzero and testable experimentally at the allowed sensitivity. The model also predicts the existence of vector-like Majorana neutrinos and charged leptons as well as new Higgs bosons, some of them can be light and explored at the LHC and ILC.

  9. Chemical pressure and hidden one-dimensional behavior in rare earth tri-telluride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sacchetti, A.; Degiorgi, L.; /Zurich, ETH; Giamarchi, T.; /Geneva U.; Ru, N.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first optical measurements of the rare-earth tri-telluride charge-density-wave systems. Our data, collected over an extremely broad spectral range, allow us to observe both the Drude component and the single-particle peak, ascribed to the contributions due to the free charge carriers and to the charge-density-wave gap excitation, respectively. The data analysis displays a diminishing impact of the charge-density-wave condensate on the electronic properties with decreasing lattice constant across the rare-earth series. We propose a possible mechanism describing this behavior and we suggest the presence of a one-dimensional character in these two-dimensional compounds. We also envisage that interactions and umklapp processes might play a relevant role in the formation of the charge-density-wave state in these compounds.

  10. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Iowa, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  11. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Delaware, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  12. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Colorado, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  13. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Massachusetts, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  14. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Illinois, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  15. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Florida, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  16. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Wisconsin, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  17. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Kentucky, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off-site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  18. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Connecticut, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility; the first nine digit alphanumeric number a facility holds under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems.

  19. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Ohio, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  20. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Utah, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  1. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Hawaii, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  2. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Missouri, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  3. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Minnesota, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  4. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Michigan, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  5. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Georgia, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  6. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Arkansas, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  7. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Kansas, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off-site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  8. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Nevada, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  9. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Nebraska, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  10. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Maryland, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  11. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Oklahoma, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  12. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Arizona, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  13. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Louisiana, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  14. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Montana, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  15. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Indiana, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  16. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Alaska, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year.Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  17. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Pennsylvania, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility; the first nine digit alphanumeric number a facility holds under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems.

  18. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Oregon, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  19. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Vermont, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  20. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Mssissippi, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  1. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Tennessee, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  2. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), California, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  3. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Washington, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  4. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Wyoming, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  5. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Idaho, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  6. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Alabama, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year.Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  7. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Texas, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  8. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Maine, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  9. Rapid and convergent synthesis of a 2,4'-linked tri-oxazole in an approach to poly-oxazoles Caspi, et al. 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    (5, 46.2 g, 45.6 g theoretical, >100% yield) as an orange oil. This crude material was used without were recorded on a Varian Mercury 300 (at 300 MHz), or a Varian Inova 500 (at 500 MHz) and are reported), multiplicity, coupling constant (Hz), and integration. 13 C NMR spectra were recorded on a Varian Mercury 300

  10. Tri-county pre-commercial analysis of converting wastes to marketable products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frolich, M. [Integrated Resource Development, Gardnerville, NV (United States); Munk, G. [Nevada Bio-Serv, Lovelock, NV (United States); McArthur, K. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Open field burning of harvest residues is an effective, low cost method of controlling diseases, insects and weeds in many agricultural operations. Restrictions have been imposed against this practice in several areas and these restrictions are expected to increase in the near future. The agricultural community in the Tri-County area of Nevada recognized that eventually burning would be an unacceptable practice of disposal. A biomass inventory was jointly funded by the area seed producers and Western Regional Biomass Energy Program that revealed a sufficient biomass resource to justify further work to answer the question: Can economic alternative methods of disposal be developed either through export of biomass or through conversion technologies in the local area? Technically the answer is yes. Several methods are available, either singly or in combination, capable of converting the difficult residues into energy or commodity products. Economically, the answer is not clear. There are many assumptions made in the financial analyses reported by the process developers that combine with a lack of concrete markets resulting in the conclusion that economic viability cannot be attained at the present time.

  11. Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume II. Middle United States: TRY data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 22 cities in the continental United States using Test Reference Year (TRY) source weather data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

  12. On the ambiguities in the tri-bimaximal mixing matrix and corresponding charged lepton corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duarah, Chandan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two negative signs naturally appear in the $U_{\\mu 1}$ and $U_{\\tau 2}$ elements of the Tri-bimaximal (TBM) matrix for positive values of the mixing angles $\\theta_{12}$ and $\\theta_{23}$. Apart from this, in other TBM matrices negative signs are shifted to other elements in each case. They account for positive as well as negative values of $\\theta_{12}$ and $\\theta_{23}$. We discuss the sign ambiguity in the TBM matrix and find that the TBM matrices, in fact, can be divided into two groups under certain circumstances. Interestingly, this classification of TBM matrices is accompanied by two different $\\mu-\\tau$ symmetric mass matrices which can separately be related to the groups. To accommodate non-zero value of $\\theta_{13}$ and deviate $\\theta_{23}$ towards first octant, we then perturb the TBM mixing ansatz with the help of charged lepton correction. The diagonalizing matrices for charged lepton mass matrices also possess sign ambiguity and respect the grouping of TBM matrices. They are parametrized in te...

  13. A new TriBeam system for three-dimensional multimodal materials analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echlin, McLean P.; Mottura, Alessandro; Torbet, Christopher J.; Pollock, Tresa M. [Materials Department, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93101 (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The unique capabilities of ultrashort pulse femtosecond lasers have been integrated with a focused ion beam (FIB) platform to create a new system for rapid 3D materials analysis. The femtosecond laser allows for in situ layer-by-layer material ablation with high material removal rates. The high pulse frequency (1 kHz) of ultrashort (150 fs) laser pulses can induce material ablation with virtually no thermal damage to the surrounding area, permitting high resolution imaging, as well as crystallographic and elemental analysis, without intermediate surface preparation or removal of the sample from the chamber. The TriBeam system combines the high resolution and broad detector capabilities of the DualBeam{sup TM} microscope with the high material removal rates of the femtosecond laser, allowing 3D datasets to be acquired at rates 4-6 orders of magnitude faster than 3D FIB datasets. Design features that permit coupling of laser and electron optics systems and positioning of a stage in the multiple analysis positions are discussed. Initial in situ multilayer data are presented.

  14. ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory Print Wednesday, 22 October 2014 11:43 Researchers recently uncovered the first step in the process...

  15. ALS Beamlines Directory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG,ALS Beamlines Directory PrintALS

  16. ALS User Meeting Archives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALSALS Reveals NewALS TechniqueALS

  17. View the newsletter at caeo.unlv.edu UNLV Celebrates National TRiO/GEAR UP Day

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    March 2013 View the newsletter at caeo.unlv.edu UNLV Celebrates National TRiO/GEAR UP Day Adult Educational Services Educational Talent Search Family Support Services GEAR UP McNair ScholarsO and GEAR UP participants both past and present. Shortly after 5 p.m., there were only a few seats empty

  18. 926 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 53, NO. 5, MAY 2006 Tri-Polar Concentric Ring Electrode Development for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besio, Walter G.

    for approximating the analytical Laplacian based on a nine-point finite difference method (NPM). For direct comparison, the FPM, quasi-bipolar method (a hybrid NPM), and NPM were calculated over a 400 400 mesh with 1, and the results were verified with tank experiments. The tri-polar configuration and the NPM were found to have

  19. als strategie voor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    try to maximize their profits while consumers will try to minimize their costs. From an electricity market perspective, the producers strategy to maximize profits is mainly...

  20. Smith et al Supporting Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarvis, Erich D.

    Smith et al 1 Supporting Information for Smith et al. 2006, PLoS Computational Biology 2:e161-hyperpallium apicale; HF-hippocampal formation, and M-mesopallium. #12;Smith et al 2 FigureS2,nolinkswerefoundbetweenelectrodesindifferentbirds,andnolinkswerefoundintothesoundstimulusvariable. CombinedAnalysisofAllBirds'ElectrodesPlusSound #12;Smith et al 3 Analysis of Data from Subsections

  1. Molecular Simulation of Water Extraction into a Tri-n-Butyl-Phosphate/n-Dodecane Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Almeida, Valmor F [ORNL] [ORNL; Ye, Xianggui [ORNL] [ORNL; Cui, Shengting [ORNL] [ORNL; Khomami, Bamin [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate water extraction into a solution of 30 vol% tri-n-butyl-phosphate (TBP) in n-dodecane. This solvent extraction mixture is commonly used in hydrometallurgical and nuclear fuel recycling operations for recovering metals from aqueous streams. It is known that water is coextracted in the organic phase and that it competes with metal ions for the available extractant agent (TBP). Therefore investigating pure water extraction provides a realistic prototype to test molecular simulation methods for the first time in this area. Our computational results indicate that the TBP electric dipole moment has a significant effect on the predicted water solubility. A larger TBP dipole moment decreases the aqueous-organic interfacial tension, leading to increased roughness of the aqueous-organic interface. Interfacial roughness has a significant effect on disrupting the interfacial water hydrogen bonding structure, resulting in a greater number of dangling water molecules at the interface. This enhances the probability of water molecules to break away from the aqueous phase and to migrate into the bulk of the organic phase. Therefore, the magnitude of the TBP dipole moment is a crucial factor in controlling water hydrogen bond breaking at the aqueous-organic interface. By slightly lowering the atomic partial charges of the TBP atoms, to produce a dipole moment that better agrees with experimental data, we were able to predict water solubility in close agreement with experimental measurements. Hence we demonstrate that a molecular modeling and simulation approach may provide quantitative support to experimental programs in this area. In addition, our simulation results shed light into the molecular mechanism of water extraction, the critical role of TBP, and the structural forms of water molecules both at the interface and in the bulk of the organic phase. Specifically, it is found that water molecules are extracted either as single molecules or as clusters. Furthermore, within the organic phase, the extracted water forms clusters with up to 20 water molecules, however, more than 70% of these water clusters contain less than 5 water molecules when the water extraction process reaches saturation.

  2. Design and synthesis of a novel, orally active, brain penetrant, tri-substituted thiophene based JNK inhibitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowers, Simeon; Truong, Anh P.; Neitz, R. Jeffrey; Neitzel, Martin; Probst, Gary D.; Hom, Roy K.; Peterson, Brian; Galemmo, Jr., Robert A.; Konradi, Andrei W.; Sham, Hing L.; Tóth, Gergley; Pan, Hu; Yao, Nanhua; Artis, Dean R.; Brigham, Elizabeth F.; Quinn, Kevin P.; Sauer, John-Michael; Powell, Kyle; Ruslim, Lany; Ren, Zhao; Bard, Frédérique; Yednock, Ted A.; Griswold-Prenner, Irene (Elan)

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The SAR of a series of tri-substituted thiophene JNK3 inhibitors is described. By optimizing both the N-aryl acetamide region of the inhibitor and the 4-position of the thiophene we obtained single digit nanomolar compounds, such as 47, which demonstrated an in vivo effect on JNK activity when dosed orally in our kainic acid mouse model as measured by phospho-c-jun reduction.

  3. ALS Activity Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG, APIL.AFTFutureALPES20thALS

  4. ALS Beamlines Directory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG,ALS Beamlines Directory Print

  5. ALS Beamlines Directory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG,ALS Beamlines Directory

  6. ALS Chemistry Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG,ALS BeamlinesALSALSALSALSALS

  7. ALS Chemistry Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG,ALS BeamlinesALSALSALSALSALSALS

  8. ALS Chemistry Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG,ALS

  9. ALS Communications Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYou are70 Years ofAA-Z Index A B ALS

  10. About the ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Become agovEducationWelcome toAboutAboutUs About UsAboutALS

  11. ALS Communications Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALS Communications Group Print

  12. ALS Postdoctoral Fellowship Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALS

  13. ALS User Meeting Archives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALSALS Reveals NewALS

  14. ALS in the News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALSALS RevealsALS

  15. 2013 ALS User Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruary 2004AugustApril 2013 Wed,SeptemberNovember33 ALS

  16. Access to the ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1 Introduction In theACME -ToggleAccess to the ALS Print

  17. Superfund explanation of significant difference for the record of decision (EPA Region 5): Tri-County Landfill/Waste Management Illinois, South Elgin, IL, April 23, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tri-County/Elgin Landfill Superfund Site (TCLF) encompasses both the Tri-County and Elgin Landfills. The purpose of this ESD is to explain why the design for the landfill cap component of the remedy differs from that set forth in the ROD (PB93-964133) and to address the cost differentials associated with the change.

  18. Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium Risk Assessment during the Production of Marinated Beef Inside Skirts and Tri-tip Roasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muras, Tiffany Marie

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    and 18 tri-tips were used during this study. Both inside skirts and tri-tips were vacuum tumbled for a total of 1 h. Samples of products were tested immediately following tumbling (day 0), or were vacuum packaged and stored in the cooler (approximately 2...

  19. Tri-State Synfuels Project Review: Volume 12. Fluor project status. [Proposed Henderson, Kentucky coal to gasoline plant; engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document and summarize activities associated with Fluor's efforts on the Tri-State Synfuels Project. The proposed facility was to be coal-to-transport fuels facility located in Henderson, Kentucky. Tri-State Synfuels Company was participating in the project as a partner of the US Department of Energy per terms of a Cooperative Agreement resulting from DOE's synfuel's program solicitation. Fluor's initial work plan called for preliminary engineering and procurement services to the point of commitment for construction for a Sasol Fischer-Tropsch plant. Work proceeded as planned until October 1981 when results of alternative coal-to-methanol studies revealed the economic disadvantage of the Synthol design for US markets. A number of alternative process studies followed to determine the best process configuration. In January 1982 Tri-State officially announced a change from Synthol to a Methanol to Gasoline (MTG) design basis. Further evaluation and cost estimates for the MTG facility eventually led to the conclusion that, given the depressed economic outlook for alternative fuels development, the project should be terminated. Official announcement of cancellation was made on April 13, 1982. At the time of project cancellation, Fluor had completed significant portions of the preliminary engineering effort. Included in this report are descriptions and summaries of Fluor's work during this project. In addition location of key project data and materials is identified and status reports for each operation are presented.

  20. Driving conditions dependence of magneto-electroluminescence in tri-(8-hydroxyquinoline)-aluminum based organic light emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Qiming; Li, Xianjie; Li, Mingliang; Li, Feng

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    we investigated the magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) in tri-(8-hydroxyquinoline)-aluminum based organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) through the steady-state and transient method simultaneously. The MELs show the great different behaviors when we turn the driving condition from a constant voltage to a pulse voltage. For devices driven by the constant voltage, the MELs are similar with the literature data; for devices driven by the pulse voltage, the MELs are quite different, they firstly increase to a maximum then decrease as the magnetic field increases continuously. Negative MELs can be seen when both the magnetic field and driving voltage are high enough.

  1. ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory Print Researchers recently uncovered the first step in the process that transforms gas-phase molecules into solid particles like soot and...

  2. EA-1915: Conveyance of Approximately 1,641 Acres of Unimproved Land to the Tri-City Development Council, the Local Community Reuse Organization, Richland, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of conveyance of approximately 1,641 acres of unimproved land at DOE’s Hanford Site, Richland, Washington to the Tri-City Development Council (TRIDEC), the local community reuse organization (CRO).

  3. Al Akhawayn University Al Akhawayn partner of TUM since 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cengarle, María Victoria

    Haddouti · Dissertation at Chair for Databases (Prof. Bayer), Professor at Al Akhawayn, now working at BMW (TUM & AUI Alumni) · BMW, Hachim.haddouti@bmw.de #12;Double Degree TUM - Georgia Tech Fakultät für

  4. Al Akhawayn University Al Akhawayn partner of TUM since 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cengarle, María Victoria

    Haddouti · Dissertation at Chair for Databases (Prof. Bayer), Professor at Al Akhawayn, now working at BMW) · BMW, Hachim.haddouti@bmw.de #12;Double Degree TUM - Georgia Tech Fakultät für Informatik TUM School

  5. Al Akhawayn University Al Akhawayn partner of TUM since 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cengarle, María Victoria

    Haddouti · Dissertation at Chair for Databases (Prof. Bayer), Professor at Al Akhawayn, now working at BMW Alumni) · BMW, Hachim.haddouti@bmw.de #12;Double Degree TUM - Georgia Tech Fakultät für Informatik TUM

  6. Recent developments of the ion sources at Tri University Meson Factory/Isotope Separator and ACcelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bricault, P. G.; Ames, F.; Dombsky, M.; Labrecque, F.; Lassen, J.; Mjos, A.; Minor, G. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Tigelhoefer, A. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department Of Physics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the recent progresses concerning the on-line ion source at the Tri University Meson Factory/Isotope Separator and ACcelerator (TRIUMF/ISAC) Radioactive Ion-Beam Facility; description of the new design of the surface-ion-source for improved stability of the beam intensity, description of the transport path to the east target station at ISAC, description of the new brazing techniques that solved recurrent problems with water leaks on the target/ion source assembly in the vacuum system, finally, recent developments concerning the Forced Electron Beam Induced Arc Discharge (FEBIAD) ion source are reported. In particular, a study on the effect of the plasma chamber volume on the ionization efficiency was completed.

  7. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Puerto Rico, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  8. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Kansas, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  9. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Nebraska, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  10. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Hampshire, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  11. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Montana, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  12. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Utah, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  13. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Texas, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  14. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Idaho, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  15. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Rhode Island, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  16. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Florida, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  17. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Hampshire, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  18. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Oklahoma, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  19. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), West Virginia, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  20. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), South Dakota, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  1. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Missouri, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  2. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Mexico, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  3. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Washington, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  4. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Maryland, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  5. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), North Dakota, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  6. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Arizona, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  7. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), American Samoa, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  8. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Alaska, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  9. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Connecticut, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  10. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), vVrginia, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  11. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Puerto Rico, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  12. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Pennsylvania, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  13. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Minnesota, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  14. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Iowa, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  15. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), South Carolina, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  16. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Oregon, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  17. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Georgia, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  18. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Wyoming, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  19. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), North Dakota, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  20. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Arkansas, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  1. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Louisiana, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  2. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), United States and Territories, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year.Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility; the first nine digit alphanumeric number a facility holds under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems.

  3. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), North Carolina 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  4. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Virgin Islands, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  5. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Indiana, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  6. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), California, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  7. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Virgin Islands, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  8. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Jersey, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  9. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Vermont, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  10. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Wisconsin, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  11. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Maine, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  12. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), West Virginia, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  13. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Illinois, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  14. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Jersey, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  15. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Rhode Island, 1991 and 1992 (in dbase iii plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  16. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Virginia, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  17. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Mexico, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  18. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), South Dakota, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  19. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Tennessee, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  20. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Massachusetts, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  1. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Ohio, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  2. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), American Samoa, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  3. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New York, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  4. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Alabama, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  5. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Hawaii, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  6. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), South Carolina, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  7. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Mississippi, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  8. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Delaware, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  9. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Michigan, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  10. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Kentucky, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  11. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Nevada, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  12. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), North Carolina, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  13. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Colorado, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  14. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New York, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  15. Water Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, searchOpenInformation Henkle, Et Al.,

  16. Aeromagnetic Survey At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Ward, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEE JumpAeroWind Inc. Place: Potsdam,OpenAl., 1984)1991)

  17. Try This: Household Magnets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliancesTrending:Schedule FYHousehold Magnets

  18. Course Syllabus: Chemistry 3AL Course Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Course Syllabus: Chemistry 3AL Course Information Course Name Chemistry 3AL Course Instructor are online. Chemistry 3AL Syllabus https://elearning.berkeley.edu/AngelUploads/Content/2013SUC... 1 of 5 5

  19. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Tri-City Disposal Company, operable unit 2, Bullitt County, Brooks, KY, March 29, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document presents the decision made by the U.S. Environmental protection Agency (USEPA) for the second phase of remedial action (Operable Unit No. 2) at the Tri-City Industrial Disposal Site. Based on the results of additional sampling at Tri-City, monitoring reports, and risk evaluation, no further remedial action is necessary at the site to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This decision is the final remedial action for the site. Although EPA has determined that no additional Superfund action is warranted for the second operable unit, treatment and monitoring of contaminated groundwater (OU1) (PB92-964004) will continue at the site as necessary.

  20. Model-Independent Analysis of Tri-bimaximal Mixing: A Softly-Broken Hidden or an Accidental Symmetry?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albright, Carl H.; /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab; Rodejohann, Werner; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To address the issue of whether tri-bimaximal mixing (TBM) is a softly-broken hidden or an accidental symmetry, we adopt a model-independent analysis in which we perturb a neutrino mass matrix leading to TBM in the most general way but leave the three texture zeros of the diagonal charged lepton mass matrix unperturbed. We compare predictions for the perturbed neutrino TBM parameters with those obtained from typical SO(10) grand unified theories with a variety of flavor symmetries. Whereas SO(10) GUTs almost always predict a normal mass hierarchy for the light neutrinos, TBM has a priori no preference for neutrino masses. We find, in particular for the latter, that the value of |U{sub e3}| is very sensitive to the neutrino mass scale and ordering. Observation of |U{sub e3}|{sup 2} > 0.001 to 0.01 within the next few years would be incompatible with softly-broken TBM and a normal mass hierarchy and would suggest that the apparent TBM symmetry is an accidental symmetry instead. No such conclusions can be drawn for the inverted and quasi-degenerate hierarchy spectra.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Tri-n-butyl-phosphate/n-Dodecane Mixture: Thermophysical Properties and Molecular Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Almeida, Valmor F [ORNL; Cui, Shengting [ORNL; Khomami, Bamin [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular dynamics simulations of tri-n-butyl-phosphate (TBP)/n-dodecane mixture in the liquid phase have been carried out using two recently developed TBP force field models (J. Phys. Chem. B 2012, 116, 305) in combination with the all-atom optimized potentials for liquid simulations (OPLS-AA) force field model for n-dodecane. Specifically, the electric dipole moment of TBP, mass density of the mixture, and the excess volume of mixing were computed with TBP mole fraction ranging from 0 to 1. It is found that the aforementioned force field models accurately predict the mass density of the mixture in the entire mole fraction range. Commensurate with experimental measurements, the electric dipole moment of the TBP was found to slightly increase with the mole fraction of TBP in the mixture. Also, in accord with experimental data, the excess volume of mixing is positive in the entire mole fraction range, peaking at TBP mole fraction range 0.3 0.5. Finally, a close examination of the spatial pair correlation functions between TBP molecules, and between TBP and n-dodecane molecules, revealed formation of TBP dimers through self-association at close distance, a phenomenon with ample experimental evidence.

  2. ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance Print Thursday, 27 September 2012 00:00 ritchie ceramics...

  3. ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship in ResidenceALS EvidenceALS

  4. ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALS Communications GroupALS

  5. A nuclear magnetic resonance probe of Fe-Al and Al20V2Eu intermetallics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chi, Ji

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Al-rich Fe-Al systems (FeAl2, Fe2 Al5 and Fe4Al13) and Al20V2Eu have complicated structures with quasicrystal-like features making these materials potentially of interest for magnetic behavior. However, there is not much work on these materials...

  6. Dopant-Free GaN/AlN/AlGaN Radial Nanowire Heterostructures as High

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yat

    Dopant-Free GaN/AlN/AlGaN Radial Nanowire Heterostructures as High Electron Mobility Transistors, 2006 ABSTRACT We report the rational synthesis of dopant-free GaN/AlN/AlGaN radial nanowire-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies reveal that the GaN/ AlN/AlGaN

  7. Tri-axial magnetic anisotropies in RE{sub 2}Ba{sub 4}Cu{sub 7}O{sub 15?y} superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horii, Shigeru, E-mail: horii.shigeru.7e@kyoto-u.ac.jp; Doi, Toshiya [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Okuhira, Shota; Yamaki, Momoko [Department of Environmental Systems Engineering, Kochi University of Technology, Tosa-Yamada, Kami-shi, Kochi 782-8502 (Japan); Kishio, Kohji; Shimoyama, Jun-ichi [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a novel quantification method of tri-axial magnetic anisotropy in orthorhombic substances containing rare earth (RE) ions using tri-axial magnetic alignment and tri-axial magnetic anisotropies depending on the type of RE in RE-based cuprate superconductors. From the changes in the axes for magnetization in magnetically aligned powders of (RE?{sub 1?x}RE?{sub x}){sub 2}Ba{sub 4}Cu{sub 7}O{sub y} [(RE?,RE?)247] containing RE ions with different single-ion magnetic anisotropies, the ratios of three-dimensional magnetic anisotropies between RE?247 and RE?247 could be determined. The results in (Y,Er)247, (Dy,Er)247, (Ho,Er)247, and (Y,Eu)247 systems suggest that magnetic anisotropies largely depended on the type of RE? (or RE?), even in the heavy RE ions with higher magnetic anisotropies. An appropriate choice of RE ions in RE-based cuprate superconductors enables the reduction of the required magnetic field for the production of their bulks and thick films based on the tri-axial magnetic alignment technique using modulated rotation magnetic fields.

  8. al tratamiento local: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and MEG data (Vigario et al., 1998; Tang et al., 2000a; Vigario et al., 1999, 2000; Wubbeler et al Pearlmutter, Barak 39 Independent Components of...

  9. Ultra-sensitive strain sensors based on piezoresistive nanographene films Jing Zhao, Congli He, Rong Yang, Zhiwen Shi, Meng Cheng et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Guangyu

    ­3 Along with the relentless pursuit of low-cost and miniatur- ized devices, different candidate materials characteristics of nanographene films, which indicates our results provide a different rout toward ultra advantages in scalable devices fabrication via top-down approaches, which is com- patible with existing

  10. Scott Taylor, ALS Safety Manager

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearchPhysics LabwildfiresScott Taylor, ALS Safety

  11. Microsoft Word - Research Campaign_Ahring et al.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Junfeng Xue, 1 Ljiljana Pasa-Tolic, 2 Galya Orr, 2 1 Center for Bioproducts and Bioenergy, Washington State University Tri-Cities, 2 Environmental Molecular Sciences...

  12. Stratigraphy of hydrated sulfates in the sedimentary deposits of Aram Chaos, Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glotch, Timothy D.

    Jeffrey AndrewsHanna,9 and Leah H. Roach8,10 Received 31 January 2009; revised 1 December 2009; accepted for Mars (CRISM) data [Murchie et al., 2009; Roach et al., 2009], has revolution- ized our understanding

  13. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Tri County/Elgin Landfill Site, Elgin, IL. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The 66-acre Tri County Landfill (TCL) site comprises two former landfills the Tri County Landfill and the Elgin Landfill, located near the junction of Kane, Cook and DuPage Counties, Illinois. The two disposal operations overlapped to the point where the two landfills were indistinguishable. Land use in the area is predominantly agricultural. The local residents and businesses use private wells as their drinking water supply. Prior to the 1940's, both landfills were used for gravel mining operations. From 1968 to 1976, the TCL received liquid and industrial waste. State and county inspection reports revealed that open dumping, area filling, and dumping into the abandonded gravel quarry had occurred at the site. In addition, confined dumping, inadequate daily cover, blowing litter, fires, lack of access restrictions, and leachate flows were typical problems reported. In 1981, the landfill was closed with a final cover.

  14. Synergetic effects of II-VI sensitization upon TiO{sub 2} for photoelectrochemical water splitting; a tri-layered structured scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mumtaz, Asad, E-mail: asad-032@yahoo.com [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, University Teknologi PETRONAS (Malaysia); Mohamed, Norani Muti, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my [Centre of Innovative Nanostructures and Nanodevices (COINN), Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    World's energy demands are growing on a higher scale increasing the need of more reliable and long term renewable energy resources. Efficient photo-electrochemical (PEC) devices based on novel nano-structured designs for solar-hydrogen generation need to be developed. This study provides an insight of the tri-layered-TiO2 based nanostructures. Observing the mechanism of hydrogen production, the comparison of the structural order during the synthesis is pronounced. The sequence in the tri-layered structure affects the photogenerated electron (e{sup ?}) and hole (h{sup +}) pair transfer and separation. It is also discussed that not only the semiconductors band gaps alignment is important with respect to the water redox potential but also the interfacial regions. Quasi-Fermi-level adjustment at the interfacial regions plays a key role in deciding the solar to hydrogen efficiency. More efficient multicomponent semiconductor nano-design (MCSN) could be developed with the approach given in this study.

  15. AL2007-03.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of Energy-ChapterDepartment6-04v2.pdf MoreAL 2007-03

  16. AL2007-05.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of Energy-ChapterDepartment6-04v2.pdf MoreAL7-05

  17. ALS 20th Anniversary Celebration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG, APIL.AFTFutureALPES20thALS 20th

  18. ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship in ResidenceALS Evidence

  19. ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship in ResidenceALS

  20. ALS Scientific Advisory Committee Charter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship inALS Reveals NewScientific

  1. ALS Scientific Advisory Committee Charter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship inALS Reveals

  2. ALS Scientific Advisory Committee Charter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship inALS RevealsScientific

  3. AL PRO | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORT Americium/Curium Vitrification4th Day EnergyADAPTItalyAL PRO

  4. 2012 ALS User Meeting Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment ofAugust 2011October 2012 Thu, 10/04/20122 ALS User

  5. 2012 ALS User Meeting Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment ofAugust 2011October 2012 Thu, 10/04/20122 ALS

  6. ALS Doctoral Fellowship in Residence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALS Communications Group

  7. ALS Evidence Confirms Combustion Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALS Communications GroupALSALS

  8. Al Geist | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA, adefault Sign InLeaksGreenAl

  9. April 27, 2015-Special ALS Colloquium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 27, 2015-Special ALS Colloquium Print Special Event on Monday, April 27 @ 12 noon, USB 15-253 X-Ray Microscopy: The First 120 Years Janos Kirz, ALS Abstract Rntgen's great...

  10. April 27, 2015-Special ALS Colloquium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 27, 2015-Special ALS Colloquium April 27, 2015-Special ALS Colloquium Print Wednesday, 22 April 2015 13:19 Special Event on Monday, April 27 @ 12 noon, USB 15-253 X-Ray...

  11. United States Patent [19] Church et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    United States Patent [19] Church et al. [54] CHARACTERIZATION OF INDIVIDUAL POLYMER MOLECULES BASED 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 US005795782A [11] Patent Number: [45] Date of Patent: 5,795,782 Aug. 18, 1998 Boulanger et al

  12. (12) United States Patent Vertes et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    (12) United States Patent Vertes et al. (54) NANOPHOTONIC PRODUCTION, MODULATION AND SWITCHING to any disclaimer, the term ofthis patent is extended or adjusted under 35 U.S.c. 154(b) by 194 days. (21) References Cited U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS 200910236512 Al * 912009 Naya et al. .................... 250/281 2009

  13. United States Patent [19] Miura et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A.

    of Pyrrole--3,4--diacetic Acid and Its Derivatives", Synthesis, pp. 262--265 (1989). Coderre et al., "Boron/1992 OTHER PUBLICATIONS Japan . Japan . WIPO . WIPO . Miura et al.,, "Synthesis, Tissue Uptake, and Toxicity Therapy for Cancer, Kobe, Japan (Oct. 31--Nov. 4, 1994). Miura et al., "Synthesis and Spectroscopic

  14. ccsd00001116 Nucleation of Al 3 Zr and Al 3 Sc in aluminum alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd­00001116 (version 1) : 4 Feb 2004 Nucleation of Al 3 Zr and Al 3 Sc in aluminum alloys: from 4, 2004) Zr and Sc precipitate in aluminum alloys to form the compounds Al3Zr and Al3Sc which

  15. Activated Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} for transformation of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lien, H.L.; Zhang, W.X.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the preparation of activated Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture has been developed in the laboratory. Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are infused and activated within an alkaline solution. Optimal Al to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio is in the range of 0.1 to 1. Batch experiments have demonstrated that the activated Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture can rapidly dechlorinate tetrachloroethylene (PCE), carbon tetrachloride (CT) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB). Due to the high reactivity, light density and low cost, the activated Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} may be used as a remediation agent in ex-situ treatment of industrial effluent, in-situ treatment wall, and for direct injection into ground water.

  16. TriBITS lifecycle model. Version 1.0, a lean/agile software lifecycle model for research-based computational science and engineering and applied mathematical software.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willenbring, James M.; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Heroux, Michael Allen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Software lifecycles are becoming an increasingly important issue for computational science and engineering (CSE) software. The process by which a piece of CSE software begins life as a set of research requirements and then matures into a trusted high-quality capability is both commonplace and extremely challenging. Although an implicit lifecycle is obviously being used in any effort, the challenges of this process - respecting the competing needs of research vs. production - cannot be overstated. Here we describe a proposal for a well-defined software lifecycle process based on modern Lean/Agile software engineering principles. What we propose is appropriate for many CSE software projects that are initially heavily focused on research but also are expected to eventually produce usable high-quality capabilities. The model is related to TriBITS, a build, integration and testing system, which serves as a strong foundation for this lifecycle model, and aspects of this lifecycle model are ingrained in the TriBITS system. Here, we advocate three to four phases or maturity levels that address the appropriate handling of many issues associated with the transition from research to production software. The goals of this lifecycle model are to better communicate maturity levels with customers and to help to identify and promote Software Engineering (SE) practices that will help to improve productivity and produce better software. An important collection of software in this domain is Trilinos, which is used as the motivation and the initial target for this lifecycle model. However, many other related and similar CSE (and non-CSE) software projects can also make good use of this lifecycle model, especially those that use the TriBITS system. Indeed this lifecycle process, if followed, will enable large-scale sustainable integration of many complex CSE software efforts across several institutions.

  17. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites. Abstract: The degree of substitution of Si4+ by Al3+ in the...

  18. Structural, morphological, and optical properties of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with AlN buffer and interlayer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozbay, Ekmel

    N buffer layer BL grown on an Al2O3 substrate and an AlN IL grown under the AlGaN ternary layer TL. In the present study, we investigate the effects of an AlN BL on an Al2O3 substrate and an AlN IL between an AlGaNStructural, morphological, and optical properties of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with AlN buffer

  19. Crystallographic Consulting Brings Research to the ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the ALS, with most of his research supporting pharmaceutical companies working on new treatments for metabolic diseases and cancer. Pauly spent 15 years of his career working...

  20. Al Corn Clean Fuel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60 Jump2008 | OpenOhio:Akuo EnergyFuel Jump

  1. Al Husseini Amelio JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60 Jump2008 | OpenOhio:Akuo EnergyFuel

  2. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vjunov, Aleksei; Fulton, John L.; Huthwelker, Thomas; Pin, Sonia; Mei, Donghai; Schenter, Gregory K.; Govind, Niranjan; Camaioni, Donald M.; Hu, Jian Z.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The degree of substitution of Si4+ by Al3+ in the oxygen-terminated tetrahedra (Al T-sites) of zeolites determines the concentration of ion-exchange and Brønsted acid sites. As the location of the tetrahedra and the associated subtle variations in bond angles influence the acid strength, quantitative information about Al T-sites in the framework is critical to rationalize catalytic properties and to design new catalysts. A quantitative analysis is reported that uses a combination of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis and 27Al MAS NMR spectroscopy supported by DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations. To discriminate individual Al atoms, sets of ab initio EXAFS spectra for various T-sites are generated from DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations allowing quantitative treatment of the EXAFS single- and multiple-photoelectron scattering processes out to 3-4 atom shells surrounding the Al absorption center. It is observed that identical zeolite types show dramatically different Al-distributions. A preference of Al for T-sites that are part of one or more 4-member rings in the framework over those T-sites that are part of only 5- and 6-member rings in the HBEA150 sample has been determined from a combination of these methods. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences.

  3. Johns, R. H., D. W. Burgess, C. A. Doswell III, M. S. Gilmore, J. A. Hart, and S. F. Piltz, 2013: The 1925 Tri-State tornado damage path and associated storm system. Electronic J. Severe Storms Meteor., 8 (2), 133.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doswell III, Charles A.

    mi) east-northeast of the apparent end of the Tri- State tornado damage path in Pike County, IN: The 1925 Tri- State tornado damage path and associated storm system. Electronic J. Severe Storms Meteor., 8 (2), 1­33. 1 The 1925 Tri-State Tornado Damage Path and Associated Storm System ROBERT H. JOHNS

  4. A new discontinuously reinforced aluminum MMC: Al+AlB{sub 2} flakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HALL,AARON C.; ECONOMY,J.

    2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of a novel metal matrix composite based on the Al-B alloy system has been undertaken. Preparation of this discontinuously reinforced material is based on the precipitation of high aspect ratio AlB{sub 2} from an Al-B alloy. This paper describes a number of efforts forced on preparing high volume fractions (> 30 v%) of AlB{sub 2} in aluminum. New insights into the behavior of the Al-B alloys system allowed this effort to be successful.

  5. Public health assessment for tri-county landfill waste management of Illinois, South Elgin, Kane County, Illinois, Region 5. Cerclis No. ILD048306183. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tri-County and Elgin Landfills pose a public health hazard because the concentrations of lead in downgradient private wells are high enough to be a long-term health concern. Completed exposure pathways include the exposure to contaminated water from on- and off-site private wells (inhalation, ingestion, dermal contact; past, present, future). Contaminants of concern in on-site groundwater include bis(2-chloroethyl)ether, vinyl chloride, antimony, arsenic, barium, cadmium, fluoride, lead, manganese, nickel, nitrate + nitrite, and thallium. Chemicals of concern in on-site surface soil and sediments include PCBs, arsenic, cadmium, and nickel. Contaminants of concern in on-site subsurface soil include PCBs, arsenic, cadmium, lead, and nickel. This public health assessment recommends health professionals education and community health education be conducted for the community impacted by the landfills.

  6. Thermal diffusion in Ni/Al multilayer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swain, M.; Bhattacharya, D.; Singh, S.; Basu, S. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400085 (India); Gupta, M. [UGC-DAE-Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452017 (India)

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Two Ni/Al multilayers deposited by ion beam sputtering of nominal design [Ni(200A)/Al(100A)] Multiplication-Sign 5 and [Ni(50A)/Al(227A)] Multiplication-Sign 5 on Si substrates were annealed at 200 Degree-Sign C. As-deposited and annealed samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray reflectometry (XRR). The effort was to study the path of alloying in the above two multilayers of same elements but of opposite stoichiometric ratio. We find distinct differences in alloying of these samples.

  7. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), United States and Territories, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  8. Summary Slides of ALS Industry Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highlight ALSNews Volume 15 Caribou Biosciences Has Roots at ALS - 09.24.2014 Vol. 357 13 Lithium-Battery Dendrite Growth: A New View 8.3.2 04.30.2014 Vol. 352 12 IBM Probes...

  9. Western Baldwin County, AL Grid Interconnection Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas DeBell

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Objective of this Project was to provide an additional supply of electricity to the affected portions of Baldwin County, AL through the purchase, installation, and operation of certain substation equipment.

  10. Tri-Generation Success World's First Tri-Gen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    station uses anaerobically digested biogas from the municipal wastewater treatment plant as the fuel SAE protocols for rapid 3-minute complete tank refueling. Gas or Biogas H2 is produced at anode Gas Electrolyte Cathode Anode Anaerobic digester gas fuel is cleaned and then sent to a molten carbonate fuel cell

  11. 6. M. Jeltsch et al., Science 276, 1423 (1997); S. J. Oh et al., Dev. Biol. 188, 96 (1997).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suarez, Andrew V.

    6. M. Jeltsch et al., Science 276, 1423 (1997); S. J. Oh et al., Dev. Biol. 188, 96 (1997). 7. V, 671 (1997). 16. A. Vecchi et al., Eur. J. Cell Biol. 63, 247 (1994). 17. The presence of VEGFR-3 m. 12, 473 (1998). 21. L. C. Wang et al., EMBO J. 16, 4374 (1997). 22. P. Carmeliet et al., Nature 383

  12. AlGaN/GaN/AlN quantum-well field-effect transistors with highly resistive AlN epilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Hongxing

    AlGaN/GaN/AlN quantum-well field-effect transistors with highly resistive AlN epilayers Z. Y. Fana 66506-2601 Received 23 November 2005; accepted 5 January 2006; published online 16 February 2006 AlGaN/GaN/AlN quantum-well field-effect transistors have been demonstrated. By replacing a semi-insulating GaN epilayer

  13. al censo nacional: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOCUMENTS 4,450,407 51984 Kwon et al. ... 324304 4 Romalis, Mike 229 (12) United States Patent Bezos et al. Computer Technologies and Information...

  14. al derecho castellano: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOCUMENTS 4,450,407 51984 Kwon et al. ... 324304 4 Romalis, Mike 255 (12) United States Patent Bezos et al. Computer Technologies and Information...

  15. al alloy matrix: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dislocation structure of both Al matrix and precipitates Gubicza, Jen 3 Elevated temperature wear of an aluminum matrix composite Al6061-20 percent aluminum(2) oxygen(3)...

  16. New ALS Technique Guides IBM in Next-Generation Semiconductor...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New ALS Technique Guides IBM in Next-Generation Semiconductor Development New ALS Technique Guides IBM in Next-Generation Semiconductor Development Print Wednesday, 21 January 2015...

  17. ALS Gives Chevron Scientists New Insights into Corrosion Resistance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Gives Chevron Scientists New Insights into Corrosion Resistance ALS Gives Chevron Scientists New Insights into Corrosion Resistance Print Thursday, 25 July 2013 13:44 In the...

  18. al envejecimiento poblacional: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AL Wongawallan AL Mt Tamborine Canungra Pimpama R Laheys Lookout Greenslade, Diana 5 -Hoffmann, Odile et Pedro Quintin, 1999, Organizacin social, dinmicas culturales e identidades...

  19. al azar rapd: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Statement, and Program of February 2005 Companion Workshop at Al Azar University, Egypt University of Kansas - KU ScholarWorks Summary: February 12, 2005 at Al Azhar...

  20. amplificado al azar: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Statement, and Program of February 2005 Companion Workshop at Al Azar University, Egypt University of Kansas - KU ScholarWorks Summary: February 12, 2005 at Al Azhar...

  1. al ni shape: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NiAl NANOLAMINATES . Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??To characterize the self-propagating, high-temperature exothermic alloying reactions of NiAl nanoscaled...

  2. al acceso parte: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hills landfill (Byrne et al. 1992; Gilbert et al. 1998143 1 INTRODUCTION Geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) with geomembranes (GMs) placed on slopes as part of composite liner...

  3. The beta-decay of 22Al

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. L. Achouri; F. de Oliveira Santos; M. Lewitowicz; B. Blank; J. Aysto; G. Canchel; S. Czajkowski; P. Dendooven; A. Emsallem; J. Giovinazzo; N. Guillet; A. Jokinen; A. M. Laird; C. Longour; K. Perajarvi; N. Smirnova; M. Stanoiu; J. C. Thomas

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an experiment performed at the LISE3 facility of GANIL, we studied the decay of 22Al produced by the fragmentation of a 36Ar primary beam. A beta-decay half-life of 91.1 +- 0.5 ms was measured. The beta-delayed one- and two-proton emission as well as beta-alpha and beta-delayed gamma decays were measured and allowed us to establish a partial decay scheme for this nucleus. New levels were determined in the daughter nucleus 22Mg. The comparison with model calculations strongly favours a spin-parity of 4+ for the ground state of 22Al.

  4. ALS Reveals New State of Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship inALS Reveals New StateALS

  5. Tri-State Synfuels Project Review: Volume 8. Commercial status of licensed process units. [Proposed Henderson, Kentucky coal to gasoline plant; licensed commercial processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document demonstrates the commercial status of the process units to be used in the Tri-State Synfuels Project at Henderson, Kentucky. The basic design philosophy as established in October, 1979, was to use the commercial SASOL II/III plants as a basis. This was changed in January 1982 to a plant configuration to produce gasoline via a methanol and methanol to gasoline process. To accomplish this change the Synthol, Oil workup and Chemical Workup Units were eliminated and replaced by Methanol Synthesis and Methanol to Gasoline Units. Certain other changes to optimize the Lurgi liquids processing eliminated the Tar Distillation and Naphtha Hydrotreater Units which were replaced by the Partial Oxidation Unit. The coals to be gasified are moderately caking which necessitates the installation of stirring mechanism in the Lurgi Dry Bottom gasifier. This work is in the demonstration phase. Process licenses either have been obtained or must be obtained for a number of processes to be used in the plant. The commercial nature of these processes is discussed in detail in the tabbed sections of this document. In many cases there is a list of commercial installations at which the licensed equipment is used.

  6. ccsd00004518, Precipitation kinetics of Al 3 Zr and Al 3 Sc in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , kinetics, aluminum alloys, cluster dynamics PACS: 64.60.Cn, 64.60.-i, 64.70.Kb, 64.75.+g 1 Introduction Transition elements are added to aluminum alloys so as to obtain small ordered precipitates and by this wayccsd­00004518, version 2 ­ 21 Mar 2005 Precipitation kinetics of Al 3 Zr and Al 3 Sc in aluminum

  7. Supra-Canonical 26Al/27Al and the Residence Time of CAIs in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Mark

    . Laser ablation and whole-rock multiple- collector inductively coupled plasma-source mass spectrometry absolute 207Pb-206Pb ages of 4567.2 T 0.6 My (4). Here, we present new ul- traviolet (UV) laser ablation few to warrant revision of the canonical (26Al/27Al)o. We present new laser-ablation MC-ICPMS Mg

  8. Electronic circuits having NiAl and Ni.sub.3 Al substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electronic circuit component having improved mechanical properties and thermal conductivity comprises NiAl and/or Ni.sub.3 Al, upon which an alumina layer is formed prior to applying the conductive elements. Additional layers of copper-aluminum alloy or copper further improve mechanical strength and thermal conductivity.

  9. I have never touched her: the body in Al-Ghazal Al-‘Udhri 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alharthi, Jokha Mohammed

    2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Al-ghazal al-‘udhri emerged as a remarkable literary genre in Arabic literature during the Umayyad period (7th-8th centuries CE). The leaders of this genre are famous poet-lovers who were known for their dramatic love ...

  10. Intersubband absorption in AlN/GaN/AlGaN coupled quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driscoll, Kristina; Bhattacharyya, Anirban; Moustakas, Theodore D.; Paiella, Roberto; Zhou, Lin; Smith, David J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Photonics Center, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary's Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Department of Physics and School of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AlN/GaN/AlGaN coupled quantum wells grown by molecular beam epitaxy have been developed and characterized via intersubband absorption spectroscopy. In these structures, an AlGaN layer of sufficiently low Al content is used to achieve strong interwell coupling without the need for ultrathin inner barriers. At the same time, AlN is used in the outer barriers to provide the large quantum confinement required for near-infrared intersubband transitions. The composition of the inner barriers also provides a continuously tunable parameter to control the coupling strength. Double intersubband absorption peaks are measured in each sample, at photon energies in good agreement with theoretical expectations.

  11. Lieth et al -p.1 Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieth, J. Heinrich

    of the greenhouse system, such as inner air, soil surface and glass. It is also necessary to monitor cooling controlLieth et al - p.1 Progress Report covering 10/1/1999 - 12/31/1999 for project EISG program project be found in greenhouse systems. The greenhouse is a transparent structure, its primary energy source

  12. Ternary Dy-Er-Al magnetic refrigerants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Takeya, Hiroyuki

    1995-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A ternary magnetic refrigerant material comprising (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} for a magnetic refrigerator using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle spanning a temperature range from about 60K to about 10K, which can be adjusted by changing the Dy to Er ratio of the refrigerant. 29 figs.

  13. Ternary Dy-Er-Al magnetic refrigerants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A. (Ames, IA); Takeya, Hiroyuki (Ibaraki, JP)

    1995-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A ternary magnetic refrigerant material comprising (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 for a magnetic refrigerator using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle spanning a temperature range from about 60K to about 10K, which can be adjusted by changing the Dy to Er ratio of the refrigerant.

  14. (12) United States Patent Vertes et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    (12) United States Patent Vertes et al. (54) THREE-DIMENSIONAL MOLECULAR IMAGING BY INFRARED LASER) ( *) Notice: Subject to any disclaimer, the term ofthis patent is extended or adjusted under 35 U.S.c. 154(b/282,287,288; 4361173 See application file for complete search history. (56) References Cited U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS 6

  15. (12) United States Patent Vertes et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    (12) United States Patent Vertes et al. (54) LASERABLATION ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION (LAESI) ( *) Notice: Subject to any disclaimer, the term ofthis patent is extended or adjusted under 35 U.S.C. 154(b) by 0 days. lbis patent is subject to a terminal dis- claimer. (21) Appl. No.: 131271,435 Oct. 12, 2011

  16. (12) United States Patent Vertes et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    (12) United States Patent Vertes et al. (54) LASER DESORPTION IONIZATION AND PEPTIDE SEQUENCING to any disclaimer, the term ofthis patent is extended or adjusted under 35 U.S.c. 154(b) by 1079 days application file for complete search history. References Cited U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS 6,288,390 Bl 912001

  17. (12) United States Patent Geohegan et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geohegan, David B.

    (12) United States Patent Geohegan et al. US008540542B2 US 8,540,542 B2 Sep. 24, 2013 (10) Patent N0.: (45) Date of Patent: (54) TRANSPARENT CONDUCTIVE NANO-COMPOSITES (75) Inventors: David Bruce Research Foundation, Knoxville, TN (US) Notice: Subject to any disclaimer, the term ofthis patent

  18. (12) United States Patent Vertes et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    (12) United States Patent Vertes et al. (54) PROTEIN MICROSCOPE (75) Inventors: Akos Vertes, Reston patent is extended or adjusted under 35 U.S.c. 154(b) by 135 days. (21) Appl. No.: 111795,687 (22 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 16 US007735146B2 (10) Patent No.: (45) Date of Patent: US 7,735,146 B2 Jun. 8,2010 (56) References

  19. (12) United States Patent Grier et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    (12) United States Patent Grier et al. US008791985B2 US 8,791,985 B2 Jul. 29, 2014 (10) Patent N0.: (45) Date of Patent: (54) (75) (73) (21) (22) (86) (87) (65) (60) (51) (52) TRACKING to any disclaimer, the term ofthis patent is extended or adjusted under 35 U.S.C. 154(b) by 744 days. 12

  20. Crawford et al.32 32 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Wayne

    and White, 2001; Fruehn et al., 2001; Martini and Bean, 2001; Hobbs, 2002; Fliedner and White, 2003; White to sub-basalt sediments almost everywhere where the water depth is greater than 0.9 km and in some if the water depth is 1 km or more. For the same water depths, if the depth limits of the sub-basalt sediments

  1. lthough proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers are widely used in the process indus-try, their effectiveness is often limited due to poor tuning. The manual tuning of PID controllers,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krstic, Miroslav

    A lthough proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers are widely used in the process indus- try, their effectiveness is often limited due to poor tuning. The manual tuning of PID controllers, and it is not desirable to open the process loop for system identifica- tion. Thus, a method for tuning PID parameters

  2. Metastable phase boundaries of quasicrystalline phases. [Al-Mn; Al-Ru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Knapp, J.A.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The melting curve (T/sub 0/) of the metastable icosahedral phase and the liquidus of the decagonal phase of Al-Mn have been obtained for 14 to 22 at. % Mn. Icosahedral Al-Mn has a congruent melting point of 910 +- 20/sup 0/C at 20 at. % Mn, and melts approx.30/sup 0/C lower than crystalline compounds with the same composition. Icosahedral Al/sub 82/Ru/sub 18/ was determined to melt at 1260 +- 30/sup 0/C. These results were obtained by forming single-phase icosahedral alloys with ion beam mixing, and by rapid heating to accurately known temperatures with electron beams.

  3. Effect of the substrate temperature on the physical properties of molybdenum tri-oxide thin films obtained through the spray pyrolysis technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, H.M. [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia)] [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia); Torres, J., E-mail: njtorress@unal.edu.co [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia); Lopez Carreno, L.D. [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia)] [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia); Rodriguez-Garcia, M.E. [Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Juriquilla, Queretaro, Qro., Mexico (Colombia)] [Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Juriquilla, Queretaro, Qro., Mexico (Colombia)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycrystalline molybdenum tri-oxide thin films were prepared using the spray pyrolysis technique; a 0.1 M solution of ammonium molybdate tetra-hydrated was used as a precursor. The samples were prepared on Corning glass substrates maintained at temperatures ranging between 423 and 673 K. The samples were characterized through micro Raman, X-ray diffraction, optical transmittance and DC electrical conductivity. The species MoO{sub 3} (H{sub 2}O){sub 2} was found in the sample prepared at a substrate temperature of 423 K. As the substrate temperature rises, the water disappears and the samples crystallize into {alpha}-MoO{sub 3}. The optical gap diminishes as the substrate temperature rises. Two electrical transport mechanisms were found: hopping under 200 K and intrinsic conduction over 200 K. The MoO{sub 3} films' sensitivity was analyzed for CO and H{sub 2}O in the temperature range 160 to 360 K; the results indicate that CO and H{sub 2}O have a reduction character. In all cases, it was found that the sensitivity to CO is lower than that to H{sub 2}O. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A low cost technique is used which produces good material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin films are prepared using ammonium molybdate tetra hydrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The control of the physical properties of the samples could be done. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A calculation method is proposed to determine the material optical properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MoO{sub 3} thin films prepared by spray pyrolysis could be used as gas sensor.

  4. Neutronic Analysis of the Burning of Transuranics in Fully Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Tri-Isotropic Particle-Fuel in a PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Pope; R. Sonat Sen; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Gilles Youinou; Brian Boer

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculations have been performed to assess the neutronic behavior of pins of Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel in otherwise-conventional Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel pins. The FCM fuel contains transuranic (TRU) – only oxide fuel in tri-isotropic (TRISO) particles with the TRU loading coming from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Use of the TRISO particle fuel would provide an additional barrier to fission product release in the event of cladding failure. Depletion calculations were performed to evaluate reactivity-limited burnup of the TRU-only FCM fuel. These calculations showed that due to relatively little space available for fuel, the achievable burnup with these pins alone is quite small. Various reactivity parameters were also evaluated at each burnup step including moderator temperature coefficient (MTC), Doppler, and soluble boron worth. These were compared to reference UO2 and MOX unit cells. The TRU-only FCM fuel exhibits degraded MTC and Doppler coefficients relative to UO2 and MOX. Also, the reactivity effects of coolant voiding suggest that the behavior of this fuel would be similar to a MOX fuel of very high plutonium fraction, which are known to have positive void reactivity. In general, loading of TRU-only FCM fuel into an assembly without significant quantities of uranium presents challenges to the reactor design. However, if such FCM fuel pins are included in a heterogeneous assembly alongside LEU fuel pins, the overall reactivity behavior is dominated by the uranium pins while attractive TRU destruction performance levels in the TRU-only FCM fuel pins is. From this work, it is concluded that use of heterogeneous assemblies such as these appears feasible from a preliminary reactor physics standpoint.

  5. UN TRAIT POLITIQUE DU IIE L'PTRE DE UBAYD ALLH B. AL-ASAN AL-ANBAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ubayd Allh b. al-asan al-Anbar (m. 168/785) à lintention du calife abbside al-Mahd (158/775-169/785). À la littérature de « miroirs des princes », voir notamment C.E. Bosworth, « Naat al-mulk », EI, VII, p

  6. Local stress-induced effects on AlGaAs/AlOx oxidation front shape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chouchane, F.; Almuneau, G., E-mail: almuneau@laas.fr; Arnoult, A.; Lacoste, G.; Fontaine, C. [CNRS, LAAS, 7 avenue du colonel Roche, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Univ de Toulouse, UPS, LAAS, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Cherkashin, N. [Univ de Toulouse, UPS, LAAS, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, CEMES, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The lateral oxidation of thick AlGaAs layers (>500?nm) is studied. An uncommon shape of the oxide tip is evidenced and attributed to the embedded stress distribution, inherent to the oxidation reaction. Experimental and numerical studies of the internal strain in oxidized Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As/GaAs structures were carried out by dark-field electron holography and finite element methods. A mapping of the strain distribution around the AlGaAs/oxide interface demonstrates the main role of internal stress on the shaping of the oxide front. These results demonstrate the high relevance of strain in oxide-confined III-V devices, in particular, with over-500-nm thick AlOx confinement layers.

  7. The evolution of Al-Azhar Street, Al-Qahira, Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkatsha, Markus Fawzy Fahmy

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The historic quarter of Cairo, al-Qahira, is going through a period intense transformation that is threatening the physical environment as well as the social and economic fabric of the city. The transformations taking place ...

  8. Status of the AlCap experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litchfield, R Phillip

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AlCap experiment is a joint project between the COMET and Mu2e collaborations. Both experiments intend to look for the lepton-flavour violating conversion $\\mu + A \\rightarrow e + A$, using tertiary muons from high-power pulsed proton beams. In these experiments the products of ordinary muon capture in the muon stopping target are an important concern, both in terms of hit rates in tracking detectors and radiation damage to equipment. The goal of the AlCap experiment is to provide precision measurements of the products of nuclear capture on Aluminium, which is the favoured target material for both COMET and Mu2e. The results will be used for optimising the design of both conversion experiments, and as input to their simulations. Data was taken in December 2013 and is currently being analysed.

  9. Status of the AlCap experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Phillip Litchfield

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The AlCap experiment is a joint project between the COMET and Mu2e collaborations. Both experiments intend to look for the lepton-flavour violating conversion $\\mu + A \\rightarrow e + A$, using tertiary muons from high-power pulsed proton beams. In these experiments the products of ordinary muon capture in the muon stopping target are an important concern, both in terms of hit rates in tracking detectors and radiation damage to equipment. The goal of the AlCap experiment is to provide precision measurements of the products of nuclear capture on Aluminium, which is the favoured target material for both COMET and Mu2e. The results will be used for optimising the design of both conversion experiments, and as input to their simulations. Data was taken in December 2013 and is currently being analysed.

  10. Observable Proxies For 26 Al Enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Young, Patrick A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ellinger, Carola I [ASU; Arnett, William D [UNIV ARIZONA

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the cospatial production of elements in supernova explosions to find observationally detectable proxies for enhancement of {sup 26}Al in supernova ejecta and stellar systems. Using four progenitors we explore a range of 1D explosions at different energies and an asymmetric 3D explosion. We find that the most reliable indicator of the presence of {sup 26}Al in unmixed ejecta is a very low S/Si ratio ({approx} 0.05). Production of N in O/S/Si-rich regions is also indicative. The biologically important element P is produced at its highest abundance in the same regions. Proxies should be detectable in supernova ejecta with high spatial resolution multi wavelength observations, but the small absolute abundance of material injected into a proto-planetary disk makes detection unlikely in existing or forming stellar/planetary systems.

  11. United States Patent [19] Carlson et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adelson, Edward

    United States Patent [19] Carlson et al. [11] Patent Number: 4,523,230 [45] Date of Patent: Jun. 11 ............. 358/160, 163; 166; 167, 358/905, 21 R, 36; 382/49, 54 [56] References Cited U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS 4 signals. 24 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures #12;U.S. Patent Jun. 11, 1985 Sheet 1 of 4 4,523,230 #12;U.S. Patent

  12. United States Patent [19] Burt et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adelson, Edward

    United States Patent [19] Burt et al. [11] Patent Number: 4 , 6 98, 84 3 [45] Date of Patent: Oct, 43, 49, 50, 54, 55 [56] References Cited U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS 3,737,855 6/1973 Cutaia.S. Patent Oct. 6, 1987 Sheet 1 of 3 4,698,843 #12;U.S. Patent Oct. 6, 1987 Sheet 2 of 3 4,698,843 #12;U

  13. A comparative wear study on Al-Li and Al-Li/SiC composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okumus, S. Cem, E-mail: cokumus@sakarya.edu.tr; Karslioglu, Ramazan, E-mail: cokumus@sakarya.edu.tr; Akbulut, Hatem, E-mail: cokumus@sakarya.edu.tr [Sakarya University Engineering Faculty, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Esentepe Campus, 54187, Sakarya (Turkey)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum-lithium based unreinforced (Al-8090) alloy and Al-8090/SiCp/17 vol.% metal matrix composite produced by extrusion after spray co-deposition. A dry ball-on disk wear test was carried out for both alloy and composite. The tests were performed against an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ball, 10 mm in diameter, at room temperature and in laboratory air conditions with a relative humidity of 40-60%. Sliding speed was chosen as 1.0 ms{sup ?1} and normal loads of 1.0, 3.0 and 5.0 N were employed at a constant sliding distance of 1000 m. The wear damage on the specimens was evaluated via measurement of wear depth and diameter. Microstructural and wear characterization was carried out via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that wear loss of the Al-8090/SiC composite was less than that of the Al-8090 matrix alloy. Plastic deformation observed on the wear surface of the composite and the matrix alloy, and the higher the applied load the greater the plastic deformation. Scanning electron microscopy examinations of wear tracks also reveal that delamination fracture was the dominant wear mechanism during the wear progression. Friction coefficient was maximum at the low applied load in the case of the Al-8090/SiC composite while a gradual increase was observed with applied load for the matrix alloy.

  14. Electron mobility enhancement in AlN/GaN/AlN heterostructures with InGaN nanogrooves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    improve the room-temperature carrier mobility in wurtzite AlN/GaN/AlN heterostructures, which is limited consider a narrow groove made of InxGa1-xN with small In content x inside a wurtzite AlN/GaN/AlN heteroN 2 nm /GaN 3 nm /AlN 3 nm . A well-known feature of wurtzite heterostructures is a strong buit

  15. Short-period superlattices of AlN/Al{sub 0.08}Ga{sub 0.92}N grown on AlN substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikishin, S.A.; Borisov, B.A.; Chandolu, A.; Kuryatkov, V.V.; Temkin, H.; Holtz, M.; Mokhov, E.N.; Makarov, Yu.; Helava, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Nano Tech Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409-3102 (United States); Nano Tech Center/Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Fox Group Inc., 1154 Stealth Street, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    High-quality short-period superlattices of AlN/Al{sub 0.08}Ga{sub 0.92}N have been grown by gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy with ammonia on Al face of AlN (0001) substrates. A significant reduction was achieved in the dislocation density, down to 3x10{sup 8} cm{sup -2}. Complete removal of residual Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface oxide is needed in order to obtain low dislocation density in homoepitaxy on AlN. We show that the presence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} islands with the surface coverage as low as 0.2% results in increased dislocation density.

  16. Al-Ca and Al-Fe metal-metal composite strength, conductivity, and microstructure relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyong June

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deformation processed metal-metal composites (DMMC’s) are composites formed by mechanical working (i.e., rolling, swaging, or wire drawing) of two-phase, ductile metal mixtures. Since both the matrix and reinforcing phase are ductile metals, the composites can be heavily deformed to reduce the thickness and spacing of the two phases. Recent studies have shown that heavily drawn DMMCs can achieve anomalously high strength and outstanding combinations of strength and conductivity. In this study, Al-Fe wire composite with 0.07, 0.1, and 0.2 volume fractions of Fe filaments and Al-Ca wire composite with 0.03, 0.06, and 0.09 volume fractions of Ca filaments were produced in situ, and their mechanical properties were measured as a function of deformation true strain. The Al-Fe composites displayed limited deformation of the Fe phase even at high true strains, resulting in little strengthening effect in those composites. Al-9vol%Ca wire was deformed to a deformation true strain of 13.76. The resulting Ca second-phase filaments were deformed to thicknesses on the order of one micrometer. The ultimate tensile strength increased exponentially with increasing deformation true strain, reaching a value of 197 MPa at a true strain of 13.76. This value is 2.5 times higher than the value predicted by the rule of mixtures. A quantitative relationship between UTS and deformation true strain was determined. X-ray diffraction data on transformation of Al + Ca microstructures to Al + various Al-Ca intermetallic compounds were obtained at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Electrical conductivity was measured over a range of true strains and post-deformation heat treatment schedules.

  17. AL/FAL 99-01

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of Energy-ChapterDepartment ofLead Performers:AL/FAL

  18. A=17Al (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less2012KE01) (Not6AJ01)93TI07) (See77AJ02) (See93TI07)Al

  19. ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG,ALS BeamlinesALSALSALSALS Ceramics

  20. ALS Ceramics Materials Research Advances Engine Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG,ALS BeamlinesALSALSALSALS

  1. ALS Reveals New State of Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship in ResidenceALSHistory:ALS

  2. ALS Reveals New State of Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship inALS Reveals New State of

  3. ALS Reveals New State of Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship inALS Reveals New State

  4. ALS Reveals New State of Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral Fellowship inALS Reveals New

  5. Microsoft Word - AL2006-10.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions forCheneyNovember S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY6 ADM1AL-2006-10 Acquisition

  6. Microsoft Word - AL2006-11.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions forCheneyNovember S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY6 ADM1AL-2006-10Site

  7. Microsoft Word - AL2008-05.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions forCheneyNovember S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY6Department of Energy No. AL

  8. Microsoft Word - AL2000-01.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC) Richard2015MountainLLCFebruary 2014RecoveryLetters (AL) that

  9. Microsoft Word - AL2005-03.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC) Richard2015MountainLLCFebruary4-02.doc More DocumentsAL

  10. ALS History: The First 20 Years

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALS Communications

  11. ALS Operating Schedule on Google Calendar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALS CommunicationsOperating

  12. ALS Postdoc Recognized for Outstanding Thesis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALS CommunicationsOperatingALSNews

  13. ALS@20 Kick-Off Celebration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALSALS RevealsALSALS@20 ALS@20

  14. April 27, 2015-Special ALS Colloquium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni AlumniFederal FacilityApril 27, 2015-Special ALS Colloquium

  15. Category:Montgomery, AL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformationCashtonGo Back toFL" The followingAL Jump

  16. Promising Magnesium Battery Research at ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 HgPromising Magnesium Battery Research at ALS Promising

  17. California Building Industry Association et al. v. State Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    et al. v. State Water Resources Control Board Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal CaseHearing: California Building Industry Association et al....

  18. als bestandteil des: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    berexprimiert. Das kodierende Onkogen BMI1 ist ein direktes Zielgen des (more) Fehr, Daniel 2007-01-01 8 Structures Al-Al2O3-InP : Analyse des processus de drive et valuation...

  19. al ruido industrial: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: .5% absolute 2 compared to conventional aluminum back surface field (Al-BSF) solar cells. The main effect SINGULAR In the recent years, aluminum oxide (AlOx) layers...

  20. Data Transfer Considerations for ALS Scientists and Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Transfer Considerations for ALS Scientists and Users Print Introduction Working at the ALS generates huge amounts of data, and for many years this has caused users to have to...

  1. al paciente terminal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robin L. 4 La faune de Mammifres du Pliocne terminal d'Ahl al Oughlam, Casablanca, Maroc The Late Pliocene mammalian fauna of Ahl al Oughlam, Casablanca, Morocco Physics...

  2. al coated a2: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 AlTiN layer effect on mechanical properties of Ti-doped diamond-like carbon composite coatings Engineering Websites Summary: AlTiN layer effect on mechanical properties...

  3. als semantische bausteine: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I. 53 In Memory of Al Cameron CERN Preprints Summary: Al Cameron, who died recently (October 3, 2005) at 80, was one of the giants in astrophysics. His insights were profound and...

  4. al embarazo reporte: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    seurauksiin, geenitutkimukseen ja (more) Ahvonen,Jukka 2006-01-01 57 Al-Qaeda in Libya: A Profile PREFACE CiteSeer Summary: This report attempts to assess al-Qaedas...

  5. Takeda Advances Diabetes Drug Development at the ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Takeda Advances Diabetes Drug Development at the ALS Takeda Advances Diabetes Drug Development at the ALS Print Tuesday, 19 May 2015 12:25 Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM),...

  6. Metastable phase diagram for Ni-implanted Al and pulse surface melted Al(Ni)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Picraux, S.T.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The microstructure of <110> Al implanted with Ni was examined before and after subsequent electron beam pulsed surface melting (65 ns, 1.7 J/cm/sup 2/). Both processes were done with the Al substrate at room temperature. Implantation at several energies (160 to 15 keV) into a given sample produced a nearly constant measured Ni concentration through a approx. 0.1 ..mu..m region below the surface (7). Such samples with concentrations from 8 to 25 at. % Ni were examined, along with a sample with a peak concentration of 32 at. % Ni.

  7. als medium von: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Technology) Prof. Dr. Andreas Rausch (Software Systems Engineering Zachmann, Gabriel 7 Bachelorarbeit Integration von PDF-Formularen als Multidisciplinary...

  8. als homologem von: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Technology) Prof. Dr. Andreas Rausch (Software Systems Engineering Zachmann, Gabriel 7 Bachelorarbeit Integration von PDF-Formularen als Multidisciplinary...

  9. als folge von: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Technology) Prof. Dr. Andreas Rausch (Software Systems Engineering Zachmann, Gabriel 12 Bachelorarbeit Integration von PDF-Formularen als Multidisciplinary...

  10. Chemical Hygiene Planh UNIVERSITY OF AlASKA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    Chemical Hygiene Planh · UNIVERSITY OF AlASKA · · FAIRBANKS INTRODUCTION.....................................................................................................3 C Chemical Hygiene Officer (CHO ................................................................................................................... 5 B Personal Hygiene

  11. R. Jaff, et al.: Closing a major gap in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olver, Peter

    and source of black carbon aerosol over Taklimakan Desert, LI Juan et al, Science China - Chemistry, 53 (2010, 13 #12;Monday, May 6, 13 #12;HAMMES ET AL.: BLACK CARBON QUANTIFICATION RING TRIAL HAMMES ET AL.: BLACK CARBON QUANTIFICATION RING TRIAL Monday, May 6, 13 #12;http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_carbon

  12. Graeber et al. 2014 1 Supporting Information (SI Appendix)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chittka, Lars

    Graeber et al. 2014 1 Supporting Information (SI Appendix) Graeber et al. (2014) - www for the temperature- and gibberellin-dependent control of seed germination Kai Graeber, Ada Linkies, Tina Steinbrecher17 and WT #12;Graeber et al. 2014 2 Supplementary Methods Genome Size Analysis by Flow Cytometry

  13. Corrosion of Bare and Coated Al 5052-H3 and Al 6061-T6 in Seawater Work sponsored by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Corrosion of Bare and Coated Al 5052-H3 and Al 6061-T6 in Seawater Work sponsored by: US and Kentaro Kusada Hawaii Corrosion Laboratory Department of Mechanical Engineering College of Engineering

  14. 13. B. E. Baysal et al., Genomics 44, 214 (1997); P. Deloukas et al., Science 282, 744 (1998).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulanovsky, Nachum

    . Kelleher, M. Hoeckel, Strahlenther. Onkol. 174, Suppl. 4, 6 (1998). 30. T. G. Graeber et al., Nature 379

  15. AlGaN/GaN MIS-HEMT Gate Structure Improvement Using Al2O3 Deposited by PEALD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    AlGaN/GaN MIS-HEMT Gate Structure Improvement Using Al2O3 Deposited by PEALD R. Meunier1 , A, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9, France 2 LAAS-CNRS, 7 Avenue du Colonel Roche, 31400 Toulouse, France AlGaN /GaN behavior. Those trapped charges can be associated to the carbon contamination of the AlGaN surface

  16. Oxidation of Al doped Au clusters: A first principles study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajesh, Chinagandham [RMC, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Majumder, Chiranjib [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2009-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Using first principles method we report the oxidation of Al doped Au clusters. This work is divided into two parts: (i) the equilibrium structures and stability of Al doped Au{sub n-1} clusters (n=2-7,21) and (ii) the interaction of O{sub 2} with stable clusters. The calculations are performed using the plane wave pseudopotential approach under the density functional theory and generalized gradient approximation for the exchange and correlation functional. The optimized geometries of Au{sub n-1}Al clusters indicate that the substitution of Au by Al results an early onset of three-dimensional structures from tetramer onwards. This is different from the results of transition metal doped Au clusters, where the planar conformation of Au clusters retains up to heptamer. The stability of Au{sub n-1}Al clusters has been analyzed based on the binding energy, second difference in energy, and the energy gaps between the highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy levels. Based on the energetics, the Au{sub 3}Al and Au{sub 5}Al clusters are found to have extraordinary stability. The oxidation mechanism of Al doped Au clusters have been studied by the interaction of O{sub 2} with Al, Au, AuAl, Au{sub 3}Al, and Au{sub 20}Al clusters. It is found that the oxidation of Au{sub n-1}Al clusters undergoes via dissociative mechanism, albeit significant charge transfer from Al to Au. Moreover, the O{sub 2} molecule prefers to attach at the Al site rather than at the Au site.

  17. Magnetization anomaly of Nb3Al strands and instability of Nb3Al Rutherford cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, Ryuji; /Fermilab; Kikuchi, Akihiro; /Tsukuba Magnet Lab; Wake, Masayoshi; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a Cu stabilized Nb{sub 3}Al strand with Nb matrix, a 30 meter long Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable was made by a collaboration of Fermilab and NIMS. Recently the strand and cable were tested. In both cases instability was observed at around 1.5 Tesla. The magnetization of this Nb{sub 3}Al strand was measured first using a balanced coil magnetometer at 4.2 K. Strands showed an anomalously large magnetization behavior around at 1.6 T, which is much higher than the usual B{sub c2} {approx} 0.5 Tesla (4.2 K) of Nb matrix. This result is compared with the magnetization data of short strand samples using a SQUID magnetometer, in which a flux-jump signal was observed at 0.5 Tesla, but not at higher field. As a possible explanation for this magnetization anomaly, the interfilament coupling through the thin Nb films in the strands is suggested. The instability problem observed in low field tests of the Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cables is attributed to this effect.

  18. INFORME DE LA SNDICA DE GREUGES AL CLAUSTRE I AL CONSELL SOCIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschure, Paul

    .2.1. Consultes i informacions d'altres síndics al Síndic de la UPF 137 2.2.2. Informes rebuts d'altres síndics del Síndic de Greuges de la UPF. Quina és la característica que domina en l'informe que presentem

  19. Surface structures of Al-Pd-Mn and Al-Cu-Fe icosahedral quasicrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Z.

    1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, the author reports on the surface structure of i-Al-Pd-Mn twofold, threefold, fivefold and i-Al-Cu-Fe fivefold surfaces. The LEED studies indicate the existence of two distinct stages in the regrowth of all four surfaces after Ar{sup +} sputtering. In the first stage, upon annealing at relatively low temperature: 500K--800K (depending on different surfaces), a cubic phase appears. The cubic LEED patterns transform irreversibly to unreconstructed quasicrystalline patterns upon annealing to higher temperatures, indicating that the cubic overlayers are metastable. Based upon the data for three chemically-identical, but symmetrically-inequivalent surfaces, a model is developed for the relation between the cubic overlayers and the quasicrystalline substrate. The model is based upon the related symmetries of cubic close-packed and icosahedral-packed materials. These results may be general among Al-rich, icosahedral materials. STM study of Al-Pd-Mn fivefold surface shows that terrace-step-kink structures start to form on the surface after annealing above 700K. Large, atomic ally-flat terraces were formed after annealing at 900K. Fine structures with fivefold icosahedral symmetry were found on those terraces. Data analysis and comparison of the STM images and structure model of icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn suggest that the fine structures in the STM images may be the pseudo Mackay (PMI) clusters which are the structure units of the structure model. Based upon his results, he can conclude that quasicrystalline structures are the stable structures of quasicrystal surfaces. In other words, quasicrystalline structures extend from the bulk to the surface. As a result of the effort reported in this dissertation, he believes that he has increased his understanding of the surface structure of icosahedral quasicrystals to a new level.

  20. Overview of the development of FeAl intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Liu, C.T.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B2-phase FeAl ordered intermetallic alloys based on an Fe-36 at.% Al composition are being developed to optimize a combination of properties that includes high-temperature strength, room-temperature ductility, and weldability. Microalloying with boron and proper processing are very important for FeAl properties optimization. These alloys also have the good to outstanding resistance to oxidation, sulfidation, and corrosion in molten salts or chlorides at elevated temperatures, characteristic of FeAl with 30--40 at.% Al. Ingot- and powder-metallurgy (IM and PM, respectively) processing both produce good properties, including strength above 400 MPa up to about 750 C. Technology development to produce FeAl components for industry testing is in progress. In parallel, weld-overlay cladding and powder coating technologies are also being developed to take immediate advantage of the high-temperature corrosion/oxidation and erosion/wear resistance of FeAl.

  1. Short-period superlattices of AlN/Al0.08Ga0.92N grown on AlN substrates S. A. Nikishin,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz, Mark

    Group Inc., 1154 Stealth Street, Livermore, California 94550 (Received 10 August 2004; accepted 8 from high dislocation densities that reduce quantum efficiency and lifetime of light emitting diodes (LEDs) and solar blind pho- todetectors. Short period superlattices (SPSLs) of AlN/Al0.08Ga0.92N

  2. Effect of dislocations on electron mobility in AlGaN/GaN and AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaun, Stephen W.; Burke, Peter G.; Kyle, Erin C. H.; Speck, James S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Wong, Man Hoi; Mishra, Umesh K. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN (x = 0.06, 0.12, 0.24) and AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructures were grown on 6 H-SiC, GaN-on-sapphire, and free-standing GaN, resulting in heterostructures with threading dislocation densities of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}, {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8}, and {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} cm{sup -2}, respectively. All growths were performed under Ga-rich conditions by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Dominant scattering mechanisms with variations in threading dislocation density and sheet concentration were indicated through temperature-dependent Hall measurements. The inclusion of an AlN interlayer was also considered. Dislocation scattering contributed to reduced mobility in these heterostructures, especially when sheet concentration was low or when an AlN interlayer was present.

  3. On the preparation of TiAl alloy by direct reduction of the oxide mixtures in calcium chloride melt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prabhat K. Tripathy; Derek J. Fray

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, TiAl-based intermetallic alloys are being increasingly considered for application in areas such as (i) automobile/transport sector (passenger cars, trucks and ships) (ii) aerospace industry (jet engines and High Speed Civil Transport propulsion system) and (iii) industrial gas turbines. These materials offer excellent (i) high temperature properties (at higher than 6000C) (ii) mechanical strength and (iii) resistance to corrosion and as a result have raised renewed interest. The combination of these properties make them possible replacement materials for traditional nickel-based super-alloys, which are nearly as twice as dense (than TiAl based alloys). Since the microstructures of these intermetallic alloys affect, to a significant extent, their ultimate performance, further improvements (by way of alteration/modification of these microstructures), have been the subject matter of intense research investigations. It has now been established that the presence of alloy additives, such as niobium, tantalum, manganese, boron, chromium, silicon, nickel and yttrium etc, in specific quantities, impart marked improvement to the properties, viz. fatigue strength, fracture toughness, oxidation resistance and room temperature ductility, of these alloys. From a number of possible alloy compositions, {gamma}-TiAl and Ti-Al-Nb-Cr have, of late, emerged as two promising engineering alloys/materials. . The conventional fabrication process of these alloys include steps such as melting, forging and heat treatment/annealing of the alloy compositions. However, an electrochemical process offers an attractive proposition to prepare these alloys, directly from the mixture of the respective oxides, in just one step. The experimental approach, in this new process, was, therefore, to try to electrochemically reduce the (mixed) oxide pellet to an alloy phase. The removal of oxygen, from the (mixed) oxide pellet, was effected by polarizing the oxide pellet against a graphite electrode in a pool of molten calcium chloride at a temperature of 9000C. The dominant mechanism of the oxygen removal was the ionization of oxygen followed by its subsequent discharge, as CO2/CO, at the anode surface. The removal of oxygen from the oxide mixture helped form the alloy in situ. The presentation shall cover the detailed experimental results pertaining to the preparation, evaluation and characterization of Ti-47Al-2Nb-2Cr (atom%) alloy.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation comparison of atomic scale intermixing at the amorphous Al2O3/semiconductor interface for a-Al2O3/Ge, a-Al2O3/InGaAs,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    /semiconductor interface for a-Al2O3/Ge, a-Al2O3/InGaAs, and a-Al2O3/InAlAs/InGaAs Evgueni A. Chagarov *, Andrew oxides Ge InGaAs InAlAs Oxide­semiconductor stack High-K oxide a b s t r a c t The structural properties of a-Al2O3/Ge, a-Al2O3/In0.5Ga0.5As and a-Al2O3/In0.5Al0.5As/InGaAs interfaces were investigated

  5. Specific-Heat of the Organic Metal Bis(tetrathiotetracene) Tri-Iodide from 20-K to 100-K, the Vicinity of the Metal-Nonmetal Phase-Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CORT, B.; Naugle, Donald G.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    selenium ana- log, the transition-metal complex KCP, ' and tetrathiofulvalenium-thiocyanate [TTF(SCN) 0588] and its selenium analog' which are similar to the organic metal studied in this work. That the metallic state is stabilized by impurities...PHYSICAL REVIEW B VOLUME 24, NUMBER 7 1 OCTOBER 1981 Specific heat of the organic metal bis(tetrathiotetracene) tri-iodide from 20 to 100 K, the vicinity of the metal-nonmetal phase transition B. Cort' and D. G. Naugle Department of Physics...

  6. Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanna, Mark Cooper (Boulder, CO); Reedy, Robert (Golden, CO)

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A GaAlInP compound semiconductor and a method of producing a GaAlInP compound semiconductor are provided. The apparatus and method comprises a GaAs crystal substrate in a metal organic vapor deposition reactor. Al, Ga, In vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing organometallic compounds. P vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing phospine gas, group II vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing an organometallic group IIA or IIB compound. Group VIB vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing a gaseous compound of group VIB. The Al, Ga, In, P, group II, and group VIB vapors grow a GaAlInP crystal doped with group IIA or IIB and group VIB elements on the substrate wherein the group IIA or IIB and a group VIB vapors produced a codoped GaAlInP compound semiconductor with a group IIA or IIB element serving as a p-type dopant having low group II atomic diffusion.

  7. High-temperature phase equilibria in the Al-rich corner of the Al-Ti-C system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frage, N.; Frumin, N.; Levin, L.; Polak, M.; Dariel, M.P. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel). Dept. of Materials Engineering

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermodynamic analysis of the Al-rich corner in the ternary Al-Ti-C diagram, providing phase relations and regions of phase stability, is presented. An invariant four-phase equilibrium between Al, Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}, Al{sub 3}Ti, and TiC{sub x} takes place at 0.53 at. pct Ti, 7.10{sup {minus}6} at. pct C, and TiC{sub 0.883} at 966 K. The carbon content of the TiC{sub x} phase, which extends from x = 0.48 to 0.98, exerts a significant effect on phase relationships in this ternary system. In particular, it is shown that stoichiometric TiC is not stable in the presence of liquid Al. For example, at 1,300 K, a two-phase equilibrium between Al{sub L} and TiC{sub x} exists only in the 0.91 < x < 0.82 range. Thus, the interaction of Al{sub L} with stoichiometric TiC leads to the formation of the Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} aluminum carbide phase, whereas for x < 0.82, only the intermetallic compound Al{sub 3}Ti can form at this temperature. The results of this analysis were confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of relevant composites.

  8. Fusion of Dilute $A_L$ Lattice Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu-kui Zhou; Paul A. Pearce; Uwe Grimm

    1995-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The fusion procedure is implemented for the dilute $A_L$ lattice models and a fusion hierarchy of functional equations with an $su(3)$ structure is derived for the fused transfer matrices. We also present the Bethe ansatz equations for the dilute $A_L$ lattice models and discuss their connection with the fusion hierarchy. The solution of the fusion hierarchy for the eigenvalue spectra of the dilute $A_L$ lattice models will be presented in a subsequent paper.

  9. Radiation Hard AlGaN Detectors and Imager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation hardness of AlGaN photodiodes was tested using a 65 MeV proton beam with a total proton fluence of 3x10{sup 12} protons/cm{sup 2}. AlGaN Deep UV Photodiode have extremely high radiation hardness. These new devices have mission critical applications in high energy density physics (HEDP) and space explorations. These new devices satisfy radiation hardness requirements by NIF. NSTec is developing next generation AlGaN optoelectronics and imagers.

  10. acceso al agua: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    actuales de las marcas de agua, dn- doles exibilidad Boyer, Edmond 2 Propuesta de Investigacion Algoritmos de Control de Acceso al Medio en Redes Engineering Websites...

  11. al estudio del: Topics by E-print Network

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    de biocarburantes, podr-an suponer barreras no arancelarias al comercio del bioetanol brasileo. Este anlisis, que involucra el comercio de biocarburantes en el...

  12. al comercio agropecuario: Topics by E-print Network

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    de biocarburantes, podr-an suponer barreras no arancelarias al comercio del bioetanol brasileo. Este anlisis, que involucra el comercio de biocarburantes en el...

  13. al sacrificio sobre: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    seminal papers on nuclear astrophysics. Most of our current ideas concerning element formation in stars have followed from those two pioneering and historical works. Al also...

  14. als erstmanifestation einer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    durch Photoeffekt mit zirkular polarisiertem Licht an einem GaAs-Kristall erzeugt Pir. Als Lichtquelle wird ein Lasersystem verwendet, das linear polarisiertes Licht...

  15. als instrument einer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    durch Photoeffekt mit zirkular polarisiertem Licht an einem GaAs-Kristall erzeugt Pir. Als Lichtquelle wird ein Lasersystem verwendet, das linear polarisiertes Licht...

  16. als folge einer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    durch Photoeffekt mit zirkular polarisiertem Licht an einem GaAs-Kristall erzeugt Pir. Als Lichtquelle wird ein Lasersystem verwendet, das linear polarisiertes Licht...

  17. als ursache einer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    durch Photoeffekt mit zirkular polarisiertem Licht an einem GaAs-Kristall erzeugt Pir. Als Lichtquelle wird ein Lasersystem verwendet, das linear polarisiertes Licht...

  18. analogas al acido: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Supporting Information Osborn et al. 10.1073pnas.1100682108 SI Methods Dissolved gas samples were- bons....

  19. atencion integral al: Topics by E-print Network

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    Joel 1967-09-01 40 Das Elektrofahrzeug als flexibler Verbraucher und Energiespeicher im Smart Home. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Die vorliegende Arbeit...

  20. al desarrollo regional: Topics by E-print Network

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    aiuta a realizzarla La Direzione Lavoro della Regione Veneto partecipa al progetto I. E. SMART -Smart Training Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: Veneto...

  1. al tratamiento integral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    eines rckspeisefhigen Elektrofahrzeugs in das Energiemanagement-System eines Smart Home. Ziel ist es, das Elektrofahrzeug bestmglich als flexibel (more) Mltin,...

  2. al cuidado integral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joel 1967-09-01 48 Das Elektrofahrzeug als flexibler Verbraucher und Energiespeicher im Smart Home. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Die vorliegende Arbeit...

  3. adaptacin al cambio: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    al Ministerio de Econom-a, Fomento y Reconstruccin o Rudnick, Hugh 5 ARQUITECTURA BASADA EN AGENTES INTELIGENTES Y SERVICIOS WEB PARA LA ADAPTACIN DE CONTENIDOS...

  4. al dengue una: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    secondary infection with a different serotype and with primary Sujan Shresta 12 UNA ARQUITECTURA SEGMENTADA PARA EL CLCULO DEL TIEMPO AL IMPACTO CON VISIN LOG-POLAR Engineering...

  5. al gen env: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renaissance AL Massachusetts at Amherst, University of 7 ENVE 415 HYDROLOGY TOPIC SYLLABUS Engineering Websites Summary: Chapters 4, 14 Watershed Delineation, Characteristics...

  6. al disciplinamiento social: Topics by E-print Network

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    Information Technology) Prof. Dr. Andreas Rausch (Software Systems Engineering Zachmann, Gabriel 3 Intagorn et al. Harvesting Geospatial Knowledge from Social Metadata...

  7. al-Qaida Strategy, Ideology, Doctrine, and Media

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dr. Jarret Brachman

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dr. Jarret Brachman, an internationally recognized al-Qaida specialist, author and public lecturer, shares his thoughts on a range of topics, including the differences involved in fighting insurgent groups versus terrorist organizations, the future of the global al-Qaida movement, and assessing America's efforts to combat al-Qaida. In his talk, Brachman focuses specifically on current trends in al-Qaida's military and messaging strategies, both from the perspective of the group's senior leadership and its regional commands. Presented on June 17, 2010.

  8. al matrix composite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materialia 65 (2011) 288291 Extreme anelastic responses in Zn80Al20 matrix composite materials containing Materials Science Websites Summary: Scripta Materialia 65 (2011)...

  9. al matrix composites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materialia 65 (2011) 288291 Extreme anelastic responses in Zn80Al20 matrix composite materials containing Materials Science Websites Summary: Scripta Materialia 65 (2011)...

  10. al cambio climtico: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: Mundial de la Biosfera (UNESCO), Parque Nacional Torres del Paine, Patagonia - Chile 2012: Una Experiencia al Parque Nacional y Reserva Mundial de la Biosfera...

  11. ALS Technique Gives Novel View of Lithium Battery Dendrite Growth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Technique Gives Novel View of Lithium Battery Dendrite Growth Print Lithium-ion batteries, popular in today's electronic devices and electric vehicles, could gain significant...

  12. als beitrag zum: Topics by E-print Network

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    Philipps-Universitt Mar- burg 02. Dezember 2013 Sport als Sucht: soziologische Hoffmann, Rolf 15 EINLADUNG ZUM KOLLOQUIUM Dr. Stefan Krebs Mathematics Websites Summary: (...

  13. als schluessel zum: Topics by E-print Network

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    Philipps-Universitt Mar- burg 02. Dezember 2013 Sport als Sucht: soziologische Hoffmann, Rolf 7 EINLADUNG ZUM KOLLOQUIUM Dr. Stefan Krebs Mathematics Websites Summary: (...

  14. als knstler und: Topics by E-print Network

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    Verbindungen mit Lithium 18 2.1.3 Elektrolyte Hoffmann, Rolf 5 Wachstum und Realstruktur von epitaktischen (Al,Ga)N-Schichten. Open Access...

  15. als geschichtliches und: Topics by E-print Network

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    Verbindungen mit Lithium 18 2.1.3 Elektrolyte Hoffmann, Rolf 5 Wachstum und Realstruktur von epitaktischen (Al,Ga)N-Schichten. Open Access...

  16. al tratamiento nutricional: Topics by E-print Network

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    Krishnamoorthy1* Abstract in the wild type (WT) protein, such as increased or decreased stability, reactivity, or solubility Krishnamoorthy, Bala 288 Vilain et al. AJMA...

  17. al settore delle: Topics by E-print Network

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    stampantiscanner Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: 7232, che si trova presso la portineria di ingresso al Palazzo San Niccol pu...

  18. al regolamento emas: Topics by E-print Network

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    stampantiscanner Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: 7232, che si trova presso la portineria di ingresso al Palazzo San Niccol pu...

  19. al si alloys: Topics by E-print Network

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    de Extensin Universitaria Red Metropolitana Red Vsquez, Carlos 488 Graeber et al. 2014 1 Supporting Information (SI Appendix) Biology and Medicine Websites...

  20. al sio2 si: Topics by E-print Network

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    de Extensin Universitaria Red Metropolitana Red Vsquez, Carlos 497 Graeber et al. 2014 1 Supporting Information (SI Appendix) Biology and Medicine Websites...

  1. al si ti: Topics by E-print Network

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    de Extensin Universitaria Red Metropolitana Red Vsquez, Carlos 385 Graeber et al. 2014 1 Supporting Information (SI Appendix) Biology and Medicine Websites...

  2. al si mg: Topics by E-print Network

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    de Extensin Universitaria Red Metropolitana Red Vsquez, Carlos 374 Graeber et al. 2014 1 Supporting Information (SI Appendix) Biology and Medicine Websites...

  3. al si fe: Topics by E-print Network

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    de Extensin Universitaria Red Metropolitana Red Vsquez, Carlos 399 Graeber et al. 2014 1 Supporting Information (SI Appendix) Biology and Medicine Websites...

  4. al zn alloy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NANOLAMINATES . Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??To characterize the self-propagating, high-temperature exothermic alloying reactions of NiAl nanoscaled...

  5. alloying elements al: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NANOLAMINATES . Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??To characterize the self-propagating, high-temperature exothermic alloying reactions of NiAl nanoscaled...

  6. Aerial Photography At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Blackwell, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEE Jump to:Ohio:Ads-tecInformationAecomLtd, 2003) |2003)

  7. Aerial Photography At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Wesnousky, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEE Jump to:Ohio:Ads-tecInformationAecomLtd, 2003)2003) |

  8. *Tri-Generation is a novel technology that was conceived by the National Fuel Cell Research Center in 2001 to simultaneously generate electricity, hydrogen, and heat. It was developed into the first prototype in collaboration with FuelCell Energy, Inc., a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    and fuel cell electric vehicles), there are still emissions associated with the upstream processes Electric Vehicles Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles #12;*Tri-Generation is a novel technology that was conceived by the National Fuel Cell Research Center

  9. Precipitation in cold-rolled Al–Sc–Zr and Al–Mn–Sc–Zr alloys prepared by powder metallurgy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlach, M., E-mail: martin.vlach@mff.cuni.cz [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Ke Karlovu 3, CZ-121 16 Prague (Czech Republic); Stulikova, I.; Smola, B.; Kekule, T.; Kudrnova, H.; Danis, S. [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Ke Karlovu 3, CZ-121 16 Prague (Czech Republic); Gemma, R. [King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Physical Sciences and Engineering Division, 23955-6900 Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Ocenasek, V. [SVÚM a.s., Podnikatelská 565, CZ-190 11 Prague (Czech Republic); Malek, J. [Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, CZ-120 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Tanprayoon, D.; Neubert, V. [Institut für Materialprüfung und Werkstofftechnik, Freiberger Strasse 1, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of cold-rolling on thermal, mechanical and electrical properties, microstructure and recrystallization behaviour of the AlScZr and AlMnScZr alloys prepared by powder metallurgy were studied. The powder was produced by atomising in argon with 1% oxygen and then consolidated by hot extrusion at 350 °C. The electrical resistometry and microhardness together with differential scanning calorimetry measurements were compared with microstructure development observed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction. Fine (sub)grain structure developed and fine coherent Al{sub 3}Sc and/or Al{sub 3}(Sc,Zr) particles precipitated during extrusion at 350 °C in the alloys studied. Additional precipitation of the Al{sub 3}Sc and/or Al{sub 3}(Sc,Zr) particles and/or their coarsening was slightly facilitated by the previous cold rolling. The presence of Sc,Zr-containing particles has a significant antirecrystallization effect that prevents recrystallization at temperatures minimally up to 420 °C. The precipitation of the Al{sub 6}Mn- and/or Al{sub 6}(Mn,Fe) particles of a size ? 1.0 ?m at subgrain boundaries has also an essential antirecrystallization effect and totally suppresses recrystallization during 32 h long annealing at 550 °C. The texture development of the alloys seems to be affected by high solid solution strengthening by Mn. The precipitation of the Mn-containing alloy is highly enhanced by a cold rolling. The apparent activation energy of the Al{sub 3}Sc particles formation and/or coarsening and that of the Al{sub 6}Mn and/or Al{sub 6}(Mn,Fe) particle precipitation in the powder and in the compacted alloys were determined. The cold deformation has no effect on the apparent activation energy values of the Al{sub 3}Sc-phase and the Al{sub 6}Mn-phase precipitation. - Highlights: • The Mn, Sc and Zr additions to Al totally suppresses recrystallization at 550 °C. • The Sc,Zr-containing particle precipitation is slightly facilitated by cold rolling. • The Mn-containing particle precipitation is highly enhanced by cold rolling. • Cold rolling has no effect on activation energy of the Al{sub 3}Sc and Al{sub 6}Mn precipitation. • The texture development is affected by high solid solution strengthening by Mn.

  10. Universiteit Utrecht, Faculteit Geowetenschappen RUIMTE VOOR DE STAD ALS GROEIMOTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oort, Frank van

    #12;#12;Universiteit Utrecht, Faculteit Geowetenschappen RUIMTE VOOR DE STAD ALS GROEIMOTOR (Universität Jena) Prof. dr. P. Hooimeijer Utrecht, 17 september 2013 #12;Universiteit Utrecht, Faculteit Geowetenschappen #12;Universiteit Utrecht, Faculteit Geowetenschappen 17 september 2013 Ruimte voor de stad als

  11. Lanthanide Al-Ni base Ericsson cycle magnetic refrigerants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Takeya, Hiroyuki

    1995-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic refrigerant for a magnetic refrigerator using the Ericsson thermodynamic cycle comprises DyAlNi and (Gd{sub 0.54}Er{sub 0.46})AlNi alloys having a relatively constant {Delta}Tmc over a wide temperature range. 16 figs.

  12. Al Prof. Luca Beltrametti Direttore del Dipartimento di Economia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    Mod. D3 Al Prof. Luca Beltrametti Direttore del Dipartimento di Economia Indirizzo Via Vivaldi 5, Darsena, Genova n. fax. 010 2095208 e-mail: direttore@economia.unige.it Oggetto: votazioni in data 18 Economia, con mandato fino al 31.10.2015. Richiesta di pubblicizzazione della disponibilità ad essere

  13. Gaseous modification of MCrAlY coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally describes methods for modifying MCrAlY coatings by using gaseous carburization, gaseous nitriding or gaseous carbonitriding. The modified MCrAlY coatings are useful in thermal barrier coating systems, which may be used in gas turbine engines.

  14. Intermetallic compound formation at Cu-Al wire bond interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bae, In-Tae; Young Jung, Dae [Small Scale Systems Integration and Packaging Center, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Chen, William T.; Du Yong [Advanced Semiconductor Engineering Inc., 1255 E Arques Ave, Sunnyvale, California 94085 (United States)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Intermetallic compound (IMC) formation and evolution at Cu-Al wire bond interface were studied using focused ion beam /scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), nano beam electron diffraction (NBED) and structure factor (SF) calculation. It was found that discrete IMC patches were formed at the Cu/Al interface in as-packaged state and they grew toward Al pad after high temperature storage (HTS) environment at 150 Degree-Sign C. TEM/EDS and NBED results combined with SF calculation revealed the evidence of metastable {theta} Prime -CuAl{sub 2} IMC phase (tetragonal, space group: I4m2, a = 0.404 nm, c= 0.580 nm) formed at Cu/Al interfaces in both of the as-packaged and the post-HTS samples. Two feasible mechanisms for the formation of the metastable {theta} Prime -CuAl{sub 2} phase are discussed based on (1) non-equilibrium cooling of wire bond that is attributed to highly short bonding process time and (2) the epitaxial relationships between Cu and {theta} Prime -CuAl{sub 2}, which can minimize lattice mismatch for {theta} Prime -CuAl{sub 2} to grow on Cu.

  15. Aluminum sulfate (alum; Al2 O) is used as a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    477 Aluminum sulfate (alum; Al2 (SO4 )3 ·14H2 O) is used as a chemical treatment of poultry litter, and pelletizing, the use of chemical amendments, primarily aluminum sulfate (alum, Al2 (SO4 )3 ·14H2 O), alter

  16. Infrared reflection of GaN and AlGaN thin film heterostructures with AlN buffer layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Christian M.

    Infrared reflection of GaN and AlGaN thin film heterostructures with AlN buffer layers C. Wetzel, Nagoya, Japan Received 11 December 1995; accepted for publication 21 February 1996 Infrared reflection, their alloys and potential substrates need to be investigated as well. Here we present a study of the infrared

  17. EnvironMEntAl EnginEEring AnD EnvironMEntAl QuAlity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    EnvironMEntAl EnginEEring AnD EnvironMEntAl QuAlity SciEncE College of Engineering and Mines Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering 907-474-6129 http://cem.uaf.edu/cee/environmental-engineering/ MS Degree Minimum Requirements for Degree: 30 credits The environmental engineering and environmental

  18. Comments on Jacobson et al.'s proposal for a wind, water, and solar energy future for New York State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    Forum Comments on Jacobson et al.'s proposal for a wind, water, and solar energy future for New April 2013 Accepted 2 May 2013 Keywords: Energy systems Renewable integration Global warming a b s t r of the energy demands in New York State with wind, solar, and water resources. In this forum we suggest

  19. Stimulated emission and optical gain in AlGaN heterostructures grown on bulk AlN substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Wei, E-mail: wguo2@ncsu.edu; Bryan, Zachary; Kirste, Ronny; Bryan, Isaac; Hussey, Lindsay; Bobea, Milena; Haidet, Brian; Collazo, Ramón; Sitar, Zlatko [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7919 (United States); Xie, Jinqiao; Mita, Seiji [HexaTech, Inc., 991 Aviation Pkwy, Suite 800, Morrisville, North Carolina 27560 (United States); Gerhold, Michael [Engineering Science Directorate, Army Research Office, P.O. BOX 12211, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27703 (United States)

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical gain spectra for ?250?nm stimulated emission were compared in three different AlGaN-based structures grown on single crystalline AlN substrates: a single AlGaN film, a double heterostructure (DH), and a Multiple Quantum Well (MQW) structure; respective threshold pumping power densities of 700, 250, and 150?kW/cm{sup 2} were observed. Above threshold, the emission was transverse-electric polarized and as narrow as 1.8?nm without a cavity. The DH and MQW structures showed gain values of 50–60?cm{sup ?1} when pumped at 1?MW/cm{sup 2}. The results demonstrated the excellent optical quality of the AlGaN-based heterostructures grown on AlN substrates and their potential for realizing electrically pumped sub-280?nm laser diodes.

  20. Methotrexate intercalated ZnAl-layered double hydroxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, Manjusha; Dasgupta, Sudip; Soundrapandian, Chidambaram [Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, CSIR, 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Chakraborty, Jui, E-mail: jui@cgcri.res.in [Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, CSIR, 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Ghosh, Swapankumar, E-mail: swapankumar.ghosh2@mail.dcu.ie [National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST), CSIR, Trivandrum 695019 (India); Mitra, Manoj K. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Basu, Debabrata [Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, CSIR, 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The anticancerous drug methotrexate (MTX) has been intercalated into an ZnAl-layered double hydroxide (LDH) using an anion exchange technique to produce LDH-MTX hybrids having particle sizes in the range of 100-300 nm. X-ray diffraction studies revealed increases in the basal spacings of ZnAl-LDH-MTX hybrid on MTX intercalation. This was corroborated by the transmission electron micrographs, which showed an increase in average interlayer spacing from 8.9 A in pristine LDH to 21.3 A in LDH-MTX hybrid. Thermogravimetric analyses showed an increase in the decomposition temperature for the MTX molecule in the LDH-MTX hybrid indicating enhanced thermal stability of the drug molecule in the LDH nanovehicle. The cumulative release profile of MTX from ZnAl-LDH-MTX hybrids in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) at pH 7.4 was successfully sustained for 48 h following Rigter-Peppas model release kinetics via diffusion. - Graphical abstract: ZnAl-layered double hydroxide intercalated with methotrexate ({approx}34% loading) promises the possibility of use of ZnAl-LDH material as drug carrier and in controlled delivery. Highlights: > ZnAl-layered double hydroxide methotrexate nanohybrid has been synthesized. > XRD and TEM studies on nanohybrid revealed successful intercalation of methotrexate. > TG and CHN analyses showed {approx}34 wt% of methotrexate loading into the nanohybrid. > Possibility of use of ZnAl-LDH material as drug carrier and in delivery.

  1. Lattice crossover and phase transitions in NdAlO{sub 3}-GdAlO{sub 3} system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasylechko, L., E-mail: crystal-lov@polynet.lviv.ua [Lviv Polytechnic National University, 12 Bandera St., 79013 Lviv (Ukraine); Shmanko, H.; Ohon, N. [Lviv Polytechnic National University, 12 Bandera St., 79013 Lviv (Ukraine)] [Lviv Polytechnic National University, 12 Bandera St., 79013 Lviv (Ukraine); Prots, Yu.; Hoffmann, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Ubizskii, S. [Lviv Polytechnic National University, 12 Bandera St., 79013 Lviv (Ukraine)] [Lviv Polytechnic National University, 12 Bandera St., 79013 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase and structural behaviour in the (1-x)NdAlO{sub 3}-xGdAlO{sub 3} system in a whole concentration range has been studied by means of in situ high-resolution X-ray synchrotron powder diffraction technique and differential thermal analysis. Two kinds of solid solutions Nd{sub 1-x}Gd{sub x}AlO{sub 3} have been found at room temperature: one with rhombohedral (x<0.15) and one with orthorhombic (x{>=}0.20) symmetry. A morphotropic phase transition occurs at x Almost-Equal-To 0.15, where the co-existence of both phases was observed. Peculiarity of the orthorhombic solid solution is the lattice parameter crossover at the compositions with x=0.33, 0.49 and 0.62. First-order structural transition Pbnm{r_reversible}R3{sup Macron }c has been detected both from in situ powder diffraction and thermal analysis data. Continuous phase transformation R3{sup Macron }c{r_reversible}Pm3{sup Macron }m above 2140 K has been predicted for Nd-rich sample Nd{sub 0.85}Gd{sub 0.15}AlO{sub 3} from the extrapolation of high-temperature behaviour of the lattice parameter ratio of the rhombohedral phase. Based on the experimental data, the phase diagram of the pseudo-binary system NdAlO{sub 3}-GdAlO{sub 3} has been constructed. - Graphical abstract: Concentration dependencies of normalized lattice parameters of Nd{sub 1-x}Gd{sub x}AlO{sub 3} perovskite solid solutions. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two kinds of solid solutions Nd{sub 1-x}Gd{sub x}AlO{sub 3} were found in the NdAlO{sub 3}-GdAlO{sub 3} system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Morphotropic transition between both perovskite phases occurs at x Almost-Equal-To 0.15. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lattice parameter crossover was found in orthorhombic solid solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Temperature driven first-order phase transition Pbnm{r_reversible}R3{sup Macron }c was found in Nd{sub 1-x}Gd{sub x}AlO{sub 3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase diagram of the pseudo-binary system NdAlO{sub 3}-GdAlO{sub 3} has been constructed.

  2. AL2010-03.pdf | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRA Newsletters 2010 ARRAA LiquidAL2010-03.pdf AL2010-03.pdf AL2010-03.pdf

  3. ALS Capabilities Reveal How Like Can Attract Like

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG,ALS BeamlinesALS CapabilitiesALS

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of the thermal dissociation of O,O'-bis(1,3,5-TRI-tert-butyl-4-oxo-2,5-cyclo-hexadienyl)-p-benzoquinone dioxime in solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khizhnyi, V.A.; Danilova, T.A.; Goloverda, G.Z.; Dobronravova, Z.A.

    1987-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetics and mechanism of the thermal dissociation of O,O'-bis(1,3,5-tri-tert-butyl-4-oxo-2,5-cyclohexadienyl)-p-benzoquinone dioxime (quinol ether) in solutions in nonpolar solvents were investigated. The dissociation of the quinol ether is reversible two-stage process and involves the formation of an intermediate radical. In relation to the reaction conditions (initial concentration, temperature) the dissociation rate of the quinol ether obeys the kinetic equations omega = k/sub eff/ x c/sup 1/2/ or omega = k/sub 1/c. The change in the reaction order is due to the ratio of the rates of dissociation of the intermediate radical and of its reaction with the phenoxyl radical. The ESR spectra were recorded on a Varian E-9 radiospectrometer with high-frequency modulation of 100 kHz.

  5. Two-dimensional electron gases in strained quantum wells for AlN/GaN/AlN double heterostructure field-effect transistors on AlN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Guowang; Song, Bo; Ganguly, Satyaki; Zhu, Mingda; Wang, Ronghua; Yan, Xiaodong; Verma, Jai; Protasenko, Vladimir; Grace Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep, E-mail: djena@nd.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Double heterostructures of strained GaN quantum wells (QWs) sandwiched between relaxed AlN layers provide a platform to investigate the quantum-confined electronic and optical properties of the wells. The growth of AlN/GaN/AlN heterostructures with varying GaN quantum well thicknesses on AlN by plasma molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is reported. Photoluminescence spectra provide the optical signature of the thin GaN QWs. Reciprocal space mapping in X-ray diffraction shows that a GaN layer as thick as ?28 nm is compressively strained to the AlN layer underneath. The density of the polarization-induced two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the undoped heterostructures increases with the GaN QW thickness, reaching ?2.5?×?10{sup 13}/cm{sup 2}. This provides a way to tune the 2DEG channel density without changing the thickness of the top barrier layer. Electron mobilities less than ?400 cm{sup 2}/Vs are observed, leaving ample room for improvement. Nevertheless, owing to the high 2DEG density, strained GaN QW field-effect transistors with MBE regrown ohmic contacts exhibit an on-current density ?1.4?A/mm, a transconductance ?280 mS/mm, and a cut off frequency f{sub T}?104?GHz for a 100-nm-gate-length device. These observations indicate high potential for high-speed radio frequency and high voltage applications that stand to benefit from the extreme-bandgap and high thermal conductivity of AlN.

  6. Identification of phases in the interaction layer between U-Mo-Zr/Al and U-Mo-Zr/Al-Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varela, C.L. Komar; Arico, S.F.; Mirandou, M.; Balart, S.N. [Departamento Materiales, GIDAT, GAEN, CNEA, Avda. Gral Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martin (Argentina); Gribaudo, L.M. [Departamento Materiales, GIDAT, GAEN, CNEA, Avda. Gral Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martin (Argentina); CONICET, Avda. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Out-of-pile diffusion experiments were performed between U-7wt.% Mo-1wt.% Zr and Al or Al A356 (7,1wt.% Si) at 550 deg. C. In this work morphological characterization and phase identification on both interaction layer are presented. They were carried out by the use of different techniques: optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-Ray diffraction and WDS microanalysis. In the interaction layer U-7wt.% Mo-1wt.% Zr/Al, the phases UAl{sub 3}, UAl{sub 4}, Al{sub 20}Mo{sub 2}U and Al{sub 43}Mo{sub 4}U{sub 6} were identified. In the interaction layer U-7wt.% Mo-1wt.% Zr/Al A356, the phases U(Al, Si) with 25at.% Si and Si{sub 5}U{sub 3} were identified. This last phase, with a higher Si concentration, was identified with XRD Synchrotron radiation performed at the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), Campinas, Brasil. (author)

  7. ALS Global Agroecosystems 2014 -page 1 Global Agroecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    . House. 2010. Sustainable agroecosystem management: Integrating ecology, economics, and society. CRC Crop Production (AGR 4214C), and Agricultural Ecology (ALS 3153), or equivalents, or approval of topics that integrate ecological with agricultural principles to optimize resource conservation

  8. als modell fuer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    very.al. (eds), North- Holland, pp. 481-488, (IFIP International Conference), 1990. Smart Memory: The Memory Martinez, Tony R. 168 Lab-Tutorials for teaching quantum physics...

  9. anterior al boom: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M. Vriend et al. Geosciences Websites Summary: and field results, the only possible propagation of sound waves in a dry sand bed under gravity is through only consider low-...

  10. al tiempo tratamiento: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 UNA ARQUITECTURA SEGMENTADA PARA EL CLCULO DEL TIEMPO AL IMPACTO CON VISIN LOG-POLAR Engineering...

  11. al finalizar una: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    que se ha visto en el ejemplo anterior, la derivada representa Hurtado, Ana 7 UNA ARQUITECTURA SEGMENTADA PARA EL CLCULO DEL TIEMPO AL IMPACTO CON VISIN LOG-POLAR Engineering...

  12. al nacimiento una: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    que se ha visto en el ejemplo anterior, la derivada representa Hurtado, Ana 8 UNA ARQUITECTURA SEGMENTADA PARA EL CLCULO DEL TIEMPO AL IMPACTO CON VISIN LOG-POLAR Engineering...

  13. al nacer una: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    que se ha visto en el ejemplo anterior, la derivada representa Hurtado, Ana 8 UNA ARQUITECTURA SEGMENTADA PARA EL CLCULO DEL TIEMPO AL IMPACTO CON VISIN LOG-POLAR Engineering...

  14. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    times science has used high-brilliance x-rays to look so closely at these reactions. Lead author Dr. David Mueller at the ALS using x-rays to characterize working fuel cells....

  15. elementare Grafiken Export von Grafiken als EPS-Files

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auzinger, Winfried

    , axis off grid on, grid off box on, box off title, xlabel, ylabel, legend text print 35 Der Befehl) = Koordinatenachsen grid off (grid on) = Gitterlinien box on (box off) = Koord.achsen als Box axis

  16. al galfan alloy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    present work, the transformation during Yao, Y. Lawrence 9 Oxidation of Single and Dual Phase NiCrAl(Y) Bond Coat Alloys. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??The...

  17. al alloy matrices: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    present work, the transformation during Yao, Y. Lawrence 9 Oxidation of Single and Dual Phase NiCrAl(Y) Bond Coat Alloys. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??The...

  18. al a356 alloy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    work, the transformation during Yao, Y. Lawrence 10 Oxidation of Single and Dual Phase NiCrAl(Y) Bond Coat Alloys. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??The...

  19. als courses based: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Course Syllabus: Chemistry 3AL Course Information Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: manner....

  20. Amorphous powders of Al-Hf prepared by mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, R.B.; Hannigan, J.W.; Sheinberg, H.; Tiainen, T.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We synthesized amorphous Al/sub 50/Hf/sub 50/ alloy powder by mechanically alloying an equimolar mixture of crystalline powders of Al and Hf using hexane as a dispersant. We characterized the powder as a function of mechanical-alloying time by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry. Amorphous Al/sub 50/Hf/sub 50/ powder heated at 10 K s/sup /minus/1/ crystallizes polymorphously at 1003 K into orthorhombic AlHf (CrB-type structure). During mechanical alloying, some hexane decomposes and hydrogen and carbon are incorporated into the amorphous alloy powder. The hydrogen can be removed by annealing the powder by hot pressing at a temperature approximately 30 K below the crystallization temperature. The amorphous compacts have a diamond pyramidal hardness of 1025 DPH. 24 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. al sur del: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Teatro al Sur y la escena Argentina University of Kansas - KU ScholarWorks Summary: 140 LATIN AMERICAN THEATRE REVIEW...

  2. al plan auge: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ASP and Planning, Jul-Aug 2003, Sydney, NICTA Third week (Chapter 4) The second part Zachmann, Gabriel 2 (12) United States Patent (10) Patent NO.: US 7,417,568 B2 Fallon et al....

  3. ALS Data Visualization Lab Serves Up Computing Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS folks refer to it) includes two Windows workstations with 64 GB of RAM,high-end graphics cards, and large displays; three top-of-the-line iMacs; a teleconferencing...

  4. al abordaje coronal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    region of their source coronal hole. INTRODUCTION The Solar in high-speed solar wind emanating from the south polar coronal hole. Tables I and II of Ko et al. (2 Owocki,...

  5. Students Get a Taste of ALS User Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Science and Math Education (IISME) program. Mytko's time at the ALS was focused on 3D imaging and printing techniques. An integral part of the ISME program is educators...

  6. al si ca: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bi2Se3 thin films Palevski, Alexander 80 MRS spring meeting San Francisco, April 5-9, 1999, paper Y5.21 DIELECTRIC FUNCTION OF AlN GROWN ON Si (111) BY MBE Physics Websites...

  7. Comment on the narrow structure reported by Amaryan et al

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Anghinolfi; J. Ball; N. A. Baltzell; M. Battaglieri; I. Bedlinskiy; M. Bellis; A. S. Biselli; C. Bookwalter; S. Boiarinov; P. Bosted; V. D. Burkert; D. S. Carman; A. Celentano; S. Chandavar; P. L. Cole; V. Crede; R. De Vita; E. De Sanctis; B. Dey; R. Dickson; D. Doughty; M. Dugger; R. Dupre; H. Egiyan; A. El Alaoui; L. El Fassi; L. Elouadrhiri; P. Eugenio; G. Fedotov; M. Y. Gabrielyan; M. Garcon; G. P. Gilfoyle; K. L. Giovanetti; F. X. Girod; J. T. Goetz; E. Golovatch; M. Guidal; L. Guo; K. Hafidi; H. Hakobyan; D. Heddle; K. Hicks; M. Holtrop; D. G. Ireland; B. S. Ishkhanov; E. L. Isupov; H. S. Jo; K. Joo; P. Khetarpal; A. Kim; W. Kim; V. Kubarovsky; S. V. Kuleshov; H. Y. Lu; L. J. D. MacGregor; N. Markov; M. E. McCracken; B. McKinnon; M. D. Mestayer; C. A. Meyer; M. Mirazita; V. Mokeev; K. Moriya; B. Morrison; A. Ni; S. Niccolai; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; M. Osipenko; A. I Ostrovidov; K. Park; S. Park; S. Anefalos Pereira; S. Pisano; O. Pogorelko; S. Pozdniakov; J. W. Price; G. Ricco; M. Ripani; B. G. Ritchie; P. Rossi; D. Schott; R. A. Schumacher; E. Seder; Y. G. Sharabian; E. S. Smith; D. I Sober; S. S. Stepanyan; P. Stoler; W. Tang; M. Ungaro; B. Vernarsky; M. F. Vineyard; D. P. Weygand; M. H. Wood; N. Zachariou; B. Zhao

    2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The CLAS Collaboration provides a comment on the physics interpretation of the results presented in a paper published by M. Amaryan et al. regarding the possible observation of a narrow structure in the mass spectrum of a photoproduction experiment.

  8. al transparent conducting: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Reduction of graphene oxide films on Al foil for hybrid transparent conductive film applications...

  9. aplicados al problema: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    en diversos campos de la ciencia, la ingenier-a o la econom-a 5. Sin embargo, la calidad de estos Duarte, Abraham 5 ALGORITMOS DE OPTIMIZACIN APLICADOS AL SEGUIMIENTO DEL...

  10. AlGaN/GaN-based power semiconductor switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Bin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AlGaN/GaN-based high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) have great potential for their use as high efficiency and high speed power semiconductor switches, thanks to their high breakdown electric field, mobility and ...

  11. Pb nanowire formation on Al/lead zirconate titanate surfaces...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pattering of the Al film. Citation: Alvine KJ, V Shutthanandan, BW Arey, CM Wang, WD Bennett, and SG Pitman.2012."Pb nanowire formation on Allead zirconate titanate surfaces in...

  12. al single crystal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Low-Leakage Superconducting Tunnel Junctions with a Single-Crystal Al2O3 Barrier* Computer Technologies and...

  13. al single crystals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Low-Leakage Superconducting Tunnel Junctions with a Single-Crystal Al2O3 Barrier* Computer Technologies and...

  14. al medio natural: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6. T. P. Devereaux, T. Cuk, Z.-X. Shen, N. Nagaosa, Physics Websites Summary: . Superconduct. 22, 755 (1998). 25. F. Cilento et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 021102 (2010). 26. P....

  15. al si application: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that could boost Si-based wireless technology 99 High Performance Polycrystalline SiGe Thin Film Transistors Using Al2O3 Gate Insulator Materials Science Websites Summary:...

  16. al ann surg: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: 245 Chapter 12 Cancer Systems Biology Dana Faratian, James L. Bown, V. Anne Smith, Simon P. Langdon+Business Media, LLC 2010 12;246 Faratian et al. While cancer can...

  17. aguas al sur: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Resumen. La fosa de Cariaco, ubicada al sur del Caribe en el margen continental de Venezuela, ha sido el foco de muchos estudios de relevancia global sobre la qumica de las...

  18. Nanoimprint Lithography of Al Nanovoids for Deep-UV SERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Tao; Sigle, Daniel O.; Herrmann, Lars O.; Wolverson, Daniel; Baumberg, Jeremy

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    the electromagnetic field intensity in the plasmonic ‘hot spots’. However, fundamental constraints exist as a result of quantum tunnelling6, besides the fabrication difficulties at this nanoscale. Another strategy is to identify electronic transitions in the analyte... 2009, 113, 20539-20542. (23) Stratakis, E.; Barberoglou, M.; Fotakis, C.; Viau, G.; Garcia, C.; Shafeev, G. A., Generation of Al Nanoparticles Via Ablation of Bulk Al in Liquids with Short Laser Pulses. Opt. Express 2009, 17, 12650-12659. (24) Viau...

  19. Optical microcavities and enhanced electroluminescence from electroformed Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickmott, T. W. [Department of Physics, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York 12222 (United States)

    2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Electroluminescence (EL) and electron emission into vacuum (EM) occur when a non-destructive dielectric breakdown of Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes, electroforming, results in the development of a filamentary region in which current-voltage (I-V) characteristics exhibit voltage-controlled negative resistance. The temperature dependence of I-V curves, EM, and, particularly, EL of Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes with anodic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thicknesses between 12?nm and 30?nm, has been studied. Two filters, a long-pass (LP) filter with transmission of photons with energies less than 3.0?eV and a short-pass (SP) filter with photon transmission between 3.0 and 4.0?eV, have been used to characterize EL. The voltage threshold for EL with the LP filter, V{sub LP}, is ?1.5?V. V{sub LP} is nearly independent of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thickness and of temperature and is 0.3–0.6?V less than the threshold voltage for EL for the SP filter, V{sub SP}. EL intensity is primarily between 1.8 and 3.0?eV when the bias voltage, V{sub S} ? 7?V. EL in the thinnest diodes is enhanced compared to EL in thicker diodes. For increasing V{sub S}, for diodes with the smallest Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thicknesses, there is a maximum EL intensity, L{sub MX}, at a voltage, V{sub LMX}, followed by a decrease to a plateau. L{sub MX} and EL intensity at 4.0?V in the plateau region depend exponentially on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thickness. The ratio of L{sub MX} at 295?K for a diode with 12?nm of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to L{sub MX} for a diode with 25?nm of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is ?140. The ratio of EL intensity with the LP filter to EL intensity with the SP filter, LP/SP, varies between ?3 and ?35; it depends on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thickness and V{sub S}. Enhanced EL is attributed to the increase of the spontaneous emission rate of a dipole in a non-resonant optical microcavity. EL photons interact with the Ag and Al films to create surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at the metal-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interfaces. SPPs generate large electromagnetic fields in the filamentary region of the electroformed Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diode, which then acts as an optical microcavity. A model is proposed for electronic processes in electroformed Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ag diodes.

  20. RHQT Nb3Al 15-Tesla magnet design study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, R.; Ambrosio, G.; Barzi, E.; Kashikin, V.; Kikuchi, A.; Novitski, I.; Takeuchi, T.; Wake, M.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab /NIMC, Tsukuba /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feasibility study of 15-Tesla dipole magnets wound with a new copper stabilized RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable is presented. A new practical long copper stabilized RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strand is presented, which is being developed and manufactured at the National Institute of Material Science (NIMS) in Japan. It has achieved a non-copper J{sub c} of 1000A/mm{sup 2} at 15 Tesla at 4.2K, with a copper over non-copper ratio of 1.04, and a filament size less than 50 microns. For this design study a short Rutherford cable with 28 Nb{sub 3}Al strands of 1 mm diameter will be fabricated late this year. The cosine theta magnet cross section is designed using ROXIE, and the stress and strain in the coil is estimated and studied with the characteristics of the Nb{sub 3}Al strand. The advantages and disadvantages of the Nb{sub 3}Al cable are compared with the prevailing Nb{sub 3}Sn cable from the point of view of stress-strain, J{sub c}, and possible degradation of stabilizer due to cabling. The Nb{sub 3}Al coil of the magnet, which will be made by wind and react method, has to be heat treated at 800 degree C for 10 hours. As preparation for the 15 Tesla magnet, a series of tests on strand and Rutherford cables are considered.