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1

Supervised Harvesting of Expression Trees Trevor Hastie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supervised Harvesting of Expression Trees Trevor Hastie #3; , Robert Tibshirani y , David Botstein learning from gene ex- pression data. We call it \\Tree Harvesting". This technique starts between genes. Conclusions Tree Harvesting is a potentially useful tool for exploration of gene expression

Hastie, Trevor

2

C. Rdiger, J.P. Walker, J.D. Kalma, G.R. Willgoose, and P.R. Houser (2004), Streamflow data assimilation: A study on nested catchments,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assimilation: A study on nested catchments, in Proceedings of the 2nd international CAHMDA workshop on: The Ter.P. Walker1, J.D. Kalma2, G.R. Willgoose3, and P.R. Houser4 1Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering "observations" and the evaluation data. The initial conditions and land surface forcing data are then degraded

Walker, Jeff

3

EVIDENCE FOR CO DISSOCIATION ON RHODIUM SURFACES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon monoxide adsorbs molecularly on rhodium surfaces at 300K, but if the rhodium samples are heated in the presence of carbon monoxide, there is evidence for carbon-oxygen bond breaking at step and/or defect sites. The effects of step and defect site density, subsurface oxygen concentration, and oxygen dissolution into the rhodium lattice on CO dissociation are discussed.

Castner, D.G.; Dubois, L.H.; Sexton, B.A.; Somorjai, G.A.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Complexity of the Ritchken-Trevor-Cakici-Topyan GARCH Option Pricing Algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complexity of the Ritchken-Trevor-Cakici-Topyan GARCH Option Pricing Algorithm Yuh-Dauh Lyuu, Taiwan Abstract The trinomial-tree GARCH option pricing algo- rithm of Ritchken and Trevor (1999, exceeds a typically small number determined by the GARCH parameters. Worse, when explo- sion happens

Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

5

Earth Observations for rapid response to large earthquakes Supervisors: Dr Zhenhong Li and Prof Trevor Hoey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Earth Observations for rapid response to large earthquakes Supervisors: Dr Zhenhong Li and Prof Trevor Hoey School of Geographical and Earth Sciences, University of Glasgow, UK Earthquakes, together of the earth system; they are messengers of the fundamental processes that shape the surface of the Earth

Guo, Zaoyang

6

Lego Robotics Engineering Camps at the UC Irvine, Claire Trevor School of the Arts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soccer for the young mind! Lego® Robotics Engineering Camps at the UC Irvine, Claire Trevor static structures used in robotics by applying the fundamentals of art, design, math and science concepts. Robot Cadets will build strong and stable structures, explore simple machines, and program

Loudon, Catherine

7

Implementing Six Sigma in Challenging Times: A Case Jose Hernandez, Trevor Turner,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implementing Six Sigma in Challenging Times: A Case Study Jose Hernandez, Trevor Turner, DMEM by introducing Six Sigma. The paper discusses the effects that the current economic climate has had in the business and presents the findings of a Six Sigma project implementation. Keywords: Six Sigma, SMES, Cost

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

8

Hydrodesulfurization Properties of Rhodium Phosphide: Comparison  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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9

Rhodium-catalyzed dehydrogenative borylation of cyclic alkenes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A rhodium-catalyzed dehydrogenative borylation of cyclic alkenes is described. This reaction provides direct access to cyclic 1-alkenylboronic acid pinacol esters, useful intermediates in organic synthesis. SuzukiMiyaura ...

Kondoh, Azusa

10

Methanol adsorption and decomposition on rhodium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The decomposition of methanol on rhodium probed from {approximately}200 atomic sites of the (001) or (111) planes or Rh field emitter crystals but randomly with regard to crystallographic zones was studied by pulsed field desorption mass spectrometry. High electric field pulses were used to quantitatively desorb the final products, carbon monoxide and hydrogen, thus achieving steady-state conditions. Substantial amounts of methoxy (mainly desorbed as CH{sub 3}{sup +} ions) were also present at the surface. Applying a steady electric field, F{sub R} {ge} 4 V/nm, between the field pulses, led to a deceleration of the decomposition reaction and to increase of the amount of adsorbed CH{sub 3}O and CH{sub 2}O species. There were indicators that the rate-determining step of the reaction is C-H bond cleavage in adsorbed methoxy to form the CH{sub 2}O intermediate. This was supported by the observation of a kinetic isotope effect in the formation of CD{sub 2}O and CHDO from methyl-d{sub 2}-alcohol, CHD{sub 2}OH. Here, the C-H bond breaking to form the CD{sub 2}O was found to be twice as fast as the breaking of the C-D bond which results in CHDO. Field ion microscopy was applied to investigate the influence of the reaction on the structure of the whole hemispherical single crystal surface. There were neither topographic changes nor corrosion of the Rh surface after field-free exposure to 2 Pa methanol at temperatures up to 423 K.

Chuah, G.K.; Kruse, N.; Schmidt, W.A.; Block, J.H.; Abend, G. (Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin (Germany, F.R.))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Discovery of Rubidium, Strontium, Molybdenum, and Rhodium Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently, thirty-one rubidium, thirty-five strontium, thirty-five molybdenum and thirty-eight rhodium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

Parker, A M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Discovery of rubidium, strontium, molybdenum, and rhodium isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, 31 rubidium, 35 strontium, 35 molybdenum, and 38 rhodium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

Parker, A.M.; Thoennessen, M., E-mail: thoennessen@nscl.msu.edu

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Discovery of Rubidium, Strontium, Molybdenum, and Rhodium Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently, thirty-one rubidium, thirty-five strontium, thirty-five molybdenum and thirty-eight rhodium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

A. M. Parker; M. Thoennessen

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

14

Direct Ethanol Fuel Cells: Platinum/Rhodium Anode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct Ethanol Fuel Cells: Platinum/Rhodium Anode Catalysis Ken Ellis-Guardiola PCCM REU 2010 #12 EtOH+3H2O 12H+ +2CO2+ 12e- Pt C 4H+ + 4e- + O2 2H2O O2 Anode Cathode The Direct Ethanol Fuel Cell #12;The addition of other metals to Platinum improves its fuel cell performance Pt alone is easily

Petta, Jason

15

Rhodium coated mirrors deposited by magnetron sputtering for fusion applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic mirrors will be essential components of all optical spectroscopy and imaging systems for ITER plasma diagnostics. Any change in the mirror performance, in particular, its reflectivity, due to erosion of the surface by charge exchange neutrals or deposition of impurities will influence the quality and reliability of the detected signals. Due to its high reflectivity in the visible wavelength range and its low sputtering yield, rhodium appears as an attractive material for first mirrors in ITER. However, the very high price of the raw material calls for using it in the form of a film deposited onto metallic substrates. The development of a reliable technique for the preparation of high reflectivity rhodium films is therefore of the highest importance. Rhodium layers with thicknesses of up to 2 {mu}m were produced on different substrates of interest (Mo, stainless steel, Cu) by magnetron sputtering. Produced films exhibit a low roughness and crystallite size of about 10 nm with a dense columnar structure. No impurities were detected on the surface after deposition. Scratch tests demonstrate that adhesion properties increase with substrate hardness. Detailed optical characterizations of Rh-coated mirrors as well as results of erosion tests performed both under laboratory conditions and in the TEXTOR tokamak are presented in this paper.

Marot, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Oelhafen, P.; Covarel, G.; Litnovsky, A. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Laboratoire Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes de Fabrication, 61 rue Albert Camus, Universite de Haute-Alsace, F-68093 Mulhouse Cedex (France); Institut fuer Energieforschung (Plasmaphysik), Forschungszentrum Juelich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, D 52425 Juelich (Germany)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over iron-rhodium alloy catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To investigate the nature of iron-rhodium alloy catalysts during the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, a combination of experimental techniques were applied. Infrared spectroscopy was mainly used to extract direct information on the surface of catalysts under the reaction conditions. In addition, Mossbauer spectroscopy was employed to study the iron alloy catalysts. Further characterization of the catalysts was performed by chemisorption measurements. Hydrocarbon products of the CO + H/sub 2/ synthesis reaction were analyzed by gas chromatography. The working surface of a silica-supported rhodium catalyst was found to be saturated with molecular carbon monoxide. The intensity of the linear carbonyl absorption band remained constant compared to that for room temperature CO adsorption, while that of the bridge-bonded carbonyl absorption band was drastically reduced during the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The bridge-bonded adsorption sites are assumed to be the active sites for dissociating carbon monoxide. The hydrogenation rate of the linearly adsorbed carbon monoxide was much slower than the steady state reaction rate. The alloy catalyst did not form a bulk carbide, but the presence of surface carbon was suggested by the large shift of the linear carbonyl absorption band. On the other hand, infrared spectra on an iron catalyst showed only weak bands, indicating a high degree of CO dissociation. On a silica-supported iron-rhodium alloy catalyst, surface analysis by infrared spectroscopy presents evidence of well-mixed alloy formation. Three models of carbon monoxide adsorption were identified.

Choi, S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Agnes Houser | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation 2011Oversupply Management

18

Rhodium-catalyzed epoxide-opening cascades toward brevisin and hemibrevetoxin B  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER I. Rhodium-Catalyzed Epoxide-Opening Cascades: Formal Synthesis of (-)-Brevisin [chemical formula inserted] [Rh(CO)?Cl]? was found to be an effective catalyst for endo-selective cyclizations and cascades of ...

Armbrust, Kurt W. (Kurt Willes)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Effect of support on catalytic behavior of dispersed rhodium for hydrocarbon hydrogenolyses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFFCT OF SUPPORT ON CATALYTIC BEHAVIOR OF DISPERSED RHODIUM POR HYDROCARBON HYDROGENOLYSES A Thesis AMINA ARMED KHAL'lFA Submi I ted to the Graduate College of Texas AKM University in partial full illment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Chemistry EFFECT OF SUPPORT ON CATALYTIC BEHAVIOR OF DISPERSED RHODIUM FOR HYDROCARBON HYDROGENOLYSES A Thesis by AMINA AHMED KHALIFA Approved as to style and content by: M. P. osynek (Chairman...

Khalifa, Amina Ahmed

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

20

Rhodium mediated bond activation: from synthesis to catalysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, our lab has developed monoanionic tridentate ligand, To{sup R}, showing the corresponding coordination chemistry and catalyst reactivity of magnesium, zirconium, zinc and iridium complexes. This thesis details synthetic chemistry, structural study and catalytic reactivity of the To{sup R}-supported rhodium compounds. Tl[To{sup R}] has been proved to be a superior ligand transfer agent for synthesizing rhodium complexes. The salt metathesis route of Tl[To{sup M}] with [Rh({mu}-Cl)(CO)]{sub 2} and [Rh({mu}- Cl)(COE)]{sub 2} gives To{sup M}Rh(CO){sub 2} (2.2) and To{sup M}RhH({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 8}H{sub 13}) (3.1) respectively while Tl[To{sup P}] with [Rh({mu}-Cl)(CO)]{sub 2} affords To{sup P}Rh(CO){sub 2} (2.3). 2.2 reacts with both strong and weak electrophiles, resulting in the oxazoline N-attacked and the metal center-attacked compounds correspondingly. Using one of the metal center-attacked electrophiles, 2.3 was demonstrated to give high diastereoselectivity. Parallel to COE allylic C-H activation complex 3.1, the propene and allylbenzene allylic C-H activation products have also been synthesized. The subsequent functionalization attempts have been examined by treating with Brnsted acids, Lewis acids, electrophiles, nucleophiles, 1,3-dipolar reagents and reagents containing multiple bonds able to be inserted. Various related complexes have been obtained under these conditions, in which one of the azide insertion compounds reductively eliminates to give an allylic functionalization product stoichiometrically. 3.1 reacts with various primary alcohols to give the decarbonylation dihydride complex To{sup M}Rh(H){sub 2}CO (4.1). 4.1 shows catalytic reactivity for primary alcohol decarbonylation under a photolytic condition. Meanwhile, 2.2 has been found to be more reactive than 4.1 for catalytic alcohol decarbonylation under the same condition. Various complexes and primary alcohols have been investigated as well. The proposed mechanism is based on the stochiometric reactions of the possible metal and organic intermediates. Primary amines, hypothesized to undergo a similar reaction pathway, have been verified to give dehydrogenative coupling product, imines. In the end, the well-developed neutral tridentate Tpm coordinates to the rhodium bis(ethylene) dimer in the presence of TlPF{sub 6} to give the cationic complex, [TpmRh(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}][PF{sub 6}] (5.1). 5.1 serves as the first example of explicit determination of the solid state hapticity, evidenced by X-ray structure, among all the cationic Tpm{sup R}M(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup +} (Tpm{sup R} = Tpm, Tpm*, M = Rh, Ir) derivatives. The substitution chemistry of this compound has been studied by treating with soft and hard donors. The trimethylphosphine-sbustituted complex activates molecular hydrogen to give the dihydride compound.

Ho, Hung-An

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Monodisperse Platinum and Rhodium Nanoparticles as Model Heterogeneous Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Model heterogeneous catalysts have been synthesized and studied to better understand how the surface structure of noble metal nanoparticles affects catalytic performance. In this project, monodisperse rhodium and platinum nanoparticles of controlled size and shape have been synthesized by solution phase polyol reduction, stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Model catalysts have been developed using these nanoparticles by two methods: synthesis of mesoporous silica (SBA-15) in the presence of nanoparticles (nanoparticle encapsulation, NE) to form a composite of metal nanoparticles supported on SBA-15 and by deposition of the particles onto a silicon wafer using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer deposition. The particle shapes were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) and the sizes were determined by TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and in the case of NE samples, room temperature H2 and CO adsorption isotherms. Catalytic studies were carried out in homebuilt gas-phase reactors. For the nanoparticles supported on SBA-15, the catalysts are in powder form and were studied using the homebuilt systems as plug-flow reactors. In the case of nanoparticles deposited on silicon wafers, the same systems were operated as batch reactors. This dissertation has focused on the synthesis, characterization, and reaction studies of model noble metal heterogeneous catalysts. Careful control of particle size and shape has been accomplished though solution phase synthesis of Pt and Rh nanoparticles in order to elucidate further structure-reactivity relationships in noble metal catalysis.

Coble, Inger M

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Synthesis, structure and spectroscopic investigations of luminescent heterobimetallic gold(I)-Rhodium(I) species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel, three-coordinate gold(I) dimer, Au2(tfepm)3Cl2 (la, lb), was synthesized and structurally characterized. Four gold(I)-rhodium(I) heterobimetallic complexes, AuIRh'(tBuNC)2(-dppm)2C12 (2), Au'Rh'(tBuNC)2(u-dmpm)2Cl2 ...

Dempsey, Jillian Lee

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Acetic Acid from the Carbonylation of Chloride Methane Over Rhodium Based Catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of commercially important materials like vinyl acetate monomer (VAM), cellulose acetate, and acetate esters. MoreAcetic Acid from the Carbonylation of Chloride Methane Over Rhodium Based Catalysts Yafang Fan ? that makes use of the latest advance in methyl chloride production is reported. Acetic acid was produced from

Bao, Xinhe

24

Carboxylato compounds of chromium, copper, rhodium and molybdenum and new advances in the chemistry of V2(NXN)4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigated the triisopropylbenzoato complexes of some metals which are known for their ability to form a vast array of tetracarboxylato complexes, namely chromium, copper, molybdenum, and rhodium, and have found that these novel compounds display some...

Hillard, Elizabeth Anne

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

25

Selective catalytic reduction system and process for treating NOx emissions using a palladium and rhodium or ruthenium catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in a gas stream (29) in the presence of H.sub.2 is provided. The process comprises contacting the gas stream with a catalyst system (38) comprising zirconia-silica washcoat particles (41), a pre-sulfated zirconia binder (44), and a catalyst combination (40) comprising palladium and at least one of rhodium, ruthenium, or a mixture of ruthenium and rhodium.

Sobolevskiy, Anatoly (Orlando, FL); Rossin, Joseph A. (Columbus, OH); Knapke, Michael J. (Columbus, OH)

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

26

Towards a Benign and Viable Rhodium Catalyzed Hydroformylation of Higher Olefins: Economic and Environmental Impact Analyses, Solvent Effects and Membrane-based Catalyst Separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and soluble and bulky polymer bound bidentate ligands, were also examined. The rhodium metal and phosphorous ligand leaching in permeate were measured by elemental analysis technique. Chapter 5 demonstrates continuous membrane filtration integrated... with in-situ hydroformylation reaction at elevated temperature under synthesis gas pressure using polymer bound rhodium, to test the rhodium leaching as well as catalyst complexes stability, activity and selectivity. In Chapter 6, volume expansions...

Fang, Jing

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

27

Role of Si/Al Ratio on Immobilization and Stability of Rhodium Complexes on ZSM-5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rhodium complexes within the pores of zeolite ZSM-5 with varying Si/Al ratios (Si/Al 23, Si/Al 50, and Si/Al 280) were prepared from Rh1+(CO)2(C5H7O2), Rh22+(CO2CH3)4, and Rh3+(C5H7O2)3 followed by thermal treatment in He. IR results indicate...

Long, Brandon

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

A review of "The Journal of William Dowsing: Iconoclasm in East Anglia During the English Civil War." by Trevor Cooper, ed.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and there have been a number of impressive local studies in recent decades. It is a pleasure that this one has been published. Trevor Cooper, ed. The Journal of William Dowsing: Iconoclasm in East Anglia During the English Civil War. Woodbridge: Boydell Press..., 2001. 551 pp. + 64 plates. $90.00. Review by CHARLES W. A. PRIOR, QUEEN?S UNIVERSITY AT KINGSTON. Readers who are familiar with William Dowsing will know that this is less a journal than a catalogue of the activities of an iconoclast in Suffolk...

Charles W. A. Prior

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Long-Term Testing of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis 2013 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energys Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research since 2005 to develop a catalyst for the conversion of synthesis gas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen) into mixed alcohols for use in liquid transportation fuels. Initially, research involved screening possible catalysts based on a review of the literature, because at that time, there were no commercial catalysts available. The screening effort resulted in a decision to focus on catalysts containing rhodium and manganese. Subsequent research identified iridium as a key promoter for this catalyst system. Since then, research has continued to improve rhodium/manganese/iridium-based catalysts, optimizing the relative and total concentrations of the three metals, examining baseline catalysts on alternative supports, and examining effects of additional promoters. Testing was continued in FY 2013 to evaluate the performance and long-term stability of the best catalysts tested to date. Three tests were conducted. A long-term test of over 2300 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was conducted with the best carbon-supported catalyst. A second test of about 650 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was performed for comparison using the same catalyst formulation on an alternative carbon support. A third test of about 680 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was performed using the best silica-supported catalyst tested to date.

Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Thompson, Becky L.

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

30

Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis -- 2011 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). In recent years, this research has primarily involved the further development of catalysts containing rhodium and manganese based on the results of earlier catalyst screening tests. Research during FY 2011 continued to examine the performance of RhMn catalysts on alternative supports including selected zeolite, silica, and carbon supports. Catalyst optimization continued using both the Davisil 645 and Merck Grade 7734 silica supports. Research also was initiated in FY 2011, using the both Davisil 645 silica and Hyperion CS-02C-063 carbon supports, to evaluate the potential for further improving catalyst performance, through the addition of one or two additional metals as promoters to the catalysts containing Rh, Mn, and Ir.

Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Rummel, Becky L.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis 2012 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). In recent years, this research has primarily involved the further development of catalysts containing rhodium and manganese based on the results of earlier catalyst screening tests. Testing continued in FY 2012 to further improve the Ir-promoted RhMn catalysts on both silica and carbon supports for producing mixed oxygenates from synthesis gas. This testing re-examined selected alternative silica and carbon supports to follow up on some uncertainties in the results with previous test results. Additional tests were conducted to further optimize the total and relative concentrations of Rh, Mn, and Ir, and to examine selected promoters and promoter combinations based on earlier results. To establish optimum operating conditions, the effects of the process pressure and the feed gas composition also were evaluated.

Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Thompson, Becky L.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

An advanced model for the prediction of the total burnup-dependent self-powered rhodium detector response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an advanced method to generate the burnup dependent total response of a rhodium self-powered detector operating in a pressurized water reactor environment. Full use is made of advanced nodal neutronic and coupled electron-photon transport techniques. The method accounts for (1) the detailed energy and spatial dependence of the neutron activation of each detector segment in a three-dimensional representation, (2) the generation of electrons caused by both neutron and gamma interactions in all the geometrical regions of the detector, and (3) the transport of the electrons within the detector to provide an observable current. All components of the detector signal are directly calculated - the method does not require the use of any empirical data, such as detector sensitivities. Intermediate results, such as beta escape fractions, were compared to measured data, and the overall technique was extensively benchmarked against operating data from three reactors.

Ober, T.G. [Entergy Operations, Inc., Jackson, MS (United States); Malloy, J.W. [Tetra Engineering Group, Simsbury, CT (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

C-H vs C-C Bond Activation of Acetonitrile and Benzonitrile via Oxidative Addition: Rhodium vs Nickel and Cp* vs Tp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C-H vs C-C Bond Activation of Acetonitrile and Benzonitrile via Oxidative Addition: Rhodium vs@chem.rochester.edu Abstract: The photochemical reaction of (C5Me5)Rh(PMe3)H2 (1) in neat acetonitrile leads to formation of the C-H activation product, (C5Me5)Rh(PMe3)(CH2CN)H (2). Thermolysis of this product in acetonitrile

Jones, William D.

34

Adsorption of Ruthenium, Rhodium and Palladium from Simulated High-Level Liquid Waste by Highly Functional Xerogel - 13286  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fission products are generated by fission reactions in nuclear fuel. Platinum group (Pt-G) elements, such as palladium (Pd), rhodium (Rh) and ruthenium (Ru), are also produced. Generally, Pt-G elements play important roles in chemical and electrical industries. Highly functional xerogels have been developed for recovery of these useful Pt-G elements from high - level radioactive liquid waste (HLLW). An adsorption experiment from simulated HLLW was done by the column method to study the selective adsorption of Pt-G elements, and it was found that not only Pd, Rh and Ru, but also nickel, zirconium and tellurium were adsorbed. All other elements were not adsorbed. Adsorbed Pd was recovered by washing the xerogel-packed column with thiourea solution and thiourea - nitric acid mixed solution in an elution experiment. Thiourea can be a poison for automotive exhaust emission system catalysts, so it is necessary to consider its removal. Thermal decomposition and an acid digestion treatment were conducted to remove sulfur in the recovered Pd fraction. The relative content of sulfur to Pd was decreased from 858 to 0.02 after the treatment. These results will contribute to design of the Pt-G element separation system. (authors)

Onishi, Takashi [Fukushima Fuels and Materials Department O-arai Research and Development Center Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Narita-cho 4002, O-arai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan)] [Fukushima Fuels and Materials Department O-arai Research and Development Center Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Narita-cho 4002, O-arai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Koyama, Shin-ichi [Fukushima Fuels and Materials Department O-arai Research and Development Center Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Narita-cho 4002, O-arai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan)] [Fukushima Fuels and Materials Department O-arai Research and Development Center Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Narita-cho 4002, O-arai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Mimura, Hitoshi [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University Aramaki-Aza-Aoba 6-6-01-2,Aoba-ku, Sendai-shi, Miyagi-ken, 980-8579 (Japan)] [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University Aramaki-Aza-Aoba 6-6-01-2,Aoba-ku, Sendai-shi, Miyagi-ken, 980-8579 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Poly(pyridine)ruthenium(II)-photoinduced redox reactions of bipyridinium cations, poly(pyridine)rhodium complexes, and osmium ammines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quenching of *RuL/sub 3//sup 2 +/ (L is a 2,2'-bipyridine or 1,10-phenanthroline derivative) emissions by three classes of oxidants Q has been examined. The results are discussed in terms of the Marcus electron-transfer model recast in a preequilibrium formalism. Substituted bipyridinium cations (methyl viologen and related compounds) undergo thermodynamically favorable reduction with a driving force ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 eV and rate constants in the range (0.4-2.0) x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/s/sup -1/, consistent with a diffusion rate constant of 2.0 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/s/sup -1/ and an exchange rate constant of approx.10/sup 6/ M/sup -1/s/sup -1/ for the Q-Q couples. The yields of the separated redox products RuL/sub 3//sup 3 +/ and Q/sup -/ (typically 0.1 mol einstein/sup -1/ per quenching act) require K/sub 30/, the ''intramolecular'' back-reaction rate constant (to re-form ground-state RuL/sub 3//sup 2 +/ and Q), to be (2-4) x 10/sup 10/ s/sup -1/. Since K/sub 30/ increases weakly with driving force in this series, there is no evidence for inverted behavior despite the fact the ..delta..G/sup 0//sub 30/ is approx.-2 eV. With Q = Rh(4,4'-(CH/sub 3/)/sub 2/bpy)/sub 3//sup 3 +/, the quenching rate constants, k/sub q/ = (0.001-1.0) x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/s/sup -1/, exhibit a great sensitivity to the reducing power of *RuL/sub 3//sup 2 +/ and have been fitted to k/sub 11/ approx. = 2 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/s/sup -1/ and E/sup 0//sub Q,Q/sup -// = -0.97 V for the RhL/sub 3//sup 3 +/-RhL/sub 3//sup 2 +/ couple. This E/sup 0/ value is strikingly similar to that (-0.9 V vs. aqueous SCE) obtained via cyclic voltammetry in acetonitrile. The cyclic voltammetry of the RhL/sub 3//sup 3 +/ complexes in water has been reexamined, and it is concluded that the irreversibility observed is due to ligand loss from rhodium(I).

Creutz, C.; Keller, A.D.; Sutin, N.; Zipp, A.P.

1982-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

36

Rhodium self-powered neutron detector as a suitable on-line thermal neutron flux monitor in BNCT treatments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: A rhodium self-powered neutron detector (Rh SPND) has been specifically developed by the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) of Argentina to measure locally and in real time thermal neutron fluxes in patients treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this work, the thermal and epithermal neutron response of the Rh SPND was evaluated by studying the detector response to two different reactor spectra. In addition, during clinical trials of the BNCT Project of the CNEA, on-line neutron flux measurements using the specially designed detector were assessed. Methods: The first calibration of the detector was done with the well-thermalized neutron spectrum of the CNEA RA-3 reactor thermal column. For this purpose, the reactor spectrum was approximated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution in the thermal energy range. The second calibration was done at different positions along the central axis of a water-filled cylindrical phantom, placed in the mixed thermal-epithermal neutron beam of CNEA RA-6 reactor. In this latter case, the RA-6 neutron spectrum had been well characterized by both calculation and measurement, and it presented some marked differences with the ideal spectrum considered for SPND calibrations at RA-3. In addition, the RA-6 neutron spectrum varied with depth in the water phantom and thus the percentage of the epithermal contribution to the total neutron flux changed at each measurement location. Local (one point-position) and global (several points-positions) and thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities were determined from these measurements. Thermal neutron flux was also measured during BNCT clinical trials within the irradiation fields incident on the patients. In order to achieve this, the detector was placed on patient's skin at dosimetric reference points for each one of the fields. System stability was adequate for this kind of measurement. Results: Local mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities and global thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities derived from measurements performed at the RA-6 were compared and no significant differences were found. Global RA-6-based thermal neutron sensitivity showed agreement with pure thermal neutron sensitivity measurements performed in the RA-3 spectrum. Additionally, the detector response proved nearly unchanged by differences in neutron spectra from real (RA-6 BNCT beam) and ideal (considered for calibration calculations at RA-3) neutron source descriptions. The results confirm that the special design of the Rh SPND can be considered as having a pure thermal response for neutron spectra with epithermal-to-thermal flux ratios up to 12%. In addition, the linear response of the detector to thermal flux allows the use of a mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivity of 1.95 {+-} 0.05 x 10{sup -21} A n{sup -1}{center_dot}cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s. This sensitivity can be used in spectra with up to 21% epithermal-to-thermal flux ratio without significant error due to epithermal neutron and gamma induced effects. The values of the measured fluxes in clinical applications had discrepancies with calculated results that were in the range of -25% to +30%, which shows the importance of a local on-line independent measurement as part of a treatment planning quality control system. Conclusions: The usefulness of the CNEA Rh SPND for the on-line local measurement of thermal neutron flux on BNCT patients has been demonstrated based on an appropriate neutron spectra calibration and clinical applications.

Miller, Marcelo E.; Sztejnberg, Manuel L.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Longhino, Juan M.; Estryk, Guillermo [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina); Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429, Argentina and CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1033 (Argentina); Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Rhodium-Catalyzed C-C Bond Formation via Heteroatom-Directed C-H Bond Activation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Once considered the 'holy grail' of organometallic chemistry, synthetically useful reactions employing C-H bond activation have increasingly been developed and applied to natural product and drug synthesis over the past decade. The ubiquity and relative low cost of hydrocarbons makes C-H bond functionalization an attractive alternative to classical C-C bond forming reactions such as cross-coupling, which require organohalides and organometallic reagents. In addition to providing an atom economical alternative to standard cross - coupling strategies, C-H bond functionalization also reduces the production of toxic by-products, thereby contributing to the growing field of reactions with decreased environmental impact. In the area of C-C bond forming reactions that proceed via a C-H activation mechanism, rhodium catalysts stand out for their functional group tolerance and wide range of synthetic utility. Over the course of the last decade, many Rh-catalyzed methods for heteroatom-directed C-H bond functionalization have been reported and will be the focus of this review. Material appearing in the literature prior to 2001 has been reviewed previously and will only be introduced as background when necessary. The synthesis of complex molecules from relatively simple precursors has long been a goal for many organic chemists. The ability to selectively functionalize a molecule with minimal pre-activation can streamline syntheses and expand the opportunities to explore the utility of complex molecules in areas ranging from the pharmaceutical industry to materials science. Indeed, the issue of selectivity is paramount in the development of all C-H bond functionalization methods. Several groups have developed elegant approaches towards achieving selectivity in molecules that possess many sterically and electronically similar C-H bonds. Many of these approaches are discussed in detail in the accompanying articles in this special issue of Chemical Reviews. One approach that has seen widespread success involves the use of a proximal heteroatom that serves as a directing group for the selective functionalization of a specific C-H bond. In a survey of examples of heteroatom-directed Rh catalysis, two mechanistically distinct reaction pathways are revealed. In one case, the heteroatom acts as a chelator to bind the Rh catalyst, facilitating reactivity at a proximal site. In this case, the formation of a five-membered metallacycle provides a favorable driving force in inducing reactivity at the desired location. In the other case, the heteroatom initially coordinates the Rh catalyst and then acts to stabilize the formation of a metal-carbon bond at a proximal site. A true test of the utility of a synthetic method is in its application to the synthesis of natural products or complex molecules. Several groups have demonstrated the applicability of C-H bond functionalization reactions towards complex molecule synthesis. Target-oriented synthesis provides a platform to test the effectiveness of a method in unique chemical and steric environments. In this respect, Rh-catalyzed methods for C-H bond functionalization stand out, with several syntheses being described in the literature that utilize C-H bond functionalization in a key step. These syntheses are highlighted following the discussion of the method they employ.

Colby, Denise; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

38

Journal: Trevor Downey: Ecuador June 27, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to leave Baos, and those of us trying to enter, through the muddy remains of the pass. River-Rafting Rain atmosphere. Even upon driving into Baos from Quito, around a four- hour bus drive from mountain pass to mountain pass, visitors began to sense its unstable character. My friends and I were not to begin, let

Farritor, Shane

39

Claire Trevor School of the Arts Minor Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the Internet Studio Art 100 (when topic is related to digital arts) Studio Art 106: Interactive Digital Media courses: Arts 1A: Arts Core Arts 11: Digital Media: History & Foundations (formerly Arts 1D) Arts 12: Digital Media: Current Directions (formerly Arts 1E)

Rose, Michael R.

40

Claire Trevor School of the Arts Digital Arts Minor Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12A (Art, Design and Electronic Culture) _______ Art 12B (Digital Media from Steam to Steampunk) _______ Art 50A (Matter and Media) _______ Art 50B (Interaction and Experience) _______ Art 50C (Digital Media: Interaction Design) _______ II. Elective*: Choose two of the following: _______ _______ Arts 75 (Digital Media

Rose, Michael R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Claire Trevor School of the Arts Digital Arts Minor Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A (Arts Core) _______ Arts 11 (Digital Media: History and Foundations) _______ Arts 12 (Digital Media: Current Directions) _______ Arts 50 (Digital Media: Experience and Content) _______ Arts 60 (Digital Media: Video/Audio for the Web) _______ Arts 70 (Digital Media: Interaction Design) _______ Arts

Rose, Michael R.

42

JIMAR ANNUAL REPORT FOR FY 2011 P.I. NAME: Kevin Weng, Trevor A. Branch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the primary technical contact): PIFSC NOAA SPONSOR NAME: Sam Pooley PROJECT PROPOSAL TITLE: Biological IMAGES AND CAPTIONS: We will also be includ

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

43

Mr. Trevor L. Cook NGNP Project Manager NE-33, Germantown Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Area E that exhibited potential for listing. Today, these data could comprise the bulk of the identification phase of cultural resource compliance for any new project...

44

Dear Friends and Patrons, Welcome to the 20112012 season of UC Irvine's Claire Trevor School  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of new initiatives focused on sharing the excellence of our students, faculty and facilities with our and witty ensembles, Gian- Car

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

45

Justifying Practical Reasoning Katie Atkinson and Trevor Bench-Capon and Peter McBurney1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, for example, Nobel Memorial Laureate Amartya Sen has recently argued [9]. In this paper we first discuss some

Grasso, Floriana

46

Location Estimation with a Differential Update Ali Rahimi and Trevor Darrell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

algorithm by cal- culating globally consistent trajectories of a robot as it navigates along a 2D trajectory. To update a trajectory of length t, the update takes O(t). When all conditional distributions are linear to recover the trajectory of a robot given noisy measurements of its movement between points in its

Darrell, Trevor

47

C280 Computer VisionC280, Computer Vision Prof. Trevor Darrell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a house, trees, sky Theoretically I might say there were 327sky. Theoretically I might say there were 327 brightnesses and nuances of colour. Do I have "327"? No. I have sky, house, and trees.No. I have sky, house Images and its Application to Evaluating Segmentation Algorithms and Measuring Ecological Statistics

Darrell, Trevor

48

A review of "The Poetics of Melancholy in Early Modern England." by Douglas Trevor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the social forces that regulate identity, the book represents an important contribution to theories of Renaissance subjec- tivity and identity. Allan Greer. Mohawk Saint: Catherine Tekakwitha and the Jesuits. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. xiv...

Thomas P. Anderson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by companies in Texas and Utah. Catalysts for air pollution abatement continued to be the largest demand sector in the manufacture of catalytic converters. Catalysts were also used in other air-pollution-abatement processes in kilograms, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The Stillwater and East Boulder Mines

50

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by companies in Texas and Utah. Catalysts for air-pollution- abatement continued to be the leading demand industry in the manufacture of catalytic converters. Catalysts were also used in other air-pollution in kilograms unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The Stillwater and East Boulder Mines

51

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for air-pollution abatement in both light- and heavy-duty vehicles. PGMs are also used in the chemical in kilograms unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The Stillwater and East Boulder Mines in south-central Montana were the only primary platinum-group metals (PGMs) mines in the United States

52

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Catalysts for air pollution abatement continued to be the largest demand sector for PGM. In the United of catalytic converters. Catalysts were also used in other air-pollution-abatement processes to remove organic in kilograms, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The Stillwater Mine is the only primary

53

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are also used in other air pollution abatement processes to remove organic vapors, odors, or carbon platinum-group metals (PGM) mine. The mine, located near Nye, MT, processed more than 400,000 metric tons and biomedical devices. Salient Statistics--United States: 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999e Mine production:1 Platinum 1

54

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

automobile exhaust emissions. Oxidation catalysts are also used in many air pollution abatement processes platinum-group metals (PGM) mine. The mine, located near Nye, MT, processed about 430,000 metric tons--United States: 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998e Mine production: Platinum 1,960 1,590 1,840 2,610 3,5001 Palladium 6

55

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

refining by companies in Texas and Utah. Catalysts for air- pollution abatement continued to be the leading demand sector for PGMs. Catalysts were also used in other air- pollution-abatement processes to remove in kilograms unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The Stillwater and East Boulder Mines

56

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for air-pollution abatement in both light- and heavy-duty vehicles. PGMs are also used in the chemical in kilograms unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The Stillwater and East Boulder Mines in south-central Montana are the only primary platinum-group metals (PGMs) mines in the United States

57

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Automobile catalysts for air pollution abatement continued to be the largest demand sector for PGM of catalysts. Catalysts are also used in other air-pollution-abatement processes to remove organic vapors in kilograms, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The Stillwater Mine is the only primary

58

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Catalysts for air pollution abatement continued to be the leading demand sector for PGMs. In the United of catalytic converters. Catalysts were also used in other air-pollution-abatement processes to remove organic in kilograms unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The Stillwater and East Boulder Mines

59

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of catalysts. Oxidation catalysts are also used in other air-pollution-abatement processes to remove organic in kilograms, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The Stillwater Mine is the only primary platinum-group metals (PGM) producer in the United States. The mine, located near Nye, MT, processed more

60

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

automobile exhaust emissions. Oxidation catalysts are also used in many air pollution abatement processes platinum-group metals (PGM) mine. The mine, located near Nye, MT, processed about 350,000 metric tons--United States: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997e Mine production: Platinum 2,050 1,960 1,590 1,840 2,5002 Palladium 6

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Material synthesis and hydrogen storage of palladium-rhodium alloy.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pd and Pd alloys are candidate material systems for Tr or H storage. We have actively engaged in material synthesis and studied the material science of hydrogen storage for Pd-Rh alloys. In collaboration with UC Davis, we successfully developed/optimized a supersonic gas atomization system, including its processing parameters, for Pd-Rh-based alloy powders. This optimized system and processing enable us to produce {le} 50-{mu}m powders with suitable metallurgical properties for H-storage R&D. In addition, we studied hydrogen absorption-desorption pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) behavior using these gas-atomized Pd-Rh alloy powders. The study shows that the pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) behavior of Pd-Rh alloys is strongly influenced by its metallurgy. The plateau pressure, slope, and H/metal capacity are highly dependent on alloy composition and its chemical distribution. For the gas-atomized Pd-10 wt% Rh, the absorption plateau pressure is relatively high and consistent. However, the absorption-desorption PCT exhibits a significant hysteresis loop that is not seen from the 30-nm nanopowders produced by chemical precipitation. In addition, we observed that the presence of hydrogen introduces strong lattice strain, plastic deformation, and dislocation networking that lead to material hardening, lattice distortions, and volume expansion. The above observations suggest that the H-induced dislocation networking is responsible for the hysteresis loop seen in the current atomized Pd-10 wt% Rh powders. This conclusion is consistent with the hypothesis suggested by Flanagan and others (Ref 1) that plastic deformation or dislocations control the hysteresis loop.

Lavernia, Enrique J. (University of California, Davis); Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D. (Whithworth University, Spokane, WA)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Monodisperse Platinum and Rhodium Nanoparticles as Model Heterogeneous Catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

He, H 2 , and O 2 (UHP, Praxair, used as-received) and anAirGas, CP grade), hydrogen (Praxair, UHP, 99.999%)and helium (Praxair, UHP, 99.999%) were used as received.

Coble, Inger M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Mechanism of Rhodium-Catalyzed Carbene Formation from Diazo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. J. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. Engl. 1994, 33, 1797-1815. (d) Padwa, A.; Krumpe, K. E. Tetrahedron 1992

Wang, Jianbo

64

Highly Enantioselective Cycloisomerization of Enynes Catalyzed by Rhodium for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] This led us to consider strategies for expanding the scope of the reaction as well as improving trifluoroacetic acid (0.012 mL). After stirring for 3 h, NEt3 (three drops) and AcOEt (20 mL) were added

Zhang, Xumu

65

Monodisperse Platinum and Rhodium Nanoparticles as Model Heterogeneous Catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. , J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, (4) Konya, Z. ; Puntes, V. F. ;Chem. B 1999, 103, (25) Konya, Z. ; Puntes, V. F. ; Kiricsi,2, 907. (26) Zhu, J. ; Konya, Z. ; Puntes, V. F. ; Kiricsi,

Coble, Inger M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Direct Deposition of Trivalent Rhodium Hydroxide Nanoparticles onto a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pho- tocatalyst was prepared by exfoliation and intercalation of proton-exchanged KCa2Nb3O10 (see Supporting Information for details). HCa2Nb3O10 (0.13 g) was exfoliated by shaking in 50 mL of aqueous tetra % loading of Rh, 20 mM aqueous RhCl3 (0.632 mL) was added to 50 mL of the exfoliated TBAOH/Ca2Nb3O10

67

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chemicals; in the petroleum refining sector; and in laboratory equipment, including crucibles for growing Defense Stockpile remained suspended through FY 2013. Stockpile Status--9­30­13 4 Uncommitted Authorized; iridium prices were stable until midyear and then decreased markedly toward yearend, reportedly owing

68

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

refining. The leading demand sector for PGMs continued to be catalysts to decrease harmful emissions refining sector; and in the fabrication of laboratory equipment. In the electronics sector, PGMs are used toward the middle of the year, then decreased. The slowly recovering global economy in 2010, compared

69

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

refining. The leading demand sector for PGMs continued to be catalysts to decrease harmful emissions refining sector; and in laboratory equipment, including crucibles for growing high-purity single crystals­7708, ploferski@usgs.gov] #12;121 PLATINUM-GROUP METALS Events, Trends, and Issues: The global economy continued

70

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

refining. The leading demand sector for PGMs continued to be catalysts to decrease harmful emissions refining sector; and in laboratory equipment, including crucibles for growing high-purity single crystals-7708, ploferski@usgs.gov] #12;121 PLATINUM-GROUP METALS Events, Trends, and Issues: The global economy continued

71

For Immediate Release --Tuesday, October 14, 2014 Media Advisory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organizer directly. ART NOW ­ Bruce Horak Wednesday, Oct. 15, noon, W570. Contact: Trevor Kenney, 403-329-2710, trevor.kenney@uleth.ca. -- 30 -- Contact: Trevor Kenney, News & Information Manager 403-329-2710 403

Hossain, Shahadat

72

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic slope annual Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Permafrost Salinity Vegetation Arctic... Storage Change P + Gin -(Q + ET + Gout) S Rn - G Le + H 12;Arctic Land Water Cycle: key features Source: Houser, Paul R....

73

For Immediate Release --Monday, October 27, 2014 University of Lethbridge highlights for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 28, 12:15 to 1 p.m., Recital Hall W570 Christie (BMus '00) brings her2020. Contact: Trevor Kenney, 403-329-2582, trevor.kenney@uleth.ca U of L: Trevor Kenney, 403-329-2582, trevor.kenney@uleth.ca Twoonie Theatre ­ Theatre Arts

Hossain, Shahadat

74

Claire Trevor School of the Arts MAB 200 Office of the Dean Irvine, CA 92697-2775  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

faculty members this year: Diane Diefenderfer (Dance ­ Ballet/Pilates), Joel Veenstra (Drama ­ Theatre

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

75

Argument Based Moderation of Benefit Maya WARDEH, Trevor J.M. BENCH-CAPON and Frans COENEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a high of 65% in New Hampshire to a low of 31% in Texas in 2000 ­ and over time ­ from a high of 52. This is a significant problem both in terms of quality of service and financial loss through over payments. These errors% in 1998 to a low of 29% in 1982.'' Similar observations are made of the UK. An official UK Publication

Atkinson, Katie

76

Open-vocabulary Object Retrieval Sergio Guadarrama, Erik Rodner, Kate Saenko, Ning Zhang, Ryan Farrell, Jeff Donahue and Trevor Darrell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the "Please, select the " a) bottle which is lying down / pepper sauce bottle please / Tabasco / bottle of Tabasco sauce / Tabasco brand sauce / sauce here / Tabasco pepper sauce / red Tabasco sauce / small glass

O'Brien, James F.

77

For immediate release --December 1, 2014 University of Lethbridge highlights for the week of December 1 to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.m., Recital Hall, Room W570 The showcase features select senior music students: Trevor Kenney, 403-329-2710, trevor.kenney@uleth.ca Winter School on Remote Sensing

Hossain, Shahadat

78

REAL-TIME BUILDING ENERGY SIMULATION USING ENERGYPLUS AND THE BUILDING CONTROLS VIRTUAL TEST BED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Xiufeng Pang1 , Prajesh Bhattacharya1 , Zheng O'Neill2 , Philip Haves1 , Michael Wetter1 , and Trevor

79

Rhodium Catalyzed C-H Bond Functionalization: Development of Methods and Applications in Organic Synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interestingly, use of allyl acetate as the coupling partnermg, 0.25 mmol, 1 equiv), allyl acetate (75 mg, 0.75 mmol, 3

Tsai, Andy Siu-Chun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Efficient Rhodium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation for the Synthesis of a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Psychiatry 2000, 24, 647. (b) Zhi, L.; Tegley, C. M.; Marschke, K. B.; Jones, T. K. Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett

Zhang, Xumu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Thermodynamic Studies and Hydride Transfer Reactions from a Rhodium Complex to BX3 Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines the use of transition-metal hydride complexes that can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H2 gas to form BH bonds. Specifically, these studies are focused on providing a reliable and quantitative method for determining when hydride transfer from transition-metal hydrides to three-coordinate BX3 compounds will be favorable. This involves both experimental and theoretical determinations of hydride transfer abilities. Thermodynamic hydride donor abilities (?GH-) were determined for HRh(dmpe)2 and HRh(depe)2, where dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane) and depe = 1,2-bis(diethylphosphinoethane), on a previously established scale in acetonitrile. This hydride donor ability was used to determine the hydride donor ability of [HBEt3]? on this scale. Isodesmic reactions between [HBEt3]? and various BX3 complexes to form BEt3 and [HBX3]? were examined computationally to determine the relative hydride affinities of various BX3 compounds. The use of these scales of hydride donor abilities and hydride affinities for transition-metal hydrides and BX3 compounds is illustrated with a few selected reactions relevant to the regeneration of ammonia borane. Our findings indicate that it is possible to form B?H bonds from B?X bonds, and the extent to which BX3 compounds are reduced by transition-metal hydride complexes forming species containing multiple B?H bonds depends on the heterolytic B?X bond energy. An example is the reduction of B(SPh)3 using HRh(dmpe)2 in the presence of triethylamine to form Et3N-BH3 in high yields. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Mock, Michael T.; Potter, Robert G.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Li, Jun; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; Twamley, Brendan; DuBois, Daniel L.

2009-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

82

Rational Design of Rhodium Complexes Featuring κ4-N,N,N,N- and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1PrincipalRare Iron Oxide in

83

New Tandem Catalytic Cycles take to the Rhod(ium) | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Libraryornl.gov RonStaff Research

84

Greener Hydroformylation with Nanofilterable Rhodium Catalysts in A Stirred Membrane Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/h) ......................................................... 65 Figure 5.7: Syngas consumption profile during batch study using Catalyst A at 50 C and 30 bar syngas (1-octene/Rh = 500, solvent: toluene, H2/CO = 1:1, time = 22 hours) ................ 66 Figure 5.8: Temporal catalyst leaching profiles during... hydroformylation (50C, 30 bar; 1-octene/toluene = 3/7 (V/V); H2/CO = 1:1; LHSV = 181.5 g 1-octene/g Rh/h) ....................................................... 67 Figure 5.10: Temporal 1-octene conversion and selectivity catalyst leaching profiles during...

Xie, Zhuanzhuan

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Characterization and Reaction Studies of Silica Supported Platinum and Rhodium Model Catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at which a chemical reaction approaches equilibrium and does not itself undergo a net chemical change.1 When a catalyst is in a different phase (e.g. solid) than a reactant mixture it is defined as a heterogeneous catalyst. Two types of heterogeneous... concerning the active-nature of the surface. For what reasons, on an atomic level, are surfaces capable of sustaining a reaction and others deactivate? What effect does particle size/structure have on activity and selectivity? Is this an electronic...

Lundwall, Matthew James

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

86

NUTRIA MANAGEMENT IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST MEETING: PRESENTATION SUMMARIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

habitats Trevor Sheffels, Mark Sytsma, Jacoby Carter, and Jimmy Taylor Trevor Sheffels, PhD Jimmy Taylor Research Center Contact info already provided 541-737-1353 jimmy.d.taylor@aphis.usda.gov We deployed radio damage prevention methods for urban areas Trevor Sheffels, Mark Sytsma, Jacoby Carter, and Jimmy Taylor

87

E-Print Network 3.0 - assimilation system products Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

< 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Paul R. Houser,3 August 2006, Page 1 Land Surface DataLand Surface Data Summary: (calibration). Simulation: Land system process models (Hydrology,...

88

A Category-Level 3-D Object Dataset: Putting the Kinect to Work Allison Janoch, Sergey Karayev, Yangqing Jia, Jonathan T. Barron, Mario Fritz, Kate Saenko, Trevor Darrell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Category-Level 3-D Object Dataset: Putting the Kinect to Work Allison Janoch, Sergey Karayev for a chal- lenging category-level 3D object detection dataset to the fore. We review current 3D datasets our dataset of color and depth image pairs, gathered in real domestic and office environ- ments

O'Brien, James F.

89

Seedless Polyol Synthesis and CO Oxidation Activity of Monodisperse (111) and (100)-Oriented Rhodium Nanocrystals in Sub-10 nm Sizes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monodisperse sub-10 nm (6.5 nm) sized Rh nanocrystals with (111) and (100) surface structures were synthesized by a seedless polyol reduction in ethylene glycol, with poly(vinylpyrrolidone) as a capping ligand. When using [Rh(Ac){sub 2}]{sub 2} as the metal precursor, (111)-oriented Rh nanopolyhedra containing 76% (111)-twined hexagons (in 2D projection) were obtained; whereas, when employing RhCl{sub 3} as the metal precursor in the presence of alkylammonium bromide, such as tetramethylammonium bromide and trimethyl(tetradecyl)ammonium bromide, (100)-oriented Rh nanocubes were obtained with 85% selectivity. The {l_brace}100{r_brace} faces of the Rh nanocrystals are stabilized by chemically adsorbed Br{sup -} ions from alkylammonium bromides, which led to (100)-oriented nanocubes. Monolayer films of the (111)-oriented Rh nanopolyhedra and (100)-oriented Rh nanocubes were deposited on silicon wafers in a Langmuir-Blodgett trough to make model 2D nanoarray catalysts. These nanocatalysts were active for CO oxidation by O{sub 2}, and the turnover frequency was independent of nanoparticle shape, consistent with that previously observed for Rh(111) and Rh(100) single crystals.

Zhang, Yawen; Grass, Michael E.; Huang, Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Rhodium Catalysts in the Oxidation of CO by O2 and NO: Shape, Composition, and Hot Electron Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is well known that the activity, selectivity, and deactivation behavior of heterogeneous catalysts are strongly affected by a wide variety of parameters, including but not limited to nanoparticle size, shape, composition, support, pretreatment conditions, oxidation state, and electronic state. Enormous effort has been expended in an attempt to understand the role of these factors on catalytic behavior, but much still remains to be discovered. In this work, we have focused on deepening the present understanding of the role of nanoparticle shape, nanoparticle composition, and hot electrons on heterogeneous catalysis in the oxidation of carbon monoxide by molecular oxygen and nitric oxide. These reactions were chosen because they are important for environmental applications, such as in the catalytic converter, and because there is a wide range of experimental and theoretical insight from previous single crystal work as well as experimental data on nanoparticles obtained using new state-of-the-art techniques that aid greatly in the interpretation of results on complex nanoparticle systems. In particular, the studies presented in this work involve three types of samples: {approx} 6.5 nm Rh nanoparticles of different shapes, {approx} 15 nm Rh1-xPdx core-shell bimetallic polyhedra nanoparticles, and Rh ultra-thin film ({approx} 5 nm) catalytic nanodiodes. The colloidal nanoparticle samples were synthesized using a co-reduction of metal salts in alcohol and supported on silicon wafers using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. This synthetic strategy enables tremendous control of nanoparticle size, shape, and composition. Nanoparticle shape was controlled through the use of different organic polymer capping layers. Bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by careful choice of metal salt precursors. Rh/TiO{sub x} and Rh/GaN catalytic nanodiodes were fabricated using a variety of thin film device fabrication techniques, including reactive DC magnetron sputtering, electron beam evaporation, and rapid thermal annealing. The combination of these techniques enabled control of catalytic nanodiode morphology, geometry, and electrical properties.

Renzas, James R.

2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

91

Seedless Polyol Synthesis and CO Oxidation Activity of Monodisperse (111) and (100)-Oriented Rhodium Nanocrystals in Sub-10 nm Sizes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the manifold was filled with 40 Torr CO (Praxair, UHP), 100Torr O 2 (Praxair, UHP), and abalance of He (Praxair, UHP) initially at atmospheric

Zhang, Yawen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Rhodium Catalysts in the Oxidation of CO by O2 and NO: Shape, Composition, and Hot Electron Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the manifold was filled with 40 Torr CO (Praxair, UHP), 100Torr O 2 (Praxair, UHP), and abalance of He (Praxair, UHP) initially at atmospheric

Renzas, James R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Insertion of SO2 into the Metal-Carbon Bonds of Rhodium and Iridium Compounds, and Reactivity of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diverse coordination properties and its role in acid rain production. In this paper, we present two new. The sulfinate ligand can be removed with a strong acid such as HCl, generating free sulfinic acid. Acids with weakly coordinating anions protonate the sulfinate oxygen, but the sulfinic acid remains bound

Jones, William D.

94

ENTHALPIES OF FORMATION OF NEGATIVE IONS MnO , MnO , AND MnO AS DETERMINED BY ION-MOLECULE EQUILIBRIA METHOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

orifice. The temperature was measured with a platinum/(platinum-rhodium 10%) thermocouple, the accuracy

Rudnyi, Evgenii B.

95

DOI: 10.1126/science.1157707 , 680 (2008);321Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Margareta Hansson,5 Sigfús J. Johnsen,1 Jean Jouzel,6 Valérie Masson-Delmotte,6 Trevor Popp,7 Sune O

Fischer, Hubertus

96

For Immediate Release --Wednesday, April 9, 2014 Advisory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.m. at the Davis GMC Buick dealership, at the intersection of Crowsnest Trail and W.T. Hill of Management 403-329-2019 403-329-2163 (cell) zyna.taylor@uleth.ca Trevor Kenney, News & Information Manager 403-329-2710 #12;403-360-7639 (cell) trevor.kenney@uleth.ca #12;

Seldin, Jonathan P.

97

For Immediate Release --Wednesday, May 28, 2014 Advisory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prior to the start of the ceremony in room W565 (8:30 a.m. for morning UNews at http://www.uleth.ca/unews/ -- 30 -- Contact: Trevor Kenney, News & Information Manager 403-329-2710 403-360-7639 (cell) trevor.kenney

Seldin, Jonathan P.

98

Faculty Senate Meeting January 28, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Johnson, Stephen Hadwiger, David Gillette, Scott Olsen, Chet Breed, Jeremy Houser, Tom Zoumaras, AmandaFaculty Senate Meeting January 28, 2010 approved 2/25/10 SUB 3200 Activities Room Present: Tom TWO VOTES Carrying two votes: Stephen Hadwiger and Ray Barrow Alternates: 2 Votes at the table: 22

Gering, Jon C.

99

*Staff Member Last Update: 9/17/13 Art Education, Studio Foundations AEF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

*Staff Member Last Update: 9/17/13 KEY: Art Education, Studio Foundations AEF Art History AH;Last Updated 9/17/13 COMPUTER COMMITTEE/ VISUAL RESOURCE CTR Committee Elects Chair Thom Houser, Chair Geha Nell Andrew Alex Murawski #12;Last Updated 9/17/13 PORTFOLIO REVIEW Appointed by Area Chairs Asen

Arnold, Jonathan

100

Analysis of the IR-spectral behavior of adsorbed CO formed in H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ surface interaction over supported rhodium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of hydrogen and carbon dioxide has been investigated by means of infrared spectroscopy on alumina-supported Rh of different crystallite sizes produced by reduction at 573-1173 K with a view to explaining the infrared spectrum of the adsorbed CO produced which is basically different from that observed following CO adsorption on the same samples. It appeared that the adsorbed CO formed on CO/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ adsorption did not lead to the formation of gem-dicarbonyl, i.e., to disruption of the Rh-Rh bond. This behavior is attributed to the presence of adsorbed hydrogen and to the formation of Rh carbonyl hydride, which prevents the disruptive effect of adsorbed CO.

Solymosi, F.; Pasztor, M.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Studies of the coadsorption of deuterium and carbon monoxide with silver on rhodium and the adsorption of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene on clean and carbon covered platinum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ag adsorbed on Rh(100) is presented as a model of the corresponding bimetallic catalyst. Ag overlayer growth follows the Frank-Van der Merwe growth mechanism at 300 K and the Stranski-Krastanov growth mechanism at 640 K. Ag(3d) binding energies are found to track the vacuum level rather than the Fermi level. The results of D/sub 2/ and CO adsorption studies on Ag/Rh(100) show that adsorbed Ag does not significantly alter the properties of adjacent D/sub 2/ or CO adsorption sites on the Rh(100) surface. The desorption and decomposition of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) on clean and carbon covered Pt(111) is also reported. No evidence for TNT decomposition on the carbon covered surface is found. Molecular TNT desorption kinetics at low coverage are first order, yielding an activation energy of 16.7 +/- 1 Kcal/mol and a preexponential factor of 2.3 x 10/sup 11/ (x e/sup - + 0.5/) sec/sup -1/. TNT adsorbed on the clean Pt(111) surface at submonolayer coverages undergoes almost complete decomposition during heating. The major decomposition products are H/sub 2/O, NO, CO/sub 2/, CO, HCN, and a carbon residue left on the surface. TNT adsorbed in the second and higher monolayers desorbs molecularly. The significance of these results in understanding the performance of a commercial explosive vapor preconcentrator is discussed.

Peebles, H.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Surface structure of coadsorbed benzene and carbon monoxide on the rhodium(111) single crystal analyzed with low-energy electron diffraction intensities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first structural analysis of a molecular coadsorbate system is presented. Mutual reordering and site shifting are found to occur for benzene and CO coadsorbed in a (/sub 13//sup 31/) lattice on Rh(111). This low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) intensity analysis yields the first confirmed hollow-site adsorption of CO on a single-crystal metal surface, with a C-O bond length expanded by 0.06 +/- 0.05 A from the gas phase. The flat-lying benzene is found centered over hcp-type hollow sites with a strong Kekule-type distortion: C-C bond lengths alternate between 1.33 +/- 0.15 A (hydrogen positions were not determined). This suggests the possibility of a 1,3,5-cyclohexatriene species being formed. The Rh-C bond length is 2.35 +/- 0.05 A for benzene and 2.16 +/- 0.04 A for CO.

Van Hove, M.A.; Lin, R.F.; Somorjai, G.A.

1986-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

103

Tridentate Phosphine Linkers for Immobilized Catalysts: Development and Characterization of Immobilized Rhodium Complexes and Solid-State NMR Studies of Polymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of performance polymers with solid2state NMR techniques. First a brief overview of solid2state NMR and its relevance to the various areas of chemistry covered in this thesis is given. Following the synthesis, immobilization, and characterization of tridentate...

Guenther, Johannes 1983-

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

104

Photoelectron spectra and molecular orbital calculations of dicarbonyl- and dinitrosyl-bridged cobalt, rhodium and iridium cyclopentadienyl dimers and of disulfido- and diselenido-nonacarbonyltriosmium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-nonacarbonyltriosmium. . (December l987) Greg Lewis Griewe, B. A. , Grinnell College Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Michael B. Hall Gas-phase, ultraviolet photoelectron (PE) spectra and molecular orbital (MO) calculations are reported for Os3(CO)9(s3 X)2 (X=S, Se...). The spectra are similar to that reported for Fe3(CO)9(s3-S)2, but with increased band definition. The HOMO, a 3c-2e (Os-Os-Os) bond, is dominated by the e -like orbitals of the Os(CO)3 fragment and contains most of the net metal-metal overlap population...

Griewe, Greg Lewis

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

New Directions for Cancer Drug Research of Ruthenium and Rhodium Compounds: Investigation of Cytotoxicities, Mechanisms of Cancer Cell Death, and Cellular Targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Ru) compounds are a promising class of anticancer compounds that display improved therapeutic activities, different mechanisms of action, and reduced side-effects as compared to cisplatin. Two ruthenium compounds are being tested in clinical trials...

Pena Maceda, Bruno

2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

106

Name Department Abarca, Gary Anthropology [?] abarcag@uci.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Name Department Phone Room Email Abarca, Gary Anthropology [?] abarcag@uci.edu Adams, Britni Leia Economics [?] daljutai@uci.edu Allen, Trevor J Political Science [?] trevorja@uci.edu Allison, Blake

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

107

For Immediate Release --Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014 Advisory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.m. in the University Theatre (W500). Following this presentation, attendees will head Kenney, News & Information Manager 403-329-2710 403-360-7639 (cell) #12;trevor.kenney

Hossain, Shahadat

108

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 3 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 2 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 1 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 4 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Use of Optical Mapping to Aid in Assembly and Finishing of Human Microbiome Genome Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trevor Wagner of OpGen, Inc. discusses the use of optical mapping to validate the assembly of HMP genomes on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

Wagner, Trevor [OpGen, Inc

2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

113

Nov. 22, 2008 n Saturday, Nov. 22, 2008,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and constructing a bacteriophage. Fu- ture MSU Science Saturdays will cover magnetism, energy and other topics Trevor Douglas gets down and dirty with a virus cage model; C. Chemistry students wow'ed the crowd

Dyer, Bill

114

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 4  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 4 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 1  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 1 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 2  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 2 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

BIOINFORMATICS Vol. 17 no. 6 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

microarrays Olga Troyanskaya1, Michael Cantor1, Gavin Sherlock2, Pat Brown3, Trevor Hastie4, Robert Tibshirani: The software is available at http://smi-web. stanford.edu/projects/helix/pubs/impute/ Contact: russ

Botstein, David

118

11:15 AMERICAN DIPLOMACY IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY Shannon Noble, From a French Responsibility to a Strategic Center in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11:15 ­AMERICAN DIPLOMACY IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY Shannon Noble, From a French Responsibility. Patrick Mobley, Disease, Rhetoric, and Action: Cholera in Detroit, 1832 and 1834 Trevor Broad, A Forgotten

Edwards, Paul N.

119

Jailal Nicholas G Ablack Yohannes Abreham Mebrahtu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Broomfield Katrina Lin Brown Melissa Suzanne Brown Stephanie Anne Brown Trevor Cormac Vincent Bruen Luanne Donald Cameron Mark Wickus Camp Dawn Doreen Campbell Kathryn Campbell Maureen Margaret Carey Nikola

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

120

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 3  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 3 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, 2012 Robert.Smith@lex.doe.gov Eco Fair Blends Fun and Facts for Paducah Area Middle Schoolers PADUCAH, KY - Lone Oak Middle School student Trevor Tilley was impressed with a 3 rd...

122

Probability Theory: The Logic of Science by E.T. Jaynes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Data Mining, Inference and Prediction by Trevor Hastie, Robert Tibshirani and Jerome Friedman NEW YORK, the combinatorics of dice and coins are recommended; the energetic youth who invest heavily in the calculation

Franklin, James

123

Estimation of aboveground biomass and inorganic nutrient content of a 25-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESTIMATION OF ABOVEGROUND BIOMASS AND INORGANIC NUTRIENT CONTENT OF A 25-YEAR-OLD LOBLOLLY PINE (PINUS TAEDA L. ) PLANTATION A Thesis by JAMES NELSON MOUSER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August lqBO Major Si bject: Forestry ESTIMATION OF ABOVEGROUND BIOMASS AND INORGANIC NUTRIENT CONTENT OF A 25-YEAR-OLD LOBLOLLY PINE (PINUS TAEDA L. ) PLANTATION A Thesis by JAMES NELSON HOUSER Approved...

Houser, James Nelson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Mapping your data: Integrating data into a GIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

handouts to be copied: o GIS Investigation sheet (p. 7 ? 17); note see answers p. 6 o Definitions (p. 18) o Appendix A: TIGER 2000 CFCC Codes (p. 19 ? 20) o Student Answer sheet (p. 21) Standards & Objectives National Geography Standards (Adapted from... Values? ? Change the ?Value Field? to ?CFCC? ? Click the ?Add All Values? button ArcLessons Template, Copyright ? 2005 ESRI. All rights reserved. Mapping Your Data, Copyright ? 2006 Rhonda Houser. 10 Mapping Your Data ? Read the descriptions...

Houser, Rhonda

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - antimony potassium tartrate Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

28. Californium 3. Antimony 16. Rhodium 29. Mendelevium 4. Barium 17. Silicon 30. Gold 5. Iron 18... puzzle (above) barium bromine cobalt germanium helium molybdenum nitrogen...

126

Electronic structures of transition metal to hydrogen bonds: oxidative addition of dihydrogen to a square planar rhodium complex and quantum mechanical prediction of the geometry of a metal hydride  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Johnson have examined the stereoselectivity of the addition of diatonuc hydrogen to iridium(I) complexes. These four- coordinated complexes oxidatively add molecular hydrogen, giving octahedral products. It is evident from their work... to the thermodynamic product shown in Figure 3c. Thus, the incoming hydrogens are contained in a single plane (YZ plane) and the complete reaction profile could be described by as few as 5 parameters (o, 4, 8, R and r which are diagrammed in Figure 6). The distance...

Halpin, Carolyn F.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

127

Experimental Investigation of Burnup Credit for Safe Transport, Storage, and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes criticality benchmark experiments containing rhodium that were conducted as part of a Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Research Initiative project. Rhodium is an important fission product absorber. A capability to perform critical experiments with low-enriched uranium fuel was established as part of the project. Ten critical experiments, some containing rhodium and others without, were conducted. The experiments were performed in such a way that the effects of the rhodium could be accurately isolated. The use of the experimental results to test neutronics codes is demonstrated by example for two Monte Carlo codes. These comparisons indicate that the codes predict the behavior of the rhodium in the critical systems within the experimental uncertainties. The results from this project, coupled with the results of follow-on experiments that investigate other fission products, can be used to quantify and reduce the conservatism of spent nuclear fuel safety analyses while still providing the necessary level of safety.

Harms, Gary A.; Helmick, Paul H.; Ford, John T.; Walker, Sharon A.; Berry, Donald T.; Pickard, Paul S.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

JOURNAL OF INFORMATION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 28, 689-704 (2012) The Complexity of GARCH Option Pricing Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOURNAL OF INFORMATION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 28, 689-704 (2012) 689 The Complexity of GARCH computational over- head. In fact, raising n makes the popular Ritchken-Trevor tree under non-linear GARCH that LGARCH, AGARCH, GJR-GARCH, TS-GARCH and TGARCH share the same properties as NGARCH. The theoretical

Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

W. K. Edwards et al.: An Extensible Set-Top Box Platform for Home Media Applications Contributed Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this platform is that it can dynamically exchange code with other devices on the home network, allowing that allows control over a variety of home devices.1 Index Terms -- set-top box, home network, mobile code@cc.gatech.edu). He was previously at the Palo Alto Research Center (PARC). Mark W. Newman and Trevor Smith

Edwards, Keith

130

For Immediate Release --Friday, February 28, 2014 Advisory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engagements on Wednesday, Mar. 5 (12 p.m. in W570 and 6 p.m. in PE264). All.m. - The Ten Grandmothers Project ~ Dr. Linda Many Guns NAS W570 12 p -- 30 -- Contact: Trevor Kenney, News & Information Manager 403

Seldin, Jonathan P.

131

DEAN'S LIST HONORABLE MENTION Fall Semester 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Trevor Ippolito, Vincent James Ireson, Thomas C. Jacob, Gregory Benjamin Jang, Dong Min Johnson, Casey A. Delacruz, Samuel Devine, Nathan D. Ding, Nan Douglas, Amy C. Driscoll, Samuel Robert Duarte Millstone, Daniel Brucker Mukusheva, Aigerim Myers, Thomas Hamilton Nerenberg, Samuel L. Neuenfeldt

Wong, Pak Kin

132

Ecological Studies of Wolves on Isle Royale Annual Report 20002001*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,GregWright,and leaders Justin Gude and Patty Hernandez Team 2 David Marsalis,Ari Perlman,DavidVeinot,and leaders Justin,three wolves in unsuccessful chase of cow-calf pair,Carolyn and Trevor Peterson negotiate a beaver dam crossing ground-based fieldwork, aided by Greg Burkhart, Cynthia D. Carter, Philip DeWitt, Justin Gude, Patty

133

PRESENTED BY: UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Year' by USA Today and Discover magazine. Trevor spent two years working as a commercial lobster `Nick' Shay will speak about oceanic `fuel injectors,' the sea surface temperature and other atmospheric of hurricane damage and what really occurs. Dr. Brian Soden will discuss the ongoing debate about whether

Miami, University of

134

FEBRUARY 2005 NW MICHIGAN REGIONAL FRUIT NEWSLETTER CALENDER OF EVENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trevor Nichols, Fennville 3/22 Wind Energy & Farm Safety Programs NWMHRS 3/24 Food and Agricultural, Traverse City 3/1-2 Benzie-Manistee Hort Show Crystal Mountain, Thompsonville 3/4-12 ANR Week MSU For more

135

Ann Arbor, Michigan May 29, 2010 Book cover for "Builder's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ann Arbor, Michigan May 29, 2010 Book cover for "Builder's Apprentice," published by Huron River and author of "Builders Apprentice," confronted that suspicion in the mid-1980s while mulling grad school's Apprentice" Andy Hoffman reflects on crafting a custom-built life By Domenica Trevor May 29, 2010 #12;And

Hoffman, Andrew J.

136

REUNION COMMITTEE Laura L. DePaoli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLASS OFFICERS President Benjamin Hellweg Vice President Julia R. Greer Secretary Amy R. Grayson Trevor Stricker REUNION GIFT COCHAIRS Tara Fernando Bishop Gary Brackenridge Eileen M. Tanghal February activities just for our class: Friday will be a smart-casual extended happy hour in the R&D Commons. Saturday

Williams, Brian C.

137

Advance Refundings of Municipal Bonds Columbia Business School  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advance Refundings of Municipal Bonds Andrew Ang Columbia Business School and NBER Richard C. Green of Vineer Bhansali, Trevor Harris, Tal Heppenstall, Andrew Kalotay, Kemp Lewis, Paul Luhmann, Matt of colleagues, especially Jennifer Carpenter, Dan Li, Norman Sch¨urhoff, and Chester Spatt, along with seminar

Sadeh, Norman M.

138

The data processing pipeline for the Herschel/SPIRE Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The data processing pipeline for the Herschel/SPIRE Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer Trevor R the data processing pipeline to generate calibrated data products from the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer. The pipeline processes telemetry from SPIRE point

Naylor, David A.

139

MPH Program Student Writing Tutorial: Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seminar Work on title page and abstract 19 Test for Class B Complete title page and abstract 20 Complete _____________________________________ Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed. Thur. Fri. Sat. 1 Work on article Bowling with Trevor and Lilly 2 Work Soccer Lunch with Mr. Smith Think about potential paper topic 4 Work Think about potential paper topic 5 Work

140

August 2007 NW Michigan Regional Fruit Grower Newsletter CALENDAR OF EVENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/31 Pesticide Container Recycling Ends 9/24 Trevor Nichols Field Day Fennville, MI 9/27 Clean Sweep Collection and the outstanding natural resources we have in northern Michigan led me to pursue a B.S. in Resource Ecology

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Annual Report Budget Advisory Committee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Report of the Budget Advisory Committee McMaster University Faculty Association June 14, 2010 #12;Budget Advisory Committee, 2009/10 Virginia Aksan (Chair) History Trevor Chamberlain FinanceMaster Pension Plan MUFA Budget Advisory Committee June 14, 2010 Introduction Pensions have been all over

Hitchcock, Adam P.

142

Permission to make digital or hard copies of all or part of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

large size and high numbers of ports result in slow access and high energy dissipation. Figure 1 shows the effects of size and number of ports on access time, energy, and area for 128­, and 256­entry register Register Ports Using Delayed Write­Back Queues And Operand Pre­Fetch Nam Sung Kim and Trevor Mudge Advanced

Mudge, Trevor

143

Permission to make digital or hard copies of all or part of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

large size and high numbers of ports result in slow access and high energy dissipation. Figure 1 shows the effects of size and number of ports on access time, energy, and area for 128-, and 256-entry register Register Ports Using Delayed Write-Back Queues And Operand Pre-Fetch Nam Sung Kim and Trevor Mudge Advanced

Mudge, Trevor

144

Formal Type Soundness for Cyclone's Region System Dan Grossman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management of Cyclone and its static typing discipline. The design incorporates several advance- mentsFormal Type Soundness for Cyclone's Region System Dan Grossman Greg Morrisett Trevor Jim Mike Hicks Yanling Wang James Cheney November 2001 Abstract Cyclone is a polymorphic, type-safe programming language

Hicks, Michael

145

Ames Lab 101: Lanthanum Decanting  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ames Laboratory scientist Trevor Riedemann explains the process that allows Ames Laboratory to produce some of the purest lanthanum in the world. This and other high-purity rare-earth elements are used to create alloys used in various research projects and play a crucial role in the Planck satellite mission.

Riedemann, Trevor

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

146

NAS-NS-3008[Rev.) NUCLEARSCIENCESERIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory FL P. Schuman Atomic Ensrgy Division Phillips Petroleum Company (Idaho Fall&) A. W. Fairhrdl E. P Massachusetts Institute of Technology #12;Radiochemistry of Rhodium James C. Armstrong, Jr. Florida State i

147

ONE-DIMENSIONAL PSEUDO-HOMOGENEOUS PACKED BED REACTOR MODELING INCLUDING NO-CO KINETICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the chemical species and energy equations for dynamically incompressible flow in one-dimension. Furthermore, the chemical kinetics on the reduction reaction of nitric oxide by carbon monoxide over rhodium-alumina and platinum-alumina catalysts is investigated...

Srinivasan, Anand

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

Syntheses and applications of soluble polyisobutylene (PIB)-supported transition metal catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................. 34 Catalyst Recovery in Self-Separating Systems .............................. 39 Fluorous/Organic Biphasic Catalysis............................................. 41 Polymer-Supported Catalysts in Ionic Liquids... ................................................................................. 45 Results and Discussion................................................................. 51 Conclusions.................................................................................. 60 III POLYISOBUTYLENE-SUPPORTED RHODIUM...

Tian, Jianhua

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Production of hydrogen from alcohols  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing hydrogen from ethanol or other alcohols. The alcohol, optionally in combination with water, is contacted with a catalyst comprising rhodium. The overall process is preferably carried out under autothermal conditions.

Deluga, Gregg A. (St. Paul, MN); Schmidt, Lanny D. (Minneapolis, MN)

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

150

Synthesis of oxygen-containing heterocyclic compounds based on the intramolecular OH insertion and Wolff rearrangement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of tetrahydrofuran derivatives.2 Palladium- catalyzed cyclization of allylic 2-alkynoates has been utilized to build of rhodium (II) acetate, with the expectation that Rh(II)-carbene intra- molecular O­H insertion should occur

Wang, Jianbo

151

Preparation of high specific activity technetium-96  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a method of producing Tc-96 from the proton irradiation of a rhodium target and a technique for isolating under remote hot cell conditions the Tc-96 from the proton irradiated target.

Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Prach, Thomas (Port Jefferson, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Bifunctional chelates of RH-105 and AU199 as potential radiotherapeutic agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is presented on new bifunctional chelating ligand systems with stability on the macroscopic and radiochemical levels. The synthesis of the following complexes are described: rhodium 105, palladium 109, and gold 198.

Droege, P.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Development of novel metal-catalysed methods for the transformation of Ynamides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I. Rhodium-Catalysed Carbometalation of Ynamides using Organoboron Reagents. As an expansion of existing procedures for the carbometalation of ynamides, it was discovered that [Rh(cod)(MeCN)2]BF4 successfully promotes the ...

Smith, Donna Lee

2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

154

Cyclobutane amino acids and peptidomimetics, parallel catalyst screening for aziridination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for syntheses of biologically important compounds, such as amino acids, efforts to discover a catalytic system for aziridination are desirable. Copper and rhodium catalyzed asymmetric aziridination of olefins had previously been reported by others. High yields...

Li, Shih-ming

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Friday, May 9th, 2014 11:00--1:00 p.m.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Olivia Brown Spencer Kuchle Trent Masiki Justin McCarthy Jacinta Saffold For the Ph.D. Donald GeeslingFriday, May 9th, 2014 11:00--1:00 p.m. S h i r l e y G r a h a m D u B o i s R e a d i n g R o o m Nielsen Jacinta Saffold For the Minor Kasi Amaral, Shawn Campbell Trevor Frederick, Carrie Howard

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

156

Blurring boundaries: shifting perceptions of femininity in the context of the English Civil War  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the 3 monarch and debated the nature of legitimate rule within England. King Charles challenged the members' perceptions of themselves and their roles within the country and forced men to question the very nature of a... fruitless. Diplomatic debates led to the dramatic conclusion of bloodshed and regicide. Many historians have provided analyses of the social issues of the English Civil War. Hugh Trevor-Roper and Anthony Fletcher found the religious environment...

Scamardo, Tara Marie

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

157

Vapor deposition of thin films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A highly pure thin metal film having a nanocrystalline structure and a process of preparing such highly pure thin metal films of, e.g., rhodium, iridium, molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, or palladium by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of, e.g., rhodium(allyl).sub.3, iridium(allyl).sub.3, molybdenum(allyl).sub.4, tungsten(allyl).sub.4, rhenium(allyl).sub.4, platinum(allyl).sub.2, or palladium(allyl).sub.2 are disclosed. Additionally, a general process of reducing the carbon content of a metallic film prepared from one or more organometallic precursor compounds by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition is disclosed.

Smith, David C. (Los Alamos, NM); Pattillo, Stevan G. (Los Alamos, NM); Laia, Jr., Joseph R. (Los Alamos, NM); Sattelberger, Alfred P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Analog and digital dynamic compensation techniques for delayed self-powered neutron detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on analog and digital methods developed to compensate for the time delay associated with rhodium self-powered neutron detector signals. This delay is caused by the decay of the neutron-activated rhodium and results in a current signal with unfavorable time response characteristics. The compensating analog method is based on the use of lead-lag networks to eliminate undesirable poles and zeros. The digital method takes digitized signals and numerically solves the inverse kinetics equation that relates reactor flux to the detector current at all earlier times. These methods were tested in a realistic reactor environment, and the results illustrate the accuracy achieved using each method.

Yusuf, S.O.; Wehe, D.K. (Univ. of Michigan, Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Ann Arbor, MI (US))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Synthesis, chemical bonding and physical properties of RERhB{sub 4} (RE=Y, Dy-Lu)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compounds of rare-earth metals with rhodium and boron RERhB{sub 4} (RE=Y, Dy-Lu) crystallize with the orthorhombic structure type YCrB{sub 4} (space group Pbam, Pearson symbol oP24). The crystal structures of the compounds with RE=Y, Er, Tm and Yb were refined by using single-crystal diffraction data. Analysis of chemical bonding for YRhB{sub 4} and YbRhB{sub 4} was performed by electron localizability indicator and by calculation of quantum chemical charges (quantum theory of atoms in molecules). Boron and rhodium form the 3-D polyanion containing planar nets of three-bonded boron atoms interconnected by rhodium along [001]. The interaction of the RE species with the rhodium-boron polyanion is predominantly ionic. Magnetic susceptibility data of TmRhB{sub 4} and YbRhB{sub 4} showed that the RE species are in 4f{sup 12} (Tm) and 4f{sup 13} (Yb) electronic states, respectively. In the low-temperature region, the specific heat revealed a Schottky anomaly for TmRhB{sub 4} while an antiferromagnetic transition is observed at 3.5 K for YbRhB{sub 4}. X-ray absorption measurement at the Yb L{sub III} edge for YbRhB{sub 4} reveals the 4f{sup 13} state of ytterbium. - Graphical abstract: The compounds of rare-earth metals with rhodium and boron RERhB{sub 4} (RE=Y, Dy-Lu) crystallize with the orthorhombic structure type YCrB{sub 4}. Analysis of chemical bonding for YRhB{sub 4} and YbRhB{sub 4} was performed by electron localizability indicator and by calculation of quantum chemical charges (quantum theory of atoms in molecules). Boron and rhodium form the 3-D polyanion containing planar nets of three-bonded boron atoms interconnected by rhodium along [001]. The interaction of the RE species with the rhodium-boron polyanion is predominantly ionic.

Veremchuk, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Mori, T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Prots, Yu.; Schnelle, W.; Leithe-Jasper, A.; Kohout, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Grin, Yu. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: grin@cpfs.mpg.de

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Thin film solar energy collector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multi-layer solar energy collector of improved stability comprising: (1) a substrate of quartz, silicate glass, stainless steel or aluminum-containing ferritic alloy; (2) a solar absorptive layer comprising silver, copper oxide, rhodium/rhodium oxide and 0-15% by weight of platinum; (3) an interlayer comprising silver or silver/platinum; and (4) an optional external anti-reflective coating, plus a method for preparing a thermally stable multi-layered solar collector, in which the absorptive layer is undercoated with a thin film of silver or silver/platinum to obtain an improved conductor-dielectric tandem.

Aykan, Kamran (Monmouth Beach, NJ); Farrauto, Robert J. (Westfield, NJ); Jefferson, Clinton F. (Millburn, NJ); Lanam, Richard D. (Westfield, NJ)

1983-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The Structure and Chemistry of Solid Surfaces The structure of solid surfaces and the chemical reactions that take place on surfaces are of fundamental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as platinum or rhodium and the key chemical reactions involved in the removal of pollutants such as carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, and nitrogen oxides, take place on the surfaces of the metal particles. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1. Y. Lei, A. Uhl, C. Becker, K. Wandelt, B. C. Gates, R. Meyer, and M. Trenary, "Adsorption

Ben-Arie, Jezekiel

162

Tandem Catalysis A Highly Efficient and Rapid Approach to Synthetic Elaboration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diiodide catalyzed Mukaiyama Michael-aldol reactions C.) Zirconium catalyzed synthesis of !-cyanohydrins D and rhodium catalyzed annulation. B.) Cobalt catalyzed annulation and cycloaddition C.) Rapid synthesis of pyrroles and furans D.) Organocatalytic / Lewis acid tandem catalysis 5.) Conclusions Tandem catalysis

Stoltz, Brian M.

163

Strong Bond Activation with Late Transition-Metal Pincer Complexes as a Foundation for Potential Catalysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

introduction for pincer ligands ................................................ 1 1.2 Synthesis of pincer ligated transition metal complexes ........................ 3 1.3 Structural preference for group 9/10 metal complexes (4d and 5d) ...... 9 1... ..................................................................................... 126 V SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION, AND REACTIVITY OF A RHODIUM DIFLUOROCARBENE COMPLEX SUPPORTED BY PNP PINCER LIGAND ........................................................................................ 144 5.1 Introduction...

Zhu, Yanjun

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

164

Asymmetric hydrogenations of aryl alkenes using imidazol-2-ylidene iridium complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Catalysts.......................32 1.4 Lanthanide-based Chiral Catalysts....................................................36 1.5 Rhodium- and Ruthenium-based Systems ........................................38 1.6 Conclusions..........................................................................................43 2.2 Synthesis of Oxazoline Library 60....................................................47 2.3 Synthesis of Imidazole Library 59 ....................................................48 2.4 Synthesis of Ligand Precursors 57...

Cui, Xiuhua

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

165

CO Oxidation on Pt-Group Metals from Ultrahigh Vacuum to Near Atmospheric Pressures. F. Gao, Y. Cai, K. K. Gath, Y. Wang, M. S. Chen, Q. L. Guo, and D. W. Goodman*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRAS) and X-ray photoelectronCO Oxidation on Pt-Group Metals from Ultrahigh Vacuum to Near Atmospheric Pressures. 1. Rhodium F. 6 found for a Pt(111) catalyst near atmospheric conditions, the reaction rate is linearly

Goodman, Wayne

166

TheACSJournalof SurfacesandColloids MicrocontactPrintingofPalladium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:Micron-ScalePatterningby ElectrolessDepositionofGoppel PirminG.Hidber,WolfgangHelbig,EnochKim,and GeorgeM.Whitesides Departmentof Electrolessdepositionof metalssuchascopper,silver, gold,nickel,rhodium,and cobaltis a processwidely used the surfacefor selectiveelectroless metal deposition. Pailadiumis important asa catalystfor the electroless

Prentiss, Mara

167

Hybrid density functional calculations of the defect properties of ZnO:Rh and ZnO:Ir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-type material is essential to be able to manufacture optoelectronic devices with p-n junctions. A new class of p-type zinc oxides with rhodium[5] or iridium[6] has attracted attention recently due to some re- markable features of their electronic structure...

Muoz Ramo, David; Bristowe, Paul D.

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

Two-electron mixed-valence complexes small molecule activation and photocatalytic hydrogen production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two-electron mixed-valence complexes of rhodium may be supported by diphosphazane ligands (RN(PY2)2). Whereas diphosphazane ligands with strongly [pi]-acidic phosphine groups (Y = F, OCH2CF3) react with RhI starting materials ...

Heyduk, Alan F. (Alan Frank), 1974-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Syngas Chemistry DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100735  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Syngas Chemistry DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100735 Carbon Chain Growth by Formyl Insertion on Rhodium and Cobalt Catalysts in Syngas Conversion** Yong-Hui Zhao, Keju Sun, Xiufang Ma, Jinxun Liu, Dapeng Sun, Hai-Yan Su, and Wei-Xue Li* Syngas (CO/H2) produced from coal, natural gas, or biomass has attracted much

Li, Weixue

170

Overview of ALD Precursors and Reaction Mechanisms Roy G. Gordon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-flammable, non-corrosive, non-toxic, simple and non-hazardous to make and inexpensive. Presenting Author: Roy GXe YttriumY 4 CopperCu DysprosiumDy ErbiumEr LithiumLi LutetiumLu MagnesiumMg RhodiumRh RutheniumRu Sulfur

171

This is an author-deposited version published in: http://oatao.univ-toulouse.fr/ Eprints ID: 6179  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrations of substrates in the catalytic phase as required by this kinetic modeling, solubility measurements-Lebigue, Carine and Delmas, Henri (2011) Kinetics of hydroformylation of 1-octene in ionic liquid-organic biphasic-oatao@listes.diff.inp-toulouse.fr #12;Kinetics of hydroformylation of 1-octene in ionic liquid-organic biphasic media using rhodium

Mailhes, Corinne

172

DOI: 10.1002/adsc.201000585 Synthesis, Immobilization, MAS and HR-MAS NMR of a New  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on silica with their phosphonium moieties via electro- static interactions, and their mobility and leaching- vents. Immobilized Wilkinson-type rhodium com- plexes have been obtained by ligand exchange nanoparticles Introduction Catalysts immobilized on solid supports are of grow- ing academic and industrial

Bluemel, Janet

173

Homologation process making higher alcohols  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid phase process for the manufacture of C.sub.2+ alkanols by the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide in the presence of a catalyst containing ruthenium, cobalt, a halide-containing compound, and an aromatic compound substituted in adjacent ring positions by nitrogen atoms. The process embraces the use of rhodium as an additive to the catalyst system.

Leung, Tak W. (Charleston, WV); Dombek, Bernard D. (Charleston, WV)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Autothermal reforming catalyst and process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High activity steam reforming catalysts are described particularly adapted for use in autothermal reforming processes. A rhodium catalyst on a calcium oxide impregnated alumina substrate allow the autothermal reforming process to take place with substantially no carbon plugging at oxygen to carbon ratios below what had been considered critical for avoiding carbon plugging of the catalyst in the past.

Setzer, H. J.; Karavolis, S.; Lesieur, R. R.; Wnuck, W. G.

1984-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

175

Metal articles having ultrafine particles dispersed therein  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a metal article of manufacture. It comprises: a metal selected from the group consisting of copper, silver, gold, lead, tin, nickel, zinc, cobalt, antimony, bismuth, iron, cadmium, chromium, germanium, gallium, selenium, tellurium, mercury, tungsten arsenic, manganese, iridium, indium, ruthenium, rhenium, rhodium, molybdenum, palladium, osmium and platinum; and a plurality of ultrafine particles.

Alexander, G.B.; Nadkarni, R.A.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

176

Journal of Catalysis 191, 237244 (2000) doi:10.1006/jcat.1999.2793, available online at http://www.idealibrary.com on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

line shape to that of transition metal carbides (15). Commonly formed at low coverages, carbidic carbon. On several metal surfaces, it is consistently found that carbonaceous com- pounds appear in carbidic production, on a vari- ety of metals including nickel, platinum, palladium, ruthe- nium, and rhodium

Sibener, Steven

177

Brnsted Acid Catalyzed Addition of Phenols, Carboxylic Acids, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and often toxic metal catalysts, including pal- ladium,2 rhodium,3 ruthenium,4 lanthanides,5 main group-scale applications of these reactions and often generates heavy metal impurities in the product. Direct use of simple addition methods and is an alternative to metal-catalyzed reactions. Nucleophilic addition of phenols

He, Chuan

178

Photochemical reaction dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the program is to develop a fundamental understanding of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction dynamics with application in combustion and energy systems. The energy dependence in ketene isomerization, ketene dissociation dynamics, and carbonyl substitution on organometallic rhodium complexes in liquid xenon have been studied. Future studies concerning unimolecular processes in ketene as well as energy transfer and kinetic studies of methylene radicals are discussed.

Moore, B.C. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Studies of Immobilized Homogeneous Metal Catalysts on Silica Supports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tethered, chiral, chelating diphosphine rhodium complex, which catalyzes the enantioselective hydrogenation of methyl-{alpha}-acetamidocinnamate (MAC), has the illustrated structure as established by {sup 31}P NMR and IR studies. Spectral and catalytic investigations also suggest that the mechanism of action of the tethered complex is the same as that of the untethered complex in solution. The rhodium complexes, [Rh(COD)H]{sub 4}, [Rh(COD){sub 2}]{sup +}BF{sub 4}{sup -}, [Rh(COD)Cl]{sub 2}, and RhCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O, adsorbed on SiO{sub 2} are optimally activated for toluene hydrogenation by pretreatment with H{sub 2} at 200 C. The same complexes on Pd-SiO{sub 2} are equally active without pretreatments. The active species in all cases is rhodium metal. The catalysts were characterized by XPS, TEM, DRIFTS, and mercury poisoning experiments. Rhodium on silica catalyzes the hydrogenation of fluorobenzene to produce predominantly fluorocyclohexane in heptane and 1,2-dichloroethane solvents. In heptane/methanol and heptane/water solvents, hydrodefluorination to benzene and subsequent hydrogenation to cyclohexane occurs exclusively. Benzene inhibits the hydrodefluorination of fluorobenzene. In DCE or heptane solvents, fluorocyclohexane reacts with hydrogen fluoride to form cyclohexene. Reaction conditions can be chosen to selectively yield fluorocyclohexane, cyclohexene, benzene, or cyclohexane. The oxorhenium(V) dithiolate catalyst [-S(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}s-]Re(O)(Me)(PPh{sub 3}) was modified by linking it to a tether that could be attached to a silica support. Spectroscopic investigation and catalytic oxidation reactivity showed the heterogenized catalyst's structure and reactivity to be similar to its homogeneous analog. However, the immobilized catalyst offered additional advantages of recyclability, extended stability, and increased resistance to deactivation.

Keith James Stanger

2003-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

Selective Gaseous Extraction: Research, Development and Training for Isotope Production, Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

General Atomics and the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) completed research and development of selective gaseous extraction of fission products from irradiated fuel, which included training and education of MURR students. The process used porous fuel and after irradiation flowed product gases through the fuel to selectively removed desired fission products with the primary goal of demonstrating the removal of rhodium 105. High removal rates for the ruthenium/rhodium (Ru/Rh), tellurium/iodine (Te/I) and molybdenum/technetium (Mo/Tc) series were demonstrated. The success of this research provides for the reuse of the target for further production, significantly reducing the production of actinide wastes relative to processes that dissolve the target. This effort was conducted under DOE funding (DE-SC0007772). General Atomics objective of the project was to conduct R&D on alternative methods to produce a number of radioactive isotopes currently needed for medical and industry applications to include rhodium-105 and other useful isotopes. Selective gaseous extraction was shown to be effective at removing radioisotopes of the ruthenium/rhodium, tellurium/iodine and molybdenum/technetium decay chains while having trace to no quantities of other fission products or actinides. This adds a new, credible method to the area of certain commercial isotope production beyond current techniques, while providing significant potential reduction of process wastes. Waste reduction, along with reduced processing time/cost provides for superior economic feasibility which may allow domestic production under full cost recovery practices. This provides the potential for improved access to domestically produced isotopes for medical diagnostics and treatment at reduced cost, providing for the public good.

Bertch, Timothy C, [General Atomics

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Steam reforming utilizing high activity catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High activity, sulfur tolerant steam reforming catalysts are described comprising rhodium or nickel supported on lanthanum stabilized alumina or magnesium promoted lanthanum stabilized alumina. The catalysts have improved activity over conventionally used catalysts in the presence of sulfur containing hydrocarbon fuel (such as No. 2 fuel oil) in a steam reforming environment. The material has particular utility in autothermal, tubular, cyclic and adiabatic steam reforming processes.

Setzer, H. J.

1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

182

Formation of thin-film resistors on silicon substrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The formation of thin-film resistors by the ion implantation of a metallic conductive layer in the surface of a layer of phosphosilicate glass or borophosphosilicate glass which is deposited on a silicon substrate. The metallic conductive layer materials comprise one of the group consisting of tantalum, ruthenium, rhodium, platinum and chromium silicide. The resistor is formed and annealed prior to deposition of metal, e.g. aluminum, on the substrate.

Schnable, George L. (Montgomery County, PA); Wu, Chung P. (Hamilton Township, Mercer County, NJ)

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Bimetallic Ni-Rh catalysts with low amounts of Rh for the steam and autothermal reforming of n-butane for fuel-cell applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mono-metallic nickel and rhodium catalysts and bimetallic Ni-Rh catalysts supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeZrO{sub 2} and CeMgOx were prepared and evaluated for catalyzing the steam and autothermal reforming of n-butane. The binary Ni-Rh supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts with low weight loading of rhodium exhibited higher H{sub 2} yields than Ni or Rh alone. The Ni-Rh/CeZrO{sub 2} catalyst exhibited higher performance and no coke formation, compared to the same metals on other supports. A NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase was obtained on all Ni and Ni-Rh catalysts supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The presence of rhodium stabilized the spinel phase as well as NiOx species upon reforming while Ni alone was mostly reduced into metallic species. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure analysis showed evidence of Ni-Rh alloy during preparation and even further after an accelerated aging at 900C in a H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O atmosphere.

Ferrandon, M.; Kropf, A. J.; Krause, T.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity of Rh-based lanthanum zirconate pyrochlores for higher alcohol synthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two lanthanum zirconate pyrochlores (La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}; LZ) were prepared by Pechini method and tested for higher alcohols selectivity. In one, Rh was substituted into the pyrochlore lattice (LRZ, 1.7 wt%) while for the second, Rh was supported on an unsubstituted La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (R/LZ, 1.8 wt%). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed reduction (TPR) results show that the surface reducibility depends on whether the Rh is in (or supported on) the LZ pyrochlore. Rhodium in the LRZ is more reducible than rhodium supported on the R/LZ pyrochlore, likely due to the presence of a perovskite phase (LaRhO{sub 3}; identified by XRD), in which rhodium is more reducible. The formation of the perovskite accompanies that of the pyrochlore. CO hydrogenation results show higher ethanol selectivity for R/LZ than LRZ, possibly due to the strong interaction between Rh and LZ on the R/LZ, forming atomically close Rh{sup +}/Rh{sup 0} sites, which have been suggested to favor ethanol production.

Abdelsayed, Victor; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Poston, James A., Jr.; Spivey, James J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement Program, 1996-2003 Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contractual obligations with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's (ODFW), Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement Program (Program). The last Annual Program Report was submitted in 1997, and described projects undertaken in 1995. This report describes Program activities carried out in 2003, along with a summary of projects undertaken during the years 1996 through 2002. The Program works cooperatively with private landowners to develop long-term restoration agreements, under which, passive and active Habitat Improvement Projects are conducted. Historically, projects have included livestock exclusion fencing (passive restoration) to protect riparian habitats, along with the installation of instream structures (active restoration) to address erosion and improve fish habitat. In recent years, the focus of active restoration has shifted to bioengineering treatments and, more recently, to channel re-design and re-construction aimed at improving fish habitat, by restoring stable channel function. This report provides a summary table of past projects (1996-2002), along with a text description of more extensive habitat improvement projects, including: (1) Implementation of a four-phased project on the Lobato property (Birch Creek) beginning in 1996 and involving a demonstration bioengineering site and riparian improvements (fencing, planting), (2) Implementation of stable channel design/instream structure placement on the Houser property, East Birch Creek, beginning in 1998, an (3) Implementation of a joint, US Army Corps of Engineers/ODFW (cost share) project beginning in 2001 on the Brogoitti property, East Birch Creek, which involved implementation of stable channel design/construction and riparian improvement treatments.

St. Hilaire, Danny R.; Montgomery, Michael; Bailey, Timothy D. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, John Day, OR)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Light induced electron transfer reactions of metal complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Properties of the excited states of tris(2,2'-bipyridine) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes of chromium(III), iron(II), ruthenium(II), osmium(II), rhodium(III), and iridium(III) are described. The electron transfer reactions of the ground and excited states are discussed and interpreted in terms of the driving force for the reaction and the distortions of the excited states relative to the corresponding ground states. General considerations relevant to the conversion of light into chemical energy are presented and progress in the use of polypyridine complexes to effect the light decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen is reviewed.

Sutin, N.; Creutz, C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Catalytic partial oxidation of hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the production of a reaction product including a carbon containing compound. The process includes providing a film of a fuel source including at least one organic compound on a wall of a reactor, contacting the fuel source with a source of oxygen, forming a vaporized mixture of fuel and oxygen, and contacting the vaporized mixture of fuel and oxygen with a catalyst under conditions effective to produce a reaction product including a carbon containing compound. Preferred products include .alpha.-olefins and synthesis gas. A preferred catalyst is a supported metal catalyst, preferably including rhodium, platinum, and mixtures thereof.

Schmidt, Lanny D.; Krummenacher, Jakob J.; West, Kevin N.

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

188

Thermally tolerant multilayer metal membrane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of a Group IVB or Group VB metal sandwiched between two layers of a Group VIIIB metal selected from the group consisting of palladium, platinum, nickel, rhodium, iridium, cobalt, and alloys thereof, and a non-continuous layer of a metal chalcogenide upon one layer of the Group VIIIB metal is disclosed together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture using such a composite membrane and a process for forming such a composite metal membrane.

Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM); Snow, Ronny C. (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Solid fuel volatilization to produce synthesis gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method comprising contacting a carbon and hydrogen-containing solid fuel and a metal-based catalyst in the presence of oxygen to produce hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide gas, wherein the contacting occurs at a temperature sufficiently high to prevent char formation in an amount capable of stopping production of the hydrogen gas and the carbon monoxide gas is provided. In one embodiment, the metal-based catalyst comprises a rhodium-cerium catalyst. Embodiments further include a system for producing syngas. The systems and methods described herein provide shorter residence time and high selectivity for hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

Schmidt, Lanny D.; Dauenhauer, Paul J.; Degenstein, Nick J.; Dreyer, Brandon J.; Colby, Joshua L.

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

190

Method for forming gold-containing catalyst with porous structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming a gold-containing catalyst with porous structure according to one embodiment of the present invention includes producing a starting alloy by melting together of gold and at least one less noble metal that is selected from the group consisting of silver, copper, rhodium, palladium, and platinum; and a dealloying step comprising at least partial removal of the less noble metal by dissolving the at least one less noble metal out of the starting alloy. Additional methods and products thereof are also presented.

Biener, Juergen; Hamza, Alex V; Baeumer, Marcus; Schulz, Christian; Jurgens, Birte; Biener, Monika M.

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

191

Method and system for ethanol production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A transition metal carbonyl and a tertiary amine are employed as a homogeneous catalytic system in methanol or a less volatile solvent to react methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas producing ethanol and carbon dioxide. The gas contains a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio as is present in a typical gasifier product. The reaction has potential for anhydrous ethanol production as carbon dioxide rather than water is produced. Selected transition metal carbonyls include those of iron, rhodium ruthenium, manganese in combination with iron and possibly osmium. Selected amines include trimethylamine, N-Methylpyrrolidine, 2,4-diazabicyclooctane, dimethylneopentylamine, N-methylpiperidine and derivatives of N-methylpiperidine.

Feder, Harold M. (Darien, IL); Chen, Michael J. (Darien, IL)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Carbon aerogel electrodes for direct energy conversion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A direct energy conversion device, such as a fuel cell, using carbon aerogel electrodes is described, wherein the carbon aerogel is loaded with a noble catalyst, such as platinum or rhodium and soaked with phosphoric acid, for example. A separator is located between the electrodes, which are placed in a cylinder having plate current collectors positioned adjacent the electrodes and connected to a power supply, and a pair of gas manifolds, containing hydrogen and oxygen positioned adjacent the current collectors. Due to the high surface area and excellent electrical conductivity of carbon aerogels, the problems relative to high polarization resistance of carbon composite electrodes conventionally used in fuel cells are overcome. 1 fig.

Mayer, S.T.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Pekala, R.W.

1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

193

Carbon aerogel electrodes for direct energy conversion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A direct energy conversion device, such as a fuel cell, using carbon aerogel electrodes, wherein the carbon aerogel is loaded with a noble catalyst, such as platinum or rhodium and soaked with phosphoric acid, for example. A separator is located between the electrodes, which are placed in a cylinder having plate current collectors positioned adjacent the electrodes and connected to a power supply, and a pair of gas manifolds, containing hydrogen and oxygen positioned adjacent the current collectors. Due to the high surface area and excellent electrical conductivity of carbon aerogels, the problems relative to high polarization resistance of carbon composite electrodes conventionally used in fuel cells are overcome.

Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Method and system for ethanol production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A transition metal carbonyl and a tertiary amine are employed as a homogeneous catalytic system in methanol or a less volatile solvent to react methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas producing ethanol and carbon dioxide. The gas contains a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio as is present in a typical gasifier product. The reaction has potential for anhydrous ethanol production as carbon dioxide rather than water is produced. Selected transition metal carbonyls include those of iron, rhodium, ruthenium, manganese in combination with iron and possibly osmium. Selected amines include trimethylamine, N-Methylpyrrolidine, 2,4-diazabicyclooctane, dimethylneopentylamine, N-methylpiperidine and derivatives of N-methylpiperidine.

Feder, H.M.; Chen, M.J.

1981-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

195

Compatibility of aluminide-coated Hastelloy x and Inconel 617 in a simulated gas-cooled reactor environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercially prepared aluminide coatings on Hastelloy X and Inconel 617 substrates were exposed to controlled-impurity helium at 850/sup 0/ and 950/sup 0/C for 3000 h. Optical and scanning electron (SEM) microscopy, electron microprobe profiles, and SEM X-ray mapping were used to evaluate and compare exposed and unexposed control samples. Four coatings were evaluated: aluminide, aluminide with platinum, aluminide with chromium, and aluminide with rhodium. With extended time at elevated temperature, nickel diffused into the aluminide coatings to form epsilon-phase (Ni/sub 3/Al). This diffusion was the primary cause of porosity formation at the aluminide/alloy interface.

Chin, J.; Johnson, W. R.; Chen, K.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Hydrodynamic and numerical modeling of a spherical homogeneous.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmasSandy-Nor'easterStatisticalwithRhodium Metal and

197

Hydrodynamic experiment provides key data for Stockpile Stewardship  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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198

Hydrogen Absorption Induced Metal Deposition on Palladium and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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199

Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation in Supported  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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200

Hydrogen Bonded Arrays: The Power of Multiple Hydrogen Bonds. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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201

Pollution prevention and waste minimization in metal finishing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was done to identify pollution prevention and waste minimization opportunities in the general plating department and the printed circuit board processing department. Recommendations for certain recycle and recovery technologies were mad in order to reduce usage of acids and the volume of heavy metal sludge that is formed at the industrial Wastewater Pretreatment Facility (IWPF). Some of these technologies discussed were acid purification, electrowinning, and ion exchange. Specific technologies are prescribed for specific processes. Those plating processes where the metals can be recovered are copper, nickel, gold, cadmium, tin, lead, and rhodium.

Stimetz, C.J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Infrared study of the behavior of CO, NO, and CO + NO over Rh/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infrared spectroscopy was used to study the interaction of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide on a 0.475% Rh/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst. Both CO and NO readily adsorb on a prereduced catalyst surface. NO is not observed spectroscopically on preoxidized catalysts, yet isocyanate is produced during subsequent displacement by CO. The adsorption of CO on a preoxidized catalyst parallels the reduction of the catalyst. At temperatures in excess of 250/sup 0/C and mixed feeds with CO/NO greater than or equal to 1, a large buildup of isocyanate is observed on the support. At temperatures greater than 300/sup 0/C an infrared band attributed to adsorbed cyanide ion is observed near 2150 cm/sup -1/. Experiments involving displacement of NO by CO, displacement of CO by NO, and coadsorption of CO + NO show that contiguous rhodium surfaces are necessary for isocyanate production. Though the rhodium gem-dicarbonyl species, Rh(CO)/sub 2/, was observed, there was no experimental evidence demonstrating the presence of Rh(NO)/sub 2/ or Rh(NO)(CO) complexes.

Dictor, R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Mixed Alcohol Synthesis Catalyst Screening  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). PNNL is tasked with obtaining commercially available or preparing promising mixed-alcohol catalysts and screening them in a laboratory-scale reactor system. Commercially available catalysts and the most promising experimental catalysts are provided to NREL for testing using a slipstream from a pilot-scale biomass gasifier. From the standpoint of producing C2+ alcohols as the major product, it appears that the rhodium catalyst is the best choice in terms of both selectivity and space-time yield (STY). However, unless the rhodium catalyst can be improved to provide minimally acceptable STYs for commercial operation, mixed alcohol synthesis will involve significant production of other liquid coproducts. The modified Fischer-Tropsch catalyst shows the most promise for providing both an acceptable selectivity to C2+ alcohols and total liquid STY. However, further optimization of the Fischer-Tropsch catalysts to improve selectivity to higher alcohols is highly desired. Selection of a preferred catalyst will likely entail a decision on the preferred coproduct slate. No other catalysts tested appear amenable to the significant improvements needed for acceptable STYs.

Gerber, Mark A.; White, James F.; Stevens, Don J.

2007-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

204

Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Polyhedral Borane Anions and Aluminum-Ammonia-Borane Complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase 1. Hydrolysis of borohydride compounds offer the potential for significant hydrogen storage capacity, but most work to date has focused on one particular anion, BH4-, which requires high pH for stability. Other borohydride compounds, in particular polyhedral borane anions offer comparable hydrogen storage capacity without requiring high pH media and their long term thermal and hydrolytic stability coupled with non-toxic nature make them a very attractive alternative to NaBH4. The University of Missouri project provided the overall program focal point for the investigation of catalytic hydrolysis of polyhedral borane anions for hydrogen release. Due to their inherent stability, a transition metal catalyst was necessary for the hydrolysis of polyhedral borane anions. Transition metal ions such as cobalt, nickel, palladium and rhodium were investigated for their catalytic activity in the hydrolysis of nido-KB11H14, closo-K2B10H10, and closo-K2B12H12. The rate of hydrolysis follows first-order kinetics with respect to the concentration of the polyhedral borane anion and surface area of the rhodium catalyst. The rate of hydrolysis depends upon a) choice of polyhedral borane anion, c) concentration of polyhedral borane anion, d) surface area of the rhodium catalyst and e) temperature of the reaction. In all cases the yield of hydrogen was 100% which corresponds to ~7 wt% of hydrogen (based on material wt%). Phase 2. The phase 2 of program at the University of Missouri was focused upon developing aluminum ammonia-boranes (Al-AB) as chemical hydrogen storage materials, specifically their synthesis and studies of their dehydrogenation. The ammonia borane molecule (AB) is a demonstrated source of chemically stored hydrogen (19.6 wt%) which meets DOE performance parameters except for its regeneration from spent AB and elemental hydrogen. The presence of an aluminum center bonded to multiple AB residues might combine the efficiency of AB dehydrogenation with an aluminum mediated hydrogenation process leading to reversibility. The Al-AB complexes have comparable hydrogen capacity with other M-AB and have potential to meet DOEs 2010 and 2015 targets for system wt%.

Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Jalisatgi, Satish S.; Safronov, Alexander V.; Lee, Han Beak; Wu, Jianguo

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Development of a remote bushing for actinide vitrification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) are combining their existing experience in handling highly radioactive, special nuclear materials with commercial glass fiberization technology in order to assemble a small vitrification system for radioactive actinide solutions. The vitrification system or {open_quotes}brushing{close_quotes}, is fabricated from platinum-rhodium alloy and is based on early marble remelt fiberization technology. Advantages of this unique system include its relatively small size, reliable operation, geometrical safety (nuclear criticality), and high temperature capability. The bushing design should be capable of vitrifying a number of the actinide nuclear materials, including solutions of americium/curium, neptunium, and possibly plutonium. State of the art, mathematical and oil model studies are being combined with basic engineering evaluations to verify and improve the thermal and mechanical design concepts.

Schumacher, R.F.; Ramsey, W.G.; Johnson, F.M. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

Lara-Curzio, Edgar (Lenoir City, TN); An, Ke (Knoxville, TX); Kiggans, Jr., James O. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dudney, Nancy J. (Knoxville, TN); Contescu, Cristian I. (Knoxville, TN); Baker, Frederick S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Armstrong, Beth L. (Clinton, TN)

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

207

Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

Lara-Curzio, Edgar; An, Ke; Kiggans, Jr., James O; Dudney, Nancy J; Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Armstrong, Beth L

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

208

Role of support in adsorption and catalysis on supported metals. I. IR spectroscopic study of adsorption of CO and H/sub 2/ on Rh/SiO/sub 2/, Rh/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and Rh/La/sub 2/O/sub 3/  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the aim of studying the influence of the nature of the support on the properties of supported rhodium-containing catalysts, the adsorption of CO and H/sub 2/ on Rh/SiO/sub 2/, Rh/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and Rh/La/sub 2/O/sub 3/ has been investigated. It has been found that in the case of Rh/La/sub 2/O/sub 3/, along with the surface complexes that are characteristic for Rh/SiO/sub 2/ and Rh/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, new surface compounds of adsorbed CO and H/sub 2/ are formed. On the basis of an analysis of the spectrochemical properties of these boundary with the participation of the metal atoms and also the atoms of the support.

Bredikhin, M.N.; Lokhov, Yu.A.; Kuznetsov, V.L.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

High temperature coatings for gas turbines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coating for high temperature gas turbine components that include a MCrAlX phase, and an aluminum-rich phase, significantly increase oxidation and cracking resistance of the components, thereby increasing their useful life and reducing operating costs. The aluminum-rich phase includes aluminum at a higher concentration than aluminum concentration in the MCrAlX alloy, and an aluminum diffusion-retarding composition, which may include cobalt, nickel, yttrium, zirconium, niobium, molybdenum, rhodium, cadmium, indium, cerium, iron, chromium, tantalum, silicon, boron, carbon, titanium, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, and combinations thereof, and particularly nickel and/or rhenium. The aluminum-rich phase may be derived from a particulate aluminum composite that has a core comprising aluminum and a shell comprising the aluminum diffusion-retarding composition.

Zheng, Xiaoci Maggie

2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

210

Pico- and nanosecond laser ablation of mixed tungsten / aluminium films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to extend the investigation of laser-assisted cleaning of ITER-relevant first mirror materials to the picosecond regime, a commercial laser system delivering 10 picosecond pulses at 355 nm at a frequency of up to 1 MHz has been used to investigate the ablation of mixed aluminium (oxide) / tungsten (oxide) layers deposited on poly- and nanocrystalline molybdenum as well as nanocrystalline rhodium mirrors. Characterization before and after cleaning using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and spectrophotometry shows heavy dust formation, resulting in a degradation of the reflectivity. Cleaning using a 5 nanosecond pulses at 350 and 532 nm, on the other hand, proved very promising. The structure of the film remnants suggests that in this case buckling was the underlying removal mechanism rather than ablation. Repeated coating and cleaning using nanosecond pulses is demonstrated.

Wisse, M; Steiner, R; Mathys, D; Stumpp, A; Joanny, M; Travere, J M; Meyer, E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Activity and structure of perovskites as diesel reforming catalysts for solid oxide fuel cells.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent progress in developing perovskite materials as more cost-effective catalysts in autothermal reforming (ATR) of diesel fuel to hydrogen-rich reformate for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) application is reported. Perovskite-type metal oxides with B sites partially exchanged by ruthenium were prepared and evaluated under ATR reaction conditions. The hydrogen yield, reforming efficiency, and CO{sub x} selectivity of these catalysts were investigated using diesel surrogate fuel with 50 ppm sulfur. The catalyst performances have approached or exceeded a benchmark, high-cost rhodium-based material. In parallel with the reactivity study, we also investigated the physical properties of B-site doped perovskites and their impact on the reforming performance using various characterization techniques such as BET, X-ray powder diffraction, temperature programmable reduction, scanning electron microscopy, and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We found that ruthenium is highly dispersed into perovskite lattice and its redox behavior is directly associated with reforming activity.

Liu, D.-J.; Krumpelt, M.; Chemical Engineering

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Baseline milestone HWVP-87-V110202F: Preliminary evaluation of noble metal behavior in the Hanford waste vitrification plant reference glass HW-39  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The precipitation and aggregation of ruthenium (Ru), rhodium (RLh) and palladium (Pd) in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) low chromium reference glass HLW-39 were investigated to determine if there is a potential for formation of a noble metal sludge in the HWVP ceramic melter. Significant noble metal accumulations on the floor of the melter will result in the electrical shorting of the electrodes and premature failure of the melter. The purpose of this study was to obtain preliminary information on the characteristics of noble metals in a simulated HWVP glass. Following a preliminary literature view to obtain information concerning the noble metals behavior, a number of variability studies were initiated. The effects of glass redox conditions, melt temperature, melting time and noble metal concentration on the phase characteristics of these noble metals were examined.

Geldart, R.W.; Bates, S.O.; Jette, S.J.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Method for the catalytic conversion of organic materials into a product gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for converting organic material into a product gas includes: (a) providing a liquid reactant mixture containing liquid water and liquid organic material within a pressure reactor; (b) providing an effective amount of a reduced metal catalyst selected from the group consisting of ruthenium, rhodium, osmium and iridium or mixtures thereof within the pressure reactor; and (c) maintaining the liquid reactant mixture and effective amount of reduced metal catalyst in the pressure reactor at temperature and pressure conditions of from about 300 C to about 450 C; and at least 130 atmospheres for a period of time, the temperature and pressure conditions being effective to maintain the reactant mixture substantially as liquid, the effective amount of reduced metal catalyst and the period of time being sufficient to catalyze a reaction of the liquid organic material to produce a product gas composed primarily of methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. 5 figs.

Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Baker, E.G.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Enantioselective synthesis of L-(-)-4- boronophenylalanine (L-BPA)  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making substantially pure L-BPA is disclosed. The method includes the steps of reacting 4-bromobenzaldehyde with ethylene glycol to form 4-bromobenzaldehyde ethylene glycol acetal, sequentially reacting 4-bromobenzaldehyde ethyleneglycol acetal with Mg to produce the Grignard reagent and thereafter reacting with tributyl borate and then converting to an acid environment to form 4-boronobenzaldehyde, reacting 4-boronobenzaldehyde with diethanol amine to form 4-boronobenzaldehyde diethanolamine ester, condensing the 4-boronobenzaldehyde diethanolamine ester with 2-phenyl-2-oxazolin-5-one to form an azlactone, reacting the azlactone with an alkali metal hydroxide to form z-.alpha.-benzoylamino-4-boronocinnamic acid, asymmetrically hydrogenating the z-.alpha.-benzoylamino-4-boronocinnamic acid in the presence of a catalyst of a cheltate complex of rhodium (I) with chiral bisphosphines to form L-(+)-N-benzoyl-4-boronophenylalanine, and thereafter acidifying the L-(+)-N-benzoyl-4-boronophenylalanine in an organic medium to produce L-BPA.

Samsel, Edward G. (Baton Rouge, LA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Enantioselective synthesis of L-(-)-4- boronophenylalanine (L-BPA)  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making substantially pure L-BPA is disclosed. The method includes the steps of reacting 4-bromobenzaldehyde with ethylene glycol to form 4-bromobenzaldehyde ethylene glycol acetal, sequentially reacting 4-bromobenzaldehyde ethyleneglycol acetal with Mg to produce the Grignard reagent and thereafter reacting with tributyl borate and then converting to an acid environment to form 4-boronobenzaldehyde, reacting 4-boronobenzaldehyde with diethanol amine to form 4-boronobenzaldehyde diethanolamine ester, condensing the 4-boronobenzaldehyde diethanolamine ester with 2-phenyl-2-oxazolin-5-one to form an azlactone, reacting the azlactone with an alkali metal hydroxide to form z-[alpha]-benzoylamino-4boronocinnamic acid, asymmetrically hydrogenating the z-[alpha]-benzoylamino-4-boronocinnamic acid in the presence of a catalyst of a cheltate complex of rhodium (I) with chiral bisphosphines to form L-(+)-N-benzoyl-4-boronophenylalanine, and thereafter acidifying the L-(+)-N-benzoyl-4-boronophenylalanine in an organic medium to produce L-BPA. 3 figs.

Samsel, E.G.

1992-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

216

Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray scattering diffraction station at the SESAME synchrotron radiation facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The calculation for the optics of the synchrotron radiation small and wide angle x-ray scattering beamline, currently under construction at SESAME is described. This beamline is based on a cylindrically bent germanium (111) single crystal with an asymmetric cut of 10.5 deg., followed by a 1.2 m long rhodium coated plane mirror bent into a cylindrical form. The focusing properties of bent asymmetrically cut crystals have not yet been studied in depth. The present paper is devoted to study of a particular application of a bent asymmetrically cut crystal using ray tracing simulations with the SHADOW code. These simulations show that photon fluxes of order of 1.09x10{sup 11} photons/s will be available at the experimental focus at 8.79 keV. The focused beam dimensions will be 2.2 mm horizontal full width at half maximum (FWHM) by 0.12 mm vertical (FWHM).

Salah, Wa'el [Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Application in the Middle East (SESAME), P.O. Box 7, Allan 19252 (Jordan); Department of Physics, The Hashemite University, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan); Sanchez del Rio, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Bp 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Hoorani, H. [Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Application in the Middle East (SESAME), P.O. Box 7, Allan 19252 (Jordan)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Refractory electrodes for joule heating and methods of using same  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A certain group of electrically conductive refractory materials presently known for use in high temperature applications as throat constructions, melter sidewalls, forehearth, stacks, port sills, hot face lining for slagging coal gasifiers, slag runners, and linings for nuclear waste encapsulation furnaces may be used as electrodes permitting joule heating at temperatures in excess of 1200 C. in excess of about 4400 hours even in the presence of transition group element(s). More specifically, the invention is an electrode for melting earthen materials, wherein the electrode is made from an electrically conductive refractory material, specifically at least one metal oxide wherein the metal is selected from the group consisting of chrome, ruthenium, rhodium, tin and combinations thereof.

Lamar, David A. (West Richland, WA); Chapman, Chris C. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Michael L. (Kennewick, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Refractory electrodes for joule heating and methods of using same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A certain group of electrically conductive refractory materials presently known for use in high temperature applications as throat constructions, melter sidewalls, forehearth, stacks, port sills, hot face lining for slagging coal gasifiers, slag runners, and linings for nuclear waste encapsulation furnaces may be used as electrodes permitting joule heating at temperatures in excess of 1,200 C in excess of about 4400 hours even in the presence of transition group element(s). More specifically, the invention is an electrode for melting earthen materials, wherein the electrode is made from an electrically conductive refractory material, specifically at least one metal oxide wherein the metal is selected from the group consisting of chrome, ruthenium, rhodium, tin and combinations thereof. 2 figs.

Lamar, D.A.; Chapman, C.C.; Elliott, M.L.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

219

Progress in chemical processing of LEU targets for {sup 99}Mo production -- 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presented here are recent experimental results of the continuing development activities associated with converting current processes for producing fission-product {sup 99}Mo from targets using high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). Studies were focused in four areas: (1) measuring the chemical behavior of iodine, rhodium, and silver in the LEU-modified Cintichem process, (2) performing experiments and calculations to assess the suitability of zinc fission barriers for LEU metal foil targets, (3) developing an actinide separations method for measuring alpha contamination of the purified {sup 99}Mo product, and (4) developing a cooperation with Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory that will lead to approval by the US Federal Drug Administration for production of {sup 99}Mo from LEU targets. Experimental results continue to show the technical feasibility of converting current HEU processes to LEU.

Vandegrift, G.F.; Conner, C.; Sedlet, J.; Wygmans, D.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wu, D. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Iskander, F.; Landsberger, S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Significance of M2 and E3 transitions for $4p^54d^{N+1}$ and $4p^64d^{N-1}4f$ configuration metastable level lifetimes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic quadrupole and electric octupole transitions from the configurations $4p^54d^{N+1}$ and $4p^64d^{N-1}4f$ were calculated along with magnetic dipole, electric dipole and electric quadrupole radiative transitions in quasirelativistic Hartree-Fock approximation. Their significance in determining the metastable level radiative lifetimes was investigated along several isoelectronic sequences for the ions from $Z=50$ to $Z=92$. Strontium-like ions, zirconium-like ions, molybdenum-like ions and rhodium-like ions were studied comprehensively. Remaining isoelectronic sequences with the ground configuration $4d^{N}$ ($N=1,3,5,7,8,10$) were also reviewed albeit in less detail. A systematic trends of determined total radiative lifetimes were studied. The importance of magnetic quadrupole and electric octupole transitions from metastable levels of ions from these isoelectronic sequences was investigated and discussed. Inclusion of such transitions of higher multipole order can change theoretical radiative lifetim...

Karpukien?, R; Kisielius, R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

X-ray source for mammography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

Logan, Clinton M. (Pleasanton, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Method for the catalytic conversion of organic materials into a product gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for converting organic material into a product gas includes: a) providing a liquid reactant mixture containing liquid water and liquid organic material within a pressure reactor; b) providing an effective amount of a reduced metal catalyst selected from the group consisting of ruthenium, rhodium, osmium and iridium or mixtures thereof within the pressure reactor; and c) maintaining the liquid reactant mixture and effective amount of reduced metal catalyst in the pressure reactor at temperature and pressure conditions of from about 300.degree. C. to about 450.degree. C.; and at least 130 atmospheres for a period of time, the temperature and pressure conditions being effective to maintain the reactant mixture substantially as liquid, the effective amount of reduced metal catalyst and the period of time being sufficient to catalyze a reaction of the liquid organic material to produce a product gas composed primarily of methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen.

Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA); Sealock, Jr., L. John (Richland, WA); Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Engineering and manufacturing of ITER first mirror mock-ups  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the ITER optical diagnostics aiming at viewing and monitoring plasma facing components will use in-vessel metallic mirrors. These mirrors will be exposed to a severe plasma environment and lead to an important tradeoff on their design and manufacturing. As a consequence, investigations are carried out on diagnostic mirrors toward the development of optimal and reliable solutions. The goals are to assess the manufacturing feasibility of the mirror coatings, evaluate the manufacturing capability and associated performances for the mirrors cooling and polishing, and finally determine the costs and delivery time of the first prototypes with a diameter of 200 and 500 mm. Three kinds of ITER candidate mock-ups are being designed and manufactured: rhodium films on stainless steel substrate, molybdenum on TZM substrate, and silver films on stainless steel substrate. The status of the project is presented in this paper.

Joanny, M.; Travere, J. M.; Salasca, S.; Corre, Y. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Marot, L. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Thellier, C.; Gallay, G.; Cammarata, C.; Passier, B.; Ferme, J. J. [SESO, 305 Rue Louis Armand CS 30504, 13593 Aix-en-Provence Cedex 3 (France)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

X-ray source for mammography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray source is described utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms. 6 figures.

Logan, C.M.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

225

DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. A relatively wide temperature window was established for the use of alumina-supported cerium oxide-copper oxide mixtures as regenerable sorbents for SO{sub 2} removal. Evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with methane. Since the replacement of ammonia by methane is commercially very attractive, in this project, it was planned to investigate the effect of promoters on the activity and selectivity of copper oxide/cerium oxide-based catalysts and to obtain data on the reaction mechanism for the SCR with methane. The investigation of the reaction mechanism will help in the selection of promoters to improve the catalytic activity and selectivity of the sorbents in the SCR with methane. This will result in new catalyst formulations. The last component of the project involves our industrial partner TDA Research, and the objective is to evaluate long- term stability and durability of the prepared sorbent/catalysts. In the second year of the project, the catalysts were investigated for their SCR activity with methane in a microreactor setup and also, by the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The results from the SCR experiments indicated that manganese is a more effective promoter than rhodium on the supported copper oxide-ceria catalysts under study; the effectiveness of the promoter increases with the increase in Ce/Cu ratio. The TPD profiles of the unpromoted catalyst (Cu/Ce=3) is different than those promoted with 0.1% rhodium. In the current reporting period, the screening of the promoted catalysts were completed, sufficient amount of the selected catalysts were prepared and delivered to TDA for long term deactivation testing.

Dr. Ates Akyurlu; Dr. Jale F. Akyurtlu

2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

226

Outlooks of HLW Partitioning Technologies Usage for Recovering of Platinum Metals from Spent Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existing practice of management of high level waste (HLW) generated by NPPs, call for a task of selective separation of the most dangerous long-lived radionuclides with the purpose of their subsequent immobilization and disposal. HLW partitioning allows to reduce substantially the cost of vitrified product storage owing to isolation of the most dangerous radionuclides, such as transplutonium elements (TPE) into separate fractions of small volumes, intended for ultimate storage. By now numerous investigations on partitioning of HLW of various composition have been carried out in many countries and a lot of processes permitting to recover cesium, strontium, TPE and rare earth elements (REE) have been already tested. Apart from enumerated radionuclides, a fair quantity of palladium and rhodium presents in spent fuel, but the problem of these elements recovery has not yet been decided at the operating radiochemical plants. A negative effect of platinum group metals (PGM) occurrence is determined by the formation of separate metal phase, which not only worsens the conditions of glass-melting but also shortens considerably the service life of the equipment. At the same time, the exhaustion of PGMs natural resources may finally lead to such a growth of their costs that the spent nuclear fuel would became a substituting source of these elements industrial production. Allowing above mentioned, it is of interest to develop the technique for ''reactor'' palladium and rhodium recovery process which would be compatible with HLW partitioning and could be realized using the same facilities. In the report the data on platinum metals distribution in spent fuel reprocessing products and the several flowsheets for palladium separation from HLW are presented.

Pokhitonov, Y. A.; Estimantovskiy, V.; Romanovski, v.; Zatsev, B.; Todd, T.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

227

Intrinsic Uncertainties in Modeling Complex Systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models are built to understand and predict the behaviors of both natural and artificial systems. Because it is always necessary to abstract away aspects of any non-trivial system being modeled, we know models can potentially leave out important, even critical elements. This reality of the modeling enterprise forces us to consider the prospective impacts of those effects completely left out of a model - either intentionally or unconsidered. Insensitivity to new structure is an indication of diminishing returns. In this work, we represent a hypothetical unknown effect on a validated model as a finite perturba- tion whose amplitude is constrained within a control region. We find robustly that without further constraints, no meaningful bounds can be placed on the amplitude of a perturbation outside of the control region. Thus, forecasting into unsampled regions is a very risky proposition. We also present inherent difficulties with proper time discretization of models and representing in- herently discrete quantities. We point out potentially worrisome uncertainties, arising from math- ematical formulation alone, which modelers can inadvertently introduce into models of complex systems. Acknowledgements This work has been funded under early-career LDRD project %23170979, entitled %22Quantify- ing Confidence in Complex Systems Models Having Structural Uncertainties%22, which ran from 04/2013 to 09/2014. We wish to express our gratitude to the many researchers at Sandia who con- tributed ideas to this work, as well as feedback on the manuscript. In particular, we would like to mention George Barr, Alexander Outkin, Walt Beyeler, Eric Vugrin, and Laura Swiler for provid- ing invaluable advice and guidance through the course of the project. We would also like to thank Steven Kleban, Amanda Gonzales, Trevor Manzanares, and Sarah Burwell for their assistance in managing project tasks and resources.

Cooper, Curtis S; Bramson, Aaron L.; Ames, Arlo L.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. A relatively wide temperature window was established for the use of alumina-supported cerium oxide-copper oxide mixtures as regenerable sorbents for SO{sub 2} removal. Preliminary evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with ammonia, but indicated low selectivity when methane was used as the reductant. Since the replacement of ammonia by another reductant is commercially very attractive, in this project, four research components will be undertaken. The investigation of the reaction mechanism, the first component, will help in the selection of promoters to improve the catalytic activity and selectivity of the sorbents in the SCR with methane. This will result in new catalyst formulations (second component). If this research is successful, the combined SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x} removal process based on alumina-supported copper oxide-ceria sorbent/catalysts will become very attractive for commercial applications. The objective of the third component of the project is to develop an alternative SCR process using another inexpensive fuel, residual fuel oil, instead of natural gas. This innovative proposal is based on very scant evidence concerning the good performance of coked catalysts in the selective reduction of NO and if proven to work the process will certainly be commercially viable. The fourth component of the project involves our industrial partner TDA Research, and the objective is to evaluate long- term stability and durability of the prepared sorbent/catalysts. In the second year of the project, the catalysts were investigated for their SCR activity with methane in a microreactor setup and also, by the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The results from the SCR experiments indicated that manganese is a more effective promoter than rhodium on the supported copper oxide-ceria catalysts under study; the effectiveness of the promoter increases with the increase in Ce/Cu ratio. The TPD profiles of the unpromoted catalyst (Cu/Ce=3) is different than those promoted with 0.1% rhodium.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Final Technical Report "Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation" Grant number : DE-FG02-86ER13615  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Title: Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER13615 PI: Wayland, B. B. (wayland@sas.upenn.edu) Abstract Development of new mechanistic strategies and catalyst materials for activation of CO, H2, CH4, C2H4, O2, and related substrates relevant to the conversion of carbon monoxide, alkanes, and alkenes to organic oxygenates are central objectives encompassed by this program. Design and synthesis of metal complexes that manifest reactivity patterns associated with potential pathways for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide through metallo-formyl (M-CHO), dimetal ketone (M-C(O)-M), and dimetal dionyl (M-C(O)-C(O)-M) species is one major focus. Hydrocarbon oxidation using molecular oxygen is a central goal for methane activation and functionalization as well as regioselective oxidation of olefins. Discovery of new reactivity patterns and control of selectivity are pursued through designing new metal complexes and adjusting reaction conditions. Variation of reaction media promotes distinct reaction pathways that control both reaction rates and selectivities. Dimetalloradical diporphyrin complexes preorganize transition states for substrate reactions that involve two metal centers and manifest large rate increases over mono-metalloradical reactions of hydrogen, methane, and other small molecule substrates. Another broad goal and recurring theme of this program is to contribute to the thermodynamic database for a wide scope of organo-metal transformations in a range of reaction media. One of the most complete descriptions of equilibrium thermodynamics for organometallic reactions in water and methanol is emerging from the study of rhodium porphyrin substrate reactions in aqueous and alcoholic media. Water soluble group nine metalloporphyrins manifest remarkably versatile substrate reactivity in aqueous and alcoholic media which includes producing rhodium formyl (Rh-CHO) and hydroxy methyl (Rh-CH2OH) species. Exploratory directions for this program include expending new strategies for anti-Markovnikov addition of water, alcohols, and amines with olefins, developing catalytic reactions of CO to give formamides and formic esters, and evaluating the potential for coupling reactions of CO to produce organic building blocks.

Wayland, B.B.

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

Mixed Alcohol Synthesis Catalyst Screening 2007 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are researching the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). PNNL is obtaining commercially available mixed alcohol or preparing promising mixed-alcohol catalysts and screening them in a laboratory-scale reactor system. The most promising catalysts are provided to NREL for testing using a slipstream from a pilot-scale biomass gasifier. After a review of the literature in 2006 and conversations with companies that produce catalysts, it was determined that no commercial mixed-alcohol synthesis catalysts were available. One manufacturer supplied a modified methanol catalyst that was tested in the PNNL laboratory-scale system and provided to NREL for further testing. PNNL also prepared and tested the behavior of 10 other catalysts representing the distinct catalyst classes for mixed alcohol syntheses. Based on those results,testing in 2007 focused on the performance of the rhodium-based catalysts. The effects of adding promoters to the rhodium catalysts in addition to the manganese already being used were examined. The iron and rhenium promoters both stood out as achieving higher carbon selectivities , followed by Cu. Iridium and Li, on the other hand, had low carbon selectivity ratios of 0.27 and 0.22, respectively. Although testing of candidate promoters is not complete, it appears that Ir and Li promoters warrant further optimization and possibly combination to further improve STYs and carbon selectivities to C2+ oxygenates. However, using these promoters, it will be necessary to incorporate a separate hydrogenation catalyst to improve the yield of C2+ alcohols with respect to the other oxygenates. Fe, Re, and Cu stand out as possible candidates in this respect, but additional research is needed to examine whether they can be combined with the other promoters on the Rh-based catalyst or need to be optimized on a separate catalyst support that is either physically mixed or used in series with the promoted Rh-based catalyst.

Gerber, Mark A.; White, J. F.; Gray, Michel J.; Stevens, Don J.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Irradiation testing of a niobium-molybdenum developmental thermocouple  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A need exists for a radiation-resistant thermocouple capable of monitoring temperatures in excess of the limits of the chromel/alumel system. Tungsten/rhenium and platinum/rhodium thermocouples have sufficient temperature capability but have proven to be unstable because of irradiation-induced decalibration. The niobium/molybdenum system is believed to hold great potential for nuclear applications at temperatures up to 2000 K. However, the fragility of pure niobium and fabrication problems with niobium/molybdenum alloys have limited development of this system. Utilizing the Fast Flux Test Facility, a developmental thermocouple with a thermoelement pair consisting of a pure molybdenum and a niobium-1%zirconium alloy wire was irradiated fro 7200 hours at a temperature of 1070 K. The thermocouple performed flawlessly for the duration of the experiment and exhibited stability comparable to a companion chromel/alumel unit. A second thermocouple, operating at 1375 K, is currently being employed to monitor a fusion materials experiment in the Fast Flux Test Facility. This experiment, also scheduled for 7200 hours, will serve to further evaluate the potential of the niobium-1%zirconium/molybdenum thermoelement system. 7 refs., 7 figs.

Knight, R.C.; Greenslade, D.L.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Method for bonding thin film thermocouples to ceramics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for adhering a thin film metal thermocouple to a ceramic substrate used in an environment up to 700 degrees Centigrade, such as at a cylinder of an internal combustion engine. The method includes the steps of: depositing a thin layer of a reactive metal on a clean ceramic substrate; and depositing thin layers of platinum and a platinum-10% rhodium alloy forming the respective legs of the thermocouple on the reactive metal layer. The reactive metal layer serves as a bond coat between the thin noble metal thermocouple layers and the ceramic substrate. The thin layers of noble metal are in the range of 1-4 micrometers thick. Preferably, the ceramic substrate is selected from the group consisting of alumina and partially stabilized zirconia. Preferably, the thin layer of reactive metal is in the range of 0.015-0.030 micrometers (15-30 nanometers) thick. The preferred reactive metal is chromium. Other reactive metals may be titanium or zirconium. The thin layer of reactive metal may be deposited by sputtering in ultra high purity argon in a vacuum of approximately 2 milliTorr (0.3 Pascals).

Kreider, Kenneth G. (Potomac, MD)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Method of generating hydrogen by catalytic decomposition of water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing hydrogen includes providing a feed stream comprising water; contacting at least one proton conducting membrane adapted to interact with the feed stream; splitting the water into hydrogen and oxygen at a predetermined temperature; and separating the hydrogen from the oxygen. Preferably the proton conducting membrane comprises a proton conductor and a second phase material. Preferable proton conductors suitable for use in a proton conducting membrane include a lanthanide element, a Group VIA element and a Group IA or Group IIA element such as barium, strontium, or combinations of these elements. More preferred proton conductors include yttrium. Preferable second phase materials include platinum, palladium, nickel, cobalt, chromium, manganese, vanadium, silver, gold, copper, rhodium, ruthenium, niobium, zirconium, tantalum, and combinations of these. More preferably second phase materials suitable for use in a proton conducting membrane include nickel, palladium, and combinations of these. The method for generating hydrogen is preferably preformed in the range between about 600.degree. C. and 1,700.degree. C.

Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL); Dorris, Stephen E. (LaGrange Park, IL); Bose, Arun C. (Pittsburgh, PA); Stiegel, Gary J. (Library, PA); Lee, Tae-Hyun (Naperville, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Sol-gel processed silica-alumina materials for diesel engine emission reduction catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The incorporation of >30% silica in alumina prior to platinum impregnation improves the NOx conversion efficiency in the 200--300 C range from 45 to 57% and reduces light-off temperature. Further increase in the amount of silica to 50% is detrimental to NOx conversion efficiency. The {sup 1}H and {sup 29}Si NMR of the materials suggest that this trend is probably related to the surface acidity. The analyses of these materials by X-ray powder diffraction and electron microscopy do not reveal significant differences. Additional NOx conversion in the 350--450 C range with a maximum of 30% at 400 C can be achieved if a rhodium-impregnated 30% silica-alumina, Rh-30% SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, is placed upstream of Pt-30% SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. It is important to note that mixing Pt-30% SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with Rh-30% SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} does not enhance conversion efficiency or effective temperature range.

Narula, C.K.; Rokosz, M.; Allard, L.F.; Kudla, R.J.; Chattha, M.S.

2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

235

A versatile facility for the calibration of X-ray polarimeters with polarized and unpolarized controlled beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We devised and built a versatile facility for the calibration of the next generation X-ray polarimeters with unpolarized and polarized radiation. The former is produced at 5.9 keV by means of a Fe55 radioactive source or by X-ray tubes, while the latter is obtained by Bragg diffraction at nearly 45 degrees. Crystals tuned with the emission lines of X-ray tubes with molybdenum, rhodium, calcium and titanium anodes are employed for the efficient production of highly polarized photons at 2.29, 2.69, 3.69 and 4.51 keV respectively. Moreover the continuum emission is exploited for the production of polarized photons at 1.65 keV and 2.04 keV and at energies corresponding to the higher orders of diffraction. The photons are collimated by means of interchangeable capillary plates and diaphragms, allowing a trade-off between collimation and high fluxes. The direction of the beam is accurately arranged by means of high precision motorized stages, controlled via computer so that long and automatic measurements can be done. Selecting the direction of polarization and the incidence point we can map the response of imaging devices to both polarized and unpolarized radiation. Changing the inclination of the beam we can study the systematic effects due to the focusing of grazing incidence optics and the feasibility of instruments with large field of view.

Fabio Muleri; Paolo Soffitta; Ronaldo Bellazzini; Alessandro Brez; Enrico Costa; Massimo Frutti; Marcello Mastropietro; Ennio Morelli; Michele Pinchera; Alda Rubini; Gloria Spandre

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Low Cost Autothermal Diesel Reforming Catalyst Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalytic autothermal reforming (ATR) represents an important step of converting fossil fuel to hydrogen rich reformate for use in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. The state-of-the-art reforming catalyst, at present, is a Rh based material which is effective but costly. The objective of our current research is to reduce the catalyst cost by finding an efficient ATR catalyst containing no rhodium. A group of perovskite based catalysts have been synthesized and evaluated under the reforming condition of a diesel surrogate fuel. Hydrogen yield, reforming efficiency, and conversion selectivity to carbon oxides of the catalyst ATR reaction are calculated and compared with the benchmark Rh based material. Several catalyst synthesis improvements were carried out including: 1) selectively doping metals on the A-site and B-site of the perovskite structure, 2) changing the support from perovskite to alumina, 3) altering the method of metal addition, and 4) using transition metals instead of noble metals. It was found that the catalytic activity changed little with modification of the A-site metal, while it displayed considerable dependence on the B-site metal. Perovskite supports performed much better than alumina based supports.

Shihadeh, J.; Liu, D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Mg{sub 8}Rh{sub 4}B - A new type of boron stabilized Ti{sub 2}Ni structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new magnesium rhodium boron compound Mg{sub 8}Rh{sub 4}B has been synthesized by reaction of the metal powders with crystalline or amorphous boron or the RhB precursor. The crystal structure of Mg{sub 8}Rh{sub 4}B was solved using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data (space group Fd3-bar m, a=12.1711(4)A, Z=8, 174 reflections, R{sub F}=0.016). The crystal structure can be described as a filled Ti{sub 2}Ni type where the interstitial sites 8b (12,12,12), located at the center of two nested Mg{sub 4}Rh{sub 4} tetrahedra, are occupied by boron atoms. Taking into account the absence of the Ti{sub 2}Ni-type phase in the binary Mg-Rh system, the boron atoms can be considered as stabilizing this structural motif. From the bonding analysis with the electron localization function the crystal structure is described as covalently bonded [Rh{sub 4}B]{sup 3-} anions, embedded in a cationic magnesium matrix.

Alekseeva, A.M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany) and Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: alekseev@cpfs.mpg.de; Abakumov, A.M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); EMAT, University of Antwerp, Antwerp B-2020 (Belgium); Leithe-Jasper, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Schnelle, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Prots, Yu. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Chizhov, P.S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Van Tendeloo, G. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Antwerp B-2020 (Belgium); Antipov, E.V. [Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Grin, Yu. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Process for functionalizing alkanes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons selectively in the terminal position comprising: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: RH where: H represents a hydrogen atom, and R represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 H.sub.2 where: Cp represents a pentamethylated cyclopentadienyl radical, Rh represents a rhodium atom, P represents a phosphorous atom, Me represents a methyl group, H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of ultraviolet radiation at a temperature maintained at about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form a hydridoalkyl complex of the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RH (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with a haloform of the formula: CHX.sub.3 where: X represents a bromine, iodine or chlorine atom, at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RX; and, (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex formed in (b) with halogen (X.sub.2) at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to 25.degree. C. (i.e. ambient) to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

Bergman, Robert G. (Kensington, CA); Janowicz, Andrew H. (Wilmington, DE); Periana-Pillai, Roy A. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

With no Color and Scent (part III): Architecture of metal shells grown on templates by pulse current electrodeposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method of growing mushroom or shell like nanostructured metal convex concave models has been worked out. Silver,copper,nickel,rhodium and Pd-Ni,Pd-Co alloy structures are reproduced as a result of self-assembly of nanowires growing on porous membranes in the course of pulse current electrodeposition. It is shown that the method allows to model not only the shell shape but also the hierarchical structure at the nano, micro and mesolevels. A 1,2 mm sized shell was grown from Pd-Ni alloy. The architecture of the models was studied by fragmentation and chemical etching. The images were obtained using SUPRA 50 VP and JEOL scanning electron microscopes. The metal shell is a bowl-shaped frame, its walls composed of densely packed nanoelements. Each nanoelement is a conical bundle of nanowires grown as a supported wine glass. The shell inner surface is a weave of nanowires with a vegetation pattern with bottom up directed lines. The inner surface exhibits also well pronounced transverse rings formed by the bottom u...

Strukova, Galina; Egorov, Sergey

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Catalyst and process development for hydrogen preparation from future fuel cell feedstocks. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1980. [Pt/Rh, Pd, Pt, Rh, Ni/Rh, Rh/Re, Ni  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalysts are being screened to steam reform hydrocarbons in an autothermal reformer (STR). Twenty-one samples have been screened in a 1-in.-diam (ATR) reactor using No. 2 oil as the hydrocarbon feed. A series of platinum-rhodium catalysts were evaluated to study the effect of varying compositions. A sample containing 1.7% Pt/0.3% Rh was most active but the difference among the samples was within the range of test variability. Development of a more realistic test has been started. The effect of O/sub 2//C level on the gas composition leaving the catalytic partial oxidation section has been determined. The amount of unreacted oil increases as O/sub 2//C level decreases. The unreacted oil is more aromatic than the feedstock. The gas composition contains considerably more olefins as the O/sub 2//C level decreases. Post-run catalyst characterization indicates that the catalyst carrier does not deteriorate in the ATR test. A drastic decrease in CO chemisorption is noted on the Pt/Rh samples. This decline in CO chemisorption could either be due to metal sintering or to carbon deposition on the metal. Other analysis are required to determine which is causing the decline in CO chemisorption. Very low coke levels were found on Pt, Rh, and Pt/Rh samples. Addition of Rh to nickel reduces the coke level over that observed for nickel catalysts.

Yarrington, R M; Feins, I R; Hwang, H S

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Solar reforming of methane in a direct absorption catalytic reactor on a parabolic dish  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of solar driven chemical reactions in a commercial-scale volumetric receiver/reactor on a parabolic concentrator was successfully demonstrated in the CAtalytically Enhanced Solar Absorption Receiver (CAESAR) test. Solar reforming of methane (CH{sub 4}) with carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) was achieved in a 64-cm diameter direct absorption reactor on a parabolic dish capable of 150 kW solar power. The reactor was a catalytic volumetric absorber consisting of a multi-layered, porous alumina foam disk coated with rhodium (Rh) catalyst. The system was operated during both steady-state and solar transient (cloud passage) conditions. The total solar power absorbed reached values up to 97 kW and the maximum methane conversion was 70%. Receiver thermal efficiencies ranged up to 85% and chemical efficiencies peaked at 54%. The absorber performed satisfactorily in promoting the reforming reaction during the tests without carbon formation. However, problems of cracking and degradation of the porous matrix, nonuniform dispersion of the Rh through the absorber, and catalyst deactivation due to sintering and possible encapsulation, must be resolved to achieve long-term operation and eventual commercialization. 17 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Muir, J.F.; Hogan, R.E. Jr.; Skocypec, R.D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Buck, R. (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Stuttgart (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Technische Thermodynamik)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

US Department of Energy radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this edition of the radioisotope customer list at the request of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (ER-73), Office of Energy Research, US Department of Energy (DOE). This is the 25th report in a series dating from 1964. This report covers DOE radioisotope sales and distribution activities by its facilities to domestic, foreign and other DOE facilities for FY 1988. The report is divided into five sections: radioisotope suppliers, facility contacts, and radioisotopes or services supplied; a list of customers, suppliers, and radioisotopes purchased; a list of radioisotopes purchased cross-referenced to customer numbers; geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and radioisotope sales and transfers -- FY 1988. Radioisotopes not previously reported in this series of reports were argon-37, arsenic-72, arsenic-73, bismuth-207, gadolinium-151, rhenium-188, rhodium-101, selenium-72, xenon-123 and zirconium-88. The total value of DOE radioisotope sales for FY 1988 was $11.1 million, an increase of 3% from FY 1987.

Van Houten, N.C.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Long term materials test program. Quarterly report, October-December 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long-term exposure of gas turbine vane and blade base alloys and a variety of protective coating systems to the effluent from a pressurized fluidized bed coal combustor has reached 4398 hours. After 4053 hours, FeCrAlY overlay coatings and platinum/rhodium-aluminide pack diffusion coatings show excellent resistance to corrosion attack at 1500/sup 0/F. Cobalt-base coatings are somewhat more susceptible to hot corrosion, and the unprotected nickel and cobalt-base alloys are most susceptible to corrosion, although corrosion rates have decreased to less than 1 mil/1000 hours for all materials at 1500/sup 0/F; i.e., corrosion penetration data is evolving parabolically. The three-stage cyclone cleanup system became severely distorted after approximately 5600 hours total service life. Distortion of the cyclones contributed to an increased dust loading to the material test sections, 110 to 250 ppM versus normal loadings of 30 to 90 ppM, for a period of about 75 hours. This increase in dust loading caused severe erosion of the airfoils in the high-velocity test section. Metal recession ranged 4 to 18 mils of leading edge loss on the impulse airfoils, and 11 to 27 mils of leading edge loss on the reaction airfoils. A new three-stage cyclone system was installed and dust loadings now range from 15 to 45 ppM.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Structural Investigations of Complex Oxides using Synchrotron Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work is a collaborative effort between Prof. Hanno zur Loye at the University of South Carolina and Dr. Tom Vogt at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The collaborative research focuses on the synthesis and the structural characterization of perovskites and perovskite related oxides and will target new oxide systems where we have demonstrated expertise in synthesis, yet lack the experimental capabilities to answer important structural issues. Synthetically, we will focus on two subgroups of perovskite structures, the double and triple perovskites, and the 2H-perovskite related oxides belonging to the A3n+3mAnB3m+nO9m+6n family. In the first part of the proposal, our goal of synthesizing and structurally characterizing new ruthenium, iridium, rhodium and ruthenium containing double and triple perovskites, with the emphasis on exercising control over the oxidation state(s) of the metals, is described. These oxides will be of interest for their electronic and magnetic properties that will be investigated as well.

Hans-Conrad zur Loye

2007-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

245

Process for removal of mineral particulates from coal-derived liquids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Suspended mineral solids are separated from a coal-derived liquid containing the solids by a process comprising the steps of: (a) contacting said coal-derived liquid containing solids with a molten additive having a melting point of 100.degree.-500.degree. C. in an amount of up to 50 wt. % with respect to said coal-derived liquid containing solids, said solids present in an amount effective to increase the particle size of said mineral solids and comprising material or mixtures of material selected from the group of alkali metal hydroxides and inorganic salts having antimony, tin, lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, beryllium, aluminum, zinc, molybdenum, cobalt, nickel, ruthenium, rhodium or iron cations and chloride, iodide, bromide, sulfate, phosphate, borate, carbonate, sulfite, or silicate anions; and (b) maintaining said coal-derived liquid in contact with said molten additive for sufficient time to permit said mineral matter to agglomerate, thereby increasing the mean particle size of said mineral solids; and (c) recovering a coal-derived liquid product having reduced mineral solids content. The process can be carried out with less than 5 wt. % additive and in the absence of hydrogen pressure.

McDowell, William J. (Knoxville, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The Behavior and Effects of the Noble Metals in the DWPF Melter System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Governments worldwide have committed to stabilization of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) by vitrification to a durable glass form for permanent disposal. All of these nuclear wastes contain the fission-product noble metals: ruthenium, rhodium, and palladium. SRS wastes also contain natural silver from iodine scrubbers. Closely associated with the noble metals are the fission products selenium and tellurium which are chemical analogs of sulfur and which combine with noble metals to influence their behavior and properties. Experience has shown that these melt insoluble metals and their compounds tend to settle to the floor of Joule-heated ceramic melters. In fact, almost all of the major research and production facilities have experienced some operational problem which can be associated with the presence of dense accumulations of these relatively conductive metals and/or their compounds. In most cases, these deposits have led to a loss of production capability, in some cases, to the point that melter operation could not continue. HLW nuclear waste vitrification facilities in the United States are the Department of Energy`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site, the planned Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) at the Hanford Site and the operating West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) at West Valley, NY. The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is a vitrification test facility at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). It was designed and constructed to provide an engineering-scale representation of the DWPF melter and its associated feed preparation and off-gas treatment systems. An extensive noble metals testing program was begun in 1990. The objectives of this task were to explore the effects of the noble metals on the DWPF melter feed preparation and waste vitrification processes. This report focuses on the vitrification portion of the test program.

Smith, M.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bickford, D.F.

1997-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

247

Kinetic study on the catalytic performance of Rh/TiO/sub 2/ reduced at different temperatures in the CO-H/sub 2/ reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalytic CO-H/sub 2/ reaction on Rh/TiO/sub 2/ reduced at 200, 400, and 500/sup 0/C (Cat-200, -400, -500) for 2 h was kinetically studied at 250/sup 0/C using a circulating reactor and Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy to determine how Cat-400 exhibited the highest activity. The rate equation distinguished the best catalyst with zero and first orders in CO and H/sub 2/, respectively, from other catalysts with negative order in CO. The adsorption ability of the catalyst at 200/sup 0/C was comparable to that of Cat-200, and two to three times larger than that of Cat-500, although the ability of Cat-200 was much larger at room temperature. Carbon monoxide adsorbed on the catalysts reversibly as well as irreversibly. IR spectroscopy revealed that the major form of irreversibly adsorbed CO was linear on Cat-200, whereas similar amounts of linear and bridge forms were observed on Cat-400 and Cat-500. These latter forms were highly reactive against hydrogen molecules when no carbon monoxide was present in the gas phase. Based on these results, the highest activity of Cat-400 is ascribed to rhodium metal modified by properly reduced TiO/sub 2/ to show the appropriate adsorption ability of carbon monoxide which least retards the activation of hydrogen according to first-order kinetics. Typical strong metal-support interaction decreases the catalytic activity by decreasing the active sites and strengthening the CO adsorption too much.

Fujitsu, H.; Ikeyama, N.; Mochida, I.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Chemical modification of surfaces: the effect of potassium on the chemisorption of molecules on transition metal crystal surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physical and chemical properties of pure potassium monolayers and its effect on the adsorption of oxygen, carbon monoxide and benzene on the (111) faces of platinum and rhodium single crystals are described. Potassium adsorption on both surfaces is quite similar. Potassium forms hexagonally close packed structures that are incommensurate with the substrate. The heat of desorption of potassium on these surfaces decreases with increasing potassium coverage. The surface free electron density increases and the work function decreases substantially wtih alkali adsorption, indicating charge transfer occurs from potassium to the substrate. Oxygen adsorption increases the potassium binding energy, and forms a surface complex at high potassium coverages. Oxygen adsorption is dissociative on both clean and potassium dosed Rh(111). The metal-oxygen stretching vibration increases in the presence of potassium, indicating stronger adsorption. Carbon monoxide adsorption on both metal surfaces is strongly affected. With increasing potassium coverage, the heat of desorption increases while the C-O stretching frequencies decrease. Also, substantial population shifts from the atop to the bridged site occur. Dissociation of CO is induced on Rh(111) by the presence of potassium. Benzene is found to be ..pi.. bonded oriented with the ring plane parallel to the surface with C/sub 3v/(sigma/sub d/) symmetry on both the clean and potassium dosed Rh(111) surfaces. Potassium reduces the heat of desorption of molecular benzene and induces a lower temperature pathway to decomposition. The major influence of potassium is to increase the surface electron density, which, for molecular adsorbates with low lying vacant orbitals of the correct symmetry, can lead to substantial changes in their bonding with the surface.

Crowell, J.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Separation of gas mixtures by supported complexes. Final report, 1 October 1982-30 September 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report covers research performed to identify and demonstrate advantageous procedures for the chemical separation of gases, such as CO, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/, from medium-Btu gas mixtures by use of supported complexes. Three complexes were chosen for rapid gas uptake and selectivity at 25/sup 0/C from among a group of 22 coordination complexes synthesized during this program. The three complexes showed considerable selectivity toward individual gases. For instance, Pd/sub 2/(dpm)/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ or bis-..mu..-(bisdiphenylphosphinomethane)-dichlorodipalladium (Pd-Pd), rapidly bound carbon monoxide from solution. This complex could be regenerated, with the carbon monoxide reversibly removed, by warming to 40/sup 0/C. The presence of other gases, such as carbon dioxide, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, ethylene, or acetylene, had no effect upon the rapid uptake of carbon monoxide or its removal. Such selectivity was also noted with Ru(CO)/sub 2/(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 3/, biscarbonyltris(triphenylphosphine)ruthenium. Although this complex bound hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and oxygen in solution, the hydrogen was taken up twice as fast as carbon monoxide and seven times faster than oxygen. These gases could be removed from the complex with mild heat or decreased pressure. Crystalline Rh(OH)(CO)(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 2/, hydroxocarbonylbis(triphenylphosphine)rhodium, rapidly bound carbon dioxide; the complex was regenerated at 50/sup 0/C under reduced pressure. The rapid uptake of carbon dioxide by this complex was not changed in the presence of oxygen. In general the three selected crystalline or solvent dissolved complexes performed well in the absence of polymeric support. The stability and favorable kinetics of the three complexes suggest that they could be utilized in a solution system for gas separation (Conceptual Analyses and Preliminary Economics). Further, these complexes appear to be superb candidates as transport agents for facilitated-transport, membrane systems. 69 references, 21 figures.

Nelson, D.A.; Hallen, R.T.; Lilga, M.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Final Report: Investigation of Catalytic Pathways for Lignin Breakdown into Monomers and Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin is a biopolymer that comprises up to 35% of woody biomass by dry weight. It is currently underutilized compared to cellulose and hemicellulose, the other two primary components of woody biomass. Lignin has an irregular structure of methoxylated aromatic groups linked by a suite of ether and alkyl bonds which makes it difficult to degrade selectively. However, the aromatic components of lignin also make it promising as a base material for the production of aromatic fuel additives and cyclic chemical feed stocks such as styrene, benzene, and cyclohexanol. Our laboratory research focused on three methods to selectively cleave and deoxygenate purified lignin under mild conditions: acidolysis, hydrogenation and electrocatalysis. (1) Acidolysis was undertaken in CH2Cl2 at room temperature. (2) Hydrogenation was carried out by dissolving lignin and a rhodium catalyst in 1:1 water:methoxyethanol under a 1 atm H2 environment. (3) Electrocatalysis of lignin involved reacting electrically generated hydrogen atoms at a catalytic palladium cathode with lignin dissolved in a solution of aqueous methanol. In all of the experiments, the lignin degradation products were identified and quantified by gas chromatography mass spectroscopy and flame ionization detection. Yields were low, but this may have reflected the difficulty in recovering the various fractions after conversion. The homogeneous hydrogenation of lignin showed fragmentation into monomers, while the electrocatalytic hydrogenation showed production of polyaromatic hydrocarbons and substituted benzenes. In addition to the experiments, promising pathways for the conversion of lignin were assessed. Three conversion methods were compared based on their material and energy inputs and proposed improvements using better catalyst and process technology. A variety of areas were noted as needing further experimental and theoretical effort to increase the feasibility of lignin conversion to fuels.

Gluckstein, Jeffrey A [ORNL; Hu, Michael Z. [ORNL; Kidder, Michelle [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar [ORNL; Sturgeon, Matthew R [ORNL

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Fate of Noble Metals during the Pyroprocessing of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the pyroprocessing of spent nuclear fuel by electrochemical techniques, fission products are separated as the fuel is oxidized at the anode and refined uranium is deposited at the cathode. Those fission products that are oxidized into the molten salt electrolyte are considered active metals while those that do not react are considered noble metals. The primary noble metals encountered during pyroprocessing are molybdenum, zirconium, ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, and technetium. Pyroprocessing of spent fuel to date has involved two distinctly different electrorefiner designs, in particular the anode to cathode configuration. For one electrorefiner, the anode and cathode collector are horizontally displaced such that uranium is transported across the electrolyte medium. As expected, the noble metal removal from the uranium during refining is very high, typically in excess of 99%. For the other electrorefiner, the anode and cathode collector are vertically collocated to maximize uranium throughput. This arrangement results in significantly less noble metals removal from the uranium during refining, typically no better than 20%. In addition to electrorefiner design, operating parameters can also influence the retention of noble metals, albeit at the cost of uranium recovery. Experiments performed to date have shown that as much as 100% of the noble metals can be retained by the cladding hulls while affecting the uranium recovery by only 6%. However, it is likely that commercial pyroprocessing of spent fuel will require the uranium recovery to be much closer to 100%. The above mentioned design and operational issues will likely be driven by the effects of noble metal contamination on fuel fabrication and performance. These effects will be presented in terms of thermal properties (expansion, conductivity, and fusion) and radioactivity considerations. Ultimately, the incorporation of minor amounts of noble metals from pyroprocessing into fast reactor metallic fuel will be shown to be of no consequence to reactor performance.

B.R. Westphal; D. Vaden; S.X. Li; G.L. Fredrickson; R.D. Mariani

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Fission-chamber-compensated self-powered detector for in-core flux measurement and reactor control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An apparatus is described for in-core flux measurement and nuclear reactor control consisting of: a self-powered rhodium neutron detector for producing an output signal corresponding to reactor power level; first amplifier means having an input for receiving the neutron detector output signal, and the first amplifier means producing a corresponding first amplifier output signal (V/sub 1/); a fission chamber for producing an output signal corresponding to reactor power level; second amplifier means having an input for receiving the fission chamber output signal, the second amplifier means producing a corresponding second amplifier output signal; first differentiating means coupled to the output of the second amplifier means including a resistor and a capacitor coupled to provide a time constant T/sub 1//1n 2 where T/sub 1/ is the half-life of the ground state of Rh/sup 104/; third amplifier means having an input for receiving the second amplifier means output signal, the third amplifier means having a voltage gain of (1-c)/c; second differentiating means coupled to the output of the third amplifying means and including a capacitor and resistor providing a time constant T/sub 2//1n 2 where T/sub 2/ is the half-life of the isomeric state of Rh/sup 104/; and fourth amplifier means including corresponding inputs for receiving the output of the first amplifier means, a processed output from the first differentiating circuit, and a processed output from the second differentiating circuit, and for producing a corresponding summed output signal.

Neissel, J.P.

1986-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Task 4.9 -- Value-added products from syngas. Semi-annual report, July 1--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work on advanced fuel forms in 1996 focused on the synthesis of higher alcohols from mixtures of hydrogen and carbon dioxide (syngas) from coal gasification. Initial work in this project utilized a novel molybdenum sulfide catalyst previously shown to be active for hydrodesulfurization reactions of coal liquids. A pressurized fixed-bed flow-through reactor was constructed, and the MoS{sub 2} catalysts were tested with syngas under a variety of conditions. Unfortunately, the catalysts, even with higher molybdenum loading and addition of promoters, failed to give alcohol products. A batch reactor test of the catalyst was also conducted, but did not produce alcohol products. Group VIII metals have been used previously in catalysts for syngas reactions. Ruthenium and rhodium catalysts were prepared by impregnation of a hydrotalcite support. Tests with these catalysts in flow-through reactors also did not produce the desired alcohol products. The formation of higher alcohols from smaller ones, such as methanol and ethanol, could be commercially important if high selectivity could be achieved. The methanol and ethanol would be derived from syngas and fermentation, respectively. Based on previous work in other laboratories, it was hypothesized that the hydrotalcite-supported MoS{sub 2} or Ru or Rh catalysts could catalyze the formation of butyl alcohols. Although the desired 1-butanol was obtained in batch reactions with the promoted ruthenium catalyst, the reaction was not as selective as desired. Product suitable for a lower-vapor-pressure gasoline oxygenate additive was obtained, but it may not be economical to market such products in competition with methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE). Flow-through catalytic bed reactions were not successful.

Olson, E.S.; Sharma, R.K.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Optimum catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas: Second quarterly technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A base case process for economic studies of making fuel alcohols from syngas has been developed. It uses existing technologies which have been demonstrated to be feasible or have already been commercialized. The process consists of the following steps: coal or natural gas (reforming or partial oxidation) to syngas; syngas to methanol by ICI technology; methanol to light olefins by proprietary UCC technology using molecular sieves; olefins to alcohols by hydroformylation (with a homogeneous rhodium catalyst) followed by hydrogenation. Process economics for the two natural gas-based routes have been developed. With insights gained from this, an optimized and integrated multi-step process has been conceptualized which allows estimation of the lowest cost at which fuel alcohols can be produced. A 60% methanol and 40% higher alcohol mix was assumed to be a suitable fuel alcohol blend for gasoline. At a natural gas price of $2/MMBTU, the cost of producing this, by either partial oxidation or reforming, is $1.12/gal. An integrated process with autothermal reforming at 750 psia and methanol synthesis at 700 psia allows incorporation of the best features of reforming and partial oxidation as well as elimination of syngas compression. The production cost of fuel alcohols by this process is estimated to be $0.90/gal. This is, therefore, the lowest cost at which fuel alcohols can be produced by an integrated, multi-step process. An ''ideal'' process has also been conceptualized which establishes a target production cost that new technology should strive for to be competitive. This process incorporates autothermal reforming for producing syngas followed by conversion to fuel alcohols using emerging technologies. The target production cost is estimated to be $0.65/gal. 16 figs., 10 tabs.

Not Available

1987-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

Monochromatic wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence providing sensitive and selective detection of uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monochromatic wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (MWDXRF) is a sensitive and selective method for elemental compositional analyses. The basis for this instrumental advance is the doubly curved crystal (DCC) optic. Previous work has demonstrated the feasibility of sensitive trace element detection for yttrium as a surrogate for curium in aqueous solutions. Additional measurements have demonstrated similar sensitivity in several different matrix environments which attests to the selectivity of the DCC optic as well as the capabilities of the MWDXRF concept. The objective of this effort is to develop an improved Pu characterization method for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The MWDXRF prototype instrument is the second step in a multi-year effort to achieve an improved Pu assay. This work will describe a prototype MWDXRF instrument designed for uranium detection and characterization. The prototype consists of an X-ray tube with a rhodium anode and a DCC excitation optic incorporated into the source. The DCC optic passes the RhK{alpha} line at 20.214 keV for monochromatic excitation of the sample. The source is capable of 50 W power at 50 kV and 1.0 mA operation. The x-ray emission from the sample is collected by a DCC optic set at the UL{alpha} line of 13.613 keV. The collection optic transmits the UL{alpha} x-rays to the silicon drift detector. The x-ray source, sample, collection optic and detector are all mounted on motion controlled stages for the critical alignment of these components. The sensitivity and selectivity of the instrument is obtained through the monochromatic excitation and the monochromatic detection. The prototype instrument performance has a demonstrated for sensitivity for uranium detection of around 2 ppm at the current state of development. Further improvement in sensitivity is expected with more detailed alignment.

Havrilla, George J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Collins, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Velma M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Zewu [XOS; Wei, Fuzhong [XOS

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

An Assessment of the Current Day Impact of Various Materials Associated with the U.S. Nuclear Test Program in the Marshall Island  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Different stable elements, and some natural and man-made radionuclides, were used as tracers or associated in other ways with nuclear devices that were detonated at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls as part of the U.S. nuclear testing program from 1946 through 1958. The question has been raised whether any of these materials dispersed by the explosions could be of sufficient concentration in either the marine environment or on the coral islands to be of a health concern to people living, or planning to live, on the atolls. This report addresses that concern. An inventory of the materials involved during the test period was prepared and provided to us by the Office of Defense Programs (DP) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The materials that the DOE and the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) ask to be evaluated are--sulfur, arsenic, yttrium, tantalum, gold, rhodium, indium, tungsten, thallium, thorium-230,232 ({sup 230,232}Th), uranium-233,238 ({sup 233,238}U), polonium-210 ({sup 210}Po), curium-232 ({sup 232}Cu), and americium-241 ({sup 241}Am). The stable elements were used primarily as tracers for determining neutron energy and flux, and for other diagnostic purposes in the larger yield, multistage devices. It is reasonable to assume that these materials would be distributed in a similar manner as the fission products subsequent to detonation. A large inventory of fission product and uranium data was available for assessment. Detailed calculations show only a very small fraction of the fission products produced during the entire test series remain at the test site atolls. Consequently, based on the information provided, we conclude that the concentration of these materials in the atoll environment pose no adverse health effects to humans.

Robison, W L; Noshkin, V E; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L; Bogen, K T

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Colloidally Synthesized Monodisperse Rh Nanoparticles Supported on SBA-15 for Size- and Pretreatment-Dependent Studies of CO Oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A particle size dependence for CO oxidation over rhodium nanoparticles of 1.9-11.3 nm has been investigated and determined to be modified by the existence of the capping agent poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP). The particles were prepared using a polyol reduction procedure with PVP as the capping agent. The Rh nanoparticles were subsequently supported on SBA-15 during hydrothermal synthesis to produce Rh/SBA-15 supported catalysts for size-dependent catalytic studies. CO oxidation by O{sub 2} at 40 Torr CO and 100 Torr O{sub 2} was investigated over two series of Rh/SBA-15 catalysts: as-synthesized Rh/SBA-15 covering the full range of Rh sizes and the same set of catalysts after high temperature calcination and reduction. The turnover frequency at 443 K increases from 0.4 to 1.7 s{sup -1} as the particle size decreases from 11.3 to 1.9 nm for the as-synthesized catalysts. After calcination and reduction, the turnover frequency is between 0.1 and 0.4 s{sup -1} with no particle size dependence. The apparent activation energy for all catalysts is {approx}30 kcal mol{sup -1} and is independent of particle size and thermal treatment. Infrared spectroscopy of CO on the Rh nanoparticles indicates that the heat treatments used influence the mode of CO adsorption. As a result, the particle size dependence for CO oxidation is altered after calcination and reduction of the catalysts. CO adsorbs at two distinct bridge sites on as-synthesized Rh/SBA-15, attributable to metallic Rh(0) and oxidized Rh(I) bridge sites. After calcination and reduction, however, CO adsorbs only at Rh(0) atop sites. The change in adsorption geometry and oxidation activity may be attributable to the interaction between PVP and the Rh surface. This capping agent affect may open new possibilities for the tailoring of metal catalysts using solution nanoparticle synthesis methods.

Grass, Michael E.; Joo, Sang Hoon; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2009-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

258

Evaluation of Alternate Materials for Coated Particle Fuels for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Candidate ceramic materials were studied to determine their suitability as Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor particle fuel coatings. The ceramics examined in this work were: TiC, TiN, ZrC, ZrN, AlN, and SiC. The studies focused on (i) chemical reactivity of the ceramics with fission products palladium and rhodium, (ii) the thermomechanical stresses that develop in the fuel coatings from a variety of causes during burnup, and (iii) the radiation resiliency of the materials. The chemical reactivity of TiC, TiN, ZrC, and ZrN with Pd and Rh were all found to be much lower than that of SiC. A number of important chemical behaviors were observed at the ceramic-metal interfaces, including the formation of specific intermetallic phases and a variation in reaction rates for the different ceramics investigated. Based on the data collected in this work, the nitride ceramics (TiN and ZrN) exhibit chemical behavior that is characterized by lower reaction rates with Pd and Rh than the carbides TiC and ZrC. The thermomechanical stresses in spherical fuel particle ceramic coatings were modeled using finite element analysis, and included contributions from differential thermal expansion, fission gas pressure, fuel kernel swelling, and thermal creep. In general the tangential stresses in the coatings during full reactor operation are tensile, with ZrC showing the lowest values among TiC, ZrC, and SiC (TiN and ZrN were excluded from the comprehensive calculations due to a lack of available materials data). The work has highlighted the fact that thermal creep plays a critical role in the development of the stress state of the coatings by relaxing many of the stresses at high temperatures. To perform ion irradiations of sample materials, an irradiation beamline and high-temperature sample irradiation stage was constructed at the University of Wisconsins 1.7MV Tandem Accelerator Facility. This facility is now capable of irradiating of materials to high dose while controlling sample temperature up to 800C.

Paul A. Demkowicz; Karen Wright; Jian Gan; David Petti; Todd Allen; Jake Blanchard

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

TEMPERATURE MONITORING OPTIONS AVAILABLE AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY ADVANCED TEST REACTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced sensors for irradiation testing. To meet recent customer requests, an array of temperature monitoring options is now available to ATR users. The method selected is determined by test requirements and budget. Melt wires are the simplest and least expensive option for monitoring temperature. INL has recently verified the melting temperature of a collection of materials with melt temperatures ranging from 100 to 1000 C with a differential scanning calorimeter installed at INLs High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). INL encapsulates these melt wires in quartz or metal tubes. In the case of quartz tubes, multiple wires can be encapsulated in a single 1.6 mm diameter tube. The second option available to ATR users is a silicon carbide temperature monitor. The benefit of this option is that a single small monitor (typically 1 mm x 1 mm x 10 mm or 1 mm diameter x 10 mm length) can be used to detect peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 C. Equipment has been installed at INLs HTTL to complete post-irradiation resistivity measurements on SiC monitors, a technique that has been found to yield the most accurate temperatures from these monitors. For instrumented tests, thermocouples may be used. In addition to Type-K and Type-N thermocouples, a High Temperature Irradiation Resistant ThermoCouple (HTIR-TC) was developed at the HTTL that contains commercially-available doped molybdenum paired with a niobium alloy thermoelements. Long duration high temperature tests, in furnaces and in the ATR and other MTRs, demonstrate that the HTIR-TC is accurate up to 1800 C and insensitive to thermal neutron interactions. Thus, degradation observed at temperatures above 1100 C with Type K and N thermocouples and decalibration due to transmutation with tungsten-rhenium and platinum rhodium thermocouples can be avoided. INL is also developing an Ultrasonic Thermometry (UT) capability. In addition to small size, UTs offer several potential advantages over other temperature sensors. Measurements may be made near the melting point of the sensor material, potentially allowing monitoring of temperatures up to 3000 C. In addition, because no electrical insulation is required, shunting effects are avoided. Most attractive, however, is the ability to introduce acoustic discontinuities to the sensor, as this enables temperature measurements at several points along the sensor length. As discussed in this paper, the suite of temperature monitors offered by INL is not only available to ATR users, but also to users at other MTRs.

J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; D.L. Knudson; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; K.L Davis

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

ANALYSIS OF DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8) POUR STREAM SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), also referred to as Macrobatch 8 (MB8), in June 2011. SB7a is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the SB7a material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7a was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Three pour stream glass samples and two Melter Feed Tank (MFT) slurry samples were collected while processing SB7a. These additional samples were taken during SB7a to understand the impact of antifoam and the melter bubblers on glass redox chemistry. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they were analyzed. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The sum of oxides for the official SB7a pour stream glass is within the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) limits (95-105 wt%). (2) The average calculated Waste Dilution Factor (WDF) for SB7a is 2.3. In general, the measured radionuclide content of the official SB7a pour stream glass is in good agreement with the calculated values from the Tank 40 dried sludge results from the SB7a Waste Acceptance Program Specification (WAPS) sample. (3) As in previous pour stream samples, ruthenium and rhodium inclusions were detected by Scanning Electron Microscopy-Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) in the official SB7a pour stream sample. (4) The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results indicate that the official SB7a pour stream glass meets the waste acceptance criteria for durability with a normalized boron release of 0.64 g/L, which is an order of magnitude less than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. (5) The measured density of the SB7a pour stream glass was 2.7 g/cm{sup 3}. (6) The Fe{sup 2+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios of the SB7a pour stream samples were in the range of 0.04-0.13, while the MFT sample glasses prepared by SRNL were in the range of 0.02-0.04.

Johnson, F.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trevor houser rhodium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Analysis Of The Sludge Batch 7b (Macrobatch 9) DWPF Pour Stream Glass Sample  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9), in January 2012. SB7b is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and the SB7b material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7b was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Form Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Two pour stream glass samples were collected while processing SB7b. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where one was analyzed and the other was archived. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: The sum of oxides for the official SB7b pour stream glass is within the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) limits (95-105 wt%); The average calculated Waste Dilution Factor (WDF) for SB7b is 2.3. In general, the measured radionuclide content of the official SB7b pour stream glass is in good agreement with the calculated values from the Tank 40 dried sludge results from the SB7b Waste Acceptance Program Specification (WAPS) sample; As in previous pour stream samples, ruthenium and rhodium inclusions were detected by Scanning Electron Microscopy-Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) in the SB7b pour stream sample; The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results indicate that the official SB7b pour stream glass meets the waste acceptance criteria for durability with a normalized boron release of 0.8 g/L, which is an order of magnitude less than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass; The measured density of the SB7b pour stream glass was 2.70 g/cm{sup 3}; The Fe{sup 2+}/?Fe ratio of the SB7b pour stream samples was 0.07.

Johnson, F. C.; Crawford, C. L.; Pareizs, J. M.

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

262

Elimination Of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In Defense Waste Processing Facility Slurries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on lab-scale simulations of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) slurry chemistry, the addition of sodium nitrite and sodium hydroxide to waste slurries at concentrations sufficient to take the aqueous phase into the alkaline region (pH > 7) with approximately 500 mg nitrite ion/kg slurry (assuming <25 wt% total solids, or equivalently 2,000 mg nitrite/kg total solids) is sufficient to effectively deactivate the noble metal catalysts at temperatures between room temperature and boiling. This is a potential strategy for eliminating catalytic hydrogen generation from the list of concerns for sludge carried over into the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) or Recycle Collection Tank (RCT). These conclusions are drawn in large part from the various phases of the DWPF catalytic hydrogen generation program conducted between 2005 and 2009. The findings could apply to various situations, including a solids carry-over from either the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) or Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) into the SMECT with subsequent transfer to the RCT, as well as a spill of formic acid into the sump system and transfer into an RCT that already contains sludge solids. There are other potential mitigating factors for the SMECT and RCT, since these vessels are typically operated at temperatures close to the minimum temperatures that catalytic hydrogen has been observed to occur in either the SRAT or SME (pure slurry case), and these vessels are also likely to be considerably more dilute in both noble metals and formate ion (the two essential components to catalytic hydrogen generation) than the two primary process vessels. Rhodium certainly, and ruthenium likely, are present as metal-ligand complexes that are favored under certain concentrations of the surrounding species. Therefore, in the SMECT or RCT, where a small volume of SRAT or SME material would be significantly diluted, conditions would be less optimal for forming or sustaining the catalytic ligand species. Such conditions are likely to adversely impact the ability of the transferred mass to produce hydrogen at the same rate (per unit mass SRAT or SME slurry) as in the SRAT or SME vessels.

Koopman, D. C.

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

263

Sediment studies at Bikini Atoll part 3. Inventories of some long-lived gamma-emitting radionuclides associated with lagoon surface sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface sediment samples were collected during 1979 from 87 locations in the lagoon at Bikini Atoll. The collections were made to better define the concentrations and distribution of long-lived radionuclides associated with the bottom material and to show what modifications occurred to the composition of the surface sediment from the nuclear testing program conducted by the United States at the Atoll between 1946 and 1958. This is the last of three reports on Bikini sediment studies. In this report, we discuss the concentrations and inventories of the residual long-lived gamma-emitting radionuclides in sediments from the lagoon. The gamma-emitting radionuclides detected most frequently in sediments collected in 1979, in addition to Americium-241 ({sup 241}Am) (discussed in the second report of this series), included Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), Bismuth-207 ({sup 207}Bi), Europium-155 ({sup 155}Eu), and Cobalt-60 ({sup 60}Co). Other man-made, gamma-emitting radionuclides such as Europium-152,154 ({sup 152,154}Eu), Antimony-125 ({sup 125}Sb), and Rhodium-101,102m ({sup 101,102m}Rh) were occasionally measured above detection limits in sediments near test site locations. The mean inventories for {sup 137}Cs, {sup 207}Ei, {sup 155}Eu, and {sup 60}Co in the surface 4 cm of the lagoon sediment to be 1.7, 0.56, 7.76, and 0.74 TBq, respectively. By June 1997, radioactive decay would reduce these values to 1.1, 0.38, 0.62, and 0.07 TBq, respectively. Some additional loss results from a combination of different processes that continuously mobilize and return some amount of the radionuclides to the water column. The water and dissolved constituents are removed from the lagoon through channels and exchange with the surface waters of the north equatorial Pacific Ocean. Highest levels of these radionuclides are found in surface deposits lagoonward of the Bravo Crater. Lowest concentrations and inventories are associated with sediment lagoonward of the eastern reef. The quantities in the 0-4 cm surface layer are estimated to be less than 35% of the total inventory to depth in the sediment column.

Noshkin, V.E.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Small, Inexpensive Combined NOx Sensor and O2 Sensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been successfully demonstrated in this program that a zirconia multilayer structure with rhodium-based porous electrodes performs well as an amperometric NOx sensor. The sensitivity of the sensor bodies operating at 650 to 700 C is large, with demonstrated current outputs of 14 mA at 500 ppm NOx from sensors with 30 layers. The sensor bodies are small (4.5 x 4.2 x 3.1 mm), rugged, and inexpensive. It is projected the sensor bodies will cost $5 - $10 in production. This program has built on another successful development program for an oxygen sensor based on the same principles and sponsored by DOE. This oxygen sensor is not sensitive to NOx. A significant technical hurdle has been identified and solved. It was found that the 100% Rh electrodes oxidize rapidly at the preferred operating temperatures of 650 - 700 C, and this oxidation is accompanied by a volume change which delaminates the sensors. The problem was solved by using alloys of Rh and Pt. It was found that a 10%/90% Rh/Pt alloy dropped the oxidation rate of the electrodes by orders of magnitude without degrading the NOx sensitivity of the sensors, allowing long-term stable operation at the preferred operating temperatures. Degradation in the sensor output caused by temperature cycling was identified as a change in resistance at the junction between the sensor body and the external leads attached to the sensor body. The degradation was eliminated by providing strong mechanical anchors for the wire and processing the junctions to obtain good electrical bonds. The NOx sensors also detect oxygen and therefore the fully-packaged sensor needs to be enclosed with an oxygen sensor in a small, heated zirconia chamber exposed to test gas through a diffusion plug which limits the flow of gas from the outside. Oxygen is pumped from the interior of the chamber to lower the oxygen content and the combination of measurements from the NOx and oxygen sensors yields the NOx content of the gas. Two types of electronic control units were designed and built. One control unit provides independent constant voltages to the NOx and oxygen sensors and reads the current from them (that is, detects the amount of test gas present). The second controller holds the fully-assembled sensor at the desired operating temperature and controllably pumps excess oxygen from the test chamber. While the development of the sensor body was a complete success, the development of the packaging was only partially successful. All of the basic principles were demonstrated, but the packaging was too complex to optimize the operation within the resources of the program. Thus, no fully-assembled sensors were sent to outside labs for testing of cross-sensitivities, response times, etc. Near the end of the program, Sensata Technologies of Attleboro, MA tested the sensor bodies and confirmed the CeramPhysics measurements as indicated in the following attached letter. Sensata was in the process of designing their own packaging for the sensor and performing cross-sensitivity tests when they stopped all sensor development work due to the automotive industry downturn. Recently Ceramatec Inc. of Salt Lake City has expressed an interest in testing the sensor, and other licensing opportunities are being pursued.

W. N. Lawless; C. F. Clark, Jr.

2008-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

265

Small, Inexpensive Combined NOx and O2 Sensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been successfully demonstrated in this program that a zirconia multilayer structure with rhodium-based porous electrodes performs well as an amperometric NO{sub x} sensor. The sensitivity of the sensor bodies operating at 650 to 700 C is large, with demonstrated current outputs of 14 mA at 500 ppm NO{sub x} from sensors with 30 layers. The sensor bodies are small (4.5 x 4.2 x 3.1 mm), rugged, and inexpensive. It is projected the sensor bodies will cost $5-$10 in production. This program has built on another successful development program for an oxygen sensor based on the same principles and sponsored by DOE. This oxygen sensor is not sensitive to NO{sub x}. A significant technical hurdle has been identified and solved. It was found that the 100% Rh electrodes oxidize rapidly at the preferred operating temperatures of 650-700 C, and this oxidation is accompanied by a volume change which delaminates the sensors. The problem was solved by using alloys of Rh and Pt. It was found that a 10%/90% Rh/Pt alloy dropped the oxidation rate of the electrodes by orders of magnitude without degrading the NO{sub x} sensitivity of the sensors, allowing long-term stable operation at the preferred operating temperatures. Degradation in the sensor output caused by temperature cycling was identified as a change in resistance at the junction between the sensor body and the external leads attached to the sensor body. The degradation was eliminated by providing strong mechanical anchors for the wire and processing the junctions to obtain good electrical bonds. The NO{sub x} sensors also detect oxygen and therefore the fully-packaged sensor needs to be enclosed with an oxygen sensor in a small, heated zirconia chamber exposed to test gas through a diffusion plug which limits the flow of gas from the outside. Oxygen is pumped from the interior of the chamber to lower the oxygen content and the combination of measurements from the NO{sub x} and oxygen sensors yields the NO{sub x} content of the gas. Two types of electronic control units were designed and built. One control unit provides independent constant voltages to the NOx and oxygen sensors and reads the current from them (that is, detects the amount of test gas present). The second controller holds the fully-assembled sensor at the desired operating temperature and controllably pumps excess oxygen from the test chamber. While the development of the sensor body was a complete success, the development of the packaging was only partially successful. All of the basic principles were demonstrated, but the packaging was too complex to optimize the operation within the resources of the program. Thus, no fully-assembled sensors were sent to outside labs for testing of cross-sensitivities, response times, etc. Near the end of the program, Sensata Technologies of Attleboro, MA tested the sensor bodies and confirmed the CeramPhysics measurements as indicated in the following attached letter. Sensata was in the process of designing their own packaging for the sensor and performing cross-sensitivity tests when they stopped all sensor development work due to the automotive industry downturn. Recently Ceramatec Inc. of Salt Lake City has expressed an interest in testing the sensor, and other licensing opportunities are being pursued.

W. Lawless; C. Clark

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Integrated superhard and metallic coatings for MEMS : LDRD 57300 final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two major research areas pertinent to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) materials and material surfaces were explored and developed in this 5-year PECASE LDRD project carried out by Professor Roya Maboudian and her collaborators at the University of California at Berkeley. In the first research area, polycrystalline silicon carbide (poly-SiC) was developed as a structural material for MEMS. This material is potentially interesting for MEMS because compared to polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon), the structural material in Sandia National Laboratories' SUMMiTV process, it may exhibit high wear resistance, high temperature operation and a high Young's modulus to density ratio. Each of these characteristics may extend the usefulness of MEMS in Sandia National Laboratories' applications. For example, using polycrystalline silicon, wear is an important issue in microengines, temperature degradation is of concern in thermal actuators and the characteristics of resonators can be extended with the same lithography technology. Two methods of depositing poly-SiC from a 1,3-disilabutane source at 650 C to 800 C by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) were demonstrated. These include a blanket method in which the material is made entirely out of poly-SiC and a method to coat previously released and fabricated polysilicon MEMS. This deposition method is much simpler to use than previous methods such as high temperature LPCVD and atmospheric CVD. Other major processing issues that were surmounted in this LDRD with the poly-SiC film include etching, doping, and residual strain control. SiC is inert and as such is notoriously difficult to etch. Here, an HBr-based chemistry was demonstrated for the first time to make highly selective etching of SiC at high etch rates. Nitrogen was incorporated from an NH3 gas source, resulting in high conductivity films. Residual strain and strain gradient were shown to depend on deposition parameters, and can be made negative or positive. The tribology of poly-SiC was also investigated. Much improved release stiction and in-use stiction performance relative to polysilicon MEMS was found. Furthermore, wear of poly-SiC-coated MEMS was much reduced relative to uncoated polysilicon MEMS. A prototype baseline process flow now exists to produce poly-SiC in the Berkeley Sensor and Actuator (BSAC) facility. In the second project, galvanic deposition of metals onto polysilicon surfaces has been developed. The possible applications include reflective and optical coatings for optical MEMS, microswitches and microrelays for radio frequency MEMS and catalytic surfaces for microchemical reactors. In contrast to electroless deposition, galvanic displacement deposition requires no prior activation of the surface and is truly selective to silicon surfaces. This approach was used to deposit copper, gold and rhodium onto polysilicon MEMS. A method to study the adhesion of these metals to polysilicon was developed. It was also shown that the surfaces could be rendered hydrophobic by applying thiol-based self-assembled monolayers. This procedure also lowered their surface energy to {approx}3 {micro}J/m{sup 2}, consistent with monolayer-coated polysilicon MEMS.

de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Maboudian, Roya (University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA.)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Transition metal complexes of oxazolinylboranes and cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borates: Catalysts for asymmetric olefin hydroamination and acceptorless alcohol decarbonylation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research presented and discussed in this dissertation involves the synthesis of transition metal complexes of oxazolinylboranes and cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borates, and their application in catalytic enantioselective olefin hydroamination and acceptorless alcohol decarbonylation. Neutral oxazolinylboranes are excellent synthetic intermediates for preparing new borate ligands and also developing organometallic complexes. Achiral and optically active bis(oxazolinyl)phenylboranes are synthesized by reaction of 2-lithio-2-oxazolide and 0.50 equiv of dichlorophenylborane. These bis(oxazolinyl)phenylboranes are oligomeric species in solid state resulting from the coordination of an oxazoline to the boron center of another borane monomer. The treatment of chiral bis(oxazolinyl)phenylboranes with sodium cyclopentadienide provide optically active cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borates H[PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 5})(Ox{sup R}){sub 2}] [Ox{sup R} = Ox{sup 4S-iPr,Me2}, Ox{sup 4R-iPr,Me2}, Ox{sup 4S-tBu]}. These optically active proligands react with an equivalent of M(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) to afford corresponding cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borato group 4 complexes {PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 4})(Ox{sup R}){sub 2}}M(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} in high yields. These group 4 compounds catalyze cyclization of aminoalkenes at room temperature or below, providing pyrrolidine, piperidine, and azepane with enantiomeric excesses up to 99%. Our mechanistic investigations suggest a non-insertive mechanism involving concerted C?N/C?H bond formation in the turnover limiting step of the catalytic cycle. Among cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borato group 4 catalysts, the zirconium complex {PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 4})(Ox{sup 4S-iPr,Me2}){sub 2}}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} ({S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}) displays highest activity and enantioselectivity. Interestingly, {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} also desymmetrizes olefin moieties of achiral non-conjugated aminodienes and aminodiynes during cyclization. The cyclization of aminodienes catalyzed by {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} affords diastereomeric mixture of cis and trans cylic amines with high diasteromeric ratios and excellent enantiomeric excesses. Similarly, the desymmetrization of alkyne moieties in {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}-catalyzed cyclization of aminodiynes provides corresponding cyclic imines bearing quaternary stereocenters with enantiomeric excesses up to 93%. These stereoselective desymmetrization reactions are significantly affected by concentration of the substrate, temperature, and the presence of a noncyclizable primary amine. In addition, both the diastereomeric ratios and enantiomeric excesses of the products are markedly enhanced by N-deuteration of the substrates. Notably, the cationic zirconium-monoamide complex [{S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2})][B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}] obtained from neutral {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} cyclizes primary aminopentenes providing pyrrolidines with S-configuration; whereas {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} provides R-configured pyrrolidines. The yttrium complex {S-2}YCH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3} also affords S-configured pyrrolidines by cyclization of aminopentenes, however the enantiomeric excesses of products are low. An alternative optically active yttrium complex {PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 4})(Ox{sup 4S-tBu}){sub 2}}YCH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3} ({S-3}YCH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3}) is synthesized, which displays highly enantioselective in the cyclization of aminoalkenes at room temperature affording S-configured cyclic amines with enantiomeric excesses up to 96%. A noninsertive mechanism involving a six-membered transition state by a concerted C?N bond formation and N?H bond cleavage is proposed for {S-3}YCH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3} system based on the kinetic, spectroscopic, and stereochemical features. In the end, a series of bis- and tris(oxazolinyl)borato iridium and rhodium complexes are synthesized with bis(oxazolinyl)phenylborane [PhB(Ox{sup Me2}){sub 2}]{sub n}, tris(oxazolinyl)borane [B(Ox{sup Me2}){sub 3}]n, and tris(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)phenylborate [To{sup M}]{sup ?}. All these new an

Manna, Kuntal [Ames Laboratory

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z