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1

C. Rdiger, J.P. Walker, J.D. Kalma, G.R. Willgoose, and P.R. Houser (2004), Streamflow data assimilation: A study on nested catchments,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assimilation: A study on nested catchments, in Proceedings of the 2nd international CAHMDA workshop on: The Ter.P. Walker1, J.D. Kalma2, G.R. Willgoose3, and P.R. Houser4 1Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering "observations" and the evaluation data. The initial conditions and land surface forcing data are then degraded

Walker, Jeff

2

EVIDENCE FOR CO DISSOCIATION ON RHODIUM SURFACES  

SciTech Connect

Carbon monoxide adsorbs molecularly on rhodium surfaces at 300K, but if the rhodium samples are heated in the presence of carbon monoxide, there is evidence for carbon-oxygen bond breaking at step and/or defect sites. The effects of step and defect site density, subsurface oxygen concentration, and oxygen dissolution into the rhodium lattice on CO dissociation are discussed.

Castner, D.G.; Dubois, L.H.; Sexton, B.A.; Somorjai, G.A.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Rhodium Nanoparticle Shape Dependence in the Reduction of NO by CO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~320 - 400°C. Rhodium Nanoparticle Shape Dependence in theNano Lett. , 7 Rhodium Nanoparticle Shape Dependence in the87 (1984) 152. Rhodium Nanoparticle Shape Dependence in the

Renzas, J.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Heat Kernel for Open Manifolds Trevor H. Jones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Kernel for Open Manifolds Trevor H. Jones 22nd July, 2010 Abstract It is known that for open manifolds with bounded geometry, the differential form heat kernel exists and is unique. Furthermore, it has been shown that the components of the differential form heat kernel are related via the exterior

Jones, Trevor H.

5

Recovering Articulated Model Topology from Observed Motion Leonid Taycher, John W. Fisher III, and Trevor Darrell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 02139 {lodrion, fisher, trevor}@ai.mit.edu Abstract Tracking human motion is an integral part to developing powerful human-computer interfaces. Several successful tracking algorithms were developed

Darrell, Trevor

6

New Tandem Catalytic Cycles take to the Rhod(ium) | The Ames...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Tandem Catalytic Cycles take to the Rhod(ium) Light, combined with a novel rhodium catalyst, enables greener production of chemical feedstocks from biorenewables. A key...

7

Earth Observations for rapid response to large earthquakes Supervisors: Dr Zhenhong Li and Prof Trevor Hoey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Earth Observations for rapid response to large earthquakes Supervisors: Dr Zhenhong Li and Prof Trevor Hoey School of Geographical and Earth Sciences, University of Glasgow, UK Earthquakes, together of the earth system; they are messengers of the fundamental processes that shape the surface of the Earth

Guo, Zaoyang

8

Rhodium-catalyzed dehydrogenative borylation of cyclic alkenes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A rhodium-catalyzed dehydrogenative borylation of cyclic alkenes is described. This reaction provides direct access to cyclic 1-alkenylboronic acid pinacol esters, useful intermediates in organic synthesis. Suzuki–Miyaura ...

Kondoh, Azusa

9

Methanol adsorption and decomposition on rhodium  

SciTech Connect

The decomposition of methanol on rhodium probed from {approximately}200 atomic sites of the (001) or (111) planes or Rh field emitter crystals but randomly with regard to crystallographic zones was studied by pulsed field desorption mass spectrometry. High electric field pulses were used to quantitatively desorb the final products, carbon monoxide and hydrogen, thus achieving steady-state conditions. Substantial amounts of methoxy (mainly desorbed as CH{sub 3}{sup +} ions) were also present at the surface. Applying a steady electric field, F{sub R} {ge} 4 V/nm, between the field pulses, led to a deceleration of the decomposition reaction and to increase of the amount of adsorbed CH{sub 3}O and CH{sub 2}O species. There were indicators that the rate-determining step of the reaction is C-H bond cleavage in adsorbed methoxy to form the CH{sub 2}O intermediate. This was supported by the observation of a kinetic isotope effect in the formation of CD{sub 2}O and CHDO from methyl-d{sub 2}-alcohol, CHD{sub 2}OH. Here, the C-H bond breaking to form the CD{sub 2}O was found to be twice as fast as the breaking of the C-D bond which results in CHDO. Field ion microscopy was applied to investigate the influence of the reaction on the structure of the whole hemispherical single crystal surface. There were neither topographic changes nor corrosion of the Rh surface after field-free exposure to 2 Pa methanol at temperatures up to 423 K.

Chuah, G.K.; Kruse, N.; Schmidt, W.A.; Block, J.H.; Abend, G. (Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin (Germany, F.R.))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Discovery of Rubidium, Strontium, Molybdenum, and Rhodium Isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, thirty-one rubidium, thirty-five strontium, thirty-five molybdenum and thirty-eight rhodium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

Parker, A M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Discovery of rubidium, strontium, molybdenum, and rhodium isotopes  

SciTech Connect

Currently, 31 rubidium, 35 strontium, 35 molybdenum, and 38 rhodium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

Parker, A.M.; Thoennessen, M., E-mail: thoennessen@nscl.msu.edu

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Discovery of Rubidium, Strontium, Molybdenum, and Rhodium Isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, thirty-one rubidium, thirty-five strontium, thirty-five molybdenum and thirty-eight rhodium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

A. M. Parker; M. Thoennessen

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

13

Rhodium coated mirrors deposited by magnetron sputtering for fusion applications  

SciTech Connect

Metallic mirrors will be essential components of all optical spectroscopy and imaging systems for ITER plasma diagnostics. Any change in the mirror performance, in particular, its reflectivity, due to erosion of the surface by charge exchange neutrals or deposition of impurities will influence the quality and reliability of the detected signals. Due to its high reflectivity in the visible wavelength range and its low sputtering yield, rhodium appears as an attractive material for first mirrors in ITER. However, the very high price of the raw material calls for using it in the form of a film deposited onto metallic substrates. The development of a reliable technique for the preparation of high reflectivity rhodium films is therefore of the highest importance. Rhodium layers with thicknesses of up to 2 {mu}m were produced on different substrates of interest (Mo, stainless steel, Cu) by magnetron sputtering. Produced films exhibit a low roughness and crystallite size of about 10 nm with a dense columnar structure. No impurities were detected on the surface after deposition. Scratch tests demonstrate that adhesion properties increase with substrate hardness. Detailed optical characterizations of Rh-coated mirrors as well as results of erosion tests performed both under laboratory conditions and in the TEXTOR tokamak are presented in this paper.

Marot, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Oelhafen, P.; Covarel, G.; Litnovsky, A. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Laboratoire Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes de Fabrication, 61 rue Albert Camus, Universite de Haute-Alsace, F-68093 Mulhouse Cedex (France); Institut fuer Energieforschung (Plasmaphysik), Forschungszentrum Juelich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, D 52425 Juelich (Germany)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over iron-rhodium alloy catalysts  

SciTech Connect

To investigate the nature of iron-rhodium alloy catalysts during the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, a combination of experimental techniques were applied. Infrared spectroscopy was mainly used to extract direct information on the surface of catalysts under the reaction conditions. In addition, Mossbauer spectroscopy was employed to study the iron alloy catalysts. Further characterization of the catalysts was performed by chemisorption measurements. Hydrocarbon products of the CO + H/sub 2/ synthesis reaction were analyzed by gas chromatography. The working surface of a silica-supported rhodium catalyst was found to be saturated with molecular carbon monoxide. The intensity of the linear carbonyl absorption band remained constant compared to that for room temperature CO adsorption, while that of the bridge-bonded carbonyl absorption band was drastically reduced during the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The bridge-bonded adsorption sites are assumed to be the active sites for dissociating carbon monoxide. The hydrogenation rate of the linearly adsorbed carbon monoxide was much slower than the steady state reaction rate. The alloy catalyst did not form a bulk carbide, but the presence of surface carbon was suggested by the large shift of the linear carbonyl absorption band. On the other hand, infrared spectra on an iron catalyst showed only weak bands, indicating a high degree of CO dissociation. On a silica-supported iron-rhodium alloy catalyst, surface analysis by infrared spectroscopy presents evidence of well-mixed alloy formation. Three models of carbon monoxide adsorption were identified.

Choi, S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Slide 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

| Making Sense of Chinese Energy Statistics | Making Sense of Chinese Energy Statistics 1 10 East 40 th Street, Suite 3601, New York, NY 10016 Tel: +1.212.532.1158 | Fax: +1.212.532.1162 | Web: www.rhgroup.net Address: 5 Columbus Circle, New York, NY 10019 | Tel: +1.212.532.1158 | Fax: +1.212.532.1162 | Web: www.rhg.com Making Sense of Chinese Energy Statistics Trevor Houser Partner, Rhodium Group tghouser@rhg,com EIA | June 18, 2013 EIA | Making Sense of Chinese Energy Statistics 2 Why Good Chinese Energy Statistics Matter for Energy Markets Share of Global Demand Growth Source: Historical data is 2002-2012 from BP Statistical Review. Projections are from the IEA's 2012 World Energy Outlook "New Policies Scenario" 87% 44% 14% 8% 30% 66% 20% 56% 31% 68% 21% 37% 53%

16

Slide 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conference | Powering China's Growth Conference | Powering China's Growth 1 10 East 40 th Street, Suite 3601, New York, NY 10016 Tel: +1.212.532.1158 | Fax: +1.212.532.1162 | Web: www.rhgroup.net 10 East 40 th Street, Suite 3601, New York, NY 10016 Tel: +1.212.532.1158 | Fax: +1.212.532.1162 | Web: www.rhgroup.net Powering China's Growth Electricity Market Projections and Global Implications Trevor Houser Partner, Rhodium Group (RHG) EIA Conference Washington, DC tghouser@rhgroup.net April 27, 2011 EIA Conference | Powering China's Growth 2 China Has Commendable Clean Energy Ambitions Projected Capacity Additions 2010-2020 Source: US-BAU is AEO 2011. US-C&T is a generic economy-wide cap-and-trade program with banking and borrowing , international offsets and emissions reduction targets of 17% below

17

Doppler Effect in the Slow Neutron Resonance in Rhodium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The variation in transmission of a rhodium foil to 1.26-ev neutrons has been measured as a function of foil temperature using a crystal spectrometer. A change in transmission of approximately two percent per 100-degree temperature change has been observed over a temperature range from 120°K to 860°K. After correction for instrument resolution and Doppler effect, a peak cross section of 4850±200 barns results. Comparison has been made with the theory of Bethe and Placzek as extended by Lamb.

H. H. Landon

1954-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Rhodium-catalyzed epoxide-opening cascades toward brevisin and hemibrevetoxin B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHAPTER I. Rhodium-Catalyzed Epoxide-Opening Cascades: Formal Synthesis of (-)-Brevisin [chemical formula inserted] [Rh(CO)?Cl]? was found to be an effective catalyst for endo-selective cyclizations and cascades of ...

Armbrust, Kurt W. (Kurt Willes)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Effect of support on catalytic behavior of dispersed rhodium for hydrocarbon hydrogenolyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFFCT OF SUPPORT ON CATALYTIC BEHAVIOR OF DISPERSED RHODIUM POR HYDROCARBON HYDROGENOLYSES A Thesis AMINA ARMED KHAL'lFA Submi I ted to the Graduate College of Texas AKM University in partial full illment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Chemistry EFFECT OF SUPPORT ON CATALYTIC BEHAVIOR OF DISPERSED RHODIUM FOR HYDROCARBON HYDROGENOLYSES A Thesis by AMINA AHMED KHALIFA Approved as to style and content by: M. P. osynek (Chairman...

Khalifa, Amina Ahmed

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

20

Evidence from bond lengths and bond angles for enneacovalence of cobalt, rhodium, iridium, iron, ruthenium, and osmium in compounds with elements of medium electronegativity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...enneacovalence of cobalt, rhodium, iridium, iron, ruthenium, and osmium in compounds...enneacovalence of cobalt, rhodium, iridium, iron, ruthenium, and osmium in compounds...CO)10(diop)] 274.4 45 acac, acetylacetonate; diop, di-o-phthalate. Chemistry...

Linus Pauling

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Monodisperse Platinum and Rhodium Nanoparticles as Model Heterogeneous Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Model heterogeneous catalysts have been synthesized and studied to better understand how the surface structure of noble metal nanoparticles affects catalytic performance. In this project, monodisperse rhodium and platinum nanoparticles of controlled size and shape have been synthesized by solution phase polyol reduction, stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Model catalysts have been developed using these nanoparticles by two methods: synthesis of mesoporous silica (SBA-15) in the presence of nanoparticles (nanoparticle encapsulation, NE) to form a composite of metal nanoparticles supported on SBA-15 and by deposition of the particles onto a silicon wafer using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer deposition. The particle shapes were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) and the sizes were determined by TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and in the case of NE samples, room temperature H2 and CO adsorption isotherms. Catalytic studies were carried out in homebuilt gas-phase reactors. For the nanoparticles supported on SBA-15, the catalysts are in powder form and were studied using the homebuilt systems as plug-flow reactors. In the case of nanoparticles deposited on silicon wafers, the same systems were operated as batch reactors. This dissertation has focused on the synthesis, characterization, and reaction studies of model noble metal heterogeneous catalysts. Careful control of particle size and shape has been accomplished though solution phase synthesis of Pt and Rh nanoparticles in order to elucidate further structure-reactivity relationships in noble metal catalysis.

Coble, Inger M

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Synthesis, structure and spectroscopic investigations of luminescent heterobimetallic gold(I)-Rhodium(I) species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel, three-coordinate gold(I) dimer, Au2(tfepm)3Cl2 (la, lb), was synthesized and structurally characterized. Four gold(I)-rhodium(I) heterobimetallic complexes, AuIRh'(tBuNC)2(-dppm)2C12 (2), Au'Rh'(tBuNC)2(u-dmpm)2Cl2 ...

Dempsey, Jillian Lee

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Application of organo-nanoclay as a solid sorbent for rhodium complex separation and preconcentration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An organo-nanoclay is used as a new, easily accessible ... then the complex was then adsorbed onto the nanoclay. The rhodium ions were eluted from the...?1 and 20.0 ?g mL?1 in the initial solution, the relative s...

Daryoush Afzali; Ali Mostafavi; Hadis Beitollah

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Acetic Acid from the Carbonylation of Chloride Methane Over Rhodium Based Catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of commercially important materials like vinyl acetate monomer (VAM), cellulose acetate, and acetate esters. MoreAcetic Acid from the Carbonylation of Chloride Methane Over Rhodium Based Catalysts Yafang Fan Ă? that makes use of the latest advance in methyl chloride production is reported. Acetic acid was produced from

Bao, Xinhe

25

Time-Resolved Structural Characterization of Formation and Break-up of Rhodium Clusters Supported in Highly Dealuminated Y Zeolite  

SciTech Connect

Mononuclear rhodium complexes incorporating two ethylene ligands and anchored to dealuminated zeolite Y by two Rh-O bonds were characterized by transient extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and infrared (IR) spectroscopy as they were converted in the presence of H{sub 2}. EXAFS spectra indicate reduction of the rhodium in the complex at 298 K to form rhodium clusters less than 3 {angstrom} in average diameter. Contacting of the resultant clusters with C{sub 2}H{sub 4} led to their oxidative fragmentation, and the process was reversible. When the H{sub 2} treatment was carried out at a higher temperature (373 K), larger clusters formed. The reduction and oxidation of the rhodium were confirmed by X-ray absorption near edge spectra. During the ethylene treatments, ethyl groups formed on the rhodium, as indicated by IR spectra; treatment in H{sub 2} led to hydrogenation of these groups to form ethane, and the ethyl groups are inferred to be intermediates in the catalytic hydrogenation of ethylene. Ethylene in the gas phase helps to stabilize rhodium in the form of mononuclear complexes on the zeolite during catalysis, hindering the cluster formation.

Liang, Ann J.; Gates, Bruce C. (UCD)

2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

26

Towards a Benign and Viable Rhodium Catalyzed Hydroformylation of Higher Olefins: Economic and Environmental Impact Analyses, Solvent Effects and Membrane-based Catalyst Separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and soluble and bulky polymer bound bidentate ligands, were also examined. The rhodium metal and phosphorous ligand leaching in permeate were measured by elemental analysis technique. Chapter 5 demonstrates continuous membrane filtration integrated... with in-situ hydroformylation reaction at elevated temperature under synthesis gas pressure using polymer bound rhodium, to test the rhodium leaching as well as catalyst complexes stability, activity and selectivity. In Chapter 6, volume expansions...

Fang, Jing

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

27

Role of Si/Al Ratio on Immobilization and Stability of Rhodium Complexes on ZSM-5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rhodium complexes within the pores of zeolite ZSM-5 with varying Si/Al ratios (Si/Al 23, Si/Al 50, and Si/Al 280) were prepared from Rh1+(CO)2(C5H7O2), Rh22+(CO2CH3)4, and Rh3+(C5H7O2)3 followed by thermal treatment in He. IR results indicate...

Long, Brandon

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

A review of "The Journal of William Dowsing: Iconoclasm in East Anglia During the English Civil War." by Trevor Cooper, ed.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and there have been a number of impressive local studies in recent decades. It is a pleasure that this one has been published. Trevor Cooper, ed. The Journal of William Dowsing: Iconoclasm in East Anglia During the English Civil War. Woodbridge: Boydell Press..., 2001. 551 pp. + 64 plates. $90.00. Review by CHARLES W. A. PRIOR, QUEEN?S UNIVERSITY AT KINGSTON. Readers who are familiar with William Dowsing will know that this is less a journal than a catalogue of the activities of an iconoclast in Suffolk...

Charles W. A. Prior

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Development of novel rhodium and iridium complexes with a fac-chelating ligand for electrophilic C-H activation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Several new bis-3,5(dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)acetate rhodium and iridium complexes were synthesized from MCl3•H2O. [Rh(bdmpza)Cl3]- was isolated with three different cations, lithium, sodium and tetraethylamonium, to obtain a… (more)

Rhinehart, Jennifer Lee (1984 - )

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis -- 2011 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). In recent years, this research has primarily involved the further development of catalysts containing rhodium and manganese based on the results of earlier catalyst screening tests. Research during FY 2011 continued to examine the performance of RhMn catalysts on alternative supports including selected zeolite, silica, and carbon supports. Catalyst optimization continued using both the Davisil 645 and Merck Grade 7734 silica supports. Research also was initiated in FY 2011, using the both Davisil 645 silica and Hyperion CS-02C-063 carbon supports, to evaluate the potential for further improving catalyst performance, through the addition of one or two additional metals as promoters to the catalysts containing Rh, Mn, and Ir.

Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Rummel, Becky L.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Catalytic partial oxidation of iso-octane over rhodium catalysts: An experimental, modeling, and simulation study  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic partial oxidation of iso-octane over a rhodium/alumina coated honeycomb monolith is experimentally and numerically studied at short-contact times for varying fuel-to-oxygen ratios. A new experimental set-up with well-defined inlet and boundary conditions is presented. The conversion on the catalyst and in the gas-phase is modeled by detailed reaction mechanisms including 857 gas-phase and 17 adsorbed species. Elementary-step based heterogeneous and homogeneous reaction mechanisms are implemented into two-dimensional flow field description of a single monolith channel. Experiment and simulation provide new insights into the complex reaction network leading to varying product distribution as function of fuel-to-oxygen ratio. At fuel rich conditions, the formation of by-products that can serve as coke precursors is observed and interpreted. (author)

Hartmann, M.; Minh, H.D. [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Maier, L. [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Deutschmann, O. [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis – 2012 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). In recent years, this research has primarily involved the further development of catalysts containing rhodium and manganese based on the results of earlier catalyst screening tests. Testing continued in FY 2012 to further improve the Ir-promoted RhMn catalysts on both silica and carbon supports for producing mixed oxygenates from synthesis gas. This testing re-examined selected alternative silica and carbon supports to follow up on some uncertainties in the results with previous test results. Additional tests were conducted to further optimize the total and relative concentrations of Rh, Mn, and Ir, and to examine selected promoters and promoter combinations based on earlier results. To establish optimum operating conditions, the effects of the process pressure and the feed gas composition also were evaluated.

Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Thompson, Becky L.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Phase Transition of Trapped Nuclear Exciton of Long-lived Rhodium Mossbauer States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report experimental observations of the long-lived rhodium Mossbauer emissions by the time- and energy-resolved spectroscopy. The extraordinary observations manifest the open-up of photonic band gap in analogy to the superconducting gap of remarkable symmetry breakings at transition point. These observations are of potential importance for detecting gravitational waves and development of the two-photon gamma laser. Firstly, phase transitions shown by spectral evolution of characteristic emissions reveal the different aggregate exciton orderings at room temperature. Six different phases are identified by spectra profiles emitted from the color centers. Secondly, the cascade branching of the multipolar nuclear transition is discovered being the spontaneous cascade down-conversion to generate entangled gammas. The macroscopic angular distribution of entangled gammas from the polycrystalline sample manifests a global photon-nucleus-photon bound state across the grain boundaries. Thirdly, the gamma-energy distributions depending on exciton phases reveal the photonic band gap typically on the order of several hundred eV.

Yao Cheng; Bing Xia

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

34

C-H vs C-C Bond Activation of Acetonitrile and Benzonitrile via Oxidative Addition: Rhodium vs Nickel and Cp* vs Tp  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nickel and Cp* vs Tp (Tp ) Hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)borate, Cp* ) 5 interaction with the rhodium center. Reactions of acetonitrile and benzonitrile with the fragment [Tp of acetonitrile on nickel(II) using potassium tert- butoxide.6 In contrast, the fragment [Tp

Jones, William D.

35

Reactivity of coordinated [Ph2PCHP(S)Ph2]- and [Ph2P(S)CHP(S)Ph2]-: two-center, regiospecific reactivity in rhodium and iridium complexes and formation of a disubstituted methylene bridge between platinum atoms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reactivity of coordinated [Ph2PCHP(S)Ph2]- and [Ph2P(S)CHP(S)Ph2]-: two-center, regiospecific reactivity in rhodium and iridium complexes and formation of a disubstituted methylene bridge between platinum atoms ...

Jane. Browning; Keith R. Dixon; Robert W. Hilts

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

NMR and thermodynamic investigation of the reaction of square-planar rhodium(I) compounds with H/sub 2/  

SciTech Connect

The reaction of square-planar rhodium(I) complexes of the general formula (P(4-tolyl)/sub 3/)/sub 2/RhClB with H/sub 2/ has been investigated where B is P(4-tolyl)/sub 3/, pyridine, or tetrahydrothiophene. NMR studies confirm that in all cases the product geometry has the two hydrogens cis to each other and the two phosphines trans to each other. The rate of dissociation of pyridine from the hydride is reported and compared with that of phosphine dissociation. Thermodynamic data for activation of H/sub 2/ by the phosphine and tetrahydrothiophene adducts are reported. From this information metal-hydrogen bond strengths can be calculated and the influence of B on this quantity determined.

Drago, R.S. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville); Miller, J.G.; Hoselton, M.A.; Farris, R.D.; Desmond, M.J.

1983-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

37

An advanced model for the prediction of the total burnup-dependent self-powered rhodium detector response  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an advanced method to generate the burnup dependent total response of a rhodium self-powered detector operating in a pressurized water reactor environment. Full use is made of advanced nodal neutronic and coupled electron-photon transport techniques. The method accounts for (1) the detailed energy and spatial dependence of the neutron activation of each detector segment in a three-dimensional representation, (2) the generation of electrons caused by both neutron and gamma interactions in all the geometrical regions of the detector, and (3) the transport of the electrons within the detector to provide an observable current. All components of the detector signal are directly calculated - the method does not require the use of any empirical data, such as detector sensitivities. Intermediate results, such as beta escape fractions, were compared to measured data, and the overall technique was extensively benchmarked against operating data from three reactors.

Ober, T.G. [Entergy Operations, Inc., Jackson, MS (United States); Malloy, J.W. [Tetra Engineering Group, Simsbury, CT (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

Rhodium self-powered neutron detector as a suitable on-line thermal neutron flux monitor in BNCT treatments  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: A rhodium self-powered neutron detector (Rh SPND) has been specifically developed by the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) of Argentina to measure locally and in real time thermal neutron fluxes in patients treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this work, the thermal and epithermal neutron response of the Rh SPND was evaluated by studying the detector response to two different reactor spectra. In addition, during clinical trials of the BNCT Project of the CNEA, on-line neutron flux measurements using the specially designed detector were assessed. Methods: The first calibration of the detector was done with the well-thermalized neutron spectrum of the CNEA RA-3 reactor thermal column. For this purpose, the reactor spectrum was approximated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution in the thermal energy range. The second calibration was done at different positions along the central axis of a water-filled cylindrical phantom, placed in the mixed thermal-epithermal neutron beam of CNEA RA-6 reactor. In this latter case, the RA-6 neutron spectrum had been well characterized by both calculation and measurement, and it presented some marked differences with the ideal spectrum considered for SPND calibrations at RA-3. In addition, the RA-6 neutron spectrum varied with depth in the water phantom and thus the percentage of the epithermal contribution to the total neutron flux changed at each measurement location. Local (one point-position) and global (several points-positions) and thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities were determined from these measurements. Thermal neutron flux was also measured during BNCT clinical trials within the irradiation fields incident on the patients. In order to achieve this, the detector was placed on patient's skin at dosimetric reference points for each one of the fields. System stability was adequate for this kind of measurement. Results: Local mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities and global thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities derived from measurements performed at the RA-6 were compared and no significant differences were found. Global RA-6-based thermal neutron sensitivity showed agreement with pure thermal neutron sensitivity measurements performed in the RA-3 spectrum. Additionally, the detector response proved nearly unchanged by differences in neutron spectra from real (RA-6 BNCT beam) and ideal (considered for calibration calculations at RA-3) neutron source descriptions. The results confirm that the special design of the Rh SPND can be considered as having a pure thermal response for neutron spectra with epithermal-to-thermal flux ratios up to 12%. In addition, the linear response of the detector to thermal flux allows the use of a mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivity of 1.95 {+-} 0.05 x 10{sup -21} A n{sup -1}{center_dot}cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s. This sensitivity can be used in spectra with up to 21% epithermal-to-thermal flux ratio without significant error due to epithermal neutron and gamma induced effects. The values of the measured fluxes in clinical applications had discrepancies with calculated results that were in the range of -25% to +30%, which shows the importance of a local on-line independent measurement as part of a treatment planning quality control system. Conclusions: The usefulness of the CNEA Rh SPND for the on-line local measurement of thermal neutron flux on BNCT patients has been demonstrated based on an appropriate neutron spectra calibration and clinical applications.

Miller, Marcelo E.; Sztejnberg, Manuel L.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Longhino, Juan M.; Estryk, Guillermo [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina); Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429, Argentina and CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1033 (Argentina); Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Journal: Trevor Downey: Ecuador June 13, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Mariscal Sucre Airport. Flying in, I sat next to a Quito native who pointed out the lights below, but I could tell from building-packed streets, as well as the sturdy concrete and steel barriers around the globe (with representatives from Switzerland, Finland, Spain, Israel and Germany) on a 2 1

Farritor, Shane

40

QUIŃONES, RENATO A., AND TREVOR PLATT. The relationship ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jul 12, 1990 ... terials in marine ecosystems: Theory and practice. NATO Conf. Ser. 4, Mar. ... Many decisions concerning freshwater re- sources, however, are ...

2000-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

SILVERT, WILLIAM, AND TREVOR PLATT. Energy flux in the ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mar 11, 1977 ... tions of this spectrum can be measured automatically ... of particles, per unit volume of water, in ... rate at which energy is lost from the sys-.

2000-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

42

Magnetism in fcc rhodium and palladium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

First-principles total-energy band calculations using the fixed-spin-moment procedure are used to study the volume dependence of the magnetic behavior for fcc Rh and Pd. We calculate the total energy, the magnetic moment, and the spin-polarized l-decomposed electron occupancy from below the equilibrium volume to the free-atom limit, and show the magnetic susceptibility in the nonmagnetic range. We find that both metals are nonmagnetic at zero pressure, but undergo first-order transitions from nonmagnetic to magnetic behavior at expanded volumes. In both cases, the onset of magnetic behavior is accompanied by magnetic moments that exceed the Hund’s-rule atomic limit. With increasing volume, we find a depletion of s and p states and a corresponding increase of d states with an approach to the 4d9 and 4d10 free-atom configurations for Rh and Pd, respectively.

V. L. Moruzzi and P. M. Marcus

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Nogalamycin. Stereochemistry and chemical modification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Paul F. Wiley , David W. Elrod , David J. Houser , Jian L. Johnson , Loraine M. Pschigoda , W. C. Krueger , Albert Moscowitz ...

Paul F. Wiley; David W. Elrod; David J. Houser; Jian L. Johnson; Loraine M. Pschigoda; W. C. Krueger; Albert Moscowitz

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemicals; in the petroleum refining sector; and in laboratory equipment, including crucibles for growing Defense Stockpile remained suspended through FY 2013. Stockpile Status--9­30­13 4 Uncommitted Authorized; iridium prices were stable until midyear and then decreased markedly toward yearend, reportedly owing

45

Material synthesis and hydrogen storage of palladium-rhodium alloy.  

SciTech Connect

Pd and Pd alloys are candidate material systems for Tr or H storage. We have actively engaged in material synthesis and studied the material science of hydrogen storage for Pd-Rh alloys. In collaboration with UC Davis, we successfully developed/optimized a supersonic gas atomization system, including its processing parameters, for Pd-Rh-based alloy powders. This optimized system and processing enable us to produce {le} 50-{mu}m powders with suitable metallurgical properties for H-storage R&D. In addition, we studied hydrogen absorption-desorption pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) behavior using these gas-atomized Pd-Rh alloy powders. The study shows that the pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) behavior of Pd-Rh alloys is strongly influenced by its metallurgy. The plateau pressure, slope, and H/metal capacity are highly dependent on alloy composition and its chemical distribution. For the gas-atomized Pd-10 wt% Rh, the absorption plateau pressure is relatively high and consistent. However, the absorption-desorption PCT exhibits a significant hysteresis loop that is not seen from the 30-nm nanopowders produced by chemical precipitation. In addition, we observed that the presence of hydrogen introduces strong lattice strain, plastic deformation, and dislocation networking that lead to material hardening, lattice distortions, and volume expansion. The above observations suggest that the H-induced dislocation networking is responsible for the hysteresis loop seen in the current atomized Pd-10 wt% Rh powders. This conclusion is consistent with the hypothesis suggested by Flanagan and others (Ref 1) that plastic deformation or dislocations control the hysteresis loop.

Lavernia, Enrique J. (University of California, Davis); Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D. (Whithworth University, Spokane, WA)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by companies in Texas and Utah. Catalysts for air pollution abatement continued to be the largest demand sector in the manufacture of catalytic converters. Catalysts were also used in other air-pollution-abatement processes in kilograms, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The Stillwater and East Boulder Mines

47

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by companies in Texas and Utah. Catalysts for air-pollution- abatement continued to be the leading demand industry in the manufacture of catalytic converters. Catalysts were also used in other air-pollution in kilograms unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The Stillwater and East Boulder Mines

48

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for air-pollution abatement in both light- and heavy-duty vehicles. PGMs are also used in the chemical in kilograms unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The Stillwater and East Boulder Mines in south-central Montana were the only primary platinum-group metals (PGMs) mines in the United States

49

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Catalysts for air pollution abatement continued to be the largest demand sector for PGM. In the United of catalytic converters. Catalysts were also used in other air-pollution-abatement processes to remove organic in kilograms, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The Stillwater Mine is the only primary

50

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are also used in other air pollution abatement processes to remove organic vapors, odors, or carbon platinum-group metals (PGM) mine. The mine, located near Nye, MT, processed more than 400,000 metric tons and biomedical devices. Salient Statistics--United States: 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999e Mine production:1 Platinum 1

51

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

automobile exhaust emissions. Oxidation catalysts are also used in many air pollution abatement processes platinum-group metals (PGM) mine. The mine, located near Nye, MT, processed about 430,000 metric tons--United States: 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998e Mine production: Platinum 1,960 1,590 1,840 2,610 3,5001 Palladium 6

52

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

refining by companies in Texas and Utah. Catalysts for air- pollution abatement continued to be the leading demand sector for PGMs. Catalysts were also used in other air- pollution-abatement processes to remove in kilograms unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The Stillwater and East Boulder Mines

53

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for air-pollution abatement in both light- and heavy-duty vehicles. PGMs are also used in the chemical in kilograms unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The Stillwater and East Boulder Mines in south-central Montana are the only primary platinum-group metals (PGMs) mines in the United States

54

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Automobile catalysts for air pollution abatement continued to be the largest demand sector for PGM of catalysts. Catalysts are also used in other air-pollution-abatement processes to remove organic vapors in kilograms, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The Stillwater Mine is the only primary

55

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Catalysts for air pollution abatement continued to be the leading demand sector for PGMs. In the United of catalytic converters. Catalysts were also used in other air-pollution-abatement processes to remove organic in kilograms unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The Stillwater and East Boulder Mines

56

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of catalysts. Oxidation catalysts are also used in other air-pollution-abatement processes to remove organic in kilograms, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The Stillwater Mine is the only primary platinum-group metals (PGM) producer in the United States. The mine, located near Nye, MT, processed more

57

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

automobile exhaust emissions. Oxidation catalysts are also used in many air pollution abatement processes platinum-group metals (PGM) mine. The mine, located near Nye, MT, processed about 350,000 metric tons--United States: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997e Mine production: Platinum 2,050 1,960 1,590 1,840 2,5002 Palladium 6

58

Biological effects of simple changes in functionality on rhodium metalloinsertors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pyridine-2-yl)amino)ethanol (5a) To a slurry of lithium aluminium hydride (LAH; 1.17g, 30.8mmol, 3.0 equiv...20mg, 0.038mmol) and 5a (17.8mg, 0.082mmol, excess) were dissolved in a 1:1 mixture of ethanol and water...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Biological effects of simple changes in functionality on rhodium metalloinsertors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pyridine-2-yl)amino)acetate (4) was prepared according...chromatography (SiO2, hexane/ethyl acetate=8:2) to give a yellow...ethanol (5a) To a slurry of lithium aluminium hydride (LAH; 1...chromatography (SiO2, hexane/ethyl acetate=1:1) to afford DPAE...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Highly Enantioselective Cycloisomerization of Enynes Catalyzed by Rhodium for the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

raw materials, intermediates, and active ingredients in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, food additives

Zhang, Xumu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

refining. The leading demand sector for PGMs continued to be catalysts to decrease harmful emissions refining sector; and in the fabrication of laboratory equipment. In the electronics sector, PGMs are used toward the middle of the year, then decreased. The slowly recovering global economy in 2010, compared

62

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

refining. The leading demand sector for PGMs continued to be catalysts to decrease harmful emissions refining sector; and in laboratory equipment, including crucibles for growing high-purity single crystals­7708, ploferski@usgs.gov] #12;121 PLATINUM-GROUP METALS Events, Trends, and Issues: The global economy continued

63

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

refining. The leading demand sector for PGMs continued to be catalysts to decrease harmful emissions refining sector; and in laboratory equipment, including crucibles for growing high-purity single crystals-7708, ploferski@usgs.gov] #12;121 PLATINUM-GROUP METALS Events, Trends, and Issues: The global economy continued

64

Mr. Trevor L. Cook NGNP Project Manager NE-33, Germantown Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Area E that exhibited potential for listing. Today, these data could comprise the bulk of the identification phase of cultural resource compliance for any new project...

65

Justifying Practical Reasoning Katie Atkinson and Trevor Bench-Capon and Peter McBurney1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, for example, Nobel Memorial Laureate Amartya Sen has recently argued [9]. In this paper we first discuss some

Grasso, Floriana

66

For Immediate Release --Tuesday, October 14, 2014 Media Advisory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organizer directly. ART NOW ­ Bruce Horak Wednesday, Oct. 15, noon, W570. Contact: Trevor Kenney, 403-329-2710, trevor.kenney@uleth.ca. -- 30 -- Contact: Trevor Kenney, News & Information Manager 403-329-2710 403

Hossain, Shahadat

67

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic pond ecosystems Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Permafrost Salinity Vegetation Arctic... Storage Change P + Gin -(Q + ET + Gout) S Rn - G Le + H 12;Arctic Land Water Cycle: key features Source: Houser, Paul R....

68

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic slope annual Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Permafrost Salinity Vegetation Arctic... Storage Change P + Gin -(Q + ET + Gout) S Rn - G Le + H 12;Arctic Land Water Cycle: key features Source: Houser, Paul R....

69

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ecosystem final Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Permafrost Salinity Vegetation Arctic... Storage Change P + Gin -(Q + ET + Gout) S Rn - G Le + H 12;Arctic Land Water Cycle: key features Source: Houser, Paul R....

70

For Immediate Release --Monday, October 27, 2014 University of Lethbridge highlights for the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 28, 12:15 to 1 p.m., Recital Hall W570 Christie (BMus '00) brings her2020. Contact: Trevor Kenney, 403-329-2582, trevor.kenney@uleth.ca U of L: Trevor Kenney, 403-329-2582, trevor.kenney@uleth.ca Twoonie Theatre ­ Theatre Arts

Hossain, Shahadat

71

News Release | Contact: Nils Nadeau, Communications and Publications Manager | (603) 646-2095 | nils.nadeau@dartmouth.edu Follow the Money  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

illustrated brochure accompanies the exhibition, and art historian Trevor Fairbrother, the guest curator

Lotko, William

72

Argument Based Moderation of Benefit Maya WARDEH, Trevor J.M. BENCH-CAPON and Frans COENEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a high of 65% in New Hampshire to a low of 31% in Texas in 2000 ­ and over time ­ from a high of 52. This is a significant problem both in terms of quality of service and financial loss through over payments. These errors% in 1998 to a low of 29% in 1982.'' Similar observations are made of the UK. An official UK Publication

Atkinson, Katie

73

Open-vocabulary Object Retrieval Sergio Guadarrama, Erik Rodner, Kate Saenko, Ning Zhang, Ryan Farrell, Jeff Donahue and Trevor Darrell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the "Please, select the " a) bottle which is lying down / pepper sauce bottle please / Tabasco / bottle of Tabasco sauce / Tabasco brand sauce / sauce here / Tabasco pepper sauce / red Tabasco sauce / small glass

O'Brien, James F.

74

Characterization and Reaction Studies of Silica Supported Platinum and Rhodium Model Catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at which a chemical reaction approaches equilibrium and does not itself undergo a net chemical change.1 When a catalyst is in a different phase (e.g. solid) than a reactant mixture it is defined as a heterogeneous catalyst. Two types of heterogeneous... concerning the active-nature of the surface. For what reasons, on an atomic level, are surfaces capable of sustaining a reaction and others deactivate? What effect does particle size/structure have on activity and selectivity? Is this an electronic...

Lundwall, Matthew James

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

75

Fundamental Investigation of Oxygen Reduction Reaction on Rhodium Sulfide-Based Chalcogenides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, Department of Chemistry, The George Washington University, Washington, D.C. 20375, De Nora Research and Development Division, 625 East Street, Fairport Harbor, Ohio 44077, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 ... Incorporating the information gathered from these previous studies on Pt-based electrocatalysts, we recently published the first ever communications regarding the spectroscopic observation of the water activation process on a chalcogenide electrocatalyst (30 wt % RhxSy/C, commercially available from De Nora). ... Despite its high level of performance, it is unlikely that RhxSy/C will ever be a viable alternative to Pt-based electrocatalysts in PEMFC or DMFC applications. ...

Joseph M. Ziegelbauer; Daniel Gatewood; Andrea F. Gullá; Maxime J.-F. Guinel; Frank Ernst; David E. Ramaker; Sanjeev Mukerjee

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

76

Csp3–Csp3 Homocoupling Reaction of Benzyl Halides Catalyzed by Rhodium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A highly reactive alkylrhodium complex was formed from Me2Zn and RhCl(PPh3)3 and effectively catalyzed a Csp3–Csp3 homocoupling reaction of benzyl halides. A Csp3–Csp3 coupling reaction using Rh catalyst has not been reported up to now. The reaction ...

Kazuyuki Sato; Yuichi Inoue; Tomohisa Mori; Atsushi Sakaue; Atsushi Tarui; Masaaki Omote; Itsumaro Kumadaki; Akira Ando

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

Efficient Rhodium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation for the Synthesis of a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2003, 42, 913. (3) (a) Halpern, J. Science 1982, 217, 401. (b) Lubell, W. D

Zhang, Xumu

78

Catalytic Arene H/D Exchange with Novel Rhodium and Iridium Complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in sp2 and sp3 C-H bond activation. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Synthesis of bdmpza Complexes. Lithium bis(3 14627, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Three novel pendant acetate complexes, [Rh) acetate, M+ = Li+ , Na+ ), were synthesized. Abstraction of halide from these complexes with silver salts

Jones, William D.

79

Remote Electronic Effects in the Rhodium-Catalyzed Nucleophilic Ring Opening of Oxabenzonorbornadienes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A.C. thanks NSERC for a Summer Scholarship. ... (21)?Tochtermann, W.; Strickler, R.; Klein, H. A.; Biegi, E. Chem. ...

Mark Lautens; Gavin A. Schmid; Anh Chau

2002-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

80

Transition metal oxides deposited on rhodium and platinum: Surface chemistry and catalysis  

SciTech Connect

The surface chemistry and catalytic reactivity of transition metal oxides deposited on Rh and Pt substrates has been examined in order to establish the role of oxide-metal interactions in influencing catalytic activity. The oxides investigated included titanium oxide (TiOx), vanadium oxide (VOx), iron oxide (FeOx), zirconium oxide (ZrOx), niobium oxide (NbOx), tantalum oxide (TaOx), and tungsten oxide (WOx). The techniques used to characterize the sample included AES, XPS, LEED, TPD, ISS, and STM. After characterization of the surface in UHV, the sample was enclosed in an atmospheric reaction cell to measure the influence of the oxide deposits on the catalytic activity of the pure metal for CO and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation. The oxide deposits were found to strongly enhance the reactivity of the Rh foil. The rates of methane formation were promoted by up to 15 fold with the maximum in rate enhancement occurring at oxide coverages of approximately 0.5 ML. TiOx TaOx, and NbOx were the most effective promoters and were stable in the highest oxidation states during both reactions (compared to VOx, WOx, and FeOx). The trend in promoter effectiveness was attributed to the direct relationship between oxidation state and Lewis acidity. Bonding at the metal oxide/metal interface between the oxygen end of adsorbed CO and the Lewis acidic oxide was postulated to facilitate C-O bond dissociation and subsequent hydrogenation. 192 refs.

Boffa, A.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Bifunctional Rhodium Cocatalysts for Photocatalytic Steam Reforming of Methane over Alkaline Titanate  

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Biomethane is one of the possible hydrogen sources. ... (2-9) The PSRM using biomethane can be considered as a sustainable technology for conversion of solar energy into the storable chemical potential of hydrogen. ...

Katsuya Shimura; Hiromasa Kawai; Tomoko Yoshida; Hisao Yoshida

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

82

Greener Hydroformylation with Nanofilterable Rhodium Catalysts in A Stirred Membrane Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydroformylation for producing industrial chemical intermediates such as aldehydes and alcohols from olefinic substrates is a 15 billion lb/year industry and a potential route for increasing the carbon chain of light olefins such as ethylene...

Xie, Zhuanzhuan

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

A Revised Structure and Hydrogen-Bonding System in Cellulose II from a Neutron Fiber Diffraction Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

P. Langan , Y. Nishiyama , and H. Chanzy ... Daisuke Sawada, Yoshiharu Nishiyama, Paul Langan, V. Trevor Forsyth, Satoshi Kimura, and Masahisa Wada ... Daisuke Sawada, Yoshiharu Nishiyama, Paul Langan, V. Trevor Forsyth, Satoshi Kimura, and Masahisa Wada ...

P. Langan; Y. Nishiyama; H. Chanzy

1999-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

84

For immediate release --December 1, 2014 University of Lethbridge highlights for the week of December 1 to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.m., Recital Hall, Room W570 The showcase features select senior music students: Trevor Kenney, 403-329-2710, trevor.kenney@uleth.ca Winter School on Remote Sensing

Hossain, Shahadat

85

Enhanced Oil Recovery to Fuel Future Oil Demands | GE Global...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Fuel Future Oil Demands Enhanced Oil Recovery to Fuel Future Oil Demands Trevor Kirsten 2013.10.02 I'm Trevor Kirsten and I lead a team of GE researchers that investigate a...

86

AN INVITATION TO JOIN The Hood Museum of Art is committed to engaging all  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Cover: Sol LeWitt, Untitled (Brushstrokes), 1993, gouache on paper. Gift of Trevor Fairbrother and John

Myers, Lawrence C.

88

MagLab - Pioneers in Electricity and Magnetism: Walter Brattain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Walter Brattain (1902-1987) Walter Brattain Walter Houser Brattain discovered the photo-effect that occurs at the free surface of a semiconductor and was co-creator of the...

89

A Category-Level 3-D Object Dataset: Putting the Kinect to Work Allison Janoch, Sergey Karayev, Yangqing Jia, Jonathan T. Barron, Mario Fritz, Kate Saenko, Trevor Darrell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Category-Level 3-D Object Dataset: Putting the Kinect to Work Allison Janoch, Sergey Karayev for a chal- lenging category-level 3D object detection dataset to the fore. We review current 3D datasets our dataset of color and depth image pairs, gathered in real domestic and office environ- ments

O'Brien, James F.

90

Synthesis of Ammonium Cyanate and Urea by Reduction of Nitric Oxide on Platinum, Rhodium, and Ruthenium Catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...E.G., RECOVERY OF NITROGEN...FIXATION OF ATMOSPHERIC NITROGEN IN...as NO, the recovery of NO from...pre-vent condensation of solid NH4OCN...through the water-gas shift...results for the recovery of fixed nitrogen...catalyst. Water, 02, and...Presumably, near-atmospheric partial pressures...

R. J. H. VOORHOEVE; L. E. TRIMBLE; D. J. FREED

1978-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

91

Time-Resolved, Sub-Angstrom Imaging of Reversible and Irreversible Conformations in Rhodium Catalysts and Graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transparent samples of graphene and STO, respectively. RE Frhodium catalysts, graphene, reversible and irreversiblerhodium catalyst and a graphene sheet are investigated upon

Kisielowski, Christian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Seedless Polyol Synthesis and CO Oxidation Activity of Monodisperse (111) and (100)-Oriented Rhodium Nanocrystals in Sub-10 nm Sizes  

SciTech Connect

Monodisperse sub-10 nm (6.5 nm) sized Rh nanocrystals with (111) and (100) surface structures were synthesized by a seedless polyol reduction in ethylene glycol, with poly(vinylpyrrolidone) as a capping ligand. When using [Rh(Ac){sub 2}]{sub 2} as the metal precursor, (111)-oriented Rh nanopolyhedra containing 76% (111)-twined hexagons (in 2D projection) were obtained; whereas, when employing RhCl{sub 3} as the metal precursor in the presence of alkylammonium bromide, such as tetramethylammonium bromide and trimethyl(tetradecyl)ammonium bromide, (100)-oriented Rh nanocubes were obtained with 85% selectivity. The {l_brace}100{r_brace} faces of the Rh nanocrystals are stabilized by chemically adsorbed Br{sup -} ions from alkylammonium bromides, which led to (100)-oriented nanocubes. Monolayer films of the (111)-oriented Rh nanopolyhedra and (100)-oriented Rh nanocubes were deposited on silicon wafers in a Langmuir-Blodgett trough to make model 2D nanoarray catalysts. These nanocatalysts were active for CO oxidation by O{sub 2}, and the turnover frequency was independent of nanoparticle shape, consistent with that previously observed for Rh(111) and Rh(100) single crystals.

Zhang, Yawen; Grass, Michael E.; Huang, Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Rhodium Catalysts in the Oxidation of CO by O2 and NO: Shape, Composition, and Hot Electron Generation  

SciTech Connect

It is well known that the activity, selectivity, and deactivation behavior of heterogeneous catalysts are strongly affected by a wide variety of parameters, including but not limited to nanoparticle size, shape, composition, support, pretreatment conditions, oxidation state, and electronic state. Enormous effort has been expended in an attempt to understand the role of these factors on catalytic behavior, but much still remains to be discovered. In this work, we have focused on deepening the present understanding of the role of nanoparticle shape, nanoparticle composition, and hot electrons on heterogeneous catalysis in the oxidation of carbon monoxide by molecular oxygen and nitric oxide. These reactions were chosen because they are important for environmental applications, such as in the catalytic converter, and because there is a wide range of experimental and theoretical insight from previous single crystal work as well as experimental data on nanoparticles obtained using new state-of-the-art techniques that aid greatly in the interpretation of results on complex nanoparticle systems. In particular, the studies presented in this work involve three types of samples: {approx} 6.5 nm Rh nanoparticles of different shapes, {approx} 15 nm Rh1-xPdx core-shell bimetallic polyhedra nanoparticles, and Rh ultra-thin film ({approx} 5 nm) catalytic nanodiodes. The colloidal nanoparticle samples were synthesized using a co-reduction of metal salts in alcohol and supported on silicon wafers using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. This synthetic strategy enables tremendous control of nanoparticle size, shape, and composition. Nanoparticle shape was controlled through the use of different organic polymer capping layers. Bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by careful choice of metal salt precursors. Rh/TiO{sub x} and Rh/GaN catalytic nanodiodes were fabricated using a variety of thin film device fabrication techniques, including reactive DC magnetron sputtering, electron beam evaporation, and rapid thermal annealing. The combination of these techniques enabled control of catalytic nanodiode morphology, geometry, and electrical properties.

Renzas, James R.

2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

94

Influence of Ceria and Nickel Addition to Alumina-Supported Rhodium Catalyst for Propane Steam Reforming at Low Temperatures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work aims to develop a fundamental understanding of the catalyst composition-structure-activity relationships for propane steam reforming over supported Rh catalysts. The work investigates the… (more)

Li, Yan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

HYDROGENATION OF CO AND CO ON CLEAN RHODIUM AND IRON FOILS. CORRELATIONS OF REACTIVITIES AND SURFACE COMPOSITIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This apparatus permitted both UHV surface characterization (range while maintaining UHV in the bell jar. An external gasto the surface during +6 UHV cleaning procedures. The metal

Dwyer, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

ENTHALPIES OF FORMATION OF NEGATIVE IONS MnO , MnO , AND MnO AS DETERMINED BY ION-MOLECULE EQUILIBRIA METHOD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

orifice. The temperature was measured with a platinum/(platinum-rhodium 10%) thermocouple, the accuracy

Rudnyi, Evgenii B.

97

For Immediate Release --Wednesday, April 9, 2014 Advisory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.m. at the Davis GMC Buick dealership, at the intersection of Crowsnest Trail and W.T. Hill of Management 403-329-2019 403-329-2163 (cell) zyna.taylor@uleth.ca Trevor Kenney, News & Information Manager 403-329-2710 #12;403-360-7639 (cell) trevor.kenney@uleth.ca #12;

Seldin, Jonathan P.

98

For Immediate Release --Wednesday, May 28, 2014 Advisory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prior to the start of the ceremony in room W565 (8:30 a.m. for morning UNews at http://www.uleth.ca/unews/ -- 30 -- Contact: Trevor Kenney, News & Information Manager 403-329-2710 403-360-7639 (cell) trevor.kenney

Seldin, Jonathan P.

99

Analysis of the IR-spectral behavior of adsorbed CO formed in H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ surface interaction over supported rhodium  

SciTech Connect

The interaction of hydrogen and carbon dioxide has been investigated by means of infrared spectroscopy on alumina-supported Rh of different crystallite sizes produced by reduction at 573-1173 K with a view to explaining the infrared spectrum of the adsorbed CO produced which is basically different from that observed following CO adsorption on the same samples. It appeared that the adsorbed CO formed on CO/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ adsorption did not lead to the formation of gem-dicarbonyl, i.e., to disruption of the Rh-Rh bond. This behavior is attributed to the presence of adsorbed hydrogen and to the formation of Rh carbonyl hydride, which prevents the disruptive effect of adsorbed CO.

Solymosi, F.; Pasztor, M.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Studies of the coadsorption of deuterium and carbon monoxide with silver on rhodium and the adsorption of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene on clean and carbon covered platinum  

SciTech Connect

Ag adsorbed on Rh(100) is presented as a model of the corresponding bimetallic catalyst. Ag overlayer growth follows the Frank-Van der Merwe growth mechanism at 300 K and the Stranski-Krastanov growth mechanism at 640 K. Ag(3d) binding energies are found to track the vacuum level rather than the Fermi level. The results of D/sub 2/ and CO adsorption studies on Ag/Rh(100) show that adsorbed Ag does not significantly alter the properties of adjacent D/sub 2/ or CO adsorption sites on the Rh(100) surface. The desorption and decomposition of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) on clean and carbon covered Pt(111) is also reported. No evidence for TNT decomposition on the carbon covered surface is found. Molecular TNT desorption kinetics at low coverage are first order, yielding an activation energy of 16.7 +/- 1 Kcal/mol and a preexponential factor of 2.3 x 10/sup 11/ (x e/sup - + 0.5/) sec/sup -1/. TNT adsorbed on the clean Pt(111) surface at submonolayer coverages undergoes almost complete decomposition during heating. The major decomposition products are H/sub 2/O, NO, CO/sub 2/, CO, HCN, and a carbon residue left on the surface. TNT adsorbed in the second and higher monolayers desorbs molecularly. The significance of these results in understanding the performance of a commercial explosive vapor preconcentrator is discussed.

Peebles, H.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Surface structure of coadsorbed benzene and carbon monoxide on the rhodium(111) single crystal analyzed with low-energy electron diffraction intensities  

SciTech Connect

The first structural analysis of a molecular coadsorbate system is presented. Mutual reordering and site shifting are found to occur for benzene and CO coadsorbed in a (/sub 13//sup 31/) lattice on Rh(111). This low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) intensity analysis yields the first confirmed hollow-site adsorption of CO on a single-crystal metal surface, with a C-O bond length expanded by 0.06 +/- 0.05 A from the gas phase. The flat-lying benzene is found centered over hcp-type hollow sites with a strong Kekule-type distortion: C-C bond lengths alternate between 1.33 +/- 0.15 A (hydrogen positions were not determined). This suggests the possibility of a 1,3,5-cyclohexatriene species being formed. The Rh-C bond length is 2.35 +/- 0.05 A for benzene and 2.16 +/- 0.04 A for CO.

Van Hove, M.A.; Lin, R.F.; Somorjai, G.A.

1986-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

102

Photoelectron spectra and molecular orbital calculations of dicarbonyl- and dinitrosyl-bridged cobalt, rhodium and iridium cyclopentadienyl dimers and of disulfido- and diselenido-nonacarbonyltriosmium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the metal 1 fracments are responsible for nearly all of the Os-Os and Os-X (X=S, Se) bonds in the cluster. Gas-phase, ultraviolet photoelectron spectra and molecular orbital calculations are also reported for Cp*2M2(s-CO)2 (Cp*=C5(CH3)5, M=Co, Rh, lr...) and Cp2M2(u-NO)2 (Cp=C5H5, M=Co, Rh). Comparison between series of calculations and series of spectra enable us to reassign the "frontier" region of the spectra as well as more thoroughly assign the "metal" and "cyclopentadienyl" regions...

Griewe, Greg Lewis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

103

Tridentate Phosphine Linkers for Immobilized Catalysts: Development and Characterization of Immobilized Rhodium Complexes and Solid-State NMR Studies of Polymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) polymers. 13C CP/MAS (cross polarization with magic angle spinning) NMR and IR spectroscopy reveal that PEEK polymers show no detectable chemical change on the molecular level, while PPS polymers display signs of oxidation of the thioether group...

Guenther, Johannes 1983-

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

104

Impact of Prior Seasonal H3N2 Influenza Vaccination or Infection on Protection and Transmission of Emerging Variants of Influenza A(H3N2)v Virus in Ferrets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Emerging Variants of Influenza A(H3N2)v Virus in Ferrets Katherine V. Houser a b Melissa B. Pearce a Jacqueline M. Katz a Terrence...infection. J. Virol. 75 :5141-5150. 21. Harvey, R , JX Wheeler, CL Wallis, JS Robertson, and OG Engelhardt. 2008. Quantitation...

Katherine V. Houser; Melissa B. Pearce; Jacqueline M. Katz; Terrence M. Tumpey

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

105

Gordon Research Conferences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Dong Zhang / Yunping Xi) Self Cleaning...Castro Borges / Xinyu Jin) Dimension Stability...Mechanoelectrical Signals (Ping Chen / Ebenezer Yamoah...Steve Houser, PeiPei Ping / Dietmar Kappes...Regeneration (Yishi Jin / Barris Bingol...Kathryn Wahl / Jian Ping Gong / David Burris...

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

106

For Immediate Release --Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014 Advisory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.m. in the University Theatre (W500). Following this presentation, attendees will head Kenney, News & Information Manager 403-329-2710 403-360-7639 (cell) #12;trevor.kenney

Hossain, Shahadat

107

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 3  

SciTech Connect

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 3 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 2  

SciTech Connect

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 2 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 1  

SciTech Connect

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 1 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 4  

SciTech Connect

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 4 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

SeasonBro 82608.indd 1 8/26/08 9:36:08 AM Special Events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sound by Vincent Olivieri Lights by Lonnie Alcaraz Eli Simon, director Claire Trevor Theatre, 4 pm & 7pm Christmas shopping with auction treasures, including theater posters, costume pieces, props, theater

Loudon, Catherine

112

Acknowledgment of Reviewers, 2013  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Price Nathan Price P. Price Samantha Price T. Douglas Price Trevor Price Imants Priede Avi Priel Ivan...Winterton Jakob Winther Douglas Winton John Wiseman Jan Wit Kimberly With Walter Witke Owen Witte Tarynn Witten Alfred...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

11:15 AMERICAN DIPLOMACY IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY Shannon Noble, From a French Responsibility to a Strategic Center in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11:15 ­AMERICAN DIPLOMACY IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY Shannon Noble, From a French Responsibility. Patrick Mobley, Disease, Rhetoric, and Action: Cholera in Detroit, 1832 and 1834 Trevor Broad, A Forgotten

Edwards, Paul N.

114

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 3  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 3 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, 2012 Robert.Smith@lex.doe.gov Eco Fair Blends Fun and Facts for Paducah Area Middle Schoolers PADUCAH, KY - Lone Oak Middle School student Trevor Tilley was impressed with a 3 rd...

116

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 1  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 1 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Enhanced Oil Recovery Affects the Future Energy Mix | GE Global...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Affects the Future Energy Mix Enhanced Oil Recovery Affects the Future Energy Mix Trevor Kirsten 2012.11.19 One of the fascinating things about my job is contemplating questions...

118

A comparison between weather simulated within the Erosion/Productivity Impact Calculator (EPIC) and observed data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A COMPARISON BETWEEN WEATHER SIMULATEDWITHINTHE EROSION/PRODUCTIVITY IMPACT CALCULATOR (EPIC) AND OBSERVED DATA A Thesis by TREVOR W. R. WALLIS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1992 Major Subject: Meteorology A COMPARISON BETWEEN WEATHER SIMULATED WITHIN THE EROSION/PRODUCTIVITY IMPACT CALCULATOR (EPIC) AND OBSERVED DATA A Thesis by TREVOR W. R. WALLIS Approved...

Wallis, Trevor W.R

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

119

Estimation of aboveground biomass and inorganic nutrient content of a 25-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ESTIMATION OF ABOVEGROUND BIOMASS AND INORGANIC NUTRIENT CONTENT OF A 25-YEAR-OLD LOBLOLLY PINE (PINUS TAEDA L. ) PLANTATION A Thesis by JAMES NELSON MOUSER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August lqBO Major Si bject: Forestry ESTIMATION OF ABOVEGROUND BIOMASS AND INORGANIC NUTRIENT CONTENT OF A 25-YEAR-OLD LOBLOLLY PINE (PINUS TAEDA L. ) PLANTATION A Thesis by JAMES NELSON HOUSER Approved...

Houser, James Nelson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Influence of pyridine and compounds of vanadium, iron, and molybdenum on the carbonylation of azo and nitro compounds in the presence of RhCl3-4H2O  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rhodium trichloride tetrahydrate without promoters catalyzes the synthesis of isocyanates by the carbonylation of azobenzenes. Pyridine, compounds of vanadium, molybdenum, and iron acetylacetonate inhibit this re...

V. I. Manov-Yuvenskii; K. B. Petrovskii…

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Isolated Palladium Atoms Allow Highly-Selective Catalysis of...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

or alloys based on platinum, palladium (Pd), rhodium, andor ruthenium. To reduce the cost and potentially increase reactivity, BES-funded researchers at Tufts University coated...

122

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional catalysts include Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

supports Summary: oxygenates over Rh- based catalysts, mainly on the effects of different additives and supports... . The addition of a very small amount of iron to rhodium...

123

Journal Article: Real-time sub-Ĺngstrom imaging of reversible...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

imaging of reversible and irreversible conformations in rhodium catalysts and graphene Citation Details Title: Real-time sub-ngstrom imaging of reversible and...

124

Experimental Investigation of Burnup Credit for Safe Transport, Storage, and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report describes criticality benchmark experiments containing rhodium that were conducted as part of a Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Research Initiative project. Rhodium is an important fission product absorber. A capability to perform critical experiments with low-enriched uranium fuel was established as part of the project. Ten critical experiments, some containing rhodium and others without, were conducted. The experiments were performed in such a way that the effects of the rhodium could be accurately isolated. The use of the experimental results to test neutronics codes is demonstrated by example for two Monte Carlo codes. These comparisons indicate that the codes predict the behavior of the rhodium in the critical systems within the experimental uncertainties. The results from this project, coupled with the results of follow-on experiments that investigate other fission products, can be used to quantify and reduce the conservatism of spent nuclear fuel safety analyses while still providing the necessary level of safety.

Harms, Gary A.; Helmick, Paul H.; Ford, John T.; Walker, Sharon A.; Berry, Donald T.; Pickard, Paul S.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

METHODS ARTICLE published: 06 January 2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for building large-scale functional brain models Trevor Bekolay*, James Bergstra , Eric Hunsberger, Travis De for Theoretical Neuroscience, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada Edited by: Andrew P. Davison, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France Reviewed by: Marc De Kamps, University of Leeds, UK Ján

Anderson, Charles H.

126

PRESENTED BY: UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Year' by USA Today and Discover magazine. Trevor spent two years working as a commercial lobster `Nick' Shay will speak about oceanic `fuel injectors,' the sea surface temperature and other atmospheric of hurricane damage and what really occurs. Dr. Brian Soden will discuss the ongoing debate about whether

Miami, University of

127

Formal Type Soundness for Cyclone's Region System Dan Grossman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management of Cyclone and its static typing discipline. The design incorporates several advance- mentsFormal Type Soundness for Cyclone's Region System Dan Grossman Greg Morrisett Trevor Jim Mike Hicks Yanling Wang James Cheney November 2001 Abstract Cyclone is a polymorphic, type-safe programming language

Hicks, Michael

128

Grobner Basis Representations of Sudoku Elizabeth Arnold, Stephen Lucas, and Laura Taalman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is currently an associate professor at James Madison University, and is a recipient of the MAA Trevor Evans at College Park in 2000. She is currently an assistant professor at James Madison University. Her research is currently an associate professor at James Madison University, after a postdoc at Harvard and a faculty

Arnold, Elizabeth A.

129

MG Documents Created By: Kath Evans on 20/07/99 at 15:50  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(ons) MG Documents Created By: Kath Evans on 20/07/99 at 15:50 Public Title: MQ057 Model Quality. In particular we would like to mention Tim Jones, Anita Ullberg, Jeff Evans, Trevor Fenton, Jonathan Gough, Dan Hedlin, Sue Hibbitt, and Steve James, and we would also like to thank all the other people who have been

Draper, David

130

A role in running UK science?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...top priority. The new Science Minister after the October...Copley Medal before taking office, and the remaining two...sympathy with applied science. Trevor I. Williams...Comptroller) in 1962, died in office in 1976. Uniquely for...existence of a Minister for Science, most scientific agencies...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

DEAN'S LIST HONORABLE MENTION Fall Semester 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Renner, David Rieffer, Ariel Rimsza, Jessica M. Ringle, James Michael Rodack, Alexander T. Rodriguez Nicole Hines, Brian James Holmes, Joshua Durell Hooten, Ashlyn R. Hottenstein, John David Husseini, Trevor Ippolito, Vincent James Ireson, Thomas C. Jacob, Gregory Benjamin Jang, Dong Min Johnson, Casey

Wong, Pak Kin

132

For Immediate Release --Friday, February 28, 2014 Advisory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engagements on Wednesday, Mar. 5 (12 p.m. in W570 and 6 p.m. in PE264). All.m. - The Ten Grandmothers Project ~ Dr. Linda Many Guns NAS W570 12 p -- 30 -- Contact: Trevor Kenney, News & Information Manager 403

Seldin, Jonathan P.

133

Herpetological Bulletin [2012] -Number 120 1 ReseaRch aRticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but water frogs (mostly Pelophylax lessonae) were apparently unaffected. On two occasions male pool frogs amphibian populations TREVOR BEEBEE Amphibian and Reptile Conservation, 655A Christchurch Rd, Boscombe numbers were reduced by >80%. Common toads Bufo bufo decreased by perhaps 20% whereas pool frogs

Gray, Matthew

134

Diversification and the adaptive radiation of the vangas of Madagascar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...We also thank Associate Editor Trevor Price, Per Alstrom, and an anonymous reviewer...10.1098/rspb.1997.0094 ) 22 Wit, M. J. 2003 Madagascar: heads it's...54 Phillimore, A. B. , and T. D. Price 2008 Density-dependent cladogenesis...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Green University Planning Committee Page 1/2 Minutes November17, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Green University Planning Committee Page 1/2 Minutes November17, 2011 Green University Planning-Noel, PGPIRG Trevor Fuson, CUPE Regrets: George Iwama, President David Claus, Energy Manager Daniel Ryan, Dean/C Bell) NEW BUSINESS: 3. New Members: Alumni, Sarah Foot and Grad Student, Raman Deep Kaur ­ D Smyth

Owens, Philip

136

REUNION COMMITTEE Laura L. DePaoli  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLASS OFFICERS President Benjamin Hellweg Vice President Julia R. Greer Secretary Amy R. Grayson Trevor Stricker REUNION GIFT COCHAIRS Tara Fernando Bishop Gary Brackenridge Eileen M. Tanghal February activities just for our class: Friday will be a smart-casual extended happy hour in the R&D Commons. Saturday

Williams, Brian C.

137

The data processing pipeline for the Herschel/SPIRE Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The data processing pipeline for the Herschel/SPIRE Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer Trevor R the data processing pipeline to generate calibrated data products from the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer. The pipeline processes telemetry from SPIRE point

Naylor, David A.

138

MPH Program Student Writing Tutorial: Part II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seminar Work on title page and abstract 19 Test for Class B Complete title page and abstract 20 Complete _____________________________________ Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed. Thur. Fri. Sat. 1 Work on article Bowling with Trevor and Lilly 2 Work Soccer Lunch with Mr. Smith Think about potential paper topic 4 Work Think about potential paper topic 5 Work

139

Permission to make digital or hard copies of all or part of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies are  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

large size and high numbers of ports result in slow access and high energy dissipation. Figure 1 shows the effects of size and number of ports on access time, energy, and area for 128­, and 256­entry register Register Ports Using Delayed Write­Back Queues And Operand Pre­Fetch Nam Sung Kim and Trevor Mudge Advanced

Mudge, Trevor

140

Permission to make digital or hard copies of all or part of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies are  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

large size and high numbers of ports result in slow access and high energy dissipation. Figure 1 shows the effects of size and number of ports on access time, energy, and area for 128-, and 256-entry register Register Ports Using Delayed Write-Back Queues And Operand Pre-Fetch Nam Sung Kim and Trevor Mudge Advanced

Mudge, Trevor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Flame Photometric Detection of Metal Chelates Separated by Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......from carbon tetra- chloride. Iron (III) hexafluoroacetyl...necessary for certain other acetylacetonate derivatives by Ross (13...mixture of chromium (III), iron (III) , and rhodium (III...chosen so that the chromium and iron chelates would be eluted to......

R. S. Juvet; R. P. Durbin

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

CONTINUATION REQUEST SUBMITTED TO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a trispyrazolylborate-rhodium complex; (2) we have for the first time determined the isotope effects on the specific discovered new C-H and C-C functionalizations that allow introduction of reactive boronate and olefin

Jones, William D.

143

PROJECT SUMMARY REPORT submitted to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a trispyrazolylborate-rhodium complex; (2) we have for the first time determined the isotope effects on the specific discovered new C-H and C-C functionalizations that allow introduction of reactive boronate and olefin

Jones, William D.

144

Syntheses and applications of soluble polyisobutylene (PIB)-supported transition metal catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................. 34 Catalyst Recovery in Self-Separating Systems .............................. 39 Fluorous/Organic Biphasic Catalysis............................................. 41 Polymer-Supported Catalysts in Ionic Liquids... ................................................................................. 45 Results and Discussion................................................................. 51 Conclusions.................................................................................. 60 III POLYISOBUTYLENE-SUPPORTED RHODIUM...

Tian, Jianhua

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

NAS-NS-3008[Rev.) NUCLEARSCIENCESERIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory FL P. Schuman Atomic Ensrgy Division Phillips Petroleum Company (Idaho Fall&) A. W. Fairhrdl E. P Massachusetts Institute of Technology #12;Radiochemistry of Rhodium James C. Armstrong, Jr. Florida State i

146

ONE-DIMENSIONAL PSEUDO-HOMOGENEOUS PACKED BED REACTOR MODELING INCLUDING NO-CO KINETICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the chemical species and energy equations for dynamically incompressible flow in one-dimension. Furthermore, the chemical kinetics on the reduction reaction of nitric oxide by carbon monoxide over rhodium-alumina and platinum-alumina catalysts is investigated...

Srinivasan, Anand

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

Chemistry of Bimetallic Linked Cyclopentadienyl Complexes: Progress Report, 1 December 1986 --30 November 1989  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Research continued on the chemistry and preparation of bimetallic cyclopentadienyl complexes containing up to two tungsten or one tungsten and a cobalt, rhodium, or ruthenium. The general method for preparation and analysis of polyenes is also discussed. (CBS)

Schrock, R. R.

1989-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

148

Inspection Report: INS-L-12-04 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Inspection Report: INS-L-12-04 June 22, 2012 Alleged Procurement and Hiring Practice Irregularities within the Office of Policy and International Affairs The Office of Policy and International Affairs (PI) has primary responsibility for the Department of Energy's international energy activities including international emergency management, national security and international cooperation in science and technology. To accomplish its mission, PI has contracts with various subject matter experts such as Rhodium Group, LLC (Rhodium). Rhodium combines policy experience, quantitative economic tools and research to analyze global trends. The Rhodium contract, valued at approximately $992,000, was executed in September 2010, as a 2-year contract. The Office of Inspector General received a complaint alleging inappropriate

149

The research bench meets industry: New facility scales up production of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Video: Scenes from Argonne's Materials Engineering Research Facility Video: Scenes from Argonne's Materials Engineering Research Facility Scenes from Argonne's Materials Engineering Research Facility Experiments can keep researchers on their feet all day long. Process R&D chemist Kris Pupek moves between fume hoods in the Materials Engineering Research Facility's process research and development lab, while lab-mate Trevor Dzwiniel records data in his notebook. Experiments can keep researchers on their feet all day long. Process R&D chemist Kris Pupek moves between fume hoods in the Materials Engineering Research Facility's process research and development lab, while lab-mate Trevor Dzwiniel records data in his notebook. Argonne material engineer YoungHo Shin prepares a coin cell battery in a glovebox in the Materials Engineering Research Facility. Once it is prepared, the battery can be tested to determine the energy output characteristics of a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries.

150

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Change Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

four data sets from the Carbon four data sets from the Carbon Dynamics and Nutrient Dynamics science themes, components of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO CD-36 South American Land Data Assimilation System Atmospheric Forcing Data . Data set prepared by L.G.G. de Goncalves, W.J. Shuttleworth, D. Vila, E. Larroza, M.J. Bottino, D.L. Herdies, J.A. Aravequia, J.G. de Mattos, D.L. Toll, M. Rodell and P. Houser. This data set provides South American Land Data Assimilation System (SALDAS) atmospheric forcing data necessary for land surface modeling for South America. The data were derived by combining modeled and observation based sources.The forcing data cover the entire continent of South America at 0.125 degree resolution and are built around the model-calculated values of

151

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Critical Evaluation of the ICARUS Portion of the ISCCP Simulator Using ARM Critical Evaluation of the ICARUS Portion of the ISCCP Simulator Using ARM Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mace, G., Utah State University Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Mace GG, S Houser, S Benson, SA Klein, and QL Min. 2011. "Critical evaluation of the ISCCP simulator using ground-based remote sensing data." Journal of Climate, 24(6), doi:10.1175/2010JCLI3517.1. Figure 1. Comparison of actual cloud top pressure from ARM remote sensors compared to ISCCP (top) and after the ICARUS algorithm has been used to convert the measured cloud top pressures to ISCCP-like quantities (bottom). Figure 2. Comparison of various measures of optical depth. Top left shows

152

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data from DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Allows Evaluation Data from DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Allows Evaluation of Surface Models Submitter: Robock, A., Rutgers University Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Robock, A., Luo, L., Wood, E. F., Wen, F., Mitchell, K. E., Houser, P. R., Schaake, J. C., Lohmann, D., Cosgrove, B., Sheffield, J., Duan, Q., Higgins, R. W., Pinker, R. T., Tarpley, J. D., Basara, J. D., Crawford, K. C., Evaluation of the North American Land Data Assimilation System over the Southern Great Plains during the warm season, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D22), 8846, doi:10.1029/2002JD003245, 2003 An example of the model discrepancies is shown in a comparison of monthly mean diurnal cycle data from July 1999 at the ARM Southern Great Plains

153

Synthesis, chemical bonding and physical properties of RERhB{sub 4} (RE=Y, Dy-Lu)  

SciTech Connect

The compounds of rare-earth metals with rhodium and boron RERhB{sub 4} (RE=Y, Dy-Lu) crystallize with the orthorhombic structure type YCrB{sub 4} (space group Pbam, Pearson symbol oP24). The crystal structures of the compounds with RE=Y, Er, Tm and Yb were refined by using single-crystal diffraction data. Analysis of chemical bonding for YRhB{sub 4} and YbRhB{sub 4} was performed by electron localizability indicator and by calculation of quantum chemical charges (quantum theory of atoms in molecules). Boron and rhodium form the 3-D polyanion containing planar nets of three-bonded boron atoms interconnected by rhodium along [001]. The interaction of the RE species with the rhodium-boron polyanion is predominantly ionic. Magnetic susceptibility data of TmRhB{sub 4} and YbRhB{sub 4} showed that the RE species are in 4f{sup 12} (Tm) and 4f{sup 13} (Yb) electronic states, respectively. In the low-temperature region, the specific heat revealed a Schottky anomaly for TmRhB{sub 4} while an antiferromagnetic transition is observed at 3.5 K for YbRhB{sub 4}. X-ray absorption measurement at the Yb L{sub III} edge for YbRhB{sub 4} reveals the 4f{sup 13} state of ytterbium. - Graphical abstract: The compounds of rare-earth metals with rhodium and boron RERhB{sub 4} (RE=Y, Dy-Lu) crystallize with the orthorhombic structure type YCrB{sub 4}. Analysis of chemical bonding for YRhB{sub 4} and YbRhB{sub 4} was performed by electron localizability indicator and by calculation of quantum chemical charges (quantum theory of atoms in molecules). Boron and rhodium form the 3-D polyanion containing planar nets of three-bonded boron atoms interconnected by rhodium along [001]. The interaction of the RE species with the rhodium-boron polyanion is predominantly ionic.

Veremchuk, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Mori, T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Prots, Yu.; Schnelle, W.; Leithe-Jasper, A.; Kohout, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Grin, Yu. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: grin@cpfs.mpg.de

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Thin film solar energy collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-layer solar energy collector of improved stability comprising: (1) a substrate of quartz, silicate glass, stainless steel or aluminum-containing ferritic alloy; (2) a solar absorptive layer comprising silver, copper oxide, rhodium/rhodium oxide and 0-15% by weight of platinum; (3) an interlayer comprising silver or silver/platinum; and (4) an optional external anti-reflective coating, plus a method for preparing a thermally stable multi-layered solar collector, in which the absorptive layer is undercoated with a thin film of silver or silver/platinum to obtain an improved conductor-dielectric tandem.

Aykan, Kamran (Monmouth Beach, NJ); Farrauto, Robert J. (Westfield, NJ); Jefferson, Clinton F. (Millburn, NJ); Lanam, Richard D. (Westfield, NJ)

1983-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

155

Brnsted Acid Catalyzed Addition of Phenols, Carboxylic Acids, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and often toxic metal catalysts, including pal- ladium,2 rhodium,3 ruthenium,4 lanthanides,5 main group-scale applications of these reactions and often generates heavy metal impurities in the product. Direct use of simple addition methods and is an alternative to metal-catalyzed reactions. Nucleophilic addition of phenols

He, Chuan

156

The Structure and Chemistry of Solid Surfaces The structure of solid surfaces and the chemical reactions that take place on surfaces are of fundamental  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as platinum or rhodium and the key chemical reactions involved in the removal of pollutants such as carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, and nitrogen oxides, take place on the surfaces of the metal particles. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1. Y. Lei, A. Uhl, C. Becker, K. Wandelt, B. C. Gates, R. Meyer, and M. Trenary, "Adsorption

Ben-Arie, Jezekiel

157

0-600 kev Gamma-Ray Spectra from Thermal Neutron Capture in the Region A=104 to 198  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energies and absolute intensities of prominent peaks in the 0-600 kev region of the gamma-ray spectrum following thermal neutron capture have been measured with a single NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometer. The elements investigated were rhodium, silver, cadmium, indium, antimony, tellurium, iodine, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, hafnium, tantalum, rhenium, iridium, platinum, and gold.

James E. Draper

1959-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Hybrid density functional calculations of the defect properties of ZnO:Rh and ZnO:Ir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-type material is essential to be able to manufacture optoelectronic devices with p-n junctions. A new class of p-type zinc oxides with rhodium[5] or iridium[6] has attracted attention recently due to some re- markable features of their electronic structure...

Muńoz Ramo, David; Bristowe, Paul D.

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

This is an author-deposited version published in: http://oatao.univ-toulouse.fr/ Eprints ID: 6179  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concentrations of substrates in the catalytic phase as required by this kinetic modeling, solubility measurements-Lebigue, Carine and Delmas, Henri (2011) Kinetics of hydroformylation of 1-octene in ionic liquid-organic biphasic-oatao@listes.diff.inp-toulouse.fr #12;Kinetics of hydroformylation of 1-octene in ionic liquid-organic biphasic media using rhodium

Mailhes, Corinne

160

DOI: 10.1002/adsc.201000585 Synthesis, Immobilization, MAS and HR-MAS NMR of a New  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on silica with their phosphonium moieties via electro- static interactions, and their mobility and leaching- vents. Immobilized Wilkinson-type rhodium com- plexes have been obtained by ligand exchange nanoparticles Introduction Catalysts immobilized on solid supports are of grow- ing academic and industrial

Bluemel, Janet

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

The production of higher alcohols from syngas using potassium promoted Co/Mo/A12O3 and Rh/Co/Mo/A12O3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The optimized compositions K(4.9)/Co(2.7)/Mo(6.4)/A1203(gamma) and K(1.2)/ Rh(1.1)/Co(0.6)/Mo(5.7)/A1203(gamma) are both productive catalysts for higher alcohols. The incorporation of rhodium into the K/Co/Mo/A12

D. A. Storm

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Journal of Catalysis 191, 237244 (2000) doi:10.1006/jcat.1999.2793, available online at http://www.idealibrary.com on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

line shape to that of transition metal carbides (15). Commonly formed at low coverages, carbidic carbon. On several metal surfaces, it is consistently found that carbonaceous com- pounds appear in carbidic production, on a vari- ety of metals including nickel, platinum, palladium, ruthe- nium, and rhodium

Sibener, Steven

163

Cold fusion research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cold fusion research ... Eugene Mallove (C&EN, Feb. 10, page 2) accuses Trevor Pinch and me of "arrogant misunderstanding of cold fusion research/' Casting his net further, he then accuses the scientific establishment and some science media of "arrogant dismissal" of a "new phenomenon of unparalleled signficance," because we regard it as "a priori impossible." ... The latter, at least, is untrue, as should be apparent to anyone who read even the first three pages of 'Too Hot to Handle," where I wrote, 'liven though intuitive[ ly we felt] that [cold fusion] was too far-fetched to be real, nonetheless it had to be checked." ...

FRANK E. CLOSE

1992-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

164

Draft Minutes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meeting Meeting April 21, 2008 Crystal City Marriott Hotel Arlington, Virginia Committee Members Participating William Martin, Chair Brew Barron Daniel Ponemaan Thomas Cochran Burton Richter Michael Corradini Allen Sessoms Marvin Fertel Kunihiko Uematsu Susan Ion Committee Member Absent Neil Todreas Other Participants: John Boger, Designated Federal Official, Office of Nuclear Energy, USDOE Nancy Carder, Medical University of South Carolina, Support Staff Trevor Cook, Office of Nuclear Energy, USDOE Phillip Finck, Associate Director, Idaho National Laboratory Shane Johnson, Director, Office of Nuclear Energy, USDOE Paul Kearns, Battelle Memorial Institute Paul Lisowski, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Fuel Cycle Development, USDOE

165

The Decay of Rh104m (4.3 Min) and Rh104 (44 Sec)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The radiations of neutron-activated rhodium are studied with 180° constant field conversion electron spectrometers and a gamma-ray scintillation spectrometer. Internal conversion electrons are observed to be associated with the 4.3-minute activity. These are interpreted as arising from two isomeric transitions of 51.1±0.2 and 77.2±0.2 kev in rhodium. By coincidence studies these two transitions are shown to be in cascade. The character of the radiations, as determined from the KL ratios and lifetime considerations, appears to be M1 and E3, respectively. Additional gamma-rays of energy 550±10 kev and ?1.2 Mev (weak) are observed with the scintillation spectrometer. The 550-kev transition is associated with both the 44-second and the 4.3-minute periods and is assumed to follow the beta-decay and hence be in Pd104.

W. C. Jordan; J. M. Cork; S. B. Burson

1953-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Platinum Group Thiophenoxyimine Complexes: Syntheses,Crystallographic and Computational Studies of Structural Properties  

SciTech Connect

Monomeric thiosalicylaldiminate complexes of rhodium(I) and iridium(I) were prepared by ligand transfer from the homoleptic zinc(II) species. In the presence of strongly donating ligands, the iridium complexes undergo insertion of the metal into the imine carbon-hydrogen bond. Thiophenoxyketimines were prepared by non-templated reaction of o-mercaptoacetophenone with anilines, and were complexed with rhodium(I), iridium(I), nickel(II) and platinum(II). X-ray crystallographic studies showed that while the thiosalicylaldiminate complexes display planar ligand conformations, those of the thiophenoxyketiminates are strongly distorted. Results of a computational study were consistent with a steric-strain interpretation of the difference in preferred ligand geometries.

Krinsky, Jamin L.; Arnold, John; Bergman, Robert G.

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

167

Studies of Immobilized Homogeneous Metal Catalysts on Silica Supports  

SciTech Connect

The tethered, chiral, chelating diphosphine rhodium complex, which catalyzes the enantioselective hydrogenation of methyl-{alpha}-acetamidocinnamate (MAC), has the illustrated structure as established by {sup 31}P NMR and IR studies. Spectral and catalytic investigations also suggest that the mechanism of action of the tethered complex is the same as that of the untethered complex in solution. The rhodium complexes, [Rh(COD)H]{sub 4}, [Rh(COD){sub 2}]{sup +}BF{sub 4}{sup -}, [Rh(COD)Cl]{sub 2}, and RhCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O, adsorbed on SiO{sub 2} are optimally activated for toluene hydrogenation by pretreatment with H{sub 2} at 200 C. The same complexes on Pd-SiO{sub 2} are equally active without pretreatments. The active species in all cases is rhodium metal. The catalysts were characterized by XPS, TEM, DRIFTS, and mercury poisoning experiments. Rhodium on silica catalyzes the hydrogenation of fluorobenzene to produce predominantly fluorocyclohexane in heptane and 1,2-dichloroethane solvents. In heptane/methanol and heptane/water solvents, hydrodefluorination to benzene and subsequent hydrogenation to cyclohexane occurs exclusively. Benzene inhibits the hydrodefluorination of fluorobenzene. In DCE or heptane solvents, fluorocyclohexane reacts with hydrogen fluoride to form cyclohexene. Reaction conditions can be chosen to selectively yield fluorocyclohexane, cyclohexene, benzene, or cyclohexane. The oxorhenium(V) dithiolate catalyst [-S(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}s-]Re(O)(Me)(PPh{sub 3}) was modified by linking it to a tether that could be attached to a silica support. Spectroscopic investigation and catalytic oxidation reactivity showed the heterogenized catalyst's structure and reactivity to be similar to its homogeneous analog. However, the immobilized catalyst offered additional advantages of recyclability, extended stability, and increased resistance to deactivation.

Keith James Stanger

2003-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

Photochemical reaction dynamics  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the program is to develop a fundamental understanding of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction dynamics with application in combustion and energy systems. The energy dependence in ketene isomerization, ketene dissociation dynamics, and carbonyl substitution on organometallic rhodium complexes in liquid xenon have been studied. Future studies concerning unimolecular processes in ketene as well as energy transfer and kinetic studies of methylene radicals are discussed.

Moore, B.C. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Steam reforming utilizing high activity catalyst  

SciTech Connect

High activity, sulfur tolerant steam reforming catalysts are described comprising rhodium or nickel supported on lanthanum stabilized alumina or magnesium promoted lanthanum stabilized alumina. The catalysts have improved activity over conventionally used catalysts in the presence of sulfur containing hydrocarbon fuel (such as No. 2 fuel oil) in a steam reforming environment. The material has particular utility in autothermal, tubular, cyclic and adiabatic steam reforming processes.

Setzer, H. J.

1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

170

Selective Gaseous Extraction: Research, Development and Training for Isotope Production, Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

General Atomics and the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) completed research and development of selective gaseous extraction of fission products from irradiated fuel, which included training and education of MURR students. The process used porous fuel and after irradiation flowed product gases through the fuel to selectively removed desired fission products with the primary goal of demonstrating the removal of rhodium 105. High removal rates for the ruthenium/rhodium (Ru/Rh), tellurium/iodine (Te/I) and molybdenum/technetium (Mo/Tc) series were demonstrated. The success of this research provides for the reuse of the target for further production, significantly reducing the production of actinide wastes relative to processes that dissolve the target. This effort was conducted under DOE funding (DE-SC0007772). General Atomics objective of the project was to conduct R&D on alternative methods to produce a number of radioactive isotopes currently needed for medical and industry applications to include rhodium-105 and other useful isotopes. Selective gaseous extraction was shown to be effective at removing radioisotopes of the ruthenium/rhodium, tellurium/iodine and molybdenum/technetium decay chains while having trace to no quantities of other fission products or actinides. This adds a new, credible method to the area of certain commercial isotope production beyond current techniques, while providing significant potential reduction of process wastes. Waste reduction, along with reduced processing time/cost provides for superior economic feasibility which may allow domestic production under full cost recovery practices. This provides the potential for improved access to domestically produced isotopes for medical diagnostics and treatment at reduced cost, providing for the public good.

Bertch, Timothy C, [General Atomics

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

Formation of thin-film resistors on silicon substrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The formation of thin-film resistors by the ion implantation of a metallic conductive layer in the surface of a layer of phosphosilicate glass or borophosphosilicate glass which is deposited on a silicon substrate. The metallic conductive layer materials comprise one of the group consisting of tantalum, ruthenium, rhodium, platinum and chromium silicide. The resistor is formed and annealed prior to deposition of metal, e.g. aluminum, on the substrate.

Schnable, George L. (Montgomery County, PA); Wu, Chung P. (Hamilton Township, Mercer County, NJ)

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Hydrogenation of unsaturated, aromatic, and heterocyclic compounds with polymer-supported catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The authors synthesized and studied catalysts based upon complexes of platinum, palladium, rhodium, and nickel with the following polymeric microligands: copolymers of styrene with maleic acid (S-MA), copolymers of maleic acid with methyl methacrylate (MA-MMA), and polyacrylic acid (PAA). The catalysts showed high activity and selectivity in the hydrogenation of furan and its derivatives, benzofuran, benzodioxane, benzene, nitrobenzene, phenol, olefins and cyclic olefins, and cyclic dienes. 2 tables.

Karakhanov, E.A.; Pshezhetskii, V.S.; Dedov, A.G.; Loktev, A.S.; Lebedeva, T.S.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Ligand exchange photochemistry of iodopentaamminerhodium (III) in a sodium/hydrogen Y type zeolite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for infrared study. Infrared spectrum of the ammonium ion band at -1 1450 cm and the zeolite background Calibration graph of ammonium ion concentration versus infrared absorption Correlation of the actual thickness of wafers of 33 38 41 43 zeolite... to determine the effects that the zeolite may have upon a photochemical reaction, iodopentaammine- rhodium (III) perchlorate has been prepared and its subsequent photo- aquation has been studied in solution as well as in the zeolite. A This thesis follows...

Camara, Michael Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

174

Bimetallic Ni-Rh catalysts with low amounts of Rh for the steam and autothermal reforming of n-butane for fuel-cell applications.  

SciTech Connect

Mono-metallic nickel and rhodium catalysts and bimetallic Ni-Rh catalysts supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeZrO{sub 2} and CeMgOx were prepared and evaluated for catalyzing the steam and autothermal reforming of n-butane. The binary Ni-Rh supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts with low weight loading of rhodium exhibited higher H{sub 2} yields than Ni or Rh alone. The Ni-Rh/CeZrO{sub 2} catalyst exhibited higher performance and no coke formation, compared to the same metals on other supports. A NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase was obtained on all Ni and Ni-Rh catalysts supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The presence of rhodium stabilized the spinel phase as well as NiOx species upon reforming while Ni alone was mostly reduced into metallic species. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure analysis showed evidence of Ni-Rh alloy during preparation and even further after an accelerated aging at 900C in a H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O atmosphere.

Ferrandon, M.; Kropf, A. J.; Krause, T.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity of Rh-based lanthanum zirconate pyrochlores for higher alcohol synthesis  

SciTech Connect

Two lanthanum zirconate pyrochlores (La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}; LZ) were prepared by Pechini method and tested for higher alcohols selectivity. In one, Rh was substituted into the pyrochlore lattice (LRZ, 1.7 wt%) while for the second, Rh was supported on an unsubstituted La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (R/LZ, 1.8 wt%). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed reduction (TPR) results show that the surface reducibility depends on whether the Rh is in (or supported on) the LZ pyrochlore. Rhodium in the LRZ is more reducible than rhodium supported on the R/LZ pyrochlore, likely due to the presence of a perovskite phase (LaRhO{sub 3}; identified by XRD), in which rhodium is more reducible. The formation of the perovskite accompanies that of the pyrochlore. CO hydrogenation results show higher ethanol selectivity for R/LZ than LRZ, possibly due to the strong interaction between Rh and LZ on the R/LZ, forming atomically close Rh{sup +}/Rh{sup 0} sites, which have been suggested to favor ethanol production.

Abdelsayed, Victor; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Poston, James A., Jr.; Spivey, James J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Renewable Energy Finance Workshop  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agenda - December 10 Agenda - December 10 th , 2012 Renewable Energy Finance Workshop 12:00 - 12:15 WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS- Richard Kauffman 12:15 - 12:25 PRESIDENTIAL PRIORITIES - Jon Powers & Rick Duke 12:25 - 12:35 INDUSTRY OVERVIEW - Lisa Jacobson & John Stanton Presentation of common themes and emerging trends from industry members. 12:35 - 1:00 MAJOR BARRIERS TO SECURITIZATION - Richard Kauffman & Trevor D'Olier-Lees Facilitated discussion on barriers to renewable energy deployment, such as data and standardized contracts. 1:00 - 1:20 BREAK 1:20 - 2:00 DATA AND RENEWABLE ENERGY RESOURCES - Ian Kalin & Chris Lohmann Open data, tools and programs that seek to support renewable energy financing. 2:00-2:20 BREAK

177

ARM - Blog Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

24, 2013 [Blog, Field Notes, MAGIC] 24, 2013 [Blog, Field Notes, MAGIC] An "Uneventful" Leg During MAGIC Bookmark and Share Editor's note: Ernie Lewis, principal investigator for the Marine ARM GPCI Investigations of Clouds (MAGIC) field campaign, sent this update on July 11, 2013. Thursday, July 11, evening We are just pulling into port in Honolulu (about 8pm local time on Thursday), a day later than normal, but we had left Los Angeles a day later than normal also. The trip was mostly uneventful (only one power outage), which is a good thing; typically anything that would make a trip "eventful" is not desirable. The instruments worked well, the techs-Pat and Mark-and, Trevor -a grad student-have been fun to work with, and the food was excellent. It was overcast nearly the entire way. It was bright a few times

178

Gas Phase Moleculer Dynamics (GPMD) Group | Chemistry Department |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Group Members Group Members Greg Hall (Group Leader) Chemical dynamics of unimolecular and bimolecular reactions. High resolution spectroscopic probes of collisional energy transfer processes. Elastic and inelastic interactions responsible for pressure broadening, saturation relaxation and depolarization. Non-adiabatic reactions and multiple surface interactions. Vector correlations and angular momentum polarization probes of chemical dynamics. Applied laser spectroscopy. Trevor Sears (PI) Use of frequency comb techniques for precision spectroscopic measurements in chemical systems. Development of new high resolution and high sensitivity spectroscopic techniques. Free radical spectroscopy relevant to combustion chemistry. Characterization of collisional phenomena and their effects on spectroscopic lineshapes, pressure broadening and sub-Doppler measurements. Hyperfine spectroscopy of 207PbF for potential e-EDM measurements

179

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Peer Review 2009 Peer Review 2009 Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, for the Untied State Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Joseph A. Henfling, Stan Atcitty, Frank Maldonado, Sandia National Laboratories Randy Normann, PermaWorks Nicholas Summers, Trevor Thornton, ASU SAND Number: 2009-5722C Overview * Program Goals for HT Power Controller - Ultimately a single module solution * Power Controller Design Details - PWM options (Microcontroller, FPGA) - High side gate control - HT MESFET demonstrated to drive SiC JFET in low side applications * Test Results * Future work * Conclusions Project Goals * Design HT power controller that can be integrated into a single module - Benefits include:

180

Microsoft Word - lois for 2011_v2.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Letters of Intent Letters of Intent 2011 Call for Beamline Development Proposals National Synchrotron Light Source II 1. High-energy x-ray micro-mapping of materials for advanced energy and structural engineering applications beamline (HEX) Spokesperson: Mark Croft, Rutgers University Source: Superconducting wiggler 2. Synchrotron-based discoveries for Chemical Biology (HIT) Marc Allaire, Brookhaven National Laboratory Undulator 3. NSLS-II Beamline for Combined High Magnetic Field and High Pressure Materials Studies (HMP) Trevor Tyson, New Jersey Institute of Technology Dipole wiggler 4. High-energy macromolecular crystallography (HMX) Vivian Stojanoff, Brookhaven National Laboratory 5. Monochromatic/White Beam X-ray Topography and High Resolution Diffraction Beamline at NSLS-II (HXT)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

REAL-TIME BUILDING ENERGY SIMULATION USING ENERGYPLUS AND THE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REAL-TIME BUILDING ENERGY SIMULATION USING ENERGYPLUS AND THE REAL-TIME BUILDING ENERGY SIMULATION USING ENERGYPLUS AND THE BUILDING CONTROLS VIRTUAL TEST BED Xiufeng Pang 1 , Prajesh Bhattacharya 1 , Zheng O'Neill 2 , Philip Haves 1 , Michael Wetter 1 , and Trevor Bailey 2 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA 2 United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT, USA ABSTRACT Most commercial buildings do not perform as well in practice as intended by the design and their performances often deteriorate over time. Reasons include faulty construction, malfunctioning equipment, incorrectly configured control systems and inappropriate operating procedures (Haves et al., 2001, Lee et al., 2007). To address this problem, the paper presents a simulation-based whole building performance monitoring tool that allows a

182

Synthesis, structure and properties of Li{sub 2}Rh{sub 3}B{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

Li{sub 2}Rh{sub 3}B{sub 2} has been synthesized at 1000 deg. C from a stoichiometric mix of rhodium and boron and an excess of lithium. Li{sub 2}Rh{sub 3}B{sub 2} crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pbam (no. 55, Z=2) with room temperature lattice constants a=5.7712(1) A, b=9.4377(2) A, c=2.8301(1) A and cell volume 154.149(6) A{sup 3}. The structure was solved from single crystal X-ray diffraction yielding the final R indices (all data) R1=2.8% and wR2=4.7%. The structure is a distortion of the CeCo{sub 3}B{sub 2} structure type, containing a network of Rh{sub 6}B trigonal prisms and short Li-Li contacts of 2.28(2) A. Li{sub 2}Rh{sub 3}B{sub 2} is a diamagnetic metal with a room temperature resistivity of 19 {mu}{omega} cm, as determined by magnetic susceptibility and single crystal transport measurements. The measured diamagnetism and electronic structure calculations show that Li{sub 2}Rh{sub 3}B{sub 2} contains rhodium in a d {sup 10} configuration. - Graphical abstract: Li{sub 2}Rh{sub 3}B{sub 2}, a diamagnetic metal, has been synthesized from a lithium flux. It adopts a distortion of the CeCo{sub 3}B{sub 2} structure type and is closely related to the 3 K superconductor, LaRh{sub 3}B{sub 2}. Pairs of lithium ions (white) fill the channels formed by rhodium-boron trigonal prisms (gray)

Bailey, Mark S. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: mbailey@anl.gov; Lobkovsky, Emil B. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Hinks, David G. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Claus, Helmut [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Hor, Yew San [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Schlueter, John A. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Mitchell, John F. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: mitchell@anl.gov

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement Program, 1996-2003 Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect

This annual report is in fulfillment of contractual obligations with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's (ODFW), Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement Program (Program). The last Annual Program Report was submitted in 1997, and described projects undertaken in 1995. This report describes Program activities carried out in 2003, along with a summary of projects undertaken during the years 1996 through 2002. The Program works cooperatively with private landowners to develop long-term restoration agreements, under which, passive and active Habitat Improvement Projects are conducted. Historically, projects have included livestock exclusion fencing (passive restoration) to protect riparian habitats, along with the installation of instream structures (active restoration) to address erosion and improve fish habitat. In recent years, the focus of active restoration has shifted to bioengineering treatments and, more recently, to channel re-design and re-construction aimed at improving fish habitat, by restoring stable channel function. This report provides a summary table of past projects (1996-2002), along with a text description of more extensive habitat improvement projects, including: (1) Implementation of a four-phased project on the Lobato property (Birch Creek) beginning in 1996 and involving a demonstration bioengineering site and riparian improvements (fencing, planting), (2) Implementation of stable channel design/instream structure placement on the Houser property, East Birch Creek, beginning in 1998, an (3) Implementation of a joint, US Army Corps of Engineers/ODFW (cost share) project beginning in 2001 on the Brogoitti property, East Birch Creek, which involved implementation of stable channel design/construction and riparian improvement treatments.

St. Hilaire, Danny R.; Montgomery, Michael; Bailey, Timothy D. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, John Day, OR)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

ITP Hanford Type 40 pin electrical connector failure analysis  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion products observed on the ITP Hanford Type 40 pin electrical connectors would be expected to adversely affect the power and control signals supplied to process equipment in the filter cell by the connectors. Corrosion products were consistent with those found on similar pins in DWPF. The recommendations based on the findings in this investigation are as follows: (1) Replace male and female rhodium plated pins with gold plated pins. (2) Replace the galvanized carbon steel spring on the male connector with a stainless steel spring. (3) Install protective caps over Hanford connectors when jumpers are removed.

Imrich, K.J.

1993-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Pollution prevention and waste minimization in metal finishing  

SciTech Connect

This study was done to identify pollution prevention and waste minimization opportunities in the general plating department and the printed circuit board processing department. Recommendations for certain recycle and recovery technologies were mad in order to reduce usage of acids and the volume of heavy metal sludge that is formed at the industrial Wastewater Pretreatment Facility (IWPF). Some of these technologies discussed were acid purification, electrowinning, and ion exchange. Specific technologies are prescribed for specific processes. Those plating processes where the metals can be recovered are copper, nickel, gold, cadmium, tin, lead, and rhodium.

Stimetz, C.J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Decarbonylation and dehydrogenation of carbohydrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbohydrates, especially aldose or ketose sugars, including those whose carbonyl group is masked by hemi-acetal or hemi-ketal formation, are decarbonylated by heating the feed carbohydrate together with a transition metal complex in a suitable solvent. Also, primary alcohols, including sugar alditols are simultaneously dehydrogenated and decarbonylated by heating a mixture of rhodium and ruthenium complexes and the alcohol and optionally a hydrogen acceptor in an acceptable solvent. Such defarbonylation and/or dehydrogenation of sugars provides a convenient procedure for the synthesis of certain carbohydrates and may provide a means for the conversion of biomass into useful products.

Andrews, Mark A. (Ridge, NY); Klaeren, Stephen A. (Corpus Christi, TX)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Method for forming gold-containing catalyst with porous structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for forming a gold-containing catalyst with porous structure according to one embodiment of the present invention includes producing a starting alloy by melting together of gold and at least one less noble metal that is selected from the group consisting of silver, copper, rhodium, palladium, and platinum; and a dealloying step comprising at least partial removal of the less noble metal by dissolving the at least one less noble metal out of the starting alloy. Additional methods and products thereof are also presented.

Biener, Juergen; Hamza, Alex V; Baeumer, Marcus; Schulz, Christian; Jurgens, Birte; Biener, Monika M.

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

188

Production of Hydrogen Using Nanocrystalline Protein-Templated Catalysts on M13 Phage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Production of Hydrogen Using Nanocrystalline Protein-Templated Catalysts on M13 Phage ... (35-38) In this work, we template nickel, rhodium, and ceria onto the surface of the M13 bacteriophage in order to produce catalysts with excellent dispersion, higher thermal stability, and a more porous structure than catalysts made using other methods. ... This result indicates that the selectivity to methane was partially controlled by the availability of hydrogen atoms on the surface required to hydrogenate the hydrocarbon species produced by acetaldehyde decarbonylation. ...

Brian Neltner; Brian Peddie; Alex Xu; William Doenlen; Keith Durand; Dong Soo Yun; Scott Speakman; Andrew Peterson; Angela Belcher

2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

189

Compatibility of aluminide-coated Hastelloy x and Inconel 617 in a simulated gas-cooled reactor environment  

SciTech Connect

Commercially prepared aluminide coatings on Hastelloy X and Inconel 617 substrates were exposed to controlled-impurity helium at 850/sup 0/ and 950/sup 0/C for 3000 h. Optical and scanning electron (SEM) microscopy, electron microprobe profiles, and SEM X-ray mapping were used to evaluate and compare exposed and unexposed control samples. Four coatings were evaluated: aluminide, aluminide with platinum, aluminide with chromium, and aluminide with rhodium. With extended time at elevated temperature, nickel diffused into the aluminide coatings to form epsilon-phase (Ni/sub 3/Al). This diffusion was the primary cause of porosity formation at the aluminide/alloy interface.

Chin, J.; Johnson, W. R.; Chen, K.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Solid fuel volatilization to produce synthesis gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method comprising contacting a carbon and hydrogen-containing solid fuel and a metal-based catalyst in the presence of oxygen to produce hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide gas, wherein the contacting occurs at a temperature sufficiently high to prevent char formation in an amount capable of stopping production of the hydrogen gas and the carbon monoxide gas is provided. In one embodiment, the metal-based catalyst comprises a rhodium-cerium catalyst. Embodiments further include a system for producing syngas. The systems and methods described herein provide shorter residence time and high selectivity for hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

Schmidt, Lanny D.; Dauenhauer, Paul J.; Degenstein, Nick J.; Dreyer, Brandon J.; Colby, Joshua L.

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

191

Infrared study of the behavior of CO, NO, and CO + NO over Rh/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Infrared spectroscopy was used to study the interaction of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide on a 0.475% Rh/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst. Both CO and NO readily adsorb on a prereduced catalyst surface. NO is not observed spectroscopically on preoxidized catalysts, yet isocyanate is produced during subsequent displacement by CO. The adsorption of CO on a preoxidized catalyst parallels the reduction of the catalyst. At temperatures in excess of 250/sup 0/C and mixed feeds with CO/NO greater than or equal to 1, a large buildup of isocyanate is observed on the support. At temperatures greater than 300/sup 0/C an infrared band attributed to adsorbed cyanide ion is observed near 2150 cm/sup -1/. Experiments involving displacement of NO by CO, displacement of CO by NO, and coadsorption of CO + NO show that contiguous rhodium surfaces are necessary for isocyanate production. Though the rhodium gem-dicarbonyl species, Rh(CO)/sub 2/, was observed, there was no experimental evidence demonstrating the presence of Rh(NO)/sub 2/ or Rh(NO)(CO) complexes.

Dictor, R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Comparison of the performance of activated carbon-supported noble metal catalysts in the hydrogenolysis of CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

The hydrogenolysis of CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2} over 1 wt% palladium, platinum, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, and rhenium on activated carbon has been studied in a micro-flow reactor, in a temperature range of 450--540 K, H{sub 2}/CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2} feed ratios between 1.5 and 6, a pressure of 0.4 MPa, and a WHSV of 1 g/(g{center_dot}h). The main products of the reaction for all investigated catalysts were CHClF{sub 2}, CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}, and methane. According to their performance, the catalysts could be divided into four groups: rhenium showing no conversion of CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2}, palladium with a high selectivity for CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}, iridium and ruthenium with a high selectivity for CHClF{sub 2}, and platinum and rhodium with moderate selectivity for CHClF{sub 2} and CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}. The adsorption of chlorine on the metal surface plays an important role in the selectivity. Strong chlorine adsorption leads to a higher selectivity for CHClF{sub 2}. These results are consistent with a reaction mechanism in which difluorocarbene is the key intermediate. Apparently, the same kinetic network applies to all metals studied. The performance of the catalysts changed as a function of time on stream. Palladium, rhodium, and especially ruthenium deactivated during reaction, whereas the activity of iridium and platinum increased. This can be explained by two opposite effects. On the one hand, the dispersion of all catalysts increased during reaction, which can explain an increase in activity as a function of time on stream. Apparently, CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2} hydrogenolysis conditions are suitable for dispersing noble metal catalysts on activated carbon. On the other hand, deactivation takes place by the adsorption of chlorine and deposits of heavy halogenated products.

Wiersma, A.; Sandt, E.J.A.X. van de; Hollander, M.A. den; Bekkum, H. van; Makkee, M.; Moulijn, J.A. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)] [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Heath Middle School Science Students Study Environmental Issue at Paducah  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heath Middle School Science Students Study Environmental Issue at Heath Middle School Science Students Study Environmental Issue at Paducah Site Heath Middle School Science Students Study Environmental Issue at Paducah Site April 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Mentor Jim Erickson of the LATA Kentucky team shows Heath Middle School sixthgrader Ian Morgan how to use red cabbage to indicate if a watery solution is acidic, basic, or neutral. Mentor Jim Erickson of the LATA Kentucky team shows Heath Middle School sixthgrader Ian Morgan how to use red cabbage to indicate if a watery solution is acidic, basic, or neutral. Heath Middle School eighth-grader Travis Crouch performs a pH (acidity-basicity) test using red cabbage. Heath Middle School eighth-grader Travis Crouch performs a pH (acidity-basicity) test using red cabbage. Kelly Layne of the LATA Kentucky team tells Heath Middle School students how to use zinc pennies in an experiment with differing known and unknown solutions. Facing, from left, are students Atherton Milford, McKenzie Moss, Trevor Kendall, Max Kolb, and James Michael Dodd.

194

Real-time Building Energy Simulation using EnergyPlus and the Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-time Building Energy Simulation using EnergyPlus and the Building Real-time Building Energy Simulation using EnergyPlus and the Building Controls Virtual Test Bed Title Real-time Building Energy Simulation using EnergyPlus and the Building Controls Virtual Test Bed Publication Type Conference Proceedings LBNL Report Number LBNL-5390E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Pang, Xiufeng, Prajesh Bhattacharya, Zheng O'Neill, Philip Haves, Michael Wetter, and Trevor Bailey Conference Name Proc. of the 12th IBPSA Conference Pagination p. 2890-2896 Date Published 11/2011 Conference Location Sydney, Australia Abstract Most commercial buildings do not perform as well in practice as intended by the design and their performances often deteriorate over time. Reasons include faulty construction, malfunctioning equipment, incorrectly configured control systems and inappropriate operating procedures (Haves et al., 2001, Lee et al., 2007). To address this problem, the paper presents a simulation-based whole building performance monitoring tool that allows a comparison of building actual performance and expected performance in real time. The tool continuously acquires relevant building model input variables from existing Energy Management and Control System (EMCS). It then reports expected energy consumption as simulated of EnergyPlus. The Building Control Virtual Test Bed (BCVTB) is used as the software platform to provide data linkage between the EMCS, an EnergyPlus model, and a database. This paper describes the integrated real-time simulation environment. A proof-of-concept demonstration is also presented in the paper.

195

NIDC: Online Catalog of Isotope Products | Product Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Product Search Product Search Step 1 - Enter your search criteria below. Element Name Actinium Aluminum Americium Antimony Argon Arsenic Astatine Barium Berkelium Beryllium Bismuth Bohrium Boron Bromine Cadmium Caesium Calcium Californium Carbon Cerium Chlorine Chromium Cobalt Copernicium Copper Curium Darmstadtium Dubnium Dysprosium Einsteinium Erbium Europium Fermium Fluorine Francium Gadolinium Gallium Germanium Gold Hafnium Hassium Helium Holmium Hydrogen Indium Iodine Iridium Iron Krypton Lanthanum Lawrencium Lead Lithium Lutetium Magnesium Manganese Meitnerium Mendelevium Mercury Molybdenum Neodymium Neon Neptunium Nickel Niobium Nitrogen Nobelium Osmium Oxygen Palladium Phosphorus Platinum Plutonium Polonium Potassium Praseodymium Promethium Protactinium Radium Radon Rhenium Rhodium Roentgenium Rubidium Ruthenium Rutherfordium Samarium Scandium Seaborgium Selenium Silicon Silver Sodium Strontium Sulfur Tantalum Technetium Tellurium Terbium Thallium Thorium Thulium Tin Titanium Tungsten Ununhexium Ununoctium Ununpentium Ununquadium Ununseptium Ununtrium Uranium Vanadium Xenon Ytterbium Yttrium Zinc Zirconium

196

NIDC: Online Catalog of Isotope Products | Request a New Product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Request a New Product Request a New Product Step 1 - Enter the new product's criteria below. Element Name Actinium Aluminum Americium Antimony Argon Arsenic Astatine Barium Berkelium Beryllium Bismuth Bohrium Boron Bromine Cadmium Caesium Calcium Californium Carbon Cerium Chlorine Chromium Cobalt Copernicium Copper Curium Darmstadtium Dubnium Dysprosium Einsteinium Erbium Europium Fermium Fluorine Francium Gadolinium Gallium Germanium Gold Hafnium Hassium Helium Holmium Hydrogen Indium Iodine Iridium Iron Krypton Lanthanum Lawrencium Lead Lithium Lutetium Magnesium Manganese Meitnerium Mendelevium Mercury Molybdenum Neodymium Neon Neptunium Nickel Niobium Nitrogen Nobelium Osmium Oxygen Palladium Phosphorus Platinum Plutonium Polonium Potassium Praseodymium Promethium Protactinium Radium Radon Rhenium Rhodium Roentgenium Rubidium Ruthenium Rutherfordium Samarium Scandium Seaborgium Selenium Silicon Silver Sodium Strontium Sulfur Tantalum Technetium Tellurium Terbium Thallium Thorium Thulium Tin Titanium Tungsten Ununhexium Ununoctium Ununpentium Ununquadium Ununseptium Ununtrium Uranium Vanadium Xenon Ytterbium Yttrium Zinc Zirconium

197

A Novel Nanobio Catalyst for Biofuels | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multiple Crystal Cavities for Unlimited X-ray Energy Resolution and Multiple Crystal Cavities for Unlimited X-ray Energy Resolution and Coherence An Intriguing Twist in the Structure of a Cobalt Oxide Catalyst Breaking Records in Neurological Microradiology Exposing Valence-Bond Model Inadequacies Plants' Rapid Response System Revealed Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed A Novel Nanobio Catalyst for Biofuels AUGUST 27, 2012 Bookmark and Share Core shell nanoparticle inside Apo. Nanoparticles synthesized from noble metals such as ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, silver (Ag), osmium, iridium, platinum, and gold (Au) are attracting increased attention by researchers around the world looking for

198

Microsoft Word - FujitaPubs12-18-06.htm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on 12/18/2006 2:12 PM on 12/18/2006 2:12 PM List of Publications: Etsuko Fujita 1. Carbon Dioxide Reduction by Pincer Rhodium η 2 -Dihydrogen Complexes: Hydrogen Binding Modes and Mechanistic Studies by Density Functional Theory Calculations. K.-W. Huang, J. H. Han, C. B. Musgrave, and E. Fujita, Organometallics, accepted. 2. Reaction of NH 3 with Titania: N-doping of the Oxide and TiN formation. H. Chen, A. Nambu, W. Wen, J. Graciani, Z. Zhong, J. C. Hanson, E. Fujita, and J. A. Rodríguez, J. Phys. Chem. B, accepted. 3. Direct Measurements of Rate Constants and Activation Volumes for the Binding of H 2 , D 2 , N 2 , C 2 H 4 and CH 3 CN to W(CO) 3 (PCy 3 ) 2 : Theoretical and Experimental Studies with Time-Resolved Step-Scan FTIR and UV-vis Spectroscopy. D. C. Grills,

199

Coming up with platinum substitutes may be elemental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coming up with platinum substitutes may be elemental Coming up with platinum substitutes may be elemental Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Coming up with platinum substitutes may be elemental Lab researchers are working with an abundant element to take their place: cobalt. February 1, 2013 dummy image Read our archives. Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Initial findings by a Los Alamos team indicate that if a cobalt atom is captured within a complex molecule, it can mimic the reactivity of platinum group metals. Platinum and some related precious metals (palladium, iridium, rhodium and ruthenium) are frequently used as chemical catalysts and for countless laboratory processes. As rare metals, they are also expensive. To ensure

200

The CAESAR project: Experimental and modeling investigations of methane reforming in a CAtalytically Enhanced Solar Absorption Receiver on a parabolic dish  

SciTech Connect

A joint US/Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) project has successfully tested a unique solar-driven chemical reactor in the CAtalytically Enhanced Solar Absorption Receiver (CAESAR) experiment. The CAESAR test was a {open_quotes}proof-of-concept{close_quotes} demonstration of carbon-dioxide reforming of methane in a commercial-scale, solar, volumetric receiver/reactor on a parabolic dish concentrator. The CAESAR design; test facility and instrumentation; thermal and chemical tests; and analysis of test results are presented in detail. Numerical models for the absorber and the receiver are developed and predicted performance is compared with test data. Post test analyses to assess the structural condition of the absorber and the effectiveness of the rhodium catalyst are presented. Unresolved technical issues are identified and future development efforts are recommended.

Muir, J.F.; Hogan, R.E. Jr.; Skocypec, R.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Buck, R. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Stuttgart (DE). Inst. of Technical Thermodynamics

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

X-ray source for mammography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

Logan, Clinton M. (Pleasanton, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Method for the catalytic conversion of organic materials into a product gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for converting organic material into a product gas includes: (a) providing a liquid reactant mixture containing liquid water and liquid organic material within a pressure reactor; (b) providing an effective amount of a reduced metal catalyst selected from the group consisting of ruthenium, rhodium, osmium and iridium or mixtures thereof within the pressure reactor; and (c) maintaining the liquid reactant mixture and effective amount of reduced metal catalyst in the pressure reactor at temperature and pressure conditions of from about 300 C to about 450 C; and at least 130 atmospheres for a period of time, the temperature and pressure conditions being effective to maintain the reactant mixture substantially as liquid, the effective amount of reduced metal catalyst and the period of time being sufficient to catalyze a reaction of the liquid organic material to produce a product gas composed primarily of methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. 5 figs.

Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Baker, E.G.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Development of a remote bushing for actinide vitrification  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) are combining their existing experience in handling highly radioactive, special nuclear materials with commercial glass fiberization technology in order to assemble a small vitrification system for radioactive actinide solutions. The vitrification system or {open_quotes}brushing{close_quotes}, is fabricated from platinum-rhodium alloy and is based on early marble remelt fiberization technology. Advantages of this unique system include its relatively small size, reliable operation, geometrical safety (nuclear criticality), and high temperature capability. The bushing design should be capable of vitrifying a number of the actinide nuclear materials, including solutions of americium/curium, neptunium, and possibly plutonium. State of the art, mathematical and oil model studies are being combined with basic engineering evaluations to verify and improve the thermal and mechanical design concepts.

Schumacher, R.F.; Ramsey, W.G.; Johnson, F.M. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

Lara-Curzio, Edgar (Lenoir City, TN); An, Ke (Knoxville, TX); Kiggans, Jr., James O. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dudney, Nancy J. (Knoxville, TN); Contescu, Cristian I. (Knoxville, TN); Baker, Frederick S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Armstrong, Beth L. (Clinton, TN)

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

205

Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries  

SciTech Connect

A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

Lara-Curzio, Edgar; An, Ke; Kiggans, Jr., James O; Dudney, Nancy J; Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Armstrong, Beth L

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

206

Role of support in adsorption and catalysis on supported metals. I. IR spectroscopic study of adsorption of CO and H/sub 2/ on Rh/SiO/sub 2/, Rh/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and Rh/La/sub 2/O/sub 3/  

SciTech Connect

With the aim of studying the influence of the nature of the support on the properties of supported rhodium-containing catalysts, the adsorption of CO and H/sub 2/ on Rh/SiO/sub 2/, Rh/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and Rh/La/sub 2/O/sub 3/ has been investigated. It has been found that in the case of Rh/La/sub 2/O/sub 3/, along with the surface complexes that are characteristic for Rh/SiO/sub 2/ and Rh/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, new surface compounds of adsorbed CO and H/sub 2/ are formed. On the basis of an analysis of the spectrochemical properties of these boundary with the participation of the metal atoms and also the atoms of the support.

Bredikhin, M.N.; Lokhov, Yu.A.; Kuznetsov, V.L.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Activity and structure of perovskites as diesel reforming catalysts for solid oxide fuel cells.  

SciTech Connect

Recent progress in developing perovskite materials as more cost-effective catalysts in autothermal reforming (ATR) of diesel fuel to hydrogen-rich reformate for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) application is reported. Perovskite-type metal oxides with B sites partially exchanged by ruthenium were prepared and evaluated under ATR reaction conditions. The hydrogen yield, reforming efficiency, and CO{sub x} selectivity of these catalysts were investigated using diesel surrogate fuel with 50 ppm sulfur. The catalyst performances have approached or exceeded a benchmark, high-cost rhodium-based material. In parallel with the reactivity study, we also investigated the physical properties of B-site doped perovskites and their impact on the reforming performance using various characterization techniques such as BET, X-ray powder diffraction, temperature programmable reduction, scanning electron microscopy, and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We found that ruthenium is highly dispersed into perovskite lattice and its redox behavior is directly associated with reforming activity.

Liu, D.-J.; Krumpelt, M.; Chemical Engineering

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Enantioselective synthesis of L-(-)-4- boronophenylalanine (L-BPA)  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making substantially pure L-BPA is disclosed. The method includes the steps of reacting 4-bromobenzaldehyde with ethylene glycol to form 4-bromobenzaldehyde ethylene glycol acetal, sequentially reacting 4-bromobenzaldehyde ethyleneglycol acetal with Mg to produce the Grignard reagent and thereafter reacting with tributyl borate and then converting to an acid environment to form 4-boronobenzaldehyde, reacting 4-boronobenzaldehyde with diethanol amine to form 4-boronobenzaldehyde diethanolamine ester, condensing the 4-boronobenzaldehyde diethanolamine ester with 2-phenyl-2-oxazolin-5-one to form an azlactone, reacting the azlactone with an alkali metal hydroxide to form z-.alpha.-benzoylamino-4-boronocinnamic acid, asymmetrically hydrogenating the z-.alpha.-benzoylamino-4-boronocinnamic acid in the presence of a catalyst of a cheltate complex of rhodium (I) with chiral bisphosphines to form L-(+)-N-benzoyl-4-boronophenylalanine, and thereafter acidifying the L-(+)-N-benzoyl-4-boronophenylalanine in an organic medium to produce L-BPA.

Samsel, Edward G. (Baton Rouge, LA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Enantioselective synthesis of L-(-)-4- boronophenylalanine (L-BPA)  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making substantially pure L-BPA is disclosed. The method includes the steps of reacting 4-bromobenzaldehyde with ethylene glycol to form 4-bromobenzaldehyde ethylene glycol acetal, sequentially reacting 4-bromobenzaldehyde ethyleneglycol acetal with Mg to produce the Grignard reagent and thereafter reacting with tributyl borate and then converting to an acid environment to form 4-boronobenzaldehyde, reacting 4-boronobenzaldehyde with diethanol amine to form 4-boronobenzaldehyde diethanolamine ester, condensing the 4-boronobenzaldehyde diethanolamine ester with 2-phenyl-2-oxazolin-5-one to form an azlactone, reacting the azlactone with an alkali metal hydroxide to form z-[alpha]-benzoylamino-4boronocinnamic acid, asymmetrically hydrogenating the z-[alpha]-benzoylamino-4-boronocinnamic acid in the presence of a catalyst of a cheltate complex of rhodium (I) with chiral bisphosphines to form L-(+)-N-benzoyl-4-boronophenylalanine, and thereafter acidifying the L-(+)-N-benzoyl-4-boronophenylalanine in an organic medium to produce L-BPA. 3 figs.

Samsel, E.G.

1992-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

210

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Proposed Action Title: (0674-1610) TVN Systems, Inc. -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

610) TVN Systems, Inc. - 610) TVN Systems, Inc. - Hydrogen/Bromine Electrical Energy Storage System Program or Field Office :Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) Submit by E-mail LocationCs) CCity/County/State): TVN Systems, Inc. (Lawrence, KS); Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN); University of Kansas (Lawrence, KS) Proposed Action Description: Funding will support efforts to develop a cost-effective hydrogen-bromine flow battery that utilizes advanced membrane materials, unique catalysts, a novel shunt current protection system , and advanced cell and system designs. Proposed work will consist of: (1) synthesizing active and stable Rhodium-sulfer based electro-catalytic materials for hydrogen reactions; (2) fabricating and testing nanofiber composite membranes;

211

X-ray source for mammography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An x-ray source is described utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms. 6 figures.

Logan, C.M.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

212

Intrinsic Uncertainties in Modeling Complex Systems.  

SciTech Connect

Models are built to understand and predict the behaviors of both natural and artificial systems. Because it is always necessary to abstract away aspects of any non-trivial system being modeled, we know models can potentially leave out important, even critical elements. This reality of the modeling enterprise forces us to consider the prospective impacts of those effects completely left out of a model - either intentionally or unconsidered. Insensitivity to new structure is an indication of diminishing returns. In this work, we represent a hypothetical unknown effect on a validated model as a finite perturba- tion whose amplitude is constrained within a control region. We find robustly that without further constraints, no meaningful bounds can be placed on the amplitude of a perturbation outside of the control region. Thus, forecasting into unsampled regions is a very risky proposition. We also present inherent difficulties with proper time discretization of models and representing in- herently discrete quantities. We point out potentially worrisome uncertainties, arising from math- ematical formulation alone, which modelers can inadvertently introduce into models of complex systems. Acknowledgements This work has been funded under early-career LDRD project %23170979, entitled %22Quantify- ing Confidence in Complex Systems Models Having Structural Uncertainties%22, which ran from 04/2013 to 09/2014. We wish to express our gratitude to the many researchers at Sandia who con- tributed ideas to this work, as well as feedback on the manuscript. In particular, we would like to mention George Barr, Alexander Outkin, Walt Beyeler, Eric Vugrin, and Laura Swiler for provid- ing invaluable advice and guidance through the course of the project. We would also like to thank Steven Kleban, Amanda Gonzales, Trevor Manzanares, and Sarah Burwell for their assistance in managing project tasks and resources.

Cooper, Curtis S; Bramson, Aaron L.; Ames, Arlo L.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Final Technical Report "Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation" Grant number : DE-FG02-86ER13615  

SciTech Connect

Title: Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER13615 PI: Wayland, B. B. (wayland@sas.upenn.edu) Abstract Development of new mechanistic strategies and catalyst materials for activation of CO, H2, CH4, C2H4, O2, and related substrates relevant to the conversion of carbon monoxide, alkanes, and alkenes to organic oxygenates are central objectives encompassed by this program. Design and synthesis of metal complexes that manifest reactivity patterns associated with potential pathways for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide through metallo-formyl (M-CHO), dimetal ketone (M-C(O)-M), and dimetal dionyl (M-C(O)-C(O)-M) species is one major focus. Hydrocarbon oxidation using molecular oxygen is a central goal for methane activation and functionalization as well as regioselective oxidation of olefins. Discovery of new reactivity patterns and control of selectivity are pursued through designing new metal complexes and adjusting reaction conditions. Variation of reaction media promotes distinct reaction pathways that control both reaction rates and selectivities. Dimetalloradical diporphyrin complexes preorganize transition states for substrate reactions that involve two metal centers and manifest large rate increases over mono-metalloradical reactions of hydrogen, methane, and other small molecule substrates. Another broad goal and recurring theme of this program is to contribute to the thermodynamic database for a wide scope of organo-metal transformations in a range of reaction media. One of the most complete descriptions of equilibrium thermodynamics for organometallic reactions in water and methanol is emerging from the study of rhodium porphyrin substrate reactions in aqueous and alcoholic media. Water soluble group nine metalloporphyrins manifest remarkably versatile substrate reactivity in aqueous and alcoholic media which includes producing rhodium formyl (Rh-CHO) and hydroxy methyl (Rh-CH2OH) species. Exploratory directions for this program include expending new strategies for anti-Markovnikov addition of water, alcohols, and amines with olefins, developing catalytic reactions of CO to give formamides and formic esters, and evaluating the potential for coupling reactions of CO to produce organic building blocks.

Wayland, B.B.

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Mixed Alcohol Synthesis Catalyst Screening 2007 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are researching the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). PNNL is obtaining commercially available mixed alcohol or preparing promising mixed-alcohol catalysts and screening them in a laboratory-scale reactor system. The most promising catalysts are provided to NREL for testing using a slipstream from a pilot-scale biomass gasifier. After a review of the literature in 2006 and conversations with companies that produce catalysts, it was determined that no commercial mixed-alcohol synthesis catalysts were available. One manufacturer supplied a modified methanol catalyst that was tested in the PNNL laboratory-scale system and provided to NREL for further testing. PNNL also prepared and tested the behavior of 10 other catalysts representing the distinct catalyst classes for mixed alcohol syntheses. Based on those results,testing in 2007 focused on the performance of the rhodium-based catalysts. The effects of adding promoters to the rhodium catalysts in addition to the manganese already being used were examined. The iron and rhenium promoters both stood out as achieving higher carbon selectivities , followed by Cu. Iridium and Li, on the other hand, had low carbon selectivity ratios of 0.27 and 0.22, respectively. Although testing of candidate promoters is not complete, it appears that Ir and Li promoters warrant further optimization and possibly combination to further improve STYs and carbon selectivities to C2+ oxygenates. However, using these promoters, it will be necessary to incorporate a separate hydrogenation catalyst to improve the yield of C2+ alcohols with respect to the other oxygenates. Fe, Re, and Cu stand out as possible candidates in this respect, but additional research is needed to examine whether they can be combined with the other promoters on the Rh-based catalyst or need to be optimized on a separate catalyst support that is either physically mixed or used in series with the promoted Rh-based catalyst.

Gerber, Mark A.; White, J. F.; Gray, Michel J.; Stevens, Don J.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

It's Elemental - The Periodic Table of Elements - Elements Listed by Atomic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic Number Atomic Number 1 Hydrogen H 2 Helium He 3 Lithium Li 4 Beryllium Be 5 Boron B 6 Carbon C 7 Nitrogen N 8 Oxygen O 9 Fluorine F 10 Neon Ne 11 Sodium Na 12 Magnesium Mg 13 Aluminum Al 14 Silicon Si 15 Phosphorus P 16 Sulfur S 17 Chlorine Cl 18 Argon Ar 19 Potassium K 20 Calcium Ca 21 Scandium Sc 22 Titanium Ti 23 Vanadium V 24 Chromium Cr 25 Manganese Mn 26 Iron Fe 27 Cobalt Co 28 Nickel Ni 29 Copper Cu 30 Zinc Zn 31 Gallium Ga 32 Germanium Ge 33 Arsenic As 34 Selenium Se 35 Bromine Br 36 Krypton Kr 37 Rubidium Rb 38 Strontium Sr 39 Yttrium Y 40 Zirconium Zr 41 Niobium Nb 42 Molybdenum Mo 43 Technetium Tc 44 Ruthenium Ru 45 Rhodium Rh 46 Palladium Pd 47 Silver Ag 48 Cadmium Cd 49 Indium In 50 Tin Sn 51 Antimony Sb 52 Tellurium Te 53 Iodine I 54 Xenon Xe 55 Cesium Cs 56 Barium Ba 57 Lanthanum La 58 Cerium Ce

216

Group Publications-Surface Electrochemistry and Electrocatalysis (SEE)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEE Group Publications 2009 - present SEE Group Publications 2009 - present 2013 Ordered Bilayer Ruthenium-Platinum Core-Shell Nanoparticles as Carbon Monoxide-Tolerant Fuel Cell Catalysts, Y.-C. Hsieh, Y. Zhang, D. Su, V. Volkov, R. Si, L. Wu, Y. Zhu, W. An, P. Liu, P. He, S. Ye, R. R. Adzic, and J.X. Wang, Nature Communications, in press. Pt Monolayer on Au-Stabilized PdNi Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Oxygen Reduction Reaction, K.A. Kuttiyiel, K. Sasaki, D. Su, M.B. Vukmirovic, N.S. Marinkovic, R.R. Adzic, Electrochimica Acta, in press. Oxygen Reduction Activity of IrCu Core Platinum Monolayer Shell Nano-electrocatalysts, Y.M. Choi, K.A. Kuttiyiel, J. P. Labis, K. Sasaki, G.-G. Park, T.-H. Yang, R.R. Adzic, Topics in Catalysis, in press. The Role of Rhodium and Tin Oxide in the Platinum-based Electrocatalysts for Ethanol Oxidation to CO2, M. Li, W.-P. Zhou, N.S. Marinkovic, K. Sasaki, R.R. Adzic, Electrochimica Acta, 104 (2013) 454-461.

217

Mg{sub 8}Rh{sub 4}B - A new type of boron stabilized Ti{sub 2}Ni structure  

SciTech Connect

The new magnesium rhodium boron compound Mg{sub 8}Rh{sub 4}B has been synthesized by reaction of the metal powders with crystalline or amorphous boron or the RhB precursor. The crystal structure of Mg{sub 8}Rh{sub 4}B was solved using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data (space group Fd3-bar m, a=12.1711(4)A, Z=8, 174 reflections, R{sub F}=0.016). The crystal structure can be described as a filled Ti{sub 2}Ni type where the interstitial sites 8b (12,12,12), located at the center of two nested Mg{sub 4}Rh{sub 4} tetrahedra, are occupied by boron atoms. Taking into account the absence of the Ti{sub 2}Ni-type phase in the binary Mg-Rh system, the boron atoms can be considered as stabilizing this structural motif. From the bonding analysis with the electron localization function the crystal structure is described as covalently bonded [Rh{sub 4}B]{sup 3-} anions, embedded in a cationic magnesium matrix.

Alekseeva, A.M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany) and Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: alekseev@cpfs.mpg.de; Abakumov, A.M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); EMAT, University of Antwerp, Antwerp B-2020 (Belgium); Leithe-Jasper, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Schnelle, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Prots, Yu. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Chizhov, P.S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Van Tendeloo, G. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Antwerp B-2020 (Belgium); Antipov, E.V. [Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Grin, Yu. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Materials prepared at the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) for reactor dosimetry applications  

SciTech Connect

Thirteen reference materials prepared under the Euratom Working Group on Reactor Dosimetry (EWGRD) monitor materials program are now available. The determination of trace impurities has recently been completed for rhodium metal (iridium 26.0 {+-} 0.6 mg{center_dot}kg{sup {minus}1}, platinum < 5 mg{center_dot}kg{sup {minus}1}) and these values will be proposed for certification. Certification analyses of titanium metal, which are continuing, indicate scandium < 0.1 mg{center_dot}kg{sup {minus}1}. The preparation of alloys for neutron fluence rate measurements are discussed. Satisfactory homogeneity in aluminum alloys can be difficult to achieve on a milligram scale due to the formation of coarse intermetallic particles, and suitable processing with a high solidification rate, cold working and annealing is essential. The example is given of the alloys Al-15 wt% U and Al-14 wt% Pu, where the inhomogeneity (in terms of relative standard deviation of alloying element) was determined by isotope dilution mass spectrometry as < 0.2% in each case for 20 mg samples. Some recent examples of dosimeter encapsulation are given including NpO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} microspheres in high purity vanadium and Al-Pu and Al-U fission foils in cold-pressed aluminum containers.

Ingelbrecht, C.D.; Peetermans, F.W.; Palmeri, S.; Robouch, P.B. [Inst. for Reference Materials and Measurements, Geel (Belgium). Sample Preparation Group

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

Structural Investigations of Complex Oxides using Synchrotron Radiation  

SciTech Connect

The work is a collaborative effort between Prof. Hanno zur Loye at the University of South Carolina and Dr. Tom Vogt at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The collaborative research focuses on the synthesis and the structural characterization of perovskites and perovskite related oxides and will target new oxide systems where we have demonstrated expertise in synthesis, yet lack the experimental capabilities to answer important structural issues. Synthetically, we will focus on two subgroups of perovskite structures, the double and triple perovskites, and the 2H-perovskite related oxides belonging to the A3n+3mA’nB3m+nO9m+6n family. In the first part of the proposal, our goal of synthesizing and structurally characterizing new ruthenium, iridium, rhodium and ruthenium containing double and triple perovskites, with the emphasis on exercising control over the oxidation state(s) of the metals, is described. These oxides will be of interest for their electronic and magnetic properties that will be investigated as well.

Hans-Conrad zur Loye

2007-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

220

On the Use of Thermal NF3 as the Fluorination and Oxidation Agent in Treatment of Used Nuclear Fuels  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents results of our investigation on the use of nitrogen trifluoride as the fluorination or fluorination/oxidation agent for use in a process for separating valuable constituents from used nuclear fuels by employing the volatility of many transition metal and actinide fluorides. Nitrogen trifluoride is less chemically and reactively hazardous than the hazardous and aggressive fluorinating agents used to prepare uranium hexafluoride and considered for fluoride volatility based nuclear fuels reprocessing. In addition, nitrogen trifluoride’s less aggressive character may be used to separate the volatile fluorides from used fuel and from themselves based on the fluorination reaction’s temperature sensitivity (thermal tunability) rather than relying on differences in sublimation/boiling temperature and sorbents. Our thermodynamic calculations found that nitrogen trifluoride has the potential to produce volatile fission product and actinide fluorides from candidate oxides and metals. Our simultaneous thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses found that the oxides of lanthanum, cerium, rhodium, and plutonium fluorinated but did not form volatile fluorides and that depending on temperature volatile fluorides formed from the oxides of niobium, molybdenum, ruthenium, tellurium, uranium, and neptunium. We also demonstrated near-quantitative removal of uranium from plutonium in a mixed oxide.

Scheele, Randall D.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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221

Biogas fuel reforming for solid oxide fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper strategies for biogas reforming and their ensuing effects on solid oxide fuel cell(SOFC) performance are explored. Synthesized biogas (65% CH4?+?35% CO2) fuel streams are reformed over a rhodium catalyst supported on a porous ?-alumina foam. Reforming approaches include steam reforming and catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) utilizing either air or pure oxygen as the oxidant. A computational model is developed and utilized to guide the specification of reforming conditions that maximize both CH4 and CO2 conversions. Model predictions are validated with experimental measurements over a wide range of biogas-reforming conditions. Higher reforming temperatures are shown to activate the biogas-borne CO2 to enable significant methane dry-reforming chemistry. Dry reforming minimizes the oxidant-addition needs for effective biogas conversion potentially decreasing the thermal requirements for reactant heating and improving system efficiency. Such high-temperature reforming conditions are prevalent during CPOX with a pure-O2 oxidant. While CPOX-with-O2 reforming is highly exothermic the endothermicity of dry-reforming chemistry can be exploited to ensure that catalyst temperatures do not reach levels which cause catalyst sintering and degradation. SOFCelectrochemical performance under biogas reformate is shown to vary substantially with reforming approach. Cell operation under CPOX-with-O2 reformate is found to be comparable to that under humidified hydrogen.

Danielle M. Murphy; Amy E. Richards; Andrew Colclasure; Wade A. Rosensteel; Neal P. Sullivan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Characterization of a spheromak plasma gun: The effect of refractory electrode coatings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to investigate the proposition that high?Z impurities are responsible for the anomalously short lifetime of the Caltech spheromak the center electrode of the spheromakplasma gun has been coated with a variety of metals (bare steel copper nickel chromium rhodium and tungsten). Visible light (230–890 nm) emitted directly from the plasma in the gun breech was monitored for each of the coatedelectrodes.Plasma density and temperature and spheromak lifetime were compared for each electrode. Results indicate little difference in gun performance or macroscopic plasma parameters. The chromium and tungstenelectrodes performed marginally better in that a previously reported helicity injection effect [Phys. Rev. Lett. 6 4 2144 (1990)] is only observed in discharges using these electrodecoatings. There are subtle differences in the detailed line emission spectra from the different electrodes but the spectra are remarkably similar. The fact that (1) contrary to expectations attempts to reduce high?Z impurities had only marginal effect on the spheromak lifetime coupled with (2) an estimate of Z effspheromaks. We will discuss the general characteristics of the spheromak gun as well as effects due to the coatings.

M. R. Brown; A. D. Bailey III; P. M. Bellan

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

A versatile facility for the calibration of X-ray polarimeters with polarized and unpolarized controlled beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We devised and built a versatile facility for the calibration of the next generation X-ray polarimeters with unpolarized and polarized radiation. The former is produced at 5.9 keV by means of a Fe55 radioactive source or by X-ray tubes, while the latter is obtained by Bragg diffraction at nearly 45 degrees. Crystals tuned with the emission lines of X-ray tubes with molybdenum, rhodium, calcium and titanium anodes are employed for the efficient production of highly polarized photons at 2.29, 2.69, 3.69 and 4.51 keV respectively. Moreover the continuum emission is exploited for the production of polarized photons at 1.65 keV and 2.04 keV and at energies corresponding to the higher orders of diffraction. The photons are collimated by means of interchangeable capillary plates and diaphragms, allowing a trade-off between collimation and high fluxes. The direction of the beam is accurately arranged by means of high precision motorized stages, controlled via computer so that long and automatic measurements can be done. Selecting the direction of polarization and the incidence point we can map the response of imaging devices to both polarized and unpolarized radiation. Changing the inclination of the beam we can study the systematic effects due to the focusing of grazing incidence optics and the feasibility of instruments with large field of view.

Fabio Muleri; Paolo Soffitta; Ronaldo Bellazzini; Alessandro Brez; Enrico Costa; Massimo Frutti; Marcello Mastropietro; Ennio Morelli; Michele Pinchera; Alda Rubini; Gloria Spandre

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Low Cost Autothermal Diesel Reforming Catalyst Development  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic autothermal reforming (ATR) represents an important step of converting fossil fuel to hydrogen rich reformate for use in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. The state-of-the-art reforming catalyst, at present, is a Rh based material which is effective but costly. The objective of our current research is to reduce the catalyst cost by finding an efficient ATR catalyst containing no rhodium. A group of perovskite based catalysts have been synthesized and evaluated under the reforming condition of a diesel surrogate fuel. Hydrogen yield, reforming efficiency, and conversion selectivity to carbon oxides of the catalyst ATR reaction are calculated and compared with the benchmark Rh based material. Several catalyst synthesis improvements were carried out including: 1) selectively doping metals on the A-site and B-site of the perovskite structure, 2) changing the support from perovskite to alumina, 3) altering the method of metal addition, and 4) using transition metals instead of noble metals. It was found that the catalytic activity changed little with modification of the A-site metal, while it displayed considerable dependence on the B-site metal. Perovskite supports performed much better than alumina based supports.

Shihadeh, J.; Liu, D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Ternary Pt/Rh/SnO2 Electrocatalysts for Oxidizing Ethanol to CO2  

SciTech Connect

Ethanol, with its high energy density, likely production from renewable sources and ease of storage and transportation, is almost the ideal combustible for fuel cells wherein its chemical energy can be converted directly into electrical energy. However, commercialization of direct ethanol fuel cells has been impeded by ethanol's slow, inefficient oxidation even at the best electrocatalysts. We synthesized a ternary PtRhSnO{sub 2}/C electrocatalyst by depositing platinum and rhodium atoms on carbon-supported tin dioxide nanoparticles that is capable of oxidizing ethanol with high efficiency and holds great promise for resolving the impediments to developing practical direct ethanol fuel cells. This electrocatalyst effectively splits the C-C bond in ethanol at room temperature in acid solutions, facilitating its oxidation at low potentials to CO{sub 2}, which has not been achieved with existing catalysts. Our experiments and density functional theory calculations indicate that the electrocatalyst's activity is due to the specific property of each of its constituents, induced by their interactions. These findings help explain the high activity of Pt-Ru for methanol oxidation and the lack of it for ethanol oxidation, and point to the way to accomplishing the C-C bond splitting in other catalytic processes.

Adzic, R.R.; Kowal, A.; Li, M.; Shao, M.; Sasaki, K.; Vukmirovic, M.B.; Zhang, J.; Marinkovic, N.S. Liu, P.; Frenkel, A.I.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Ternary Pt/Rh/SnO2 Electrocatalysts for Oxidizing Ethanol to CO2  

SciTech Connect

Ethanol, with its high energy density, likely production from renewable sources and ease of storage and transportation, is almost the ideal combustible for fuel cells wherein its chemical energy can be converted directly into electrical energy. However, commercialization of direct ethanol fuel cells has been impeded by ethanol's slow, inefficient oxidation even at the best electrocatalysts1, 2. We synthesized a ternary PtRhSnO2/C electrocatalyst by depositing platinum and rhodium atoms on carbon-supported tin dioxide nanoparticles that is capable of oxidizing ethanol with high efficiency and holds great promise for resolving the impediments to developing practical direct ethanol fuel cells. This electrocatalyst effectively splits the C-C bond in ethanol at room temperature in acid solutions, facilitating its oxidation at low potentials to CO2, which has not been achieved with existing catalysts. Our experiments and density functional theory calculations indicate that the electrocatalyst's activity is due to the specific property of each of its constituents, induced by their interactions. These findings help explain the high activity of Pt-Ru for methanol oxidation and the lack of it for ethanol oxidation, and point to the way to accomplishing the C-C bond splitting in other catalytic processes.

Kowal, A.; Li, M; Shao, M; Sasaki, K; Vukmirovic, M; Zhang, J; Marinkovic, N; Liu, P; Frenkel, A; Adzic, R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Hydrogen production from an ethanol reformer with energy saving approaches over various catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The reforming of ethanol for hydrogen production was carried out in this study. The effects of ethanol supply rate, catalysts, O2/EtOH and different energy-saving approaches on the reforming temperature, H2 + CO (syngas) concentration and thermal efficiency were investigated. The results showed that the best H2 + CO concentration of 43.41% could be achieved by using rhodium (Rh), while the next best concentration of about 42.08% could be obtained using ruthenium (Ru). The results also showed that the conversion efficiency of ethanol, concentrations of H2 and CO, and the energy loss ratio could be improved by heat insulation and heat recycling; and the improvement in the reforming performance was greater by the Ru catalyst rather than by the Rh catalyst with the energy-saving approaches. The greatest improvement in hydrogen production was achieved when using the Ru catalyst with the addition of steam and heat recycling system under an O2/EtOH ratio of 0.625 and S/C ratio of 1.0.

Wei-Cheng Chiu; Rong-Fang Horng; Huann-Ming Chou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Process for removal of mineral particulates from coal-derived liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Suspended mineral solids are separated from a coal-derived liquid containing the solids by a process comprising the steps of: (a) contacting said coal-derived liquid containing solids with a molten additive having a melting point of 100.degree.-500.degree. C. in an amount of up to 50 wt. % with respect to said coal-derived liquid containing solids, said solids present in an amount effective to increase the particle size of said mineral solids and comprising material or mixtures of material selected from the group of alkali metal hydroxides and inorganic salts having antimony, tin, lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, beryllium, aluminum, zinc, molybdenum, cobalt, nickel, ruthenium, rhodium or iron cations and chloride, iodide, bromide, sulfate, phosphate, borate, carbonate, sulfite, or silicate anions; and (b) maintaining said coal-derived liquid in contact with said molten additive for sufficient time to permit said mineral matter to agglomerate, thereby increasing the mean particle size of said mineral solids; and (c) recovering a coal-derived liquid product having reduced mineral solids content. The process can be carried out with less than 5 wt. % additive and in the absence of hydrogen pressure.

McDowell, William J. (Knoxville, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Solar reforming of methane in a direct absorption catalytic reactor on a parabolic dish  

SciTech Connect

The concept of solar driven chemical reactions in a commercial-scale volumetric receiver/reactor on a parabolic concentrator was successfully demonstrated in the CAtalytically Enhanced Solar Absorption Receiver (CAESAR) test. Solar reforming of methane (CH{sub 4}) with carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) was achieved in a 64-cm diameter direct absorption reactor on a parabolic dish capable of 150 kW solar power. The reactor was a catalytic volumetric absorber consisting of a multi-layered, porous alumina foam disk coated with rhodium (Rh) catalyst. The system was operated during both steady-state and solar transient (cloud passage) conditions. The total solar power absorbed reached values up to 97 kW and the maximum methane conversion was 70%. Receiver thermal efficiencies ranged up to 85% and chemical efficiencies peaked at 54%. The absorber performed satisfactorily in promoting the reforming reaction during the tests without carbon formation. However, problems of cracking and degradation of the porous matrix, nonuniform dispersion of the Rh through the absorber, and catalyst deactivation due to sintering and possible encapsulation, must be resolved to achieve long-term operation and eventual commercialization. 17 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Muir, J.F.; Hogan, R.E. Jr.; Skocypec, R.D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Buck, R. (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Stuttgart (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Technische Thermodynamik)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

US Department of Energy radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1988  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this edition of the radioisotope customer list at the request of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (ER-73), Office of Energy Research, US Department of Energy (DOE). This is the 25th report in a series dating from 1964. This report covers DOE radioisotope sales and distribution activities by its facilities to domestic, foreign and other DOE facilities for FY 1988. The report is divided into five sections: radioisotope suppliers, facility contacts, and radioisotopes or services supplied; a list of customers, suppliers, and radioisotopes purchased; a list of radioisotopes purchased cross-referenced to customer numbers; geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and radioisotope sales and transfers -- FY 1988. Radioisotopes not previously reported in this series of reports were argon-37, arsenic-72, arsenic-73, bismuth-207, gadolinium-151, rhenium-188, rhodium-101, selenium-72, xenon-123 and zirconium-88. The total value of DOE radioisotope sales for FY 1988 was $11.1 million, an increase of 3% from FY 1987.

Van Houten, N.C.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Dendrimer Templated Synthesis of One Nanometer Rh and Pt Particles Supported on Mesoporous Silica: Catalytic Activity for Ethylene and Pyrrole Hydrogenation.  

SciTech Connect

Monodisperse rhodium (Rh) and platinum (Pt) nanoparticles as small as {approx}1 nm were synthesized within a fourth generation polyaminoamide (PAMAM) dendrimer, a hyperbranched polymer, in aqueous solution and immobilized by depositing onto a high-surface-area SBA-15 mesoporous support. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the as-synthesized Rh and Pt nanoparticles were mostly oxidized. Catalytic activity of the SBA-15 supported Rh and Pt nanoparticles was studied with ethylene hydrogenation at 273 and 293 K in 10 torr of ethylene and 100 torr of H{sub 2} after reduction (76 torr of H{sub 2} mixed with 690 torr of He) at different temperatures. Catalysts were active without removing the dendrimer capping but reached their highest activity after hydrogen reduction at a moderate temperature (423 K). When treated at a higher temperature (473, 573, and 673 K) in hydrogen, catalytic activity decreased. By using the same treatment that led to maximum ethylene hydrogenation activity, catalytic activity was also evaluated for pyrrole hydrogenation.

Huang, Wenyu; Kuhn, John N.; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Zhang, Yawen; Habas, Susan E.; Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2008-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

232

The geochemistry of platinum group elements in marine oil shale—A case study from the Bilong Co oil shale, northern Tibet, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Bilong Co oil shale zone is located in the South Qiangtang depression. This zone, together with the Shengli River-Changshe Mountain oil shale zone in the North Qiangtang depression, northern Tibet plateau, represents the potentially largest marine oil shale resource in China. Seventeen samples including oil shale and micritic limestone were collected from the Bilong Co oil shale area to determine the concentrations, distribution patterns, occurrences and origins of platinum group elements (PGEs) in marine oil shale. The oil shale samples from the Bilong Co area exhibit very low total PGE contents ranging from 1.04 to 2.96 ng/g with a weighted mean value of 1.686 ng/g, while the micritic limestone samples from the Bilong Co area exhibit a little lower PGE value ranging from 0.413 to 1.11 ng/g. \\{PGEs\\} in oil shale samples are characterized by high contents in Pd (average 0.79 ng/g), Os (average 0.123 ng/g) and Pt (average 0.644 ng/g) compared with Ru (average 0.068 ng/g), Rh (average 0.033 ng/g) and Ir (average 0.026 ng/g). The highest values for individual \\{PGEs\\} are not uniformly distributed in the section. Clearly, the \\{PGEs\\} are generally enriched in the oil shale samples near the boundary between micritic limestone and oil shale. The individual \\{PGEs\\} in oil shale samples from the Bilong Co area exhibit various modes of occurrence. Ruthenium and Pt occur mainly in pyrite, while Pd is associated mainly with organic matter and Mg-minerals. Rhodium and Os are controlled mainly by pyrite and organic matter. Iridium is present mainly in other Fe-bearing minerals, rather than pyrite. The \\{PGEs\\} in the Bilong Co oil shale are mainly of seawater origin and possibly influenced by terrigenous supply.

Xiugen Fu; Jian Wang; Yuhong Zeng; Fuwen Tan; Chen Wenbing; Xinglei Feng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Behavior and Effects of the Noble Metals in the DWPF Melter System  

SciTech Connect

Governments worldwide have committed to stabilization of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) by vitrification to a durable glass form for permanent disposal. All of these nuclear wastes contain the fission-product noble metals: ruthenium, rhodium, and palladium. SRS wastes also contain natural silver from iodine scrubbers. Closely associated with the noble metals are the fission products selenium and tellurium which are chemical analogs of sulfur and which combine with noble metals to influence their behavior and properties. Experience has shown that these melt insoluble metals and their compounds tend to settle to the floor of Joule-heated ceramic melters. In fact, almost all of the major research and production facilities have experienced some operational problem which can be associated with the presence of dense accumulations of these relatively conductive metals and/or their compounds. In most cases, these deposits have led to a loss of production capability, in some cases, to the point that melter operation could not continue. HLW nuclear waste vitrification facilities in the United States are the Department of Energy`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site, the planned Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) at the Hanford Site and the operating West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) at West Valley, NY. The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is a vitrification test facility at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). It was designed and constructed to provide an engineering-scale representation of the DWPF melter and its associated feed preparation and off-gas treatment systems. An extensive noble metals testing program was begun in 1990. The objectives of this task were to explore the effects of the noble metals on the DWPF melter feed preparation and waste vitrification processes. This report focuses on the vitrification portion of the test program.

Smith, M.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bickford, D.F.

1997-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

Kinetic study on the catalytic performance of Rh/TiO/sub 2/ reduced at different temperatures in the CO-H/sub 2/ reaction  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic CO-H/sub 2/ reaction on Rh/TiO/sub 2/ reduced at 200, 400, and 500/sup 0/C (Cat-200, -400, -500) for 2 h was kinetically studied at 250/sup 0/C using a circulating reactor and Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy to determine how Cat-400 exhibited the highest activity. The rate equation distinguished the best catalyst with zero and first orders in CO and H/sub 2/, respectively, from other catalysts with negative order in CO. The adsorption ability of the catalyst at 200/sup 0/C was comparable to that of Cat-200, and two to three times larger than that of Cat-500, although the ability of Cat-200 was much larger at room temperature. Carbon monoxide adsorbed on the catalysts reversibly as well as irreversibly. IR spectroscopy revealed that the major form of irreversibly adsorbed CO was linear on Cat-200, whereas similar amounts of linear and bridge forms were observed on Cat-400 and Cat-500. These latter forms were highly reactive against hydrogen molecules when no carbon monoxide was present in the gas phase. Based on these results, the highest activity of Cat-400 is ascribed to rhodium metal modified by properly reduced TiO/sub 2/ to show the appropriate adsorption ability of carbon monoxide which least retards the activation of hydrogen according to first-order kinetics. Typical strong metal-support interaction decreases the catalytic activity by decreasing the active sites and strengthening the CO adsorption too much.

Fujitsu, H.; Ikeyama, N.; Mochida, I.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Chemical modification of surfaces: the effect of potassium on the chemisorption of molecules on transition metal crystal surfaces  

SciTech Connect

The physical and chemical properties of pure potassium monolayers and its effect on the adsorption of oxygen, carbon monoxide and benzene on the (111) faces of platinum and rhodium single crystals are described. Potassium adsorption on both surfaces is quite similar. Potassium forms hexagonally close packed structures that are incommensurate with the substrate. The heat of desorption of potassium on these surfaces decreases with increasing potassium coverage. The surface free electron density increases and the work function decreases substantially wtih alkali adsorption, indicating charge transfer occurs from potassium to the substrate. Oxygen adsorption increases the potassium binding energy, and forms a surface complex at high potassium coverages. Oxygen adsorption is dissociative on both clean and potassium dosed Rh(111). The metal-oxygen stretching vibration increases in the presence of potassium, indicating stronger adsorption. Carbon monoxide adsorption on both metal surfaces is strongly affected. With increasing potassium coverage, the heat of desorption increases while the C-O stretching frequencies decrease. Also, substantial population shifts from the atop to the bridged site occur. Dissociation of CO is induced on Rh(111) by the presence of potassium. Benzene is found to be ..pi.. bonded oriented with the ring plane parallel to the surface with C/sub 3v/(sigma/sub d/) symmetry on both the clean and potassium dosed Rh(111) surfaces. Potassium reduces the heat of desorption of molecular benzene and induces a lower temperature pathway to decomposition. The major influence of potassium is to increase the surface electron density, which, for molecular adsorbates with low lying vacant orbitals of the correct symmetry, can lead to substantial changes in their bonding with the surface.

Crowell, J.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Separation of gas mixtures by supported complexes. Final report, 1 October 1982-30 September 1984  

SciTech Connect

This final report covers research performed to identify and demonstrate advantageous procedures for the chemical separation of gases, such as CO, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/, from medium-Btu gas mixtures by use of supported complexes. Three complexes were chosen for rapid gas uptake and selectivity at 25/sup 0/C from among a group of 22 coordination complexes synthesized during this program. The three complexes showed considerable selectivity toward individual gases. For instance, Pd/sub 2/(dpm)/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ or bis-..mu..-(bisdiphenylphosphinomethane)-dichlorodipalladium (Pd-Pd), rapidly bound carbon monoxide from solution. This complex could be regenerated, with the carbon monoxide reversibly removed, by warming to 40/sup 0/C. The presence of other gases, such as carbon dioxide, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, ethylene, or acetylene, had no effect upon the rapid uptake of carbon monoxide or its removal. Such selectivity was also noted with Ru(CO)/sub 2/(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 3/, biscarbonyltris(triphenylphosphine)ruthenium. Although this complex bound hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and oxygen in solution, the hydrogen was taken up twice as fast as carbon monoxide and seven times faster than oxygen. These gases could be removed from the complex with mild heat or decreased pressure. Crystalline Rh(OH)(CO)(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 2/, hydroxocarbonylbis(triphenylphosphine)rhodium, rapidly bound carbon dioxide; the complex was regenerated at 50/sup 0/C under reduced pressure. The rapid uptake of carbon dioxide by this complex was not changed in the presence of oxygen. In general the three selected crystalline or solvent dissolved complexes performed well in the absence of polymeric support. The stability and favorable kinetics of the three complexes suggest that they could be utilized in a solution system for gas separation (Conceptual Analyses and Preliminary Economics). Further, these complexes appear to be superb candidates as transport agents for facilitated-transport, membrane systems. 69 references, 21 figures.

Nelson, D.A.; Hallen, R.T.; Lilga, M.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Fate of Noble Metals during the Pyroprocessing of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

During the pyroprocessing of spent nuclear fuel by electrochemical techniques, fission products are separated as the fuel is oxidized at the anode and refined uranium is deposited at the cathode. Those fission products that are oxidized into the molten salt electrolyte are considered active metals while those that do not react are considered noble metals. The primary noble metals encountered during pyroprocessing are molybdenum, zirconium, ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, and technetium. Pyroprocessing of spent fuel to date has involved two distinctly different electrorefiner designs, in particular the anode to cathode configuration. For one electrorefiner, the anode and cathode collector are horizontally displaced such that uranium is transported across the electrolyte medium. As expected, the noble metal removal from the uranium during refining is very high, typically in excess of 99%. For the other electrorefiner, the anode and cathode collector are vertically collocated to maximize uranium throughput. This arrangement results in significantly less noble metals removal from the uranium during refining, typically no better than 20%. In addition to electrorefiner design, operating parameters can also influence the retention of noble metals, albeit at the cost of uranium recovery. Experiments performed to date have shown that as much as 100% of the noble metals can be retained by the cladding hulls while affecting the uranium recovery by only 6%. However, it is likely that commercial pyroprocessing of spent fuel will require the uranium recovery to be much closer to 100%. The above mentioned design and operational issues will likely be driven by the effects of noble metal contamination on fuel fabrication and performance. These effects will be presented in terms of thermal properties (expansion, conductivity, and fusion) and radioactivity considerations. Ultimately, the incorporation of minor amounts of noble metals from pyroprocessing into fast reactor metallic fuel will be shown to be of no consequence to reactor performance.

B.R. Westphal; D. Vaden; S.X. Li; G.L. Fredrickson; R.D. Mariani

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

CO2 conversion for syngas production in methane catalytic partial oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The catalytic partial oxidation of methane (CPOM) involves the interaction among methane combustion (MC), steam reforming (SR), and dry reforming (DR), and CO2 generated from MC is utilized for syngas production in DR. To evaluate the potential of CO2 utilization in CPOM for syngas production, a numerical study is carried out where CO2 is added into the feed gas and CPOM is triggered in a rhodium-based catalyst bed. Two important parameters of CO2/O2 ratio and O2/CH4 ratio (or O/C ratio) in the feed gas are taken into account. The predictions suggest that CO2 addition plays no part in MC, but it retards SR and intensifies DR. The CO2 consumption increases with CO2/O2 ratio; however, the CO2 conversion goes down. As a whole, increasing CO2 addition enhances CO formation but reduces H2 formation. The maximum syngas production is exhibited at CO2/O2 = 0.2 when the O/C ratio is 1. At a fixed CO2/O2 ratio, the maximum H2 yield and CO2 consumption are located at O/C = 1.8 and 1.0, respectively. However, the CO2 conversion monotonically decreases with increasing O/C ratio. Within the investigated range of CO2/O2 and O/C ratios, the H2 yield and CO2 conversion in CPOM are in the ranges of approximately 0.42–1.34 mol(mol CH4)?1 and 10–41%, respectively.

Wei-Hsin Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Monochromatic wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence providing sensitive and selective detection of uranium  

SciTech Connect

Monochromatic wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (MWDXRF) is a sensitive and selective method for elemental compositional analyses. The basis for this instrumental advance is the doubly curved crystal (DCC) optic. Previous work has demonstrated the feasibility of sensitive trace element detection for yttrium as a surrogate for curium in aqueous solutions. Additional measurements have demonstrated similar sensitivity in several different matrix environments which attests to the selectivity of the DCC optic as well as the capabilities of the MWDXRF concept. The objective of this effort is to develop an improved Pu characterization method for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The MWDXRF prototype instrument is the second step in a multi-year effort to achieve an improved Pu assay. This work will describe a prototype MWDXRF instrument designed for uranium detection and characterization. The prototype consists of an X-ray tube with a rhodium anode and a DCC excitation optic incorporated into the source. The DCC optic passes the RhK{alpha} line at 20.214 keV for monochromatic excitation of the sample. The source is capable of 50 W power at 50 kV and 1.0 mA operation. The x-ray emission from the sample is collected by a DCC optic set at the UL{alpha} line of 13.613 keV. The collection optic transmits the UL{alpha} x-rays to the silicon drift detector. The x-ray source, sample, collection optic and detector are all mounted on motion controlled stages for the critical alignment of these components. The sensitivity and selectivity of the instrument is obtained through the monochromatic excitation and the monochromatic detection. The prototype instrument performance has a demonstrated for sensitivity for uranium detection of around 2 ppm at the current state of development. Further improvement in sensitivity is expected with more detailed alignment.

Havrilla, George J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Collins, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Velma M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Zewu [XOS; Wei, Fuzhong [XOS

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

An Assessment of the Current Day Impact of Various Materials Associated with the U.S. Nuclear Test Program in the Marshall Island  

SciTech Connect

Different stable elements, and some natural and man-made radionuclides, were used as tracers or associated in other ways with nuclear devices that were detonated at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls as part of the U.S. nuclear testing program from 1946 through 1958. The question has been raised whether any of these materials dispersed by the explosions could be of sufficient concentration in either the marine environment or on the coral islands to be of a health concern to people living, or planning to live, on the atolls. This report addresses that concern. An inventory of the materials involved during the test period was prepared and provided to us by the Office of Defense Programs (DP) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The materials that the DOE and the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) ask to be evaluated are--sulfur, arsenic, yttrium, tantalum, gold, rhodium, indium, tungsten, thallium, thorium-230,232 ({sup 230,232}Th), uranium-233,238 ({sup 233,238}U), polonium-210 ({sup 210}Po), curium-232 ({sup 232}Cu), and americium-241 ({sup 241}Am). The stable elements were used primarily as tracers for determining neutron energy and flux, and for other diagnostic purposes in the larger yield, multistage devices. It is reasonable to assume that these materials would be distributed in a similar manner as the fission products subsequent to detonation. A large inventory of fission product and uranium data was available for assessment. Detailed calculations show only a very small fraction of the fission products produced during the entire test series remain at the test site atolls. Consequently, based on the information provided, we conclude that the concentration of these materials in the atoll environment pose no adverse health effects to humans.

Robison, W L; Noshkin, V E; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L; Bogen, K T

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ANALYSIS OF DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8) POUR STREAM SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), also referred to as Macrobatch 8 (MB8), in June 2011. SB7a is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the SB7a material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7a was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Three pour stream glass samples and two Melter Feed Tank (MFT) slurry samples were collected while processing SB7a. These additional samples were taken during SB7a to understand the impact of antifoam and the melter bubblers on glass redox chemistry. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they were analyzed. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The sum of oxides for the official SB7a pour stream glass is within the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) limits (95-105 wt%). (2) The average calculated Waste Dilution Factor (WDF) for SB7a is 2.3. In general, the measured radionuclide content of the official SB7a pour stream glass is in good agreement with the calculated values from the Tank 40 dried sludge results from the SB7a Waste Acceptance Program Specification (WAPS) sample. (3) As in previous pour stream samples, ruthenium and rhodium inclusions were detected by Scanning Electron Microscopy-Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) in the official SB7a pour stream sample. (4) The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results indicate that the official SB7a pour stream glass meets the waste acceptance criteria for durability with a normalized boron release of 0.64 g/L, which is an order of magnitude less than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. (5) The measured density of the SB7a pour stream glass was 2.7 g/cm{sup 3}. (6) The Fe{sup 2+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios of the SB7a pour stream samples were in the range of 0.04-0.13, while the MFT sample glasses prepared by SRNL were in the range of 0.02-0.04.

Johnson, F.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Colloidally Synthesized Monodisperse Rh Nanoparticles Supported on SBA-15 for Size- and Pretreatment-Dependent Studies of CO Oxidation  

SciTech Connect

A particle size dependence for CO oxidation over rhodium nanoparticles of 1.9-11.3 nm has been investigated and determined to be modified by the existence of the capping agent poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP). The particles were prepared using a polyol reduction procedure with PVP as the capping agent. The Rh nanoparticles were subsequently supported on SBA-15 during hydrothermal synthesis to produce Rh/SBA-15 supported catalysts for size-dependent catalytic studies. CO oxidation by O{sub 2} at 40 Torr CO and 100 Torr O{sub 2} was investigated over two series of Rh/SBA-15 catalysts: as-synthesized Rh/SBA-15 covering the full range of Rh sizes and the same set of catalysts after high temperature calcination and reduction. The turnover frequency at 443 K increases from 0.4 to 1.7 s{sup -1} as the particle size decreases from 11.3 to 1.9 nm for the as-synthesized catalysts. After calcination and reduction, the turnover frequency is between 0.1 and 0.4 s{sup -1} with no particle size dependence. The apparent activation energy for all catalysts is {approx}30 kcal mol{sup -1} and is independent of particle size and thermal treatment. Infrared spectroscopy of CO on the Rh nanoparticles indicates that the heat treatments used influence the mode of CO adsorption. As a result, the particle size dependence for CO oxidation is altered after calcination and reduction of the catalysts. CO adsorbs at two distinct bridge sites on as-synthesized Rh/SBA-15, attributable to metallic Rh(0) and oxidized Rh(I) bridge sites. After calcination and reduction, however, CO adsorbs only at Rh(0) atop sites. The change in adsorption geometry and oxidation activity may be attributable to the interaction between PVP and the Rh surface. This capping agent affect may open new possibilities for the tailoring of metal catalysts using solution nanoparticle synthesis methods.

Grass, Michael E.; Joo, Sang Hoon; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2009-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

243

Analysis Of The Sludge Batch 7b (Macrobatch 9) DWPF Pour Stream Glass Sample  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9), in January 2012. SB7b is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and the SB7b material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7b was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Form Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Two pour stream glass samples were collected while processing SB7b. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where one was analyzed and the other was archived. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: The sum of oxides for the official SB7b pour stream glass is within the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) limits (95-105 wt%); The average calculated Waste Dilution Factor (WDF) for SB7b is 2.3. In general, the measured radionuclide content of the official SB7b pour stream glass is in good agreement with the calculated values from the Tank 40 dried sludge results from the SB7b Waste Acceptance Program Specification (WAPS) sample; As in previous pour stream samples, ruthenium and rhodium inclusions were detected by Scanning Electron Microscopy-Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) in the SB7b pour stream sample; The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results indicate that the official SB7b pour stream glass meets the waste acceptance criteria for durability with a normalized boron release of 0.8 g/L, which is an order of magnitude less than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass; The measured density of the SB7b pour stream glass was 2.70 g/cm{sup 3}; The Fe{sup 2+}/?Fe ratio of the SB7b pour stream samples was 0.07.

Johnson, F. C.; Crawford, C. L.; Pareizs, J. M.

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

244

Evaluation of Alternate Materials for Coated Particle Fuels for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Candidate ceramic materials were studied to determine their suitability as Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor particle fuel coatings. The ceramics examined in this work were: TiC, TiN, ZrC, ZrN, AlN, and SiC. The studies focused on (i) chemical reactivity of the ceramics with fission products palladium and rhodium, (ii) the thermomechanical stresses that develop in the fuel coatings from a variety of causes during burnup, and (iii) the radiation resiliency of the materials. The chemical reactivity of TiC, TiN, ZrC, and ZrN with Pd and Rh were all found to be much lower than that of SiC. A number of important chemical behaviors were observed at the ceramic-metal interfaces, including the formation of specific intermetallic phases and a variation in reaction rates for the different ceramics investigated. Based on the data collected in this work, the nitride ceramics (TiN and ZrN) exhibit chemical behavior that is characterized by lower reaction rates with Pd and Rh than the carbides TiC and ZrC. The thermomechanical stresses in spherical fuel particle ceramic coatings were modeled using finite element analysis, and included contributions from differential thermal expansion, fission gas pressure, fuel kernel swelling, and thermal creep. In general the tangential stresses in the coatings during full reactor operation are tensile, with ZrC showing the lowest values among TiC, ZrC, and SiC (TiN and ZrN were excluded from the comprehensive calculations due to a lack of available materials data). The work has highlighted the fact that thermal creep plays a critical role in the development of the stress state of the coatings by relaxing many of the stresses at high temperatures. To perform ion irradiations of sample materials, an irradiation beamline and high-temperature sample irradiation stage was constructed at the University of Wisconsin’s 1.7MV Tandem Accelerator Facility. This facility is now capable of irradiating of materials to high dose while controlling sample temperature up to 800şC.

Paul A. Demkowicz; Karen Wright; Jian Gan; David Petti; Todd Allen; Jake Blanchard

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A Site-Isolated Iridium Diethylene Complex Supported on Highly Dealuminated Y Zeolite: Synthesis And Characterization  

SciTech Connect

Highly dealuminated Y zeolite-supported mononuclear iridium complexes with reactive ethylene ligands were synthesized by chemisorption of Ir(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}(C{sub 5}H{sub 7}O{sub 2}). The resultant structure and its treatment in He, CO, ethylene, and H2 were investigated with infrared (IR) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies. The IR spectra show that Ir(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}(C{sub 5}H{sub 7}O{sub 2}) reacted readily with surface OH groups of the zeolite, leading to the removal of C{sub 5}H{sub 7}O{sub 2} ligands and the formation of supported mononuclear iridium complexes, confirmed by the lack of Ir-Ir contributions in the EXAFS spectra. The EXAFS data show that each Ir atom was bonded to four carbon atoms at an average distance of 2.10 {angstrom}, consistent with the presence of two ethylene ligands per Ir atom and in agreement with the IR spectra indicating {pi}-bonded ethylene ligands. The EXAFS data also indicate that each Ir atom was bonded to two oxygen atoms of the zeolite at a distance of 2.15 {angstrom}. The supported iridium-ethylene complex reacted with H{sub 2} to give ethane, and it also catalyzed ethylene hydrogenation at atmospheric pressure and 294 K. Treatment of the sample in CO led to the formation of Ir(CO){sub 2} complexes bonded to the zeolite. The sharpness of the V{sub CO} bands indicates a high degree of uniformity of these complexes on the support. The iridium-ethylene complex on the crystalline zeolite support is inferred to be one of the most nearly uniform supported metal complex catalysts. The results indicate that it is isostructural with a previously reported rhodium complex on the same zeolite; thus, the results are a start to a family of analogous, structurally well-defined supported metal complex catalysts.

Uzun, A.; Bhirud, V.A.; Kletnieks, P.W.; Haw, J.F.; Gates, B.C.

2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

246

Process for alkane group dehydrogenation with organometallic catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process is described for the catalytic dehydrogenation of organic molecules having a ##STR1## group to produce a ##STR2## group. The organic molecules are: ##STR3## wherein: A.sup.1, A.sup.2, A.sup.3, and A.sup.4 are each independently P, As or N: E.sup.2 is independently C or N; E.sup.3 is independently C, Si or Ge; E.sup.4 is independently C, Si, or Ge; and E.sup.5 is independently C, Si or Ge; M.sup.1, M.sup.2, M.sup.3, and M.sup.4 each is a metal atom independently selected from the group consisting of ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium and platinum; Q.sup.1, Q.sup.2, Q.sup.3, and Q.sup.4 are each independently a direct bond, --CH.sub.2 --, --CH.sub.2 CH.sub.2 --, or CH.dbd.CH--; in structure I, structure II or structure IV, R.sup.1, R.sup.2, R.sup.3, and R.sup.4 are each independently selected from alkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkyl, and aryl, or R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 together and R.sup.3 and R.sup.4 together form a ring structure having from 4 to 10 carbon atoms, or in structure III, R.sup.5, R.sup.6, R.sup.7, and R.sup.8 are each independently selected from alkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkyl, and aryl, or R.sup.5 and R.sup.6 together and R.sup.7 and R.sup.8 together form a ring structure having from 4 to 10 carbon atoms, at a temperature of between about 100.degree. and 250.degree. C. for between about 1 hr and 300 days in the absence of N.sub.2. The surprisingly stable catalyst is a complex of an organic ligand comprising H, C, Si, N, P atoms, and a platinum group metal. The dehydrogenation is performed between about 100 to 200.degree. C., and has increased turnover.

Kaska, W.C.; Jensen, C.M.

1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

247

Sediment studies at Bikini Atoll part 3. Inventories of some long-lived gamma-emitting radionuclides associated with lagoon surface sediments  

SciTech Connect

Surface sediment samples were collected during 1979 from 87 locations in the lagoon at Bikini Atoll. The collections were made to better define the concentrations and distribution of long-lived radionuclides associated with the bottom material and to show what modifications occurred to the composition of the surface sediment from the nuclear testing program conducted by the United States at the Atoll between 1946 and 1958. This is the last of three reports on Bikini sediment studies. In this report, we discuss the concentrations and inventories of the residual long-lived gamma-emitting radionuclides in sediments from the lagoon. The gamma-emitting radionuclides detected most frequently in sediments collected in 1979, in addition to Americium-241 ({sup 241}Am) (discussed in the second report of this series), included Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), Bismuth-207 ({sup 207}Bi), Europium-155 ({sup 155}Eu), and Cobalt-60 ({sup 60}Co). Other man-made, gamma-emitting radionuclides such as Europium-152,154 ({sup 152,154}Eu), Antimony-125 ({sup 125}Sb), and Rhodium-101,102m ({sup 101,102m}Rh) were occasionally measured above detection limits in sediments near test site locations. The mean inventories for {sup 137}Cs, {sup 207}Ei, {sup 155}Eu, and {sup 60}Co in the surface 4 cm of the lagoon sediment to be 1.7, 0.56, 7.76, and 0.74 TBq, respectively. By June 1997, radioactive decay would reduce these values to 1.1, 0.38, 0.62, and 0.07 TBq, respectively. Some additional loss results from a combination of different processes that continuously mobilize and return some amount of the radionuclides to the water column. The water and dissolved constituents are removed from the lagoon through channels and exchange with the surface waters of the north equatorial Pacific Ocean. Highest levels of these radionuclides are found in surface deposits lagoonward of the Bravo Crater. Lowest concentrations and inventories are associated with sediment lagoonward of the eastern reef. The quantities in the 0-4 cm surface layer are estimated to be less than 35% of the total inventory to depth in the sediment column.

Noshkin, V.E.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Transition metal complexes of oxazolinylboranes and cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borates: Catalysts for asymmetric olefin hydroamination and acceptorless alcohol decarbonylation  

SciTech Connect

The research presented and discussed in this dissertation involves the synthesis of transition metal complexes of oxazolinylboranes and cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borates, and their application in catalytic enantioselective olefin hydroamination and acceptorless alcohol decarbonylation. Neutral oxazolinylboranes are excellent synthetic intermediates for preparing new borate ligands and also developing organometallic complexes. Achiral and optically active bis(oxazolinyl)phenylboranes are synthesized by reaction of 2-lithio-2-oxazolide and 0.50 equiv of dichlorophenylborane. These bis(oxazolinyl)phenylboranes are oligomeric species in solid state resulting from the coordination of an oxazoline to the boron center of another borane monomer. The treatment of chiral bis(oxazolinyl)phenylboranes with sodium cyclopentadienide provide optically active cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borates H[PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 5})(Ox{sup R}){sub 2}] [Ox{sup R} = Ox{sup 4S-iPr,Me2}, Ox{sup 4R-iPr,Me2}, Ox{sup 4S-tBu]}. These optically active proligands react with an equivalent of M(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) to afford corresponding cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borato group 4 complexes {PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 4})(Ox{sup R}){sub 2}}M(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} in high yields. These group 4 compounds catalyze cyclization of aminoalkenes at room temperature or below, providing pyrrolidine, piperidine, and azepane with enantiomeric excesses up to 99%. Our mechanistic investigations suggest a non-insertive mechanism involving concerted C?N/C?H bond formation in the turnover limiting step of the catalytic cycle. Among cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borato group 4 catalysts, the zirconium complex {PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 4})(Ox{sup 4S-iPr,Me2}){sub 2}}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} ({S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}) displays highest activity and enantioselectivity. Interestingly, {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} also desymmetrizes olefin moieties of achiral non-conjugated aminodienes and aminodiynes during cyclization. The cyclization of aminodienes catalyzed by {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} affords diastereomeric mixture of cis and trans cylic amines with high diasteromeric ratios and excellent enantiomeric excesses. Similarly, the desymmetrization of alkyne moieties in {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}-catalyzed cyclization of aminodiynes provides corresponding cyclic imines bearing quaternary stereocenters with enantiomeric excesses up to 93%. These stereoselective desymmetrization reactions are significantly affected by concentration of the substrate, temperature, and the presence of a noncyclizable primary amine. In addition, both the diastereomeric ratios and enantiomeric excesses of the products are markedly enhanced by N-deuteration of the substrates. Notably, the cationic zirconium-monoamide complex [{S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2})][B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}] obtained from neutral {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} cyclizes primary aminopentenes providing pyrrolidines with S-configuration; whereas {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} provides R-configured pyrrolidines. The yttrium complex {S-2}YCH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3} also affords S-configured pyrrolidines by cyclization of aminopentenes, however the enantiomeric excesses of products are low. An alternative optically active yttrium complex {PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 4})(Ox{sup 4S-tBu}){sub 2}}YCH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3} ({S-3}YCH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3}) is synthesized, which displays highly enantioselective in the cyclization of aminoalkenes at room temperature affording S-configured cyclic amines with enantiomeric excesses up to 96%. A noninsertive mechanism involving a six-membered transition state by a concerted C?N bond formation and N?H bond cleavage is proposed for {S-3}YCH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3} system based on the kinetic, spectroscopic, and stereochemical features. In the end, a series of bis- and tris(oxazolinyl)borato iridium and rhodium complexes are synthesized with bis(oxazolinyl)phenylborane [PhB(Ox{sup Me2}){sub 2}]{sub n}, tris(oxazolinyl)borane [B(Ox{sup Me2}){sub 3}]n, and tris(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)phenylborate [To{sup M}]{sup ?}. All these new an

Manna, Kuntal [Ames Laboratory

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z