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1

"Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product Growth Trends, Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Real Gross Domestic Product Growth Trends, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Real GDP Growth Trend" " cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown...

2

Inflation uncertainty, growth uncertainty, oil prices, and output growth in the UK  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examines the transmission and response of inflation uncertainty and output uncertainty on inflation and output growth in the UK using a bi-variate EGARCH model. Results suggest that inflation uncertain...

Ramprasad Bhar; Girijasankar Mallik

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Recent Trends in Car Usage in Advanced Economies - Slower Growth...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trends in Car Usage in Advanced Economies - Slower Growth Ahead? Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Recent Trends in Car Usage in Advanced Economies -...

4

Apparatus for silicon web growth of higher output and improved growth stability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This disclosure describes an apparatus to improve the web growth attainable from prior web growth configurations. This apparatus modifies the heat loss at the growth interface in a manner that minimizes thickness variations across the web, especially regions of the web adjacent to the two bounding dendrites. In the unmodified configuration, thinned regions of web, adjacent to the dendrites, were found to be the origin of crystal degradation which ultimately led to termination of the web growth. According to the present invention, thinning adjacent to the dendrites is reduced and the incidence of crystal degradation is similarly reduced.

Duncan, Charles S. (Penn Hills, PA); Piotrowski, Paul A. (Monroeville, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Nine Charts on Recent Trends in Employment Growth in Wisconsin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics ­the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages-- enables us to assess Nine Charts on Recent Trends in Employment #12; 2 The latest release of the most comprehensive and reliable state employment data from

Saldin, Dilano

6

Structural styles of the Wilcox and Frio growth-fault trends in Texas: Constraints on geopressured reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The wide variability in structural styles within the growth-faulted, geopressured trends of the Texas Gulf Coast is illustrated by detailed structural maps of selected areas of the Wilcox and Frio growth-fault trends and quantified by statistical analysis of fault compartment geometries. Structural variability is a key determinant of the size of geopressured aquifers in the deep subsurface. Two major structural styles exist in the Wilcox trend. (1) In southeast and Central Texas, the trend consists of continuous, closely spaced faults that have little associated rollover despite moderate expansion of section; the fault plane flattens little with depth. (2) By contrast, in South Texas a narrow band of growth faults having high expansion and moderate rollover lies above and downdip of a ridge of deformed, overpressured shale but updip of a deep basin formed by withdrawal of overpressured shale. Frio fault systems generally display greater rollover and wider spacing than do Wilcox fault systems; however, the Frio trend displays distinctive features in each study area. Most of the Frio growth faults, however, have a similar geometry, showing substantial rollover, expansion of section, and a moderate flattening of the fault zone with depth, possibly related to a deep decollement surface. The local variability in style is related to the magnitude of Frio sedimentation and progradation and to the presence of thick salt or shale. Finding and developing a large geopressured aquifer require recognition of a favorable combination of sand-body geometry, reservoir quality, and fault compartment size and shape.

Ewing, T.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Atmospheric histories and growth trends Diane J. Ivy, Tim Arnold, Christina M. Harth, L. Paul Steele, Jens Mhle,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric histories and growth trends of C4 F10 , C5 F12 , C6 F14 , C7 F16 and C8 F18 * Diane J to: discover new interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess future; and improve methods to model, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts

8

EIA - AEO2010 - Trends in Economic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trends in Economic Activity Trends in Economic Activity Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Trends in Economic Activity Real gross domestic product returns to its pre-recession level by 2011 AEO2010 presents three views of economic growth (Figure 31). The rate of growth in real GDP depends on assumptions about labor force growth and productivity. In the Reference case, growth in real GDP averages 2.4 percent per year. Figure 31. Average annual growth rates of real GDP, labot force, and productivity in three cases, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 32. Average annual inflation, interest, and unemployment rates in three cases, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 33. Sectoral composition of industrial output growth rates in three cases, 2008-2035

9

Output Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Every discrete-event simulation experiment with random input generates random sample paths as output. Each path usually consists of a sequence of dependent observations that serve as the raw material for estim...

George S. Fishman

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 993 0 116 0 876 2004 2,174 0 735 10 1,429 2005 1,923 0 965 435 522 2006 2,051 0 525 1,094 433 2007 1,988 0 386 1,102 501 2008 1,025 0 454 433 138 2009 793 0 545 176 72 2010 1,623 0 1,195 370 58 2011 3,195 0 2,753 351 91 2012 3,189 0 2,788 340 61 2010 January 118 0 83 30 5 February 110 0 79 27 5 March 132 0 94 32 6 April 131 0 93 33 6 May 132 0 92 34 6 June 139 0 104 30 5 July 140 0 102 33 5 August 132 0 95 32 5 September 148 0 113 30 5

11

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 517 0 111 6 399 2003 763 0 80 9 675 2004 1,043 0 237 8 798 2005 783 0 206 8 568 2006 1,259 0 195 9 1,055 2007 1,262 0 162 11 1,090 2008 897 0 119 9 769 2009 1,007 0 126 8 873 2010 1,059 0 98 11 950 2011 1,080 0 112 6 962 2012 1,346 0 113 11 1,222 2010 January 92 0 10 1 81 February 93 0 10 1 82 March 84 0 12 1 71 April 76 0 9 1 66 May 84 0 10 0 75 June 93 0 8 0 86 July 89 0 8 0 80 August 87 0 2 1 84 September 82 0 2 1 79

12

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 193,120 57,296 105,416 227 30,182 2003 197,827 69,695 92,384 309 35,440 2004 245,389 116,086 90,747 259 38,297 2005 256,441 115,727 111,098 260 29,356 2006 246,687 102,117 98,314 269 45,987 2007 208,198 77,941 81,845 348 48,064 2008 180,034 64,843 79,856 280 35,055 2009 166,449 77,919 52,428 245 35,856 2010 173,078 94,331 41,090 340 37,317 2011 176,349 99,257 40,167 173 36,752 2012 144,266 60,862 24,925 353 58,126 2010 January 14,949 7,995 3,716 38 3,199

13

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 1,005,144 767,803 209,703 1,405 26,232 2003 1,031,778 757,384 247,732 1,816 24,846 2004 1,044,798 772,224 244,044 1,917 26,613 2005 1,065,281 761,349 276,135 1,922 25,875 2006 1,053,783 753,390 273,246 1,886 25,262 2007 1,069,606 764,765 280,377 1,927 22,537 2008 1,064,503 760,326 280,254 2,021 21,902 2009 955,190 695,615 238,012 1,798 19,766 2010 1,001,411 721,431 253,621 1,720 24,638 2011 956,470 689,316 243,168 1,668 22,319 2012 845,066 615,467 208,085 1,450 20,065

14

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 500 0 61 0 439 2004 1,158 0 415 5 738 2005 994 0 519 212 263 2006 1,034 0 267 549 218 2007 985 0 226 532 228 2008 552 0 271 211 70 2009 440 0 313 91 37 2010 847 0 643 174 30 2011 1,635 0 1,422 165 48 2012 1,630 0 1,441 156 32 2010 January 61 0 44 14 3 February 58 0 42 13 3 March 67 0 49 15 3 April 67 0 49 15 3 May 68 0 49 16 3 June 73 0 56 14 3 July 73 0 55 16 2 August 69 0 52 15 3 September 79 0 62 14 3 October 75 0 59 14 2

15

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 17,561 0 2,255 929 14,377 2003 17,720 0 2,080 1,234 14,406 2004 24,275 0 3,809 1,540 18,926 2005 23,833 0 3,918 1,544 18,371 2006 23,227 0 3,834 1,539 17,854 2007 22,810 0 3,795 1,566 17,449 2008 22,168 0 3,689 1,652 16,827 2009 20,507 0 3,935 1,481 15,091 2010 21,727 0 3,808 1,406 16,513 2011 21,532 0 3,628 1,321 16,584 2012 19,333 0 2,790 1,143 15,400 2010 January 1,972 0 371 160 1,440 February 1,820 0 347 139 1,334 March 1,839 0 338 123 1,378 April 2,142 0 284 95 1,764

16

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 76,737 0 1,669 3,276 71,788 2003 85,488 0 6,963 3,176 75,349 2004 124,809 0 8,592 7,219 108,997 2005 125,689 0 8,134 6,145 111,410 2006 87,137 0 6,740 3,481 76,916 2007 82,768 0 7,602 2,754 72,412 2008 45,481 0 7,644 2,786 35,051 2009 48,912 0 7,557 1,802 39,552 2010 29,243 0 6,402 1,297 21,545 2011 22,799 0 5,927 1,039 15,833 2012 18,233 0 5,871 746 11,616 2010 January 3,648 0 614 190 2,843 February 3,027 0 422 157 2,447 March 2,015 0 272 43 1,699

17

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 146,643 88,595 39,320 1,210 17,517 2003 189,260 105,319 62,617 1,394 19,929 2004 185,761 103,793 57,843 1,963 22,162 2005 185,631 98,223 63,546 1,584 22,278 2006 87,898 53,529 18,332 886 15,150 2007 95,895 56,910 24,097 691 14,198 2008 61,379 38,995 14,463 621 7,300 2009 51,690 31,847 11,181 477 8,185 2010 44,968 30,806 9,364 376 4,422 2011 31,152 20,844 6,637 301 3,370 2012 25,702 17,521 5,102 394 2,685 2010 January 6,193 4,381 1,188 48 576

18

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 682,060 0 9,585 727 671,747 2003 746,375 0 10,893 762 734,720 2004 1,016,124 0 14,968 1,493 999,663 2005 997,331 0 19,193 1,028 977,111 2006 1,049,161 0 18,814 1,045 1,029,303 2007 982,486 0 21,435 1,756 959,296 2008 923,889 0 18,075 1,123 904,690 2009 816,285 0 19,587 1,135 795,563 2010 876,041 0 18,357 1,064 856,620 2011 893,314 0 16,577 1,022 875,716 2012 883,158 0 19,251 949 862,958 2010 January 73,418 0 1,677 91 71,651 February 67,994 0 1,689 81 66,224

19

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 66,270 3,930 59,149 1,753 1,438 2004 70,489 5,373 60,929 2,098 2,089 2005 68,897 5,650 59,144 2,571 1,532 2006 77,004 8,287 64,217 3,937 563 2007 80,697 8,620 68,657 2,875 544 2008 94,768 10,242 81,300 2,879 346 2009 100,261 9,748 87,086 3,089 337 2010 106,681 10,029 93,405 3,011 236 2011 114,173 11,146 91,279 11,497 251 2012 125,927 12,721 101,379 10,512 1,315 2010 January 8,502 853 7,379 251 19 February 7,882 830 6,823 209 20

20

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 29,854 0 10,655 757 18,442 2004 30,228 0 12,055 2,627 15,547 2005 38,010 0 10,275 2,086 25,649 2006 36,966 0 8,561 2,318 26,087 2007 41,757 0 10,294 2,643 28,820 2008 41,851 0 9,674 1,542 30,635 2009 41,810 0 10,355 1,638 29,817 2010 47,153 0 8,436 1,648 37,070 2011 43,483 0 6,460 1,566 35,458 2012 46,863 0 6,914 1,796 38,153 2010 January 4,885 0 1,088 137 3,661 February 4,105 0 943 137 3,025 March 4,398 0 845 136 3,417 April 4,224 0 399 138 3,688

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trends output growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 14,395 0 3,192 179 11,024 2003 21,170 0 2,282 244 18,644 2004 29,342 0 6,768 226 22,347 2005 22,224 0 5,935 228 16,061 2006 38,169 0 5,672 236 32,262 2007 38,033 0 4,710 303 33,019 2008 27,100 0 3,441 243 23,416 2009 29,974 0 3,652 213 26,109 2010 31,303 0 2,855 296 28,152 2011 31,943 0 3,244 153 28,546 2012 38,777 0 3,281 315 35,181 2010 January 2,683 0 285 33 2,365 February 2,770 0 302 29 2,439 March 2,424 0 338 36 2,050 April 2,257 0 255 22 1,980

22

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 64,629 2,456 26,514 5,323 30,337 2004 49,443 2,014 21,294 6,935 19,201 2005 55,862 2,485 17,640 6,763 28,974 2006 54,693 2,611 16,348 6,755 28,980 2007 60,840 2,992 19,155 6,692 32,001 2008 66,139 3,409 22,419 5,227 35,085 2009 66,658 3,679 23,586 5,398 33,994 2010 77,150 3,668 22,884 5,438 45,159 2011 74,255 4,488 22,574 5,382 41,810 2012 77,205 4,191 22,654 5,812 44,548 2010 January 7,109 189 2,166 458 4,295 February 6,441 275 2,151 429 3,586

23

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 7,135,572 2,307,358 3,481,961 75,985 1,270,268 2003 6,498,549 1,809,003 3,450,177 60,662 1,178,707 2004 6,912,661 1,857,247 3,749,945 73,744 1,231,725 2005 7,220,520 2,198,098 3,837,717 69,682 1,115,023 2006 7,612,500 2,546,169 3,847,644 69,401 1,149,286 2007 8,181,986 2,808,500 4,219,827 71,560 1,082,099 2008 7,900,986 2,803,283 4,046,069 67,571 984,062 2009 8,138,385 2,981,285 4,062,633 77,077 1,017,390 2010 8,694,186 3,359,035 4,191,241 87,357 1,056,553

24

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 1,358 0 311 865 182 2004 2,743 0 651 1,628 464 2005 2,719 0 623 1,536 560 2006 2,840 0 725 1,595 520 2007 2,219 0 768 1,136 315 2008 2,328 0 806 1,514 8 2009 2,426 0 823 1,466 137 2010 2,287 0 819 1,316 152 2011 2,044 0 742 1,148 154 2012 1,986 0 522 1,273 190 2010 January 191 0 69 107 14 February 178 0 61 106 11 March 204 0 66 126 12 April 207 0 67 127 13 May 249 0 67 167 15 June 204 0 69 120 14 July 194 0 68 115 11

25

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 137,414 9,168 122,100 3,280 2,865 2004 146,018 11,250 126,584 4,091 4,093 2005 143,822 11,490 124,030 5,232 3,070 2006 162,084 16,617 136,632 7,738 1,096 2007 168,762 17,442 144,490 5,699 1,131 2008 196,802 20,465 170,001 5,668 668 2009 207,585 19,583 181,234 6,106 661 2010 219,954 19,975 193,623 5,905 451 2011 235,990 22,086 183,609 29,820 474 2012 259,564 25,193 204,753 27,012 2,606 2010 January 17,649 1,715 15,406 491 37 February 16,300 1,653 14,198 410 38

26

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 7,353 2,125 3,691 8 1,529 2003 7,067 2,554 3,245 11 1,257 2004 8,721 4,150 3,223 9 1,339 2005 9,113 4,130 3,953 9 1,020 2006 8,622 3,619 3,482 10 1,511 2007 7,299 2,808 2,877 12 1,602 2008 6,314 2,296 2,823 10 1,184 2009 5,828 2,761 1,850 9 1,209 2010 6,053 3,325 1,452 12 1,264 2011 6,092 3,449 1,388 6 1,248 2012 5,021 2,105 869 13 2,034 2010 January 525 283 130 1 110 February 497 258 131 1 106 March 522 308 119 1 94

27

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 13,694 0 3,118 8,858 1,718 2004 19,991 0 4,746 12,295 2,950 2005 20,296 0 4,551 11,991 3,754 2006 21,729 0 5,347 12,654 3,728 2007 16,174 0 5,683 8,350 2,141 2008 18,272 0 6,039 12,174 59 2009 18,785 0 6,229 11,535 1,021 2010 17,502 0 6,031 10,333 1,138 2011 16,766 0 5,807 9,731 1,227 2012 16,310 0 4,180 10,615 1,515 2010 January 1,476 0 518 851 107 February 1,365 0 444 835 86 March 1,572 0 486 992 93 April 1,598 0 495 1,003 100

28

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 12,228 0 286 384 11,558 2003 14,124 0 1,197 512 12,414 2004 20,654 0 1,501 1,203 17,951 2005 20,494 0 1,392 1,004 18,097 2006 14,077 0 1,153 559 12,365 2007 13,462 0 1,303 441 11,718 2008 7,533 0 1,311 461 5,762 2009 8,128 0 1,301 293 6,534 2010 4,866 0 1,086 212 3,567 2011 3,826 0 1,004 168 2,654 2012 3,097 0 992 122 1,984 2010 January 606 0 105 31 470 February 504 0 78 26 401 March 335 0 46 7 281 April 355 0 86 9 260 May 340 0 93 14 232

29

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 885,987 0 267,675 45,359 572,953 2003 762,779 0 250,120 21,238 491,421 2004 1,085,191 0 398,476 40,122 646,593 2005 1,008,404 0 392,842 35,037 580,525 2006 968,574 0 339,047 33,928 595,599 2007 894,272 0 347,181 36,689 510,402 2008 813,794 0 333,197 33,434 447,163 2009 836,863 0 312,553 42,032 482,279 2010 841,521 0 308,246 47,001 486,274 2011 861,006 0 315,411 40,976 504,619 2012 909,087 0 330,354 48,944 529,788 2010 January 74,586 0 27,368 4,148 43,070 February 65,539 0 24,180 3,786 37,573

30

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 2. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 40,020 1,319 2,550 214,137 5,961 12,550 4,732 281,269 2003 38,249 5,551 1,828 200,077 9,282 19,785 3,296 278,068 2004 39,014 5,731 2,486 239,416 18,200 17,347 3,822 326,017 2005 39,652 5,571 2,238 239,324 36,694 18,240 3,884 345,605 2006 38,133 4,812 2,253 207,095 22,567 17,284 4,435 296,579 2007 38,260 5,294 1,862 212,705 20,473 19,166 4,459 302,219 2008 37,220 5,479 1,353 204,167 22,109 17,052 4,854 292,234 2009 38,015 5,341 1,445 190,875 19,830 17,625 5,055 278,187

31

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Commerical Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 3. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Commerical Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 18,477 2,600 143 36,265 0 6,902 4,801 69,188 2003 22,780 2,520 196 16,955 0 8,296 6,142 56,889 2004 22,450 4,118 165 21,851 0 8,936 6,350 63,871 2005 22,601 3,518 166 20,227 0 8,647 5,921 61,081 2006 22,186 2,092 172 19,370 0.22 9,359 6,242 59,422 2007 22,595 1,640 221 20,040 0 6,651 3,983 55,131 2008 22,991 1,822 177 20,183 0 8,863 6,054 60,091 2009 20,057 1,095 155 25,902 0 8,450 5,761 61,420 2010 19,216 845 216 29,791 13 7,917 5,333 63,330 2011 17,234 687 111 24,848 14 7,433 5,988 56,314

32

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 912,218 553,390 243,561 7,229 108,031 2003 1,174,795 658,868 387,341 8,534 120,051 2004 1,156,763 651,712 358,685 11,763 134,603 2005 1,160,733 618,811 395,489 9,614 136,820 2006 546,529 335,130 112,052 5,444 93,903 2007 595,191 355,999 147,579 4,259 87,354 2008 377,848 242,379 87,460 3,743 44,266 2009 315,420 196,346 66,834 2,903 49,336 2010 273,357 188,987 55,444 2,267 26,660 2011 186,753 125,755 39,093 1,840 20,066 2012 153,189 105,179 29,952 2,364 15,695

33

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 860,024 0 263,619 41,435 554,970 2003 721,267 0 225,967 19,973 475,327 2004 1,052,100 0 388,424 39,233 624,443 2005 984,340 0 384,365 34,172 565,803 2006 942,817 0 330,878 33,112 578,828 2007 872,579 0 339,796 35,987 496,796 2008 793,537 0 326,048 32,813 434,676 2009 816,787 0 305,542 41,275 469,970 2010 821,775 0 301,769 46,324 473,683 2011 839,681 0 308,669 39,856 491,155 2012 886,103 0 322,607 47,883 515,613 2010 January 72,867 0 26,791 4,086 41,990

34

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 421,084 0 50,041 23,099 347,944 2003 416,700 0 47,817 28,479 340,405 2004 564,497 0 87,981 34,538 441,978 2005 548,666 0 88,364 34,616 425,685 2006 532,561 0 84,335 34,086 414,140 2007 521,717 0 83,838 34,690 403,189 2008 503,096 0 81,416 36,163 385,517 2009 462,674 0 90,867 32,651 339,156 2010 490,931 0 90,184 30,725 370,022 2011 479,822 0 84,855 28,056 366,911 2012 420,923 0 58,275 23,673 338,975 2010 January 44,514 0 8,627 3,445 32,442 February 40,887 0 8,041 3,024 29,823

35

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 1,287,114 10,659 139,532 1,196 1,135,727 2003 1,265,669 16,545 150,745 1,199 1,097,180 2004 1,360,258 19,973 145,216 1,661 1,193,408 2005 1,352,582 27,373 157,600 1,235 1,166,373 2006 1,399,235 27,455 154,360 1,314 1,216,106 2007 1,335,511 31,568 154,388 2,040 1,147,516 2008 1,262,675 29,150 148,198 1,410 1,083,917 2009 1,136,729 29,565 150,481 1,408 955,276 2010 1,225,571 40,167 155,429 1,338 1,028,637 2011 1,240,937 35,474 146,684 1,504 1,057,275

36

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Total Combined Heat and Power (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 1. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Total Combined Heat and Power (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 336,848 61,313 11,513 708,738 117,513 571,509 48,263 1,855,697 2003 333,361 68,329 16,934 610,122 110,263 632,366 54,960 1,826,335 2004 351,871 80,824 16,659 654,242 126,157 667,341 45,456 1,942,550 2005 341,806 79,362 13,021 624,008 138,469 664,691 41,400 1,902,757 2006 332,548 54,224 24,009 603,288 126,049 689,549 49,308 1,878,973 2007 326,803 50,882 25,373 554,394 116,313 651,230 46,822 1,771,816 2008 315,244 29,554 18,263 509,330 110,680 610,131 23,729 1,616,931 2009 281,557 32,591 20,308 513,002 99,556 546,974 33,287 1,527,276

37

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and F. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 161,803 5,766 132,065 21,953 2,020 2004 161,567 3,705 129,562 25,204 3,096 2005 164,635 4,724 131,080 24,914 3,918 2006 168,716 4,078 135,127 25,618 3,893 2007 162,482 4,557 133,509 21,393 3,022 2008 166,723 4,476 136,080 26,108 59 2009 165,755 3,989 132,877 27,868 1,021 2010 162,436 3,322 130,467 27,509 1,138 2011 152,007 3,433 121,648 25,664 1,262 2012 152,045 3,910 117,598 28,923 1,614 2010 January 13,015 244 10,405 2,260 107

38

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Emissions from Energy Consumption at 1. Emissions from Energy Consumption at Conventional Power Plants and Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants 2002 through 2012 (Thousand Metric Tons) Year Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) 2002 2,423,963 10,881 5,194 2003 2,445,094 10,646 4,532 2004 2,486,982 10,309 4,143 2005 2,543,838 10,340 3,961 2006 2,488,918 9,524 3,799 2007 2,547,032 9,042 3,650 2008 2,484,012 7,830 3,330 2009 2,269,508 5,970 2,395 2010 2,388,596 5,400 2,491 2011 2,287,071 4,845 2,406 2012 2,156,875 3,704 2,148 Notes: The emissions data presented include total emissions from both electricity generation and the production of useful thermal output. See Appendix A, Technical Notes, for a description of the sources and methodology used to develop the emissions estimates.

39

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and C. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 22,554 695 18,611 2,952 296 2004 22,330 444 17,959 3,439 488 2005 22,089 560 17,655 3,289 584 2006 22,469 500 18,068 3,356 545 2007 21,796 553 17,885 2,921 437 2008 22,134 509 18,294 3,323 8 2009 22,095 465 17,872 3,622 137 2010 21,725 402 17,621 3,549 152 2011 19,016 388 15,367 3,103 158 2012 18,954 418 14,757 3,577 203 2010 January 1,737 30 1,402 291 14 February 1,562 25 1,276 250 11 March 1,854 36 1,500 306 12

40

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Trends in Economic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trends in Economic Activity Trends in Economic Activity Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Trends in Economic Activity AEO2009 Presents Three Views of Economic Growth Figure 27. Average annual growth rates of real GDP, labor force, and productivity in three cases, 2007-2030 (percent per year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 28. Average annual inflation, interest, and unemployment rates in three cases, 2007-2030 (percent per year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 29. Sectoral composition of industrial output growth rates in three cases, 2007-2030 (percent per year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trends output growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Market Drivers Market Drivers Annual Energy Outlook 2004 with Projections to 2025 Market Trends - Market Drivers Index (click to jump links) Trends in Economic Activity International Oil Markets Figure 38. Average annual growth rates of real GDP and economic factors, 1995-2025 (percent). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Trends in Economic Activity Strong Economic Growth Is Expected To Continue The output of the Nation's economy, measured by gross domestic product (GDP), is projected to grow by 3.0 percent per year between 2002 and 2025 (with GDP based on 1996 chain-weighted dollars) (Figure 38). The projected growth rate is slightly lower than the 3.1-percent rate projected in AEO2003. The labor force is projected to increase by 0.9 percent per year

42

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025 - Market Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Market Drivers Market Drivers Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Market Trends - Market Drivers Strong Economic Growth Is Expected To Continue Figure 35. Average annual growth rates of real GDP and economic factors, 1995-2025 (percent). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data The output of the Nation’s economy, measured by GDP, is projected to grow by 3.1 percent per year between 2003 and 2025 (with GDP based on 2000 chain-weighted dollars) (Figure 35). The labor force is projected to increase by 0.9 percent per year between 2003 and 2025. Labor productivity growth in the nonfarm business sector is projected at 2.2 percent per year. Compared with the second half of the 1990s, the rates of growth in GDP and nonfarm employment were lower from 2000 through 2002. Economic growth has

43

EIA - AEO2010 - Energy intensity trends in AEO2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

intensity trends in AEO2010 intensity trends in AEO2010 Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Figure 17. Trends in U.S. oil prices, energy consumption, and economic output, 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Energy intensity trends in AEO2010 Energy intensity—energy consumption per dollar of real GDP—indicates how much energy a country uses to produce its goods and services. From the early 1950s to the early 1970s, U.S. total primary energy consumption and real GDP increased at nearly the same annual rate (Figure 17). During that period, real oil prices remained virtually flat. In contrast, from the mid-1970s to 2008, the relationship between energy consumption and real GDP growth changed, with primary energy consumption growing at less than one-third the previous average rate and real GDP growth continuing to grow at its historical rate. The decoupling of real GDP growth from energy consumption growth led to a decline in energy intensity that averaged 2.8 percent per year from 1973 to 2008. In the AEO2010 Reference case, energy intensity continues to decline, at an average annual rate of 1.9 percent from 2008 to 2035.

44

Trap types vs productivity of significant Wilcox gas fields in the south Texas, listric growth fault trend, and the divergent origin of its two largest producers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed mapping and analysis of 23 Wilcox fields in the subject trend indicates that gas production is related to trap type. Of total cumulative production of 3.4 TCFG, 65% is from upthrown fault blocks implying very effective fault seals due to differential pressure and/or shale smears. NE Thompsonville and Bob West fields have produced 650 and 200 BCFG, respectively, with 400 BCFG remaining reserves in the latter. The field structures are not attributed to listric growth faulting, as is suggested by their trend location. NE Thompsonville is a 9-mile-long turtle structure that originated through depositional loading of an upper slope basin, followed by tilting, and then eventual collapse of a sediment squeeze-up mound due to gravitational instability. These events provide an excellent example of basin evolution through sediment loading accompanied by withdrawal of a salt-shale substrate; the basin flanks are defined by basin-dipping listric faulting that accommodated subsidence and merge beneath its floor. Bob West Field lies along the edge of the Laramide fold belt. The 1-1/2 x 4 mile field anticline adjoins a deep-seated fault that slices over and across a buried structural ridge of probable Cretaceous age. Uplift of the latter, immediately following deposition of 20+ stacked, shelf-bar producing sands, upwarped the fault and resulted in rollover growth of the Wilcox anticline. The fault shows no downward decrease in dip typical of listric faults. NE Thompsonville and Bob West fields both produce upthrown along crestal faults. This analysis indicates that {open_quotes}high-side{close_quotes} closures, irrespective of diverse origins, have achieved head-of-the-class stature as Wilcox gas producers.

Stricklin, F.L. Jr. [Wilcox Exploration Enterprises, Woodlands, TX (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Seasonal trends in growth and biomass accumulation of selected nutrients and metals in six species of emergent aquatic macrophytes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Growth and biomass accumulation of selected nutrients and trace metals were monitored for six species of aquatic macrophytes during June, August and November, 1993. Plant species were cultivated in two polyculture treatments, each replicated three times. Polyculture I consisted of Scirpus acutus (hardstem bullrush), Phragmites communes (common reed), and Phalaris arundinacea (canary grass). Polyculture H consisted of Typha spp. (cattail), Scirpus atrovirens (green bullrush), and Scirpus cyperinus (wool grass). Each of the six cells (6 x 9 x 0.6 m), was operated as a gravel-substrate, subsurface-flow wetlands in a continuous recirculating mode. At six week intervals, macro, micro and trace elements were dissolved and added to the sump of the recirculating system. On each of three sampling dates, replicate shoot and root samples were collected, segregated by species and tissue type (roots, rhizomes, stems and leaves), and prepared for gravimetric biomass estimates and chemical analysis. Tissue specific concentrations of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu, were determined on each date for each species and tissue type. Results will be discussed with respect to species specific growth rates, biomass accumulation, and seasonal uptake and translocation of plant nutrients.

Behrends, L.L.; Bailey, E.; Bulls, M.J.; Coonrod, H.S.; Sikora, F.J.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Changing Trends in the Bulk Chemicals and Pulp and Paper Industries (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Compared with the experience of the 1990s, rising energy prices in recent years have led to questions about expectations of growth in industrial output, particularly in energy-intensive industries. Given the higher price trends, a review of expected growth trends in selected industries was undertaken as part of the production of Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO). In addition, projections for the industrial value of shipments, which were based on the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system in AEO2004, are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) in AEO2005. The change in industrial classification leads to lower historical growth rates for many industrial sectors. The impacts of these two changes are highlighted in this section for two of the largest energy-consuming industries in the U.S. industrial sector-bulk chemicals and pulp and paper.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Prices & Trends  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) collects, analyzes, and disseminates independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. Learn about EIA and Energy Department organizations that track energy prices and trends.

48

Enhanced performance CCD output amplifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low-noise FET amplifier is connected to amplify output charge from a che coupled device (CCD). The FET has its gate connected to the CCD in common source configuration for receiving the output charge signal from the CCD and output an intermediate signal at a drain of the FET. An intermediate amplifier is connected to the drain of the FET for receiving the intermediate signal and outputting a low-noise signal functionally related to the output charge signal from the CCD. The amplifier is preferably connected as a virtual ground to the FET drain. The inherent shunt capacitance of the FET is selected to be at least equal to the sum of the remaining capacitances.

Dunham, Mark E. (Los Alamos, NM); Morley, David W. (Santa Fe, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

TRENDS in Chemical Marketing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TRENDS in Chemical Marketing ... BEFORE any chemical sales organization, can meet or establish new trends in marketing, it must be completely aware of the problem it faces. ...

W. M. RUSSELL

1955-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

50

5 World Oil Trends WORLD OIL TRENDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5 World Oil Trends Chapter 1 WORLD OIL TRENDS INTRODUCTION In considering the outlook for California's petroleum supplies, it is important to give attention to expecta- tions of what the world oil market. Will world oil demand increase and, if so, by how much? How will world oil prices be affected

51

Downdip Yegua trend - overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Downdip Yegua Trend of overpressured gas-condensate reservoirs has produced over 400 bcf of gas and 10 million bbl of oil and condensate since 1979. The trend has indicated reserves in the range of 1.5-2.0 tcf. The trend was opened only in the late 1970s and 1980s because its sandstone fairways are mostly separated from the updip, sandstone-rich Yegua section (which has produced since the 1930s) by a mid-dip region where sandstones are scarce. The trend is also separated from overlying Frio and Vicksburg targets by over 1,000 ft of highly overpressured Jackson shale. At present, activity is most concentrated on detecting sweet spots of a few hundred acres or less, evaluating downdip and lateral extensions of known trends, and in defining large, potentially prolific structures in frontier areas using integrated geologic and geophysical analyses.

Ewing, T.A. (Frontera Exploration Services, San Antonio, TX (USA)); Fergeson, W.G. (Venus Oil Co., San Antonio, TX (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Energy Input Output Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Input Output Calculator Input Output Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Input-Output Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www2.eere.energy.gov/analysis/iocalc/Default.aspx Web Application Link: www2.eere.energy.gov/analysis/iocalc/Default.aspx OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools Language: English References: EERE Energy Input-Output Calculator[1] The Energy Input-Output Calculator (IO Calculator) allows users to estimate the economic development impacts from investments in alternate electricity generating technologies. About the Calculator The Energy Input-Output Calculator (IO Calculator) allows users to estimate

53

Occurrence Reporting Trends  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reporting and Processing of Reporting and Processing of Operations Information (ORPS): Five Year Trends 1 * The trend of Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) occurrences across the Complex has been steady over the past five years. The trend of occurrence reports appears to trend very closely with changes in man hours worked. * The proportion of those occurrences that are considered high consequence occurrences has decreased from approximately 30 percent in 2007 to 15 percent in 2012. High consequence occurrences are defined as occurrences that are assigned either an ORPS Significance Category 1, 2 or Operational Emergency (OE), or a 13A (HQ Significant highlighted for Management attention). 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2

54

Trends in stationary energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Trends in stationary energy Trends in stationary energy Colin McCormick Senior Advisor for R&D Office of the Under Secretary US Department of Energy Building Technologies Office Peer Review 2013 April 2013 2 Under Secretary of Energy * Oversee the applied energy programs * Efficiency & Renewables * Electric grid * Fossil energy * Nuclear energy * Indian energy * Support interactions with Office of Science, ARPA-E * Support cross-cutting topics in energy systems * Energy systems interaction * Water-energy nexus * Bulk energy storage * Energy finance * International Lab engagement * Quadrennial Technology Review (QTR) 3 2013: Already a busy year for energy 4 Some notable trends in stationary energy The water-energy nexus The rise of natural gas Global trends New models for the grid

55

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Wednesday, 29 May 2013 00:00 Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

56

Trends in stationary energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Trends in stationary energy Trends in stationary energy Colin McCormick Senior Advisor for R&D Office of the Under Secretary US Department of Energy Building Technologies Office Peer Review 2013 April 2013 2 Under Secretary of Energy * Oversee the applied energy programs * Efficiency & Renewables * Electric grid * Fossil energy * Nuclear energy * Indian energy * Support interactions with Office of Science, ARPA-E * Support cross-cutting topics in energy systems * Energy systems interaction * Water-energy nexus * Bulk energy storage * Energy finance * International Lab engagement * Quadrennial Technology Review (QTR) 3 2013: Already a busy year for energy 4 Some notable trends in stationary energy The water-energy nexus The rise of natural gas Global trends New models for the grid

57

Automation Trend Continues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

IT is difficult to discern any brand new trends in chemical process equipment this year which were not evident a year ago. However, at National Chemical Exposition, David E. Pierce, Diamond Alkali Corp., in his Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Lecture,...

1954-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Biofuels Issues and Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Biofuels Issues and Trends Biofuels Issues and Trends October 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Biofuels Issues and Trends i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. October 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Biofuels Issues and Trends ii Table of Contents

59

Food consumption trends and drivers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...original work is properly cited. Food consumption trends and drivers John Kearney...Government policy. A picture of food consumption (availability) trends and projections...largely responsible for these observed consumption trends are the subject of this review...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

NERSC HPSS Storage Trends and Summaries  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summaries Summaries Storage Trends and Summaries Total Bytes Utilized The growth in NERSC's storage systems amounts to roughly 1.7x per year. Total Bytes Utilized Number of Files Stored The growth in the number of files stored is less than the growth in the number of bytes stored as the average file size has increased over time. The average file size as of August 2003 is about 30 MB. The median file size is closer to 1 MB. Number of Files Monthly I/O The growth rate of I/O is roughly the same as the growth rate of the number of bytes stored. As a rough rule of thumb, the amount of I/O per month is about 10% to 14% of the amount of data residing in the storage systems. Additional graphs show the last 30 days of activity for the amount of I/O and the number of files transferred.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trends output growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Trends in Economic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trends in Economic Activity Trends in Economic Activity Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Trends in Economic Activity Figure 32. Average annual growth rates fo real GDP, labor force, and productivity, 2006-2030 (percent per year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 33. Average annual inflation, interest, and unemployment rates, 2006-2030 (percent per year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data AEO2008 Presents Three Views of Economic Growth AEO2008 presents three views of economic growth for the 2006-2030 projection period. Economic growth depends mainly on growth in the labor force and productivity. In the reference case, the labor force grows by an average of 0.7 percent per year; labor productivity in the nonfarm business

62

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

63

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

64

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

65

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

66

Exponential smoothing with a damped multiplicative trend  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Multiplicative trend exponential smoothing has received very little attention in the literature. It involves modelling the local slope by smoothing successive ratios of the local level, and this leads to a forecast function that is the product of level and growth rate. By contrast, the popular Holt method uses an additive trend formulation. It has been argued that more real series have multiplicative trends than additive. However, even if this is true, it seems likely that the more conservative forecast function of the Holt method will be more robust when applied in an automated way to a large batch of series with different types of trend. In view of the improvements in accuracy seen in dampening the Holt method, in this paper we investigate a new damped multiplicative trend approach. An empirical study, using the monthly time series from the M3-Competition, gave encouraging results for the new approach at a range of forecast horizons, when compared to the established exponential smoothing methods.

James W. Taylor

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Anisotropic Grid Adaptation for Multiple Aerodynamic Outputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anisotropic gridadaptive strategies are presented for viscous flow simulations in which the accurate prediction of multiple aerodynamic outputs (such as the lift, drag, and moment coefficients) is required from a single ...

Venditti, David A.

68

September 4 Webinar to Explore Renewable Energy Market Trends | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 Webinar to Explore Renewable Energy Market Trends 4 Webinar to Explore Renewable Energy Market Trends September 4 Webinar to Explore Renewable Energy Market Trends August 21, 2013 - 12:18pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy, the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Tribal Energy Program, and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) will present the next Tribal Renewable Energy Series webinar, "Renewable Energy Market Expectations and Trends," on Wednesday, September 4, 2013, from 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Eastern Time. "There are many factors that will drive the growth of the renewable energy market and influence the pace of that growth," said Randy Manion, Renewable Energy Program Manager at WAPA. "Among them are growing awareness of the many benefits associated with a low-carbon economy,

69

NAO Climatology: ROMS output is saved once every 3 days and written to an output file  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAO Climatology: ROMS output is saved once every 3 days and written to an output file every 6 days Output after 30 days in 6th file. The Starting Month = July Example: roms_low_his_levts0570dg.0120.nc.gz : July 3 roms_low_his_levts0570dg.0122.nc.gz : July 6 and July 9 roms_low_his_levts0570dg.0124.nc

Gangopadhyay, Avijit

70

Boosting America's Hydropower Output | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Boosting America's Hydropower Output Boosting America's Hydropower Output Boosting America's Hydropower Output October 9, 2012 - 2:10pm Addthis The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. City of Boulder employees celebrate the completion of the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Modernization project. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. City of Boulder employees celebrate the completion of the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Modernization project. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado.

71

PV output smoothing with energy storage.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes an algorithm, implemented in Matlab/Simulink, designed to reduce the variability of photovoltaic (PV) power output by using a battery. The purpose of the battery is to add power to the PV output (or subtract) to smooth out the high frequency components of the PV power that that occur during periods with transient cloud shadows on the PV array. The control system is challenged with the task of reducing short-term PV output variability while avoiding overworking the battery both in terms of capacity and ramp capability. The algorithm proposed by Sandia is purposely very simple to facilitate implementation in a real-time controller. The control structure has two additional inputs to which the battery can respond. For example, the battery could respond to PV variability, load variability or area control error (ACE) or a combination of the three.

Ellis, Abraham; Schoenwald, David Alan

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Population Trends and Prospects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...improve-ments in food availability per person, and today the actual number...population growth. Consequently, food production per person in most developing countries...is no improvement in staple food production, primarily cereal grain, in countries...

W. Parker Mauldin

1980-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

73

Gesture output: eyes-free output using a force feedback touch surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose using spatial gestures not only for input but also for output. Analogous to gesture input, the proposed gesture output moves the user's finger in a gesture, which the user then recognizes. We use our concept in a mobile scenario where a motion ... Keywords: eyes free, force feedback, gestures, touch

Anne Roudaut; Andreas Rau; Christoph Sterz; Max Plauth; Pedro Lopes; Patrick Baudisch

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Trends in furnace control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper relates Italimpianti's experiences over the past few years in the area of control of reheat furnaces for the steel industry. The focus is on the level 1 area; specifically on the use of PLC-based systems to perform both combustion control and mechanical/hydraulic control. Some topics to be discussed are: overview of reheat furnace control system requirements; PLC only control vs separate PLC and DCS systems; PLC hardware requirements; man machine interface (MMI) requirements; purge, light-on and safety logic; implementation of more sophisticated level 1 control algorithms; furnace temperature optimization: look up tables vs full thermal modeling; and recent trends including integrated PLC/DCS system.

McDonald, T.J.; Keefe, M.D. (Italimpianti of America, Inc., Coraopolis, PA (United States). Instrumentation and Controls Dept.)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Single Inductor Dual Output Buck Converter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of value 3V. The main focus areas are low cross regulation between the outputs and supply of completely independent load current levels while maintaining desired values (1.2V,1.5 V) within well controlled ripple levels. Dynamic hysteresis control is used...

Eachempatti, Haritha

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

76

Bioenergy technology balancing energy output with environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E2.3 Bioenergy technology ­ balancing energy output with environmental benefitsbenefits John standards #12;Is it right to grow bioenergy? Or How much bioenergy production is right? #12;Historical bioenergy Farmers historically used 25% land for horse feed #12;Energy crops are `solar panels' Solar energy

Levi, Ran

77

Modeling Multi Output Filtering Effects in PCMOS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Multi Output Filtering Effects in PCMOS Anshul Singh*, Arindam Basu, Keck-Voon Ling, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore *NTU-Rice Institute of Sustainable and Applied Infodynamics (ISAID), NTU, Singapore $School of Computer Engineering, NTU, Singapore §School of ECE, Georgia

Mooney, Vincent

78

Title Slide "The broadband acoustic output of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title Slide "The broadband acoustic output of marine seismic airgun sources" Les Hatton CISM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . #12;Seismic sources ­ marine airguns Introduction Modelling Marine Life Impact Where next Overview #12 Normal speed surface movie of airgun firing Courtesy IO limited #12;Seismic sources ­ marine airguns

Hatton, Les

79

Biofuels Issues and Trends - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Full report Biofuels Issues and Trends Release date: October 15, 2012 (updated October 18, 2012 for cellulosic production and October 23, 2012 for RSF2 volume clarification) Highlights Biofuels is a collective term for liquid fuels derived from renewable sources, including ethanol, biodiesel, and other renewable liquid fuels. This report focuses on ethanol and biodiesel, the most widely available biofuels. From 2009 to the middle of 2012, the U.S. biofuels industry increased its output and prepared to meet an expanded Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS2),1 which requires increasing volumes of biofuels use. In 2011, the biofuels industry transitioned away from tax incentives for non-cellulosic biofuels, which expired at the end of 2011. Annual ethanol and biodiesel consumption, production, imports, and exports during 2009-11

80

Trends of petroleum fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trends in properties of motor gasolines for the years 1942 through 1984; diesel fuels for the years 1950 through 1983; aviation fuels for the years 1947 through 1983; and heating oils for the years 1955 through 1984, have been evaluated based upon data contained in surveys prepared and published by the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) formerly the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC). The surveys for motor gasolines were conducted under a cooperative agreement with the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) and the Bureau of Mines from 1935 through 1948 and in cooperation with the American Petroleum Institute (API) since 1948 for all surveys. The motor gasoline surveys have been published twice annually since 1935 describing the properties of motor gasolines throughout the country. Other surveys prepared in cooperation with API and the Bureau of Mines, the Energy Research and Development Administration, the Department of Energy, and currently NIPER were aviation gasolines beginning in 1947, diesel fuels in 1950, aviation turbine fuels in 1951, and heating oils, formerly burner fuel oils, in 1955. Various companies throughout the country obtain samples of motor gasolines from retail outlets and refinery samples for the other surveys, and analyze the samples using American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) procedures. The analytical data are sent to the Bartlesville Center for survey preparation and distribution. A summary report has been assembled from data in 83 semiannual surveys for motor gasolines that shows trends throughout the entire era from winter 19

Shelton, E.M.; Woodward, P.W.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trends output growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 - Market Trends -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Market Trends - Market Drivers Market Trends - Market Drivers Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 Strong Economic Growth Is Expected To Continue Through 2030 Figure 24. Average annual growth rates of real GDP, labor frce, and productivity in three cases, 2004-2030 (percent per year). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data AEO2006 presents three views of economic growth for the forecast period from 2004 through 2030. Although probabilities are not assigned, the reference case reflects the most likely view of how the economy will unfold over the period. In the reference case, the Nation’s economic growth, measured in terms of real GDP based on 2000 chain-weighted dollars, is projected to average 3.0 percent per year (Figure 24). The labor force is

82

Transportation Energy Efficiency Trends, 1972--1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US transportation sector, which remains 97% dependent on petroleum, used a record 22.8 quads of energy in 1993. Though growing much more slowly than the economy from 1975 to 1985, energy use for transportation is now growing at nearly the same rate as GDP. This report describes the analysis of trends in energy use and energy intensity in transportation into components due to, (1) growth in transportation activity, (2) changes in energy intensity, and (3) changes in the modal structure of transportation activities.

Greene, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Fan, Y. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Solar Pricing Trends  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SB 2 1X SB 2 1X Category % of Retail Sales From Eligible Renewable Resources Date by Which Compliance Must Occur Category or Compliance Period 1 20% Dec. 31, 2013 Category or Compliance Period 2 25% Dec. 31, 2016 Category or Compliance Period 3 33% Dec. 31, 2020 2 Solar Pricing Trends 3 U.S. Grid-Connected PV Capacity Additions 4 U.S. Renewable Additions wind, 7537 MW biogas, 91 MW biomass, 330 MW geothermal, 910 MW ocean, 0 MW small hydro, 38 MW solar thermal, 3804 MW solar photovoltaic, 5778 MW CA IOU's Total Renewable Energy Capacity Currently Under Contract from Contracts Signed Since 2002, by Technology 5 CA IOU's Renewable Portfolio 6 CA IOU's Future Renewable Portfolio

84

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data For the second straight month, near normal temperatures were observed throughout the contiguous United States in October 2008. On the regional level, temperatures did deviate above normal in the western United States while parts of the South, Southeast, and Northeast experienced below average temperatures. Accordingly, heating degree days for the contiguous United States as a whole were 1.4 percent above the average for the month of October, and 63.4 percent above a much warmer October 2007. In October 2008, retail sales of electricity decreased 4.4 percent compared to October 2007, which had warmer temperatures and subsequent higher demand for electricity. The average U.S. retail price of electricity continued to show an upward trend in October 2008, increasing 9.3

85

Administrator Ready Reference Guide Customizing an Output Style  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

may be in various sections of the instructions. Some things to look for: - line spacing Preview Utility (Tools, Preview Output Styles) or by simply opening the Output Style Editor (Bibliography, Edit button -- to the right of the output style drop- down). The Output Style Preview Utility

University of Technology, Sydney

86

Generalized Input-Output Inequality Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper two types of generalized Leontief input-output inequality systems are introduced. The minimax properties for a class of functions associated with the inequalities are studied. Sufficient and necessary conditions for the inequality systems to have solutions are obtained in terms of the minimax value. Stability analysis for the solution set is provided in terms of upper semi-continuity and hemi-continuity of set-valued maps.

Liu Yingfan [Department of Mathematics, Nanjing University of Post and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210009 (China)], E-mail: yingfanliu@hotmail.com; Zhang Qinghong [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Northern Michigan University, Marquette, MI 49855 (United States)], E-mail: qzhang@nmu.edu

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Characterizing detonator output using dynamic witness plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sub-microsecond, time-resolved micro-particle-image velocimetry (PIV) system is developed to investigate the output of explosive detonators. Detonator output is directed into a transparent solid that serves as a dynamic witness plate and instantaneous shock and material velocities are measured in a two-dimensional plane cutting through the shock wave as it propagates through the solid. For the case of unloaded initiators (e.g. exploding bridge wires, exploding foil initiators, etc.) the witness plate serves as a surrogate for the explosive material that would normally be detonated. The velocity-field measurements quantify the velocity of the shocked material and visualize the geometry of the shocked region. Furthermore, the time-evolution of the velocity-field can be measured at intervals as small as 10 ns using the PIV system. Current experimental results of unloaded exploding bridge wire output in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) witness plates demonstrate 20 MHz velocity-field sampling just 300 ns after initiation of the wire.

Murphy, Michael John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adrian, Ronald J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

International Investment Trend of Photovoltaics.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??What is the trend of the global solar PV industry? What is the importance of Solar Energy in Renewable Energy? Why shall we invest solar (more)

Lin, Hsin-yu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

47 Natural Gas Market Trends NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

47 Natural Gas Market Trends Chapter 5 NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS INTRODUCTION Natural gas discusses current natural gas market conditions in California and the rest of North America, followed on the outlook for demand, supply, and price of natural gas for the forecasted 20-year horizon. It also addresses

90

Essays on Financial Liberalisation, Financial Crises and Economic Growth.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis investigates the impact of financial liberalisation policies on finance-growth relationship and financial crises. Analysis of recent trends and economic performance of financially developed (more)

Atiq, Zeeshan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Global Natural Gas Market Trends, 2. edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report provides an overview of major trends occurring in the natural gas industry and includes a concise look at the drivers behind recent rapid growth in gas usage and the challenges faced in meeting that growth. Topics covered include: an overview of Natural Gas including its history, the current market environment, and its future market potential; an analysis of the overarching trends that are driving a need for change in the Natural Gas industry; a description of new technologies being developed to increase production of Natural Gas; an evaluation of the potential of unconventional Natural Gas sources to supply the market; a review of new transportation methods to get Natural Gas from producing to consuming countries; a description of new storage technologies to support the increasing demand for peak gas; an analysis of the coming changes in global Natural Gas flows; an evaluation of new applications for Natural Gas and their impact on market sectors; and, an overview of Natural Gas trading concepts and recent changes in financial markets.

NONE

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Petrick Technology Trends Of Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;323 Petrick Technology Trends chapter 9 The Future Of Manufacturing Irene Petrick Technology Trends This chapter is a story about the future of manufacturing based on three predictions: � that firms sophisticated modeling and simulation of both new products and production processes; � that additive

93

Off-set stabilizer for comparator output  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stabilized off-set voltage is input as the reference voltage to a comparator. In application to a time-interval meter, the comparator output generates a timing interval which is independent of drift in the initial voltage across the timing capacitor. A precision resistor and operational amplifier charge a capacitor to a voltage which is precisely offset from the initial voltage. The capacitance of the reference capacitor is selected so that substantially no voltage drop is obtained in the reference voltage applied to the comparator during the interval to be measured.

Lunsford, James S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Application of computer voice input/output  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The advent of microprocessors and other large-scale integration (LSI) circuits is making voice input and output for computers and instruments practical; specialized LSI chips for speech processing are appearing on the market. Voice can be used to input data or to issue instrument commands; this allows the operator to engage in other tasks, move about, and to use standard data entry systems. Voice synthesizers can generate audible, easily understood instructions. Using voice characteristics, a control system can verify speaker identity for security purposes. Two simple voice-controlled systems have been designed at Los Alamos for nuclear safeguards applicaations. Each can easily be expanded as time allows. The first system is for instrument control that accepts voice commands and issues audible operator prompts. The second system is for access control. The speaker's voice is used to verify his identity and to actuate external devices.

Ford, W.; Shirk, D.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Coordinated Output Regulation of Multiple Heterogeneous Linear Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the generalizations of coordination of multiple linear dynamic systems to the cooperative output regulation problemCoordinated Output Regulation of Multiple Heterogeneous Linear Systems Ziyang Meng, Tao Yang, Dimos V. Dimarogonas, and Karl H. Johansson Abstract-- The coordinated output regulation problem

Dimarogonas, Dimos

96

Issues and Trends: Natural Gas - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Issues and Trends: Natural Gas Issues and Trends: Natural Gas Updated: November 25, 2013 For prior report data see Natural Gas Year-in-Review archives EIA's Natural Gas Issues and Trends highlights timely information and analyses on natural gas markets. Natural gas prices reflect decreasing seasonality. Today in Energy, November 20, 2013 Increased Northeast natural gas production reduces net inflow of supply from other areas. Today in Energy, November 19, 2013 Gas pipeline expansions reduce Marcellus backup, New York gas prices. Natural Gas Weekly Update, November 13, 2013 EIA projects lower natural gas use this winter. Natural Gas Weekly Update, October 31, 2013 Northeast net imports from Canada plummet, driven by export growth at Niagara Falls. Natural Gas Weekly Update, October 10, 2013

97

Renewable Energy Market Expectations and Trends Webinar | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Market Expectations and Trends Webinar Market Expectations and Trends Webinar Renewable Energy Market Expectations and Trends Webinar September 4, 2013 11:00AM MDT Webinar The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program, and Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) are pleased to continue their sponsorship of the Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar Series. The webinar will be held from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mountain time. The growth and pace of the renewable energy market will be driven by many factors, including awareness and concern over remaining non-renewable resources, the need for imported energy and the security issues surrounding that need, and government support and financial incentives. Participants

98

Petroleum 1996: Issues and Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Distribution Category UC-950 Petroleum 1996 Issues and Trends September 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration / Petroleum 1996: Issues and Trends iii Preface Contacts Petroleum 1996: Issues and Trends was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Office of Oil and Gas, Kenneth A. Vagts, Director (202/586-6401), and the EIA Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Webster C.

99

Compact waveguide power divider with multiple isolated outputs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A waveguide power divider (10) for splitting electromagnetic microwave power and directionally coupling the divided power includes an input waveguide (21) and reduced height output waveguides (23) interconnected by axial slots (22) and matched loads (25) and (26) positioned at the unused ends of input and output guides (21) and (23) respectively. The axial slots are of a length such that the wave in the input waveguide (21) is directionally coupled to the output waveguides (23). The widths of input guide (21) and output guides (23) are equal and the width of axial slots (22) is one half of the width of the input guide (21).

Moeller, Charles P. (Del Mar, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Aquaculture: global status and trends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the high level of public concern about GM technology...intervention in a high-energy environment (Sturrock...Advances in information and communications technology is benefiting...including fish), water and energy are key issues. Some...economics methods trends Conservation of Natural Resources...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trends output growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

GAMS program used to estimate capacity output using a distance function with both good and bad output, variable returns to scale and weak disposability of the bad outputs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

." VIMS Marine resource Report N. 2007-6. August 2007. Author: John B. Walden NMFS/NEFSC 166 Water St(obs) weights ; POSITIVE Variable weight, lambda; EQUATIONS CONSTR1(GOUTPUT, OBS) DEA constraint for each output

102

RetTrendReport1205.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Prepared by: Prepared by: Aon Consulting 111 Market Place Baltimore, MD 21202 www.aon.com Trends in Retirement Income and Retiree Medical Plans What's inside 1 Introduction 2 Defined Benefit Trends 5 Defined Contribution Plan Trends 7 Rationale Behind the Trends 9 Retiree Health Trends 11 Key Changes in Retiree Health Coverage 14 Appendix 1: DB Design Trends 16 Appendix 2: DC Design Trends 17 Appendix 3: Charts and Figures 29 Appendix 4: Recent Articles on DB Trends 30 Appendix 3: Recent Articles on Retiree Medical Trends Introduction Today, U.S. employers are finding it increasingly difficult to offer the level of retirement benefits provided to workers over the last half century. Factors impacting the changing landscape for retirement benefits include:

103

Trend dynamics : a method to improve the analysis, dissemination and forecasting of trends on the Internet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis provides a new perspective in trend analysis with the acknowledgement of individuals as carriers of trends and susceptible to influence simultaneously by a trend's perceived significance and by external effects ...

Strazza, Ernesto (Strazza Silva)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Constellation Shaping for Communication Channels with Quantized Outputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

average energy are selected more frequently than constellations with higher energy. However, the resultsConstellation Shaping for Communication Channels with Quantized Outputs Chandana Nannapaneni signal constellation and the output is quantized by a uniform scalar quantizer. The goal is to jointly

Valenti, Matthew C.

105

ANALOG-DIGITAL INPUT OUTPUT SYSTEM FOR APPLE CO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADIOS ANALOG-DIGITAL INPUT OUTPUT SYSTEM FOR APPLE CO NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY TABLES ADIOS - ANALOG-DIGITAL INPUT OUTPUT SYSTEM FOR APPLE COMPUTER TABLE FOR CONTENTS Page I Module and Apple Card (Photograph) Figure 3 Complete Apple/ADIOS System (Photograph) Figure 4 Analog

Groppi, Christopher

106

Most efficient quantum thermoelectric at finite power output  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Machines are only Carnot efficient if they are reversible, but then their power output is vanishingly small. Here we ask, what is the maximum efficiency of an irreversible device with finite power output? We use a nonlinear scattering theory to answer this question for thermoelectric quantum systems; heat engines or refrigerators consisting of nanostructures or molecules that exhibit a Peltier effect. We find that quantum mechanics places an upper bound on both power output, and on the efficiency at any finite power. The upper bound on efficiency equals Carnot efficiency at zero power output, but decays with increasing power output. It is intrinsically quantum (wavelength dependent), unlike Carnot efficiency. This maximum efficiency occurs when the system lets through all particles in a certain energy window, but none at other energies. A physical implementation of this is discussed, as is the suppression of efficiency by a phonon heat flow.

Robert S. Whitney

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

107

The Price-Independent Trend in Energy Efficiency in Canada and the Potential Influence of Non-Price Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Index (AEEI) measures the rate at which energy per unit of output (E/GDP) changes over time, with energy, suggesting that energy intensity will decline by .7% per year. At this rate, Canada will not achieve its 2010The Price-Independent Trend in Energy Efficiency in Canada and the Potential Influence of Non

108

Seasonal trends in air temperature and precipitation in IPCC AR4 GCM output for Kansas, USA: evaluation and implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-CM2.0 US 7 US Department of Commerce/NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory GFDL-CM2.1 US 8 NASA/Goddard Institute for Space Studies GISS-AOM US 9 NASA/Goddard Institute for Space Studies GISS-EH US 10 NASA/Goddard Institute for Space Studies GISS-ER...

Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Jones, Aubrey R.; Feddema, Johannes J.

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

109

Trends in electricity demand and supply in the developing countries, 1980--1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of trends concerning electricity demand and supply in the developing countries in the 1980--1990 period, with special focus on 13 major countries for which we have assembled consistent data series. We describe the linkage between electricity demand and economic growth, the changing sectoral composition of electricity consumption, and changes in the mix of energy sources for electricity generation. We also cover trends in the efficiency of utility electricity supply with respect to power plant efficiency and own-use and delivery losses, and consider the trends in carbon dioxide emissions from electricity supply.

Meyers, S.; Campbell, C.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Prediction of demand trends of coking coal in China based on grey linear regression composition model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The scarce of coking coal resources in China results in its short supply. By establishing a grey linear regression composition model, this paper has greatly improved the inadequacy of grey system prediction model and regression analysis method in trend prediction and finished the prediction of demand trends of coking coal in China with this model. As result of the prediction, it is estimated that in the next decade, the demand for coking coal in China will experience a growth trend; China's demand for coking coal will reach more than 1.535 billion tons by 2015, reach the maximum of 1.639 billion tons by 2020 and drop in 2025.

Hai-Dong Zhou; Qiang Wu; Min Fang; Zhong-Bao Ren; Li-Fei Jin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Food consumption trends and drivers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...world differs from past experiences! Public Health Nutr. 5, 205-214. ( doi:10.1111/j...China's nutrition transition overwhelm its health care system and slow economic growth? Health Aff. 27, 1064-1076. ( doi:10.1377...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Relationship Among Efficiency and Output Power of Heat Energy Converters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relationship among efficiency and output power of heat-electric energy converters as well as of any converters for transforming of heat energy into any other kind of energy is considered. It is shown, that the parameter efficiency does not determine univocally the output power of a converter. It is proposed to use another parameter for determination of working ability of heat energy converters. It is shown, that high output power can not be achieved by any kind of Stirling-type converters in spite of their high efficiency.

Alexander Luchinskiy

2004-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

113

Sparse Convolved Gaussian Processes for Multi-output Regression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the concentration of different heavy metal pollutants [5]. Modelling multiple output variables is a challenge as we methodology for synthetic data and real world applications on pollution prediction and a sensor network. 1

Rattray, Magnus

114

Computability in Anonymous Networks: Revocable vs. Irrecovable Outputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computability in Anonymous Networks: Revocable vs. Irrecovable Outputs Yuval Emek1 , Jochen Seidel2, and leader election. 1 Introduction We study computability in networks, referred to hereafter as distributed

115

Failure mode and effects analysis outputs: are they valid?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a prospective risk assessment tool that ... this study was to explore the validity of FMEA outputs within a hospital setting in the...

Nada Atef Shebl; Bryony Dean Franklin; Nick Barber

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Grid adaptation for functional outputs of compressible flow simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An error correction and grid adaptive method is presented for improving the accuracy of functional outputs of compressible flow simulations. The procedure is based on an adjoint formulation in which the estimated error in ...

Venditti, David Anthony, 1973-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Experiments and Output Data  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The CCSM web makes the source code of various versions of the model freely available and provides access to experiments that have been run and the resulting output data.

118

Fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth characteristics of nanotwinned copper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fracture and subcritical fatigue crack growth life. Possible mechanistic origins of these trends and the resistance to stable subcritical crack growth under mono- tonic and cyclic loading, especially at lowerFracture toughness and fatigue crack growth characteristics of nanotwinned copper A. Singh a,1 , L

Suresh, Subra

119

Reliable Gas Turbine Output: Attaining Temperature Independent Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of availability, it is the major option for future power generation. One inherent disadvantage of gas turbines is the degradation of output as the ambient air temperature increases. This reduction in output during times of peak load create a reliability..., power generation for offshore platforms, utility peak load 58 ESL-IE-92-04-10 Proceedings from the 14th National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 22-23, 1992 power generation, emergency power, ship propulsion, and private...

Neeley, J. E.; Patton, S.; Holder, F.

120

Interpreting and analyzing model output (A very cursory introduction) Here will talk briefly about using "ncview" and "matlab" to analyze output  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using "ncview" and "matlab" to analyze output from your model. The model output is in netcdf format for the output. I use matlab to measure, plot, compute, etc.. Recall the the model output is stored in: /scratch shown at the top.) matlab I hope you have some experience with matlab. There are handy tutorials

Gerber, Edwin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trends output growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Current trends in the Advanced Bioindustry  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry State of TechnologyMichael McAdams, President, Advanced Biofuels Association

122

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025 - Market Trends- Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand and Supply Electricity Demand and Supply Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Market Trends - Electricity Demand and Supply Continued Growth in Electricity Use Is Expected in All Sectors Figure 66. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1970-2025 (billion kilowatthours). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Total electricity sales are projected to increase at an average annual rate of 1.9 percent in the AEO2005 reference case, from 3,481 billion kilowatthours in 2003 to 5,220 billion kilowatthours in 2025 (Figure 66). From 2003 to 2025, annual growth in electricity sales is projected to average 1.6 percent in the residential sector, 2.5 percent in the commercial sector, and 1.3 percent in the industrial sector.

123

What Goes Up: Recent Trends in China's Energy Consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1996, China's energy output has dropped by 17%, while primary energy use has fallen by 4%, driven almost entirely by shrinking output from coal mines and declining direct use. Since China is the world's second-largest emitter of greenhouse gases, it is important to understand the sources of this apparent transformation, and whether it portends a permanent change in patterns of energy use. This remarkable reversal of the long-term expansion of energy use has occurred even as the economy has continued to grow, albeit more slowly than in the early 1990s. Generation of electric power has risen, implying a steep fall in end uses, particularly in industry. Available information points to a variety of forces contributing to this phenomenon, including rapid improvements in coal quality, structural changes in industry, shutdowns of factories in both the state-owned and non-state segments of the economy, improvements in end-use efficiency, and greater use of gas and electricity in households. A combination of slowing economic growth, industrial restructuring, broader economic system reforms, and environmental and energy-efficiency policies has apparently led to at least a temporary decline in, and perhaps a long-term reduction in the growth of energy use, and therefore greenhouse gas emissions.

Sinton, Jonathan E.; Fridley, David G.

2000-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

124

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: Market Analysis Website: cdn.globalccsinstitute.com/sites/default/files/publications/7326/carbo Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carbon-capture-transport-and-storage- Policies: Regulations Regulations: Emissions Mitigation Scheme The Scottish Government published this report to identify regulatory gaps or overlaps in the nation's framework for regulating carbon capture and storage (CCS). The report aims to streamline and better manage CCS regulation. It focuses on evaluating the risks, barriers, information gaps,

125

OECD Input-Output Tables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OECD Input-Output Tables OECD Input-Output Tables Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Input-Output Tables Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Market analysis, Co-benefits assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.oecd.org/document/3/0,3343,en_2649_34445_38071427_1_1_1_1,00.html Country: Sweden, Finland, Japan, South Korea, Argentina, Australia, China, Israel, United Kingdom, Portugal, Romania, Greece, Poland, Slovakia, Chile, India, Canada, New Zealand, United States, Denmark, Norway, Spain, Austria, Italy, Netherlands, Ireland, France, Belgium, Brazil, Czech Republic, Estonia, Germany, Hungary, Luxembourg, Mexico, Slovenia, South Africa, Turkey, Indonesia, Switzerland, Taiwan, Russia

126

Formalization of computer input and output: the Hadley model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current digital evidence acquisition tools are effective, but are tested rather than formally proven correct. We assert that the forensics community will benefit in evidentiary ways and the scientific community will benefit in practical ways by moving beyond simple testing of systems to a formal model. To this end, we present a hierarchical model of peripheral input to and output from von Neumann computers, patterned after the Open Systems Interconnection model of networking. The Hadley model categorizes all components of peripheral input and output in terms of data flow; with constructive aspects concentrated in the data flow between primary memory and the computer sides of peripherals' interfaces. The constructive domain of Hadley is eventually expandable to all areas of the I/O hierarchy, allowing for a full view of peripheral input and output and enhancing the forensics community's capabilities to analyze, obtain, and give evidentiary force to data.

Matthew Gerber; John Leeson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Nuclear Proliferation Technology Trends Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is underway to develop mature, integrated methodologies to address nonproliferation issues. A variety of methodologies (both qualitative and quantitative) are being considered. All have one thing in common, a need for a consistent set of proliferation related data that can be used as a basis for application. One approach to providing a basis for predicting and evaluating future proliferation events is to understand past proliferation events, that is, the different paths that have actually been taken to acquire or attempt to acquire special nuclear material. In order to provide this information, this report describing previous material acquisition activities (obtained from open source material) has been prepared. This report describes how, based on an evaluation of historical trends in nuclear technology development, conclusions can be reached concerning: (1) The length of time it takes to acquire a technology; (2) The length of time it takes for production of special nuclear material to begin; and (3) The type of approaches taken for acquiring the technology. In addition to examining time constants, the report is intended to provide information that could be used to support the use of the different non-proliferation analysis methodologies. Accordingly, each section includes: (1) Technology description; (2) Technology origin; (3) Basic theory; (4) Important components/materials; (5) Technology development; (6) Technological difficulties involved in use; (7) Changes/improvements in technology; (8) Countries that have used/attempted to use the technology; (9) Technology Information; (10) Acquisition approaches; (11) Time constants for technology development; and (12) Required Concurrent Technologies.

Zentner, Michael D.; Coles, Garill A.; Talbert, Robert J.

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

128

Arnold Schwarzenegger TRENDS IN SNOWFALL VERSUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California's electricity and natural gas ratepayers. The PIER Program strives to conduct the most promising Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor TRENDS IN SNOWFALL VERSUS RAINFALL FOR THE WESTERN UNITED this report as follows: Knowles, N., M. Dettinger, and D. Cayan. 2007. Trends in Snowfall Versus Rainfall

129

RECENT TRENDS IN FEDERAL LAB TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Budget Resources for Federal Lab R&D Spending, Ranked by Budget Level Table 2.2 Distribution of Active#12;RECENT TRENDS IN FEDERAL LAB TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER: FY 1999­2000 BIENNIAL REPORT Report Administration U.S. Department of Commerce May 2002 #12;RECENT TRENDS IN FEDERAL LAB TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER: FY

Perkins, Richard A.

130

Nuclear Power Trends Energy Economics and Sustainability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Power Trends Energy Economics and Sustainability L. H. Tsoukalas Purdue University Nuclear;National Research Council of Greece, May 8, 2008 Outline · The Problem · Nuclear Energy Trends · Energy Economics · Life Cycle Analysis · Nuclear Sustainability · Nuclear Energy in Greece? #12;National Research

131

Evidence for trends in UK flooding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...flooding. | Recent major flooding in the UK has raised concern...of a long-term trend in flooding over the last 80-120 years...Gov't | Climate Computer Simulation Disasters Ecosystem Environmental...Evidence for trends in UK flooding By Alice J. Robson Centre...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

An input-output approach to analyze the ways to increase total output of energy sectors: The case of Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to analyze the ways to increase total output of Japanese energy sectors in future time. In this study, Input-Output (IO) analysis is employed as a tool of analysis. This study focuses on petroleum refinery products and non-ferrous metals as analyzed sectors. The results show that positive impact observed in export and outside households consumption modifications while opposite impact is given by modification of import. The recommendations suggested based on these results are Japanese government should make breakthroughs so analyzed sector's export activities can increase and they have to careful in conducting import activities related to these sectors.

Ubaidillah Zuhdi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Output-Based Regulations: A Handbook for Air Regulators (U.S. EPA), August 2004  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Handbook providing practical information to help regulators decide if they want to use output-based regulations and explains how to develop an output-based emission standard

134

MODELING MULTI-OUTPUT FILTERING EFFECTS IN PCMOS Anshul Singh*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING MULTI-OUTPUT FILTERING EFFECTS IN PCMOS Anshul Singh* , Arindam Basu , Keck-Voon Ling* and Vincent J. Mooney III*$§ Email: anshul.singh@research.iiit.ac.in, {arindam.basu, ekvling}@ntu, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore * NTU-Rice Institute of Sustainable and Applied

Mooney, Vincent

135

Output-Sensitive Algorithms for Tukey Depth and Related Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Output-Sensitive Algorithms for Tukey Depth and Related Problems David Bremner University of New de Bruxelles Pat Morin Carleton University Abstract The Tukey depth (Tukey 1975) of a point p halfspace that contains p. Algorithms for computing the Tukey depth of a point in various dimensions

Morin, Pat

136

Soft-Input Soft-Output Sphere Decoding Christoph Studer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soft-Input Soft-Output Sphere Decoding Christoph Studer Integrated Systems Laboratory ETH Zurich Laboratory ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland Email: boelcskei@nari.ee.ethz.ch Abstract--Soft-input soft, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland Email: studer@iis.ee.ethz.ch Helmut Bölcskei Communication Technology

137

Maximizing output from oil reservoirs without water breakthrough  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximizing output from oil reservoirs without water breakthrough S.K. Lucas School of Mathematics, revised May 2003, published 45(3), 2004, 401­422 Abstract Often in oil reservoirs a layer of water lies, for example, Muskat [8], Bear [1]). When oil is removed from the reservoir by an oil well, it will generate

Lucas, Stephen

138

Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Market Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Market Trends Economic Activity Renewables International Oil Markets Oil & Natural Gas Energy Demand Coal Electricity Emissions The projections in AEO2001 are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend forecasts, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. Thus, they provide a policy-neutral reference case that can be used to analyze policy initiatives. EIA does not propose, advocate, or speculate on future legislative and regulatory changes. All laws are assumed to remain as currently enacted; however, the impacts of emerging regulatory changes, when defined, are reflected.

139

An Advanced simulation Code for Modeling Inductive Output Tubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the Phase I program, CCR completed several major building blocks for a 3D large signal, inductive output tube (IOT) code using modern computer language and programming techniques. These included a 3D, Helmholtz, time-harmonic, field solver with a fully functional graphical user interface (GUI), automeshing and adaptivity. Other building blocks included the improved electrostatic Poisson solver with temporal boundary conditions to provide temporal fields for the time-stepping particle pusher as well as the self electric field caused by time-varying space charge. The magnetostatic field solver was also updated to solve for the self magnetic field caused by time changing current density in the output cavity gap. The goal function to optimize an IOT cavity was also formulated, and the optimization methodologies were investigated.

Thuc Bui; R. Lawrence Ives

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

140

Clock-controlled generators with large period output sequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Clock-controlled generators are a kind of pseudo-random number generators (PRNG). Recently, some clock-controlled generators based on jumping Linear Finite State Machines (LFSMs) have been proposed, such as Pomaranch and MICKEY. The period and the linear complexity of their output sequences need to be large enough to provide security against linear attacks. In this paper, a new condition for the period to reach its maximal value is presented. The condition is better than the previous one. Further, some clock-controlled generators are considered, including a new generator which uses a Feedback with Carry Shift Register (FCSR) as the control register. How to maximise the period of their output sequences is investigated.

Zhiqiang Lin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trends output growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

LIMITS TO GROWTH AND STOCHASTICS Nicolas Bouleau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to acknowledge that the impact of the economy on the environment is not a result of temperance or mitigation of natural variations but rather that the economy itself ­ in addition to the underlying trends due to growth the context for our main discussion. I. On the Rome report: simple models and their refinements The issue

Boyer, Edmond

142

Control of XeF laser output by pulse injecton  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Injection locking is investigated as a means for control of optical pulse duration and polarization in a XeF laser. Intense short-pulse generation in the ultraviolet is achieved by injection of a low-level 1-ns optical pulse into a XeF oscillator. Control of laser output polarization by injection locking is demonstrated and studied as a function of injected signal level. Enhancement of XeF electric-discharge laser efficiency by injection pulse ''priming'' is observed.

Pacala, T.J.; Christensen, C.P.

1980-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Output power characteristics of the neutral xenon long laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lasers which oscillate within inhomogeneously broadened gain media exhibit spectral hole burning and concomitant reduction in output power compared with equivalent homogeneously-broadened laser gain media. By increasing the cavity length, it may be possible to demonstrate at least a partial transition from an inhomogeneous laser cavity mode spectrum to a homogeneous spectrum. There are a number of high gain laser lines which are inhomogeneously-broadened transitions in electric discharges of neutral xenon. In neutral xenon lasers, as in the cases of many other gas lasers, the inhomogeneous spectral broadening mechanism arises from Doppler shifts, {Delta}{nu}{sub D}, of individual atoms in thermal motion within the electric discharge comprising the laser gain medium. Optical transitions corresponding to these noble gas atoms have natural linewidths, {Delta}{nu}{sub n}{lt}{Delta}{nu}{sub D}. Simulations of the output power characteristics of the xenon laser were carried out as a function of laser cavity parameters, including the cavity length, L. These calculations showed that when the intracavity mode spacing frequency, c/2L{lt}{Delta}{nu}{sub n}, the inhomogeneously broadened xenon mode spectrum converted to a homogeneously broadened oscillation spectrum with an increase in output power. These simulations are compared with experimental results obtained for the long laser oscillation characteristics of the (5d[5/2]{degree}{sub 2}{r_arrow}6p[3/2]{sub 1}) transition corresponding to the strong, high-gain 3.508 {mu} line in xenon.

Linford, G.J. [TRW Space and Electronics Group, Redondo Beach, CA (United States). Space and Technology Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

DataTrends Water Use Tracking  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Use Tracking Use Tracking Organizations across the country are measuring and tracking the water use of over 50,000 buildings using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager. These buildings represent close to 20% of all buildings in Portfolio Manager. EPA has prepared the DataTrends series to examine trends in energy and water consumption in Portfolio Manager. This document presents the general trends seen in the water data. To learn more, visit www.energystar.gov/DataTrends. Many different types of organizations are tracking water consumption in a wide variety of buildings located in all 50 states. The most common types of buildings with water data are

145

Future trends in environmental mercury concentrations: implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Future trends in environmental mercury concentrations: implications for prevention strategies interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess uncertainty in economic, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts. This reprint is one of a series intended

146

Damped trend exponential smoothing: A modelling viewpoint  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Over the past twenty years, damped trend exponential smoothing has performed well in numerous empirical studies, and it is now well established as an accurate forecasting method. The original motivation for this method was intuitively appealing, but said very little about why or when it provided an optimal approach. The aim of this paper is to provide a theoretical rationale for the damped trend method based on Browns original thinking about the form of underlying models for exponential smoothing. We develop a random coefficient state space model for which damped trend smoothing provides an optimal approach, and within which the damping parameter can be interpreted directly as a measure of the persistence of the linear trend.

Eddie McKenzie; Everette S. Gardner Jr.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATIONHOUSEHOLD VEHICLES ENERGY USE: LATEST DATA & TRENDS ENERGY OVERVIEW E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W INTRODUCTION Author's...

148

Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends EETD's energy efficiency program and market trends research includes technical, economic and policy analysis to inform public and private decision-making on public-interest issues related to utility-sector energy efficiency programs and regulation, and government-funded energy efficiency initiatives. LBNL's research in this area is focused on: Energy efficiency portfolio planning and market assessment, Design and implementation of a portfolio of energy efficiency programs that achieve various policy objectives Utility sector energy efficiency business models, Options for administering energy efficiency programs, Evaluation, measurement and verification of energy efficiency impacts and ESCO industry and market trends and performance.

149

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Commercial > Commercial Buildings Home > Special Home > Commercial > Commercial Buildings Home > Special Reports > Trends in Commercial Buildings Trends: Buildings and Floorspace Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Overview: The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) Trends in the Commercial Buildings Sector Since 1978, the Energy Information Administration has collected basic statistical information from three of the major end-use sectors— residential, and industrial— periodic energy consumption surveys. Each survey is a snapshot of how energy is used in the year of the survey; the series of surveys in each sector reveals the trends in energy use for the sector. Introduction The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects data from a sample of buildings representative of the commercial buildings

150

World Energy Use Trends in Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to provide adequate energy supplies in the future, trends in energy demand must be evaluated and projections of future demand developed. World energy use is far from static, and an understanding of the demand

Randy Hudson

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Federal Energy Management Program: Data Center Energy Consumption Trends  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data Center Energy Data Center Energy Consumption Trends to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Data Center Energy Consumption Trends on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Data Center Energy Consumption Trends on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Data Center Energy Consumption Trends on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Data Center Energy Consumption Trends on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Data Center Energy Consumption Trends on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Data Center Energy Consumption Trends on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Water Efficiency Data Center Energy Efficiency Energy Consumption Trends

152

Energy Efficiency Trends in Residential and Commercial Buildings...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Efficiency Trends in Residential and Commercial Buildings - August 2010 Energy Efficiency Trends in Residential and Commercial Buildings - August 2010 Overview of building...

153

Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Trends: Implications for the West? Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? Committee on Regional Electric Power Cooperation. San Francisco, CA. March...

154

New Report Highlights Trends in Offshore Wind with 14 Projects...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Highlights Trends in Offshore Wind with 14 Projects Currently In Advanced Stages of Development New Report Highlights Trends in Offshore Wind with 14 Projects Currently In Advanced...

155

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025 - Market Trends- Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Market Trends - Energy Demand Figure 42. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1970-2025 (index, 1970 = 1). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Average Energy Use per Person Increases in the Forecast Energy intensity, as measured by energy use per 2000 dollar of GDP, is projected to decline at an average annual rate of 1.6 percent, with efficiency gains and structural shifts in the economy offsetting growth in demand for energy services (Figure 42). The projected rate of decline falls between the average rate of 2.3 percent from 1970 through 1986, when energy prices increased in real terms, and the 0.7-percent rate from 1986 through

156

NCPART: management of ICEMDDN output for numerical control users  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NCPART is a procedure developed by the Numerical Control Department at Bendix Kansas City Division to handle the entry to and exit from ICEMDDN, and process all of the local files output by ICEMDDN. The NCPART procedure is menu driven, and provides automatic access to ICEMDDN and any files necessary to process information with ICEM for numerical Control users. Basically, the procedure handles all of the ICEMDDN operations that involve operating system commands, and frees the NC programmer to concentrate on his/her work as a programmer.

Rossini, B.F.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Waveguide submillimetre laser with a uniform output beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for producing non-Gaussian light beams with a uniform intensity profile is described. The method is based on the use of a combined waveguide quasi-optical resonator containing a generalised confocal resonator with an inhomogeneous mirror with absorbing inhomogeneities discretely located on its surface and a hollow dielectric waveguide whose size satisfies the conditions of self-imaging of a uniform field in it. The existence of quasi-homogeneous beams at the output of an optically pumped 0.1188-mm waveguide CH{sub 3}OH laser with a amplitude-stepped mirror is confirmed theoretically and experimentally. (lasers)

Volodenko, A V; Gurin, O V; Degtyarev, A V; Maslov, Vyacheslav A; Svich, V A; Topkov, A N [V.N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, Kharkiv (Ukraine)

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

158

Cooking Trends from 1993 to 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Home Page U.S. Energy Information Administration's Residential Buildings Site, Cooking Trends from 1993 to 2001. If you need assistance viewing this page, call 202-586-8800. Energy Information Adiministration Homepage Home Page U.S. Energy Information Administration's Residential Buildings Site, Cooking Trends from 1993 to 2001. If you need assistance viewing this page, call 202-586-8800. Energy Information Adiministration Homepage Home > Residential > Residential Home Page > Cooking Trends from 1993 to 2001 Cooking Trends in the United States : Are We Really Becoming a Fast Food Country? Graphic of vegetables A popular perception is that Americans now spend less time in the kitchen than in the past. Has there been an identifiable trend toward cooking less in the 1990s, or have cooking habits remained relatively constant over that period? And what characteristics of American households can be seen to influence their cooking patterns? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on household characteristics as well as on residential energy consumption. The first RECS was conducted in 1978 and the eleventh and most recent survey was conducted in 2001. This report will refer to data collected in the 1993 and 2001 RECS.

159

China's Industrial Energy Consumption Trends and Impacts of the Top-1000  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

China's Industrial Energy Consumption Trends and Impacts of the Top-1000 China's Industrial Energy Consumption Trends and Impacts of the Top-1000 Enterprises Energy-Saving Program and the Ten Key Energy-Saving Projects Title China's Industrial Energy Consumption Trends and Impacts of the Top-1000 Enterprises Energy-Saving Program and the Ten Key Energy-Saving Projects Publication Type Journal Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ke, Jing, Lynn K. Price, Stephanie Ohshita, David Fridley, Nina Zheng Khanna, Nan Zhou, and Mark D. Levine Keywords energy saving, energy trends, industrial energy efficiency, top-1000 Abstract This study analyzes China's industrial energy consumption trends from 1996 to 2010 with a focus on the impact of the Top-1000 Enterprises Energy-Saving Program and the Ten Key Energy-Saving Projects. From 1996 to 2010, China's industrial energy consumption increased by 134%, even as the industrial economic energy intensity decreased by 46%. Decomposition analysis shows that the production effect was the dominant cause of the rapid growth in industrial energy consumption, while the efficiency effect was the major factor slowing the growth of industrial energy consumption. The structural effect had a relatively small and fluctuating influence. Analysis shows the strong association of industrial energy consumption with the growth of China's economy and changing energy policies. An assessment of the Top-1000 Enterprises Energy-Saving Program and the Ten Key Energy-Saving Projects indicates that the economic energy intensity of major energy-intensive industrial sub-sectors, as well as the physical energy intensity of major energy-intensive industrial products, decreased significantly during China's 11th Five Year Plan (FYP) period (2006-2010). This study also shows the importance and challenge of realizing structural change toward less energy-intensive activities in China during the 12th FYP period (2011-2015).

160

Method and system for managing an electrical output of a turbogenerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The system and method manages an electrical output of a turbogenerator in accordance with multiple modes. In a first mode, a direct current (DC) bus receives power from a turbogenerator output via a rectifier where turbogenerator revolutions per unit time (e.g., revolutions per minute (RPM)) or an electrical output level of a turbogenerator output meet or exceed a minimum threshold. In a second mode, if the turbogenerator revolutions per unit time or electrical output level of a turbogenerator output are less than the minimum threshold, the electric drive motor or a generator mechanically powered by the engine provides electrical energy to the direct current bus.

Stahlhut, Ronnie Dean (Bettendorf, IA); Vuk, Carl Thomas (Denver, IA)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trends output growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Trends in Multidisciplinary Engineering Education, MA&O 2006 Trends in Multidisciplinary Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the context in which engineering is practiced Economics (including business practice) History The environmentTrends in Multidisciplinary Engineering Education, MA&O 2006 Page 1 Trends in Multidisciplinary Engineering Education: 2006 and Beyond Awards Luncheon Olivier de Weck and Karen WillcoxOlivier de Weck

Peraire, Jaime

162

Wind Power Development in the United States: Current Progress, Future Trends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. wind power industry is in an era of substantial growth, with the U.S. and China likely to vie for largest-market status for years to come. With the market evolving at such a rapid pace, keeping up with current trends in the marketplace has become increasingly difficult. At the same time, limits to future growth are uncertain. This paper summarizes major trends in the U.S. wind market, and explores the technical and economic feasibility of achieving much greater levels of wind penetration. China would be well served to conduct similar analyses of the feasibility, benefits, challenges, and policy needs associated with much higher levels of wind power generation than currently expressed in national targets.

Wiser, Ryan H

2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

163

Cover Page of Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Cover Page of Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends...

164

Trends in Utility Green Pricing Programs (2006)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Trends in Utility Green Trends in Utility Green Pricing Programs (2006) Lori Bird and Marshall Kaiser Technical Report NREL/TP-670-42287 October 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Technical Report NREL/TP-670-42287 October 2007 Trends in Utility Green Pricing Programs (2006) Lori Bird and Marshall Kaiser Prepared under Task No. IGST.7330 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

165

Natural Gas 1995 Issues and Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5) 5) Distribution Category UC-950 Natural Gas 1995 Issues and Trends November 1995 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1995: Issues and Trends iii Preface Natural Gas 1995: Issues and Trends has been prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide a summary of the latest data and information relating to the natural gas industry, including prices, production, transmission,

166

DataTrends Energy Use Benchmarking  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Benchmarking Benchmarking The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager is changing the way organizations track and manage energy. As of December 2011, organizations have used Portfolio Manager to track and manage the energy use of over 260,000 buildings across all 50 states, representing over 28 billion square feet (nearly 40% of the commercial market). Because of this widespread market adoption, EPA has prepared the DataTrends series to examine benchmarking and trends in energy and water consumption in Portfolio Manager. To learn more, visit www.energystar.gov/DataTrends. Many different types of organizations use Portfolio Manager to benchmark the energy use of their buildings. Office, K-12

167

Trends in Utility Green Pricing Programs (2004)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Trends in Utility Green Trends in Utility Green Pricing Programs (2004) Lori Bird and Elizabeth Brown Technical Report NREL/TP-620-38800 October 2005 Trends in Utility Green Pricing Programs (2004) Lori Bird and Elizabeth Brown Prepared under Task No. ASG5.1003 Technical Report NREL/TP-620-38800 October 2005 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any

168

Natural Gas 1994: Issues and Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) Distribution Category UC-950 Natural Gas 1994 Issues and Trends July 1994 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. ii Natural Gas 1994: Issues and Trends Energy Information Administration Contacts Natural Gas 1994: Issues and Trends was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, under the direction of Diane W. Lique (202/586-6401). General information concerning this report may be obtained from Joan

169

Natural Gas 1996: Issues and Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Distribution Category UC-950 Natural Gas 1996 Issues and Trends December 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1996: Issues and Trends iii Preface Natural Gas 1996: Issues and Trends provides a summary of  Chapter 1. "Overview," Mary E. Carlson (202/586-4749). the latest data and information relating to the U.S. natural gas

170

Trends and balances: 1985-1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the seventh edition of Trends and Balances to be presented to the staff of Oak Ridge National (ORNL) and other interested parties. Each year at the end of the planning cycle the Laboratory publishes its official planning document, the Institutional Plan. Trends and Balances is brought out as a condensation of that more formal document and is intended to provide a reference to the kinds of plans that have occupied senior laboratory management over the past year. An institution as large as ORNL changes slowly, so some of the information in this document overlaps that contained in the previous edition of Trends and Balances. Much, however, is different. A new section, for example, describes what senior Laboratory management feels are five new directions for science and technology at ORNL. This document is intended to provide new insights into the programs and structure of the Laboratory.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Condensation temperature trends among stars with planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results from detailed spectroscopic analyses of stars hosting massive planets are employed to search for trends between abundances and condensation temperatures. The elements C, S, Na, Mg, Al, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Zn are included in the analysis of 64 stars with planets and 33 comparison stars. No significant trends are evident in the data. This null result suggests that accretion of rocky material onto the photospheres of stars with planets is not the primary explanation for their high metallicities. However, the differences between the solar photospheric and meteoritic abundances do display a weak but significant trend with condensation temperature. This suggests that the metallicity of the sun's envelope has been enriched relative to its interior by about 0.07 dex.

Guillermo Gonzalez

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

172

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Market Trend  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

mrktrend.gif (2686 bytes) Economic Activity International Oil Markets Energy Demand Electricity Oil & Natural Gas Coal Emissions The projections in AEO2000 are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend forecasts, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. Thus, they provide a policy-neutral reference case that can be used to analyze policy initiatives. EIA does not propose, advocate, or speculate on future legislative and regulatory changes. All laws are assumed to remain as currently enacted; however, the impacts of emerging regulatory changes, when defined, are reflected.

173

Persistent collective trend in stock markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Empirical evidence is given for a significant difference in the collective trend of the share prices during the stock index rising and falling periods. Data on the Dow Jones Industrial Average and its stock components are studied between 1991 and 2008. Pearson-type correlations are computed between the stocks and averaged over stock pairs and time. The results indicate a general trend: whenever the stock index is falling the stock prices are changing in a more correlated manner than in case the stock index is ascending. A thorough statistical analysis of the data shows that the observed difference is significant, suggesting a constant fear factor among stockholders.

Emeric Balogh; Ingve Simonsen; Blint Zs. Nagy; Zoltn Nda

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

174

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

  Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 006 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 7% in 006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Leads the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . .4 Texas, Washington, and California Lead the U.S. in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 GE Wind Is the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, with Siemens Gaining Market Share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Average Turbine Size Continues to Increase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Developer Consolidation Accelerates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Innovation and Competition in Non-Utility Wind Financing Persists . . . .9

175

Measurement and Modeling of Solar and PV Output Variability: Preprint  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Measurement and Modeling of Measurement and Modeling of Solar and PV Output Variability Preprint M. Sengupta To be presented at SOLAR 2011 Raleigh, North Carolina May 17-21, 2011 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-51105 April 2011 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty,

176

Quantum teleportation scheme by selecting one of multiple output ports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The scheme of quantum teleportation, where Bob has multiple (N) output ports and obtains the teleported state by simply selecting one of the N ports, is thoroughly studied. We consider both deterministic version and probabilistic version of the teleportation scheme aiming to teleport an unknown state of a qubit. Moreover, we consider two cases for each version: (i) the state employed for the teleportation is fixed to a maximally entangled state, and (ii) the state is also optimized as well as Alice's measurement. We analytically determine the optimal protocols for all the four cases, and show the corresponding optimal fidelity or optimal success probability. All these protocols can achieve the perfect teleportation in the asymptotic limit of $N\\to\\infty$. The entanglement properties of the teleportation scheme are also discussed.

Satoshi Ishizaka; Tohya Hiroshima

2009-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

177

New trends in cometary chemistry Jacques Crovisier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New trends in cometary chemistry Jacques Crovisier Received 29th November 2005, Accepted 19th some of the implications of new comet observations for cometary chemistry: recent observations in the coma by the sublimation of nucleus ices. This technique has been in use since the beginnings

Demoulin, Pascal

178

Policy message Trends in the global agricultural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and entire countries, since small-scale producers are the main source of food in developing countries. Large is attracting renewed attention, mainly because of concerns over climate change. But other trends will have, often foreign- ers, are investing in agricultural land in developing countries. Threats

Richner, Heinz

179

Outdoor Recreation Participation Trends in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Outdoor recreation is a popular pastime in Texas. This publication reports on the participation and trends in outdoor recreation in the U.S. and Texas revealed in the National Survey on Recreation and the Environment conducted by the U.S. Forest...

Schuett, Michael A.; Shafer, Carl Scott; Lu, Jiaying

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

180

INEEL Greenhouse Gas Inventory and Trend Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the INEEL GHG Inventory and Trend Analysis is to establish INEEL expertise in carbon management decision making and policy analysis. This FY-99 effort is the first step toward placing the INEEL in a leadership role within the DOE laboratories to support carbon management systems and analysis.

Shropshire, David Earl; Teel, Dale Milton

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trends output growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Trends in Spatial Data Shashi Shekhar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 3 Trends in Spatial Data Mining Shashi Shekhar , Pusheng Zhang , Yan Huang , Ranga Raju, Minneapolis, MN 55455 Abstract: Spatial data mining is the process of discovering interesting and previously traditional numeric and categorical data due to the complexity of spatial data types, spatial relationships

Huang, Yan

182

Look at the trends in business graphics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Imagine the possibilities of artificial intelligence combined with animated graphics. More realistically the authors examine certain trends in computer graphics and follow them through to their logical extension in about five years. Predictions include voice activated systems with Icon symbols to enhance communication with applications in production control and a number of business functions.

Jarrett, I.M.; Putnam, L.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Mobile user-experience design trends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The course presents essential concepts of mobile user-experience design and reviews mobile UX trends in Asia, the US, and Europe, including case studies of developing designs for China, a near failure of user-centered mobile UX design, and cross-cultural ...

Aaron Marcus

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

This page left blank. E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATIONHOUSEHOLD VEHICLES ENERGY USE: LATEST DATA & TRENDS ENERGY OVERVIEW E N E R G Y O V E RV I E W...

185

A Framework to Determine the Probability Density Function for the Output Power of Wind Farms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Framework to Determine the Probability Density Function for the Output Power of Wind Farms Sairaj to the power output of a wind farm while factoring in the availability of the wind turbines in the farm availability model for the wind turbines, we propose a method to determine the wind-farm power output pdf

Liberzon, Daniel

186

Linear model-based estimation of blood pressure and cardiac output for Normal and Paranoid cases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Provisioning a generic simple linear mathematical model for Paranoid and Healthy cases leading to auxiliary investigation of the neuroleptic drugs effect imposed on cardiac output (CO) and blood pressure (BP). Multi-input single output system identification ... Keywords: Blood pressure, Cardiac output, Heart rate, MISO transfer function, Stroke volume, System identification

Mohamed Abdelkader Aboamer, Ahmad Taher Azar, Khaled Wahba, Abdallah S. Mohamed

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2: August 13, 2: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on AddThis.com... Fact #482: August 13, 2007

188

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Commercial Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Survey Methodology Sampling Error, Standard Errors, and Relative Standard Errors The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The commercial sector consists of business establishments and other organizations that provide services. The sector includes service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as a wide range of buildings that would not be considered “commercial” in a traditional economic sense, such as public schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Excluded from the sector are the goods-producing industries: manufacturing, agriculture, mining, forestry and fisheries, and construction.

189

Trends in Utility Green Pricing Programs (2003)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

33 33 Trends in Utility Green Pricing Programs (2003) Lori Bird and Karen Cardinal National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 September 2004 * NREL/TP-620-36833 Trends in Utility Green Pricing Programs (2003) Lori Bird and Karen Cardinal Prepared under Task No. ASG4.1003 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle

190

Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Market Trend  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

mrktrend.gif (2686 bytes) mrktrend.gif (2686 bytes) Economic Activity International Oil Markets Energy Demand Electricity Oil & Natural Gas Coal Emissions The projections in AEO99 are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend forecasts, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. Thus, they provide a policy-neutral reference case that can be used to analyze policy initiatives. EIA does not propose, advocate, or speculate on future legislative and regulatory changes. All laws are assumed to remain as currently enacted; however, the impacts of emerging regulatory changes, when defined, are reflected. Because energy markets are complex, models are simplified representations of energy production and consumption, regulations, and producer and consumer behavior. Projections are highly dependent on the data, methodologies, model structures,

191

Identifying recent trends in nanomedicine development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Medical nanotechnology is a recent emerging field with the intention to improve human health. The creation and rapid expansion of nanomedicine as a new research field in the last decade is the result of nanotechnology's convergence with biology, genetics, biochemistry, chemistry, physics, pharmacology and medicine. Within nanomedicine, two major categories have emerged: diagnostics (imaging) and therapeutics (drug delivery). Each of these branches has several nanoparticle types that are actively under research and development. While nanomedicine research and use of various nanoparticles in new applications have been categorised and reviewed for their potential utility in medicine, there has been little context of the emerging trends within nanomedicine or how the field is progressing. This article presents an overview of the trends for nanomedicine that are developing over time as measured by examining peer review research literature and patent databases.

Shalu Darshan; Michael G. Tyshenko

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Chapter 28 - Air Quality Status and Trends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter describes the condition of air quality, based on air pollutant concentrations, i.e. criteria pollutants, in airsheds around the world, as well as certain air toxics in urban areas and hot spots. The variability of pollutant concentrations in space and time are discussed, as well as differences in air pollution between more industrialized and economically developed regions vs developing nations. The status and trends of atmospheric concentrations of tropospheric ozone, oxides of nitrogen, oxides of sulfur, carbon monoxide, lead, and particulate matter are discussed. Examples of air toxics include benzene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, dioxins, aldehydes, and metals, e.g. mercury. Regional and global trends include acid deposition, depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, and climate change. Indoor air quality is discussed. The chapter concludes with a description of an air quality index.

Daniel Vallero

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Since the first CBECS in 1979, the commercial buildings sector has increased in size. From 1979 to 2003: The number of commercial buildings increased from 3.8 million to 4.9 million (Figure 3). The amount of commercial floorspace increased from 51 billion to 72 billion square feet (Figure 4). Total energy consumed increased from less than 5,900 trillion to more than 6,500 trillion Btu (Figure 5). Electricity and natural gas consumption, nearly equal in 1979, diverged; electricity increased to more than 3,500 trillion Btu by 2003 while natural gas declined to 2,100 trillion Btu. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003.

194

Retrospective Evaluation of Appliance Price Trends  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Appliance Price Trends Evaluation of Appliance Price Trends Title Retrospective Evaluation of Appliance Price Trends Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Dale, Larry L., Camille Antinori, Michael A. McNeil, James E. McMahon, and Sydny K. Fujita Journal Energy Policy Volume 37 Issue 2 Pagination 597-605 Date Published November 20 Keywords appliance efficiency standards, price forecasts, EES-EG Abstract Real prices of major appliances (refrigerators, dishwashers, heating and cooling equipment) have been falling since the late 1970s despite increases in appliance efficiency and other quality variables. This paper demonstrates that historic increases in efficiency over time, including those resulting from minimum efficiency standards, incur smaller price increases than were expected by the Department of Energy (DOE) forecasts made in conjunction with standards. This effect can be explained by technological innovation, which lowers the cost of efficiency, and by market changes contributing to lower markups and economies of scale in production of higher efficiency units. We reach four principal conclusions about appliance trends and retail price setting:1. For the past several decades, the retail price of appliances has been steadily falling while efficiency has been increasing.2. Past retail price predictions made by the DOE analyses of efficiency standards, assuming constant prices over time, have tended to overestimate retail prices.3. The average incremental price to increase appliance efficiency has declined over time. DOE technical support documents have typically overestimated this incremental price and retail prices.4. Changes in retail markups and economies of scale in production of more efficient appliances may have contributed to declines in prices of efficient appliances.

195

Output, efficiency, emissions improved with Cat's 3500 series B engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Like most technologies, engine developments tend to follow evolutionary paths. And it's a given that the longer an engine's been around and the more successful it's been, the more likely it is that any changes made would be incremental. On the surface, such is the case with the Caterpillar 3500 Series B diesel engine, recently introduced in Europe and the United States. Based on the well-proven 3500 engine first introduced in 1980 and upgraded with a Phase II program five years later, most of the changes appear incremental. But taken as a whole, they provide a level of performance and durability that Caterpillar anticipates will make this engine an even stronger contender in power generation and marine applications for years to come. It's not hard to see why. Output has been increased between 17% and 30% on some models; fuel consumption is improved by as much as 15%; and with the new aftertreatment system introduced with the engines, emissions as low as 1.3 g/kWh NO[sub x] are said to be achieveable. This paper outlines the design, specifications, and highlights of the improvements in performance of these new engines. 3 figs.

Brezonick, M.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Molar Growth  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Molar Growth Molar Growth Name: Daniel Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What animals have molars that grow continuously ? Replies: No mammals that I or my colleagues are aware of, only some few whose incisors grow continuously. J. Elliott Most vertebrates are "polyphyodonts" meaning that they replace teeth continuously through out their lives. All the teeth aren't replaced at once, but in waves so that the animals always have functional teeth around those that are lost. Most mammals are "diphyodonts", which means that they have only 2 sets of teeth: baby teeth and adult teeth. The teeth of herbivore mammals, those which eat grasses, seem to grow throughout their lives. But really, the teeth are very long and extend far down into the jaws. They gradually move up in the jaw toward the surface over time, with the area beneath them filling in with bone.

197

WRI-Earth Trends Data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WRI-Earth Trends Data WRI-Earth Trends Data Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: WRI-Earth Trends Data Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute Sector: Energy Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website: www.wri.org/project/earthtrends WRI-Earth Trends Data Screenshot References: Earth Trends Data[1] About "Based on the World Resources series, EarthTrends is a free on-line resource that highlights the environmental, social, and economic trends that shape our world. The site offers the public a comprehensive collection of vital statistics, maps, and graphics for more than 200 countries. Much of the environmental information on the internet is fragmented, buried, or only available at a price. EarthTrends gathers data from more than 40 of the world's leading statistical agencies, along with

198

Origin of two differentiation trends in the Emeishan flood basalts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Both the Bowen and Fenner differentiation trends have been recognized in the ... , the lavas from Guizhou evolved along the Fenner trend leading to the magmas with high...2O3 (23%) and low SiO2 (44%) contents. Th...

Yigang Xu; Houjun Mei; Jifeng Xu; Xiaolong Huang; Yuejun Wang

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Economic Growth Policies & Economic Growth Theory Influences.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The aim of this thesis is to describe the presence of theories for economic growth in municipalities economic growth strategies, and to compare the (more)

Hallden, Sophie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

TRENDS Working Paper 05-03 1 Trends in Old-Age Functioning and Disability in Japan:1993-2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;TRENDS Working Paper 05-03 1 Trends in Old-Age Functioning and Disability in Japan:1993 Working Paper 05-03 2 Trends in Old-Age Functioning and Disability in Japan:1993-2002 Abstract Disability with those found in the US. Japan is an especially interesting country because its age structure

Shyy, Wei

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trends output growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Is water security necessary? An empirical analysis of the effects of climate hazards on national-level economic growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...extremes leads to risk aversion and a...counterproductive reduction in investment, leading to a...industrial output, investment growth and political stability to all...infrastructure investment is by nature too risky. The greater risk, however, probably...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

UNEP Global Trends in Sustainable Energy Investment 2009 Report | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNEP Global Trends in Sustainable Energy Investment 2009 Report UNEP Global Trends in Sustainable Energy Investment 2009 Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNEP Global Trends in Sustainable Energy Investment 2009 Report Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Sector: Energy Topics: Market analysis, Finance Website: sefi.unep.org/fileadmin/media/sefi/docs/publications/Global_Trends_200 References: UNEP Global Trends in Sustainable Energy Investment 2009 Report[1] TABLE OF CONTENTS Foreword ................................................................................................................ 5 List of Figures ....................................................................................................... 7 Methodology and Definitions ...................................................................................

203

Trends Online: A Compendium of Data on Global Change  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Data records are presented in multipage formats, each dealing with a specific site, region, or emissions species. The data records include tables; graphs; discussions of methods for collecting, measuring, and reporting the data; trends in the data, and references to literature providing further information. Instructions for citing specific data in Trends Online are provided for each compiled data set. All data appearing in Trends Online are available, on request, on digital media from CDIAC at no cost. [Copied from the Abstract to Trends Online at http://cdiac.ornl.gov/trends/abstract.htm

204

Status and Trend of Automotive Power Packaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comprehensive requirements in aspects of cost, reliability, efficiency, form factor, weight, and volume for power electronics modules in modern electric drive vehicles have driven the development of automotive power packaging technology intensively. Innovation in materials, interconnections, and processing techniques is leading to enormous improvements in power modules. In this paper, the technical development of and trends in power module packaging are evaluated by examining technical details with examples of industrial products. The issues and development directions for future automotive power module packaging are also discussed.

Liang, Zhenxian [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Trends in Utility Green Pricing Programs (2005)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report presents year-end 2005 data on utility green pricing programs, and examines trends in consumer response and program implementation over time. The data in this report, which were obtained via a questionnaire distributed to utility green pricing program managers, can be used by utilities to benchmark the success of their green power programs. It is important to note that this report covers only a portion of voluntary markets for renewable energy. It does not cover green power sold by independent marketers except for cases in which the marketers work in conjunction with utilities or default electricity suppliers.

206

Combining frequency and time domain approaches to systems with multiple spike train input and output  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between neuronal spike trains. Prog Biophys Mol Biol Vapnikto systems with multiple spike train input and output D. R.Keywords Multiple spike trains Neural coding Maximum

Brillinger, D. R.; Lindsay, K. A.; Rosenberg, J. R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

On using transputers to design the header and output processors for the PSi architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the complexity associatecl with general soft ware. From Upper Layer Needer Processor From Lower Leyei' Input Bus Concoction Processor Connection Processor 256 CP's Output Bus To Upper Layer Output Processor To Lower Layer Fig. 2. d. Block... yer From Lower Layer T2 T3 To Input Bus of CP's From Output Bus of CF's From Output Bus of Cfes Fig, 4. 1. e. Block diagram of Design I transputers has its own private memory. Tl acts as the header processor. Two of its serial links...

Manickam, Muralidhar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

208

A CSP Timed Input-Output Relation and a Strategy for Mechanised Conformance Verification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Here we propose a timed input-output conformance relation (named CSPTIO) based on the process algebra CSP. In contrast to other relations, CSPTIO...

Gustavo Carvalho; Augusto Sampaio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

FORMALIZATION OF INPUT AND OUTPUT IN MODERN OPERATING SYSTEMS: THE HADLEY MODEL.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??We present the Hadley model, a formal descriptive model of input and output for modern computer operating systems. Our model is intentionally inspired by the (more)

Gerber, Matthew

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Cavity dumping versus stationary output coupling in repetitively Q-switched solid-state lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comparative theoretical analysis of continuously pumped actively Q-switched solid-state lasers differing in output coupling methods (cavity dumping versus a partially transmitting...

Grishin, Mikhail

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Eyeball Growth  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Eyeball Growth Eyeball Growth Name: Jade Hawk Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Okay, I know I'm supposed to be able to answer questions here, but a friend who teaches grades 7 & 8 general science wants to know if the human eyeball is fully grown at birth. I checked my references, which are rather limited when it comes to human physiology, and found nothing. Can anyone help? Replies: The eye will still develop in size, pigmentation, and neurologically but I don't have the details here at hand. A kitten is born with eyes even more immature than human babies. Besides having sealed eyes that take about a week to open, they have retinas that a avascularized and need to undergo neovascularization to properly nourish and oxygenate the tissue. We have used the kitten to study retinopathy of prematurity, a condition caused in part by increased inspired oxygen. The kitten is also used in the study of diabetic retinopathy which a I think is the leading cause of blindness in the US. Look up publications by Dale Phelps, MD.

212

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #640: September 13, 2010 Monthly Trends  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0: September 13, 0: September 13, 2010 Monthly Trends in Vehicle Miles of Travel to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #640: September 13, 2010 Monthly Trends in Vehicle Miles of Travel on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #640: September 13, 2010 Monthly Trends in Vehicle Miles of Travel on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #640: September 13, 2010 Monthly Trends in Vehicle Miles of Travel on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #640: September 13, 2010 Monthly Trends in Vehicle Miles of Travel on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #640: September 13, 2010 Monthly Trends in Vehicle Miles of Travel on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #640: September 13, 2010 Monthly Trends in Vehicle Miles of Travel on

213

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #599: November 30, 2009 Historical Trend  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9: November 30, 9: November 30, 2009 Historical Trend for Light Vehicle Sales to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #599: November 30, 2009 Historical Trend for Light Vehicle Sales on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #599: November 30, 2009 Historical Trend for Light Vehicle Sales on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #599: November 30, 2009 Historical Trend for Light Vehicle Sales on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #599: November 30, 2009 Historical Trend for Light Vehicle Sales on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #599: November 30, 2009 Historical Trend for Light Vehicle Sales on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #599: November 30, 2009 Historical Trend for Light Vehicle Sales on

214

Trends in cobalt-60 research in nuclear science and technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper quantitatively analyses the growth and development of cobalt-60 research in nuclear science and technology in terms of publications. As per the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) database during 2000-2007, a total of 5874 publications were published. The highest number of papers in a year (896) was in 2002. The average number of publications per year was 734.25. China topped the list with 960 (14.96%) publications followed by Japan with 600 (9.35%), India with 463 (7.21%), Brazil with 339 (5.28%), and the Russian Federation with 266 (4.14%). The authorship and collaboration trend is towards multiauthored papers. Researchers in China, Japan, the Russian Federation and the USA were inclined to work in larger groups. The highly productive institutions were Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India, with 260 publications; Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Brazil with 151 publications; and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), Japan with 94 publications. The journals most preferred by scientists for the publication of papers were Acta Agriculturae Nucleatae Sinica with 183 publications, followed by Chinese Journal of Radiological Medicine and Protection with 182 publications and Radiation Physics and Chemistry with 175 publications.

Anil Sagar; B.S. Kademani; R.G. Garg; Vijai Kumar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

New England Wind Forum: Cost Trends  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Cost Trends Cost Trends Figure 1: Cost of Energy and Cumulative Domestic Capacity This graph shows how the cumulative domestic wind capacity (MW) has increased since 1980, while the cost of energy from wind power has declined by a factor of approximately 20 times during the same period but has increased slightly since 2001. Click on the image to view a larger version. This graph shows how the cumulative domestic wind capacity (MW) has increased since 1980, while the cost of energy from wind power has declined by a factor of approximately 20 times during the same period but has increased slightly since 2001. View a larger version of the graph. Overall, the wind industry is experiencing long-term decreases in the cost to produce wind-generated electricity (Figure 1), despite recent short-term increases in upfront equipment costs. Even in the short term, however, the effect of increases in up-front capital costs on the cost of energy from wind power projects has been dampened by improvements in energy capture from the wind and decreases in operating and maintenance costs.

216

Recent Trends in Crude Oil Stock Levels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J J 0 280 300 320 340 360 380 400 420 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Average Range: 1993-1995 Recent Trends in Crude Oil Stock Levels by Aileen A. Bohn Energy Information Administration (EIA) data for March 1996 primary inventories of crude oil were the lowest recorded in almost 20 years. Crude oil inventories, which were generally on a downward trend since the beginning of 1995, fell below the average range in July 1995 and have yet to recover (Figure FE1). On September 27, 1996, crude oil stocks registered 303 million barrels, compared to a normal range of nearly 311 to 332 million barrels for September. 1 Low crude oil inventories can cause price volatility in crude oil markets. 2 When inventories are low, refiners resort to

217

Development and trends in HVOF spraying technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three actual trends in development of HVOF spraying technology are described and discussed. The trends concern application fields as well as gun and feedstock characteristics. At the example of demountable draw bars it is shown that HVOF sprayed cermet coatings are capable to protect light weight material components subject to dynamical load against wear without detraction of fatigue strength. Personnel and production time savings can be exploited. High deposition efficiency at considerable powder feed rate, high density and negligible oxygen content in corrosion protective iron or nickel based coatings is achieved for spraying with newly developed HVOF guns operating at increased combustion chamber pressures. Also spraying of highly reactive materials like titanium under atmospheric conditions becomes feasible. A major obstacle for industrial use of respective coatings is the lack of adapted characterisation methods that permit to ascertain corrosion protective function. Ultrafine powder feedstock is used in order to reduce overall costs of wear protective cermet coatings due to the possibility to finish coatings by comparatively cheap belt grinding. However, it is shown that the replacement of coatings produced with conventional powder size fractions requires careful consideration of the particular tribological system. While cermet coatings produced with ultrafine powders outperform conventional coatings for sliding wear conditions, their capability to withstand dry abrasive wear stress is poor. The benefits concerning coating production costs may be outweighed by significantly decreased component life time.

Bernhard Wielage; Andreas Wank; Hanna Pokhmurska; Thomas Grund; Christian Rupprecht; Guido Reisel; Eduard Friesen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

World population and energy growth: Impact on the Caribbean and the roles of energy efficiency improvements and renewable energies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper briefly describes population and energy use trends and their consequences, particularly to the Caribbean region. Historical trends for transitional countries show a decrease in population growth rate as annual per capita commercial energy use increases. If trends continue, an increase in per capita energy will be important to stabilizing populations of transitional countries. Energy efficiency improvements, the role of fossil energy, and the use of alternative energy sources in Caribbean nations are briefly discussed. 6 refs., 3 figs.

Sheffield, J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Design of fast output sampling feedback control for smart structure model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the problem of modelling and output feedback control design for a smart structural system using piezoelectric material as a sensor/actuator is addressed. The model for a smart cantilever beam is developed by the finite element method. ... Keywords: output feedback, smart structure, vibration control

M. Umapathy; B. Bandyopadhyay

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Estimating Solar PV Output Using Modern Space/Time Geostatistics (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation describes a project that uses mapping techniques to predict solar output at subhourly resolution at any spatial point, develop a methodology that is applicable to natural resources in general, and demonstrate capability of geostatistical techniques to predict the output of a potential solar plant.

Lee, S. J.; George, R.; Bush, B.

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trends output growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

PWM Inverter Output Filter Cost to Losses Trade Off and Optimal Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PWM Inverter Output Filter Cost to Losses Trade Off and Optimal Design Robert J. Pasterczyk Jean--This paper describes how to design the output filter of a PWM inverter used in a Uninterruptible Power SupplyVA 3-ph. PWM inverter is taken as example. B. Design Constraints Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

222

Quality assurance of solar thermal systems with the ISFH-Input/Output-Procedure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Supplementary sensors may be necessary for some special solar systems (e. g. solar systems with several storagesQuality assurance of solar thermal systems with the ISFH- Input/Output-Procedure Peter Paerisch/Output-Controllers for in situ and automatic function control of solar thermal systems that were developed within the research

223

A Method of Decreasing Power Output Fluctuation of Solar Chimney Power Generating Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Severe fluctuation of power output is a common problem in the various generating systems of renewable energies. The hybrid energy storage system with water and soil is adopted to decrease the fluctuation of solar chimney power generating systems in the ... Keywords: Solar chimney power generating system, power output fluctuation, hybrid energy storage layer, collector, chimney

Meng Fanlong; Ming Tingzhen; Pan Yuan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Statistical post processing of model output from the air quality model LOTOS-EUROS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistical post processing of model output from the air quality model LOTOS-EUROS Annemiek processing of model output from the air quality model LOTOS-EUROS Author: Annemiek Pijnappel Supervisor summary Air quality forecasts are produced routinely, focusing on concentrations of polluting gases

Stoffelen, Ad

225

Optimizing the Output of a Human-Powered Energy Harvesting System with Miniaturization and Integrated Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Optimizing the Output of a Human-Powered Energy Harvesting System with Miniaturization mechanical energy from human foot-strikes and explore its configuration and control towards optimized energy output. Dielectric Elastomers (DEs) are high-energy density, soft, rubber-like material

Potkonjak, Miodrag

226

Optimization on Solar Panels: Finding the Optimal Output Brian Y. Lu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization on Solar Panels: Finding the Optimal Output Brian Y. Lu January 1, 2013 1 Introduction of solar panel: Routing the configuration between solar cells with a switch matrix. However, their result models and control policies for the optimal output of solar panels. The smallest unit on a solar panel

Lavaei, Javad

227

Growth and response of whitebrush to 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid as conditioned by available soil moisture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S ......................................... 10 R E S U L T S ...................................................... .. lb Periodicity of Plant Growth ........... . ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? 1^ Gross Responses of Nursery Plants .......................... 1^ Trends in Various Constituents at Time... ........................................... .. 19 C a l c i u m ............... .................? ? ? ? ? ? ? 20 M a g n e s i u m ............................ .. 20 B o r o n .................................................. 20 Trends in Various Plant Constituents Following Treatment...

McCully, Wayne Gunter

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

228

Building Integrated Photovoltaics: New trends and Challenges'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2015 with an about more than 10% growth Solar Cell Glass Market #12;PV Technologies 2000 20302010 2020 for photovoltaics solar energy technology Edition September 2011, by EUPV platform #12;The built environment terrestrial solar PV market. #12;The solar cell glass market showed 6.8% degrowth in 2012 over last year

Painter, Kevin

229

Organic Trends Where are we headed??  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2011 · (2) Nestle s acquisitions of Cadbury (and Green & Black s) in January, 2010, and Sweet Leaf Tea minerals · Enhance water infiltration & holding capacity · Enhance root penetration · Secrete plant growth soil diseases · Detoxify soils · Increase water and nutrient uptake #12;Lime Materials · Calcitic

230

Look taken at coal mining costs and trends for the 1980s  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author examines the trends in US bituminous coal production and consumption over the past 40 years, and then looks at the growth rates than can be expected for the rest of the 1980s. Increases are likely to be substantial in absolute terms, although nominal when expressed as a percentage. Surface minable reserves in the eastern US are rapidly being depleted, so that underground mining will gain in importance in these regions. A significant contribution to supplying increased domestic coal consumption will eventually come from new longwall mines in the Illinois Basin and northern Appalachia.

Weir, J.P.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Status and trends of geothermal direct use projects in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States is continuing to experience a significant growth rate in the use of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal resources for direct use applications, which is making an increasing contribution to the United States energy demands. This paper provides an overview of how and where geothermal energy is being used, the extent of that use, and what the development trends and concerns appear to be. The applications discussed include industrial processes, heat pumps (heating and cooling), pools and spas, aquaculture and agriculture applications, and space and district heating projects. 3 tabs.

Lunis, B.C.; Lienau, P.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Predicting the Energy Output of Wind Farms Based on Weather Data: Important Variables and their Correlation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind energy plays an increasing role in the supply of energy world-wide. The energy output of a wind farm is highly dependent on the weather condition present at the wind farm. If the output can be predicted more accurately, energy suppliers can coordinate the collaborative production of different energy sources more efficiently to avoid costly overproductions. With this paper, we take a computer science perspective on energy prediction based on weather data and analyze the important parameters as well as their correlation on the energy output. To deal with the interaction of the different parameters we use symbolic regression based on the genetic programming tool DataModeler. Our studies are carried out on publicly available weather and energy data for a wind farm in Australia. We reveal the correlation of the different variables for the energy output. The model obtained for energy prediction gives a very reliable prediction of the energy output for newly given weather data.

Vladislavleva, Katya; Neumann, Frank; Wagner, Markus

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Method for leveling the power output of an electromechanical battery as a function of speed  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a method of leveling the power output of an electromechanical battery during its discharge, while at the same time maximizing its power output into a given load. The method employs the concept of series resonance, employing a capacitor the parameters of which are chosen optimally to achieve the desired near-flatness of power output over any chosen charged-discharged speed ratio. Capacitors are inserted in series with each phase of the windings to introduce capacitative reactances that act to compensate the inductive reactance of these windings. This compensating effect both increases the power that can be drawn from the generator before inductive voltage drops in the windings become dominant and acts to flatten the power output over a chosen speed range. The values of the capacitors are chosen so as to optimally flatten the output of the generator over the chosen speed range. 3 figs.

Post, R.F.

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

234

Energy Project Incentive Funds: Updates and Trends  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Incentive Funds Project Incentive Funds Updates and Trends Elizabeth Stuart Lawrence Berkeley National Lab FUPWG Spring Meeting - April 20, 2011 EE Funding Overview * Ratepayer-funded EE budget $5.3B in 2010 - Plus over $1B for DR/LM and $1.5B for renewables * Expected to reach $6B for EE in 2011 - Nearly double the 2008 figure ($3.1B) * Strong expansion expected to 2020 - Total expected to reach $7.5-12.4B (EE only) * It's not just the usual suspects anymore - Recent entrants: NM, MI, NC, AR, VA, OH, PA, IN... EE Funding - Current Picture * ~ 45 states have ratepayer-funded EE * 2010 budget (EE only) $5.3B (source: CEE) - $4.4B in 2009, $3.1B in 2008 and $0.8B in 1998 - ~ 80% on electric side ($4.3B); ~20% for gas EE

235

Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption This report presents an analysis of residential natural gas consumption trends in the United States through 2009 and analyzes consumption trends for the United States as a whole (1990 through 2009) and for each Census Division (1998 through 2009). It examines a long-term downward per- customer consumption trend and analyzes whether this trend persists across Census Divisions. The report also examines some of the factors that have contributed to the decline in per-customer consumption. To provide a more meaningful measure of per-customer consumption, EIA adjusted consumption data presented in the report for weather. Questions or comments on the contents of this article should be directed to Lejla Alic at Lejla.Alic@eia.doe.gov or (202) 586-0858.

236

IEA Renewables in Southeast Asian Countries: Trends and Potentials | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southeast Asian Countries: Trends and Potentials Southeast Asian Countries: Trends and Potentials Jump to: navigation, search Name IEA Renewables in Southeast Asian Countries: Trends and Potentials Agency/Company /Organization International Energy Agency Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Biomass, Transportation Topics Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Publications Website http://www.iea.org/papers/2010 Country Indonesia, Thailand, Philippines, Vietnam, Singapore, Malaysia, Brunei, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar UN Region South-Eastern Asia References IEA Renewables in Southeast Asian Countries: Trends and Potentials[1] "A main focus of the report investigates the potentials and barriers for scaling up market penetration of renewable energy technologies (RETs) in

237

Price, costs and income trends for New Zealand pastoral farms.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An investigation of inflationary adjusted historical price trends of New Zealand pastoral farmers??? income and expenses over the past thirty years was investigated . The (more)

Aitken, Tim

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

ORNL technology transfer continues strong upward trend | ornl...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ron Walli Communications 865.576.0226 ORNL technology transfer continues strong upward trend Mike Paulus, director of Technology Transfer, says initiatives like SPARK have been...

239

TRENDS IN THE ORGANIZATION OF WORK IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Explored in this paper are the potential effects on the American capitalist system of the latest trends in technology and the division of labor.

Kershenbaum, Richard

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Trending and root cause analysis of TWRS radiological problem reports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a uniform method for trending and performing root cause analysis for radiological problem reports at Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS).

Brown, R.L.

1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trends output growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Worldwide Trends in Energy Use and Efficiency: Key Insights from...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

www.iea.orgpapers2008indicators2008.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentworldwide-trends-energy-use-and-effic Language: English Policies:...

242

SciTech Connect: Blade Testing Trends (Presentation)  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Org: Other Non-EERE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 17 WIND ENERGY BLADE TESTING; TRENDS; BIAXIAL TESTING; NATIONAL WIND TECHNOLOGY CENTER; NWTC;...

243

Corporate Clean Energy Investment Trends in Brazil, China, India...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil, China, India and South Africa Jump to: navigation, search Name Corporate Clean Energy Investment Trends in Brazil, China, India and South Africa AgencyCompany...

244

U.S. Solar Market Trends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

2010 marked the emergence of the utility sector photovoltaic market. Utility sector photovoltaic installations quadrupled over 2009 installations. The share of utility sector installations of all U.S. grid-connected PV installations grew from virtually none in 2006 to 15 percent in 2009 and 32 percent in 2010. In addition, 2010 saw installation of a 75 MWAC concentrating solar power plant, the largest installed in the U.S. since 1991. In 2010, annual distributed grid-connected PV installations in the United States grew by 62 percent, to 606 MWDC. Photovoltaic arrays were installed at more than 50,000 sites in 2010, a 45 percent increase over the number of installations in 2009. Solar water heating installations increased by 6 percent in 2010, compared with 2009. Solar water heating has shown only two years of higher growth in the last 10 years. Solar pool heating installations increased by 13 percent in 2010, the largest growth in five years.

Larry Sherwood

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 - Market Trends-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 Energy Demand Figure 33. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 34. Primary energy use by fuel, 2005-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Average Energy Use per Person Increases Through 2030 The future path of U.S. energy demand will depend on trends in population, economic growth, energy prices, and technology adoption. AEO2007 cases developed to illustrate the uncertainties associated with those factors include low and high economic growth cases, low and high price cases, and

246

Finding the quantum thermoelectric with maximal efficiency and minimal entropy production at given power output  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the nonlinear scattering theory for quantum systems with strong Seebeck and Peltier effects, and consider their use as heat-engines and refrigerators with finite power outputs. This article gives detailed derivations of the results summarized in Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 130601 (2014). It shows how to use the scattering theory to find (i) the quantum thermoelectric with maximum possible power output, and (ii) the quantum thermoelectric with maximum efficiency at given power output. The latter corresponds to a minimal entropy production at that power output. These quantities are of quantum origin since they depend on system size over electronic wavelength, and so have no analogue in classical thermodynamics. The maximal efficiency coincides with Carnot efficiency at zero power output, but decreases with increasing power output. This gives a fundamental lower bound on entropy production, which means that reversibility (in the thermodynamic sense) is impossible for finite power output. The suppression of efficiency by (nonlinear) phonon and photon effects is addressed in detail; when these effects are strong, maximum efficiency coincides with maximum power. Finally, we show in particular limits (typically without magnetic fields) that relaxation within the quantum system does not allow the system to exceed the bounds derived for relaxation-free systems, however a general proof of this remains elusive.

Robert S. Whitney

2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

247

U.S. Solar Market Trends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. solar installations by technology are detailed for 1998???¢????????2005. The growth and state distribution of installations are different for the three primary solar sectors: ???¢???????¢ photovoltaics, ???¢???????¢ solar water heating and space heating, and ???¢???????¢ solar pool heating. Photovoltaic installations have grown steadily. Since 2001, grid-connected installations grew at an average rate of 52%. California has 79% of the installations, with Arizona, New Jersey, New York, Illinois, Massachusetts, and Oregon accounting for most of the remaining installations. The offgrid growth has been steady, but significantly lower. Solar water heating and solar space heating installations have shown little growth since 1997. Hawaii dominates, with 41% of the market. Other states with a large number of installations include Puerto Rico, California, Florida, and Arizona. Solar pool heating accounts for the largest number of installations and has grown at an average rate of 13% since 1997. Installations in California and Florida are 75% of the pool heating market.

Larry Sherwood

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray source assembly and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode having a source spot upon which electrons impinge and a control system for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

Radley, Ian (Glenmont, NY); Bievenue, Thomas J. (Delmar, NY); Burdett, John H. (Charlton, NY); Gallagher, Brian W. (Guilderland, NY); Shakshober, Stuart M. (Hudson, NY); Chen, Zewu (Schenectady, NY); Moore, Michael D. (Alplaus, NY)

2008-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

249

RECENT TRENDS IN EMERGING TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND ENERGY CONSUMPTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abundance of energy can be improved both by developing new sources of fuel and by improving efficiency of energy utilization, although we really need to pursue both paths to improve energy accessibility in the future. Currently, 2.7 billion people or 38% of the world s population do not have access to modern cooking fuel and depend on wood or dung and 1.4 billion people or 20% do not have access to electricity. It is estimated that correcting these deficiencies will require an investment of $36 billion dollars annually through 2030. In growing economies, energy use and economic growth are strongly linked, but energy use generally grows at a lower rate due to increased access to modern fuels and adaptation of modern, more efficient technology. Reducing environmental impacts of increased energy consumption such as global warming or regional emissions will require improved technology, renewable fuels, and CO2 reuse or sequestration. The increase in energy utilization will probably result in increased transportation fuel diversity as fuels are shaped by availability of local resources, world trade, and governmental, environmental, and economic policies. The purpose of this paper is to outline some of the recently emerging trends, but not to suggest winners. This paper will focus on liquid transportation fuels, which provide the highest energy density and best match with existing vehicles and infrastructure. Data is taken from a variety of US, European, and other sources without an attempt to normalize or combine the various data sources. Liquid transportation fuels can be derived from conventional hydrocarbon resources (crude oil), unconventional hydrocarbon resources (oil sands or oil shale), and biological feedstocks through a variety of biochemical or thermo chemical processes, or by converting natural gas or coal to liquids.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Florida Growth Fund (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Florida Growth Fund can provide investments in technology and growth-related companies through co-investments with other institutional investors. The Fund awards preference to companies...

251

World petrochemical outlook: Is the current weakness a trend or an aberration?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the focus of this conference is methanol, a review of the general petrochemical industry might be enlightening and valuable to understanding the methanol market. Methanol is certainly a commodity with similarities to hydrocarbons such as gasoline and similarities to base petrochemicals such as ethylene. Methanol stands with one foot in the fuels market via MTBE and the other in the chemicals business for acetic acid and formaldehyde, among many others. Is the world petrochemical market moving into a new trend of weak prices and profits or is the strong growth seen in 1994 and 1995 continuing and the current situation an aberration? In order to determine whether the current market is a trend or aberration, the author looks at issues that he believes caused the current situation and then considers where the world`s economies and petrochemical markets are heading. The issues discussed are: unusually high price increase in a short period; inventory increase/decrease because of price changes; reduction in demand caused by high prices; increase in capacity caused by high prices; changes in growth of world economies; and political/economic issues in China.

Baggett, P.E. [CMAI, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

11 California Petroleum Supply, Transportation, Refining and Marketing Trends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11 California Petroleum Supply, Transportation, Refining and Marketing Trends Chapter 2 CALIFORNIA PETROLEUM SUPPLY, TRANSPORTATION, REFINING AND MARKETING TRENDS INTRODUCTION California is an integral part of the world oil market as a world-scale petroleum consumer. Historically, about 50 percent of this petroleum

253

7, 1176111796, 2007 Global H2O trends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vapour is the most important natural greenhouse gas in the atmosphere and plays an essential roleACPD 7, 11761­11796, 2007 Global H2O trends from satellite measurements S. Mieruch et al. Title Chemistry and Physics Discussions Analysis of global water vapour trends from satellite measurements

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

254

Trends in Building Energy Usage in Texas State Agencies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

figures for the fiscal years 1981 to 1983. While there is considerable diversity from agency to agency, the trend is toward dramatically higher energy cost per square foot for virtually all agencies. This alarming trend can be partially explained by rising...

Murphy, W. E.; Turner, W. D.; O'Neal, D. L.; Seshan, S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors May 3, 2011 - 3:41pm Addthis Oak Ridge, Tenn. - Today the Department of Energy dedicated the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), an advanced research facility that will accelerate the advancement of nuclear reactor technology. CASL researchers are using supercomputers to study the performance of light water reactors and to develop highly sophisticated modeling that will help accelerate upgrades at existing U.S. nuclear plants. These upgrades could improve the energy output of our existing reactor fleet by as much as seven reactors' worth at a fraction of the cost of building new reactors, while providing continued improvements in

256

Ensemble regression : using ensemble model output for atmospheric dynamics and prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ensemble regression (ER) is a linear inversion technique that uses ensemble statistics from atmospheric model output to make dynamical inferences and forecasts. ER defines a multivariate regression operator using ensemble ...

Gombos, Daniel (Daniel Lawrence)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Primate Motor Cortex: Individual and Ensemble Neuron-Muscle Output Relationships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The specific aims of this study were to: 1) investigate the encoding of forelimb muscle activity timing and magnitude by corticomotoneuronal (CM) cells, 2) test the stability of primary motor cortex (M1) output to forelimb ...

Griffin, Darcy Michelle

2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

258

Augmentation of Power Output of Axisymmetric Ducted Wind Turbines by Porous Trailing Edge Disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents analytical and experimental results that demonstrated that the power output from a ducted wind turbine can be dramatically increased by the addition of a trailing edge device such as a porous disk. In ...

widnall, sheila

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

259

A Hardware Implementation of the Soft Output Viterbi Algorithm for Serially Concatenated Convolutional Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis outlines the hardware design of a soft output Viterbi algorithm decoder for use in a serially concatenated convolutional code system. Convolutional codes and their related structures are described, as well as the algorithms used...

Werling, Brett William

2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

260

Code design for multiple-input multiple-output broadcast channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent information theoretical results indicate that dirty-paper coding (DPC) achieves the entire capacity region of the Gaussian multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) broadcast channel (BC). This thesis presents practical code designs for Gaussian...

Uppal, Momin Ayub

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trends output growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Cardiac output and stroke volume estimation using a hybrid of three models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cardiac output (CO) and stroke volume (SV) are the key hemodynamic parameters to be monitored and assessed in ambulatory and critically ill patients. The purpose of this study was to introduce and validate a new algorithm ...

Arai, Tatsuya

262

Power output enhancement of a vibration-driven electret generator for wireless sensor applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We developed a compact vibration-driven electret generator that excelled at a power output. It succeeded in the operation of wireless sensor modules only on electricity from electret generators. This electret generator can supply enough power to operate a wireless sensor module without an external power source. It was necessary for enabling this operation to enhance the power output of the electret generator. We enhanced the power output by decreasing the parasitic capacitance. To decrease the parasitic capacitance, we fabricated a collector substrate using concave electrodes. We decreased it from 25 to 17 pF. As a result, the power output from our generator was enhanced from 40 to 100 W considerably at an acceleration of 0.15 g (1.47 m s?2) and a resonance frequency of 30 Hz.

Tatsuakira Masaki; Kenji Sakurai; Toru Yokoyama; Masayo Ikuta; Hiroshi Sameshima; Masashi Doi; Tomonori Seki; Masatoshi Oba

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Variable-Speed Wind Generator System with Maximum Output Power Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To achieve maximum output power from wind generator systems, the rotational speed of wind generators should be adjusted in real time according to natural wind speed. This chapter pays attention to an optimum rota...

Yoko Amano

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Total Pollution Effect and Total Energy Cost per Output of Different Products for Polish Industrial System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For many years a broad use has been made of the indices of total energy requirements in the whole large production system corresponding to unit output of particular goods (Boustead I., Hancock G.F., 1979). The...

Henryk W. Balandynowicz

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool Agency/Company /Organization: National Energy Technology Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.netl.doe.gov/energy-analyses/refshelf/results.asp?ptype=Models/Too References: NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool [1] NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool This interactive tool enables the user to look at both total and power sector CO2 emissions from the use of coal, oil, or natural gas, over the period 1990 to 2030. One can use the tool to compare five of the larger CO2 emitters to each other or to overall world emissions. The data are from the

266

Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility Industry | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Trends in the Electric Utility Industry Trends in the Electric Utility Industry Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility Industry Section 1101 of the U.S. Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT)1 calls for a report on the current trends in the workforce of (A) skilled technical personnel that support energy technology industries, and (B) electric power and transmission engineers. It also requests that the Secretary make recommendations (as appropriate) to meet the future labor requirements. Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility Industry More Documents & Publications Statement of Patricia A. Hoffman, Deputy Director of Research and Development and Acting Chief Operating Officer, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability, Department of Energy before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources United States

267

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Trends in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace The addition of commercial buildings and floorspace from 1995 to 1999 continued the general trends noted since 1979 (Figures 1 and 2). The size of the commercial buildings has grown steadily over the twenty years of CBECS. Each year more buildings are added to the sector (new construction or conversion of pre-existing buildings to commercial activity) than are removed (demolition or conversion to non-commercial activity). The definition for the commercial buildings population was changed for the 1995 CBECS which resulted in a slightly smaller buildings population and accounts for the data break in both Figures 1 and 2 (see report "Trends in the Commercial Buildings Sector" for complete details). Figure 1. Total Commercial Buildings, 1979 to 1999

268

Energy scarcity and economic growth reconsidered  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The analysis in this paper is concerned with the effect of energy scarcity on economic growth in the United States. After defining the notion of scarcity and introducing two measures of scarcity - unit costs and relative energy price - changes in the trend in resource scarcity for natural gas, bituminous coals, anthracite coal, and crude oil over the most recent three decades are investigated. Each of the energy resources became significantly more scarce resources during the decade of the 1970s in the Malthusian Stock Scarcity and Malthusian Flow Scarcity sense. Unit costs exhibit a similar change for natural gas and crude oil but not for bituminous coal and anthracite coal. The situation reversed itself during the 1980s. Natural gas, bituminous coal, anthracite coal, and crude oil all became significantly less scarce resources during the decade of the 1980s than they had been during the 1970s. That is, the increase in scarcity as measured by relative energy prices observed during the decade of the) 1970s was not reversed completely during the 1980s for natural gas and crude oil. Unit costs for natural gas and crude oil demonstrate analogous patterns and test results. Given that change has taken place, it has implications for future economic growth to the extent resource scarcity and economic growth are interrelated. To see whether this is a relevant concern, subsequent to the examination of changing resource scarcity trends, an objective effort is made to identify a long run equilibrium relationship between energy scarcity and economic growth. Relying on cointegration techniques, only for crude oil is there a suggestion that resource scarcity has affected economic growth in the United States over the period 1889-1992.

Noel D. Uri

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Trends in Occupational Fatalities and Industry Growth for Construction Industry in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sets. Some countries like Finland, Spain, and Switzerland exclude self-employed workers while Australia, Germany, Italy, and United States including all the workers when counting the deaths. In addition, countries have different coverage periods... for the work related deaths. For example; Australia, Finland, and Switzerland define the deaths if it occurs within one year. Germany and Spain count the work related deaths if it happens within a month, whereat united States, Italy, Norway have...

Dogan, Yildirim

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

270

the Congo BasinDeforestation Trends in the Congo Basin Reconciling Economic Growth and Forest Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work is a product of the staff of The World Bank with external contributions. Note that The World Bank does not necessarily own each component of the content included in the work. The World Bank therefore does not warrant that the use of the content contained in the work will not infringe on the rights of third parties. The risk of claims resulting from such infringement rests solely with you. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this work do not necessarily reflect the views of The World Bank, its Board of Executive Directors, or the governments they represent. The World Bank does not guarantee the accuracy of the data included in this work. The boundaries, colors, denominations, and other information shown on any map in this work do not imply any judgment on the part of The World Bank concerning the legal status of any territory or the endorsement or acceptance of such boundaries. Nothing herein shall constitute or be considered to be a limitation upon or waiver of the privileges and immunities of The World Bank, all of which are specifically reserved. Rights and Permissions This work is available under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license (CC BY 3.0)

unknown authors

271

Growth of Indian microfinance : a case-study-based review of trends and challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The microfinance industry in India experienced extraordinary evolution throughout the 1990s and into the new century, and it is now entering a new phase of rapid expansion. But there is still a huge gap between the demand ...

Maroju, Venkateshwarlu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Imprinting a complete information about a quantum channel on its output state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a novel property of bipartite quantum states, which we call "faithfulness", and we say that a state is faithful when acting with a channel on one of the two quantum systems, the output state carries a complete information about the channel. The concept of faithfulness can also be extended to sets of states, when the output states patched together carry a complete imprinting of the channel.

Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano; Paoloplacido Lo Presti

2002-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

273

Modelling Dynamic Constraints in Electricity Markets and the Costs of Uncertain Wind Output  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shifts between periods. Finally, higher variable costs, incurred if power stations are operated below their optimal rating, are allocated to the locally lowest de- mand. For inflexible power stations like nuclear, combined cycle gas turbines or coal... the start of the station has to be decided several hours before delivering output. At the earlier time there is still uncertainty about the future demand, possible failures of power stations and predictions for wind-output. We represent the uncertainty...

Musgens, Felix; Neuhoff, Karsten

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

274

Training and Research Experiences in Nonlinear DynamicsTraining and Research Experiences in Nonlinear Dynamics TREND 2004TREND 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training and Research Experiences in Nonlinear DynamicsTraining and Research Experiences Shew, Santiago Triana, Daniel Zimmerman, and John Rodgers #12;Training and Research Experiences in Nonlinear DynamicsTraining and Research Experiences in Nonlinear Dynamics TREND 2004TREND 2004 Our Goals: u

Anlage, Steven

275

Training and Research Experiences in Nonlinear DynamicsTraining and Research Experiences in Nonlinear Dynamics TREND 2003TREND 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training and Research Experiences in Nonlinear DynamicsTraining and Research Experiences, Woodrow Shew, Daniel Sisan, Santiago Triana, Daniel Zimmerman #12;Training and Research Experiences in Nonlinear DynamicsTraining and Research Experiences in Nonlinear Dynamics TREND 2003TREND 2003 Our Goal: u

Anlage, Steven

276

The effect of small field output factor measurements on IMRT dosimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate how changes in the measured small field output factors affect the doses in intensity-modulated treatment planning. Methods: IMRT plans were created using Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The plans were optimized to treat a cylindrical target 2 cm in diameter and 2 cm in length. Output factors for 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 and 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 cm{sup 2} field sizes were changed by {+-}5%, {+-}10%, and {+-}20% increments from the baseline measurements and entered into the planning system. The treatment units were recommissioned in the treatment planning system after each modification of the output factors and treatment plans were reoptimized. All plans were delivered to a solid water phantom and dose measurements were made using an ionization chamber. The percentage differences between measured and computed doses were calculated. An Elekta Synergy and a Varian 2300CD linear accelerator were separately evaluated. Results: For the Elekta unit, decreasing the output factors resulted in higher measured than computed doses by 0.8% for -5%, 3.6% for -10%, and 8.7% for -20% steps. Increasing the output factors resulted in lower doses by 2.9% for +5%, 5.4% for +10%, and 8.3% for +20% steps. For the Varian unit no changes were observed for either increased or decreased output factors. Conclusions: The measurement accuracy of small field output factors are of importance especially when the treatment plan consists of small segments as in IMRT. The method proposed here could be used to verify the accuracy of the measured small field output factors for certain linear accelerators as well as to test the beam model. The Pinnacle treatment planning system model uses output factors as a function of jaw setting. Consequently, plans using the Elekta unit, which conforms the jaws to the segments, are sensitive to small field measurement accuracy. On the other hand, for the Varian unit, jaws are fixed and segments are modeled as blocked fields hence, the impact of small field output factors on IMRT monitor unit calculation is not evaluable by this method.

Azimi, Rezvan; Alaei, Parham; Higgins, Patrick [Department of Therapeutic Radiology-Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

The effect of performance-based research funding on output of R&D results in the Czech Republic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have studied the effects of performance-based research funding introduced to the Czech (CZ) R&D system in 2008 on outputs of R&D results. We have analyzed annual changes in number of various types of publications and applications including ... Keywords: Bibliometrics, Citation analysis, Patent output, Performance-based research funding, R&D results output

Jiri Vanecek

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

U.S. Solar Market Trends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grid-connected photovoltaic installations grew by 60% in 2006. California and New Jersey have the largest markets and installations more than doubled in New Jersey, Nevada, Colorado, Connecticut, and many other states with smaller markets. The off-grid growth has been steady, but significantly lower. For the first time in more than a decade, a solar thermal electric plant was installed in 2006. More than 350 MW installed in the 1990's still generates electricity today. Solar water heating and solar space heating installations grew in 2006 after years offlat installation numbers. Hawaii dominates this market, with nearly half of the market. Solar pool heating accounts for the largest number of installations and has grown at an average rate of 10% since 1998. However, installations decreased by 7% in 2006. Installations in California and Florida together are 73% of the pool heating market.

Larry Sherwood

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Carbon dioxide emissions, impact on Malaysia's manufacturing productivity growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The methods used to measure productivity growth generally ignore the pollutants that are produced by the industrial processes. For example, pollutant emissions generated as undesirable output, apart from the main output of Malaysia's manufacturing sector, are excluded from the productivity accounting framework. This study aims at an extended productivity measure that takes pollutants into account by internalisation of Carbon dioxide (CO2) as a measure of air pollutant emissions into the production function, as an unpriced input. The results show that there was a slowdown in the contribution of total factor productivity (TFP) growth in general, and a negative impact of CO2 emissions produced by the sector in particular, compared to other productivity indicators of the sector when CO2 is internalised in the models.

Elsadig Musa Ahmed

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Trends in emissions of acidifying species in Asia, 1985-1997.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acid deposition is a serious problem throughout much of Asia. Emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) have been increasing steadily, as nations strive to increase their levels of economic development. Coal and fuel oil have been the main choices for powering industrial development; and, until recently, only a few countries (notably Japan and Taiwan) had taken significant steps to avert the atmospheric emissions that accompany fuel combustion. This paper discusses trends in emissions of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} that have occurred in Asian countries in the period 1985--1997, using results from the RAINS-ASIA computer model and energy-use trends from the IEA Energy Statistics and Balances database. Emissions of SO{sub 2} in Asia grew from 26.6 Tg in 1985 to 33.7 Tg in 1990 and to 39.2 Tg in 1997. Though SO{sub 2} emissions used to grow as fast as fossil-fuel use, recent limitations on the sulfur content of coal and oil have slowed the growth. The annual-average emissions growth between 1990 and 1997 was only 1.1%, considerably less than the economic growth rate. Emissions of NO{sub x}, on the other hand, continue to grow rapidly, from 14.1 Tg in 1985 to 18.7 Tg in 1990 and 28.5 Tg in 1997, with no signs of abating. Thus, though SO{sub 2} remains the major contributor to acidifying emissions in Asia, the role of NO{sub x}, will become more and more important in the future.

Streets, D. G.; Tsai, N. Y.; Akimoto, H.; Oka, K.

2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trends output growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Economy and Electricity Demand Growth Linked but ƒƒƒ.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Economy and Electricity Demand Economy and Electricity Demand Growth Linked but ... for International Utility Conference, Demand Trends Panel March 12, 2013 | London, UK by Adam Sieminski, Administrator U. S. electricity use and economic growth, 1950-2040 Adam Sieminski, EEI Demand Trends, March 12, 2013 2 -2% 0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% 14% 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 Percent growth, 3-year rolling average Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release History Projections 2011 Electricity Use GDP 2.4% 0.9% 2011 - 2040 average Annual energy use of a new refrigerator, 1950-2008 Adam Sieminski, EEI Demand Trends, March 12, 2013 3 Kilowatthours per year Source: DOE / EERE - Building Technologies Office 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800

282

U.S. Railroad Safety Statistics and Trends  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Railroad Safety Statistics and Trends Railroad Safety Statistics and Trends Robert E. Fronczak, P.E. Assistant VP- Environment & Hazmat Association of American Railroads Transportation External Coordination Working Group Meeting September 21, 2005 Railroad Safety: Topics Safety Statistics & Trends Train Safety (Train Accidents) Employee Safety Hazardous Materials Safety U.S. Railroad Safety Statistics: Main Themes Railroads have dramatically improved safety over the last two and a half decades. Railroads compare favorably with other industries & transportation modes. The most troubling railroad safety problems arise from factors largely outside railroad control. Railroads have implemented numerous and effective technological improvements and company-wide safety programs.

283

A numerical method for calculation of power output from ducted vertical axis hydro-current turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper investigates effects of ducting on power output from vertical axis hydro-current turbines. A numerical two-dimensional method based on the potential flow theory is developed for calculation of non-dimensional power output from these turbines. In this method, the blades are represented by vortex filaments. The vortex shedding from the blades is modeled by discrete vortices. A boundary element method is used to incorporate the duct shape which is represented by a series of panels with constant distributions of sources and doublets. The aerodynamic loading on the blades are calculated using a quasi-steady modeling. A time-marching scheme is used for implementation of the numerical method. The results of this method are compared with experimental results for a turbine model. A good correlation between the numerical and experimental results is obtained for tip speed ratios equal and higher than 2.25. However due to a lack of dynamic stall modeling, the numerical method is not able to predict power output accurately at lower tip speed ratios wherein effects of dynamic stall are significant. Both numerical and experimental results also showed that the power output from a turbine can increase significantly when it is enclosed within a well-designed duct. The maximum power output of the turbine model investigated in this paper showed a 74% increase when the turbine is operating within the duct relative to the case it is in free-stream conditions.

Mahmoud Alidadi; Sander Calisal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Economic impacts and challenges of Chinas petroleum industry: An inputoutput analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is generally acknowledged that the petroleum industry plays an important role in Chinas national economic and social development. The direct, indirect, and induced impacts of Chinas petroleum industry are analyzed in this study by using the InputOutput approach. The study also considers the main challenges that Chinas economy might face in the future. The research results suggest the following: (1) The total economic impacts coefficients on output, given each unit of final demands change in extraction of petroleum and processing of petroleum, are 1.9180 and 3.2747 respectively, and the corresponding economic impacts coefficients on GDP are 1.0872 and 0.9001 respectively; (2) Extraction of petroleum has a more direct impact on GDP, while processing of petroleum has a greater effect on the total output; (3) Extraction of petroleums total economic impacts coefficients on both output and GDP have remained stable in recent years after a period of long decline; processing of petroleums total economic impacts coefficient on output is steadily increasing; (4) Import uncertainty, the likelihood of rising oil prices, and net oil exports caused by items manufactured with petroleum products (i.e. Made in China goods) are the main challenges the petroleum industry will cause for Chinas overall economy.

Tang Xu; Zhang Baosheng; Feng Lianyong; Marwan Masri; Afshin Honarvar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Existing Capacity by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts) 4. Existing Capacity by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts) Producer Type Number of Generators Generator Nameplate Capacity Net Summer Capacity Net Winter Capacity Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities 9,624 680,592 621,785 644,358 Independent Power Producers, Non-Combined Heat and Power Plants 6,148 412,045 374,964 389,349 Independent Power Producers, Combined Heat and Power Plants 609 39,916 35,266 38,023 Total 16,381 1,132,554 1,032,015 1,071,729 Commercial and Industrial Sectors Commercial Sector 962 3,610 3,223 3,349 Industrial Sector 1,680 31,832 27,795 29,381 Total 2,642 35,442 31,018 32,730 All Sectors Total 19,023 1,167,995 1,063,033 1,104,459 Notes: In 2011, EIA corrected the NAICS codes of several plants which resulted in a net capacity shift from the electric utility sector to the commercial sector.

286

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. U.S. Transformer Sustained Automatic Outage Counts B. U.S. Transformer Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by High-Voltage Size and NERC Region, 2012 Sustained Automatic Outage Counts High-Side Voltage (kV) Eastern Interconnection TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 100-199 -- -- -- -- 200-299 -- -- 1.00 1.00 300-399 2.00 -- 4.00 6.00 400-599 14.00 -- 11.00 25.00 600+ -- -- -- -- Grand Total 16.00 -- 16.00 32.00 Sustained Automatic Outage Hours High-Side Voltage (kV) Eastern Interconnection TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 100-199 -- -- -- -- 200-299 -- -- 27.58 27.58 300-399 153.25 -- 15.87 169.12 400-599 3,070.88 -- 258.37 3,329.25 600+ -- -- -- -- Grand Total 3,224.13 -- 301.82 3,525.95 Outage Hours per Outage Incident Eastern Interconnection TRE WECC Contiguous U.S.

287

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Coal Consumption at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 6. Coal Consumption at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic",20,52,24,73,83,-12.4 " Pennsylvania",20,52,24,73,83,-12.4 "East North Central",112,197,127,309,331,-6.8 " Illinois",34,45,29,79,66,18.9 " Indiana","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Michigan","w","w","w","w","w","w"

288

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Mine Production Range, 2012" Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Mine Production Range, 2012" ,"Mine Production Range (thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State, Region1","Above 1,000","Above 500","Above 200","Above 100","Above 50","Above 10","Above 0","Zero2","Total Number" "and Mine Type",,"to 1,000","to 500","to 200","to 100","to 50","to 10",,"of Employees" "Alabama",3415,97,655,317,160,224,54,105,5041 " Underground",2981,"-","-","-",36,88,"-",81,3190 " Surface",434,97,655,317,124,136,54,24,1851

289

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" 8. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" "(dollars per short ton)" ,2012,,,2011,,,"Percent Change" "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total" "State" "Alabama",107.73,104.51,106.57,100.17,108.71,102.69,7.6,-3.9,3.8 "Alaska","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arizona","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arkansas","w","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w"

290

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012" Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State and Region1","Continuous2","Conventional and","Longwall4","Total" ,,"Other3" "Alabama",139,20,12410,12570 "Arkansas",96,"-","-",96 "Colorado",757,"-",22889,23646 "Illinois",18969,"-",23868,42837 "Indiana",15565,"-","-",15565 "Kentucky Total",56179,2018,"-",58198 " Kentucky (East)",22090,2010,"-",24100 " Kentucky (West)",34089,9,"-",34098 "Maryland",797,"-","-",797 "Montana","-","-",5708,5708

291

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012" Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012" "(short tons produced per employee hour)" ,"Union",,"Nonunion" "Coal-Producing State and Region1","Underground","Surface","Underground","Surface" "Alabama",1.69,"-",0.66,1.8 "Alaska","-",5.98,"-","-" "Arizona","-",7.38,"-","-" "Arkansas","-","-",0.59,"-" "Colorado",4.9,6.09,6.02,4.45 "Illinois",2.09,"-",5.34,4.7 "Indiana","-","-",3.23,5.41 "Kentucky Total",3.02,2.45,2.36,3.06 " Kentucky (East)","-",2.45,1.64,2.65

292

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Sales Price of U.S. Coal by State and Disposition, 2012" Average Sales Price of U.S. Coal by State and Disposition, 2012" "(dollars per short ton)" "Coal-Producing State","Open Market1","Captive2","Total3" "Alabama",85.06,"-",106.57 "Alaska","w","-","w" "Arizona","w","-","w" "Arkansas","w","-","w" "Colorado",38.51,43.19,37.54 "Illinois",49.04,54.71,53.08 "Indiana",49.16,54.5,52.01 "Kentucky Total",61.85,73.08,63.12 " Kentucky (East)",75.8,73.08,75.62 " Kentucky (West)",48.6,"-",48.67 "Louisiana","w","-","w"

293

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Emissions from Energy Consumption at 5. Emissions from Energy Consumption at Conventional Power Plants and Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants, by State, 2011 and 2012 (Thousand Metric Tons) Census Division and State Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 34,766 37,698 33 58 39 37 Connecticut 8,987 8,196 7 1 12 6 Maine 3,722 4,351 8 12 7 8 Massachusetts 14,346 16,404 15 22 14 14 New Hampshire 4,295 5,127 2 23 4 5 Rhode Island 3,403 3,595 0.03 0.07 2 3 Vermont 12 24 0.05 0.09 1 1 Middle Atlantic 161,786 171,603 275 370 187 203 New Jersey 16,120 16,917 4 5 14 13 New York 35,669 37,256 31 52 40 43 Pennsylvania 109,997 117,430 240 313 133 147

294

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" "(million short tons)" ,2012,,2011 "Coal-Producing","Recoverable Coal","Average Recovery","Recoverable Coal","Average Recovery","Percent Change" "State","Reserves","Percentage","Reserves","Percentage","Recoverable Coal" ,,,,,"Reserves" "Alabama",265,53.63,306,55.39,-13.2 "Alaska","w","w","w","w","w" "Arizona","w","w","w","w","w" "Arkansas","w","w","w","w","w"

295

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: 7. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: Total by End-Use Sector, 2003 - December 2012 (Cents per Kilowatthour) Period Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Annual Totals 2003 8.72 8.03 5.11 7.54 7.44 2004 8.95 8.17 5.25 7.18 7.61 2005 9.45 8.67 5.73 8.57 8.14 2006 10.40 9.46 6.16 9.54 8.90 2007 10.65 9.65 6.39 9.70 9.13 2008 11.26 10.36 6.83 10.74 9.74 2009 11.51 10.17 6.81 10.65 9.82 2010 11.54 10.19 6.77 10.57 9.83 2011 11.72 10.23 6.82 10.46 9.90 2012 11.88 10.09 6.67 10.21 9.84 2010 January 10.49 9.55 6.50 10.17 9.28 February 10.89 9.89 6.55 10.48 9.47 March 11.11 9.95 6.53 10.28 9.48 April 11.71 9.95 6.55 10.52 9.53 May 11.91 10.15 6.64 10.52 9.72

296

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, 2002 - 2012 1. Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, 2002 - 2012 Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Period Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) End of Year Stocks 2002 141,714 43,935 1,711 116,952 29,601 328 24,761 14,334 1,383 2003 121,567 45,752 1,484 97,831 28,062 378 23,736 17,691 1,105 2004 106,669 46,750 937 84,917 29,144 627 21,751 17,607 309 2005 101,137 47,414 530 77,457 29,532 374 23,680 17,882 156 2006 140,964 48,216 674 110,277 29,799 456 30,688 18,416 217

297

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by High-Voltage Size and NERC Region, 2012 Sustained Automatic Outage Counts Voltage Region Type Operating (kV) FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. AC 200-299 142 49 14 141 242 49 -- 484 1,121 AC 300-399 -- 88 107 95 46 56 80 165 637 AC 400-599 9 3 -- 22 86 -- -- 125 245 AC 600+ -- -- 6 9 -- -- -- -- 15 AC Total 151 140 127 267 374 105 80 774 2,018 DC 100-199 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- DC 200-299 -- 18 -- -- -- -- -- 5 23 DC 300-399 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- DC 400-499 -- 5 -- -- -- -- -- -- 5 DC 500-599 -- -- -- 5 -- -- -- 17 22 DC 600+ -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

298

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales Price of Coal by State and Underground Mining Method, 2012" Sales Price of Coal by State and Underground Mining Method, 2012" "(dollars per short ton)" "Coal-Producing State","Continuous1","Conventional and","Longwall3","Total" ,,"Other2" "Alabama","w","-","w",107.73 "Arkansas","w","-","-","w" "Colorado","w","-",37.18,"w" "Illinois",48.08,"-",59.51,54.18 "Indiana",52.94,"-","-",52.94 "Kentucky Total","w","w","-",62.24 " Kentucky (East)","w","w","-",79.23 " Kentucky (West)",50.18,"-","-",50.18

299

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Steam Coal Exports by Customs District" Steam Coal Exports by Customs District" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Customs District","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Eastern Total",4951041,5566950,6554494,10517991,11407664,-7.8 " Baltimore, MD",1275530,831976,1715016,2107506,2852092,-26.1 " Boston, MA",7,"-",12,7,24,-70.8 " Buffalo, NY",1180,1516,2826,2696,5257,-48.7 " New York City, NY",3088,2664,2168,5752,6106,-5.8 " Norfolk, VA",3578715,4697769,4760354,8276484,8443756,-2 " Ogdensburg, NY",36894,3610,3090,40504,6838,492.3 " Philadelphia, PA",55513,29255,34241,84768,56733,49.4

300

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Number of Mines by State, County, and Mine Type, 2012" and Number of Mines by State, County, and Mine Type, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Underground",,"Surface",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Number of Mines","Production","Number of Mines","Production","Number of Mines","Production" "State and County" "Alabama",8,12570,38,6752,46,19321 " Bibb","-","-",2,119,2,119 " Blount","-","-",2,236,2,236 " Fayette",1,2249,"-","-",1,2249 " Franklin","-","-",2,137,2,137 " Jackson","-","-",3,152,3,152 " Jefferson",3,3589,9,1106,12,4695

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trends output growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Average Tested Heat Rates by Prime Mover and Energy Source, 2007 - 2012 2. Average Tested Heat Rates by Prime Mover and Energy Source, 2007 - 2012 (Btu per Kilowatthour) Prime Mover Coal Petroluem Natural Gas Nuclear 2007 Steam Generator 10,158 10,398 10,440 10,489 Gas Turbine -- 13,217 11,632 -- Internal Combustion -- 10,447 10,175 -- Combined Cycle W 10,970 7,577 -- 2008 Steam Generator 10,138 10,356 10,377 10,452 Gas Turbine -- 13,311 11,576 -- Internal Combustion -- 10,427 9,975 -- Combined Cycle W 10,985 7,642 -- 2009 Steam Generator 10,150 10,349 10,427 10,459 Gas Turbine -- 13,326 11,560 -- Internal Combustion -- 10,428 9,958 -- Combined Cycle W 10,715 7,605 -- 2010 Steam Generator 10,142 10,249 10,416 10,452 Gas Turbine -- 13,386 11,590 -- Internal Combustion -- 10,429 9,917 --

302

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 (continued) 0. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2002 0 0 -- -- -- -- 18,671 18,256 3.44 3.52 24.7 3.03 2003 0 0 -- -- -- 0.0 18,169 17,827 4.96 5.06 30.5 4.02 2004 0 0 -- -- -- 0.0 16,176 15,804 5.93 6.07 21.9 4.58 2005 0 0 -- -- -- 0.0 17,600 17,142 8.38 8.60 25.2 6.25 2006 0 0 -- -- -- 0.0 21,369 20,819 8.33 8.55 30.7 6.42

303

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 3.A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Annual Totals 2002 395,943 22,241 8,368 378,044 1,763 272,684 18,189 44,466 -1,309 8,612 1,149,001 2003 452,433 35,818 7,949 380,337 2,404 304,904 21,890 46,060 -1,003 8,088 1,258,879 2004 443,547 33,574 7,410 427,510 3,194 312,846 19,518 48,636 -962 7,856 1,303,129 2005 507,199 37,096 9,664 445,625 3,767 345,690 21,486 51,708 -1,174 6,285 1,427,346 2006 498,316 10,396 8,409 452,329 4,223 361,877 24,390 59,345 -1,277 6,412 1,424,421

304

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, 9. Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 1,787 2,998 -40% 520 898 1,257 2,087 0 0 10 12 Connecticut 297 317 -6.5% 0 0 297 317 0 0 0 0 Maine 11 14 -18% 0 0 6 7 0 0 5 6 Massachusetts 959 1,769 -46% 0 0 954 1,763 0 0 5 6 New Hampshire 520 898 -42% 520 898 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 44,000 53,658 -18% 6 16 43,734 53,052 4 1 256 589

305

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers 4. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector 2002 through 2012 (Cents per kilowatthour) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Total Electric Industry 2002 8.44 7.89 4.88 N/A 6.75 7.20 2003 8.72 8.03 5.11 7.54 N/A 7.44 2004 8.95 8.17 5.25 7.18 N/A 7.61 2005 9.45 8.67 5.73 8.57 N/A 8.14 2006 10.40 9.46 6.16 9.54 N/A 8.90 2007 10.65 9.65 6.39 9.70 N/A 9.13 2008 11.26 10.36 6.83 10.74 N/A 9.74 2009 11.51 10.17 6.81 10.65 N/A 9.82 2010 11.54 10.19 6.77 10.57 N/A 9.83 2011 11.72 10.23 6.82 10.46 N/A 9.90 2012 11.88 10.09 6.67 10.21 N/A 9.84 Full-Service Providers 2002 8.40 7.77 4.78 N/A 6.65 7.13 2003 8.68 7.89 5.01 6.82 N/A 7.38

306

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Steam Coal Exports" Average Price of U.S. Steam Coal Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",65.1,63.67,73.81,64.48,78.9,-18.3 " Canada*",59.34,55.22,63.02,57.57,73.63,-21.8 " Dominican Republic",78.47,74.41,73.89,75.4,76.61,-1.6 " Honduras","-",54.58,54.43,54.58,54.43,0.3 " Jamaica",480,54.43,"-",54.72,55.42,-1.3 " Mexico",69.42,73.33,82.64,70.83,86.44,-18.1 " Other**",80.33,389.3,70.37,82.45,76.1,8.3

307

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production by Coalbed Thickness and Mine Type, 2012" Coal Production by Coalbed Thickness and Mine Type, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal Thickness (inches)","Underground","Surface","Total" "Under 7","-",17,17 "7 - Under 13","-",2108,2108 "13 - Under 19",429,6688,7117 "19 - Under 25",111,14107,14217 "25 - Under 31",4147,12913,17060 "31 - Under 37",15128,19022,34150 "37 - Under 43",23868,17285,41153 "43 - Under 49",26035,15597,41632 "49 - Under 55",18909,22544,41453 "55 - Under 61",36946,11285,48231 "61 - Under 67",43146,15074,58220 "67 - Under 73",40983,8783,49766 "73 - Under 79",32914,10193,43107 "79 - Under 85",27011,3554,30565

308

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Carbon Dioxide Uncontrolled Emission Factors 3. Carbon Dioxide Uncontrolled Emission Factors Fuel EIA Fuel Code Source and Tables (As Appropriate) Factor (Pounds of CO2 Per Million Btu)*** Bituminous Coal BIT Source: 1 205.30000 Distillate Fuel Oil DFO Source: 1 161.38600 Geothermal GEO Estimate from EIA, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting 16.59983 Jet Fuel JF Source: 1 156.25800 Kerosene KER Source: 1 159.53500 Lignite Coal LIG Source: 1 215.40000 Municipal Solid Waste MSW Source: 1 (including footnote 2 within source) 91.90000 Natural Gas NG Source: 1 117.08000 Petroleum Coke PC Source: 1 225.13000 Propane Gas PG Sources: 1 139.17800 Residual Fuel Oil RFO Source: 1 173.90600 Synthetic Coal SC Assumed to have the emissions similar to Bituminous Coal. 205.30000

309

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Imports by Customs District" Coal Imports by Customs District" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Customs District","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Eastern Total",469878,331008,156004,800886,350124,128.7 " Baltimore, MD","-","-",106118,"-",154318,"-" " Boston, MA",373985,154438,"-",528423,51185,"NM" " Buffalo, NY",44,"-","-",44,"-","-" " New York City, NY",1373,1402,487,2775,507,447.3 " Norfolk, VA","-",68891,"-",68891,35856,92.1 " Ogdensburg, NY","-",1,12,1,12,-91.7

310

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coke Exports" U.S. Coke Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",162796,79217,201795,242013,340944,-29 " Canada*",73859,17837,112348,91696,161596,-43.3 " Mexico",88535,60517,86721,149052,176163,-15.4 " Other**",402,863,2726,1265,3185,-60.3 "South America Total",223,217,591,440,1158,-62 " Other**",223,217,591,440,1158,-62 "Europe Total",48972,59197,"-",108169,6,"NM" " Other**",347,11743,"-",12090,"-","-"

311

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013" 7. U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Coal Consumers" "Last Day of Quarter","Electric","Coke","Other","Commercial","Total","Coal Producers","Total" ,"Power","Plants","Industrial2","and",,"and" ,"Sector1",,,"Institutional Users",,"Distributors" 2007 " March 31",141389,2444,5756,"-",149588,34007,183595 " June 30",154812,2364,5672,"-",162849,32484,195333 " September 30",142666,1972,5811,"-",150448,30090,180538 " December 31",151221,1936,5624,"-",158781,33977,192758

312

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Unit of Measure Equivalents 5. Unit of Measure Equivalents Unit Equivalent Kilowatt (kW) 1,000 (One Thousand) Watts Megawatt (MW) 1,000,000 (One Million) Watts Gigawatt (GW) 1,000,000,000 (One Billion) Watts Terawatt (TW) 1,000,000,000,000 (One Trillion) Watts Gigawatt 1,000,000 (One Million) Kilowatts Thousand Gigawatts 1,000,000,000 (One Billion) Kilowatts Kilowatthours (kWh) 1,000 (One Thousand) Watthours Megawatthours (MWh) 1,000,000 (One Million) Watthours Gigawatthours (GWh) 1,000,000,000 (One Billion) Watthours Terawatthours (TWh) 1,000,000,000,000 (One Trillion) Watthours Gigawatthours 1,000,000 (One Million) Kilowatthours Thousand Gigawatthours 1,000,000,000(One Billion Kilowatthours U.S. Dollar 1,000 (One Thousand) Mills U.S. Cent 10 (Ten) Mills Barrel of Oil 42 Gallons

313

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 (continued) 6. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2002 75,711 2,677 0.63 17.68 4.98 126.0 1,680,518 1,634,734 3.68 3.78 72.3 1.53 2003 89,618 3,165 0.74 20.94 5.51 124.0 1,486,088 1,439,513 5.59 5.77 81.6 1.74 2004 107,985 3,817 0.89 25.15 5.10 92.0 1,542,746 1,499,933 6.15 6.33 82.9 1.87 2005 102,450 3,632 1.29 36.31 5.16 87.9 1,835,221 1,780,721 8.32 8.57 83.4 2.38

314

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: 2 Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 Census Division and State Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroleum Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) December 2012 December 2011 Percentage Change December 2012 December 2011 Percentage Change December 2012 December 2011 Percentage Change New England 1,030 1,389 -26% 2,483 2,680 -7.3% 0 0 -- Connecticut W W W 1,300 954 36% 0 0 -- Maine 0 0 -- W W W 0 0 -- Massachusetts W 675 W 837 990 -15% 0 0 -- New Hampshire W W W W W W 0 0 -- Rhode Island 0 0 -- W W W 0 0 -- Vermont 0 0 -- 51 49 3.0% 0 0 -- Middle Atlantic 7,553 7,800 -3.2% 5,496 6,591 -17% W W W New Jersey 926 871 6.3% 1,084 1,113 -2.6% 0 0 --

315

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 0. Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic",25,54,32,79,90,-12 " Pennsylvania",25,54,32,79,90,-12 "East North Central",115,183,117,298,301,-0.9 " Illinois",31,42,28,73,67,8.1 " Indiana","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Michigan","w","w","w","w","w","w"

316

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "New England","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Maine","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Massachusetts","w","w","w","w","w","w" "Middle Atlantic",627,587,637,1214,1254,-3.1 " New York",214,178,194,392,377,4

317

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Major U.S. Coal Mines, 2012" Major U.S. Coal Mines, 2012" "Rank","Mine Name / Company","Mine Type","State","Production (short tons)" 1,"North Antelope Rochelle Mine / Peabody Powder River Mining Ll","Surface","Wyoming",107639188 2,"Black Thunder / Thunder Basin Coal Company Llc","Surface","Wyoming",93082919 3,"Cordero Mine / Cordero Mining Llc","Surface","Wyoming",39204736 4,"Antelope Coal Mine / Antelope Coal Llc","Surface","Wyoming",34316314 5,"Belle Ayr Mine / Alpha Coal West, Inc.","Surface","Wyoming",24227846 6,"Eagle Butte Mine / Alpha Coal West, Inc.","Surface","Wyoming",22466733

318

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 835,481 553,390 241,892 3,953 36,243 2003 1,089,307 658,868 380,378 5,358 44,702 2004 1,031,954 651,712 350,093 4,544 25,606 2005 1,035,045 618,811 387,355 3,469 25,410 2006 459,392 335,130 105,312 1,963 16,987 2007 512,423 355,999 139,977 1,505 14,942 2008 332,367 242,379 79,816 957 9,215 2009 266,508 196,346 59,277 1,101 9,784 2010 244,114 188,987 49,042 970 5,115 2011 163,954 125,755 33,166 801 4,233 2012 134,956 105,179 24,081 1,618 4,078 2010 January 33,737 26,715 6,282 100 639

319

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Total Capacity of Distributed and Dispersed Generators by Technology Type, 9. Total Capacity of Distributed and Dispersed Generators by Technology Type, 2005 through 2012 Capacity (MW) Year Internal Combustion Combustion Turbine Steam Turbine Hydro Wind Photovoltaic Storage Other Wind and Other Total Number of Generators Distributed Generators 2005 4,025.0 1,917.0 1,830.0 999.0 -- -- -- -- 995.0 9,766.0 17,371 2006 3,646.0 1,298.0 2,582.0 806.0 -- -- -- -- 1,081.0 9,411.0 5,044 2007 4,624.0 1,990.0 3,596.0 1,051.0 -- -- -- -- 1,441.0 12,702.0 7,103 2008 5,112.0 1,949.0 3,060.0 1,154.0 -- -- -- -- 1,588.0 12,863.0 9,591 2009 4,339.0 4,147.0 4,621.0 1,166.0 -- -- -- -- 1,729.0 16,002.0 13,006 2010 886.8 186.0 109.9 97.4 98.9 236.3 -- 372.7 -- 1,988.0 15,630

320

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 605,054 10,659 129,947 469 463,980 2003 519,294 16,545 139,852 437 362,460 2004 344,134 19,973 130,248 168 193,745 2005 355,250 27,373 138,407 207 189,263 2006 350,074 27,455 135,546 269 186,803 2007 353,025 31,568 132,953 284 188,220 2008 338,786 29,150 130,122 287 179,227 2009 320,444 29,565 130,894 274 159,712 2010 349,530 40,167 137,072 274 172,016 2011 347,623 35,474 130,108 482 181,559 2012 390,342 32,723 138,217 478 218,924 2010 January 29,578 3,731 11,954 23 13,870

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trends output growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013" U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" ,"January - March",,"April - June",,"July - September",,"October - December",,"Total" "Year","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports" 2007,11139,8786,14702,8405,16198,10559,17124,8597,59163,36347 2008,15802,7640,23069,8982,20321,8485,22329,9101,81519,34208 2009,13335,6325,12951,5426,15159,5441,17653,5447,59097,22639 2010,17807,4803,21965,5058,21074,4680,20870,4811,81716,19353 2011,26617,3381,26987,3419,25976,3588,27679,2700,107259,13088 2012,28642,2022,37534,2329,31563,2415,28006,2394,125746,9159

322

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Consumption of Petroleum Coke for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 1. Consumption of Petroleum Coke for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 56 121 -54% 0 0 0 94 0 0 56 27

323

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nitrogen Oxides Uncontrolled Emission Factors 2. Nitrogen Oxides Uncontrolled Emission Factors Fuel, Code, Source and Emission Units Combustion System Type / Firing Configuration Cyclone Boiler Fluidized Bed Boiler Opposed Firing Boiler Spreader Stoker Boiler Fuel EIA Fuel Code Source and Tables (As Appropriate) Emissions Units Lbs = Pounds MMCF = Million Cubic Feet MG = Thousand Gallons Dry-Bottom Boilers Dry-Bottom Boilers Dry-Bottom Boilers Wet-Bottom Boilers Dry-Bottom Boilers Agricultural Byproducts AB Source: 1 Lbs per ton 1.20 1.20 1.20 N/A 1.20 Blast Furnace Gas BFG Sources: 1 (including footnote 7 within source); EIA estimates Lbs per MMCF 15.40 15.40 15.40 N/A 15.40 Bituminous Coal BIT Source: 2, Table 1.1-3 Lbs per ton 33.00 5.00 12.00 31.00 11.00 Black Liquor BLQ Source: 1 Lbs per ton ** 1.50 1.50 1.50 N/A 1.50

324

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1. Number of Ultimate Customers Served by Sector, by Provider, 2.1. Number of Ultimate Customers Served by Sector, by Provider, 2002 through 2012 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Total Electric Industry 2002 116,622,037 15,333,700 601,744 N/A 1,066,554 133,624,035 2003 117,280,481 16,549,519 713,221 1,127 N/A 134,544,348 2004 118,763,768 16,606,783 747,600 1,025 N/A 136,119,176 2005 120,760,839 16,871,940 733,862 518 N/A 138,367,159 2006 122,471,071 17,172,499 759,604 791 N/A 140,403,965 2007 123,949,916 17,377,219 793,767 750 N/A 142,121,652 2008 124,937,469 17,562,726 774,713 727 N/A 143,275,635 2009 125,177,175 17,561,661 757,519 705 N/A 143,497,060 2010 125,717,935 17,674,338 747,746 239 N/A 144,140,258 2011 126,143,072 17,638,062 727,920 92 N/A 144,509,146

325

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coke Exports" Average Price of U.S. Coke Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",240.59,241.38,218.4,240.85,225.8,6.7 " Canada*",147.49,330.47,243.04,183.08,286.56,-36.1 " Mexico",316.57,211.63,189.12,273.97,171.71,59.6 " Other**",612.42,485.63,134.48,525.92,135.04,289.5 "South America Total",140.65,156.15,322.7,148.29,250.36,-40.8 " Other**",140.65,156.15,322.7,148.29,250.36,-40.8 "Europe Total",259.26,255.24,"-",257.06,427.83,-39.9

326

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Demand-Side Management Program Annual Effects by Program 2. Demand-Side Management Program Annual Effects by Program Category, by Sector, 2002 through 2012 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Energy Efficiency - Energy Savings (Thousand MWh) 2002 15,284 24,803 10,242 -- 50,328 2003 12,914 24,758 10,031 551 48,254 2004 17,185 24,290 11,137 50 52,663 2005 18,894 28,073 11,986 47 59,000 2006 21,150 28,720 13,155 50 63,076 2007 22,772 30,359 14,038 108 67,278 2008 25,396 34,634 14,766 75 74,871 2009 27,395 34,831 14,610 76 76,912 2010 32,150 37,416 17,259 89 86,914 2011 46,790 50,732 23,061 76 120,659 2012 54,516 58,894 25,023 92 138,525 Energy Efficiency - Actual Peak Load Reduction (MW) 2002 5,300 5,389 2,768 -- 13,457 2003 5,909 4,911 2,671 94 13,585

327

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Total (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Total (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Annual Totals 2002 1,933,130 78,701 15,867 691,006 11,463 780,064 264,329 79,109 -8,743 13,527 3,858,452 2003 1,973,737 102,734 16,672 649,908 15,600 763,733 275,806 79,487 -8,535 14,045 3,883,185 2004 1,978,301 100,391 20,754 710,100 15,252 788,528 268,417 83,067 -8,488 14,232 3,970,555 2005 2,012,873 99,840 22,385 760,960 13,464 781,986 270,321 87,329 -6,558 12,821 4,055,423 2006 1,990,511 44,460 19,706 816,441 14,177 787,219 289,246 96,525 -6,558 12,974 4,064,702

328

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, 8. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 (Million Kilowatthours) Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Census Division and State Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 47,208 47,481 44,864 45,018 27,818 27,927 566 569 120,456 120,995 Connecticut 12,758 12,919 12,976 13,087 3,566 3,668 193 185 29,492 29,859 Maine 4,481 4,382 4,053 4,018 3,027 3,016 0 0 11,561 11,415 Massachusetts 20,313 20,473 17,723 17,767 16,927 16,974 350 357 55,313 55,570 New Hampshire 4,439 4,454 4,478 4,478 1,953 1,936 0 0 10,870 10,869 Rhode Island 3,121 3,129 3,640 3,660 923 916 24 27 7,708 7,732

329

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units Using Primarily Fossil Fuels and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) C. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units Using Primarily Fossil Fuels and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) Census Division and State Natural Gas Fired Combined Cycle Natural Gas Fired Combustion Turbine Other Natural Gas Coal Petroleum Coke Petroleum Liquids Other Gases Total Fossil Fuels Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 12,190.5 11,593.8 1,090.0 1,058.9 876.4 830.1 2,546.1 2,755.5 0.0 0.0 7,916.1 7,915.3 0.0 0.0 24,619.1 24,153.6 Connecticut 2,513.4 2,447.7 458.1 432.7 61.0 44.7 389.1 564.4 0.0 0.0 3,186.1 3,185.0 0.0 0.0 6,607.7 6,674.5 Maine 1,250.0 1,250.0 306.0 302.2 119.0 93.0 85.0 85.0 0.0 0.0 1,004.9 1,007.2 0.0 0.0 2,764.9 2,737.4

330

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" 0. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" "(thousand short tons)" "NAICS Code","June 30 2013","March 31 2013","June 30 2012","Percent Change" ,,,,"(June 30)" ,,,,"2013 versus 2012" "311 Food Manufacturing",875,926,1015,-13.9 "312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg.",26,17,19,35.8 "313 Textile Mills",22,22,25,-13.9 "315 Apparel Manufacturing","w","w","w","w" "321 Wood Product Manufacturing","w","w","w","w" "322 Paper Manufacturing",570,583,743,-23.3 "324 Petroleum and Coal Products*",127,113,156,-18.7

331

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing U.S. Mines by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2012" Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing U.S. Mines by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2012" "(million short tons)" ,"Underground",,"Surface",,"Total" "Mine Production Range","Recoverable Coal","Average Recovery","Recoverable Coal","Average Recovery","Recoverable Coal","Average Recovery" "(thousand short tons)","Reserves","Percentage","Reserves","Percentage","Reserves","Percentage" "Over 1,000",4874,57.96,11153,91.28,16028,81.15 "Over 500 to 1,000",531,47.14,226,81.9,757,57.49 "Over 200 to 500",604,52.72,333,69.16,938,58.57

332

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: 4. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Commercial Sector by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Middle Atlantic 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

333

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Average Cost of Petroleum Liquids Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 8. Average Cost of Petroleum Liquids Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Dollars per MMBtu) Census Division and State Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 18.64 W W 21.43 21.12 18.47 W Connecticut W 21.91 W 23.87 NM W 21.93 Maine W W W -- NM W W Massachusetts 17.17 19.76 -13% 17.45 NM 17.16 19.66 New Hampshire 23.23 W W 23.23 19.90 -- W Rhode Island -- W W -- NM -- W Vermont 24.11 NM NM 24.11 NM -- -- Middle Atlantic W 20.15 W 21.01 19.21 W 20.66 New Jersey 19.77 18.36 7.7% -- NM 19.77 20.28 New York W 19.66 W 21.01 20.00 W 19.36 Pennsylvania 21.84 22.19 -1.6% -- NM 21.84 22.19

334

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Productive Capacity of Coal Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" Productive Capacity of Coal Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" "(thousand short tons)" ,2012,,,2011,,,"Percent Change" "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total" "State" "Alabama",14594,7967,22561,16102,8911,25013,-9.4,-10.6,-9.8 "Alaska","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arizona","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arkansas","w","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w"

335

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity and Average Price of U.S. Coal Imports by Origin, 2007 - 2013" Quantity and Average Price of U.S. Coal Imports by Origin, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons and dollars per short ton)" "Year and Quarter","Australia","Canada","Colombia","Indonesia","China","Venezuela","Other","Total" ,,,,,,,"Countries" 2007,66,1967,26864,3663,50,3425,311,36347 2008,149,2027,26262,3374,45,2312,39,34208 2009,152,1288,17787,2084,9,1297,21,22639 2010,380,1767,14584,1904,53,582,83,19353 2011,62,1680,9500,856,22,779,188,13088 2012 " January - March","-",260,1594,59,7,80,22,2022 " April - June","-",281,1728,49,21,170,80,2329 " July - September","-",297,1762,266,39,"-",51,2415

336

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2012" Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2012" "Coal-Producing State and County","Number of Mines","Sales","Average Sales Price" ,,"(thousand short tons)","(dollars per short ton)" "Alabama",39,19021,106.57 " Bibb",1,"w","w" " Blount",2,"w","w" " Fayette",1,"w","w" " Franklin",1,"w","w" " Jackson",2,"w","w" " Jefferson",11,4298,146.04 " Marion",1,"w","w" " Tuscaloosa",7,8599,111.55 " Walker",11,2370,81.88

337

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 2. Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" "Census Division","June 30 2013","March 31 2013","June 30 2012","Percent Change" "and State",,,,"(June 30)" ,,,,"2013 versus 2012" "Middle Atlantic",62,58,56,10.9 " Pennsylvania",62,58,56,10.9 "East North Central",168,171,197,-14.7 " Illinois","w","w","w","w" " Indiana",75,76,75,0.5 " Michigan","w","w","w","w" " Ohio",25,15,19,27 " Wisconsin",5,5,3,59.1 "West North Central",66,75,97,-32.2

338

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Summary Statistics for Coal Refining Plants, 2012 - 2013" 3. Summary Statistics for Coal Refining Plants, 2012 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" "Year and","Coal Receipts","Average Price of Coal Receipts","Coal Used","Coal Stocks1" "Quarter",,"(dollars per short ton)" 2012 " January - March",2151,27.47,1756,771 " April - June",3844,25.42,3688,825 " July - September",5399,24.32,5286,812 " October - December",4919,24.55,4680,787 " Total",16313,25.06,15410 2013 " January - March",5067,24.6,4989,793 " April - June",4015,25.24,3754,756 " Total",9082,24.88,8744 "1 Reported as of the last day of the quarter." "Note: Average price is based on the cost, insurance, and freight (c.i.f. value). Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding."

339

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Proposed Transmission Capacity Additions by High-Voltage Size, 2013 - 2019 B. Proposed Transmission Capacity Additions by High-Voltage Size, 2013 - 2019 (Circuit Miles of Transmission) Voltage Circuit Miles Type Operating (kV) Year 2013 Year 2014 Year 2015 Year 2016 Year 2017 Year 2018 Year 2019 All Years AC 100-199 954 1,222 992 1,047 392 382 176 5,165 AC 200-299 1,003 792 1,398 319 539 427 118 4,596 AC 300-399 4,779 839 1,532 1,527 502 1,650 349 11,178 AC 400-599 399 708 669 643 660 1,151 334 4,564 AC 600+ -- -- 14 -- -- 69 -- 83 AC Total 7,134 3,562 4,606 3,536 2,092 3,679 978 25,586 DC 100-199 2 11 5 -- -- 7 -- 25 DC 200-299 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- DC 300-399 -- -- -- -- 333 -- -- 333 DC 400-599 -- -- 10 -- -- -- -- 10 DC 600+ -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

340

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Revenue and Expense Statistics for Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities, 2002 through 2012 (Million Dollars) 3. Revenue and Expense Statistics for Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities, 2002 through 2012 (Million Dollars) Description 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Utility Operating Revenues 219,609 230,151 238,759 265,652 275,501 270,964 ......Electric Utility 200,360 206,268 213,012 234,909 246,736 240,864 ......Other Utility 19,250 23,883 25,747 30,743 28,765 30,100 Utility Operating Expenses 189,062 201,057 206,960 236,786 245,589 241,198 ......Electric Utility 171,604 179,044 183,121 207,830 218,445 213,076 ............Operation 116,660 125,436 131,560 150,645 158,893 153,885 ..................Production 90,715 98,305 103,871 120,586 127,494 121,700 ........................Cost of Fuel 24,149 26,871 28,544 36,106 37,945 39,548

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341

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coke Imports" U.S. Coke Imports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Origin",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",10284,2293,159462,12577,183712,-93.2 " Canada",3009,2293,159462,5302,183712,-97.1 " Panama",7275,"-","-",7275,"-","-" "South America Total",25267,13030,88424,38297,106612,-64.1 " Brazil","-","-",78595,"-",78595,"-" " Colombia",25267,13030,9829,38297,28017,36.7 "Europe Total",6044,40281,165027,46325,485791,-90.5

342

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production and Coalbed Thickness by Major Coalbeds and Mine Type, 2012" Coal Production and Coalbed Thickness by Major Coalbeds and Mine Type, 2012" ,"Production (thousand short tons)",,,"Thickness (inches)" "Coalbed ID Number1","Underground","Surface","Total","Average2","Low","High" "Coalbed Name" "1699 Wyodak","-",351188,351188,778,160,913 "0036 Pittsburgh",52476,3871,56348,74,18,138 "0489 No. 9",42193,12181,54374,61,24,74 "0484 Herrin (Illinois No. 6)",48526,1910,50436,71,46,89 "0212 Pittsburgh",27355,76,27431,75,27,98 "1701 Smith","-",23847,23847,822,745,912 "1696 Anderson-Dietz 1-Dietz 2","-",18992,18992,932,660,960

343

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, 0. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 (Cents per Kilowatthour) Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Census Division and State Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 15.71 15.89 13.68 14.31 11.83 12.55 6.68 7.85 14.02 14.49 Connecticut 17.34 18.11 14.65 15.57 12.67 13.24 9.69 10.25 15.54 16.35 Maine 14.66 15.38 11.53 12.29 7.98 8.88 -- -- 11.81 12.58 Massachusetts 14.91 14.67 13.84 14.33 12.57 13.38 4.91 6.14 13.79 14.11 New Hampshire 16.07 16.52 13.36 14.04 11.83 12.27 -- -- 14.19 14.74 Rhode Island 14.40 14.33 11.87 12.37 10.68 11.27 8.28 14.11 12.74 13.04

344

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers 3. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by Sector, by Provider, 2002 through 2012 (Million Dollars) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Total Electric Industry 2002 106,834 87,117 48,336 N/A 7,124 249,411 2003 111,249 96,263 51,741 514 N/A 259,767 2004 115,577 100,546 53,477 519 N/A 270,119 2005 128,393 110,522 58,445 643 N/A 298,003 2006 140,582 122,914 62,308 702 N/A 326,506 2007 148,295 128,903 65,712 792 N/A 343,703 2008 155,433 138,469 68,920 827 N/A 363,650 2009 157,008 132,940 62,504 828 N/A 353,280 2010 166,782 135,559 65,750 815 N/A 368,906 2011 166,714 135,926 67,606 803 N/A 371,049 2012 163,280 133,898 65,761 747 N/A 363,687

345

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports" U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",1503162,764701,1411897,2267863,2261900,0.3 " Canada*",975783,343309,1260473,1319092,1895263,-30.4 " Dominican Republic",94,51064,"-",51158,"-","-" " Mexico",527285,370328,151424,897613,366637,144.8 "South America Total",2091488,2561772,2389018,4653260,4543747,2.4 " Argentina",104745,155806,203569,260551,253841,2.6 " Brazil",1921144,2352098,2185449,4273242,4022618,6.2

346

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 1. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic",139.64,145,158.61,143.29,158.91,-9.8 " Pennsylvania",139.64,145,158.61,143.29,158.91,-9.8 "East North Central",87.62,97.3,87.11,93.56,95.13,-1.7 " Illinois",59.27,60.3,62.17,59.86,66.69,-10.2 " Indiana","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Michigan","w","w","w","w","w","w"

347

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" Average Price of Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "New England","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Maine","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Massachusetts","w","w","w","w","w","w" "Middle Atlantic",87.05,93.03,93.73,89.93,95.68,-6 " New York",102.14,105.8,117.15,103.8,117.61,-11.7

348

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division" 8. Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division" "(thousand short tons)" "Census Division","June 30 2013","March 31 2013","June 30 2012","Percent Change" ,,,,"(June 30)" ,,,,"2013 versus 2012" "Middle Atlantic","w","w","w","w" "East North Central",1313,1177,1326,-1 "South Atlantic","w","w","w","w" "East South Central","w","w","w","w" "U.S. Total",2500,2207,2295,8.9 "w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure." "Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding."

349

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 7 Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Barrels) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption Annual Totals 2002 3,710,847 182,482 1.37 27.96 1.15 87.0 186,271 30,043 4.19 25.98 0.61 76.4 2003 4,365,996 223,984 1.34 26.20 1.15 90.4 347,546 56,138 5.41 33.50 0.58 89.7 2004 4,410,775 227,700 1.41 27.27 1.13 93.3 337,011 54,152 5.35 33.31 0.61 93.6 2005 4,459,333 229,071 1.56 30.39 1.10 83.0 381,871 61,753 8.30 51.34 0.54 97.2

350

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Metallurgical Coal Exports by Customs District" Metallurgical Coal Exports by Customs District" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Customs District","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Eastern Total",11716074,14136513,15167377,25852587,27578514,-6.3 " Baltimore, MD",2736470,4225450,5123600,6961920,9037970,-23 " Boston, MA","-","-","-","-",28873,"-" " Buffalo, NY",247714,121347,524040,369061,725698,-49.1 " Norfolk, VA",8730257,9784866,9519119,18515123,17784479,4.1 " Ogdensburg, NY",1633,4850,618,6483,1494,333.9 "Southern Total",3551564,3824484,4264938,7376048,8976503,-17.8

351

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: 3 Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, by Census Divison, 2012 and 2011 Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Census Division December 2012 December 2011 Percentage Change December 2012 December 2011 December 2012 December 2011 Coal (Thousand Tons) New England 1,030 1,389 -25.9% W W W W Middle Atlantic 7,553 7,800 -3.2% W W W W East North Central 36,139 37,262 -3.0% 27,069 27,316 9,070 9,946 West North Central 30,554 28,544 7.0% 30,554 28,544 0 0 South Atlantic 38,859 36,920 5.3% 35,527 33,163 3,331 3,757 East South Central 19,657 17,185 14.4% 19,657 17,185 0 0 West South Central 28,807 22,910 25.7% 17,047 15,125 11,760 7,785

352

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 19,996,890 15,517,857 4,215,043 9,168 254,821 2003 20,366,879 15,391,188 4,745,545 13,080 217,066 2004 20,375,751 15,610,335 4,606,584 8,251 150,581 2005 20,801,716 15,397,688 5,250,824 8,314 144,889 2006 20,527,410 15,211,077 5,166,001 7,526 142,807 2007 20,841,871 15,436,110 5,287,202 7,833 110,727 2008 20,548,610 15,189,050 5,242,194 8,070 109,296 2009 18,240,611 13,744,178 4,390,596 7,007 98,829 2010 19,196,315 14,333,496 4,709,686 6,815 146,318 2011 18,074,298 13,551,416 4,399,144 7,263 116,475

353

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Annual Totals 2002 1,514,670 52,838 6,286 229,639 206 507,380 242,302 3,089 -7,434 480 2,549,457 2003 1,500,281 62,774 7,156 186,967 243 458,829 249,622 3,421 -7,532 519 2,462,281 2004 1,513,641 62,196 11,498 199,662 374 475,682 245,546 3,692 -7,526 467 2,505,231 2005 1,484,855 58,572 11,150 238,204 10 436,296 245,553 4,945 -5,383 643 2,474,846 2006 1,471,421 31,269 9,634 282,088 30 425,341 261,864 6,588 -5,281 700 2,483,656

354

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10.6. Advanced Metering Count by Technology Type, 10.6. Advanced Metering Count by Technology Type, 2007 through 2012 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Automated Meter Reading (AMR) 2007 25,785,782 2,322,329 44,015 109 28,152,235 2008 36,425,943 3,529,985 77,122 13 40,033,063 2009 41,462,111 4,239,531 107,033 11 45,808,686 2010 43,913,225 4,611,877 159,315 626 48,685,043 2011 41,451,888 4,341,105 172,692 77 45,965,762 2012 43,455,437 4,691,018 185,862 125 48,330,822 Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) 2007 2,202,222 262,159 9,106 2 2,473,489 2008 4,190,244 444,003 12,757 12 4,647,016 2009 8,712,297 876,419 22,675 10 9,611,401 2010 18,369,908 1,904,983 59,567 67 20,334,525 2011 33,453,548 3,682,159 154,659 7 37,290,373

355

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Net Metering Customers and Capacity by Technology Type, by End Use Sector, 0. Net Metering Customers and Capacity by Technology Type, by End Use Sector, 2003 through 2012 Capacity (MW) Customers Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Historical Data 2003 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 5,870 775 168 -- 6,813 2004 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 14,114 1,494 215 3 15,826 2005 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 19,244 1,565 337 -- 21,146 2006 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 30,689 2,553 376 -- 33,618 2007 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 44,450 3,513 391 -- 48,354 2008 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 64,400 5,305 304 -- 70,009 2009 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 88,205 7,365 919 -- 96,489 Photovoltaic 2010 697.890 517.861 243.051 -- 1,458.802 137,618 11,897 1,225 -- 150,740

356

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Summary Statistics for the United States, 2002 - 2012 2. Summary Statistics for the United States, 2002 - 2012 (From Table 2.1.) Number of Ultimate Customers Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total 2002 116,622,037 15,333,700 601,744 N/A 1,066,554 133,624,035 2003 117,280,481 16,549,519 713,221 1,127 N/A 134,544,348 2004 118,763,768 16,606,783 747,600 1,025 N/A 136,119,176 2005 120,760,839 16,871,940 733,862 518 N/A 138,367,159 2006 122,471,071 17,172,499 759,604 791 N/A 140,403,965 2007 123,949,916 17,377,219 793,767 750 N/A 142,121,652 2008 124,937,469 17,562,726 774,713 727 N/A 143,275,635 2009 125,177,175 17,561,661 757,519 705 N/A 143,497,060 2010 125,717,935 17,674,338 747,746 239 N/A 144,140,258 2011 126,143,072 17,638,062 727,920 92 N/A 144,509,146

357

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Disposition by State, 2012" Coal Disposition by State, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State","Open Market Sales1","Captive Sales / Transactions2","Exports3","Total" "Alabama",8688,"-",10333,19021 "Alaska","w","-",968,"w" "Arizona","w","-","-","w" "Arkansas","w","-","-","w" "Colorado",20836,4552,3468,28856 "Illinois",29252,5113,12341,46705 "Indiana",17127,18404,375,35906 "Kentucky Total",76602,6884,5668,89154 " Kentucky (East)",37324,6884,3588,47796 " Kentucky (West)",39277,"-",2081,41358

358

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 6,126,062 2,259,684 3,148,595 32,545 685,239 2003 5,616,135 1,763,764 3,145,485 38,480 668,407 2004 5,674,580 1,809,443 3,265,896 32,839 566,401 2005 6,036,370 2,134,859 3,349,921 33,785 517,805 2006 6,461,615 2,478,396 3,412,826 34,623 535,770 2007 7,089,342 2,736,418 3,765,194 34,087 553,643 2008 6,895,843 2,730,134 3,612,197 33,403 520,109 2009 7,121,069 2,911,279 3,655,712 34,279 519,799 2010 7,680,185 3,290,993 3,794,423 39,462 555,307 2011 7,883,865 3,446,087 3,819,107 47,170 571,501

359

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Consumption of Nautral Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2. Consumption of Nautral Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 460,887 461,590 -0.2% 3,652 4,218 428,781 432,350 8,630 6,287 19,824 18,735 Connecticut 120,380 110,546 8.9% 69 730 113,620 105,965 3,952 2,061 2,739 1,790 Maine 44,424 49,352 -10% 0 0 28,456 33,555 307 12 15,662 15,785 Massachusetts 184,330 190,063 -3.0% 2,792 2,393 176,497 182,865 3,749 3,761 1,293 1,045 New Hampshire 50,678 46,927 8.0% 754 1,046 49,655 45,765 139 0 131 115

360

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 34,775 2,456 15,859 4,566 11,894 2004 19,215 2,014 9,240 4,308 3,654 2005 17,852 2,485 7,365 4,677 3,325 2006 17,727 2,611 7,788 4,436 2,893 2007 19,083 2,992 8,861 4,049 3,181 2008 24,288 3,409 12,745 3,684 4,450 2009 24,847 3,679 13,231 3,760 4,177 2010 29,996 3,668 14,449 3,790 8,090 2011 30,771 4,488 16,115 3,816 6,352 2012 30,342 4,191 15,740 4,016 6,395 2010 January 2,223 189 1,078 321 635 February 2,336 275 1,208 291 561 March 2,287 311 1,079 302 594

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trends output growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. U.S. Coal Summary Statistics, 2007 - 2013" 1. U.S. Coal Summary Statistics, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" "Year and","Production1","Imports","Waste Coal","Producer and","Consumption","Exports","Consumer","Losses and" "Quarter",,,"Supplied","Distributor",,,"Stocks2","Unaccounted" ,,,,"Stocks2",,,,"For3" 2007 " January - March",286041,8786,3264,34007,278727,11139,149588 " April - June",285687,8405,3387,32484,267106,14702,162849 " July - September",286035,10559,3697,30090,303665,16198,150448 " October - December",288872,8597,3727,33977,278500,17124,158781 " Total",1146635,36347,14076,,1127998,59163,,4085

362

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 1. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Barrels) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption Annual Totals 2002 294,234 13,659 1.45 31.29 1.56 52.1 29,137 4,638 3.55 22.33 1.24 26.5 2003 322,547 15,076 1.45 31.01 1.37 60.7 27,538 4,624 4.85 28.86 1.25 23.2 2004 326,495 15,324 1.63 34.79 1.43 57.6 25,491 4,107 4.98 30.93 1.38 18.5 2005 339,968 16,011 1.94 41.17 1.42 61.9 36,383 5,876 6.64 41.13 1.36 26.4

363

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Electric Utilties by State, 2012 2. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Electric Utilties by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 353 2.20 7.7 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 353 2.20 7.7 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

364

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Productive Capacity and Capacity Utilization of Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012" Productive Capacity and Capacity Utilization of Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Continuous1",,"Conventional and Other2",,"Longwall3",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Productive","Capacity","Productive","Capacity","Productive","Capacity","Productive","Capacity" "State","Capacity","Utilization","Capacity","Utilization","Capacity","Utilization","Capacity","Utilization" ,,"Percent",,"Percent",,"Percent",,"Percent" "Alabama","w","w","-","-","w","w",14594,85.99

365

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Receipts of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 6. Receipts of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 440,421 484,260 -9.1% 3,652 4,226 419,062 434,504 3,636 13,156 14,072 32,373 Connecticut 112,084 116,563 -3.8% 71 738 112,012 107,121 0 3,210 0 5,494 Maine 42,374 56,230 -25% 0 0 28,302 33,578 0 NM 14,072 22,639 Massachusetts 175,314 198,295 -12% 2,789 2,393 168,890 184,156 3,636 7,872 0 3,875 New Hampshire 50,408 47,137 6.9% 754 1,046 49,655 45,725 0 0 0 NM

366

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by Cause Code and by NERC Region, 2012 A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by Cause Code and by NERC Region, 2012 AC & DC Circuit Outage Counts Sustained Outage Causes FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Weather, excluding lightning 6.00 27.00 3.00 30.00 63.00 12.00 -- 69.00 210.00 Lightning 5.00 10.00 8.00 5.00 31.00 16.00 13.00 57.00 145.00 Environmental -- 1.00 1.00 5.00 -- 1.00 -- -- 8.00 Contamination 14.00 -- -- -- 22.00 3.00 6.00 7.00 52.00 Foreign Interference 34.00 3.00 -- 4.00 13.00 1.00 2.00 14.00 71.00 Fire -- 2.00 -- 1.00 6.00 3.00 1.00 85.00 98.00 Vandalism, Terrorism, or Malicious Acts -- -- -- -- 2.00 -- -- 1.00 3.00 Failed AC Substation Equipment 18.00 16.00 35.00 63.00 57.00 16.00 15.00 65.00 285.00

367

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins B. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2012 Actual, 2013-2017 Projected Net Internal Demand (Megawatts) -- Winter Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region MAPP MISO PJM SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Actual 2012 / 2013 36,409 45,545 386,359 4,925 74,430 122,566 149,359 35,079 46,909 101,706 616,927 Projected 2013 / 2014 43,384 46,008 399,149 5,385 75,320 132,229 145,657 40,558 51,435 107,341 647,317 Projected 2014 / 2015 44,060 46,090 403,883 5,500 76,252 134,742 146,130 41,259 53,742 109,418 657,192 Projected 2015 / 2016 44,596 46,184 408,927 5,563 77,058 137,338 147,201 41,767 55,346 110,814 665,866

368

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, B. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2012 Actual, 2013-2017 Projected Summer Peak Load (Megawatts) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region MAPP MISO PJM SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Actual 2012 44,338 58,319 468,092 5,051 96,769 154,339 161,687 50,246 66,548 130,465 767,762 Projected 2013 45,668 59,969 469,857 5,109 96,192 155,553 159,032 53,971 67,998 133,523 777,015 Projected 2014 46,338 60,654 475,005 5,249 96,879 158,717 159,457 54,703 69,289 132,731 784,017 Projected 2015 47,053 61,428 484,637 5,360 97,565 162,216 164,150 55,346 71,423 134,183 798,724

369

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012" 3. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012" "(short tons produced per employee hour)" ,"Mine Production Range (thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State, Region1","Above 1,000","Above 500","Above 200","Above 100","Above 50","Above 10","10 or Under","Total2" "and Mine Type",,"to 1,000","to 500","to 200","to 100","to 50" "Alabama",1.69,2.5,1.95,1.72,1.83,0.69,0.55,1.68 " Underground",1.73,"-","-","-",1.08,0.31,"-",1.64 " Surface",1.36,2.5,1.95,1.72,2.11,1.19,0.55,1.75

370

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Average Cost of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 9. Average Cost of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Dollars per MMBtu) Census Division and State Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Connecticut -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Maine -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Massachusetts -- -- -- -- -- -- -- New Hampshire -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Rhode Island -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Vermont -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Middle Atlantic -- W W -- -- -- W New Jersey -- -- -- -- -- -- -- New York -- W W -- -- -- W Pennsylvania -- -- -- -- -- -- -- East North Central W W W 4.10 4.01 W W

371

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: 5. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Industrial Sector by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 19 0.66 6.9 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 19 0.66 6.9 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

372

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Existing Net Summer Capacity of Other Renewable Sources by Producer Type, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatts) B. Existing Net Summer Capacity of Other Renewable Sources by Producer Type, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatts) Year Wind Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Geothermal Other Biomass Total (Other Renewable Sources) Total (All Sectors) 2002 4,417 397 5,844 2,252 3,800 16,710 2003 5,995 397 5,871 2,133 3,758 18,153 2004 6,456 398 6,182 2,152 3,529 18,717 2005 8,706 411 6,193 2,285 3,609 21,205 2006 11,329 411 6,372 2,274 3,727 24,113 2007 16,515 502 6,704 2,214 4,134 30,069 2008 24,651 536 6,864 2,229 4,186 38,466 2009 34,296 619 6,939 2,382 4,317 48,552 2010 39,135 866 7,037 2,405 4,369 53,811 2011 45,676 1,524 7,077 2,409 4,536 61,221 2012 59,075 3,170 7,508 2,592 4,811 77,155

373

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012" Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012" "(million short tons)" ,"Continuous1",,"Conventional and Other2",,"Longwall3",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Recoverable","Average Recovery","Recoverable","Average Recovery","Recoverable","Average Recovery","Recoverable","Average Recovery" "State","Coal Reserves","Percentage","Coal Reserves","Percentage","Coal Reserves","Percentage","Coal Reserves","Percentage" ,"at Producing",,"at Producing",,"at Producing",,"at Producing"

374

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Outages by Type and NERC region, 2012 A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Outages by Type and NERC region, 2012 Outage Type FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Circuit Outage Counts Automatic Outages (Sustained) 151.00 163.00 127.00 272.00 374.00 105.00 80.00 796.00 2,068.00 Non-Automatic Outages (Operational) 77.00 44.00 97.00 230.00 192.00 27.00 45.00 337.00 1,049.00 Non-Automatic Outages (Planned) 2,650.00 453.00 512.00 2,050.00 2,450.00 369.00 472.00 2,744.00 11,700.00 Circuit Outage Hours Automatic Outages (Sustained) 2,852.28 1,312.97 14,244.87 19,857.23 7,123.70 1,509.51 682.60 24,238.64 71,821.80 Non-Automatic Outages (Operational) 186.87 27.08 67.68 186.08 426.59 3.32 13.96 67.59 979.17 Non-Automatic Outages (Planned) 872.65 710.33 1,222.36 1,095.46 503.01 357.44 105.06 1,105.43 5,971.74

375

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 21,196 695 18,300 2,087 115 2004 19,587 444 17,308 1,811 24 2005 19,370 560 17,033 1,753 25 2006 19,629 500 17,343 1,761 25 2007 19,576 553 17,116 1,785 122 2008 19,805 509 17,487 1,809 0 2009 19,669 465 17,048 2,155 0 2010 19,437 402 16,802 2,233 0 2011 16,972 388 14,625 1,955 4 2012 16,968 418 14,235 2,304 12 2010 January 1,546 30 1,332 184 0 February 1,384 25 1,215 144 0 March 1,650 36 1,434 180 0 April 1,655 33 1,426 196 0

376

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Consumption of Landfill Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 3. Consumption of Landfill Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 9,595 9,945 -3.5% 0 0 9,074 9,945 520 0 0 0 Connecticut 595 624 -4.6% 0 0 595 624 0 0 0 0 Maine 518 524 -1.0% 0 0 518 524 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 3,603 3,623 -0.6% 0 0 3,603 3,623 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 1,790 1,485 21% 0 0 1,270 1,485 520 0 0 0 Rhode Island 2,409 3,037 -21% 0 0 2,409 3,037 0 0 0 0

377

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Price of Coal Delivered to End Use Sector by Census Division and State, 2012 and 2011" 4. Average Price of Coal Delivered to End Use Sector by Census Division and State, 2012 and 2011" "(dollars per short ton)" ,2012,,,,2011,,,,"Annual Percent Change" "Census Division","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial" "and State","Power1","Industrial",,"and","Power1","Industrial",,"and","Power1","Industrial",,"and" ,,,,"Institutional",,,,"Institutional",,,,"Institutional" "New England",88.32,165.17,"-","-",87.62,"w","-","-",0.8,"w","-","-"

378

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013" U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,"Other Industrial",,,"Commercial and Institutional" "Year and","Electric","Coke","CHP2","Non-","Total","CHP4","Non-","Total","Total" "Quarter","Power","Plants",,"CHP3",,,"CHP5" ,"Sector1" 2007 " January - March",257516,5576,5834,8743,14578,547,510,1058,278727 " April - June",246591,5736,5552,8521,14074,426,279,705,267106 " July - September",283556,5678,5546,8180,13725,458,247,705,303665 " October - December",257478,5726,5605,8634,14238,495,563,1058,278500

379

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Average Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" 9. Average Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "NAICS Code","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "311 Food Manufacturing",51.17,49.59,50.96,50.35,50.94,-1.2 "312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg.",111.56,115.95,113.47,113.49,117.55,-3.5 "313 Textile Mills",115.95,118.96,127.41,117.4,128.07,-8.3 "315 Apparel Manufacturing","w","w","w","w","w","w" "321 Wood Product Manufacturing","w","w","w","w","w","w"

380

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 136,421 9,168 121,984 3,280 1,989 2004 143,844 11,250 125,848 4,081 2,665 2005 141,899 11,490 123,064 4,797 2,548 2006 160,033 16,617 136,108 6,644 664 2007 166,774 17,442 144,104 4,598 630 2008 195,777 20,465 169,547 5,235 530 2009 206,792 19,583 180,689 5,931 589 2010 218,331 19,975 192,428 5,535 393 2011 232,795 22,086 180,856 29,469 384 2012 256,376 25,193 201,965 26,672 2,545 2010 January 17,531 1,715 15,323 461 32 February 16,189 1,653 14,120 384 33

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trends output growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 . Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Average Cost Average Cost Average Cost Average Cost Period Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Receipts (Thousand Barrels) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Receipts (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per MMBtu) 2002 884,287 0.94 1.25 25.52 120,851 1.64 3.34 20.77 5,607,737 3.56 1.86 2003 986,026 0.97 1.28 26.00 185,567 1.53 4.33 26.78 5,500,704 5.39 2.28 2004 1,002,032 0.97 1.36 27.42 186,655 1.66 4.29 26.56 5,734,054 5.96 2.48 2005 1,021,437 0.98 1.54 31.20 194,733 1.61 6.44 39.65 6,181,717 8.21 3.25

382

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commercial Sector, 2002 - 2012 9. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commercial Sector, 2002 - 2012 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Barrels) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption Annual Totals 2002 9,580 399 2.10 50.44 2.59 28.4 503 91 5.38 29.73 0.02 7.5 2003 8,835 372 1.99 47.24 2.43 20.5 248 43 7.00 40.82 0.04 3.1 2004 10,682 451 2.08 49.32 2.48 23.5 3,066 527 6.19 35.96 0.20 26.9 2005 11,081 464 2.57 61.21 2.43 24.2 1,684 289 8.28 48.22 0.17 18.3 2006 12,207 518 2.63 61.95 2.51 27.5 798 137 13.50 78.70 0.17 15.5

383

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Breeze Production at Coke Plants" Coke and Breeze Production at Coke Plants" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East North Central",2303,2314,2365,4617,4754,-2.9 "South Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East South Central","w","w","w","w","w","w" "U.S. Total",4152,4098,4104,8249,8233,0.2 "Coke Total",3954,3841,3863,7795,7721,1

384

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Electric Power Industry - Electricity Sales for Resale, 2. Electric Power Industry - Electricity Sales for Resale, 2002 through 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Year Electric Utilities Energy-Only Providers Independent Power Producers Combined Heat and Power U.S. Total 2002 1,838,901 5,757,283 943,531 28,963 8,568,678 2003 1,824,030 3,906,220 1,156,796 33,909 6,920,954 2004 1,923,440 3,756,175 1,053,364 25,996 6,758,975 2005 1,925,710 2,867,048 1,252,796 26,105 6,071,659 2006 1,698,389 2,446,104 1,321,342 27,638 5,493,473 2007 1,603,179 2,476,740 1,368,310 31,165 5,479,394 2008 1,576,976 2,718,661 1,355,017 30,079 5,680,733 2009 1,495,636 2,240,399 1,295,857 33,139 5,065,031 2010 1,541,554 2,946,452 1,404,137 37,068 5,929,211 2011 1,529,434 2,206,981 1,372,306 34,400 5,143,121

385

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Petroleum Liquids as the Primary Fuel, 2. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Petroleum Liquids as the Primary Fuel, by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts, Percent) Fuel-Switchable Part of Total Producer Type Total Net Summer Capacity of All Generators Reporting Petroleum as the Primary Fuel Net Summer Capacity of Petroleum-Fired Generators Reporting the Ability to Switch to Natural Gas Fuel Switchable Capacity as Percent of Total Maximum Achievable Net Summer Capacity Using Natural Gas Electric Utilities 26,732 7,640 28.6 7,224 Independent Power Producers, Non-Combined Heat and Power Plants 18,644 7,867 42.2 6,628 Independent Power Producers, Combined Heat and Power Plants 317 -- -- -- Electric Power Sector Subtotal 45,693 15,507 33.9 13,852 Commercial Sector 443 21 4.8 21

386

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 6,836 2,125 3,580 2 1,130 2003 6,303 2,554 3,166 2 582 2004 7,677 4,150 2,985 1 541 2005 8,330 4,130 3,746 1 452 2006 7,363 3,619 3,286 1 456 2007 6,036 2,808 2,715 2 512 2008 5,417 2,296 2,704 1 416 2009 4,821 2,761 1,724 1 335 2010 4,994 3,325 1,354 2 313 2011 5,012 3,449 1,277 1 286 2012 3,675 2,105 756 1 812 2010 January 433 283 121 0.17 29 February 404 258 120 0.15 25 March 438 308 108 0.19 23 April 382 253 107 0.12 22 May 415 261 129 0 25

387

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: 5. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: Total by End-Use Sector, 2003 - December 2012 (Million Kilowatthours) Period Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Annual Totals 2003 1,275,824 1,198,728 1,012,373 6,810 3,493,734 2004 1,291,982 1,230,425 1,017,850 7,224 3,547,479 2005 1,359,227 1,275,079 1,019,156 7,506 3,660,969 2006 1,351,520 1,299,744 1,011,298 7,358 3,669,919 2007 1,392,241 1,336,315 1,027,832 8,173 3,764,561 2008 1,379,981 1,335,981 1,009,300 7,700 3,732,962 2009 1,364,474 1,307,168 917,442 7,781 3,596,865 2010 1,445,708 1,330,199 970,873 7,712 3,754,493 2011 1,422,801 1,328,057 991,316 7,672 3,749,846 2012 1,374,515 1,327,101 985,714 7,320 3,694,650 2010

388

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division" 3. Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East North Central",3051,2997,3092,6048,6156,-1.8 "South Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East South Central","w","w","w","w","w","w" "U.S. Total",5471,5280,5296,10751,10579,1.6 "w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure."

389

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Consumption of Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 4. Consumption of Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 4,041 4,122 -2.0% 0 0 3,838 3,922 203 200 0 0 Connecticut 1,415 1,442 -1.9% 0 0 1,415 1,442 0 0 0 0 Maine 440 445 -1.3% 0 0 237 246 203 200 0 0 Massachusetts 2,017 2,063 -2.2% 0 0 2,017 2,063 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 169 172 -2.0% 0 0 169 172 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

390

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, A. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, 2002 - 2012, Actual Net Internal Demand (Megawatts) -- Summer Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region ECAR MAAC MAIN MAPP MISO MRO PJM RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 2002 37,951 55,164 430,396 101,251 54,296 53,267 -- -- 28,825 -- -- 154,459 38,298 55,833 117,032 696,376 2003 40,387 53,936 422,253 98,487 53,566 53,617 -- -- 28,775 -- -- 148,380 39,428 59,282 120,894 696,752 2004 42,243 51,580 419,349 95,300 52,049 50,499 -- -- 29,094 -- -- 153,024 39,383 58,531 121,205 692,908

391

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 0 N/A N/A 29,643 N/A N/A N/A 0 3,825 N/A 2003 0 0 0 27,988 96 36 583 0 4,222 32,926 2004 0 0 0 28,367 120 30 647 0 3,248 32,413 2005 0 0 0 28,271 113 34 585 0 3,195 32,199 2006 0 0 0 28,400 29 35 509 0 2,899 31,872 2007 0 0 0 28,287 27 40 565 0 1,590 30,509 2008 0 0 0 26,641 21 0 800 0 1,676 29,138 2009 0 0 0 25,292 22 0 718 0 1,868 27,901 2010 0 2 0 25,706 15 0 853 0 1,668 28,244

392

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Net Generation from Other Energy Sources 6. Net Generation from Other Energy Sources by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 2,153 2,019 6.7% 0 0 1,944 1,888 88 84 121 46 Connecticut 756 705 7.3% 0 0 756 704 0 0 0 1 Maine 424 390 8.7% 0 0 245 261 88 84 92 45 Massachusetts 906 860 5.5% 0 0 877 860 0 0 29 0 New Hampshire 66 64 2.6% 0 0 66 64 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 2,497 2,441 2.3% 0 0 1,924 1,975 465 344 107 122

393

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Steam Coal Exports" U.S. Steam Coal Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",1619502,1246181,2153814,2865683,3065683,-6.5 " Canada*",797861,599752,841061,1397613,1280803,9.1 " Dominican Republic",51698,160672,124720,212370,312741,-32.1 " Honduras","-",41664,34161,41664,68124,-38.8 " Jamaica",25,36311,"-",36336,33585,8.2 " Mexico",717687,407422,1116653,1125109,1331754,-15.5 " Other**",52231,360,37219,52591,38676,36

394

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Receipts and Quality of Coal Delivered for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 . Receipts and Quality of Coal Delivered for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Period Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight 2002 423,128 1.47 10.1 391,785 0.36 6.2 65,555 0.93 13.3 2003 467,286 1.50 10.0 432,513 0.38 6.4 79,869 1.03 14.4 2004 470,619 1.52 10.4 445,603 0.36 6.0 78,268 1.05 14.2 2005 480,179 1.56 10.5 456,856 0.36 6.2 77,677 1.02 14.0 2006 489,550 1.59 10.5 504,947 0.35 6.1 75,742 0.95 14.4 2007 467,817 1.62 10.3 505,155 0.34 6.0 71,930 0.90 14.0

395

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumption at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" Coal Consumption at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "New England","w","w",20,"w","w","w" " Maine","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Massachusetts","w","w","w","w","w","w" "Middle Atlantic",583,589,651,1171,1237,-5.3 " New York",155,181,206,337,374,-10.1

396

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 65,770 3,930 59,089 1,753 998 2004 69,331 5,373 60,514 2,093 1,351 2005 67,902 5,650 58,624 2,360 1,269 2006 75,970 8,287 63,950 3,388 345 2007 79,712 8,620 68,432 2,344 316 2008 94,215 10,242 81,029 2,668 276 2009 99,821 9,748 86,773 2,999 301 2010 105,835 10,029 92,763 2,837 205 2011 112,538 11,146 89,857 11,332 203 2012 124,297 12,721 99,938 10,356 1,282 2010 January 8,441 853 7,335 236 17 February 7,824 830 6,781 197 17 March 9,056 1,013 7,796 226 21

397

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 6,249,585 2,307,358 3,214,286 30,626 697,315 2003 5,735,770 1,809,003 3,200,057 39,424 687,286 2004 5,827,470 1,857,247 3,351,469 33,623 585,132 2005 6,212,116 2,198,098 3,444,875 34,645 534,498 2006 6,643,926 2,546,169 3,508,597 35,473 553,687 2007 7,287,714 2,808,500 3,872,646 34,872 571,697 2008 7,087,191 2,803,283 3,712,872 34,138 536,899 2009 7,301,522 2,981,285 3,750,080 35,046 535,111 2010 7,852,665 3,359,035 3,882,995 40,356 570,279 2011 8,052,309 3,511,732 3,906,484 48,509 585,584

398

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division" 4. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East North Central",157.29,176.84,199.7,166.21,198.26,-16.2 "South Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East South Central","w","w","w","w","w","w" "U.S. Total",157.26,171.51,191.48,163.85,190.51,-14

399

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Demand-Side Management Program Direct and Indirect Costs, 5. Demand-Side Management Program Direct and Indirect Costs, 2002 through 2012 (Thousand Dollars) Year Energy Efficiency Load Management Direct Cost Indirect Cost Total Cost 2002 1,032,911 410,323 1,443,234 206,169 1,649,403 2003 807,403 352,137 1,159,540 137,670 1,340,686 2004 910,816 510,281 1,421,097 132,295 1,560,578 2005 1,180,576 622,287 1,802,863 127,925 1,939,115 2006 1,270,602 663,980 1,934,582 128,886 2,072,962 2007 1,677,969 700,362 2,378,331 160,326 2,604,711 2008 2,137,452 836,359 2,973,811 181,843 3,186,742 2009 2,221,480 944,261 3,165,741 394,193 3,607,076 2010 2,906,906 1,048,356 3,955,262 275,158 4,230,420 2011 4,002,672 1,213,102 5,215,774 328,622 5,544,396 2012 4,397,635 1,270,391 5,668,026 332,440 6,000,466

400

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 213 N/A N/A 709 N/A N/A N/A 1,402 242,302 N/A 2003 354 2 0 882 394 326 214 1,249 249,622 253,043 2004 405 6 0 1,209 460 198 166 1,248 245,546 249,238 2005 1,046 16 0 1,829 503 250 175 1,126 245,553 250,499 2006 2,351 15 0.18 1,937 705 228 190 1,162 261,864 268,452 2007 4,361 10 1 2,226 751 240 226 1,139 226,734 235,687 2008 6,899 16 1 1,888 844 211 252 1,197 229,645 240,953

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401

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 134,415 88,595 39,035 826 5,959 2003 175,136 105,319 61,420 882 7,514 2004 165,107 103,793 56,342 760 4,212 2005 165,137 98,223 62,154 580 4,180 2006 73,821 53,529 17,179 327 2,786 2007 82,433 56,910 22,793 250 2,480 2008 53,846 38,995 13,152 160 1,538 2009 43,562 31,847 9,880 184 1,652 2010 40,103 30,806 8,278 164 855 2011 27,326 20,844 5,633 133 716 2012 22,604 17,521 4,110 272 702 2010 January 5,587 4,381 1,083 17 106 February 2,156 1,599 454 15 88

402

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Power Plant Operating Expenses for Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities, 2002 through 2012 (Mills per Kilowatthour) 4. Average Power Plant Operating Expenses for Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities, 2002 through 2012 (Mills per Kilowatthour) Operation Maintenance Year Nuclear Fossil Steam Hydro-electric Gas Turbine and Small Scale Nuclear Fossil Steam Hydro-electric Gas Turbine and Small Scale 2002 9.00 2.59 3.71 3.26 5.04 2.67 2.62 2.38 2003 9.12 2.74 3.47 3.50 5.23 2.72 2.32 2.26 2004 8.97 3.13 3.83 4.27 5.38 2.96 2.76 2.14 2005 8.26 3.21 3.95 3.69 5.27 2.98 2.73 1.89 2006 9.03 3.57 3.76 3.51 5.69 3.19 2.70 2.16 2007 9.54 3.63 5.44 3.26 5.79 3.37 3.87 2.42 2008 9.89 3.72 5.78 3.77 6.20 3.59 3.89 2.72 2009 10.00 4.23 4.88 3.05 6.34 3.96 3.50 2.58 2010 10.50 4.04 5.33 2.79 6.80 3.99 3.81 2.73

403

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price of U.S. Coal Imports" Price of U.S. Coal Imports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Origin",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",147.86,138.39,191.01,144.86,197.96,-26.8 " Canada",147.86,138.39,191,144.86,197.95,-26.8 " Mexico","-","-",286.23,"-",286.23,"-" "South America Total",75.29,80.74,86.52,77.2,87.17,-11.4 " Argentina","-","-",504.7,"-",504.7,"-" " Colombia",74.87,80.74,83.03,76.96,85.25,-9.7 " Peru",87.09,"-","-",87.09,"-","-"

404

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators: From Natural Gas to Petroleum Liquids, 4. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators: From Natural Gas to Petroleum Liquids, by Year of Initial Commercial Operation, 2012 (Megawatts, Percent) Year of Initial Commercial Operation Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity Fuel Switchable Net Summer Capacity Reported to Have No Factors that Limit the Ability to Switch to Petroleum Liquids Pre-1970 318 11,735 7,535 1970-1974 376 18,210 11,033 1975-1979 105 11,031 7,283 1980-1984 46 945 211 1985-1989 107 3,155 413 1990-1994 208 11,738 1,453 1995-1999 134 9,680 2,099 2000-2004 392 39,841 5,098 2005-2009 116 14,791 2,066 2010-2012 78 8,479 320 Total 1,880 129,604 37,510 Notes: Petroleum includes distillate fuel oil (all diesel and No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 fuel oils), residual fuel oil (No. 5 and No. 6 fuel oils and bunker C fuel oil), jet fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke (converted to liquid petroleum, see Technical Notes for conversion methodology), waste oil, and beginning in 2011, synthetic gas and propane. Prior to 2011, synthetic gas and propane were included in Other Gases.

405

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" 5. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "NAICS Code","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "311 Food Manufacturing",2256,2561,1864,4817,4343,10.9 "312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg.",38,50,48,88,95,-7.7 "313 Textile Mills",31,29,21,60,59,2.2 "315 Apparel Manufacturing","w","w","w","w","w","w" "321 Wood Product Manufacturing","w","w","w","w","w","w"

406

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 148,110 5,766 128,947 13,095 302 2004 141,577 3,705 124,815 12,909 146 2005 144,339 4,724 126,529 12,923 164 2006 146,987 4,078 129,779 12,964 165 2007 146,308 4,557 127,826 13,043 881 2008 148,452 4,476 130,041 13,934 0 2009 146,971 3,989 126,649 16,333 0 2010 144,934 3,322 124,437 17,176 0 2011 135,241 3,433 115,841 15,933 34 2012 135,735 3,910 113,418 18,307 100 2010 January 11,540 244 9,886 1,410 0 February 10,313 190 9,030 1,094 0

407

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Average Quality of Fossil Fuel Receipts for the Electric Power Industry, 3. Average Quality of Fossil Fuel Receipts for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Period Average Btu per Pound Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Average Btu per Gallon Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Average Btu per Cubic Foot 2002 10,168 0.94 8.7 147,903 1.64 0.2 1,025 2003 10,137 0.97 9.0 147,086 1.53 0.1 1,030 2004 10,074 0.97 9.0 147,286 1.66 0.2 1,027 2005 10,107 0.98 9.0 146,481 1.61 0.2 1,028 2006 10,063 0.97 9.0 143,883 2.31 0.2 1,027 2007 10,028 0.96 8.8 144,546 2.10 0.1 1,027 2008 9,947 0.97 9.0 142,205 2.21 0.3 1,027 2009 9,902 1.01 8.9 141,321 2.14 0.2 1,025 2010 9,842 1.16 8.8 140,598 2.14 0.2 1,022

408

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Net Generation from Hydroelectric (Pumped Storage) Power 5. Net Generation from Hydroelectric (Pumped Storage) Power by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England -305 -435 -29.9% 0 0 -305 -435 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 3 6 -51.5% 0 0 3 6 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts -308 -440 -30.1% 0 0 -308 -440 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic -1,022 -1,124 -9.0% -579 -630 -443 -494 0 0 0 0

409

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports" Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",78.29,77.25,102.62,77.88,105.14,-25.9 " Canada*",81.61,80.7,110.67,81.3,112.16,-27.5 " Dominican Republic",78.54,75.09,73.89,75.77,76.61,-1.1 " Honduras","-",54.58,54.43,54.58,54.43,0.3 " Jamaica",480,54.43,"-",54.72,55.42,-1.3 " Mexico",73.45,75.81,94.36,74.35,100.95,-26.3 " Other**",80.33,389.3,70.37,82.45,76.1,8.3

410

SAS Output  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

5. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu)...

411

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Weighted Average Cost of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Total Fossil Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite All Coal Ranks...

412

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators: From Natural Gas to Petroleum Liquids, by Type of Prime Mover, 2012 (Megawatts, Percent) Prime Mover Type Number of Generators...

413

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

" Italy","-","-","-","-",3,"-" " Netherlands","-","-","-","-",1046,"-" " Russia",42439,"-","-",42439,"-","-" " Ukraine",80025,23142,"-",103167,22155,365.7 " United...

414

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

455,214 Other Gases 94 2,253 1,946 1,933 Nuclear 104 107,938 101,885 104,182 Hydroelectric Conventional 4,023 78,241 78,738 78,215 Wind 947 59,629 59,075 59,082 Solar...

415

SAS Output  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

3,001 2,267 2,431 Other Gases 1 * * * 4 120 152 152 Nuclear -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Hydroelectric Conventional 15 345 344 342 28 317 315 314 Wind 149 12,953 12,885 12,885 1 13 12...

416

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Net Generation from Hydroelectric (Conventional) Power by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors...

417

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

because of independent rounding." "Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Mine Safety and Health Administration, Form 7000-2, 'Quarterly Mine Employment and Coal Production Report.'...

418

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2012 (From Chapter 2.) Supply (Million Megawatthours) Generation Year Electric Utilities IPP (Non-CHP) IPP (CHP) Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Total Imports Total...

419

SAS Output  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

- Electricity Purchases, 2002 through 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Year Electric Utilities Energy-Only Providers Independent Power Producers Combined Heat and Power U.S. Total...

420

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

to Date" "Customs District","April - June","January - March","April - June",2014,2013,"Percent" ,2014,2014,2013,,,"Change" "Eastern Total",14307904,16331296,16667115,3063920...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trends output growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,,,"Year to Date" "Commodity","April - June","January - March","April - June",2014,2013,"Percent" ,2014,2014,2013,,,"Change" "Coke" " Sales",1969,1865,1969,3834,3905,-1.8 "...

422

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

18,481,678 1,320,095 624,502 45,083,186 19,106,180 2011 51,075,952 14,398,470 1,223,758 650,082 52,299,710 15,048,552 2012 57,971,110 11,392,267 1,285,959 603,382...

423

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Productivity by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" ,"Number of Mining Operations2",,,"Number of Employees3",,,"Average Production per Employee Hour" ,,,"(short tons)4"...

424

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve by Mining Method, 2012" "(million short tons)" ,"Underground - Minable...

425

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Coal Rank, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Bituminous",,"Subbituminous",,"Lignite",,"Anthracite",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Number...

426

SAS Output  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

B. U.S. Transformer Outages by Type and NERC region, 2012 Outage Type Eastern Interconnection TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Circuit Outage Counts Automatic Outages (Sustained) 16.00 --...

427

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2012 2,162,230 102,223 1,509 -- 2,265,963 In 2006 the single largest provider of green pricing services in the country discontinued service in two States. More than...

428

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins B. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2012 Actual, 2013-2017 Projected Net Internal Demand (Megawatts) -- Summer Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region MAPP MISO PJM SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Actual 2012 44,338 58,319 469,273 4,967 96,769 156,319 158,041 53,177 66,548 130,465 768,943 Projected 2013 42,532 59,969 447,171 5,022 91,644 144,378 152,949 53,177 65,901 129,278 744,851 Projected 2014 43,142 60,654 448,912 5,161 92,331 144,497 152,843 54,080 67,592 128,200 748,499 Projected 2015 43,812 61,428 457,865 5,270 93,017 147,568 157,287 54,722 69,679 129,553 762,336

429

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Annual Totals 2002 21,525 3,196 1,207 79,013 9,493 0 3,825 30,489 0 3,832 152,580 2003 19,817 3,726 1,559 78,705 12,953 0 4,222 28,704 0 4,843 154,530 2004 19,773 4,128 1,839 78,959 11,684 0 3,248 29,164 0 5,129 153,925 2005 19,466 3,804 1,564 72,882 9,687 0 3,195 29,003 0 5,137 144,739 2006 19,464 2,567 1,656 77,669 9,923 0 2,899 28,972 0 5,103 148,254 2007 16,694 2,355 1,889 77,580 9,411 0 1,590 28,919 0 4,690 143,128

430

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Existing Net Summer Capacity by Energy Source and Producer Type, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatts) A. Existing Net Summer Capacity by Energy Source and Producer Type, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatts) Year Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Other Gases Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Other Renewable Sources Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Energy Sources Total Total (All Sectors) 2002 315,350 59,651 312,512 2,008 98,657 79,356 16,710 20,371 686 905,301 2003 313,019 60,730 355,442 1,994 99,209 78,694 18,153 20,522 684 948,446 2004 313,020 59,119 371,011 2,296 99,628 77,641 18,717 20,764 746 962,942 2005 313,380 58,548 383,061 2,063 99,988 77,541 21,205 21,347 887 978,020 2006 312,956 58,097 388,294 2,256 100,334 77,821 24,113 21,461 882 986,215 2007 312,738 56,068 392,876 2,313 100,266 77,885 30,069 21,886 788 994,888

431

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Average Cost of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 0. Average Cost of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Dollars per MMBtu) Census Division and State Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 3.69 4.94 -25% 4.73 5.70 3.68 4.93 Connecticut 3.88 4.97 -22% 6.45 NM 3.87 4.96 Maine W W W -- -- W W Massachusetts 3.55 4.88 -27% 4.47 5.75 3.53 4.87 New Hampshire W W W 5.54 6.01 W W Rhode Island 3.86 5.01 -23% -- -- 3.86 5.01 Vermont 4.06 5.22 -22% 4.06 5.22 -- -- Middle Atlantic 3.52 5.14 -32% 3.86 5.32 3.46 5.11 New Jersey 3.52 5.11 -31% -- -- 3.52 5.11 New York 3.85 5.45 -29% 3.86 5.32 3.84 5.50

432

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Average Operating Heat Rate for Selected Energy Sources, . Average Operating Heat Rate for Selected Energy Sources, 2002 through 2012 (Btu per Kilowatthour) Year Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Nuclear 2002 10,314 10,641 9,533 10,442 2003 10,297 10,610 9,207 10,422 2004 10,331 10,571 8,647 10,428 2005 10,373 10,631 8,551 10,436 2006 10,351 10,809 8,471 10,435 2007 10,375 10,794 8,403 10,489 2008 10,378 11,015 8,305 10,452 2009 10,414 10,923 8,159 10,459 2010 10,415 10,984 8,185 10,452 2011 10,444 10,829 8,152 10,464 2012 10,498 10,991 8,039 10,479 Coal includes anthracite, bituminous, subbituminous and lignite coal. Waste coal and synthetic coal are included starting in 2002. Petroleum includes distillate fuel oil (all diesel and No. 1 and No. 2 fuel oils), residual fuel oil (No. 5 and No. 6 fuel oils and bunker C fuel oil, jet fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke, and waste oil.

433

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Net Generation from Natural Gas 0. Net Generation from Natural Gas by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 62,490 63,236 -1.2% 345 357 58,757 59,763 901 700 2,488 2,416 Connecticut 16,537 15,188 8.9% 6 NM 15,801 14,715 397 211 333 227 Maine 6,044 6,877 -12.1% 0 0 4,057 4,850 26 0.26 1,960 2,026 Massachusetts 24,672 25,940 -4.9% 278 240 23,812 25,120 416 443 166 136 New Hampshire 7,050 6,658 5.9% 58 80 6,947 6,552 16 0 29 26 Rhode Island 8,185 8,571 -4.5% 0 0 8,140 8,525 45 46 0 0

434

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Quality of Coal Received at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 4. Average Quality of Coal Received at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State1",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic" " Btu",12906,12815,11709,12844,12440,3.2 " Sulfur",1.03,0.92,0.99,0.96,0.97,-1 " Ash",8.94,8.62,10,8.72,9.11,-4.3 "Pennsylvania" " Btu",12906,12815,11709,12844,12440,3.2 " Sulfur",1.03,0.92,0.99,0.96,0.97,-1 " Ash",8.94,8.62,10,8.72,9.11,-4.3 "East North Central" " Btu",11928,12228,11682,12112,11933,1.5

435

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Major U.S. Coal Producers, 2012" Major U.S. Coal Producers, 2012" "Rank","Controlling Company Name","Production (thousand short tons)","Percent of Total Production" 1,"Peabody Energy Corp",192563,18.9 2,"Arch Coal Inc",136992,13.5 3,"Alpha Natural Resources LLC",104306,10.3 4,"Cloud Peak Energy",90721,8.9 5,"CONSOL Energy Inc",55752,5.5 6,"Alliance Resource Operating Partners LP",35406,3.5 7,"Energy Future Holdings Corp",31032,3.1 8,"Murray Energy Corp",29216,2.9 9,"NACCO Industries Inc",28207,2.8 10,"Patriot Coal Corp",23946,2.4 11,"Peter Kiewit Sons Inc",22725,2.2 12,"Westmoreland Coal Co",22215,2.2 13,"BHP Billiton Ltd",12580,1.2

436

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Receipts of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 5. Receipts of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 106 79 35% 0 0 0 23 0 0 106 56 New Jersey 0 NM NM 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NM

437

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Net Generation 6. Net Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 120,887 123,338 -2.0% 3,278 4,408 111,191 112,613 1,178 949 5,240 5,368 Connecticut 36,118 33,745 7.0% 37 93 35,347 33,208 397 211 337 233 Maine 14,429 15,974 -9.7% 0.17 1 10,186 10,890 208 176 4,035 4,907 Massachusetts 36,198 38,055 -4.9% 591 610 34,321 36,783 469 490 817 172 New Hampshire 19,264 20,066 -4.0% 2,017 2,994 17,170 17,020 49 20 29 31

438

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units Using Primarily Renewable Energy Sources and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) B. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units Using Primarily Renewable Energy Sources and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) Census Division and State Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Conventional Hydroelectric Biomass Sources Geothermal Total Renewable Sources Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 784.1 422.8 49.2 13.9 0.0 0.0 1,956.9 1,946.9 1,367.5 1,421.6 0.0 0.0 4,157.7 3,805.2 Connecticut 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 122.2 121.7 172.5 178.2 0.0 0.0 294.7 299.9 Maine 427.6 322.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 742.3 742.3 534.6 576.0 0.0 0.0 1,704.5 1,640.8 Massachusetts 63.8 29.6 41.2 11.7 0.0 0.0 261.1 262.7 395.4 406.9 0.0 0.0 761.5 710.9

439

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Independent Power Producers by State, 2012 3. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Independent Power Producers by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 732 0.87 10.5 41 0.09 2.0 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 41 0.09 2.0 0 -- -- Maine 32 0.80 7.0 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 700 0.88 10.7 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

440

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Average Cost of Coal Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 7. Average Cost of Coal Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Dollars per MMBtu) Census Division and State Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 3.59 3.68 -2.4% 4.07 3.55 3.34 3.74 Connecticut W W W -- -- W W Maine W W W -- -- W W Massachusetts W W W -- -- W W New Hampshire 4.07 3.55 15% 4.07 3.55 -- -- Rhode Island -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Vermont -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Middle Atlantic 2.50 2.68 -6.7% -- 2.92 2.50 2.63 New Jersey 4.05 4.18 -3.1% -- -- 4.05 4.18 New York 3.12 3.27 -4.6% -- 3.88 3.12 3.27 Pennsylvania 2.43 2.55 -4.7% -- 2.91 2.43 2.45

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trends output growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Count of Electric Power Industry Power Plants, by Sector, by Predominant Energy Sources within Plant, 2002 through 2012 . Count of Electric Power Industry Power Plants, by Sector, by Predominant Energy Sources within Plant, 2002 through 2012 Year Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Other Gases Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Other Renewables Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Energy Sources Total (All Sectors) 2002 633 1,147 1,649 40 66 1,426 682 38 28 2003 629 1,166 1,693 40 66 1,425 741 38 27 2004 625 1,143 1,670 46 66 1,425 749 39 28 2005 619 1,133 1,664 44 66 1,422 781 39 29 2006 616 1,148 1,659 46 66 1,421 843 39 29 2007 606 1,163 1,659 46 66 1,424 929 39 25 2008 598 1,170 1,655 43 66 1,423 1,076 39 29 2009 593 1,168 1,652 43 66 1,427 1,219 39 28 2010 580 1,169 1,657 48 66 1,432 1,355 39 32

442

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 (continued) 2. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2002 3,846 138 0.76 21.20 5.91 9.1 852,547 828,439 3.36 3.46 66.8 2.88 2003 16,383 594 1.04 28.74 5.73 47.3 823,681 798,996 5.32 5.48 69.9 4.20 2004 14,876 540 0.98 27.01 5.59 40.4 839,886 814,843 6.04 6.22 68.4 4.76 2005 16,620 594 1.21 33.75 5.44 58.2 828,882 805,132 8.00 8.24 74.3 6.18

443

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Existing Transmission Capacity by High-Voltage Size, 2012 A. Existing Transmission Capacity by High-Voltage Size, 2012 Voltage Circuit Miles Type Operating (kV) FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. AC 100-199 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- AC 200-299 6,018 7,813 1,538 6,933 21,757 2,948 -- 38,410 85,416 AC 300-399 -- 7,362 5,850 13,429 3,650 5,303 9,529 10,913 56,036 AC 400-599 1,201 543 -- 2,618 8,876 94 -- 12,794 26,125 AC 600-799 -- -- 190 2,226 -- -- -- -- 2,416 AC Multi-Circuit Structure 200-299 1,198 686 36 2,008 4,156 9 -- -- 8,092 AC Multi-Circuit Structure 300-399 -- 372 274 3,706 313 153 2,747 -- 7,564 AC Multi-Circuit Structure 400-599 -- -- -- 90 857 -- -- -- 947 AC Multi-Circuit Structure 600-799 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

444

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Energy for Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, A. Net Energy for Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2002 - 2012, Actual Net Energy (Thousands of Megawatthours) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region ECAR MAAC MAIN MAPP MISO MRO PJM RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 2002 211,116 286,199 2,301,321 567,897 273,907 279,264 -- -- 150,058 -- -- 835,319 194,876 280,269 666,696 3,745,601 2003 219,021 288,791 2,255,233 545,109 276,600 267,068 -- -- 153,918 -- -- 826,964 185,574 283,868 664,754 3,711,667 2004 220,335 292,725 2,313,180 553,236 283,646 274,760 -- -- 152,975 -- -- 856,734 191,829 289,146 682,053 3,797,439 2005 226,544 303,607 2,385,461 -- -- -- -- -- 216,633 -- 1,005,226 962,054 201,548 299,225 685,624 3,900,461

445

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Exports" U.S. Coal Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",3122664,2010882,3565711,5133546,5327583,-3.6 " Canada*",1773644,943061,2101534,2716705,3176066,-14.5 " Dominican Republic",51792,211736,124720,263528,312741,-15.7 " Honduras","-",41664,34161,41664,68124,-38.8 " Jamaica",25,36311,"-",36336,33585,8.2 " Mexico",1244972,777750,1268077,2022722,1698391,19.1 " Other**",52231,360,37219,52591,38676,36

446

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. U.S. Transformer Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by Cause Code and by NERC Region, 2012 B. U.S. Transformer Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by Cause Code and by NERC Region, 2012 Transformer Outage Counts Sustained Outage Causes FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Weather, excluding lightning -- -- -- -- 1.00 -- -- -- 1.00 Lightning -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Environmental -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Contamination 1.00 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 1.00 Foreign Interference -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Fire -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Vandalism, Terrorism, or Malicious Acts -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Failed AC Substation Equipment 3.00 1.00 -- 1.00 5.00 -- -- 4.00 14.00 Failed AC/DC Terminal Equipment -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Failed Protection System Equipment -- 1.00 -- -- 3.00 -- -- -- 4.00

447

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units by Technology and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) A. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units by Technology and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) Census Division and State Renewable Sources Fossil Fuels Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Energy Storage Nuclear All Other Sources All Sources Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 4,157.7 3,805.2 24,619.1 24,153.6 1,753.4 1,709.4 3.0 3.0 4,630.3 4,653.7 48.0 26.0 35,211.5 34,350.9 Connecticut 294.7 299.9 6,607.7 6,674.5 29.4 29.4 0.0 0.0 2,102.5 2,102.5 26.0 26.0 9,060.3 9,132.3 Maine 1,704.5 1,640.8 2,764.9 2,737.4 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 22.0 0.0 4,491.4 4,378.2 Massachusetts 761.5 710.9 11,155.2 10,637.8 1,724.0 1,680.0 3.0 3.0 677.3 684.7 0.0 0.0 14,321.0 13,716.4

448

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by State" by State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Coal-Producing Region","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Alabama",4649,4410,5171,9059,10150,-10.8 "Alaska",442,300,542,742,1091,-32 "Arizona",2184,1825,2002,4009,4169,-3.8 "Arkansas",2,4,11,6,33,-83.1 "Colorado",5297,5781,6885,11079,13914,-20.4 "Illinois",13474,13996,12487,27470,24419,12.5 "Indiana",9516,9422,9147,18938,18794,0.8 "Kansas",5,5,5,9,8,23.7 "Kentucky Total",20683,20594,22803,41276,49276,-16.2 " Eastern (Kentucky)",10392,10144,12444,20536,27516,-25.4

449

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Net Generation from Solar 0. Net Generation from Solar by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 35 7 427.1% 9 4 25 2 1 1 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 30 5 521.6% 9 4 20 0.14 1 1 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 5 2 179.0% 0 0 5 2 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 389 98 295.3% 41 19 303 65 37 8 8 5

450

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, A. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, 2002 - 2012, Actual Net Internal Demand (Megawatts) -- Winter Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region ECAR MAAC MAIN MAPP MISO MRO PJM RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 2002 / 2003 42,001 45,980 360,748 84,844 46,159 39,974 -- -- 23,090 -- -- 137,541 29,140 44,719 94,554 588,002 2003 / 2004 36,229 47,850 357,026 86,332 45,625 39,955 -- -- 24,042 -- -- 133,244 27,828 41,988 100,337 583,430 2004 / 2005 41,449 47,859 371,011 91,800 45,565 40,618 -- -- 24,446 -- -- 139,486 29,096 44,010 101,002 605,331

451

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumers in the Manufacturing and Coke Sectors, 2012" Coal Consumers in the Manufacturing and Coke Sectors, 2012" "Company Name","Plant Location" "Top Ten Manufacturers" "American Crystal Sugar Co","MN, ND" "Archer Daniels Midland","IA, IL, MN, ND, NE" "Carmeuse Lime Stone Inc","AL, IL, IN, KY, MI, OH, PA, TN, VA, WI" "Cemex Inc","AL, CA, CO, FL, GA, KY, OH, TN, TX" "Dakota Gasification Company","ND" "Eastman Chemical Company","TN" "Georgia-Pacific LLC","AL, GA, OK, VA, WI" "Holcim (US) Inc","AL, CO, MD, MO, MT, OK, SC, TX, UT" "NewPage Corporation","MD, MI, WI" "U S Steel Corporation","AL, IN, MI, MN"

452

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 0 N/A N/A 13 N/A N/A N/A 0 13 N/A 2003 0 0 0 13 152 717 420 0 72 1,374 2004 0 0 0 13 172 945 444 0 105 1,680 2005 0 0 0 16 218 953 486 0 86 1,759 2006 0 0 0 21 173 956 470 0 93 1,713 2007 0 0 0 15 203 962 434 0 77 1,691 2008 0 0.08 0 21 234 911 389 0 60 1,615 2009 0.21 0.04 0 20 318 1,045 386 0 71 1,839 2010 16 5 0 21 256 1,031 386 0 80 1,794 2011 51 84 0 26 952 971 393 0 26 2,502

453

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Net Generation from Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric 4. Net Generation from Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 8,557 8,015 6.8% 664 574 5,652 5,352 136 104 2,105 1,985 Connecticut 667 660 1.0% 0 0 667 660 0 0 0 0 Maine 4,099 4,495 -8.8% 0 0 2,468 2,421 92 89 1,539 1,985 Massachusetts 1,843 1,207 52.8% 68 48 1,198 1,145 11 13 566 0 New Hampshire 1,381 1,091 26.6% 347 291 1,003 800 31 0 0 0.35 Rhode Island 102 130 -21.8% 0 0 102 130 0 0 0 0

454

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Average Quality of Coal Received at Manufacturing and Coke Plants by Census Division and State" 3. Average Quality of Coal Received at Manufacturing and Coke Plants by Census Division and State" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State1",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "New England" " Btu",13323,13196,13391,13253,13339,-0.6 " Sulfur",0.84,0.89,0.72,0.87,0.72,20.3 " Ash",5.95,5.81,5.93,5.87,6.09,-3.6 "Maine" " Btu","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Sulfur","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Ash","w","w","w","w","w","w"

455

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Net Generation from Petroleum Coke 9. Net Generation from Petroleum Coke by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 76 344 -78.0% 0 0 0 263 0 0 76 81 New Jersey 40 58 -30.6% 0 0 0 0 0 0 40 58

456

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Net Generation from Petroleum Liquids 8. Net Generation from Petroleum Liquids by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 413 639 -35.4% 52 120 267 374 49 55 45 90 Connecticut 112 166 -32.6% 4 5 104 155 0.05 0 4 5 Maine 84 178 -52.8% 0.17 1 65 89 2 3 16 85 Massachusetts 174 197 -11.2% 15 40 98 128 37 28 25 NM New Hampshire 22 78 -72.1% 20 57 0.12 1 2 20 0.17 0.10 Rhode Island 18 14 31.0% 11 10 0.12 1 7 2 0 0 Vermont 3 8 -58.1% 2 6 0 0 1 2 0 0

457

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Union Status, 2012" Average Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Union Status, 2012" ,"Union",,"Nonunion" "Coal-Producing State","Underground","Surface","Underground","Surface" "and Region1" "Alabama",3044,70,89,1677 "Alaska","-",143,"-","-" "Arizona","-",432,"-","-" "Arkansas","-","-",70,"-" "Colorado",174,212,1858,261 "Illinois",647,58,3291,534 "Indiana","-","-",2054,1868 "Kentucky Total",564,93,10122,4595 " Kentucky (East)",48,93,6821,3943 " Kentucky (West)",516,"-",3301,652

458

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Annual Totals 2002 992 426 6 4,310 0.01 0 13 1,065 0 603 7,415 2003 1,206 416 8 3,899 0 0 72 1,302 0 594 7,496 2004 1,340 493 7 3,969 0 0 105 1,575 0 781 8,270 2005 1,353 368 7 4,249 0 0 86 1,673 0 756 8,492 2006 1,310 228 7 4,355 0.04 0 93 1,619 0 758 8,371 2007 1,371 180 9 4,257 0 0 77 1,614 0 764 8,273 2008 1,261 136 6 4,188 0 0 60 1,555 0 720 7,926 2009 1,096 157 5 4,225 0 0 71 1,769 0 842 8,165

459

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Number of Employees by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" Average Number of Employees by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" ,2012,,,2011,,,"Percent Change" "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total" "State and Region1" "Alabama",3190,1851,5041,3138,1618,4756,1.7,14.4,6 "Alaska","-",143,143,"-",136,136,"-",5.1,5.1 "Arizona","-",432,432,"-",419,419,"-",3.1,3.1 "Arkansas",70,3,73,67,3,70,4.5,"-",4.3 "Colorado",2032,473,2505,1927,478,2405,5.4,-1,4.2 "Illinois",3938,574,4512,3563,542,4105,10.5,5.9,9.9

460

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity Utilization of Coal Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" Capacity Utilization of Coal Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" "(percent)" ,2012,,,2011 "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total" "State" "Alabama",85.99,83.96,85.28,67.52,90.91,75.85 "Alaska","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arizona","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arkansas","w","-","w","w","-","w" "Colorado","w","w",76.65,"w","w",74.63 "Illinois",71.02,57.41,69.11,71.73,53.22,68.54

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trends output growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. U.S. Coke Summary Statistics, 2007 - 2013" 2. U.S. Coke Summary Statistics, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" "Year and","Production","Imports","Producer and","Consumption2","Exports" "Quarter",,,"Distributor" ,,,"Stocks1" 2007 " January - March",4000,454,717,4078,343 " April - June",4083,685,767,4428,291 " July - September",4063,521,637,4371,344 " October - December",4055,800,632,4394,466 " Total",16201,2460,,17270,1444 2008 " January - March",4036,850,478,4723,316 " April - June",3810,1243,505,4559,466 " July - September",4107,998,464,4494,653 " October - December",3694,512,916,3229,524

462

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Underground Coal Mining Productivity by State and Mining Method, 2012" 2. Underground Coal Mining Productivity by State and Mining Method, 2012" "(short tons produced per employee hour)" "Coal-Producing State, Region1 and Mine Type","Continuous2","Conventional and","Longwall4","Total" ,,"Other3" "Alabama",0.71,"-",1.69,1.66 "Arkansas",0.59,"-","-",0.59 "Colorado",1.9,"-",6.38,5.93 "Illinois",3.65,"-",6.6,4.86 "Indiana",3.25,"-","-",3.25 "Kentucky Total",2.43,1.77,"-",2.39 " Kentucky (East)",1.61,1.77,"-",1.62 " Kentucky (West)",3.61,"-","-",3.56 "Maryland",1.8,"-","-",1.8

463

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2012" 1. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2012" "(dollars per short ton)" "Coal-Producing State","Bituminous","Subbituminous","Lignite","Anthracite","Total" "Alabama",106.57,"-","-","-",106.57 "Alaska","-","w","-","-","w" "Arizona","w","-","-","-","w" "Arkansas","w","-","-","-","w" "Colorado","w","w","-","-",37.54 "Illinois",53.08,"-","-","-",53.08 "Indiana",52.01,"-","-","-",52.01

464

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013" Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013" "(dollars per short ton)" ,"January - March",,"April - June",,"July - September",,"October - December",,"Total" "Year","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports" 2007,74.13,45.91,64.3,46.86,72.1,47.38,71.09,50.51,70.25,47.64 2008,81.81,52.91,97.24,55.59,102.51,64.65,104.97,65.33,97.68,59.83 2009,113.08,61.03,93.28,65.44,98.7,64.93,100.98,64.72,101.44,63.91 2010,106.52,62.02,121.36,71.91,125.45,77.12,126.16,76.18,120.41,71.77 2011,139.34,86,153,105.86,155.88,112.06,147.38,110.19,148.86,103.32

465

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Coke and Breeze Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division" 1. Coke and Breeze Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division" "(thousand short tons)" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June","Percent Change" ,2013,2013,2012,"(June 30)" ,,,,"2013 versus 2012" "Middle Atlantic","w","w","w","w" "East North Central",724,510,509,42.1 "South Atlantic","w","w","w","w" "East South Central","w","w","w","w" "U.S. Total",914,690,674,35.6 "Coke Total",757,573,594,27.5 "Breeze Total",157,117,80,95.2 "w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure."

466

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Planned Generating Capacity Changes, by Energy Source, 2013-2017 5. Planned Generating Capacity Changes, by Energy Source, 2013-2017 Generator Additions Generator Retirements Net Capacity Additions Energy Source Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity 2013 U.S. Total 513 15,144 179 12,604 334 2,540 Coal 4 1,482 28 4,465 -24 -2,983 Petroleum 21 45 41 1,401 -20 -1,356 Natural Gas 87 6,818 55 2,950 32 3,868 Other Gases -- -- 1 4 -1 -4 Nuclear -- -- 4 3,576 -4 -3,576 Hydroelectric Conventional 17 385 36 185 -19 201 Wind 25 2,225 -- -- 25 2,225 Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic 277 3,460 1 1 276 3,459 Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels 10 489 -- -- 10 489 Geothermal 5 50 1 11 4 39

467

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" "(thousand short tons)" ,2012,,2011,,"Percent Change" "Coal-Producing","Number of Mines","Production","Number of Mines","Production","Number of Mines","Production" "State and Region1" "Alabama",46,19321,52,19071,-11.5,1.3 " Underground",8,12570,9,10879,-11.1,15.5 " Surface",38,6752,43,8192,-11.6,-17.6 "Alaska",1,2052,1,2149,"-",-4.5 " Surface",1,2052,1,2149,"-",-4.5 "Arizona",1,7493,1,8111,"-",-7.6 " Surface",1,7493,1,8111,"-",-7.6 "Arkansas",2,98,2,133,"-",-26.4

468

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Net Generation from Biomass 8. Net Generation from Biomass by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 7,229 7,138 1.3% 570 515 4,428 4,544 125 94 2,105 1,985 Connecticut 667 660 1.0% 0 0 667 660 0 0 0 0 Maine 3,212 3,788 -15.2% 0 0 1,581 1,714 92 89 1,539 1,985 Massachusetts 1,724 1,140 51.2% 0 0 1,157 1,137 1 3 566 0 New Hampshire 1,173 1,025 14.4% 347 291 795 734 31 0 0 0.35 Rhode Island 101 127 -21.1% 0 0 101 127 0 0 0 0

469

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 10,141 N/A N/A 8,300 N/A N/A N/A 13,089 18,189 N/A 2003 10,834 0 532 8,645 4,435 7,227 1,211 13,175 21,890 67,949 2004 13,739 0 569 8,528 4,377 6,978 884 13,563 19,518 68,154 2005 16,764 0 535 8,741 4,308 7,092 701 13,566 21,486 73,195 2006 24,238 0 493 8,404 4,771 7,259 774 13,406 24,390 83,736 2007 30,089 6 595 8,486 5,177 7,061 839 13,498 19,109 84,860 2008 48,464 60 787 8,750 6,057 6,975 1,040 13,643 23,451 109,226

470

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Year-End Coal Stocks by Sector, Census Division, and State, 2012 and 2011" 7. Year-End Coal Stocks by Sector, Census Division, and State, 2012 and 2011" "(thousand short tons)" ,2012,,,,,2011,,,,,"Total" "Census Division","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Producer","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Producer",2012,2011,"Percent" "and State","Power1","Industrial",,"and","and","Power1","Industrial",,"and","and",,,"Change" ,,,,"Institutional","Distributor",,,,"Institutional","Distributor" "New England",1030,13,"-","-","-",1389,"w","-","-","-",1042,"w","w"

471

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Net Generation from Nuclear Energy 2. Net Generation from Nuclear Energy by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 36,116 34,283 5.3% 0 0 36,116 34,283 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 17,078 15,928 7.2% 0 0 17,078 15,928 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 5,860 5,085 15.2% 0 0 5,860 5,085 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 8,189 8,363 -2.1% 0 0 8,189 8,363 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 4,989 4,907 1.7% 0 0 4,989 4,907 0 0 0 0

472

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Net Generation from Coal 7. Net Generation from Coal by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 4,103 6,848 -40.1% 1,268 2,208 2,793 4,592 0 0 42 47 Connecticut 653 526 24.2% 0 0 653 526 0 0 0 0 Maine 45 55 -18.0% 0 0 30 38 0 0 15 18 Massachusetts 2,137 4,059 -47.4% 0 0 2,110 4,029 0 0 27 30 New Hampshire 1,268 2,208 -42.6% 1,268 2,208 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

473

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Nitrogen Oxides Control Technology Emissions Reduction Factors 4. Nitrogen Oxides Control Technology Emissions Reduction Factors Nitrogen Oxides Control Technology EIA-Code(s) Reduction Factor Advanced Overfire Air AA 30% Alternate Burners BF 20% Flue Gas Recirculation FR 40% Fluidized Bed Combustor CF 20% Fuel Reburning FU 30% Low Excess Air LA 20% Low NOx Burners LN 30% Other (or Unspecified) OT 20% Overfire Air OV 20% Selective Catalytic Reduction SR 70% Selective Catalytic Reduction With Low Nitrogen Oxide Burners SR and LN 90% Selective Noncatalytic Reduction SN 30% Selective Noncatalytic Reduction With Low NOx Burners SN and LN 50% Slagging SC 20% Notes: Starting with 1995 data, reduction factors for Advanced Overfire Air, Low NOx Burners, and Overfire Air were reduced by 10 percent.

474

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Retail Sales and Direct Use of Electricity to Ultimate Customers 2. Retail Sales and Direct Use of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by Sector, by Provider, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatthours) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Direct Use Total End Use Total Electric Industry 2002 1,265,179,869 1,104,496,607 990,237,631 N/A 105,551,904 3,465,466,011 166,184,296 3,631,650,307 2003 1,275,823,910 1,198,727,601 1,012,373,247 6,809,728 N/A 3,493,734,486 168,294,526 3,662,029,012 2004 1,291,981,578 1,230,424,731 1,017,849,532 7,223,642 N/A 3,547,479,483 168,470,002 3,715,949,485 2005 1,359,227,107 1,275,079,020 1,019,156,065 7,506,321 N/A 3,660,968,513 150,015,531 3,810,984,044 2006 1,351,520,036 1,299,743,695 1,011,297,566 7,357,543 N/A 3,669,918,840 146,926,612 3,816,845,452

475

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Total Electric Power Industry Summary Statistics, 2012 and 2011 1. Total Electric Power Industry Summary Statistics, 2012 and 2011 Net Generation and Consumption of Fuels for January through December Total (All Sectors) Electric Power Sector Commercial Industrial Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Fuel Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Net Generation (Thousand Megawatthours) Coal 1,514,043 1,733,430 -12.7% 1,146,480 1,301,107 354,076 416,783 883 1,049 12,603 14,490 Petroleum Liquids 13,403 16,086 -16.7% 9,892 11,688 2,757 3,655 191 86 563 657 Petroleum Coke 9,787 14,096 -30.6% 5,664 9,428 1,758 3,431 6 3 2,359 1,234 Natural Gas 1,225,894 1,013,689 20.9% 504,958 414,843 627,833 511,447 6,603 5,487 86,500 81,911

476

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, 9. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 (Million Dollars) Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Census Division and State Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 7,418 7,546 6,137 6,441 3,292 3,504 38 45 16,885 17,536 Connecticut 2,213 2,339 1,901 2,038 452 486 19 19 4,584 4,882 Maine 657 674 467 494 242 268 0 0 1,366 1,436 Massachusetts 3,029 3,003 2,453 2,547 2,127 2,270 17 22 7,627 7,842 New Hampshire 713 736 598 629 231 238 0 0 1,543 1,602 Rhode Island 450 449 432 453 99 103 2 4 982 1,008 Vermont 356 346 285 281 142 139 0 0 784 766

477

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 (continued) 8. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2002 47,805 1,639 1.03 29.98 4.85 44.4 3,198,108 3,126,308 3.55 3.63 91.6 2.42 2003 59,377 2,086 0.60 17.16 4.88 64.3 3,335,086 3,244,368 5.33 5.48 96.2 3.15 2004 73,745 2,609 0.72 20.30 4.95 81.0 3,491,942 3,403,474 5.86 6.01 93.1 3.43 2005 92,706 3,277 0.90 25.42 5.09 82.9 3,675,165 3,578,722 8.20 8.42 95.8 4.69

478

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Coal Stocks at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" 9. Coal Stocks at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" "Census Division","June 30 2013","March 31 2013","June 30 2012","Percent Change" "and State",,,,"(June 30)" ,,,,"2013 versus 2012" "New England","w","w",21,"w" " Maine","w","w","w","w" " Massachusetts","w","w","w","w" "Middle Atlantic",295,251,286,3.2 " New York",137,78,107,27.6 " Pennsylvania",158,172,179,-11.5 "East North Central",734,692,761,-3.5 " Illinois",160,152,187,-14.1

479

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Stocks of Coal by Coal Rank: Electric Power Sector, 2002 - 2012 4. Stocks of Coal by Coal Rank: Electric Power Sector, 2002 - 2012 Electric Power Sector Period Bituminous Coal Subbituminous Coal Lignite Coal Total End of Year Stocks 2002 70,704 66,593 4,417 141,714 2003 57,716 59,884 3,967 121,567 2004 49,022 53,618 4,029 106,669 2005 52,923 44,377 3,836 101,137 2006 67,760 68,408 4,797 140,964 2007 63,964 82,692 4,565 151,221 2008 65,818 91,214 4,556 161,589 2009 91,922 92,448 5,097 189,467 2010 81,108 86,915 6,894 174,917 2011 82,056 85,151 5,179 172,387 2012 86,437 93,833 4,846 185,116 2010, End of Month Stocks January 86,354 86,893 4,845 178,091 February 82,469 83,721 4,836 171,026 March 86,698 86,014 5,030 177,742 April 92,621 89,545 7,095 189,260 May 93,069 91,514 7,085 191,669

480

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" 8. U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "NAICS Code","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "311 Food Manufacturing",2214,2356,1994,4570,4353,5 "312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg.",48,37,53,85,90,-5.6 "313 Textile Mills",31,29,22,59,63,-6.1 "315 Apparel Manufacturing","w","w","w","w","w","w" "321 Wood Product Manufacturing","w","w","w","w","w","w"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trends output growth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports" Average Price of U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",92.5,99.4,146.56,94.82,140.7,-32.6 " Canada*",99.83,125.2,142.46,106.43,138.19,-23 " Dominican Republic",114.6,77.21,"-",77.27,"-","-" " Mexico",78.93,78.54,180.76,78.77,153.65,-48.7 "South America Total",119.26,117.51,167.05,118.3,168.12,-29.6 " Argentina",146.7,131.08,182.47,137.36,196.37,-30.1 " Brazil",119.21,117.38,165.61,118.2,171.84,-31.2

482

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012" Coal Production by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Union",,"Nonunion",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Underground","Surface","Underground","Surface" "State and Region1" "Alabama",12410,"-",139,6669,12549,6669 "Alaska","-",2052,"-","-","-",2052 "Arizona","-",7493,"-","-","-",7493 "Arkansas","-","-",96,"-",96,"-" "Colorado",1673,2655,21955,2265,23628,4920 "Illinois",2897,"-",39939,5649,42837,5649

483

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Total (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Total (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 10,354 N/A N/A 38,665 N/A N/A N/A 14,491 264,329 N/A 2003 11,187 2 532 37,529 5,077 8,306 2,428 14,424 275,806 355,293 2004 14,144 6 569 38,117 5,128 8,151 2,141 14,811 268,417 351,485 2005 17,811 16 535 38,856 5,142 8,330 1,948 14,692 270,321 357,651 2006 26,589 15 493 38,762 5,677 8,478 1,944 14,568 289,246 385,772 2007 34,450 16 596 39,014 6,158 8,304 2,063 14,637 247,510 352,747

484

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Sulfur Dioxide Uncontrolled Emission Factors 1. Sulfur Dioxide Uncontrolled Emission Factors Fuel, Code, Source and Emission Units Combustion System Type / Firing Configuration Fuel EIA Fuel Code Source and Tables (As Appropriate) Emissions Units Lbs = Pounds MMCF = Million Cubic Feet MG = Thousand Gallons Cyclone Boiler Fluidized Bed Boiler Opposed Firing Boiler Spreader Stoker Boiler Tangential Boiler All Other Boiler Types Combustion Turbine Internal Combustion Engine Agricultural Byproducts AB Source: 1 Lbs per ton 0.08 0.01 0.08 0.08 0.08 0.08 N/A N/A Blast Furnace Gas BFG Sources: 1 (including footnote 7 within source); 2, Table 1.4-2 (including footnote d within source) Lbs per MMCF 0.60 0.06 0.60 0.60 0.60 0.60 0.60 0.60 Bituminous Coal* BIT Source: 2, Table 1.1-3 Lbs per ton 38.00 3.80 38.00 38.00 38.00 38.00 N/A N/A

485

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coke Imports" Average Price of U.S. Coke Imports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Origin",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",263.21,252.66,353.05,261.29,356.01,-26.6 " Canada",263.51,252.66,353.05,258.82,356.01,-27.3 " Panama",263.09,"-","-",263.09,"-","-" "South America Total",196.86,194.14,175.88,195.94,181.01,8.2 " Brazil","-","-",157.6,"-",157.6,"-" " Colombia",196.86,194.14,322.06,195.94,246.68,-20.6

486

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Natural Gas as the Primary Fuel, by Producer Type, 2012 1. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Natural Gas as the Primary Fuel, by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts, Percent) Fuel-Switchable Part of Total Producer Type Total Net Summer Capacity of All Generators Reporting Natural Gas as the Primary Fuel Net Summer Capacity of Natural Gas-Fired Generators Reporting the Ability to Switch to Petroleum Liquids Fuel Switchable Capacity as Percent of Total Maximum Achievable Net Summer Capacity Using Petroleum Liquids Fuel Switchable Net Summer Capacity Reported to Have No Factors that Limit the Ability to Switch to Petroleum Liquids Electric Utilities 206,774 78,346 37.9 74,835 23,624 Independent Power Producers, Non-Combined Heat and Power Plants 170,654 42,509 24.9 40,788 12,216

487

Worldwide Trends in Energy Use and Efficiency: Key Insights from  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Worldwide Trends in Energy Use and Efficiency: Key Insights from Worldwide Trends in Energy Use and Efficiency: Key Insights from International Energy Agency (IEA) Indicator Analysis in Support of the Group of Eight (G8) Plan of Action Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Worldwide Trends in Energy Use and Efficiency: Key Insights from International Energy Agency (IEA) Indicator Analysis in Support of the Group of Eight (G8) Plan of Action Focus Area: Power Plant Efficiency Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: www.iea.org/papers/2008/indicators_2008.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/worldwide-trends-energy-use-and-effic Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Deployment Programs" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property.

488

Future Trends in Nuclear Power Generation [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Future Trends in Nuclear Power Generation [and Discussion...the Calder Hall reactors were ordered...building and operating nuclear power stations...situations, a high nuclear share of new capacity...1980s. The fast reactor, prototypes of...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Variability of the Australian Monsoon and Precipitation Trends at Darwin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An atmospheric classification for northwestern Australia is used to define periods of monsoon activity and investigate the interannual and intraseasonal variability of the Australian monsoon, as well as long-term precipitation trends at Darwin. ...

Stuart Evans; Roger Marchand; Thomas Ackerman

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Trends in high-performance computing for engineering calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...James DeBonis Trends in high-performance computing for engineering calculations...and the environment . High-performance computing has evolved remarkably...application developers. high-performance computing|multicore|manycore...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Trends and Opportunities in Industrial Hazardous Waste Minimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes trends and opportunities in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act hazardous waste minimization. It uses U.S. Environmental Protection Agency data gathered since 1989 from over 20,000 facilities that account for almost all...

Atlas, M.

492

Recent Trends in Emerging Transportation Fuels and Energy Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several recent trends indicate current developments in energy and transportation fuels. World trade in biofuels is developing in ethanol, wood chips, and vegetable oil / biodiesel with some countries being exp...

B. G. Bunting

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Wind Power Price Trends in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

should eventually help wind power regain the downward priceModern Energy Review] Wind Power Price Trends in the Unitedled the world in adding new wind power capacity in 2008, and

Bolinger, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Positron Computed Tomography: Current State, Clinical Results and Future Trends  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

An overview is presented of positron computed tomography: its advantages over single photon emission tomography, its use in metabolic studies of the heart and chemical investigation of the brain, and future trends. (ACR)

Schelbert, H. R.; Phelps, M. E.; Kuhl, D. E.

1980-09-00T23:59:59.000Z

495

Intersecting Fault Trends and Crustal-Scale Fluid Pathways Below...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with deeper, NNW conductors. These conductors are believed to repre-sent zones of saline fluids whose collection is pro-moted by opening of these structural trends with the...

496

Californias North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1998. Changing trends in seafood markets: The case of farmed1998. Changing trends in seafood markets: The case of farmed1998. Changing trends in seafood markets: The case of farmed

Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Meeting National Needs, Creating Opportunities for Growth Brookhaven National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Needs, Creating Opportunities for Growth National Needs, Creating Opportunities for Growth Brookhaven National Laboratory Economic Impact Report This report was prepared by Appleseed, a New York City-based economic development consulting firm that works with government, corporations, and nonprofit institutions to promote economic growth and opportunity. 80 Broad Street 13th Floor New York, NY 10004 www.appleseedinc.com Fiscal Year 2009 Highlights By the numbers... State & Local Impacts National Influence Global Reach $704 Million in economic output generated by Brookhaven Lab and its visitors $573 Million in total funding 5,400 jobs created throughout New York State 3,000 employees, 98% living on Long Island 12% growth in employment from 2006 to 2009 $74.7 Million invested in new facilities and renovations

498

U.S. Solar Market Trends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grid-connected photovoltaic installations grew by 40% in 2009 compared with installations in 2008. California and New Jersey have the largest markets. Growth occurred in the residential and utility markets, but non-residential customer-sited installations did not change compared with the installations in 2008. Two small solar thermal electric plants were connected to the grid in 2009 with a combined capacity of 7 MW. The future prospects for solar thermal electric plants look bright, although developers are not expected to complete any new large plants until at least 2011. Solar water heating and solar space heating annual installations grew by 40% in 2008 compared with 2007. Hawaii, California, Puerto Rico, and Florida dominate this market. Solar pool heating annual installation capacity fell by 1% in 2008 following a dramatic decline of 15% in solar pool heating capacity in 2007 compared with 2006. Florida and California are the largest markets for solar pool heating. The economic decline in the real estate markets in Florida and California likely led to the decrease in pool installations and thus the dramatic decline in capacity installed of solar pool systems in 2007.

Larry Sherwood

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Office equipment energy use and trends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Office information technologies are using an increasing amount of energy in commercial buildings. During recent forecasting hearings in California, the office equipment end use has been a major source of differences among forecasts of commercial sector energy use. Not only are there major differences in forecasted load growth resulting from the energy use of office equipment, but there are also differences in interpretations of historical and base-year estimates. Understanding office equipment energy use is particularly important because office equipment is widely believed to be the fastest growing electrical end use in the fastest growing sector. This report describes the development and application of a spreadsheet to estimate current and future energy use by office equipment. We define the term ``office equipment`` to mean information processing technologies used in buildings. The seven categories of office equipment relate to categories found in our analysis of utility surveys and industry sales reports. These seven categories of equipment are examined for eleven types of commercial buildings.

Piette, M.A.; Eto, J.H.; Harris, J.P.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Office equipment energy use and trends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Office information technologies are using an increasing amount of energy in commercial buildings. During recent forecasting hearings in California, the office equipment end use has been a major source of differences among forecasts of commercial sector energy use. Not only are there major differences in forecasted load growth resulting from the energy use of office equipment, but there are also differences in interpretations of historical and base-year estimates. Understanding office equipment energy use is particularly important because office equipment is widely believed to be the fastest growing electrical end use in the fastest growing sector. This report describes the development and application of a spreadsheet to estimate current and future energy use by office equipment. We define the term office equipment'' to mean information processing technologies used in buildings. The seven categories of office equipment relate to categories found in our analysis of utility surveys and industry sales reports. These seven categories of equipment are examined for eleven types of commercial buildings.

Piette, M.A.; Eto, J.H.; Harris, J.P.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z