Sample records for treatment system monticello

  1. Field Projects: Monticello, Utah

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) of zero-valent iron is helping to clean up groundwater at a former uranium and vanadium ore processing mill at Monticello, Utah. LM managed remediation of...

  2. Completion of the Five-Year Reviews for the Monticello, Utah...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Contaminated Properties Site (Monticello Vicinity Properties) and the Monticello Mill Tailings Site Completion of the Five-Year Reviews for the Monticello, Utah, Radioactively...

  3. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 8): Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE), Operable Unit 3, Monticello, UT, September 29, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This decision document presents the selected interim remedial action for Operable Unit (OU) 3 surface water and ground water at the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) in San Juan County, Utah. The selected alternative for the interim remedial action for OU 3 surface water runoff, continuation of ongoing monitoring efforts, and evaluation of a permeable reactive treatment (PeRT) wall through the use of a pilot-scale treatability study. If monitoring results indicate that the interim remedial action is not achieving the objectives of preventing exposure to and reducing contaminants in contaminated ground water, other alternatives will be evaluated from the OU 3 feasibility study.

  4. Monticello Steam Electric Station, Mount Pleasant, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Javetski, J. [TXU Power (United States)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Why does Monticello, a 30 year old plant, deserve recognition as one of Power's Top Plants of 2006? Because TXU has been blending Powder River Basin (PRB) coal with local lignite at the plant for the past decade, and steady reductions in air-pollutant emission rates have been the result. That positive experience has made the company confident enough to propose building nearly 9,100 MW of new coal or lignite-fired capacity in Texas by 2010 at a cost of $10 billion. The article records some of the lessons that TXU has learned about handling PRB coal safely. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Monticello, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,Monterey County,Monticello, Indiana: Energy Resources Jump to:

  6. Monticello, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,Monterey County,Monticello, Indiana: Energy Resources Jump

  7. Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J.; Kastens, M.K.; Sheader, L.R.L. [Environmental Sciences Laboratory, Grand Junction, CO (United States); Benson, C.H. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Albright, W.H. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV (United States); Mushovic, P.S. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Denver, CO (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) collaborated on the design and monitoring of an alternative cover for the Monticello uranium mill tailings disposal cell, a Superfund site in southeastern Utah. Ground-water recharge is naturally limited at sites like Monticello where thick, fine-textured soils store precipitation until evaporation and plant transpiration seasonally return it to the atmosphere. The cover at Monticello uses local soils and a native plant community to mimic the natural soil water balance. The cover is fundamentally an evapotranspiration (ET) design with a capillary barrier. A 3-hectare drainage lysimeter was embedded in the cover during construction of the disposal cell in 2000. The lysimeter consists of a geo-membrane liner below the capillary barrier that directs percolation water to a monitoring system. Soil water storage is determined by integration of point water content measurements. Meteorological parameters are measured nearby. Plant cover, shrub density, and leaf area index (LAI) are monitored annually. The cover performed well over the 7-year monitoring period (2000-2007). The cumulative percolation was 4.2 mm (0.6 mm yr{sup -1}), satisfying an EPA goal of an average percolation of <3.0 mm yr{sup -1}. Almost all percolation can be attributed to the exceptionally wet winter and spring of 2004-2005 when soil water content slightly exceeded the water storage capacity of the cover. The diversity, percent cover, and LAI of vegetation increased over the monitoring period, although the density of native shrubs that extract water from deeper in the cover has remained less than revegetation targets. DOE and EPA are applying the monitoring results to plan for long-term surveillance and maintenance and to evaluate alternative cover designs for other waste disposal sites. (authors)

  8. Implementation of a cut flower and seed production garden at Monticello

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felderhoff, Craig Anton

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The restored gardens of Monticello fulfill multiple roles, including the enhancement of the architectural and historical aspects of Thomas Jefferson's estate, a botanical garden, a site for historic plant preservation and a study in historic garden...

  9. Monticello Mill Tailings Site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information pertaining to environmental activities conducted during calendar year 1992 at and near the inactive uranium millsite in Monticello, Utah. Environmental activities conducted at the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) during 1992 included those associated with remedial action and compliance monitoring. Compliance monitoring consisted of both radiological and nonradiological monitoring of air, surface water, and ground water. Radiological and nonradiological air monitoring at the MMTS included measurements of atmospheric radon, particulate matter, and gamma radiation. Air particulate monitoring for radiological and nonradiological constituents was conducted at one location on and two locations off the millsite with high-volume particulate samplers. The maximum airborne concentrations of radium-226, thorium-230, and total uranium at all locations were several orders of magnitude below the regulatory limits specified by DOE Order 5400.5. Surface water monitoring included water quality measurements within Montezuma Creek. During 1992, maximum levels of selenium; gross alpha, gross beta, total dissolved solids, and iron exceeded their respective state standards in one or more samples collected from upstream, on-site, and downstream locations. Ground-water monitoring was conducted for two aquifers underlying the millsite. The shallow aquifer is contaminated by leached products of uranium mill tailings. During 1992, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act and state of Utah ground-water standards for arsenic, barium, nitrate, chromium, lead, selenium, molybdenum, uranium-234 and -238, gross alpha particle activity, and radium-226 and -228 were exceeded in one or more alluvial wells. This well will continue to be sampled to determine if the presence of these constituents was anomalous or if the measurements represented contamination in the aquifer.

  10. Portable treatment systems study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherick, M.J.; Schwinkendorf, W.E.; Bechtold, T.E.; Cole, L.T.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In developing their Site Treatment Plans (STPs), many of the Department of Energy installations identified some form of portable treatment, to facilitate compliant disposition of select mixed low-level wastestreams. The Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology requested that a systems study be performed to better define the potential role of portable treatment with respect to mixed low-level waste, highlight obstacles to implementation, and identify opportunities for future research and development emphasis. The study was performed by first establishing a representative set of mixed waste, then formulating portable treatment system concepts to meet the required processing needs for these wastes. The portable systems that were conceptualized were evaluated and compared to a fixed centralized treatment alternative. The system evaluations include a life-cycle cost analysis and an assessment of regulatory, institutional, and technical issues associated with the potential use of portable systems. The results of this study show that when all costs are included, there are no significant cost differences between portable systems and fixed systems. However, it is also emphasized that many uncertainties exist that could impact the cost of implementing portable treatment systems. Portable treatment could be made more attractive through private sector implementation, although there is little economic incentive for a commercial vendor to develop small, specialized treatment capabilities with limited applicability. Alternatively, there may also be valid reasons why fixed units cannot be used for some problematic wastestreams. In any event, there are some site-specific problems that still need to be addressed, and there may be some opportunity for research and development to make a positive impact in these areas.

  11. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Aerobic Treatment Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerobic units treat wastewater using the same process, only scaled down, as municipal wastewater treatment systems. This publication explains how aerobic units work, what their design requirements are, and how to maintain them....

  12. TREATMENT SYSTEMS AN INTEGRATED APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    for on-site management and treatment of effluent and solid waste 3. Provide for surface water attenuationECOLOGICAL TREATMENT SYSTEMS AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO THE TREATMENT OF WASTE AND WASTE WATER biological removal efficiencies in excess of 95% Treatment system averages 92% reduction in suspended solids

  13. Integrated nonthermal treatment system study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biagi, C.; Bahar, D.; Teheranian, B.; Vetromile, J. [Morrison Knudsen Corp. (United States); Quapp, W.J. [Nuclear Metals (United States); Bechtold, T.; Brown, B.; Schwinkendorf, W. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swartz, G. [Swartz and Associates (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a study of nonthermal treatment technologies. The study consisted of a systematic assessment of five nonthermal treatment alternatives. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The alternatives considered were innovative nonthermal treatments for organic liquids and sludges, process residue, soil and debris. Vacuum desorption or various washing approaches are considered for treatment of soil, residue and debris. Organic destruction methods include mediated electrochemical oxidation, catalytic wet oxidation, and acid digestion. Other methods studied included stabilization technologies and mercury separation of treatment residues. This study is a companion to the integrated thermal treatment study which examined 19 alternatives for thermal treatment of MLLW waste. The quantities and physical and chemical compositions of the input waste are based on the inventory database developed by the US Department of Energy. The Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) systems were evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 pounds per hour) as the Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems (ITTS). 48 refs., 68 figs., 37 tabs.

  14. Wastewater and Wastewater Treatment Systems (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality administers regulations for waste water and waste water treatment systems. Construction of a municipal treatment work, non-industrial waste water...

  15. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A constructed wetland system for domestic wastewater treatment is designed to mimic the natural wetland treatment process of Mother Nature. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation and maintenance of constructed wetlands....

  16. Animal Waste Treatment System Loan Program (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Animal Waste Treatment System Loan Program is to finance animal waste treatment systems for independent livestock and poultry producers at below conventional interest rates. Loan...

  17. Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello, Utah,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Site EnvironmentalEnergySafelyVirtualStephanieDepartment ofImprove System Reliability

  18. Sonic spectrometer and treatment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slomka, B.J.

    1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel system and method is developed for treating an object with sonic waveforms. A traveling broad-band sonic waveform containing a broad-band of sonic frequencies is radiated at the object. A traveling reflected sonic waveform containing sonic frequencies reflected by the object is received in response to the traveling broad-band sonic waveform. A traveling transmitted sonic waveform containing sonic frequencies transmitted through the object is also received in response to the traveling broad-band sonic waveform. In a resonance mode, the frequency spectra of the broad-band and reflected sonic waveforms is analyzed so as to select one or more sonic frequencies that cause the object to resonate. An electrical resonance treatment sonic waveform containing the sonic frequencies that cause the object to resonate is then radiated at the object so as to treat the object. In an absorption mode, the frequency spectra of the electrical broad-band, reflected, and transmitted sonic waveforms is compared so as to select one or more sonic frequencies that are absorbed by the object. An electrical absorption treatment sonic waveform containing the sonic frequencies that are absorbed by the object is then radiated at the object so as to treat the object. 1 fig.

  19. Sonic spectrometer and treatment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slomka, Bogdan J. (Ames, IA)

    1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel system and method for treating an object with sonic waveforms. A traveling broad-band sonic waveform containing a broad-band of sonic frequencies is radiated at the object. A traveling reflected sonic waveform containing sonic frequencies reflected by the object is received in response to the traveling broad-band sonic waveform. A traveling transmitted sonic waveform containing sonic frequencies transmitted through the object is also received in response to the traveling broad-band sonic waveform. In a resonance mode, the frequency spectra of the broad-band and reflected sonic waveforms is analyzed so as to select one or more sonic frequencies that cause the object to resonate. An electrical resonance treatment sonic waveform containing the sonic frequencies that cause the object to resonate is then radiated at the object so as to treat the object. In an absorption mode, the frequency spectra of the electrical broad-band, reflected, and transmitted sonic waveforms is compared so as to select one or more sonic frequencies that are absorbed by the object. An electrical absorption treatment sonic waveform containing the sonic frequencies that are absorbed by the object is then radiated at the object so as to treat the object.

  20. MONTICELLO PROJECTS

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 1 - June 30, .. FFA

  1. MONTICELLO PROJECTS

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 1 - June 30, ..

  2. MONTICELLO PROJECTS

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 1 - June 30, ..1

  3. MONTICELLO PROJECTS

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 1 - June 30, ..131,

  4. MONTICELLO PROJECTS

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 1 - June 30,

  5. MONTICELLO PROJECTS

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 1 - June 30,31,

  6. MONTICELLO PROJECTS

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  7. MONTICELLO PROJECTS

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 1 - JuneJuly

  8. MONTICELLO PROJECTS

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 1 - JuneJulyOctober

  9. MONTICELLO PROJECTS

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 1 -

  10. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Liquid Chlorination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Richard; Lesikar, Bruce J.; Richter, Amanda; O'Neill, Courtney

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication explains the process, components, legal requirements, factors affecting performance, and maintenance needs of liquid chlorination systems for onsite wastewater treatment....

  11. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Operation and Maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil absorption fieldTwo-compartment septic tank Perforated pipe for effluent disposal Sand/loam soil Gravel Geotextile fabric Onsite wastewater treatment systems Operation and maintenance L-5347 8-08 Figure 1: A septic tank and soil absorption... field system. I f your home or business uses an onsite wastewater treatment system, common- ly known as a septic system, you need to know how to operate and maintain the system properly to prevent pollution and sewage backups. For many years, people...

  12. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Ultraviolet Light Disinfection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Some onsite wastewater treatment systems include a disinfection component. This publication explains how homeowners can disinfect wastewater with ultraviolet light, what the components of such a system are, what factors affect the performance of a...

  13. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Graywater Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melton, Rebecca; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    irrigation and decr,ease the amount of wastewater entering sewers or onsite wastewater treatment systems. Onsite wastewater treatment systems However, homeowners who irrigate their lawns with graywater need to understand the risks and safety issues.... Residential wastewater can be classified as either blackwater (sew- age containing fecal matter or food wastes) or graywater. If graywater is collected separately from blackwater, it can be dispersed as irrigation water with less treatment than...

  14. Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T ADRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL

  15. System and process for biomass treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunson, Jr., James B; Tucker, III, Melvin P; Elander, Richard T; Lyons, Robert C

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A system including an apparatus is presented for treatment of biomass that allows successful biomass treatment at a high solids dry weight of biomass in the biomass mixture. The design of the system provides extensive distribution of a reactant by spreading the reactant over the biomass as the reactant is introduced through an injection lance, while the biomass is rotated using baffles. The apparatus system to provide extensive assimilation of the reactant into biomass using baffles to lift and drop the biomass, as well as attrition media which fall onto the biomass, to enhance the treatment process.

  16. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Spray Distribution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Spray distribution systems for wastewater are much like lawn sprinkler systems, in that they spray treated wastewater over the surface of a yard. This publication explains how spray distribution systems work, what their design requirements are...

  17. LOCAL IMPACTS OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM THE MONTICELLO COAL FIRED POWER PLANT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SULLIVAN, T.M.; ADAMS, J.; MILIAN, L.; SUBRAMANIAN, S.; FEAGIN, L.; WILLIAMS, J.; BOYD, A.

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) and the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) as currently proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) when fully implemented will lead to reduction in mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants by 70 percent to fifteen tons per year by 2018. The EPA estimates that mercury deposition would be reduced 8 percent on average in the Eastern United States. The CAMR permits cap-and-trade approach that requires the nationwide emissions to meet the prescribed level, but do not require controls on each individual power plant. This has led to concerns that there may be hot-spots of mercury contamination near power plants. Partially because of this concern, many states including Pennsylvania have implemented, or are considering, state regulations that are stricter on mercury emissions than those in the CAMR. This study examined the possibility that coal-fired power plants act as local sources leading to mercury ''hot spots'', using two types of evidence. First, the world-wide literature was searched for reports of deposition around mercury sources, including coal-fired power plants. Second, soil samples from around two mid-sized U.S. coal-fired power plants were collected and analyzed for evidence of ''hot spots'' and for correlation with model predictions of deposition. The following summarizes our findings from published reports on the impacts of local deposition. In terms of excesses over background the following increments have been observed within a few km of the plant: (A) local soil concentration Hg increments of 30%-60%, (B) sediment increments of 18-30%, (C) wet deposition increments of 11-12%, and (D) fish Hg increments of about 5-6%, based on an empirical finding that fish concentrations are proportional to the square root of deposition. Important uncertainties include possible reductions of RGM to Hg(0) in power plant plumes and the role of water chemistry in the relationship between Hg deposition and fish content. Soil and vegetation sampling programs were performed around the Monticello coal fired power plant. The objectives were to determine if local mercury hot spots exist, to determine if they could be attributed to deposition of coal-fired power plant emissions, and to determine if they correlated with model predictions. The study found the following: (1) There was no correlation between modeled mercury deposition and either soil concentrations or vegetation concentrations. At the Monticello plant, excess soil Hg was associated with soil characteristics with higher values near the lake. Vegetation concentration showed some correlation with soil concentrations having higher mercury in vegetation when the soil mercury. (2) Based on computer modeling, Hg deposition was primarily RGM with much lower deposition from elemental mercury. The total deposition within 50 Km of the plant was predicted to be 4.2% of the total emitted. In the deposition, RGM is responsible for 98.7% of the total deposition, elemental mercury accounts for 1.1% and particulate mercury accounts for 0.2%. Less than 1% of the elemental mercury emitted was predicted to deposit within 50 km.

  18. Renewable Energy Powered Water Treatment Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards, Bryce S.; Schäfer, Andrea

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many motivations for choosing renewable energy technologies to provide the necessary energy to power water treatment systems for reuse and desalination. These range from the lack of an existing electricity grid, ...

  19. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Sand Filters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Sand filters are beds of granular material, or sand, drained from underneath so that pretreated wastewater can be treated, collected and distributed to a land application system. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation...

  20. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Sand Filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Sand filters are beds of granular material, or sand, drained from underneath so that pretreated wastewater can be treated, collected and distributed to a land application system. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation...

  1. Comparison of risk for pre- and post-remediation of uranium mill tailings from vicinity properties in Monticello, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espegren, M.L.; Pierce, G.A.; Halford, D.K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pre- and post-remedial action dose rates were calculated on 101 Monticello, Utah, properties included in the Monticello Vicinity Property Remedial Action Project. Dose rates were calculated using the RESRAD computer code, which indicated that 98% of the effective dose equivalent was contributed by external gamma radiation and radon emanation. Radium concentrations in pCig{sup {minus}1} were averaged for pre- and post-remedial action measurements: point sources were not included in the averages. The volume of the deposit was also used in the dose calculation. In all cases the dose was reduced, and at 77 properties the dose was reduced to 0.30 mSv y{sup {minus}1} (Department of Energy ALARA recommendation). A paired t-test showed a significant reduction (p < 0.05) between the pre- and post-remedial action dose rates. The average cost of remedial action, number of persons per household, number of properties remediated, and the reduction of cancer mortalities through remediation resulted in an approximate cost of $11,000,000 per life saved by remediation of mill tailings. 13 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Monticello Mill Tailings site, San Juan County, UT. (First remedial action), August 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The 300-acre Monticello Mill Tailings site is comprised of a 78-acre inactive uranium and vanadium milling operation and affected peripheral properties in Monticello, San Juan County, Utah. Surrounding land use is rural residential and agricultural. Milling of ore began in 1942, and a vanadium/uranium sludge product was produced onsite from 1943 to 1944. The mill was permanently closed in 1960, and the tailings piles were covered and vegetated. In 1972, 15,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil were excavated and disposed of on the onsite tailings piles. Site investigations from 1989 to 1990 identified the presence of onsite and offsite radioactively-contaminated soil and ground water, and elevated concentrations of metals within the tailings piles. The Record of Decision (ROD)addresses remediation of two Operable Units (OUs): the 78-acre Millsite area (OU1), and the 240-acres of peripheral properties (OU2). The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and debris are metals including arsenic, chromium, and lead; and radioactive materials including radium-226 and radon.

  3. Enhanced integrated nonthermal treatment system study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biagi, C.; Schwinkendorf, B.; Teheranian, B.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Enhanced Nonthermal Treatment Systems (ENTS) study is to evaluate alternative configurations of one of the five systems evaluated in the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) study. Five alternative configurations are evaluated. Each is designed to enhance the final waste form performance by replacing grout with improved stabilization technologies, or to improve system performance by improving the destruction efficiency for organic contaminants. AU enhanced systems are alternative configurations of System NT-5, which has the following characteristics: Nonthermal System NT-5: (1) catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) to treat organic material including organic liquids, sludges, and soft (or combustible) debris, (2) thermal desorption of inorganic sludge and process residue, (3) washing of soil and inorganic debris with treatment by CWO of removed organic material, (4) metal decontamination by abrasive blasting, (5) stabilization of treated sludge, soil, debris, and untreated debris with entrained contamination in grout, and (6) stabilization of inorganic sludge, salts and secondary waste in polymer. System NT-5 was chosen because it was designed to treat combustible debris thereby minimizing the final waste form volume, and because it uses grout for primary stabilization. The enhanced nonthermal systems were studied to determine the cost and performance impact of replacing grout (a commonly used stabilization agent in the DOE complex) with improved waste stabilization methods such as vitrification and polymer.

  4. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Mound System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, B.; Waynard, V.

    Septic tank Pump tank Distribution pipe Sand Gravel Geotextile fabric On-site wastewater treatment systems Mound system Bruce Lesikar and Vance Weynand Associate Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineering Specialist, Extension Assistant.... The wastewater is pumped at low pressure in controlled doses to ensure that it is distributed uniformly throughout the bed. It flows through holes in the pipes, trickles downward through the absorption area and percolates into the sand. Treatment Wastewater must...

  5. In-tank recirculating arsenic treatment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brady, Patrick V. (Albuquerque, NM); Dwyer, Brian P. (Albuquerque, NM); Krumhansl, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Chwirka, Joseph D. (Tijeras, NM)

    2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-cost, water treatment system and method for reducing arsenic contamination in small community water storage tanks. Arsenic is removed by using a submersible pump, sitting at the bottom of the tank, which continuously recirculates (at a low flow rate) arsenic-contaminated water through an attached and enclosed filter bed containing arsenic-sorbing media. The pump and treatment column can be either placed inside the tank (In-Tank) by manually-lowering through an access hole, or attached to the outside of the tank (Out-of-Tank), for easy replacement of the sorption media.

  6. High throughput chemical munitions treatment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haroldsen, Brent L. (Manteca, CA); Stofleth, Jerome H. (Albuquerque, NM); Didlake, Jr., John E. (Livermore, CA); Wu, Benjamin C-P (San Ramon, CA)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new High-Throughput Explosive Destruction System is disclosed. The new system is comprised of two side-by-side detonation containment vessels each comprising first and second halves that feed into a single agent treatment vessel. Both detonation containment vessels further comprise a surrounding ventilation facility. Moreover, the detonation containment vessels are designed to separate into two half-shells, wherein one shell can be moved axially away from the fixed, second half for ease of access and loading. The vessels are closed by means of a surrounding, clam-shell type locking seal mechanisms.

  7. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Selecting and Permitting (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication explains how to select and obtain a permit for an on-site wastewater treatment system in Texas....

  8. Medical waste treatment and decontamination system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC); Schulz, Rebecca L. (Aiken, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention discloses a tandem microwave system consisting of a primary chamber in which hybrid microwave energy is used for the controlled combustion of materials. A second chamber is used to further treat the off-gases from the primary chamber by passage through a susceptor matrix subjected to additional hybrid microwave energy. The direct microwave radiation and elevated temperatures provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the treated off gases. The tandem microwave system can be utilized for disinfecting wastes, sterilizing materials, and/or modifying the form of wastes to solidify organic or inorganic materials. The simple design allows on-site treatment of waste by small volume waste generators.

  9. Integrated radwaste treatment system. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, M.N.; Houston, H.M.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 1988, the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) began pretreating liquid high-level radioactive waste (HLW). This HLW was produced during spent nuclear fuel reprocessing operations that took place at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center from 1966 to 1972. Original reprocessing operations used plutonium/uranium extraction (PUREX) and thorium extraction (THOREX) processes to recover usable isotopes from spent nuclear fuel. The PUREX process produced a nitric acid-based waste stream, which was neutralized by adding sodium hydroxide to it. About two million liters of alkaline liquid HLW produced from PUREX neutralization were stored in an underground carbon steel tank identified as Tank 8D-2. The THOREX process, which was used to reprocess one core of mixed uranium-thorium fuel, resulted in about 31,000 liters of acidic waste. This acidic HLW was stored in an underground stainless steel tank identified as Tank 8D-4. Pretreatment of the HLW was carried out using the Integrated Radwaste Treatment System (IRTS), from May 1988 until May 1995. This system was designed to decontaminate the liquid HLW, remove salts from it, and encapsulate the resulting waste into a cement waste form that achieved US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) criteria for low-level waste (LLW) storage and disposal. A thorough discussion of IRTS operations, including all systems, subsystems, and components, is presented in US Department of Energy (DOE) Topical Report (DOE/NE/44139-68), Integrated Radwaste Treatment System Lessons Learned from 2 1/2 Years of Operation. This document also presents a detailed discussion of lessons learned during the first 2 1/2 years of IRTS operation. This report provides a general discussion of all phases of IRTS operation, and presents additional lessons learned during seven years of IRTS operation.

  10. K West integrated water treatment system subproject safety analysis document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SEMMENS, L.S.

    1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This Accident Analysis evaluates unmitigated accident scenarios, and identifies Safety Significant and Safety Class structures, systems, and components for the K West Integrated Water Treatment System.

  11. Modeling Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems in the Dickinson Bayou Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbis-Stokes, Aaron

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs) are a commonly used means of wastewater treatment in the Dickinson Bayou watershed which is located between Houston and Galveston. The Dickinson Bayou is classified as "impaired" by the Texas Commission...

  12. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetland Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Weaver, Richard; Richter, Amanda; O'Neill, Courtney

    2005-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication explains the functions, characteristics, choices, configurations and maintenance needs for constructed wetland media in on-site wastewater treatment systems....

  13. Operation technology of air treatment system in nuclear facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chun, Y B; Hwong, Y H; Lee, H K; Min, D K; Park, K J; Uom, S H; Yang, S Y

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective operation techniques were reviewed on the air treatment system to protect the personnel in nuclear facilities from the contamination of radio-active particles and to keep the environment clear. Nuclear air treatment system consisted of the ventilation and filtering system was characterized by some test. Measurement of air velocity of blowing/exhaust fan in the ventilation system, leak tests of HEPA filters in the filtering, and measurement of pressure difference between the areas defined by radiation level were conducted. The results acquired form the measurements were reflected directly for the operation of air treatment. In the abnormal state of virus parts of devices composted of the system, the repairing method, maintenance and performance test were also employed in operating effectively the air treatment system. These measuring results and techniques can be available to the operation of air treatment system of PIEF as well as the other nuclear facilities in KAERI.

  14. Process modeling for the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System (INTS) study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, B.W.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the process modeling done in support of the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System (INTS) study. This study was performed to supplement the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) study and comprises five conceptual treatment systems that treat DOE contract-handled mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) at temperatures of less than 350{degrees}F. ASPEN PLUS, a chemical process simulator, was used to model the systems. Nonthermal treatment systems were developed as part of the INTS study and include sufficient processing steps to treat the entire inventory of MLLW. The final result of the modeling is a process flowsheet with a detailed mass and energy balance. In contrast to the ITTS study, which modeled only the main treatment system, the INTS study modeled each of the various processing steps with ASPEN PLUS, release 9.1-1. Trace constituents, such as radionuclides and minor pollutant species, were not included in the calculations.

  15. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Septic Tank/Soil Absorption Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    For septic tank and soil absorption systems to work properly, homeowners must choose the right kind of system for their household size and soil type, and they must maintain them regularly. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation...

  16. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Homeowner's Guide to Evaluating Service Contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; O'Neill, Courtney; Deal, Nancy; Loomis, George; Gustafson, David; Lindbo, David

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide helps homeowners who are seeking maintenance services for their onsite wastewater treatment systems (such as septic systems). Included are definitions of common terms used in service contracts, types of service contracts available...

  17. Peak Treatment Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian,Parle Biscuits PvtPaw Paw,Paxton,Facility |Lake,Treatment

  18. Summary - System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at Hanford Why DOE-EM Did This Review Construction of the facilities of...

  19. Optimizing Aeration in Pulp Mill Secondary Treatment Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahmood, T.; Banerjee, S.; Welsh, J. T.; Sackellares, R. W.

    With better spill control and lower carbon loads to the treatment system, there is excess aeration occurring at the lagoon. This leads to unnecessary power costs, especially during peak demand summer periods. A study was conducted to determine...

  20. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Selecting and Permitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication explains factors to consider when choosing an on-site wastewater treatment system and lists the nine steps required to obtain a permit for one. It includes addresses and phone numbers of Texas Natural Resource Conservation...

  1. Integrated thermal treatment system study -- Phase 2 results. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the second phase of a study on thermal treatment technologies. The study consists of a systematic assessment of nineteen thermal treatment alternatives for the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the MLLW. The alternatives considered in Phase 2 were innovative thermal treatments with nine types of primary processing units. Other variations in the study examined the effect of combustion gas, air pollution control system design, and stabilization technology for the treatment residues. The Phase 1 study examined ten initial thermal treatment alternatives. The Phase 2 systems were evaluated in essentially the same manner as the Phase 1 systems. The alternatives evaluated were: rotary kiln, slagging kiln, plasma furnace, plasma gasification, molten salt oxidation, molten metal waste destruction, steam gasification, Joule-heated vitrification, thermal desorption and mediated electrochemical oxidation, and thermal desorption and supercritical water oxidation. The quantities, and physical and chemical compositions, of the input waste used in the Phase 2 systems differ from those in the Phase 1 systems, which were based on a preliminary waste input database developed at the onset of the Integrated Thermal Treatment System study. The inventory database used in the Phase 2 study incorporates the latest US Department of Energy information. All systems, both primary treatment systems and subsystem inputs, have now been evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 lb/hr). 28 refs., 88 figs., 41 tabs.

  2. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1--issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2--issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study--drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering.

  3. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Mound System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2002-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A mound system is a soil absorption system placed above the natural surface of the ground. The system distributes treated wastewater into the soil. This publication discusses the design and maintenance of mound systems....

  4. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durrani, H.A.; Schmidt, L.J.; Erickson, T.A.; Sondreal, E.A.; Erjavec, J.; Steadman, E.N.; Fabrycky, W.J.; Wilson, J.S.; Musich, M.A.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report analyzes three systems engineering (SE) studies performed on integrated thermal treatment systems (ITTSs) and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTSs) for the remediation of mixed low-level waste (MLLW) stored throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), the Waste Policy Institute (WPI), and Virginia Tech (VT). The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1--issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2--issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study--drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions taken in the studies might bias the resulting economic evaluations of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to produce sound SE applications.

  5. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Graywater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melton, Rebecca; Lesikar, Bruce J.; Smith, David; O'Neill, Courtney

    2008-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    pollutants being added to the graywater. Each source contributes different contami- nants due to its particular water com- ? can be cleaned; and ? meets structural requirements of the 2004 American Water Works Association (AWWA) standards. Settling tank...; ? that can be cleaned; and ? that meet the structural standards of the 2004 American Water Works Association (AWWA) standards. (Look for a stamp indicating the tank meets AWWA standards.) ? The graywater system must use piping...

  6. Acid mine water aeration and treatment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackman, Terry E. (Finleyville, PA); Place, John M. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-line system is provided for treating acid mine drainage which basically comprises the combination of a jet pump (or pumps) and a static mixer. The jet pump entrains air into the acid waste water using a Venturi effect so as to provide aeration of the waste water while further aeration is provided by the helical vanes of the static mixer. A neutralizing agent is injected into the suction chamber of the jet pump and the static mixer is formed by plural sections offset by 90 degrees.

  7. Development of a Novel Bioreactor System for Treatment of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugulis, Andrew J.

    Development of a Novel Bioreactor System for Treatment of Gaseous Benzene Sung-Ho Yeom,1,2 Andrew J 2000 Abstract: A novel, continuous bioreactor system combin- ing a bubble column (absorption section) and a two- phase bioreactor (degradation section) has been de- signed to treat a gas stream containing

  8. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Responding to Power Outages and Floods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin; Alexander, Rachel

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    People and the environment can be harmed if a home's onsite wastewater treatment system does not work properly after a flood or power outage. This publication explains the steps to take after such an event to get the system back into service. 4 pp...

  9. POOL WATER TREATMENT AND COOLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. King

    2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System is located in the Waste Handling Building (WHB), and is comprised of various process subsystems designed to support waste handling operations. This system maintains the pool water temperature within an acceptable range, maintains water quality standards that support remote underwater operations and prevent corrosion, detects leakage from the pool liner, provides the capability to remove debris from the pool, controls the pool water level, and helps limit radiological exposure to personnel. The pool structure and liner, pool lighting, and the fuel staging racks in the pool are not within the scope of the Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System. Pool water temperature control is accomplished by circulating the pool water through heat exchangers. Adequate circulation and mixing of the pool water is provided to prevent localized thermal hotspots in the pool. Treatment of the pool water is accomplished by a water treatment system that circulates the pool water through filters, and ion exchange units. These water treatment units remove radioactive and non-radioactive particulate and dissolved solids from the water, thereby providing the water clarity needed to conduct waste handling operations. The system also controls pool water chemistry to prevent advanced corrosion of the pool liner, pool components, and fuel assemblies. Removal of radioactivity from the pool water contributes to the project ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) goals. A leak detection system is provided to detect and alarm leaks through the pool liner. The pool level control system monitors the water level to ensure that the minimum water level required for adequate radiological shielding is maintained. Through interface with a demineralized water system, adequate makeup is provided to compensate for loss of water inventory through evaporation and waste handling operations. Interface with the Site Radiological Monitoring System provides continuous radiological monitoring of the pool water. The Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System, Site-Generated Radiological Waste Handling System, Site Radiological Monitoring System, Waste Handling Building Electrical System, Site Water System, and the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System.

  10. Process modeling for the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liebelt, K.H.; Brown, B.W.; Quapp, W.J.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the process modeling done in support of the integrated thermal treatment system (ITTS) study, Phases 1 and 2. ITTS consists of an integrated systems engineering approach for uniform comparison of widely varying thermal treatment technologies proposed for treatment of the contact-handled mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) currently stored in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. In the overall study, 19 systems were evaluated. Preconceptual designs were developed that included all of the various subsystems necessary for a complete installation, from waste receiving through to primary and secondary stabilization and disposal of the processed wastes. Each system included the necessary auxiliary treatment subsystems so that all of the waste categories in the complex were fully processed. The objective of the modeling task was to perform mass and energy balances of the major material components in each system. Modeling of trace materials, such as pollutants and radioactive isotopes, were beyond the present scope. The modeling of the main and secondary thermal treatment, air pollution control, and metal melting subsystems was done using the ASPEN PLUS process simulation code, Version 9.1-3. These results were combined with calculations for the remainder of the subsystems to achieve the final results, which included offgas volumes, and mass and volume waste reduction ratios.

  11. MINERVA - A Multi-Modal Radiation Treatment Planning System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. E. Wessol; C. A. Wemple; D. W. Nigg; J. J. Cogliati; M. L. Milvich; C. Frederickson; M. Perkins; G. A. Harkin

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, research efforts have begun to examine the combination of BNCT with external beam photon radiotherapy (Barth et al. 2004). In order to properly prepare treatment plans for patients being treated with combinations of radiation modalities, appropriate planning tools must be available. To facilitiate this, researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL)and Montana State University (MSU) have undertaken development of a fully multi-modal radiation treatment planning system.

  12. Integrated thermal treatment system study: Phase 1 results. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.; Hempill, H.G.; Groffie, F.J.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated systems engineering approach is used for uniform comparison of widely varying thermal treatment technologies proposed for management of contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. Ten different systems encompassing several incineration design options are studied. All subsystems, including facilities, equipment, and methods needed for integration of each of the ten systems are identified. Typical subsystems needed for complete treatment of MLLW are incoming waste receiving and preparation (characterization, sorting, sizing, and separation), thermal treatment, air pollution control, primary and secondary stabilization, metal decontamination, metal melting, mercury recovery, lead recovery, and special waste and aqueous waste treatment. The evaluation is performed by developing a preconceptual design package and planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for each system. As part of the preconceptual design process, functional and operational requirements, flow sheets and mass balances, and conceptual equipment layouts are developed for each system. The PLCC components estimated are technology development, production facility construction, pre-operation, operation and maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning. Preconceptual design data and other technology information gathered during the study are examined and areas requiring further development, testing, and evaluation are identified and recommended. Using a qualitative method, each of the ten systems are ranked.

  13. Combined process for 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid treatment Coupling of an electrochemical system with a biological treatment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    system with a biological treatment. Jean-Marie Fontmorina,b *, Florence Fourcadea,b Florence Genestec-made electrochemical flow cell was used for the pre-treatment and a biological treatment was then carried out using activated sludge supplied by a local wastewater treatment plant. 2,4-D was used as a target compound

  14. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Understanding and Maintaining your Septic System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin; Alexander, Rachel

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    It is important that homeowners maintain their septic systems properly. Otherwise, problems that develop could threaten human health and the environment. In this publication you will learn how to maintain all the components of a septic system...

  15. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering.

  16. Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Monticello

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    date","License expiration date" 1,554,"4,695",96.7,"BWR","applicationvnd.ms-excel","applicationvnd.ms-excel" ,554,"4,695",96.7 "Data for 2010" "BWR Boiling Water Reactor."...

  17. monticello.cdr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj:'I,\ W CTheuseLocation of the

  18. monticello_esd.cdr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj:'I,\ W CTheuseLocation of

  19. MONTICELLO NPL SITES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ I

  20. MONTICELLO NPL SITES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 1 - June 30, 2008

  1. MONTICELLO NPL SITES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 1 - June 30,

  2. MONTICELLO NPL SITES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 1 - June 30, .. ' \

  3. Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Monticello

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,CubicWithdrawals (MillionperYearThousandFeet)

  4. monticello_esd.cdr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V4100 DOE/EA-1452DiOverview ThelasThe

  5. monticello_superfund.cdr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V4100 DOE/EA-1452DiOverview ThelasTheAC

  6. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Soil Particle Analysis Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2005-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil is an important component of an on-site wastewater treatment system. This publication explains the composition of soils, the sizing of soil particles, and the ways soil particles are analyzed to determine whether a site is suitable for a...

  7. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Alternative Collection Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2000-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Rural Texas communities have new options for wastewater management infrastructure that are cost effective but still protect human health and environmental quality. Such communities now can combine different kinds of systems in a new approach called...

  8. INTEC CPP-603 Basin Water Treatment System Closure: Process Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimmitt, Raymond Rodney; Faultersack, Wendell Gale; Foster, Jonathan Kay; Berry, Stephen Michael

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the engineering activities that have been completed in support of the closure plan for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) CPP-603 Basin Water Treatment System. This effort includes detailed assessments of methods and equipment for performing work in four areas: 1. A cold (nonradioactive) mockup system for testing equipment and procedures for vessel cleanout and vessel demolition. 2. Cleanout of process vessels to meet standards identified in the closure plan. 3. Dismantlement and removal of vessels, should it not be possible to clean them to required standards in the closure plan. 4. Cleanout or removal of pipelines and pumps associated with the CPP-603 basin water treatment system. Cleanout standards for the pipes will be the same as those used for the process vessels.

  9. Effluent treatment options for nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shipers, L.R.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1992-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of approaches for handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests in an environmentally acceptable manner are discussed. The functional requirements of effluent treatment are defined and concept options are presented within the framework of these requirements. System concepts differ primarily in the choice of fission-product retention and waste handling concepts. The concept options considered range from closed cycle (venting the exhaust to a closed volume or recirculating the hydrogen in a closed loop) to open cycle (real time processing and venting of the effluent). This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of different methods to handle effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests.

  10. Westinghouse Cementation Facility of Solid Waste Treatment System - 13503

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, Torsten; Aign, Joerg [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D- 22419 Hamburg (Germany)] [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D- 22419 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During NPP operation, several waste streams are generated, caused by different technical and physical processes. Besides others, liquid waste represents one of the major types of waste. Depending on national regulation for storage and disposal of radioactive waste, solidification can be one specific requirement. To accommodate the global request for waste treatment systems Westinghouse developed several specific treatment processes for the different types of waste. In the period of 2006 to 2008 Westinghouse awarded several contracts for the design and delivery of waste treatment systems related to the latest CPR-1000 nuclear power plants. One of these contracts contains the delivery of four Cementation Facilities for waste treatment, s.c. 'Follow on Cementations' dedicated to three locations, HongYanHe, NingDe and YangJiang, of new CPR-1000 nuclear power stations in the People's Republic of China. Previously, Westinghouse delivered a similar cementation facility to the CPR-1000 plant LingAo II, in Daya Bay, PR China. This plant already passed the hot functioning tests successfully in June 2012 and is now ready and released for regular operation. The 'Follow on plants' are designed to package three 'typical' kind of radioactive waste: evaporator concentrates, spent resins and filter cartridges. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview on the Westinghouse experience to design and execution of cementation facilities. (authors)

  11. Strategies for automatic online treatment plan reoptimization using clinical treatment planning system: A planning parameters study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Taoran; Wu, Qiuwen; Zhang, You; Vergalasova, Irina; Lee, W. Robert; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Q. Jackie [Duke Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)] [Duke Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Adaptive radiation therapy for prostate cancer using online reoptimization provides an improved control of interfractional anatomy variations. However, the clinical implementation of online reoptimization is currently limited by the low efficiency of current strategies and the difficulties associated with integration into the current treatment planning system. This study investigates the strategies for performing fast (?2 min) automatic online reoptimization with a clinical fluence-map-based treatment planning system; and explores the performance with different input parameters settings: dose-volume histogram (DVH) objective settings, starting stage, and iteration number (in the context of real time planning).Methods: Simulated treatments of 10 patients were reoptimized daily for the first week of treatment (5 fractions) using 12 different combinations of optimization strategies. Options for objective settings included guideline-based RTOG objectives, patient-specific objectives based on anatomy on the planning CT, and daily-CBCT anatomy-based objectives adapted from planning CT objectives. Options for starting stages involved starting reoptimization with and without the original plan's fluence map. Options for iteration numbers were 50 and 100. The adapted plans were then analyzed by statistical modeling, and compared both in terms of dosimetry and delivery efficiency.Results: All online reoptimized plans were finished within ?2 min with excellent coverage and conformity to the daily target. The three input parameters, i.e., DVH objectives, starting stage, and iteration number, contributed to the outcome of optimization nearly independently. Patient-specific objectives generally provided better OAR sparing compared to guideline-based objectives. The benefit in high-dose sparing from incorporating daily anatomy into objective settings was positively correlated with the relative change in OAR volumes from planning CT to daily CBCT. The use of the original plan fluence map as the starting stage reduced OAR dose at the mid-dose region, but increased the monitor units by 17%. Differences of only 2cc or less in OAR V50%/V70Gy/V76Gy were observed between 100 and 50 iterations.Conclusions: It is feasible to perform automatic online reoptimization in ?2 min using a clinical treatment planning system. Selecting optimal sets of input parameters is the key to achieving high quality reoptimized plans, and should be based on the individual patient's daily anatomy, delivery efficiency, and time allowed for plan adaptation.

  12. Modeling Offgas Systems for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Frank G., III

    2005-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    To augment steady-state design calculations, dynamic models of three offgas systems that will be used in the Waste Treatment Plant now under construction at the Hanford Site were developed using Aspen Custom Modeler{trademark}. The offgas systems modeled were those for the High Level Waste (HLW) melters, Low Activity Waste (LAW) melters and HLW Pulse Jet Ventilation (PJV) system. The models do not include offgas chemistry but only consider the two major species in the offgas stream which are air and water vapor. This is sufficient to perform material and energy balance calculations that accurately show the dynamic behavior of gas pressure, temperature, humidity and flow throughout the systems. The models are structured to perform pressure drop calculations across the various unit operations using a combination of standard engineering calculations and empirical data based correlations for specific pieces of equipment. The models include process controllers, gas ducting, control valves, exhaust fans and the offgas treatment equipment. The models were successfully used to analyze a large number of operating scenarios including both normal and off-normal conditions.

  13. The proposed combustion standards and DOE thermal treatment systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFee, J. [IT Corp. (United States); Hinman, M.B. [Carter and Hinman, P.A. (United States); Eaton, D.; NcNeel, K. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the provisions of the Clean Air Act (CAA) concerning emission of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the proposed Revised Standards for Hazardous Waste Combustors on April 19, 1996 (EPA, 1996). These standards would apply to the existing Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive and mixed waste incinerators, and may be applied to several developing alternatives to incineration. The DOE has reviewed the basis for these regulations and prepared extensive comments to present concerns about the bases and implications of the standards. DOE is now discussing compliance options with the EPA for regulation of radioactive and mixed waste thermal treatment systems.

  14. Boiler System Efficiency Improves with Effective Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloom, D.

    Water treatment is an important aspect of boiler operation which can affect efficiency or result in damage if neglected. Without effective water treatment, scale can form on boiler tubes, reducing heat transfer, and causing a loss of boiler...

  15. MODIFIED REVERSE OSMOSIS SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.M. Whitworth; Liangxiong Li

    2002-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed during the first year of the project ''Modified Reverse Osmosis System for Treatment of Produced Waters.'' This research project has two objectives. The first objective is to test the use of clay membranes in the treatment of produced waters by reverse osmosis. The second objective is to test the ability of a system patented by the New Mexico Tech Research Foundation to remove salts from reverse osmosis waste streams as a solid. We performed 12 experiments using clay membranes in cross-flow experimental cells. We found that, due to dispersion in the porous frit used adjacent to the membrane, the concentration polarization layer seems to be completely (or nearly completely) destroyed at low flow rates. This observation suggests that clay membranes used with porous frit material many reach optimum rejection rates at lower pumping rates than required for use with synthetic membranes. The solute rejection efficiency decreases with increasing solution concentration. For the membranes and experiments reported here, the rejection efficiency ranged from 71% with 0.01 M NaCl solution down to 12% with 2.3 M NaCl solution. More compacted clay membranes will have higher rejection capabilities. The clay membranes used in our experiments were relatively thick (approximately 0.5 mm). The active layer of most synthetic membranes is only 0.04 {micro}m (0.00004 mm), approximately 1250 times thinner than the clay membranes used in these experiments. Yet clay membranes as thin as 12 {micro}m have been constructed (Fritz and Eady, 1985). Since Darcy's law states that the flow through a material of constant permeability is inversely proportional to it's the material's thickness, then, based on these experimental observations, a very thin clay membrane would be expected to have much higher flow rates than the ones used in these experiments. Future experiments will focus on testing very thin clay membranes. The membranes generally exhibited reasonable stable rejection rates over time for chloride for a range of concentrations between 0.01 and 2.5 M. One membrane ran in excess of three months with no apparent loss of usability. This suggests that clay membranes may have a long useable life. Twenty different hyperfiltration-induced solute precipitation experiments were either attempted or completed and are reported here. The results of these experiments suggest that hyperfiltration-induced solute precipitation is possible, even for very soluble substances such as NaCl. However, the precipitation rates obtained in the laboratory do not appear to be adequate for commercial application at this time. Future experiments will focus on making the clay membranes more compact and thinner in order to obtain higher flux rates. Two alternative methods of removing solutes from solution, for which the New Mexico Tech Research Foundation is preparing patent applications, are also being investigated. These methods will be described in the next annual report after the patent applications are filed. Technology transfer efforts included two meetings (one in Farmington NM, and one in Hobbs, NM) where the results of this research were presented to independent oil producers and other interested parties. In addition, members of the research team gave seven presentations concerning this research and because of this research project T. M. (Mike) Whitworth was asked to sit on the advisory board for development of a new water treatment facility for the City of El Paso, Texas. Several papers are in preparation for submission to peer-reviewed journals based on the data presented in this report.

  16. In situ heat treatment process utilizing a closed loop heating system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for an in situ heat treatment process that utilizes a circulation system to heat one or more treatment areas are described herein. The circulation system may use a heated liquid heat transfer fluid that passes through piping in the formation to transfer heat to the formation. In some embodiments, the piping may be positioned in at least two of the wellbores.

  17. A simple DVH generation technique from various radiotherapy treatment planning systems for independent information system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min, Byung Jun; Jeong, Il Sun; Lee, Hyebin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the use of PACS for radiation therapy has become the norm in hospital environment and has suggested for collecting data and management from different TPSs with DICOM objects. However, some TPS does not provide the DVH exportation with text or other format. In addition, plan review systems for various TPSs often allow DVH recalculation with different algorithms. These algorithms result in the inevitable discrepancy between the values obtained with the recalculation and those obtained with TPS itself. The purpose of this study was to develop a simple method for generating reproducible DVH values obtained from the TPSs. Treatment planning information including structures and delivered dose was exported by the DICOM format from planning systems. The supersampling and trilinear interpolation methods were employed to calculate DVH data from 35 treatment plans. The discrepancies between DVHs extracted from each TPS and the proposed calculation method were evaluated with respect to the supersampling ...

  18. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Evapotranspiration Bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evapotranspiration (ET) beds treat wastewater in the soil by evaporation and by transpiration from plants growing there. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation and maintenance of ET beds....

  19. System Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization Methodology for Diesel Exhaust After-treatment Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    System Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization Methodology for Diesel Exhaust After;System Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization Methodology for Diesel Exhaust After-treatment Technologies Developing new aftertreatment technologies to meet emission regulations for diesel engines is a growing

  20. Dosimetric evaluation of PLATO and Oncentra treatment planning systems for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy gynecological treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Hardev; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Showalter, Barry; Thompson, Spencer J.; Syzek, Elizabeth J.; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peggy and Charles Stephenson Oklahoma Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This study compares the dosimetric differences in HDR brachytherapy treatment plans calculated with Nucletron's PLATO and Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning systems (TPS). Ten patients (1 T1b, 1 T2a, 6 T2b, 2 T4) having cervical carcinoma, median age of 43.5 years (range, 34-79 years) treated with tandem and ring applicator in our institution were selected retrospectively for this study. For both Plato and Oncentra TPS, the same orthogonal films anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral were used to manually draw the prescription and anatomical points using definitions from the Manchester system and recommendations from the ICRU report 38. Data input for PLATO was done using a digitizer and Epson Expression 10000XL scanner was used for Oncentra where the points were selected on the images in the screen. The prescription doses for these patients were 30 Gy to points right A (RA) and left A (LA) delivered in 5 fractions with Ir-192 HDR source. Two arrangements: one dwell position and two dwell positions on the tandem were used for dose calculation. The doses to the patient points right B (RB) and left B (LB), and to the organs at risk (OAR), bladder and rectum for each patient were calculated. The mean dose and the mean percentage difference in dose calculated by the two treatment planning systems were compared. Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences in mean RB, LB, bladder and rectum doses were found with p-values > 0.14. The mean percent difference of doses in RB, LB, bladder and rectum are found to be less than 2.2%, 1.8%, 1.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Dose calculations based on the two different treatment planning systems were found to be consistent and the treatment plans can be made with either system in our department without any concern.

  1. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Subsurface Drip Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A subsurface drip system distributes wastewater to the lawn through a system of tubing installed below the ground. This publication explains the advantages and disadvantages of subsurface drip distribution systems, as well as estimated costs...

  2. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Spray Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A spray distribution system is very similar to a lawn irrigation system. Spray heads are used to distribute treated wastewater to the surface of the yard. This publication explains the advantages and disadvantages of spray distribution systems...

  3. MODIFIED REVERSE OSMOSIS SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert L. Lee; Junghan Dong

    2004-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report of ''Modified Reverse Osmosis System for Treatment of Produced Water,'' DOE project No. DE-FC26-00BC15326 describes work performed in the third year of the project. Several good results were obtained, which are documented in this report. The compacted bentonite membranes were replaced by supported bentonite membranes, which exhibited the same salt rejection capability. Unfortunately, it also inherited the clay expansion problem due to water invasion into the interlayer spaces of the compacted bentonite membranes. We noted that the supported bentonite membrane developed in the project was the first of its kind reported in the literature. An {alpha}-alumina-supported MFI-type zeolite membrane synthesized by in-situ crystallization was fabricated and tested. Unlike the bentonite clay membranes, the zeolite membranes maintained stability and high salt rejection rate even for a highly saline solution. Actual produced brines from gas and oil fields were then tested. For gas fields producing brine, the 18,300 ppm TDS (total dissolved solids) in the produced brine was reduced to 3060 ppm, an 83.3% rejection rate of 15,240 ppm salt rejection. For oilfield brine, while the TDS was reduced from 181,600 ppm to 148,900 ppm, an 18% rejection rate of 32,700 ppm reduction, the zeolite membrane was stable. Preliminary results show the dissolved organics, mainly hydrocarbons, did not affect the salt rejection. However, the rejection of organics was inconclusive at this point. Finally, the by-product of this project, the {alpha}-alumina-supported Pt-Co/Na Y catalytic zeolite membrane was developed and demonstrated for overcoming the two-step limitation of nonoxidation methane (CH{sub 4}) conversion to higher hydrocarbons (C{sub 2+}) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}). Detailed experiments to obtain quantitative results of H{sub 2} generation for various conditions are now being conducted. Technology transfer efforts included five manuscripts submitted to peer-reviewed journals and five conference presentations.

  4. Comparison of costs for alternative mixed low-level waste treatment systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwinkendorf, W.E.; Harvego, L. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cooley, C.R. [Dept. of Energy (United States); Biagi, C. [Morrison Knudsen (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Total life cycle costs (TLCCs), including disposal costs, of thermal, nonthermal and enhanced nonthermal systems were evaluated to guide future research and development programs for the treatment of mixed low-level waste (MLLW) consisting of RCRA hazardous and low-level radioactive wastes. In these studies, nonthermal systems are defined as those systems that process waste at temperatures less than 350 C. Preconceptual designs and costs were developed for thirty systems with a capacity (2,927 lbs/hr) to treat the DOE MLLW stored inventor y(approximately 236 million pounds) in 20 years in a single, centralized facility. A limited comparison of the studies` results is presented in this paper. Sensitivity of treatment costs with respect to treatment capacity, number of treatment facilities, and system availability were also determined. The major cost element is operations and maintenance (O and M), which is 50 to 60% of the TLCC for both thermal and nonthermal systems. Energy costs constitute a small fraction (< 1%) of the TLCCs. Equipment cost is only 3 to 5% of the treatment cost. Evaluation of subsystem costs demonstrate that receiving and preparation is the highest cost subsystem at about 25 to 30% of the TLCC for both thermal and nonthermal systems. These studies found no cost incentives to use nonthermal or hybrid (combined nonthermal treatment with stabilization by vitrification) systems in place of thermal systems. However, there may be other incentives including fewer air emissions and less local objection to a treatment facility. Building multiple treatment facilities to treat the same total mass of waste as a single facility would increase the total treatment cost significantly, and improved system availability decreases unit treatment costs by 17% to 30%.

  5. Development of knowledge Base Expert System for Natural treatment of Diabetes disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jha, Sanjeev Kumar

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of expert system for treatment of Diabetes disease by using natural methods is new information technology derived from Artificial Intelligent research using ESTA (Expert System Text Animation) System. The proposed expert system contains knowledge about various methods of natural treatment methods (Massage, Herbal/Proper Nutrition, Acupuncture, Gems) for Diabetes diseases of Human Beings. The system is developed in the ESTA (Expert System shell for Text Animation) which is Visual Prolog 7.3 Application. The knowledge for the said system will be acquired from domain experts, texts and other related sources.

  6. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Gravel-less Pipe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2000-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravel-less pipe systems distribute treated wastewater into the soil. This publication lists the advantages and disadvantages of gravel-less pipe systems, explains how to maintain them and gives estimates of costs....

  7. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project melter system preliminary design technical review meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy, T.L.; Raivo, B.D.; Soelberg, N.R.; Wiersholm, O.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project sponsored a plasma are melter technical design review meeting to evaluate high-temperature melter system configurations for processing heterogeneous alpha-contaminated low-level radioactive waste (ALLW). Thermal processing experts representing Department of Energy contractors, the Environmental Protection Agency, and private sector companies participated in the review. The participants discussed issues and evaluated alternative configurations for three areas of the melter system design: plasma torch melters and graphite arc melters, offgas treatment options, and overall system configuration considerations. The Technical Advisory Committee for the review concluded that graphite arc melters are preferred over plasma torch melters for processing ALLW. Initiating involvement of stakeholders was considered essential at this stage of the design. For the offgas treatment system, the advisory committee raised the question whether to a use wet-dry or a dry-wet system. The committee recommended that the waste stream characterization, feed preparation, and the control system are essential design tasks for the high-temperature melter treatment system. The participants strongly recommended that a complete melter treatment system be assembled to conduct tests with nonradioactive surrogate waste material. A nonradioactive test bed would allow for inexpensive design and operational changes prior to assembling a system for radioactive waste treatment operations.

  8. Independent peer review panel report on the integrated nonthermal treatment systems study and the comparison of integrated thermal and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for mixed low level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) Office of Science and Technology (OST) has conducted studies of integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTS) for treating contact handled, alpha and non-alpha mixed low level radioactive waste (MLLW). The MLLW in the DOE complex consists of a wide variety of organic and inorganic solids and liquids contaminated with radioactive substances. Treatment systems are needed to destroy organic material and stabilize residues prior to land disposal. In May 1996 the Deputy Assistant Secretary for OST appointed an Independent Peer Review Panel to: (1) review and comment on the INTS Study; (2) make recommendations on the most promising thermal and nonthermal treatment systems; (3) make recommendations on research and development necessary to prove the performance of nonthermal and thermal technologies; and (4) review and comment on the preliminary draft of the ITTS/INTS Comparison Report. This report presents the primary conclusions and recommendations based on the review of the INTS study and the comparison report. System selection, overviews, comparisons, cost estimations and sensitivity analyses, and recommended R and D engineering needs are then described and discussed.

  9. CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    following CHP technologies: Reciprocating Engine, Microturbine, Combustion Turbines, Stirling Engine, and Fuel Cell. CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater...

  10. Bifurcation of Singular Arcs in an Optimal Control Problem for Cancer Immune System Interactions under Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledzewicz, Urszula

    , 63130-4899, hms@wustl.edu Abstract-- A mathematical model for cancer treatment that includesBifurcation of Singular Arcs in an Optimal Control Problem for Cancer Immune System Interactions under Treatment Urszula Ledzewicz Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics, Southern Illinois University

  11. DECISION SUPPORT FOR A WASTE ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT TREATMENT SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohanec, Marko

    and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) treatment system in the development of incineration, disposal, treatment and recycling integrated programs. In the paper, we describe the WEEE, taking a broad view of various types of decisions in the field of WEEE. A detailed explanation of the decisions in the WEEE Logistics is given

  12. Integrated process analysis of treatment systems for mixed low level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, C.R. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Schwinkendorf, W.E. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.]|[Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bechtold, T.E. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selection of technologies to be developed for treatment of DOE`s mixed low level waste (MLLW) requires knowledge and understanding of the expected costs, schedules, risks, performance, and reliability of the total engineered systems that use these technologies. Thus, an integrated process analysis program was undertaken to identify the characteristics and needs of several thermal and nonthermal systems. For purposes of comparison, all systems were conceptually designed for a single facility processing the same amount of waste at the same rate. Thirty treatment systems were evaluated ranging from standard incineration to innovative thermal systems and innovative nonthermal chemical treatment. Treating 236 million pounds of waste in 20 years through a central treatment was found to be the least costly option with total life cycle cost ranging from $2.1 billion for a metal melting system to $3.9 billion for a nonthermal acid digestion system. Little cost difference exists among nonthermal systems or among thermal systems. Significant cost savings could be achieved by working towards maximum on line treatment time per year; vitrifying the final waste residue; decreasing front end characterization segregation and sizing requirements; using contaminated soil as the vitrifying agent; and delisting the final vitrified waste form from Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restriction (LDR) requirements.

  13. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Leaching Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2000-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Leaching chambers distribute treated wastewater into the soil. This publication lists the advantages and disadvantages of leaching chamber systems, explains how to maintain them and gives estimates of costs....

  14. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1 -- issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2 -- issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study -- drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering.

  15. Future waste treatment and energy systems – examples of joint scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Münster, M., E-mail: maem@dtu.dk [System Analysis Division, DTU Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Finnveden, G. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and the Built Environment, Department of Planning and Environment, Division of Environmental Strategies Research – fms, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Wenzel, H. [Institute of Chemical Engineering, Biotechnology and Environmental Technology, University of Southern Denmark, Niels Bohrs Allé 1, 5230 Odense M (Denmark)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Approach for use of scenarios dealing with both waste management and energy issues. • Overall scenarios for the common project and sub-scenarios in parts of the project. • Combining different types of scenarios to the tools of different disciplines. • Use of explorative external scenarios based on marginals for consequential LCA. - Abstract: Development and use of scenarios for large interdisciplinary projects is a complicated task. This article provides practical examples of how it has been carried out in two projects addressing waste management and energy issues respectively. Based on experiences from the two projects, recommendations are made for an approach concerning development of scenarios in projects dealing with both waste management and energy issues. Recommendations are given to develop and use overall scenarios for the project and leave room for sub-scenarios in parts of the project. Combining different types of scenarios is recommended, too, in order to adapt to the methods and tools of different disciplines, such as developing predictive scenarios with general equilibrium tools and analysing explorative scenarios with energy system analysis tools. Furthermore, as marginals identified in differing future background systems determine the outcomes of consequential life cycle assessments (LCAs), it is considered advisable to develop and use explorative external scenarios based on possible marginals as a framework for consequential LCAs. This approach is illustrated using an on-going Danish research project.

  16. Waste management system alternatives for treatment of wastes from spent fuel reprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKee, R.W.; Swanson, J.L.; Daling, P.M.; Clark, L.L.; Craig, R.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.; McCarthy, D.; Franklin, A.L.; Hazelton, R.F.; Lundgren, R.A.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was performed to help identify a preferred TRU waste treatment alternative for reprocessing wastes with respect to waste form performance in a geologic repository, near-term waste management system risks, and minimum waste management system costs. The results were intended for use in developing TRU waste acceptance requirements that may be needed to meet regulatory requirements for disposal of TRU wastes in a geologic repository. The waste management system components included in this analysis are waste treatment and packaging, transportation, and disposal. The major features of the TRU waste treatment alternatives examined here include: (1) packaging (as-produced) without treatment (PWOT); (2) compaction of hulls and other compactable wastes; (3) incineration of combustibles with cementation of the ash plus compaction of hulls and filters; (4) melting of hulls and failed equipment plus incineration of combustibles with vitrification of the ash along with the HLW; (5a) decontamination of hulls and failed equipment to produce LLW plus incineration and incorporation of ash and other inert wastes into HLW glass; and (5b) variation of this fifth treatment alternative in which the incineration ash is incorporated into a separate TRU waste glass. The six alternative processing system concepts provide progressively increasing levels of TRU waste consolidation and TRU waste form integrity. Vitrification of HLW and intermediate-level liquid wastes (ILLW) was assumed in all cases.

  17. Technical analysis of advanced wastewater-treatment systems for coal-gasification plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis of advanced wastewater treatment systems for coal gasification plants highlights the three coal gasification demonstration plants proposed by the US Department of Energy: The Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant, the Illinois Coal Gasification Group Pipeline Gas Demonstration Plant, and the CONOCO Pipeline Gas Demonstration Plant. Technical risks exist for coal gasification wastewater treatment systems, in general, and for the three DOE demonstration plants (as designed), in particular, because of key data gaps. The quantities and compositions of coal gasification wastewaters are not well known; the treatability of coal gasification wastewaters by various technologies has not been adequately studied; the dynamic interactions of sequential wastewater treatment processes and upstream wastewater sources has not been tested at demonstration scale. This report identifies key data gaps and recommends that demonstration-size and commercial-size plants be used for coal gasification wastewater treatment data base development. While certain advanced treatment technologies can benefit from additional bench-scale studies, bench-scale and pilot plant scale operations are not representative of commercial-size facility operation. It is recommended that coal gasification demonstration plants, and other commercial-size facilities that generate similar wastewaters, be used to test advanced wastewater treatment technologies during operation by using sidestreams or collected wastewater samples in addition to the plant's own primary treatment system. Advanced wastewater treatment processes are needed to degrade refractory organics and to concentrate and remove dissolved solids to allow for wastewater reuse. Further study of reverse osmosis, evaporation, electrodialysis, ozonation, activated carbon, and ultrafiltration should take place at bench-scale.

  18. auxiliary power system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    proposal for implementation The Monticello operating staff had previously conducted the logging of RPS mg set output current and voltage several times each shift since initial...

  19. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ENGINEERED CONTAINER RETRIEVAL AND TRANSFER SYSTEM PRELIMINARY DESIGN HAZARD ANALYSIS SUPPLEMENT 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FRANZ GR; MEICHLE RH

    2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This 'What/If' Hazards Analysis addresses hazards affecting the Sludge Treatment Project Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) NPH and external events at the preliminary design stage. In addition, the hazards of the operation sequence steps for the mechanical handling operations in preparation of Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC), disconnect STSC and prepare STSC and Sludge Transport System (STS) for shipping are addressed.

  20. Preliminary design report for the K basins integrated water treatment system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauly, T.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Preliminary Design Report (PDR) provides a revised concept for the K Basins Integrated Water Treatment Systems (IWTS). This PDR incorporates the 11 recommendations made in a May 1996 Value Engineering session into the Conceptual Design, and provides new flow diagrams, hazard category assessment, cost estimate, and schedule for the IWTS Subproject.

  1. Statement of work for definitive design of the K basins integrated water treatment system project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauly, T.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Statement of Work (SOW) identifies the scope of work and schedule requirements for completing definitive design of the K Basins Integrated Water Treatment Systems (IWTS) Subproject. This SOW shall form the contractual basis between WHC and the Design Agent for the Definitive Design.

  2. Combined Microbial-Fe(0) Treatment Systems 1 1058-8337/00/$.50

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    produces cathodic H2 when corroded by water. The preferential colonization of Fe(0) suggests- valent iron (Fe(0)) is submerged in anoxic water, hydro- gen gas is produced via cathodic depolarizationCombined Microbial-Fe(0) Treatment Systems 1 1058-8337/00/$.50 © 2000 by Battelle Memorial

  3. K West Basin Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) E-F Annular Filter Vessel Accident Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RITTMANN, P.D.

    1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Three bounding accidents postdated for the K West Basin integrated water treatment system are evaluated against applicable risk evaluation guidelines. The accidents are a spray leak during fuel retrieval, spray leak during backflushing, and a hydrogen explosion. Event trees and accident probabilities are estimated. In all cases, the unmitigated dose consequences are below the risk evaluation guidelines.

  4. Verification of Gamma Knife extend system based fractionated treatment planning using EBT2 film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natanasabapathi, Gopishankar; Bisht, Raj Kishor [Gamma Knife Unit, Department of Neurosurgery, Neurosciences Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110029 (India)] [Gamma Knife Unit, Department of Neurosurgery, Neurosciences Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110029 (India)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This paper presents EBT2 film verification of fractionated treatment planning with the Gamma Knife (GK) extend system, a relocatable frame system for multiple-fraction or serial multiple-session radiosurgery.Methods: A human head shaped phantom simulated the verification process for fractionated Gamma Knife treatment. Phantom preparation for Extend Frame based treatment planning involved creating a dental impression, fitting the phantom to the frame system, and acquiring a stereotactic computed tomography (CT) scan. A CT scan (Siemens, Emotion 6) of the phantom was obtained with following parameters: Tube voltage—110 kV, tube current—280 mA, pixel size—0.5 × 0.5 and 1 mm slice thickness. A treatment plan with two 8 mm collimator shots and three sectors blocking in each shot was made. Dose prescription of 4 Gy at 100% was delivered for the first fraction out of the two fractions planned. Gafchromic EBT2 film (ISP Wayne, NJ) was used as 2D verification dosimeter in this process. Films were cut and placed inside the film insert of the phantom for treatment dose delivery. Meanwhile a set of films from the same batch were exposed from 0 to 12 Gy doses for calibration purposes. An EPSON (Expression 10000 XL) scanner was used for scanning the exposed films in transparency mode. Scanned films were analyzed with inhouse written MATLAB codes.Results: Gamma index analysis of film measurement in comparison with TPS calculated dose resulted in high pass rates >90% for tolerance criteria of 1%/1 mm. The isodose overlay and linear dose profiles of film measured and computed dose distribution on sagittal and coronal plane were in close agreement.Conclusions: Through this study, the authors propose treatment verification QA method for Extend frame based fractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery using EBT2 film.

  5. Karlsruhe Database for Radioactive Wastes (KADABRA) - Accounting and Management System for Radioactive Waste Treatment - 12275

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Himmerkus, Felix; Rittmeyer, Cornelia [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The data management system KADABRA was designed according to the purposes of the Cen-tral Decontamination Department (HDB) of the Wiederaufarbeitungsanlage Karlsruhe Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs-GmbH (WAK GmbH), which is specialized in the treatment and conditioning of radioactive waste. The layout considers the major treatment processes of the HDB as well as regulatory and legal requirements. KADABRA is designed as an SAG ADABAS application on IBM system Z mainframe. The main function of the system is the data management of all processes related to treatment, transfer and storage of radioactive material within HDB. KADABRA records the relevant data concerning radioactive residues, interim products and waste products as well as the production parameters relevant for final disposal. Analytical data from the laboratory and non destructive assay systems, that describe the chemical and radiological properties of residues, production batches, interim products as well as final waste products, can be linked to the respective dataset for documentation and declaration. The system enables the operator to trace the radioactive material through processing and storage. Information on the actual sta-tus of the material as well as radiological data and storage position can be gained immediately on request. A variety of programs accessed to the database allow the generation of individual reports on periodic or special request. KADABRA offers a high security standard and is constantly adapted to the recent requirements of the organization. (authors)

  6. Oak Ridge National Lebroatory Liquid&Gaseous Waste Treatment System Strategic Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Hoesen, S.D.

    2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Excellence in Laboratory operations is one of the three key goals of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Agenda. That goal will be met through comprehensive upgrades of facilities and operational approaches over the next few years. Many of ORNL's physical facilities, including the liquid and gaseous waste collection and treatment systems, are quite old, and are reaching the end of their safe operating life. The condition of research facilities and supporting infrastructure, including the waste handling facilities, is a key environmental, safety and health (ES&H) concern. The existing infrastructure will add considerably to the overhead costs of research due to increased maintenance and operating costs as these facilities continue to age. The Liquid Gaseous Waste Treatment System (LGWTS) Reengineering Project is a UT-Battelle, LLC (UT-B) Operations Improvement Program (OIP) project that was undertaken to develop a plan for upgrading the ORNL liquid and gaseous waste systems to support ORNL's research mission.

  7. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Low-Pressure Dosing System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-pressure dosing system treats wastewater and then pumps it into the soil several times daily. This publication explains the advantages and disadvantages of low-pressure dosing systems as well as estimated costs and maintenance requirements....

  8. Figure-of-merit analysis and cost effectiveness of low-level radioactive waste treatment systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, N.D.; Falconer, K.L.; McCormack, M.D.; Hootman, H.D.; Thompson, T.K.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two studies were performed to assess low-level waste treatment systems that are available commercially for volume reduction and/or solidification. In the first, a Figure-of-Merit (FOM) decision analysis technique was used to evaluate fourteen low-level radioactive waste processing systems on their ability to treat power reactor wastes. The assessment of the various processing systems was accomplished using a five member task force. The systems were judged on eleven major criteria and twenty subcriteria. The system judged superior to all the others was compaction of dry wastes with liquid wastes and sludges being directly incorporated into concrete. This was also the lowest cost system. The controlled air incinerator was judged the preferred incineration process. The Werner-Pfleider bitumen extruder was the preferred liquid waste treatment system. In the second study, the cost economy of volume reduction measured in land disposal dollars was investigated. The greatest cost savings with volume reduction were realized with a BWR using a deep bed condensate polishing system; the least with a PWR with condensate polishing. For both BWR systems and PWRs without condensate cleanup, over 80% of the savings in land disposal dollars resulted from volume reduction of liquid waste streams (concentrated liquids and filter sludge). For a PWR with a condensate polishing system, which had the least cost effective system for volume reduction, about one-third of the savings resulting from incineration of spent resin and compactible trash was offset by the increased expense of casks required for transporting concentrated liquids which have undergone additional volume reduction.

  9. A client management system for criminal justice referrals to drug abuse treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pate, Wayland Gordon

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over the years of research. Therapeutic communities are typically residential, drug-free programs offering 24-hour care and they concentrate on rehabilitation through resocialization of the addict toward more adaptive and productive pursuits. Drug...A CLIENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFERRALS TO DRUG ABUSE TREATMENT A Thesis by WAYLAND GORDON PATE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  10. System Description for the KW Basin Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) (70.3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DERUSSEAU, R.R.

    2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a description of the system that collects and processes the sludge and radioactive ions released by the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) processing operations conducted in the 105 KW Basin. The system screens, settles, filters, and conditions the basin water for reuse. Sludge and most radioactive ions are removed before the water is distributed back to the basin pool. This system is part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP).

  11. EVALUATION OF ALTERNATE STAINLESS STEEL SURFACE TREATMENTS FOR MASS SPECTROSCOPY AND OTHER TRITIUM SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, E.; Mauldin, C.; Neikirk, K.

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    There are specific components in the SRS Tritium Facilities that are required to introduce as few chemical impurities (such as protium and methane) as possible into the process gas. Two such components are the inlet systems for the mass spectroscopy facilities and hydrogen isotope mix standard containers. Two vendors now passivate stainless steel components for these systems, and both are relatively small businesses whose future viability can be questioned, which creates the need for new sources. Stainless steel containers were designed to evaluate alternate surface treatment vendors for tritium storage and handling for these high purity tritium systems. Five vendors applied their own 'best' surface treatments to two containers each - one was a current vendor, another was a chemical vapor deposited silicon coating, and the other three were electropolishing and chemical cleaning vendors. Pure tritium gas was introduced into all ten containers and the composition was monitored over time. The only observed impurities in the gas were some HT, less CT{sub 4}, and very small amounts of T{sub 2}O in all cases. The currently used vendor treated containers contained the least impurities. The chemical vapor deposited silicon treatment resulted in the highest impurity levels. Sampling one set of containers after about one month of tritium exposure revealed the impurity level to be nearly the same as that after more than a year of exposure - this result suggests that cleaning new stainless steel components by tritium gas contact for about a month may be a worthy operation.

  12. H02 WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEM WATER CHEMISTRY SAMPLING AND RESULTS REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bach, M; Michael Serrato, M; Eric Nelson, E

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The H-02 Wetland Treatment System (Figure 1) is used to remove heavy metals (e.g., copper and zinc) from the H-Area process and storm water discharge. Routine flow enters an equalization basin by inlets on either the east (Location 1) or west end (Location 2). The west end influent constitutes 75% of the average flow into the basin which has an average residence time of approximately 3 days at low pool (i.e., 120 gal/min. through a volume of 0.5 million gallons). The water then exits via the basin outlet on the east end. Next, the water flows to a splitter box (Location 3) which evenly separates the flow between two wetland cells for a design flow of 60 gal/min. per wetland cell with a residence time in the cell of approximately 2 days. The wetland effluent is then combined (Location 4) and flows through a spillway before reaching the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) measurement point near Road 4. During initial operation, it was observed that the pH of the water leaving the equalization basin was elevated compared to the influent pH. Furthermore, the elevated pH remained through the wetland cells so that there was an average pH of 10 leaving the wetland cells during the daytime which exceeds the upper NPDES limit of 8.5. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the cause of the increase in pH within the equalization basin of the H-02 Wetland Treatment System. Possible mechanisms included algal activity and inorganic chemistry interactions (e.g., interactions with the clay and/or bentonite liner). Water quality parameters were evaluated throughout the H-02 Wetland Treatment system and over time in order to determine the cause of high pH values measured in the basin and wetland. Fluctuations in dissolved oxygen (DO) and accompanying changes in pH would be expected in systems where algae are an influencing factor. An unexpected increase or decrease in the concentration of inorganic substances may indicate operational changes or an inorganic chemistry influence on pH. In addition, alternative methods to alleviate or mitigate the pH increase were evaluated. This study documents the results of sampling activities undertaken and conveys the analytical results along with suggestions for operation of the H-02 Wetland Treatment System. The water samples collected and the water quality data generated from this activity are for analytical purposes only, and as such, were not collected in support of compliance activities.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF WET-OXIDATION TREATMENT SYSTEM FOR FILTER BACKWASH SLUDGE AND ION EXCHANGE RESINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyamoto, T.; Motoyama, M.; Shibuya, M.; Wada, H.; Yamazaki, K.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Decomposition of organic compounds contained in filter backwash sludge and spent ion exchange resins is considered effective in reducing the waste volume. A system using the wet-oxidation process has been studied for the treatment of the sludge and resins stored at Tsuruga Power Station Unit 1, 357MWe BWR, owned by The Japan Atomic Power Company. Compared with various processes for treating sludge and resin, the wet-oxidation system is rather simple and the process conditions are mild. Waste samples collected from storage tanks were processed by wet-oxidation and appropriate decomposition of the organic compounds was verified. After the decomposition the residue can be solidified with cement or bitumen for final disposal. When compared with direct solidification without decomposition, the number of waste packages can be reduced by a factor of a few dozens for the sludge and three for the resin. Additional measures for conditioning secondary waste products have also been studied, and their applicability to the Tsuruga Power Station was verified. Some of the conditions studied were specific to the Tsuruga Power Station, but it is expected that the system will provide an effective solution for sludge and resin treatment at other NPPs.

  14. Defining manganese(II) removal processes in passive coal mine drainage treatment systems through laboratory incubation experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgos, William

    - trations. At operating coal mines, the most commonly used ``active treatment'' method to remove MnDefining manganese(II) removal processes in passive coal mine drainage treatment systems through for the passive removal of Mn(II) from coal mine drainage (CMD). Aqueous Mn(II) is removed via oxidative

  15. Operating cost guidelines for benchmarking DOE thermal treatment systems for low-level mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmon, R.; Loghry, S.L.; Hermes, W.H.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents guidelines for estimating operating costs for use in benchmarking US Department of Energy (DOE) low-level mixed waste thermal treatment systems. The guidelines are based on operating cost experience at the DOE Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) mixed waste incinerator at the K-25 Site at Oak Ridge. In presenting these guidelines, it should be made clear at the outset that it is not the intention of this report to present operating cost estimates for new technologies, but only guidelines for estimating such costs.

  16. Water treatment capacity of forward osmosis systems utilizing power plant waste heat

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Xingshi; Gingerich, Daniel B.; Mauter, Meagan S.

    2015-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Forward osmosis (FO) has the potential to improve the energy efficiency of membrane-based water treatment by leveraging waste heat from steam electric power generation as the primary driving force for separation. In this study, we develop a comprehensive FO process model, consisting of membrane separation, heat recovery, and draw solute regeneration (DSR) models. We quantitatively characterize three alternative processes for DSR: distillation, steam stripping, and air stripping. We then construct a mathematical model of the distillation process for DSR that incorporates hydrodynamics, mass and heat transport resistances, and reaction kinetics, and we integrate this into a model for the fullmore »FO process. Finally, we utilize this FO process model to derive a first-order approximation of the water production capacity given the rejected heat quantity and quality available at U.S. electric power facilities. We find that the upper bound of FO water treatment capacity using low-grade heat sources at electric power facilities exceeds process water treatment demand for boiler water make-up and flue gas desulfurization wastewater systems.« less

  17. Water treatment capacity of forward osmosis systems utilizing power plant waste heat

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Xingshi [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Gingerich, Daniel B. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Mauter, Meagan S. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Forward osmosis (FO) has the potential to improve the energy efficiency of membrane-based water treatment by leveraging waste heat from steam electric power generation as the primary driving force for separation. In this study, we develop a comprehensive FO process model, consisting of membrane separation, heat recovery, and draw solute regeneration (DSR) models. We quantitatively characterize three alternative processes for DSR: distillation, steam stripping, and air stripping. We then construct a mathematical model of the distillation process for DSR that incorporates hydrodynamics, mass and heat transport resistances, and reaction kinetics, and we integrate this into a model for the full FO process. Finally, we utilize this FO process model to derive a first-order approximation of the water production capacity given the rejected heat quantity and quality available at U.S. electric power facilities. We find that the upper bound of FO water treatment capacity using low-grade heat sources at electric power facilities exceeds process water treatment demand for boiler water make-up and flue gas desulfurization wastewater systems.

  18. Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) at Fossil-Fueled Electric Generating Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Alan Mays; Bert R. Bock; Gregory A. Brodie; L. Suzanne Fisher; J. Devereux Joslin; Donald L. Kachelman; Jimmy J. Maddox; N. S. Nicholas; Larry E. Shelton; Nick Taylor; Mark H. Wolfe; Dennis H. Yankee; John Goodrich-Mahoney

    2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Department of Energy-National Energy Technologies Laboratory (DOE-NETL) are evaluating and demonstrating integration of terrestrial carbon sequestration techniques at a coal-fired electric power plant through the use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system gypsum as a soil amendment and mulch, and coal fly ash pond process water for periodic irrigation. From January to March 2002, the Project Team initiated the construction of a 40 ha Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) near TVA's Paradise Fossil Plant on marginally reclaimed surface coal mine lands in Kentucky. The CCWESTRS is growing commercial grade trees and cover crops and is expected to sequester 1.5-2.0 MT/ha carbon per year over a 20-year period. The concept could be used to meet a portion of the timber industry's needs while simultaneously sequestering carbon in lands which would otherwise remain non-productive. The CCWESTRS includes a constructed wetland to enhance the ability to sequester carbon and to remove any nutrients and metals present in the coal fly ash process water runoff. The CCWESTRS project is a cooperative effort between TVA, EPRI, and DOE-NETL, with a total budget of $1,574,000. The proposed demonstration project began in October 2000 and has continued through December 2005. Additional funding is being sought in order to extend the project. The primary goal of the project is to determine if integrating power plant processes with carbon sequestration techniques will enhance carbon sequestration cost-effectively. This goal is consistent with DOE objectives to provide economically competitive and environmentally safe options to offset projected growth in U.S. baseline emissions of greenhouse gases after 2010, achieve the long-term goal of $10/ton of avoided net costs for carbon sequestration, and provide half of the required reductions in global greenhouse gases by 2025. Other potential benefits of the demonstration include developing a passive technology for water treatment for trace metal and nutrient release reductions, using power plant by-products to improve coal mine land reclamation and carbon sequestration, developing wildlife habitat and green-space around production facilities, generating Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) credits for the use of process water, and producing wood products for use by the lumber and pulp and paper industry. Project activities conducted during the five year project period include: Assessing tree cultivation and other techniques used to sequester carbon; Project site assessment; Greenhouse studies to determine optimum plant species and by-product application; Designing, constructing, operating, monitoring, and evaluating the CCWESTRS system; and Reporting (ongoing). The ability of the system to sequester carbon will be the primary measure of effectiveness, measured by accessing survival and growth response of plants within the CCWESTRS. In addition, costs associated with design, construction, and monitoring will be evaluated and compared to projected benefits of other carbon sequestration technologies. The test plan involves the application of three levels each of two types of power plant by-products--three levels of FGD gypsum mulch, and three levels of ash pond irrigation water. This design produces nine treatment levels which are being tested with two species of hardwood trees (sweet gum and sycamore). The project is examining the effectiveness of applications of 0, 8-cm, and 15-cm thick gypsum mulch layers and 0, 13 cm, and 25 cm of coal fly ash water for irrigation. Each treatment combination is being replicated three times, resulting in a total of 54 treatment plots (3 FGD gypsum levels X 3 irrigation water levels x 2 tree species x 3 replicates). Survival and growth response of plant species in terms of sequestering carbon in plant material and soil will be the primary measure of effectiveness of each treatment. Additionally, the ability of the site soils and unsaturated zone subsurface m

  19. Pilot scale test of a produced water-treatment system for initial removal of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Enid J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwon, Soondong [UT-AUSTIN; Katz, Lynn [UT-AUSTIN; Kinney, Kerry [UT-AUSTIN

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot-scale test to remove polar and non-polar organics from produced water was performed at a disposal facility in Farmington NM. We used surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorbent beds and a membrane bioreactor (MBR) in combination to reduce the organic carbon content of produced water prior to reverse osmosis (RO). Reduction of total influent organic carbon (TOC) to 5 mg/L or less is desirable for efficient RO system operation. Most water disposed at the facility is from coal-bed gas production, with oil production waters intermixed. Up to 20 gal/d of produced water was cycled through two SMZ adsorbent units to remove volatile organic compounds (BTEX, acetone) and semivolatile organic compounds (e.g., napthalene). Output water from the SMZ units was sent to the MBR for removal of the organic acid component of TOC. Removal of inorganic (Mn and Fe oxide) particulates by the SMZ system was observed. The SMZ columns removed up to 40% of the influent TOC (600 mg/L). BTEX concentrations were reduced from the initial input of 70 mg/L to 5 mg/L by the SMZ and to an average of 2 mg/L after the MBR. Removal rates of acetate (input 120-170 mg/L) and TOC (input up to 45 mg/L) were up to 100% and 92%, respectively. The water pH rose from 8.5 to 8.8 following organic acid removal in the MBR; this relatively high pH was likely responsible for observed scaling of the MBR internal membrane. Additional laboratory studies showed the scaling can be reduced by metered addition of acid to reduce the pH. Significantly, organic removal in the MBR was accomplished with a very low biomass concentration of 1 g/L throughout the field trial. An earlier engineering evaluation shows produced water treatment by the SMZ/MBR/RO system would cost from $0.13 to $0.20 per bbl at up to 40 gpm. Current estimated disposal costs for produced water are $1.75 to $4.91 per bbl when transportation costs are included, with even higher rates in some regions. Our results suggest that treatment by an SMZ/MBR/RO system may be a feasible alternative to current methods for produced water treatment and disposal.

  20. Fate of As, Se, and Hg in a Passive Integrated System for Treatment of Fossil Plant Wastewater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry Yost; Paul Pier; Gregory Brodie

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    TVA is collaborating with EPRI and DOE to demonstrate a passive treatment system for removing SCR-derived ammonia and trace elements from a coal-fired power plant wastewater stream. The components of the integrated system consist of trickling filters for ammonia oxidation, reaction cells containing zero-valent iron (ZVI) for trace contaminant removal, a settling basin for storage of iron hydroxide floc, and anaerobic vertical-flow wetlands for biological denitrification. The passive integrated treatment system will treat up to 0.25 million gallons per day (gpd) of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) pond effluent, with a configuration requiring only gravity flow to obviate the need for pumps. The design of the system will enable a comparative evaluation of two parallel treatment trains, with and without the ZVI extraction trench and settling/oxidation basin components. One of the main objectives is to gain a better understanding of the chemical transformations that species of trace elements such as arsenic, selenium, and mercury undergo as they are treated in passive treatment system components with differing environmental conditions. This progress report details the design criteria for the passive integrated system for treating fossil power plant wastewater as well as performance results from the first several months of operation. Engineering work on the project has been completed, and construction took place during the summer of 2005. Monitoring of the passive treatment system was initiated in October 2005 and continued until May 18 2006. The results to date indicate that the treatment system is effective in reducing levels of nitrogen compounds and trace metals. Concentrations of both ammonia and trace metals were lower than expected in the influent FGD water, and additions to increase these concentrations will be done in the future to further test the removal efficiency of the treatment system. In May 2006, the wetland cells were drained of FGD water, refilled with less toxic ash pond water, and replanted due to low survival rates from the first planting the previous summer. The goals of the TVA-EPRI-DOE collaboration include building a better understanding of the chemical transformations that trace elements such as arsenic, selenium, and mercury undergo as they are treated in a passive treatment system, and to evaluate the performance of a large-scale replicated passive treatment system to provide additional design criteria and economic factors.

  1. Documentation on currently operating low-level radioactive waste treatment systems: National Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 1985, the US Department of Energy issued a Program Research and Development Announcement requesting documentation on currently operating low-level radioactive waste treatment systems. Six grants were awarded to support that documentation. Final reports for the following grants and grantees are compiled in this document: Shredder/Compactor Report by Impell Corp., Volume Reduction and Solidification System for Low-Level Radwaste Treatment by Waste Chem Corp., Low-Level Radioactive Waste Treatment Systems in Northern Europe by Pacific Nuclear Services/Nuclear Packaging Inc., The University of Missouri Research Reactor Facility Can Melter System by the University of Missouri, Drying of Ion-Exchange Resin and Filter Media by Nuclear Packaging Inc., and Operational Experience with Selective Ion-Exchange Media in Sluiceable Pressurized Demineralizers at Nuclear Power Plants by Analytical Resources Inc. 65 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. One System Integrated Project Team Progress in Coordinating Hanford Tank Farms and the Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skwarek, Raymond J. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Harp, Ben J. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Duncan, Garth M. [Bechtel National, Inc. (United States)

    2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed at the Hanford Site in late 2011 as a way to improve coordination and itegration between the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) on interfaces between the two projects, and to eliminate duplication and exploit opportunities for synergy. The IPT is composed of jointly staffed groups that work on technical issues of mutal interest, front-end design and project definition, nuclear safety, plant engineering system integration, commissioning, planning and scheduling, and environmental, safety, health and quality (ESH&Q) areas. In the past year important progress has been made in a number of areas as the organization has matured and additional opportunities have been identified. Areas covered in this paper include: Support for development of the Office of Envirnmental Management (EM) framework document to progress the Office of River Protection's (ORP) River Protection Project (RPP) mission; Stewardship of the RPP flowsheet; Collaboration with Savannah River Site (SRS), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Operations programs integration; and, Further development of the waste acceptance criteria.

  3. Transacting generation attributes across market boundaries: Compatible information systems and the treatment of imports and exports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grace, Robert; Wiser, Ryan

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Treatment of Imports and Exports Robert Grace Sustainableand Exports 31 AlternativeImports and Exports 34 Geographic

  4. Fukushima Nuclear Crisis Recovery: A Modular Water Treatment System Deployed in Seven Weeks - 12489

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denton, Mark S.; Mertz, Joshua L. [Kurion, Inc., P.O. Box 5901, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Bostick, William D. [Materials and Chemistry Laboratory, Inc. (MCL) ETTP, Building K-1006, 2010 Highway 58, Suite 1000, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On March 11, 2011, the magnitude 9.0 Great East Japan earthquake, Tohoku, hit off the Fukushima coast of Japan. This was one of the most powerful earthquakes in recorded history and the most powerful one known to have hit Japan. The ensuing tsunami devastated a huge area resulting in some 25,000 persons confirmed dead or missing. The perfect storm was complete when the tsunami then found the four reactor, Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Station directly in its destructive path. While recovery systems admirably survived the powerful earthquake, the seawater from the tsunami knocked the emergency cooling systems out and did extensive damage to the plant and site. Subsequent hydrogen generation caused explosions which extended this damage to a new level and further flooded the buildings with highly contaminated water. Some 2 million people were evacuated from a fifty mile radius of the area and evaluation and cleanup began. Teams were assembled in Tokyo the first week of April to lay out potential plans for the immediate treatment of some 63 million gallons (a number which later exceeded 110 million gallons) of highly contaminated water to avoid overflow from the buildings as well as supply the desperately needed clean cooling water for the reactors. A system had to be deployed with a very brief cold shake down and hot startup before the rainy season started in early June. Joined by team members Toshiba (oil removal system), AREVA (chemical precipitation system) and Hitachi-GE (RO system), Kurion (cesium removal system following the oil separator) proposed, designed, fabricated, delivered and started up a one of a kind treatment skid and over 100 metric tons of specially engineered and modified Ion Specific Media (ISM) customized for this very challenging seawater/oil application, all in seven weeks. After a very short cold shake down, the system went into operation on June 17, 2011 on actual waste waters far exceeding 1 million Bq/mL in cesium and many other isotopes. One must remember that, in addition to attempting to do isotope removal in the competition of seawater (as high as 18,000 ppm sodium due to concentration), some 350,000 gallons of turbine oil was dispersed into the flooded buildings as well. The proposed system consisted of a 4 guard vessel skid for the oil and debris, 4 skids containing 16 cesium towers in a lead-lag layout with removable vessels (sent to an interim storage facility), and a 4 polishing vessel skid for iodine removal and trace cesium levels. At a flow rate of at least 220 gallons per minute, the system has routinely removed over 99% of the cesium, the main component of the activity, since going on line. To date, some 50% of the original activity has been removed and stabilized and cold shutdown of the plant was announced on December 10, 2011. In March and April alone, 10 cubic feet of Engineered Herschelite was shipped to Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant, NPP, to support the April 1, 2011 outage cleanup; 400 cubic feet was shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for strontium (Sr-90) ground water remediation; and 6000 cubic feet (100 metric tons, MT, or 220,400 pounds) was readied for the Fukushima Nuclear Power Station with an additional 100 MT on standby for replacement vessels. This experience and accelerated media production in the U.S. bore direct application to what was to soon be used in Fukushima. How such a sophisticated and totally unique system and huge amount of media could be deployable in such a challenging and changing matrix, and in only seven weeks, is outlined in this paper as well as the system and operation itself. As demonstrated herein, all ten major steps leading up to the readiness and acceptance of a modular emergency technology recovery system were met and in a very short period of time, thus utilizing three decades of experience to produce and deliver such a system literally in seven weeks: - EPRI - U.S. Testing and Experience Leading to Introduction to EPRI - Japan and Subsequently TEPCO Emergency Meetings - Three Mile Island (TMI) Media and Vitrification Experience

  5. TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS USING A SURFACTANT MODIFIED ZEOLITE/VAPOR PHASE BIOREATOR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LYNN E. KATZ; KERRY A. KINNEY; R.S. BOWMAN; E.J. SULLIVAN

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry is by some estimates the largest single waste stream in the country, aside from nonhazardous industrial wastes. Characteristics of produced water include high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component, and chemicals added during the oil-production process. While most of the produced water is disposed via reinjection, some of them must be treated to remove organic constituents before the water is discharged. An efficient, cost-effective treatment technology is needed to remove these constituents. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been used successfully to treat contaminated ground water for organic and inorganic constituents. In addition, the low cost of natural zeolites makes their use attractive in water-treatment applications. Our previous DOE research work (DE-AC26-99BC15221) demonstrated that SMZ could successfully remove BTEX compounds from the produced water. In addition, SMZ could be regenerated through a simple air sparging process. The primary goal of this project is to develop a robust SMZ/VPB treatment system to efficiently remove the organic constituents from produced water in a cost-effective manner. This report summarizes work of this project from March 2003 through September 2003. We have continued our investigation of SMZ regeneration from our previous DOE project. Ten saturation/stripping cycles have been completed for SMZ columns saturated with BTEX compounds. The results suggest that BTEX sorption capacity is not lost after ten saturation/regeneration cycles. The composition of produced water from a site operated by Crystal Solutions Ltd. in Wyoming has been characterized and was used to identify key semi-volatile components. Isotherms with selected semi-volatile components have been initiated and preliminary results have been obtained. The experimental vapor phase bioreactors for this project have been designed and assembled to treat the off-gas from the SMZ regeneration process. These columns will be used both in the laboratory and in the proposed field testing to be conducted next year. Innocula for the columns that degrade all of the BTEX columns have been developed.

  6. MRAP MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 11 DATAMRAP

  7. MSG MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITIES AGREEMENT REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 11

  8. MSG MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 11August 2004

  9. MSG MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 11August

  10. MSG MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril

  11. MSG MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IAprilSeptember/October

  12. MSG MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^

  13. MSG MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^August/September 2005

  14. Monticello, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinutemanVista CapitalMonterey,Ohio:

  15. Monticello, Utah, Disposal and Processing Sites

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 August 2008 Office7-TAC U.S.4 Through4 Fact

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Monticello

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CT 0-01 FUSRAPMonsanto Chemical Company

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Monticello

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNew MexicoUtah Mexican Hat, Utah,LMUtah

  18. Monticello National Priorities List (NPL) Sites

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year38Report3 Through AprilSiteS

  19. Partitioning planning studies: Preliminary evaluation of metal and radionuclide partitioning the high-temperature thermal treatment systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liekhus, K.; Grandy, J.; Chambers, A. [and others

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary study of toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning during high-temperature processing of mixed waste has been conducted during Fiscal Year 1996 within the Environmental Management Technology Evaluation Project. The study included: (a) identification of relevant partitioning mechanisms that cause feed material to be distributed between the solid, molten, and gas phases within a thermal treatment system; (b) evaluations of existing test data from applicable demonstration test programs as a means to identify and understand elemental and species partitioning; and, (c) evaluation of theoretical or empirical partitioning models for use in predicting elemental or species partitioning in a thermal treatment system. This preliminary study was conducted to identify the need for and the viability of developing the tools capable of describing and predicting toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning in the most applicable mixed waste thermal treatment processes. This document presents the results and recommendations resulting from this study that may serve as an impetus for developing and implementing these predictive tools.

  20. Decontamination and inspection plan for Phase 3 closure of the 300 area waste acid treatment system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUKE, S.N.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This decontamination and inspection plan (DIP) describes decontamination and verification activities in support of Phase 3 closure of the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System (WATS). Phase 3 is the third phase of three WATS closure phases. Phase 3 attains clean closure conditions for WATS portions of the 334 and 311 Tank Farms (TF) and the 333 and 303-F Buildings. This DIP also describes designation and management of waste and debris generated during Phase 3 closure activities. Information regarding Phase 1 and Phase 2 for decontamination and verification activities closure can be found in WHC-SD-ENV-AP-001 and HNF-1784, respectively. This DIP is provided as a supplement to the closure plan (DOE/RL-90-11). This DIP provides the documentation for Ecology concurrence with Phase 3 closure methods and activities. This DIP is intended to provide greater detail than is contained in the closure plan to satisfy Ecology Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 requirement that closure documents describe the methods for removing, transporting, storing, and disposing of all dangerous waste at the unit. The decontamination and verification activities described in this DIP are based on the closure plan and on agreements reached between Ecology and the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) during Phase 3 closure activity workshops and/or project manager meetings (PMMs).

  1. Development of low level liquid waste treatment systems: April-September 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M.K.; Colvin, C.M.; Bond, W.H.

    1982-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The pilot plant reverse osmosis system was demonstrated to be effective in removing large percentages of cobalt-60, iodine-125, and a mixture of cesium-137, cobalt-60, and iodine-125 from two types of aqueous streams. The effectiveness of three membrane porosities, 0, 50, and 97% salt rejection, were explored with each isotope. The 97% salt rejection membrane was the most effective in each experiment. Removals as high as 97.5% of the cobalt, 92.9% of the iodine and 95.1% of the combined isotopes were achieved. The effect of possibly interfering factors on the adsorbence of cobalt-60 and iodine-129 on selected ion exchange resins were investigated. The factors thought to affect cobalt-60 adsorption were (OH/sup -/), (NH/sub 4//sup +/), and (SO/sub 3//sup =/). None of the seven factors investigated had any effect on iodine-129 adsorption. Cesium-137 was removed from a 4600-gal aqueous waste containing a large amount of sodium hydroxide by treatment with sodium tetraphenyl boron. The cesium concentration of the supernatant portion was reduced from 570 to 4 counts/min/ml.

  2. Treatment of Produced Water Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn E. Katz; Kerry A. Kinney; Robert S. Bowman; Enid J. Sullivan; Soondong Kwon; Elaine B. Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Craig R. Altare

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. Produced waters typically contain a high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component as well as chemicals added during the oil-production process. It has been estimated that a total of 14 billion barrels of produced water were generated in 2002 from onshore operations (Veil, 2004). Although much of this produced water is disposed via reinjection, environmental and cost considerations can make surface discharge of this water a more practical means of disposal. In addition, reinjection is not always a feasible option because of geographic, economic, or regulatory considerations. In these situations, it may be desirable, and often necessary from a regulatory viewpoint, to treat produced water before discharge. It may also be feasible to treat waters that slightly exceed regulatory limits for re-use in arid or drought-prone areas, rather than losing them to reinjection. A previous project conducted under DOE Contract DE-AC26-99BC15221 demonstrated that surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) represents a potential treatment technology for produced water containing BTEX. Laboratory and field experiments suggest that: (1) sorption of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) to SMZ follows linear isotherms in which sorption increases with increasing solute hydrophobicity; (2) the presence of high salt concentrations substantially increases the capacity of the SMZ for BTEX; (3) competitive sorption among the BTEX compounds is negligible; and, (4) complete recovery of the SMZ sorption capacity for BTEX can be achieved by air sparging the SMZ. This report summarizes research for a follow on project to optimize the regeneration process for multiple sorption/regeneration cycles, and to develop and incorporate a vapor phase bioreactor (VPB) system for treatment of the off-gas generated during air sparging. To this end, we conducted batch and column laboratory SMZ and VPB experiments with synthetic and actual produced waters. Based on the results of the laboratory testing, a pilot scale study was designed and conducted to evaluate the combined SMZ/VPB process. An economic and regulatory feasibility analysis was also completed as part of the current study to assess the viability of the process for various water re-use options.

  3. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ENGINEERED CONTAINER RETRIEVAL AND TRANSFER SYSTEM PRELMINARY DESIGN HAZARD AND OPERABILITY STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARRO CA

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Hazard and Operability (HAZOP) study addresses the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) preliminary design for retrieving sludge from underwater engineered containers located in the 105-K West (KW) Basin, transferring the sludge as a sludge-water slurry (hereafter referred to as 'slurry') to a Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) located in a Modified KW Basin Annex, and preparing the STSC for transport to T Plant using the Sludge Transport System (STS). There are six, underwater engineered containers located in the KW Basin that, at the time of sludge retrieval, will contain an estimated volume of 5.2 m{sup 3} of KW Basin floor and pit sludge, 18.4 m{sup 3} of 105-K East (KE) Basin floor, pit, and canister sludge, and 3.5 m{sup 3} of settler tank sludge. The KE and KW Basin sludge consists of fuel corrosion products (including metallic uranium, and fission and activation products), small fuel fragments, iron and aluminum oxide, sand, dirt, operational debris, and biological debris. The settler tank sludge consists of sludge generated by the washing of KE and KW Basin fuel in the Primary Clean Machine. A detailed description of the origin of sludge and its chemical and physical characteristics can be found in HNF-41051, Preliminary STP Container and Settler Sludge Process System Description and Material Balance. In summary, the ECRTS retrieves sludge from the engineered containers and hydraulically transfers it as a slurry into an STSC positioned within a trailer-mounted STS cask located in a Modified KW Basin Annex. The slurry is allowed to settle within the STSC to concentrate the solids and clarify the supernate. After a prescribed settling period the supernate is decanted. The decanted supernate is filtered through a sand filter and returned to the basin. Subsequent batches of slurry are added to the STSC, settled, and excess supernate removed until the prescribed quantity of sludge is collected. The sand filter is then backwashed into the STSC. The STSC and STS cask are then inerted and transported to T Plant.

  4. Treatment and prevention systems for acid mine drainage and halogenated contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jin, Song (Fort Collins, CO); Fallgren, Paul H. (Laramie, WY); Morris, Jeffrey M. (Laramie, WY)

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Embodiments include treatments for acid mine drainage generation sources (10 perhaps by injection of at least one substrate (11) and biologically constructing a protective biofilm (13) on acid mine drainage generation source materials (14). Further embodiments include treatments for degradation of contaminated water environments (17) with substrates such as returned milk and the like.

  5. Conceptual Design of a MEDE Treatment System for Sodium Bonded Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carl E. Baily; Karen A. Moore; Collin J. Knight; Peter B. Wells; Paul J. Petersen; Ali S. Siahpush; Matthew T. Weseman

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unirradiated sodium bonded metal fuel and casting scrap material containing highly enriched uranium (HEU) is stored at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This material, which includes intact fuel assemblies and elements from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) reactors as well as scrap material from the casting of these fuels, has no current use under the terminated reactor programs for both facilities. The Department of Energy (DOE), under the Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel Treatment Record of Decision (ROD), has determined that this material could be prepared and transferred to an off-site facility for processing and eventual fabrication of fuel for commercial nuclear reactors. A plan is being developed to prepare, package and transfer this material to the DOE High Enriched Uranium Disposition Program Office (HDPO), located at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Disposition of the sodium bonded material will require separating the elemental sodium from the metallic uranium fuel. A sodium distillation process known as MEDE (Melt-Drain-Evaporate), will be used for the separation process. The casting scrap material needs to be sorted to remove any foreign material or fines that are not acceptable to the HDPO program. Once all elements have been cut and loaded into baskets, they are then loaded into an evaporation chamber as the first step in the MEDE process. The chamber will be sealed and the pressure reduced to approximately 200 mtorr. The chamber will then be heated as high as 650 ºC, causing the sodium to melt and then vaporize. The vapor phase sodium will be driven into an outlet line where it is condensed and drained into a receiver vessel. Once the evaporation operation is complete, the system is de-energized and returned to atmospheric pressure. This paper describes the MEDE process as well as a general overview of the furnace systems, as necessary, to complete the MEDE process.

  6. An integrated system to remote monitor and control anaerobic wastewater treatment plants through the internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard, Olivier

    controllers that stabilise the treatment plant, meet the depollution requirements and provide a biogas quality to degrade slowly degradable substrates at high #12;concentrations, very low sludge production, low energy

  7. An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-Traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Rodgers; James Castle

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assessed opportunities for improving water quality associated with coal-fired power generation including the use of non-traditional waters for cooling, innovative technology for recovering and reusing water within power plants, novel approaches for the removal of trace inorganic compounds from ash pond effluents, and novel approaches for removing biocides from cooling tower blowdown. This research evaluated specifically designed pilot-scale constructed wetland systems for treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters for reuse in thermoelectric power generation and other purposes. The overall objective of this project was to decrease targeted constituents in non-traditional waters to achieve reuse criteria or discharge limitations established by the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Clean Water Act (CWA). The six original project objectives were completed, and results are presented in this final technical report. These objectives included identification of targeted constituents for treatment in four non-traditional water sources, determination of reuse or discharge criteria for treatment, design of constructed wetland treatment systems for these non-traditional waters, and measurement of treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters, as well as determination of the suitability of the treated non-traditional waters for reuse or discharge to receiving aquatic systems. The four non-traditional waters used to accomplish these objectives were ash basin water, cooling water, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) water, and produced water. The contaminants of concern identified in ash basin waters were arsenic, chromium, copper, mercury, selenium, and zinc. Contaminants of concern in cooling waters included free oxidants (chlorine, bromine, and peroxides), copper, lead, zinc, pH, and total dissolved solids. FGD waters contained contaminants of concern including arsenic, boron, chlorides, selenium, mercury, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and zinc. Similar to FGD waters, produced waters contained contaminants of concern that are predominantly inorganic (arsenic, cadmium, chlorides, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, sulfide, zinc, total dissolved solids), but also contained some organics (benzene, PAHs, toluene, total organic carbon, total suspended solids, and oil and grease). Constituents of concern that may cause chemical scaling, biofouling and corrosion, such as pH, hardness and ionic strength, and nutrients (P, K, and N) may also be found in all four non-traditional waters. NPDES permits were obtained for these non-traditional waters and these permit limits are summarized in tabular format within this report. These limits were used to establish treatment goals for this research along with toxicity values for Ceriodaphnia dubia, water quality criteria established by the US EPA, irrigation standards established by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), and reuse standards focused on minimization of damage to the power plant by treated waters. Constructed wetland treatment systems were designed for each non-traditional water source based on published literature reviews regarding remediation of the constituents of concern, biogeochemistry of the specific contaminants, and previous research. During this study, 4 non-traditional waters, which included ash basin water, cooling water, FGD water and produced water (PW) were obtained or simulated to measure constructed wetland treatment system performance. Based on data collected from FGD experiments, pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment systems can decrease aqueous concentrations of elements of concern (As, B, Hg, N, and Se). Percent removal was specific for each element, including ranges of 40.1% to 77.7% for As, 77.6% to 97.8% for Hg, 43.9% to 88.8% for N, and no measureable removal to 84.6% for Se. Other constituents of interest in final outflow samples should have aqueous characteristics sufficient for discharge, with the exception of chlorides (<2000 mg/L). Based on total dissolved solids, co-

  8. Tuning of the spin pumping in yttrium iron garnet/Au bilayer system by fast thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Lichuan, E-mail: lichuanj@udel.edu, E-mail: hwzhang@uestc.edu.cn; Zhang, Huaiwu, E-mail: lichuanj@udel.edu, E-mail: hwzhang@uestc.edu.cn; Yang, Qinghui; Tang, Xiaoli; Zhong, Zhiyong [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology, Chengdu 610054 (China); Zhang, Dainan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Xiao, John Q. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter, we investigated the influence of the fast thermal treatment on the spin pumping in ferromagnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet (YIG)/normal metal Au bilayer system. The YIG/Au bilayer thin films were treated by fast annealing process with different temperatures from 0 to 800?°C. The spin pumping was studied using ferromagnetic resonance. The surface evolution was investigated using a high resolution scanning microscopy and an atomic force microscopy. A strong thermal related spin pumping in YIG/Au bilayer system has been revealed. It was found that the spin pumping process can be enhanced by using fast thermal treatment due to the thermal modifications of the Au surface. The effective spin-mixing conductance of the fast thermal treated YIG/Au bilayer has been obtained.

  9. Non-Incineration Treatment to Reduce Benzene and VOC Emissions from Green Sand Molding Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred S. Cannon; Robert C. Voigt

    2002-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Final report describing laboratory, pilot scale and production scale evaluation of advanced oxidation systems for emissions and cost reduction in metal casting green sand systems.

  10. Development of US Navy Shipboard Systems for solid and liquid waste thermal treatment. Report for July 1995-April 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gullet, B.K.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes the U.S. Navy`s shipboard environmental challenges and a few of its research programs for meeting its needs for solid and liquid waste treatment. This objective is particularly important in environmentally sensitive areas, such as the Mediterranean Sea, where fleet deployment time is significant. Prohibitions on ocean dumping and anticipated requirements on effluent discharge quality have led the Navy to continue the research, development, and demonstration of shipboard systems to treat their unpreventable wastes. For solid, non-hazardous wastes, post-minimization efforts are geared toward long-term development of systems to thermally pyrolyze and oxidize the wastes into significantly reduced volume and weight.

  11. Method and apparatus for treating gaseous effluents from waste treatment systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flannery, Philip A. (Ramsey, MT); Kujawa, Stephan T. (Butte, MT)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effluents from a waste treatment operation are incinerated and oxidized by passing the gases through an inductively coupled plasmas arc torch. The effluents are transformed into plasma within the torch. At extremely high plasma temperatures, the effluents quickly oxidize. The process results in high temperature oxidation of the gases without addition of any mass flow for introduction of energy.

  12. air-treatment system hepa: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ( ) which has a total of 10 digits (0 to the more familiar decimal system In this lesson, you will learn: What is meant by a weighted number system. Basic features of weighted...

  13. Optical 2-D Scanning System for Laser - Generated Shockwave Treatment of Wound Infections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Shahzad Neville

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    biofilm structure from confocal scanning laser microscopyAngeles Optical 2-D Scanning System for Laser - GeneratedTHE THESIS Optical 2-D Scanning System for Laser-Generated

  14. Operational experience of the Juelich incineration system in the treatment of radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halaszovich, S.; Jablonski, W. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Lins, W.; Wurster, W.; Kaufmann, K.H. [Kraftanlagen Aktiengesellschaft, Heidelberg (Germany)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    After ten years spent on development and testing of a prototype incinerator in the Juelich Research Center, a new industrial scale unit has been built. The paper gives a short description of the plant design and operation characteristics. The major part of the paper deals with the experience gained from the treatment of 355 Mg low-level radioactive waste during the last four years.

  15. In Situ Chemical Oxidation of Contaminated Ground Water: Permanganate Reactive Barrier Systems for the Long-Term Treatment of Contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, X. David; Schwartz, Frank W.

    2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxidation of chlorinated solvents by permanganate has proven to be effective in destroying these compounds in the aqueous phase. A semi-passive, well-based permanganate reactive barrier system (PRBS) was designed in order for the long-term treatment of dissolved contaminant in the ground water. Results from laboratory experiments indicate the PRBS could deliver permanganate at a stable, constant and controllable rate. In this paper, different field designs of the PRBS are discussed. Numerical simulation was conducted to elucidate the parameters that will influence the field implementation of a PRBS. We investigated issues such as permanganate consumption by aquifer materials, variable density flow effect, as well as lateral spreading under different geological settings. Results from this study continue to point to the promise of an in situ chemical oxidation scheme. PRBS provides a potential treatment of the contaminated ground water at relatively low management cost as compared with other alternatives.

  16. Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) Process Flow Diagram Mass Balance Calculations for K West Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REED, A.V.

    2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop the rational for the material balances that are documented in the KW Basin water system Level 1 process flow diagrams.

  17. Spirasol : improvements to semi-continuous solar disinfection water treatment systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loux, Brian Michael, 1981-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study was carried out to determine the feasibility of an original point of use solar water disinfection system created by the author and named "Spirasol." The study primarily focused on the comparison of ...

  18. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Conventional Septic Tank/Drain Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional septic systems have traditionally been the most commonly used technology for treating wastewater. This publication explains the advantages and disadvantages of conventional septic tank/drain fields, as well as estimated costs...

  19. Water treatment process and system for metals removal using Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krauter, Paula A. W. (Livermore, CA); Krauter, Gordon W. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and a system for removal of metals from ground water or from soil by bioreducing or bioaccumulating the metals using metal tolerant microorganisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is tolerant to the metals, able to bioreduce the metals to the less toxic state and to accumulate them. The process and the system is useful for removal or substantial reduction of levels of chromium, molybdenum, cobalt, zinc, nickel, calcium, strontium, mercury and copper in water.

  20. Demonstration and evaluation of the pulsed ultraviolet-irradiation gas-treatment system, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, J.; Wilkey, M.; Peters, R.; Tomczyk, N.; Friedlund, J.; Farber, P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.; Mass, B.; Haag, W. [Purus, Inc., San Jose, CA (United States)

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory was asked to demonstrate and evaluate a pulsed ultraviolet-irradiation system developed by Purus, Inc., at the Volatile Organic Compounds Non-Arid Integrated Demonstration at the Savannah River Site near aiken, South Carolina. The Purus system consists of four reactor chambers, each containing a xenon flash lamp. During the two weeks of testing, samples were taken and analyzed from the inlet and outlet sides of the Purus system. The contaminants of concern on the inlet were tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA); the contaminants of concern on the outlet were PCE, TCE, TCA, carbon tetrachloride (CT), and chloroform. The evaluation of the Purus system included an examination of the reduction of both TCE and PCE and a search for any change in the concentrations. (Operating conditions included flow rates, ranging from 25 to 100 standard cubic feet per minute; inlet concentration of PCE, ranging from 360 to 10,700 parts per million volume; and flash lamp rates, ranging from 1 to 30 hertz.) The Purus system was quite efficient at reducing the concentrations of both PCE and TCE. The potential by-products, TCA, CT, and chloroform, showed no significant increases throughout the range of the various operating parameters. Overall, the Purus system appears to be a cost-efficient means of reducing the concentrations of PCE and TCE, while the removal of the initial photo-oxidation products and TCA is slower and needs further evaluation.

  1. One System Integrated Project Team: Retrieval and Delivery of Hanford Tank Wastes for Vitrification in the Waste Treatment Plant - 13234

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harp, Benton J. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Post Office Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Post Office Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Kacich, Richard M. [Bechtel National, Inc., 2435 Stevens Center Place, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Bechtel National, Inc., 2435 Stevens Center Place, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Skwarek, Raymond J. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Post Office Box 850, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Post Office Box 850, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed in late 2011 as a way for improving the efficiency of delivery and treatment of highly radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 586-square-mile Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The purpose of the One System IPT is to improve coordination and integration between the Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) contractor and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC). The vision statement is: One System is a WTP and TOC safety-conscious team that, through integrated management and implementation of risk-informed decision and mission-based solutions, will enable the earliest start of safe and efficient treatment of Hanford's tank waste, to protect the Columbia River, environment and public. The IPT is a formal collaboration between Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), which manages design and construction of the WTP for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (DOEORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), which manages the TOC for ORP. More than fifty-six (56) million gallons of highly radioactive liquid waste are stored in one hundred seventy-seven (177) aging, underground tanks. Most of Hanford's waste tanks - one hundred forty-nine (149) of them - are of an old single-shell tank (SST) design built between 1944 and 1964. More than sixty (60) of these tanks have leaked in the past, releasing an estimated one million gallons of waste into the soil and threatening the nearby Columbia River. There are another twenty-eight (28) new double-shelled tanks (DSTs), built from 1968 to 1986, that provide greater protection to the environment. In 1989, DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) signed a landmark agreement that required Hanford to comply with federal and state environmental standards. It also paved the way for agreements that set deadlines for retrieving the tank wastes and for building and operating the WTP. The tank wastes are the result of Hanford's nearly fifty (50) years of plutonium production. In the intervening years, waste characteristics have been increasingly better understood. However, waste characteristics that are uncertain and will remain as such represent a significant technical challenge in terms of retrieval, transport, and treatment, as well as for design and construction of WTP. What also is clear is that the longer the waste remains in the tanks, the greater the risk to the environment and the people of the Pacific Northwest. The goal of both projects - tank operations and waste treatment - is to diminish the risks posed by the waste in the tanks at the earliest possible date. About two hundred (200) WTP and TOC employees comprise the IPT. Individual work groups within One System include Technical, Project Integration and Controls, Front-End Design and Project Definition, Commissioning, Nuclear Safety and Engineering Systems Integration, and Environmental Safety and Health and Quality Assurance (ESH and QA). Additional functions and team members will be added as the WTP approaches the operational phase. The team has undertaken several initiatives since its formation to collaborate on issues: (1) alternate scenarios for delivery of wastes from the tank farms to WTP; (2) improvements in managing Interface Control Documents; (3) coordination on various technical issues, including the Defense Nuclear Facilities Nuclear Safety Board's Recommendation 2010-2; (4) deployment of the SmartPlant{sup R} Foundation-Configuration Management System; and (5) preparation of the joint contract deliverable of the Operational Readiness Support Plan. (authors)

  2. One System Integrated Project Team: Retrieval And Delivery Of The Hanford Tank Wastes For Vitrification In The Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harp, Benton J. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Kacich, Richard M. [Bechtel National, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Skwarek, Raymond J. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed in late 2011 as a way for improving the efficiency of delivery and treatment of highly radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 586-square-mile Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The purpose of the One System IPT is to improve coordination and integration between the Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) contractor and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC). The vision statement is: One System is a WTP and TOC safety conscious team that, through integrated management and implementation of risk-informed decision and mission-based solutions, will enable the earliest start of safe and efficient treatment of Hanford's tank waste, to protect the Columbia River, environment and public. The IPT is a formal collaboration between Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), which manages design and construction of the WTP for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (DOEORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), which manages the TOC for ORP. More than fifty-six (56) million gallons of highly radioactive liquid waste are stored in one hundred seventy-seven (177) aging, underground tanks. Most of Hanford's waste tanks - one hundred forty-nine (149) of them - are of an old single-shell tank (SST) design built between 1944 and 1964. More than sixty (60) of these tanks have leaked in the past, releasing an estimated one million gallons of waste into the soil and threatening the nearby Columbia River. There are another twenty-eight (28) new double-shelled tanks (DSTs), built from 1968 to 1986, that provide greater protection to the environment. In 1989, DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) signed a landmark agreement that required Hanford to comply with federal and state environmental standards. It also paved the way for agreements that set deadlines for retrieving the tank wastes and for building and operating the WTP. The tank wastes are the result of Hanford's nearly fifty (50) years of plutonium production. In the intervening years, waste characteristics have been increasingly better understood. However, waste characteristics that are uncertain and will remain as such represent a significant technical challenge in terms of retrieval, transport, and treatment, as well as for design and construction ofWTP. What also is clear is that the longer the waste remains in the tanks, the greater the risk to the environment and the people of the Pacific Northwest. The goal of both projects - tank operations and waste treatment - is to diminish the risks posed by the waste in the tanks at the earliest possible date. About two hundred (200) WTP and TOC employees comprise the IPT. Individual work groups within One System include Technical, Project Integration & Controls, Front-End Design & Project Definition, Commissioning, Nuclear Safety & Engineering Systems Integration, and Environmental Safety and Health and Quality Assurance (ESH&QA). Additional functions and team members will be added as the WTP approaches the operational phase. The team has undertaken several initiatives since its formation to collaborate on issues: (1) alternate scenarios for delivery of wastes from the tank farms to WTP; (2) improvements in managing Interface Control Documents; (3) coordination on various technical issues, including the Defense Nuclear Facilities Nuclear Safety Board's Recommendation 2010-2; (4) deployment of the SmartPlant? Foundation-configuration Management System; and (5) preparation of the joint contract deliverable of the Operational Readiness Support Plan.

  3. Exhaust after-treatment system with in-cylinder addition of unburnt hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coleman, Gerald N. (Corby, GB); Kesse, Mary L. (Peoria, IL)

    2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Certain exhaust after-treatment devices, at least periodically, require the addition of unburnt hydrocarbons in order to create reductant-rich exhaust conditions. The present disclosure adds unburnt hydrocarbons to exhaust from at least one combustion chamber by positioning, at least partially within a combustion chamber, a mixed-mode fuel injector operable to inject fuel into the combustion chamber in a first spray pattern with a small average angle relative to a centerline of the combustion chamber and a second spray pattern with a large average angle relative to the centerline of the combustion chamber. An amount of fuel is injected in the first spray pattern into a non-combustible environment within the at least one combustion chamber during at least one of an expansion stroke and exhaust stroke. The exhaust with the unburnt amount of fuel is moved into an exhaust passage via an exhaust valve.

  4. Numerical treatment of the Boltzmann equation for self-propelled particle systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florian Thüroff; Christoph A. Weber; Erwin Frey

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetic theories constitute one of the most promising tools to decipher the characteristic spatio-temporal dynamics in systems of actively propelled particles. In this context, the Boltzmann equation plays a pivotal role, since it provides a natural translation between a particle-level description of the system's dynamics and the corresponding hydrodynamic fields. Yet, the intricate mathematical structure of the Boltzmann equation substantially limits the progress toward a full understanding of this equation by solely analytical means. Here, we propose a general framework to numerically solve the Boltzmann equation for self-propelled particle systems in two spatial dimensions and with arbitrary boundary conditions. We discuss potential applications of this numerical framework to active matter systems, and use the algorithm to give a detailed analysis to a model system of self-propelled particles with polar interactions. In accordance with previous studies, we find that spatially homogeneous isotropic and broken symmetry states populate two distinct regions in parameter space, which are separated by a narrow region of spatially inhomogeneous, density-segregated moving patterns. We find clear evidence that these three regions in parameter space are connected by first order phase transitions, and that the transition between the spatially homogeneous isotropic and polar ordered phases bears striking similarities to liquid-gas phase transitions in equilibrium systems. Within the density segregated parameter regime, we find a novel stable limit-cycle solution of the Boltzmann equation, which consists of parallel lanes of polar clusters moving in opposite directions, so as to render the overall symmetry of the system's ordered state nematic, despite purely polar interactions on the level of single particles.

  5. Jaynes Cummings treatment of superconducting resonators with dielectric loss due to two-level systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bhattacharya; K. D. Osborn; Ari Mizel

    2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a quantum mechanical analysis of superconducting resonators subject to dielectric loss arising from charged two-level systems. We present numerical and analytical descriptions of the dynamics of energy decay from the resonator within the Jaynes-Cummings model. Our analysis allows us to distinguish the strong and weak coupling regimes of the model and to describe within each regime cases where the two-level system is unsaturated or saturated. We find that the quantum theory agrees with the classical model for weak coupling. However, for strong coupling the quantum theory predicts lower loss than the classical theory in the unsaturated regime. Also, in contrast to the classical theory, the photon number at which saturation occurs in the strong coupling quantum theory is independent of the coupling between the resonator and the two-level system.

  6. Methods used for the treatment of non-proportionally damped structural systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conoscente, J.P.; Maslenikov, O.R.; Johnson, J.J. [EQE Engineering Consultants, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-proportional or non-classical damping is defined as a form of viscous damping that introduces coupling between the undamped modal coordinates of motion. Such problems have practical applications in the dynamic analysis of soil-structure systems, structure-equipment systems, and structural systems made of materials with different energy dissipation capacities, which is applicable to seismic analysis of nuclear power plants. Presented in this report is a review of the methods most commonly used in structural analysis for the solution of the dynamic response of systems with non-proportional damping. Both rigorous and approximate methods are described. Since rigorous methods usually require large computational efforts, approximate methods using undamped mode shapes are often preferred. In the study described here, the accuracy of three approximate methods was evaluated for three benchmark problems, with various parametric variations. Results were compared with the exact solution for different combinations of structural properties. Based on these results, conclusions and recommendations are presented for the use of the selected approximate methods.

  7. Transacting generation attributes across market boundaries: Compatible information systems and the treatment of imports and exports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grace, Robert; Wiser, Ryan

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Voluntary markets for ''green'' power, and mandatory policies such as fuel source disclosure requirements and renewables portfolio standards, each rely on the ability to differentiate electricity by the ''attributes'' of the generation. Throughout North America, electricity markets are devising accounting and verification systems for generation ''attributes'': those characteristics of a power plant's production such as fuel source and emissions that differentiate it from undifferentiated (or ''commodity'') electricity. These accounting and verification systems are intended to verify compliance with market mandates, create accurate disclosure labels, substantiate green power claims, and support emissions markets. Simultaneously, interest is growing in transacting (importing or exporting) generation attributes across electricity market borders, with or without associated electricity. Cross-border renewable attribute transactions have advantages and disadvantages. Broad access to markets may encourage more renewable generation at lower cost, but this result may conflict with desires to assure that at least some renewable resources are built locally to achieve either local policy goals or purchaser objectives. This report is intended to serve as a resource document for those interested in and struggling with cross-border renewable attribute transactions. The report assesses the circumstances under which renewable generation attributes from a ''source'' region might be recognized in a ''sink'' region. The report identifies several distinct approaches that might be used to account for and verify attribute import and export transactions, and assesses the suitability of these alternative approaches. Because policymakers have often made systems ''compatibility'' between market areas a pre-requisite to allowing cross-border renewable transactions, this report develops criteria for ''compatible information systems.'' Where fully compatible information systems do not exist, certain cross-border attribute transactions may still be deemed suitably credible and verifiable to be recognized; this report also identifies possible criteria for such ''compatible transactions.'' The importance of credibly addressing imports and exports of renewable energy attributes should be evident. A lack of clarity as to what generation can and cannot be recognized in various markets can paralyze investment in and contracting for renewable generation. The development of rules for imports and exports will also minimize the potential for ''double counting'' of renewable energy attributes, will help define where and at what cost renewable plants will be built, and will directly impact the location of the benefits that renewable generation provides. This report ultimately concludes that the ''correct'' approach to treating renewable energy imports and exports depends on the context and motivations behind the transaction or the mandate, and that the presence of practical constraints or multiple objectives of ten make selecting the best approach difficult. That said, the report urges those creating market rules to move quickly in defining valid cross-border transaction structures and to consider the implications of their decisions on the creation of viable markets for new renewable generation.

  8. Reinforcing of QA/QC programs in radiotherapy departments in Croatia: Results of treatment planning system verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jurkovi?, Slaven; Švabi?, Manda; Dikli?, Ana; Smilovi? Radoj?i?, ?eni; Dundara, Dea [Clinic for Radiotherapy and Oncology, Physics Division, University Hospital Rijeka, Rijeka (Croatia); Kasabaši?, Mladen; Ivkovi?, Ana [Department for Radiotherapy and Oncology, University Hospital Osijek, Osijek (Croatia); Faj, Dario, E-mail: dariofaj@mefos.hr [Department of Physics, School of Medicine, University of Osijek, Osijek (Croatia)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Implementation of advanced techniques in clinical practice can greatly improve the outcome of radiation therapy, but it also makes the process much more complex with a lot of room for errors. An important part of the quality assurance program is verification of treatment planning system (TPS). Dosimetric verifications in anthropomorphic phantom were performed in 4 centers where new systems were installed. A total of 14 tests for 2 photon energies and multigrid superposition algorithms were conducted using the CMS XiO TPS. Evaluation criteria as specified in the International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Reports Series (IAEA TRS) 430 were employed. Results of measurements are grouped according to the placement of the measuring point and the beam energy. The majority of differences between calculated and measured doses in the water-equivalent part of the phantom were in tolerance. Significantly more out-of-tolerance values were observed in “nonwater-equivalent” parts of the phantom, especially for higher-energy photon beams. This survey was done as a part of continuous effort to build up awareness of quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) importance in the Croatian radiotherapy community. Understanding the limitations of different parts of the various systems used in radiation therapy can systematically improve quality as well.

  9. Overview of Pulse Jet Mixer/Hybrid Mixing System Development to Support the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurath, Dean E.; Meyer, Perry A.; Stewart, Charles W.; Barnes, Steven M.

    2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will process and treat radioactive waste that is stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. Pulse jet mixer (PJM) technology was selected for mixing the contents of many of the process vessels. Several of the tanks are expected to contain concentrated slurries that exhibit a non-Newtonian rheology and the understanding required to apply this technology to mobilize the non-Newtonian slurries was not mature. Consequently, an experimental testing effort was undertaken to investigate PJM performance in several scaled versions of WTP vessels and to develop mixing system configurations that met WTP requirements. This effort evolved into a large, multifaceted test program involving many different test facilities. Elements of the test program included theoretical analysis, development and characterization of simulants, development of instrumentation and measurement techniques, hundreds of tests at various scales in numerous test stands, and data analysis and application. This program provided the technical basis for the selection of pulse jet mixers along with air spargers and steady jets generated by recirculation pumps to provide mixing systems for several of the vessels with non-Newtonian slurries. This paper provides an overview of the testing program and a summary of the key technical results that formed the technical basis of the final mixing system configurations to be used in the WTP.

  10. Sandia Energy - Water Monitoring & Treatment Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Monitoring & Treatment Technology Home Climate & Earth Systems WaterEnergy Nexus Water Monitoring & Treatment Technology Water Monitoring & Treatment Technologyashoter2015-0...

  11. Release model for in situ vitrification large-field test off-gas treatment system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pafford, D.J.; Tung, V.X.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A conceptual model for the vapor and aerosol transport and deposition in the in situ vitrification large-field test off-gas system (OGS) has been developed. This model can be used to predict the emissions from the OGS under normal and off-normal conditions. Results generated by the model can be used to evaluate design and/or procedural modifications, define tests, and predict results. The OGS vapor and aerosol transport and deposition is modeled using the PULSE/MOD-ISV/VER 1.0.0 developmental computer code. Input data requirements for this code include the specific geometries of the OGS components; the composition, rate, and temperature of the vapors and aerosols entering the OGS; and the OGS component surface temperatures or heat fluxes. Currently, not all of these model inputs are available. Therefore, conceptual input parameters are developed. Using this input data, preliminary calculations with the code have been performed. These calculations include a demonstration that the code predicts convergent results, a comparison of predicted results with performance data for one of the OGS components, and a preliminary sensitivity study of the complete model.

  12. K-1435 Wastewater Treatment System for the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Wastewater at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swientoniewski M.D.

    2008-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the design and performance of a wastewater treatment system installed to support the operation of a hazardous waste incinerator. The Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator (TSCAI), located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), is designed and permitted to treat Resource ConservatioN and Recovery Act (RCRA) wastes including characteristic and listed wastes and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated mixed waste. the incinerator process generates acidic gases and particulates which consist of salts, metals, and radionuclides. These off-gases from the incinerator are treated with a wet off-gas scrubber system. The recirculated water is continuously purged (below down), resulting in a wastewater to be treated. Additional water sources are also collected on the site for treatment, including storm water that infiltrates into diked areas and fire water from the incinerator's suppression system. To meet regulatory requirements for discharge, a wastewater treatment system (WWTS) was designed, constructed, and operated to treat these water sources. The WWTS was designed to provide for periodic fluctuation of contaminant concentrations due to various feed streams to the incinverator. Blow down consists of total suspended solids (TSS) and total dissolved solids (TDS), encompassing metals, radionuclide contamination and trace organics. The system design flow rate range is 35 to 75 gallons per minute (gpm). The system is designed with redundancy to minimize time off-line and to reduce impacts to the TSCAI operations. A novel treatment system uses several unit operations, including chemical feed systems, two-stage chemical reaction treatment, microfiltration, sludge storage and dewatering, neutralization, granular activated carbon, effluent neutralization, and a complete programmable logic controller (PLC) and human-machine interface (HMI) control system. To meet the space requirements and to provide portability of the WWTS to other applications, the system was installed in three, over-the-road semi trailers, and interconnected with piping and power. Trailers were oriented on a small site footprint to facilitate ease of installation. A remote sump pump skid was provided to convey water from two holding sumps adjacent to the treatment process. An accumulation tank and pump were also provided to receive miscellaneous wastewaters for treatment if they meet the waste acceptance criteria. The paper includes details of the technology used in the design, the requirements for compliance, and the initial performance demonstration and jar testing results. The WWTS successfully allowed for highly efficient, high-volume treatment with compliant discharge to off-site surface water.

  13. Implementation of Recommendations from the One System Comparative Evaluation of the Hanford Tank Farms and Waste Treatment Plant Safety Bases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, Richard L. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Niemi, Belinda J. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Paik, Ingle K. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Buczek, Jeffrey A. [AREVA Federal Services LLC (United States); Lietzow, J. [URS Professional Services (United States); McCoy, F. [AREVA Federal Services LLC (United States); Beranek, F. [URS Professional Services (United States); Gupta, M. [URS Professional Services (United States)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A Comparative Evaluation was conducted for One System Integrated Project Team to compare the safety bases for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project (WTP) and Tank Operations Contract (TOC) (i.e., Tank Farms) by an Expert Review Team. The evaluation had an overarching purpose to facilitate effective integration between WTP and TOC safety bases. It was to provide One System management with an objective evaluation of identified differences in safety basis process requirements, guidance, direction, procedures, and products (including safety controls, key safety basis inputs and assumptions, and consequence calculation methodologies) between WTP and TOC. The evaluation identified 25 recommendations (Opportunities for Integration). The resolution of these recommendations resulted in 16 implementation plans. The completion of these implementation plans will help ensure consistent safety bases for WTP and TOC along with consistent safety basis processes. procedures, and analyses. and should increase the likelihood of a successful startup of the WTP. This early integration will result in long-term cost savings and significant operational improvements. In addition, the implementation plans lead to the development of eight new safety analysis methodologies that can be used at other U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) complex sites where URS Corporation is involved.

  14. Italian WEEE management system and treatment of end-of-life cooling and freezing equipments for CFCs removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sansotera, M., E-mail: maurizio.sansotera@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, I-20131 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), via Giusti 9, I-50121 Firenze (Italy); Navarrini, W. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, I-20131 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), via Giusti 9, I-50121 Firenze (Italy); Talaeemashhadi, S.; Venturini, F. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, I-20131 Milano (Italy)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Italian data about WEEE management in the period 2005–2010 have been reported. • In 2001–2004 CFC release was monitored and Po Valley resulted as main source region. • The Italian directive on WEEE management was enacted in 2005 but took effect in 2008. • The CFC analytic procedures of the audit assessments have been discussed. - Abstract: This study presents and analyzes the data of the Italian system for take-back and recovery of waste electrical and electronic equipments (WEEEs) in the start-up period 2008–2010. The analysis was focused particularly on the data about the treatment of end-of-life cooling and freezing equipments. In fact, the wastes of cooling and freezing equipments have a high environmental impact. Indeed, in their compressor oil and insulation polyurethane (PU) foams chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) ozone-depleting gases are still present. In the period 2001–2004 Northern Italy resulted the main source in Europe of CFCs. The European Directive on WEEE management was enacted in 2002, but in Italy it was implemented by the legislative Decree in 2005 and it became operational in 2008. Actually, in 2008 the national WEEE Coordination Centre was founded in order to organize the WEEE pick-up process and to control collection, recovery and recycling targets. As a result, in 2010 the average WEEE collection per capita exceeded the threshold of more than 4 kg per inhabitant, as well as cooling and freezing appliances represented more than one fourth of the Italian WEEE collection stream. During the treatment of end-of-life cooling and freezing equipments, CFCs were recovered and disposed principally by burner methods. The analyses of defined specimens collected in the treatment facilities were standardized to reliably determine the amount of recovered CFCs. Samples of alkaline solid salt, alkaline saline solution, polyurethane matrix and compressor oil collected during the audit assessment procedure were analyzed and the results were discussed. In particular, the analysis of PU samples after the shredding and the warm pressing procedures measured a residual CFCs content around 500–1300 mg/kg of CFCs within the foam matrix.

  15. Design report on the test system used to assess treatment of trench water from Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent, T.E.; Taylor, P.A.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New liquid waste streams will be generated as a consequence of closure activities at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It is proposed that these waste streams be treated for removal of contaminants by adding them to the ORNL wastewater treatment facilities. Previous bench-scale treatability studies indicate that ORNL treatment operations will adequately remove the contaminants, although additional study is required to characterize the secondary waste materials produced as a result of the treatment. A larger scale treatment system was constructed to produce secondary wastes in the quantities necessary for characterization and US Environmental protection Agency toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) testing. The test system is designed to simulate the operation of the ORNL process waste treatment facilities and to treat a mixture of ORNL process wastewater and WAG 6 wastewater at a combined flow rate of 0.5 L/min. The system is designed to produce the necessary quantities of waste sludges and spent carbon for characterization studies and TCLP testing.

  16. DESIGN OF THE DEMOSNTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM FOR THE SUPPLEMENTAL TREATMENT OF LOW ACTIVITY TANK WASTE AT HANFORD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VAN BEEK JE

    2008-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 2004, the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) was initiated with the intent to design, construct, and operate a full-scale bulk vitrification pilot-plant to treat low-activity tank waste from Hanford Tank 241-S-109. The DBVS facility uses In-Container Vitrification{trademark} (ICV{trademark}) at the core of the treatment process. The basic process steps combine liquid low-activity waste (LAW) and glassformers; dry the mixture; and then vitrify the mixture in a batch feed-while-melt process in a refractory lined steel container. Off-gases are processed through a state-of-the-art air pollution control system including sintered-metal filtration, thermal oxidation, acid gas scrubbing, and high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) and high-efficiency gas adsorber (HEGA) filtration. Testing has focused on development and validation of the waste dryer, ICV, and sintered-metal filters (SMFs) equipment, operations enhancements, and glass formulation. With a parallel testing and design process, testing has allowed improvements to the DBVS equipment configuration and operating methodology, since its original inception. Design improvements include optimization of refractory panels in the ICV, simplifying glassformer addition equipment, increasing the number of waste feed chutes to the ICV, and adding capability for remote clean-out of piping, In addition, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has provided an independent review of the entire DBVS process. While the review did not find any fatal flaws, some technical issues were identified that required a re-evaluation of the DBVS design and subsequent changes to the design. A 100 percent design package for the pilot plant will be completed and submitted to DOE for review in early 2008 that incorporates process improvements substantiated through testing and reviews. This paper provides a description of the bulk vitrification process and a discussion of major equipment design changes that have occurred based on full-scale testing over the past two years and DOE reviews.

  17. Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by nitrification helped to reduce the corrosivity and biocide demand. Also, the lower pH and alkalinity resulting from nitrification reduced the scaling to an acceptable level, without the addition of anti-scalant chemicals. Additional GAC adsorption treatment, MWW_NFG, yielded no net benefit. Removal of organic matter resulted in pitting corrosion in copper and cupronickel alloys. Negligible improvement was observed in scaling control and biofouling control. For all of the tertiary treatments, biofouling control was achievable, and most effectively with pre-formed monochloramine (2-3 ppm) in comparison with NaOCl and ClO2. Life cycle cost (LCC) analyses were performed for the tertiary treatment systems studied experimentally and for several other treatment options. A public domain conceptual costing tool (LC3 model) was developed for this purpose. MWW_SF (lime softening and sand filtration) and MWW_NF were the most cost-effective treatment options among the tertiary treatment alternatives considered because of the higher effluent quality with moderate infrastructure costs and the relatively low doses of conditioning chemicals required. Life cycle inventory (LCI) analysis along with integration of external costs of emissions with direct costs was performed to evaluate relative emissions to the environment and external costs associated with construction and operation of tertiary treatment alternatives. Integrated LCI and LCC analysis indicated that three-tiered treatment alternatives such as MWW_NSF and MWW_NFG, with regular chemical addition for treatment and conditioning and/or regeneration, tend to increase the impact costs and in turn the overall costs of tertiary treatment. River water supply and MWW_F alternatives with a single step of tertiary treatment were associated with lower impact costs, but the contribution of impact costs to overall annual costs was higher than all other treatment alternatives. MWW_NF and MWW_SF alternatives exhibited moderate external impact costs with moderate infrastructure and chemical conditioner dosing, which makes them (especially

  18. This book is designed to be a comprehensive treatment of parallel al gorithms for optimal control of large scale linear and bilinear systems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajic, Zoran

    ­ tion column, steam power system, hydro power plant, chemical plants, gas absorber, supported beam the power and usefulness of the synchronous parallel algorithms for optimal control of large scale linearPreface This book is designed to be a comprehensive treatment of parallel al­ gorithms for optimal

  19. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the Basin Facility Basin Water Treatment System - Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, S. K.

    2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan for the Basin Water Treatment System located in the Basin Facility (CPP-603), Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, was developed to meet future milestones established under the Voluntary Consent Order. The system to be closed includes units and associated ancillary equipment included in the Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan and Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank Systems INTEC-077 and INTEC-078 that were determined to have managed hazardous waste. The Basin Water Treatment System will be closed in accordance with the requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, to achieve "clean closure" of the tank system. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods of achieving those standards for the Basin Water Treatment Systems.

  20. A comparison of HDR near source dosimetry using a treatment planning system, Monte Carlo simulation, and radiochromic film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoush, Ahmad, E-mail: amousha@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Luckstead, Marcus; Lamba, Michael; Elson, Howard; Kassing, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study aimed to investigate the high-dose rate Iridium-192 brachytherapy, including near source dosimetry, of a catheter-based applicator from 0.5 mm to 1 cm along the transverse axis. Radiochromic film and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation were used to generate absolute dose for the catheter-based applicator. Results from radiochromic film and MC simulation were compared directly to the treatment planning system (TPS) based on the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Updated Task Group 43 (TG-43U1) dose calculation formalism. The difference between dose measured using radiochromic film along the transverse plane at 0.5 mm from the surface and the predicted dose by the TPS was 24%±13%. The dose difference between the MC simulation along the transverse plane at 0.5 mm from the surface and the predicted dose by the TPS was 22.1%±3%. For distances from 1.5 mm to 1 cm from the surface, radiochromic film and MC simulation agreed with TPS within an uncertainty of 3%. The TPS under-predicts the dose at the surface of the applicator, i.e., 0.5 mm from the catheter surface, as compared to the measured and MC simulation predicted dose. MC simulation results demonstrated that 15% of this error is due to neglecting the beta particles and discrete electrons emanating from the sources and not considered by the TPS, and 7% of the difference was due to the photon alone, potentially due to the differences in MC dose modeling, photon spectrum, scoring techniques, and effect of the presence of the catheter and the air gap. Beyond 1 mm from the surface, the TPS dose algorithm agrees with the experimental and MC data within 3%.

  1. Effective monitoring of non-chromate chemical treatment programs for refinery cooling systems using sewage water as make-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AlMajnouni, A.D.; Jaffer, A.E. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Treated sewage water as make-up to the cooling tower requires novel approaches to control potential cooling water problems common to refineries besides meeting environmental regulations. An intensive field study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of non-chromate treatment programs. On-line cleaning of the exchangers occurred prior to instituting the new chemical treatment program. Low carbon steel corrosion rates with minimal deposition was achieved. Microbiological fouling was controlled with chlorination and non-oxidizing biocide program. Field results are presented which compare the efficacy of these proprietary treatments to control corrosion and inhibit scale and fouling. Analytical results which provide a comprehensive performance evaluation of a new non-chromate chemical treatment program are presented.

  2. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems'', during the time-period January 1 through March 31, 2006. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, and the use of a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system downstream to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Generation Company LP, the Southern Company, and Duke Energy. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified catalyst materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months or longer at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests are being conducted periodically at each site to confirm the ability to scrub the catalytically oxidized mercury at high efficiency. This is the ninth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts primarily consisted of operating the catalyst pilot units at the TXU Generation Company LP's Monticello Steam Electric Station and at Georgia Power's Plant Yates. Two catalyst activity measurement trips were made to Plant Yates during the quarter. This Technical Progress Report presents catalyst activity results from the oxidation catalyst pilot unit at Plant Yates and discusses the status of the pilot unit at Monticello.

  3. Long Term Field Development of a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System for Treatment of Produced Waters for Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Katz; Kerry Kinney; Robert Bowman; Enid Sullivan; Soondong Kwon; Elaine Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Craig Altare

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using a combined physicochemical/biological treatment system to remove the organic constituents present in saline produced water. In order to meet this objective, a physical/chemical adsorption process was developed and two separate biological treatment techniques were investigated. Two previous research projects focused on the development of the surfactant modified zeolite adsorption process (DE-AC26-99BC15221) and development of a vapor phase biofilter (VPB) to treat the regeneration off-gas from the surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorption system (DE-FC26-02NT15461). In this research, the SMZ/VPB was modified to more effectively attenuate peak loads and to maintain stable biodegradation of the BTEX constituents from the produced water. Specifically, a load equalization system was incorporated into the regeneration flow stream. In addition, a membrane bioreactor (MBR) system was tested for its ability to simultaneously remove the aromatic hydrocarbon and carboxylate components from produced water. The specific objectives related to these efforts included the following: (1) Optimize the performance VPBs treating the transient loading expected during SMZ regeneration: (a) Evaluate the impact of biofilter operating parameters on process performance under stable operating conditions. (b) Investigate how transient loads affect biofilter performance, and identify an appropriate technology to improve biological treatment performance during the transient regeneration period of an SMZ adsorption system. (c) Examine the merits of a load equalization technology to attenuate peak VOC loads prior to a VPB system. (d) Evaluate the capability of an SMZ/VPB to remove BTEX from produced water in a field trial. (2) Investigate the feasibility of MBR treatment of produced water: (a) Evaluate the biodegradation of carboxylates and BTEX constituents from synthetic produced water in a laboratory-scale MBR. (b) Evaluate the capability of an SMZ/MBR system to remove carboxylates and BTEX from produced water in a field trial. Laboratory experiments were conducted to provide a better understanding of each component of the SMZ/VPB and SMZ/MBR process. Laboratory VPB studies were designed to address the issue of influent variability and periodic operation (see DE-FC26-02NT15461). These experiments examined multiple influent loading cycles and variable concentration loadings that simulate air sparging as the regeneration option for the SMZ system. Two pilot studies were conducted at a produced water processing facility near Farmington, New Mexico. The first field test evaluated SMZ adsorption, SMZ regeneration, VPB buffering, and VPB performance, and the second test focused on MBR and SMZ/MBR operation. The design of the field studies were based on the results from the previous field tests and laboratory studies. Both of the biological treatment systems were capable of removing the BTEX constituents in the laboratory and in the field over a range of operating conditions. For the VPB, separation of the BTEX constituents from the saline aqueous phase yielded high removal efficiencies. However, carboxylates remained in the aqueous phase and were not removed in the combined VPB/SMZ system. In contrast, the MBR was capable of directly treating the saline produced water and simultaneously removing the BTEX and carboxylate constituents. The major limitation of the MBR system is the potential for membrane fouling, particularly when the system is treating produced water under field conditions. The combined process was able to effectively pretreat water for reverse osmosis treatment and subsequent downstream reuse options including utilization in power generation facilities. The specific conclusions that can be drawn from this study are summarized.

  4. A view of treatment process of melted nuclear fuel on a severe accident plant using a molten salt system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, R.; Takahashi, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Mizuguchi, K. [Power and Industrial Research and Development Center, Toshiba Corporation Power Systems Company, 4-1 Ukishima-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki 210-0862 (Japan); Oomori, T. [Chemical System Design and Engineering Department, Toshiba Corporation Power Systems Company, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At severe accident such as Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident, the nuclear fuels in the reactor would melt and form debris which contains stable UO2-ZrO2 mixture corium and parts of vessel such as zircaloy and iron component. The requirements for solution of issues are below; -) the reasonable treatment process of the debris should be simple and in-situ in Fukushima Daiichi power plant, -) the desirable treatment process is to take out UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} or metallic U and TRU metal, and dispose other fission products as high level radioactive waste; and -) the candidate of treatment process should generate the smallest secondary waste. Pyro-process has advantages to treat the debris because of the high solubility of the debris and its total process feasibility. Toshiba proposes a new pyro-process in molten salts using electrolysing Zr before debris fuel being treated.

  5. Maternal dexamethasone treatment alters tissue and circulating components of the renin-angiotensin system in the pregnant ewe and fetus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forhead, Alison J.; Jellyman, Juanita K.; De Blasio, Miles J.; Johnson, Emma; Giussani, Dino A.; Pipi, Fiona Broughton; Fowden, Abigail L.

    2015-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    and following maternal treatment with dexa- methasone in sheep. J Physiol. 2005;567:673–688. 27. Kream J, Mulay S, Fukushima DK, Solomon S. Determination of plasma dexamethasone in the mother and the newborn after ad- ministration of the hormone in a clinical...

  6. SU-E-J-160: Comparing the Setup Accuracy of Non-Ionizing Patient Localization Systems with CBCT to Reduce Imaging Dose in Prone Breast Treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, E; Yamamoto, T; Mayadev, J; Dieterich, S [UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: CBCT is the current gold standard to verify prone breast patient setup. We investigated in a phantom if non-ionizing localization systems can replace ionizing localization systems for prone breast treatments. Methods: An anthropomorphic phantom was positioned on a prone breast board. Electromagnetic transponders were attached on the left chest surface. The CT images of the phantom were imported to the treatment planning system. The isocenter was set to the center of the transponders. The positions of the isocenter and transponders transferred to the transponder tracking system. The posterior phantom surface was contoured and exported to the optical surface tracking system. A CBCT was taken for the initial setup alignment on the treatment machine. Using the electromagnetic and optical localization systems, the deviation of the phantom setup from the original CT images was measured. This was compared with the difference between the original CT and kV-CBCT images. Results: For the electromagnetic localization system, the phantom position deviated from the original CT in 1.5 mm, 0.0 mm and 0.5 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI) and left-right (LR) directions. For the optical localization system, the phantom position deviated from the original CT in 2.0 mm, ?2.0 mm and 0.1 mm in the AP, SI and LR directions. For the CBCT, the phantom position deviated from the original CT in 4.0 mm, 1.0 mm and ?1.0 mm in the AP, SI and LR directions. The measured values from the non-ionizing localization systems differed from those with the CBCT less than 3.0 mm in all directions. Conclusions: This phantom study showed the feasibility of using a combination of non-ionizing localization systems to achieve a similar setup accuracy as CBCT for prone breast patients. This could potentially eliminate imaging dose. As a next step, we are expanding this study to actual patients. This work has been in part supported by Departmental Research Award RODEPT1-JS001, Department of Radiation Oncology, UC Davis Medical Center.

  7. Adaptive Treatment Strategies Getting SMART About Developing Individualized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Susan A.

    Other names are dynamic treatment regimes, treatment algorithms, stepped care models, expert systems: prevent relapse to alcohol abuse · Critical treatment decisions: which treatment to provide first?; which1 Adaptive Treatment Strategies Getting SMART About Developing Individualized Sequences of Adaptive

  8. Resource recovery and epidemiology of anaerobic wastewater treatment process in a controlled ecological life support system. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, K.; Hunt, M.D.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of work accomplished under two different areas: (1) Resource Recovery of an Anaerobic Wastewater Treatment process, and (2) Epidemiological Study of an Anaerobic Wastewater Treatment Process are documented. The first part of the work was to set up and test three anaerobic digesters and then run these three digesters with a NASA-simulated wastewater. The second part of the work was to use a multi-drug resistant strain of Salmonella choleraesuis as the indicator bacteria for the epidemiological study. Details of these two parts can be found in two master`s theses and are described in Sections 3 and 4 of this report. Several important results condensed from these two parts are summarized in Section 2.

  9. Biologically Inspired Photocatalytically Active Membranes for Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinsinger, Nichola

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wastewater treatment systems include treatment of the influent by a series of stages: pretreatment, primary sedimentation, biological

  10. INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT, MONTICELLO, SOUTH CAROLINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Letters INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT,12091 INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT,transient data from a hydraulic fracturing experiment have

  11. Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartmentDepartment of Energy Photo of a vaporDepartment

  12. MONTICELLO NPL SITES FFA QUARTERLY REPORT: October 1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 1 - June 30, .. '

  13. MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITIES AGREEMENT REPORT Report Period: January 1-

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 1 -PROJECTS FEDERAL

  14. MSGOUID MONTICELLO PROJECTS ·FEDERAL FACILITIES AGREEMENT REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  15. Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding RemovalCSSDepartment of Energy Challenges andof Energy

  16. Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 Budget Fossil EnergyFullGO 2009 AnnualDepartment ofDepartment

  17. Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  18. Microsoft Word - Final monticello 10 7 04 JRW.DOC

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Monticello Mill Site - UT 03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  20. Monticello Mill site Federal Facility Agreement, December 22, 1988

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  1. Monticello Mill site Federal Facility Agreement, December 22, 1988 Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_Cost Estimating35.doc Microsoft2006

  2. Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Annual Groundwater Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year38Report3 Through April 2014

  3. Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Ecological Risk

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year38Report3 Through April

  4. Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit Ill Interim Remedial Action

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year38Report3 Through AprilSite

  5. City of Monticello, Georgia (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPowerCityJonesville,Livingston,CityCityCity of Montezuma,City

  6. Path integral treatment of a family of super-integrable systems in n-dimensional Euclidean space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. T. Chefrour; F. Benamira; L. Guechi; S. Mameri

    2003-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The exact path integration for a family of maximally super-integrable systems generalizing the hydrogen atom in the $n$-dimensional Euclidean space is presented. The Green's function is calculated in parabolic rotational and spherical coordinate systems. The energy spectrum and the correctly normalized wave functions of the bound states are obtained from the poles of the Green's function and their residues, respectively.

  7. Impact of speciation on behaviour of uranium in a solar powered membrane system for treatment of brackish groundwater 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossiter, Helfrid M.A.; Graham, Margaret C.; Schäfer, Andrea

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Factors affecting uranium removal from brackish groundwater using a direct solar powered ultrafiltration-nanofiltration/reverse osmosis membrane system were investigated during a field trial in the Australian outback. ...

  8. Success of prednisone in the treatment of a patient with sarcoidosis and systemic sclerosis: Report of a case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costa, João Borges da; Mayer-da-Silva, Augusto; Almeida, Luís Miguel Soares de; Gomes, Manuel Marques

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    diffuse systemic sclerosis (dSSc) is rare. This associationpoor prognosis in its dSSc variant [ 4 ]. Most reports [corticosteroid therapy in dSSc and in its association with

  9. Effect of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-treatment on textural and solid-solid interactions in ferric/cobaltic oxides system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fagal, Gehan A. [Physical Chemistry Department, National Research Center, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt)] [Physical Chemistry Department, National Research Center, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt); Badawy, Abdelrahman A. [Physical Chemistry Department, Center of Excellence for advanced Science, Renewable Energy Group, National Research Center, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt)] [Physical Chemistry Department, Center of Excellence for advanced Science, Renewable Energy Group, National Research Center, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt); Hassan, Neven A. [Physical Chemistry Department, National Research Center, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt)] [Physical Chemistry Department, National Research Center, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt); El-Shobaky, Gamil A., E-mail: gamil_elshobaky@yahoo.com [Physical Chemistry Department, National Research Center, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Pure and La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-containing (0.75-3.0 mol%) Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} solids were prepared by thermal treatment of their carbonates at 500-700 Degree-Sign C. The produced solids were characterized using XRD, HRTEM, EDX and nitrogen adsorption at -196 Degree-Sign C. The results revealed that pure solids calcined at 600 and 700 Degree-Sign C consisted of nanosized CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} phase, while pure mixed solids calcined at 500 Degree-Sign C consisted of trace amount of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and unreacted Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} phases. The presence of 0.75 mol% La{sub 2}O{sub 3} enhanced solid-solid interaction between Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} at 500 Degree-Sign C yielding CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The ferrite phase existed also in all mixed oxides upon treated with La{sub 2}O{sub 3} besides LaCoO{sub 3} phase. LaCoO{sub 3} existed as a major phase in all mixed oxides treated with 3 mol% La{sub 2}O{sub 3}. La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-treatment modified the crystallite size of all phases present to an extent dependent on calcination temperature and amount of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} content. This treatment decreased effectively the S{sub BET} of all mixed solids. - Graphical Abstract: TEM photographs of pure mixed oxides calcined at 500 Degree-Sign C. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt ferrite exhibit chemical stability, low electric loss and high coercivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt ferrite is used in microwave devices, computer memories and magnetic storage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid-solid interactions in ferric/cobaltic oxides system were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-treatment modified surface compositions of the system investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All phases present in various solids existed as nanosized solids.

  10. Subterranean drilling and in situ treatment of wastes using a contamination control system and methods relating thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jessmore, James J.; Loomis, Guy G.; Pettet, Mark C.; Flyckt, Melissa C.

    2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods relating to subterranean drilling while maintaining containment of any contaminants released during the drilling. A thrust block installed over a zone of interest provides an overflow space for retaining any contaminants and excess sealant returns. Negative air pressure may be maintained in the overflow space by a ventilation system. Access ports in the thrust block seal the overflow space from the surrounding environment with a membrane seal. A flexible sack seal in the access port may be connected to a drill shroud prior to drilling, providing containment during drilling after the drill bit penetrates the membrane seal. The drill shroud may be adapted to any industry standard drilling rig and includes a connection conduit for connecting to the flexible sack seal and a flexible enclosure surrounding the drill shaft and of a length to accommodate full extension thereof. Upon withdrawal, the sack seal may be closed off and separated, maintaining containment of the overflow space and the drill shroud.

  11. Coherent quantum transport in disordered systems: A unified polaron treatment of hopping and band-like transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chee Kong Lee; Jeremy Moix; Jianshu Cao

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum transport in disordered systems is studied using a polaron-based master equation. The polaron approach is capable of bridging the results from the coherent band-like transport regime governed by the Redfield equation to incoherent hopping transport in the classical regime. A non-monotonic dependence of the diffusion coefficient is observed both as a function of temperature and system-phonon coupling strength. In the band-like transport regime, the diffusion coefficient is shown to be linearly proportional to the system-phonon coupling strength, and vanishes at zero coupling due to Anderson localization. In the opposite classical hopping regime, we correctly recover that the dynamics are described by the Fermi's Golden Rule (FGR) and establish that the scaling of the diffusion coefficient depends on the phonon bath relaxation time. In both the hopping and band-like transport regimes, it is demonstrated that at low temperature the zero-point fluctuations of the bath lead to non-zero transport rates, and hence a finite diffusion constant. Application to rubrene and other organic semiconductor materials shows a good agreement with experimental mobility data.

  12. Mapping of RBE-Weighted Doses Between HIMAC- and LEM-Based Treatment Planning Systems for Carbon Ion Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinstraeter, Olaf, E-mail: o.steinstraeter@gsi.de [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)] [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Gruen, Rebecca [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany) [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz, TH-Mittelhessen, Giessen (Germany); Fachbereich Medizin, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Scholz, Uwe [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany) [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Friedrich, Thomas [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)] [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Durante, Marco [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany) [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Scholz, Michael [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)] [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A method was developed to convert clinically prescribed RBE (Relative Biological Effectiveness)-weighted doses from the approach used at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) at the National Institute of Radiological Science, Chiba, Japan, to the LEM (Local Effect Model)-based TReatment planning for Particles (TRiP98) approach used in the pilot project at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum, Darmstadt, and the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). Methods and Materials: The proposed conversion method is based on a simulation of the fixed spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) depth dose profiles as used for the irradiation at HIMAC by LEM/TRiP98 and a recalculation of the resulting RBE-weighted dose distribution. We present data according to the clinical studies conducted at GSI in the past decade (LEM I), as well as data used in current studies (refined LEM version: LEM IV). Results: We found conversion factors (RBE-weighted dose LEM/RBE-weighted dose HIMAC) reaching from 0.4 to 2.0 for prescribed carbon ion doses from 1 to 60 Gy (RBE) for SOBP extensions ranging from 20 to 120 mm according to the HIMAC approach. A conversion factor of 1.0 was found for approximately 5 Gy (RBE). The conversion factor decreases with increasing prescribed dose. Slightly smaller values for the LEM IV-based data set compared with LEM I were found. A significant dependence of the conversion factor from the SOBP width could be observed in particular for LEM IV, whereas the depth dependence was found to be small. Conclusions: For the interpretation and comparison of clinical trials performed at HIMAC and GSI/HIT, it is of extreme importance to consider these conversion factors because according to the various methods to determine the RBE-weighted dose, similar dose values might not necessarily be related to similar clinical outcomes.

  13. Technology demonstration summary: Bio Trol soil-washing system for treatment of a wood-preserving site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program was instituted in 1986 to promote the development and application of innovative technologies to the remediation of Superfund and other sites contaminated with hazardous wastes. The Project Summary highlights the results of an evaluation of a specific arrangement of the three technologies of the BSWS. The system consists of multiple stages of physical abrasion, attrition, flotation, and washing of excavated soil in the BSW. The site selected for the evaluation is a wood preserving facility in New Brighton, MN, where creosote and pentachlorophenol were used for several decades.

  14. Speciation of Arsenic in An Anaerobic Treatment System at a Pb-Zn Smelter Site, Gold Roaster Products, Cu Smelter Stack Dust And Impacted Soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paktunc, D.

    2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Mining and metallurgical processing of gold and base metal ores often results in solid wastes and effluents containing high concentrations of arsenic. In addition, arsenic can be released to the atmosphere from gold roasters and base metal smelters. Speciation of arsenic in roaster products, in a stack sample from a copper smelter, in organic soils impacted by smelter emissions, and in an anaerobic effluent treatment system at a smelter site was determined in order to broaden our understanding of the nature and occurrence of arsenic in a wider range of metallurgical wastes. Micro-XANES spectra obtained from iron oxide particles forming in a gold roaster indicate preferential enrichment of As{sup 3+} species in maghemite-rich domains and microlayers. In comparison, haematite-rich iron oxide particles are dominated by As{sup 5+} species. It appears that maghemite is retarding oxidation of arsenic and its volatilisation during roasting. Arsenic occurs as both As{sup 3+} and As{sup 5+} species in a stack sample emitted from a Cu smelter, confined to fine-grained secondary product layers accumulated on the surfaces of spherical Cu particles. This is probably resulting from condensation of As species upon cooling following their volatilisation during the combustion process. Soil samples collected at various distances from the Cu smelter are dominated by As{sup 5+} species including monomethylarsonic acid and tetramethylarsonium iodide as the organic arsenic species. The presence of reduced As{sup 3+} species highlights the importance of organic material influencing the speciation of arsenic and mineralogical transformations taking place within the soil profile. The XANES spectra indicate that arsenic occurs predominantly as aqueous arsenite species in the anaerobic treatment system, contrary to the conventional thinking of As retention by the formation of secondary sulfides.

  15. Speciation of arsenic in an anaerobic treatment system at a Pb-Zn smelter site, gold roaster products, Cu smelter stack dust and impacted soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paktunc, D. (CCM)

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Mining and metallurgical processing of gold and base metal ores often results in solid wastes and effluents containing high concentrations of arsenic. In addition, arsenic can be released to the atmosphere from gold roasters and base metal smelters. Speciation of arsenic in roaster products, in a stack sample from a copper smelter, in organic soils impacted by smelter emissions, and in an anaerobic effluent treatment system at a smelter site was determined in order to broaden our understanding of the nature and occurrence of arsenic in a wider range of metallurgical wastes. Micro-XANES spectra obtained from iron oxide particles forming in a gold roaster indicate preferential enrichment of As{sup 3+} species in maghemite-rich domains and microlayers. In comparison, haematite-rich iron oxide particles are dominated by As{sup 5+} species. It appears that maghemite is retarding oxidation of arsenic and its volatilisation during roasting. Arsenic occurs as both As{sup 3+} and As{sup 5+} species in a stack sample emitted from a Cu smelter, confined to fine-grained secondary product layers accumulated on the surfaces of spherical Cu particles. This is probably resulting from condensation of As species upon cooling following their volatilisation during the combustion process. Soil samples collected at various distances from the Cu smelter are dominated by As{sup 5+} species including monomethylarsonic acid and tetramethylarsonium iodide as the organic arsenic species. The presence of reduced As{sup 3+} species highlights the importance of organic material influencing the speciation of arsenic and mineralogical transformations taking place within the soil profile. The XANES spectra indicate that arsenic occurs predominantly as aqueous arsenite species in the anaerobic treatment system, contrary to the conventional thinking of As retention by the formation of secondary sulfides.

  16. Tunable, self-powered integrated arc plasma-melter vitrification system for waste treatment and resource recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Titus, Charles H. (Newtown Square, PA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnuthill, MA); Surma, Jeffrey E. (Kennewick, WA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a relatively compact self-powered, tunable waste conversion system and apparatus which has the advantage of highly robust operation which provides complete or substantially complete conversion of a wide range of waste streams into useful gas and a stable, nonleachable solid product at a single location with greatly reduced air pollution to meet air quality standards. The system provides the capability for highly efficient conversion of waste into high quality combustible gas and for high efficiency conversion of the gas into electricity by utilizing a high efficiency gas turbine or by an internal combustion engine. The solid product can be suitable for various commercial applications. Alternatively, the solid product stream, which is a safe, stable material, may be disposed of without special considerations as hazardous material. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the arc plasma furnace and joule heated melter are formed as a fully integrated unit with a common melt pool having circuit arrangements for the simultaneous independently controllable operation of both the arc plasma and the joule heated portions of the unit without interference with one another. The preferred configuration of this embodiment of the invention utilizes two arc plasma electrodes with an elongated chamber for the molten pool such that the molten pool is capable of providing conducting paths between electrodes. The apparatus may additionally be employed with reduced or without further use of the gases generated by the conversion process. The apparatus may be employed as a self-powered or net electricity producing unit where use of an auxiliary fuel provides the required level of electricity production.

  17. Coal pile leachate treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, E C; Kimmitt, R R

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The steam plant located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory was converted from oil- to coal-fired boilers. In the process, a diked, 1.6-ha coal storage yard was constructed. The purpose of this report is to describe the treatment system designed to neutralize the estimated 18,000 m/sup 3/ of acidic runoff that will be produced each year. A literature review and laboratory treatability study were conducted which identified two treatment systems that will be employed to neutralize the acidic runoff. The first, a manually operated system, will be constructed at a cost of $200,000 and will operate for an interim period of four years. This system will provide for leachate neutralization until a more automated system can be brought on-line. The second, a fully automated system, is described and will be constructed at an estimated cost of $650,000. This automated runoff treatment system will ensure that drainage from the storage yard meets current National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Standards for pH and total suspended solids, as well as future standards, which are likely to include several metals along with selected trace elements.

  18. Design report on the test system used to assess treatment of trench water from Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent, T.E.; Taylor, P.A.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New liquid waste streams will be generated as a consequence of closure activities at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It is proposed that these waste streams be treated for removal of contaminants by adding them to the ORNL wastewater treatment facilities. Previous bench-scale treatability studies indicate that ORNL treatment operations will adequately remove the contaminants, although additional study is required to characterize the secondary waste materials produced as a result of the treatment. A larger scale treatment system was constructed to produce secondary wastes in the quantities necessary for characterization and US Environmental protection Agency toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) testing. The test system is designed to simulate the operation of the ORNL process waste treatment facilities and to treat a mixture of ORNL process wastewater and WAG 6 wastewater at a combined flow rate of 0.5 L/min. The system is designed to produce the necessary quantities of waste sludges and spent carbon for characterization studies and TCLP testing.

  19. Channel Design to Increase Wastewater Treatment Wetland Capacity and Connectivity in Stockton, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cubbison, Erin O.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control Facility. Treatment Wetland System Startup PeriodDesign to Increase Wastewater Treatment Wetland Capacity andof wastewater treatment wetlands at the Stockton Regional

  20. Dosimetric accuracy of a deterministic radiation transport based {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy treatment planning system. Part III. Comparison to Monte Carlo simulation in voxelized anatomical computational models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zourari, K.; Pantelis, E.; Moutsatsos, A.; Sakelliou, L.; Georgiou, E.; Karaiskos, P.; Papagiannis, P. [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece); Department of Physics, Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, University of Athens, Ilisia, 157 71 Athens (Greece); Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare TG43-based and Acuros deterministic radiation transport-based calculations of the BrachyVision treatment planning system (TPS) with corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results in heterogeneous patient geometries, in order to validate Acuros and quantify the accuracy improvement it marks relative to TG43. Methods: Dosimetric comparisons in the form of isodose lines, percentage dose difference maps, and dose volume histogram results were performed for two voxelized mathematical models resembling an esophageal and a breast brachytherapy patient, as well as an actual breast brachytherapy patient model. The mathematical models were converted to digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) image series for input to the TPS. The MCNP5 v.1.40 general-purpose simulation code input files for each model were prepared using information derived from the corresponding DICOM RT exports from the TPS. Results: Comparisons of MC and TG43 results in all models showed significant differences, as reported previously in the literature and expected from the inability of the TG43 based algorithm to account for heterogeneities and model specific scatter conditions. A close agreement was observed between MC and Acuros results in all models except for a limited number of points that lay in the penumbra of perfectly shaped structures in the esophageal model, or at distances very close to the catheters in all models. Conclusions: Acuros marks a significant dosimetry improvement relative to TG43. The assessment of the clinical significance of this accuracy improvement requires further work. Mathematical patient equivalent models and models prepared from actual patient CT series are useful complementary tools in the methodology outlined in this series of works for the benchmarking of any advanced dose calculation algorithm beyond TG43.

  1. Measurements of lateral penumbra for uniform scanning proton beams under various beam delivery conditions and comparison to the XiO treatment planning system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana, Suresh; Zeidan, Omar; Ramirez, Eric; Rains, Michael; Gao, Junfang; Zheng, Yuanshui [Department of Medical Physics, ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The main purposes of this study were to (1) investigate the dependency of lateral penumbra (80%–20% distance) of uniform scanning proton beams on various factors such as air gap, proton range, modulation width, compensator thickness, and depth, and (2) compare the lateral penumbra calculated by a treatment planning system (TPS) with measurements.Methods: First, lateral penumbra was measured using solid–water phantom and radiographic films for (a) air gap, ranged from 0 to 35 cm, (b) proton range, ranged from 8 to 30 cm, (c) modulation, ranged from 2 to 10 cm, (d) compensator thickness, ranged from 0 to 20 cm, and (e) depth, ranged from 7 to 15 cm. Second, dose calculations were computed in a virtual water phantom using the XiO TPS with pencil beam algorithm for identical beam conditions and geometrical configurations that were used for the measurements. The calculated lateral penumbra was then compared with the measured one for both the horizontal and vertical scanning magnets of our uniform scanning proton beam delivery system.Results: The results in the current study showed that the lateral penumbra of horizontal scanning magnet was larger (up to 1.4 mm for measurement and up to 1.0 mm for TPS) compared to that of vertical scanning magnet. Both the TPS and measurements showed an almost linear increase in lateral penumbra with increasing air gap as it produced the greatest effect on lateral penumbra. Lateral penumbra was dependent on the depth and proton range. Specifically, the width of lateral penumbra was found to be always lower at shallower depth than at deeper depth within the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) region. The lateral penumbra results were less sensitive to the variation in the thickness of compensator, whereas lateral penumbra was independent of modulation. Overall, the comparison between the results of TPS with that of measurements indicates a good agreement for lateral penumbra, with TPS predicting higher values compared to measurements.Conclusions: Lateral penumbra of uniform scanning proton beams depends on air gap, proton range, compensator thickness, and depth, whereas lateral penumbra is not dependent on modulation. The XiO TPS typically overpredicted lateral penumbra compared to measurements, within 1 mm for most cases, but the difference could be up to 2.5 mm at a deep depth and large air gap.

  2. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Observation of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Facility Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Systems Hazards Analysis Activities...

  3. SU-E-T-300: Spatial Variations of Multiple Off-Axial Targets for a Single Isocenter SRS Treatment Plan in ExacTrac 6D Robotic Couch System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S [Genesis Medical Center, Davenport, IA (United States); Tseng, T [Mount Sinai Hospital, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the spatial variations of multiple off-axial targets for a single isocenter stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment plan in ExacTrac 6D robotic couch system (BrainLab AG). Methods: Five metallic ball bearing (BB) markers were placed sparsely in 3D off-axial locations (non-coplanar) inside a skull phantom as the representatives of multiple targets mimicking multiple brain metastases. The locations of the BB markers were carefully chosen to minimize overlapping of each other in a port imaging detector plane. The skull phantom was immobilized by a frameless mask and CT scanned with a BrainLab Head and Neck Localizer using a GE Optima MDCT scanner. The CT images were exported to iPlan software (BrainLab AG) and a multiple target PTV was drawn by combining all the contours of the BBs. The margin of the MLC opening was selected as 3 mm expansion outward. Two coplanar arc beams were placed to generate a single isocenter SRS plan to treat the PTV. The arc beams were delivered using Novalis Tx system with portal imaging acquisition mode per 10% temporal resolution. The locations of the BBs were visualized and analyzed with respect to the MLC aperture in the treatment plan similar to the Winston-Lutz test. Results: All the BBs were clearly identified inside the MLC openings. The positional errors for the BBs were overall less than 1 mm along the rotational path of the two arcs. Conclusion: This study verified that the spatial deviations of multiple off-axial targets for a single isocenter SRS treatment plan is within sub-millimeter range in ExacTrac 6D robotic couch system. Accompanied with the Winston-Lutz test, this test will quality-assure the spatial accuracies of the isocenter as well as the positions of multiple off-axial targets for the SRS treatment using a single isocenter multiple target treatment plan.

  4. SU-E-J-04: A Data-Driven, Response-Based, Multi-Criteria Decision Support System for Personalized Lung Radiation Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Y; McShan, D; Schipper, M; Matuszak, M; Ten Haken, R [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kong, F [Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA (Georgia)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a decision support tool to predict a patient's potential overall survival (OS) and radiation induced toxicity (RIT) based on clinical factors and responses during the course of radiotherapy, and suggest appropriate radiation dose adjustments to improve therapeutic effect. Methods: Important relationships between a patient's basic information and their clinical features before and during the radiation treatment are identified from historical clinical data by using statistical learning and data mining approaches. During each treatment period, a data analysis (DA) module predicts radiotherapy features such as time to local progression (TTLP), time to distant metastases (TTDM), radiation toxicity to different organs, etc., under possible future treatment plans based on patient specifics or responses. An information fusion (IF) module estimates intervals for a patient's OS and the probabilities of RIT from a treatment plan by integrating the outcomes of module DA. A decision making (DM) module calculates “satisfaction” with the predicted radiation outcome based on trade-offs between OS and RIT, and finds the best treatment plan for the next time period via multi-criteria optimization. Results: Using physical and biological data from 130 lung cancer patients as our test bed, we were able to train and implement the 3 modules of our decision support tool. Examples demonstrate how it can help predict a new patient's potential OS and RIT with different radiation dose plans along with how these combinations change with dose, thus presenting a range of satisfaction/utility for use in individualized decision support. Conclusion: Although the decision support tool is currently developed from a small patient sample size, it shows the potential for the improvement of each patient's satisfaction in personalized radiation therapy. The radiation treatment outcome prediction and decision making model needs to be evaluated with more patients and demonstrated for use in radiation treatments for other cancers. P01-CA59827;R01CA142840.

  5. Modeling Hepatitis C treatment policy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuypers, Marshall A.; Lambert, Gregory Joseph; Moore, Thomas W.; Glass, Robert John,; Finley, Patrick D.; Ross, David [Clinical Public Health Group, Veterans Health Administration, Washington, D.C.; Chartier, Maggie

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chronic infection with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) results in cirrhosis, liver cancer and death. As the nation's largest provider of care for HCV, US Veterans Health Administration (VHA) invests extensive resources in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. This report documents modeling and analysis of HCV treatment dynamics performed for the VHA aimed at improving service delivery efficiency. System dynamics modeling of disease treatment demonstrated the benefits of early detection and the role of comorbidities in disease progress and patient mortality. Preliminary modeling showed that adherence to rigorous treatment protocols is a primary determinant of treatment success. In depth meta-analysis revealed correlations of adherence and various psycho-social factors. This initial meta-analysis indicates areas where substantial improvement in patient outcomes can potentially result from VA programs which incorporate these factors into their design.

  6. Computer Simulation and Comparison of Proton and Carbon Ion Treatment of Tumor Cells Using Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis, Keel Brandon

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    implemented for treatment in Europe and Japan, this study will focus on carbon as the heavier ion of choice. Comparisons are drawn between moderated and unmoderated protons and carbon ions, all of which have a penetration depth of 10 cm in tissue. Scattering...

  7. The effect of heat treatment on the digestibility of wheat gluten in a model food system containing wheat gluten, corn starch and corn oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Debra Marie Ruzicka

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), gross prote1n value (GPV), relat1ve nitrogen ut111zat1on (RNU), net protein rat1o (NPR), and relat1ve protein value (RPV), will reveal a change only when the treatment affects the limiting amino acid but show no change when other amino acids...

  8. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Field demonstration at X-701B Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korte, N.; Muck, M.; Kearl, P.; Siegrist, R.; Schlosser, R.; Zutman, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Houk, T. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Piketon, OH (United States). Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant] [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Piketon, OH (United States). Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the field-scale demonstration performed as part of the project, In Situ Treatment of Mixed Contaminants in Groundwater. This project was a 3{1/2} year effort comprised of laboratory work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and fieldwork performed at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The overall goal of the project was to evaluate in situ treatment of groundwater using horizontal recirculation coupled with treatment modules. Specifically, horizontal recirculation was tested because of its application to thin, interbedded aquifer zones. Mixed contaminants were targeted because of their prominence at DOE sites and because they cannot be treated with conventional methods. The project involved several research elements, including treatment process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and full-scale testing at a contaminated site. This report presents the results of the work at the contaminated site, X-701B at PORTS. Groundwater contamination at X-701B consists of trichloroethene (TCE) (concentrations up to 1800 mg/L) and technetium-998 (Tc{sup 99}) (activities up to 926 pCi/L).

  9. The Substance Abuse Treatment Workforce of South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sodano, Ruthlyn; Watson, Donnie W.; Rataemane, Solomon; Rataemane, Lusanda; Ntlhe, Nomvuyo; Rawson, Richard

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct care workers in the National Drug Abuse Treatmentabuse treatment system includes a diverse set of health care

  10. anaerobic biological treatment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    results for an anaerobic digestion system operated at an existing wastewater treatment plant. Based on scale-up evaluation, the test system should yield an energy balance with...

  11. Waste Treatment Plant Overview

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

  12. The effect of heat treatment on the digestibility of wheat gluten in a model food system containing wheat gluten, corn starch and corn oil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Debra Marie Ruzicka

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to evaluate the nutritive value of protein foods (18). These include other rat bioassays such as NPR (Net Protein Ratio) and NPU (Net F t i Utile ti }, i bi t gi 1 y (~Tt h ~ufo computed PER (essential amino acid profile together with an in vitro protein...), gross prote1n value (GPV), relat1ve nitrogen ut111zat1on (RNU), net protein rat1o (NPR), and relat1ve protein value (RPV), will reveal a change only when the treatment affects the limiting amino acid but show no change when other amino acids...

  13. Geek-Up[12.10.2010]: A New Planet in Another Solar System, Fast-Tracked Drug Treatments and Better Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Using high-contrast, near infrared adaptive optics on the Keck II telescope in Hawaii, LLNL astronomers have identified a fourth planet that is part of a new planetary system discovered in 2008.

  14. Comparative dosimetric study of three-dimensional conformal, dynamic conformal arc, and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for brain tumor treatment using Novalis system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding Meisong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Science Center, Aurora, CO (United States)]. E-mail: Meisong.Ding@uchsc.edu; Newman, Francis M.S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Science Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Science Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Stuhr, Kelly M.S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Science Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Johnson, Tim K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Science Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Science Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric differences among three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for brain tumor treatment. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients treated with Novalis were selected. We performed 3D-CRT, DCAT, and IMRT plans for all patients. The margin for the planning target volume (PTV) was 1 mm, and the specific prescription dose was 90% for all plans. The target coverage at the prescription dose, conformity index (CI), and heterogeneity index were analyzed for all plans. Results: For small tumors (PTV {<=}2 cm{sup 3}), the three dosimetric parameters had approximate values for both 3D-CRT and DCAT plans. The CI for the IMRT plans was high. For medium tumors (PTV >2 to {<=}100 cm{sup 3}), the three plans were competitive with each other. The IMRT plans had a greater CI, better target coverage at the prescription dose, and a better heterogeneity index. For large tumors (PTV >100 cm{sup 3}), the IMRT plan had good target coverage at the prescription dose and heterogeneity index and approximate CI values as those in the 3D-CRT and DCAT plans. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that DCAT is suitable for most cases in the treatment of brain tumors. For a small target, 3D-CRT is useful, and IMRT is not recommended. For larger tumors, IMRT is superior to 3D-CRT and very competitive in sparing critical structures, especially for big tumors.

  15. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Aerobic Treatment Unit (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2000-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    sea de alta calidad. En el sistema, las aguas negras primero entran al tanque de pretratamiento o a la trampa de basura, que saca los objetos pl?sticos y otros s?lidos que flotan o se asientan. Despu?s, entra a un tanque de aireaci?n donde el ox... Sistemas individuales para el tratamiento de aguas negras Fosa de basura de un compartimiento Cloronizador Unidad de tratamiento aer?bico Rociadores Tanque bomba Unidad de tratamiento aer?bico Bruce Lesikar y Juan Enciso Promotores Especialistas de...

  16. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Aerobic Treatment Unit (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2000-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    puestas a prueba y tener una certificaci?n de acuerdo con las normas internacionales Standard 40 de la ?National Sanitation Foundation? para los dispositivos de tratamiento de aguas negras. Las unidades de tratamiento aer?bico que pasan las pruebas se...

  17. Wastewater treatment and energy : an analysis on the feasibility of using renewable energy to power wastewater treatment plants in Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foley, Kevin John

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wastewater treatment is a very energy intensive industry. Singapore has a state-of-the-art wastewater treatment system that uses a number of sustainable techniques that greatly improve its overall efficiency. The centralized ...

  18. Theoretical modeling of UV-Vis absorption and emission spectra in liquid state systems including vibrational and conformational effects: Explicit treatment of the vibronic transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D’Abramo, Marco [Supercomputing Applications and Innovation, CINECA, Via dei Tizii, 6, 00185 Rome (Italy) [Supercomputing Applications and Innovation, CINECA, Via dei Tizii, 6, 00185 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Chimica, Universitá Sapienza, P.le Aldo Moro, 5, 00185, Rome (Italy); Aschi, Massimiliano [Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, University of Aquila, via Vetoio (Coppito 1), 67010 Aquila (Italy)] [Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, University of Aquila, via Vetoio (Coppito 1), 67010 Aquila (Italy); Amadei, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.amadei@uniroma2.it [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche Universita’ di Roma, Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche Universita’ di Roma, Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Here, we extend a recently introduced theoretical-computational procedure [M. D’Alessandro, M. Aschi, C. Mazzuca, A. Palleschi, and A. Amadei, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114102 (2013)] to include quantum vibrational transitions in modelling electronic spectra of atomic molecular systems in condensed phase. The method is based on the combination of Molecular Dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations within the Perturbed Matrix Method approach. The main aim of the presented approach is to reproduce as much as possible the spectral line shape which results from a subtle combination of environmental and intrinsic (chromophore) mechanical-dynamical features. As a case study, we were able to model the low energy UV-vis transitions of pyrene in liquid acetonitrile in good agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Measurement and Treatment of Nuisance Odors at Wastewater Treatment Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham, Samantha Margaret

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the ability of existing treatment technologies at Plant 1 toof existing treatment technologies at both OCSD plantsof existing treatment technologies at both OCSD plants

  20. Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 1. Systems. 1.1. On Line. In this introductory section we will pose no exercises, but instead, will detail. how to use Maple to solve problems in linear ...

  1. ADVANCED NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE EFFECTS ON THE TREATMENT OF UNCERTAINTY IN THE LONG-TERM ASSESSMENT OF GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL SYSTEMS - EBS INPUT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, M; Blink, J A; Greenberg, H R; Sharma, M

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign within the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Technology (FCT) program has been tasked with investigating the disposal of the nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level nuclear waste (HLW) for a range of potential waste forms and geologic environments. The planning, construction, and operation of a nuclear disposal facility is a long-term process that involves engineered barriers that are tailored to both the geologic environment and the waste forms being emplaced. The UFD Campaign is considering a range of fuel cycles that in turn produce a range of waste forms. The UFD Campaign is also considering a range of geologic media. These ranges could be thought of as adding uncertainty to what the disposal facility design will ultimately be; however, it may be preferable to thinking about the ranges as adding flexibility to design of a disposal facility. For example, as the overall DOE-NE program and industrial actions result in the fuel cycles that will produce waste to be disposed, and the characteristics of those wastes become clear, the disposal program retains flexibility in both the choice of geologic environment and the specific repository design. Of course, other factors also play a major role, including local and State-level acceptance of the specific site that provides the geologic environment. In contrast, the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) repository license application (LA) is based on waste forms from an open fuel cycle (PWR and BWR assemblies from an open fuel cycle). These waste forms were about 90% of the total waste, and they were the determining waste form in developing the engineered barrier system (EBS) design for the Yucca Mountain Repository design. About 10% of the repository capacity was reserved for waste from a full recycle fuel cycle in which some actinides were extracted for weapons use, and the remaining fission products and some minor actinides were encapsulated in borosilicate glass. Because the heat load of the glass was much less than the PWR and BWR assemblies, the glass waste form was able to be co-disposed with the open cycle waste, by interspersing glass waste packages among the spent fuel assembly waste packages. In addition, the Yucca Mountain repository was designed to include some research reactor spent fuel and naval reactor spent fuel, within the envelope that was set using the commercial reactor assemblies as the design basis waste form. This milestone report supports Sandia National Laboratory milestone M2FT-12SN0814052, and is intended to be a chapter in that milestone report. The independent technical review of this LLNL milestone was performed at LLNL and is documented in the electronic Information Management (IM) system at LLNL. The objective of this work is to investigate what aspects of quantifying, characterizing, and representing the uncertainty associated with the engineered barrier are affected by implementing different advanced nuclear fuel cycles (e.g., partitioning and transmutation scenarios) together with corresponding designs and thermal constraints.

  2. aerated treatment pond: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nitratenitrite can be reduced with influent BOD. The key feature Nerenberg, Robert 50 Treatment of saltwater crocodile Pond wastewater using constructed Wetland system;. Open...

  3. Mobile water treatment plant special study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of the level and extent of groundwater contamination in the vicinity of Title I mill sites began during the surface remedial action stage (Phase 1) of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Some of the contamination in the aquifer(s) at the abandoned sites is attributable to milling activities during the years the mills were in operation. To begin implementation of Phase 11 groundwater remediation, the US Department of Energy (DOE) requested that (1) the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) conduct a study to provide for the design of a mobile water treatment plant to treat groundwater extracted during site characterization studies at completed Phase I UMTRA sites, and (2) the results of the TAC investigations be documented in a special study report. This special study develops the design criteria for a water treatment plant that can be readily transported from one UMTRA site to another and operated as a complete treatment system. The 1991 study provides the basis for selecting a mobile water treatment system to meet the operating requirements recommended in this special study. The scope of work includes the following: Determining contaminants, flows, and loadings. Setting effluent quality criteria. Sizing water treatment unit(s). Evaluating non-monetary aspects of alternate treatment processes. Comparing costs of alternate treatment processes. Recommending the mobile water treatment plant design criteria.

  4. Measurement and Treatment of Nuisance Odors at Wastewater Treatment Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham, Samantha Margaret

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oil refineries, and waste treatment operations such as composting, sludgeoil refineries, and waste treatment operations such as composting, sludge

  5. REVIEW ARTICLE Impacts of calcium water treatment residue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    REVIEW ARTICLE Impacts of calcium water treatment residue on the soil-water-plant system in citrus of calcium water treatment residue (Ca-WTR) for stabilizing Cu in soil and its subsequent influence on Cu. Keywords Calcium water treatment residue . Citrus production . Copper contamination . Soil pH . Remediation

  6. Use Of The Evidence Base In Substance Abuse Treatment Programs for American Indians and Alaska Natives: Pursuing Quality in the Crucible Of Practice And Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abuse Treatment Capacity in Targeted Areas of Need-Local Recovery-Oriented Systems of Care (care systems and have varying approaches to substance abuse treatment [

  7. Magnetic coordinatesfor equilibria with a continuoussymmetry R. L. Dewar and D. A. Monticello

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dewar, Robert L.

    Physics,ResearchSchool of Physical Sciences, The Australian National University, Canberra A.C.T.2601, Australia. easier. We construct TheoreticalPhysics,ResearchSchool ofPhysicalSciences, TheAustralianNational University, CanberraA.C.T.2601,Australia (Received5 August 1983;accepted 22 March 1984) Magnetic coordinatesfor hydromagnetic equilibria

  8. FIVE YEAR REVIEW - MONTICELLO RADIOACTIVELY CONTAMINATED PROPERTIES - 06/11/2007

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ," POST RmDIAL8FISK

  9. MONTICELLO NPL SITES Minutes and Action Items of the Federal Facilities Agreement Meeting

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 1 - June 30, ..

  10. MSG MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT REPORT March!April2005

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^August/September

  11. Microsoft Word - Apr-June 2012 Monticello Quarterly_S09178_FFA -final.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F ENaturalWater Vapor in2 June 2012

  12. Microsoft Word - July-Sept 2012 FFA Monticello Quarterly Report.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:FEngineers® New York2 October 2012

  13. Completion of the Five-Year Reviews for the Monticello, Utah, Radioactively

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville EnergyDepartment.Attachment FY2011-40 Chapter

  14. Completion of the Five-Year Reviews for the Monticello, Utah, Radioactively

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. DepartmentEnergy This partAs theFebruary 24,of theIssueAY-12

  15. Microsoft Word - Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello df.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions forCheneyNovember S. DEPARTMENTthe UseCR-091 PrimaryJanuary 2014

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Monticello AEC Ore Buying Station - UT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CT 0-01 FUSRAPMonsanto Chemical

  17. Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit I11 Remedial Investigation Addendum1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year38Report

  18. Monticello NPL Sites Federal Facilities Agreement Meeting Minutes & Action Items

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year38Report3 Through AprilSiteS H

  19. This fact sheet describes wetlands in and around Monticello, Utah, and what the

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O'1repository design activities

  20. U.S. Department of Energy at Grand Junction 2003 Annual Inspection⎯Monticello, Utah

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O'1repositoryShiprock,at Grand

  1. Medical Management Treatment Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    Medical Management Treatment Manual: A Clinical Guide for Researchers and Clinicians) This manual is an adaptation of: Medical Management Treatment Manual: A Clinical Research Guide for Medically, Maryland #12;Message to the Users of this Medical Management (MM) Manual from the Editors Background

  2. Energy from vascular plant wastewater treatment systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolverton, B.C.; McDonald, R.C.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) duckweed (Spirodela sp. and Lemna sp.), water pennywort (Hydrocotyle ranunculoides), and kudzu (Pueraria lobata) were anaerobically fermented using an anaerobic filter technique that reduced the total digestion time from 90 d to an average of 23 d and produced 0.14 to 0.22 m/sup 3/ CH/sub 4//kg (dry weight) (2.3 to 3.6 ft/sup 3//lb) from mature filters for the 3 aquatic species. Kudzu required an average digestion time of 33 d and produced an average of 0.21 m/sup 3/ CH/sub 4//kg (dry weight) (3.4 ft/sup 3//lb). The anaerobic filter provided a large surface area for the anaerobic bacteria to establish and maintain an optimal balance of facultative, acid-forming, and methane-producing bacteria. Consequently the efficiency of the process was greatly improved over prior batch fermentations.

  3. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Pump Tank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Pump tanks are concrete, fiberglass or polyethylene containers that collect wastewater to be dosed into the soil at intervals. This publication explains the design and maintenance of pump tanks, and it offers advice on what to do if a pump tank...

  4. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Tablet Chlorination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Wastewater that is sprayed onto lawns must first be disinfected to prevent odors and remove disease-causing organisms. This publication explains how tablet chlorinators disinfect wastewater and gives tips on how to maintain them....

  5. A significant number of Iowa water treatment systems are dependent upon well-based water sources. Because of this, CIRAS efforts have been focused on the "Ground Water Levels" as reported by Iowa DNR. Currently, DNR officials are indicating that restricti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    A significant number of Iowa water treatment systems are dependent upon well-based water sources. Because of this, CIRAS efforts have been focused on the "Ground Water Levels" as reported by Iowa DNR. Currently, DNR officials are indicating that restrictions or loss of the water supply is not likely

  6. Medical Actinium Therapeutic Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Learn how INL researchers are increasing world supplies of Bismuth 213 to help with cancer treatments. For more information about INL research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  7. Thermal treatment wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

  8. Medical Actinium Therapeutic Treatment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Learn how INL researchers are increasing world supplies of Bismuth 213 to help with cancer treatments. For more information about INL research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  9. Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    biological operations. Tertiary treatment processes wastewaterwastewater treatment system, called the Living Machine, uses natural non-chemical biologicalbiological (Wilkinson 2000). Each type generally refers to a certain point in the wastewater treatment

  10. Passive treatment of wastewater and contaminated groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phifer, Mark A. (N. Augusta, SC); Sappington, Frank C. (Dahlonega, GA); Millings, Margaret R. (N. Augusta, SC); Turick, Charles E. (Aiken, SC); McKinsey, Pamela C. (Aiken, SC)

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A bioremediation system using inorganic oxide-reducing microbial consortia for the treatment of, inter alia coal mine and coal yard runoff uses a containment vessel for contaminated water and a second, floating phase for nutrients. Biodegradable oils are preferred nutrients.

  11. Passive treatment of wastewater and contaminated groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phifer, Mark A.; Sappington, Frank C.; Millings, Margaret R.; Turick, Charles E.; McKinsey, Pamela C.

    2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A bioremediation system using inorganic oxide-reducing microbial consortia for the treatment of, inter alia coal mine and coal yard runoff uses a containment vessel for contaminated water and a second, floating phase for nutrients. Biodegradable oils are preferred nutrients.

  12. New England Water Treatment Technology Assistance Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with vancomycin (ADA-V) according to EPA Method 1605. #12;Enhanced Corrosion Control in Small Water Systems Using. Unlike the traditional treatment combination (prechlor-ination/coagulation/sedimentation/rapid sand was detected in samples collected after slow sand filtra-tion, suggesting that slow sand filtration alone might

  13. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the November 1...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    B Accident Investigation Board Report on the November 1, 1999, Construction Injury at the Monticello Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Monticello, Utah Type B Accident...

  14. The Hybrid Treatment Process for mixed radioactive and hazardous waste treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, W.A.; Kindle, C.H.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new process for treating mixed hazardous and radioactive waste, commonly called mixed waste. The process is called the Hybrid Treatment Process (HTP), so named because it is built on the 20 years of experience with vitrification of wastes in melters, and the 12 years of experience with treatment of wastes by the in situ vitrification (ISV) process. It also uses techniques from several additional technologies. Mixed wastes are being generated by both the US Department of Energy (DOE) and by commercial sources. The wastes are those that contain both a hazardous waste regulated under the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations and a radioactive waste with source, special nuclear, or byproduct materials. The dual regulation of the wastes increases the complexity of the treatment, handling, and storage of the waste. The DOE is the largest holder and generator of mixed waste. Its mixed wastes are classified as either high-level, transuranic (TRU), or low-level waste (LLW). High-level mixed wastes will be treated in vitrification plants. Transuranic wastes may be disposed of without treatment by obtaining a no-migration variance from the EPA. Lowlevel wastes, however, will require treatment, but treatment systems with sufficient capacity are not yet available to DOE. Various facilities are being proposed for the treatment of low-level waste. The concept described in this paper represents one option for establishing that treatment capacity.

  15. The Hybrid Treatment Process for mixed radioactive and hazardous waste treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, W.A.; Kindle, C.H.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new process for treating mixed hazardous and radioactive waste, commonly called mixed waste. The process is called the Hybrid Treatment Process (HTP), so named because it is built on the 20 years of experience with vitrification of wastes in melters, and the 12 years of experience with treatment of wastes by the in situ vitrification (ISV) process. It also uses techniques from several additional technologies. Mixed wastes are being generated by both the US Department of Energy (DOE) and by commercial sources. The wastes are those that contain both a hazardous waste regulated under the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations and a radioactive waste with source, special nuclear, or byproduct materials. The dual regulation of the wastes increases the complexity of the treatment, handling, and storage of the waste. The DOE is the largest holder and generator of mixed waste. Its mixed wastes are classified as either high-level, transuranic (TRU), or low-level waste (LLW). High-level mixed wastes will be treated in vitrification plants. Transuranic wastes may be disposed of without treatment by obtaining a no-migration variance from the EPA. Lowlevel wastes, however, will require treatment, but treatment systems with sufficient capacity are not yet available to DOE. Various facilities are being proposed for the treatment of low-level waste. The concept described in this paper represents one option for establishing that treatment capacity.

  16. WASTEWATER TREATMENT OVER SAND COLUMNS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the biological mechanisms responsible for wastewater treatment. The first part of the study, conducted on site93/0096 WASTEWATER TREATMENT OVER SAND COLUMNS TREATMENT YIELDS, LOCALISATION OF THE BIOMASS Domestic wastewater treatment by infiltration-percolation is a process that becomming common in France

  17. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Spray Distribution System (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2002-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    , y son los m?s econ?micos de instalar de todos los sistemas de distribuci?n de aguas negras. Sin embargo, necesitan un mayor tratamiento de las aguas negras que cualquier otro sistema. Esto aumenta el costo de un sistema de tratamiento completo y de...

  18. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Alternative Collection Systems (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2002-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    regiones rurales tienen m?s opciones que nunca para manejar las aguas negras. Estas opciones ofrecen: a19 Protecci?n ambiental, a19 Flexibilidad para que las comunidades planeen su futuro desarrollo econ?mico, y a19 Costos de instalaci?n m?s bajos que los... negras sean transportadas a elevaciones m?s altas. Puesto que las l?neas deben colocarse en un ?ngulo lo suficientemente agudo para mover la materia s?lida por la tuber?a, el costo de la excavaci?n puede ser consider- able para instalar un sistema de...

  19. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Alternative Collection Systems (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2002-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    estatal para el trata- miento econ?mico de aguas negras municipales en las regiones rurales, muchas comunidades rurales de Texas tienen que crear sistemas para el manejo de aguas negras para proteger eficazmente la salud p?blica y la calidad ambiental...Residuos crudos Tanque s?ptico Efluente Sistemas individuales para el tratamiento de aguas negras Sistemas de recolecci?n alternativos Bruce Lesikar y Juan Enciso Promotores Especialistas en Ingenier?a Agr?cola El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M B...

  20. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Spray Distribution System (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2002-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    .035 0.035 0.041 0.041 0.109 0.109 0.086 0.086 0.064 0.064 0.045 0.045 Debido al riesgo del contacto humano con las aguas negras, los sistemas de rociado deben tratar las aguas negras a un nivel de calidad muy alto antes de rociarlas a los jardines. Este... sistema debe tratar las aguas negras hasta alcanzar un ?efluente de segunda calidad?. Esto quiere decir que debe eliminar del 85 al 98 por ciento de los s?lidos o la materia org?nica. Tambi?n debe desinfectar las aguas negras para eliminar los pat...

  1. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Mound Systems (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2002-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Tanque s?ptico Tanque bomba Tela geotextil Tubo de distribuci?n Arena Grava L-5414S 4-02 Figure 1: Un sistema de mont?culo para distribuir aguas negras tratadas al suelo. U n sistema de mont?culo para el tratamiento de aguas negras es un sistema de... campo de absorci?n colocado encima de la superficie natural del suelo. Los sistemas de mont?culo se utilizan para distribuir las aguas negras en lugares donde hay muy poca tierra antes de llegar a las aguas subterr?neas, suelos impermeables o lechos de...

  2. Situ treatment of contaminated groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Ruiz, Roberto (Tracy, CA); Pico, Tristan M. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for treating dissolved halogenated organic compounds in groundwater that relies upon electrolytically-generated hydrogen to chemically reduce the halogenated compounds in the presence of a suitable catalyst. A direct current is placed across at least a pair, or an array, of electrodes which are housed within groundwater wells so that hydrogen is generated at the cathode and oxygen at the anode. A pump is located within the well housing in which the cathode(s) is(are) located and draws in groundwater where it is hydrogenated via electrolysis, passes through a well-bore treatment unit, and then transported to the anode well(s) for reinjection into the ground. The well-bore treatment involves a permeable cylinder located in the well bore and containing a packed bed of catalyst material that facilitates the reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated organic compounds by hydrogen into environmentally benign species such as ethane and methane. Also, electro-osmatic transport of contaminants toward the cathode also contributes to contaminant mass removal. The only above ground equipment required are the transfer pipes and a direct circuit power supply for the electrodes. The electrode wells in an array may be used in pairs or one anode well may be used with a plurality of cathode wells. The DC current flow between electrode wells may be periodically reversed which controls the formation of mineral deposits in the alkaline cathode well-bore water, as well as to help rejuvenate the catalysis.

  3. BULKING SLUDGE TREATMENT BY MICROSCOPIC OBSERVATION AND MECHANICAL TREATMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the operation of the biological stage of waste water treatment plants. If the threatening extensive growth of wastewater treatment plants often need a complex control for the optimal processing. The measurement status and for the regulation of biological parts in waste water treatment plants. Furthermore, e

  4. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Household Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Household wastewater treatment systems (septic systems) can contaminate ground water unless they are properly designed, constructed and maintained. This publication describes various kinds of systems and guides the homeowner in assessing...

  5. Heat treatment furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D; Parrott, Jeffrey G; DeMint, Paul D; Finney, Kevin R; Blue, Charles T

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A furnace heats through both infrared radiation and convective air utilizing an infrared/purge gas design that enables improved temperature control to enable more uniform treatment of workpieces. The furnace utilizes lamps, the electrical end connections of which are located in an enclosure outside the furnace chamber, with the lamps extending into the furnace chamber through openings in the wall of the chamber. The enclosure is purged with gas, which gas flows from the enclosure into the furnace chamber via the openings in the wall of the chamber so that the gas flows above and around the lamps and is heated to form a convective mechanism in heating parts.

  6. Surface Treatments of Nb by Buffered Electropolishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Andy T. [JLAB; Rimmer, Robert A. [JLAB; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB; Manus, Robert L. [JLAb; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Williams, J. S. [JLAB; Eozénou, F. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Jin, S. [PKU/IHIP, Beijing; Lin, L. [PKU/IHIP, Beijing; Lu, X.Y. [PKU/IHIP, Beijing; Mammosser, John D. [JLAB; Wang, E. [BNL

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Buffered electropolishing (BEP) is a Nb surface treatment technique developed at Jefferson Lab1. Experimental results obtained from flat Nb samples show2-4 that BEP can produce a surface finish much smoother than that produced by the conventional electropolishing (EP), while Nb removal rate can be as high as 4.67 ?m/min. This new technique has been applied to the treatments of Nb SRF single cell cavity employing a vertical polishing system5 constructed at JLab as well as a horizontal polishing system at CEA Saclay. Preliminary results show that the accelerating gradient can reach 32 MV/m for a large grain cavity and 26.7 MV/m for a regular grain cavity. In this presentation, the latest progresses from the international collaboration between Peking University, CEA Saclay, and JLab on BEP will be summarized.

  7. Analysis of Assembly Bill 1000: Cancer Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of recurrent cancers, and treatment of cancers that cannotNeill VJ, Twelves CJ. Oral cancer treatment: Developments inchanging paradigm in cancer treatment: Oral chemotherapy.

  8. Analysis of Senate Bill 961: Cancer Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of recurrent cancers, and treatment of cancers that cannotNeill VJ, Twelves CJ. Oral cancer treatment: Developments inchanging paradigm in cancer treatment: Oral chemotherapy.

  9. Underground Coal Thermal Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Smith; M. Deo; E. Eddings; A. Sarofim; K. Gueishen; M. Hradisky; K. Kelly; P. Mandalaparty; H. Zhang

    2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coalâ??s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Efforts focused on: â?¢ Constructing a suite of three different coal pyrolysis reactors. These reactors offer the ability to gather heat transfer, mass transfer and kinetic data during coal pyrolysis under conditions that mimic in situ conditions (Subtask 6.1). â?¢ Studying the operational parameters for various underground thermal treatment processes for oil shale and coal and completing a design matrix analysis for the underground coal thermal treatment (UCTT). This analysis yielded recommendations for terms of targeted coal rank, well orientation, rubblization, presence of oxygen, temperature, pressure, and heating sources (Subtask 6.2). â?¢ Developing capabilities for simulating UCTT, including modifying the geometry as well as the solution algorithm to achieve long simulation times in a rubblized coal bed by resolving the convective channels occurring in the representative domain (Subtask 6.3). â?¢ Studying the reactive behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with limestone, sandstone, arkose (a more complex sandstone) and peridotite, including mineralogical changes and brine chemistry for the different initial rock compositions (Subtask 6.4). Arkose exhibited the highest tendency of participating in mineral reactions, which can be attributed to the geochemical complexity of its initial mineral assemblage. In experiments with limestone, continuous dissolution was observed with the release of CO{sub 2} gas, indicated by the increasing pressure in the reactor (formation of a gas chamber). This occurred due to the lack of any source of alkali to buffer the solution. Arkose has the geochemical complexity for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2} as carbonates and is also relatively abundant. The effect of including NH{sub 3} in the injected gas stream was also investigated in this study. Precipitation of calcite and trace amounts of ammonium zeolites was observed. A batch geochemical model was developed using Geochemists Workbench (GWB). Degassing effect in the experiments was corrected using the sliding fugacity model in GWB. Experimental and simulation results were compared and a reasonable agreement between the two was observed.

  10. Casimir force: an alternative treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. R. Silva

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Casimir force between two parallel uncharged closely spaced metallic plates is evaluated in ways alternatives to those usually considered in the literature. In a first approximation we take in account the suppressed quantum numbers of a cubic box, representing a cavity which was cut in a metallic block. We combine these ideas with those of the MIT bag model of hadrons, but adapted to non-relativistic particles. In a second approximation we consider the particles occupying the energy levels of the Bohr atom, so that the Casimir force depends explicitly on the fine structure constant alpha. In both treatments, the mean energies which have explicit dependence on the particle mass and on the maximum occupied quantum number (related to the Fermi level of the system) at the beginning of the calculations, have these dependences mutually canceled at the end of them. Finally by comparing the averaged energies computed in both approximations, we are able to make an estimate of the value of the fine structure constant alpha.

  11. Optimization of low-cost phosphorus removal from wastewater using co-treatments with constructed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    water treatment residuals with vertical-flow constructed wetland mesocosms planted with Schoenoplectus. This process of accretion may take many years. However, treatment wetlands can decline in performance over to improve P removal by wetland treatment systems (Brix et al., 2001; Gru¨neberg and Kern, 2001). Other

  12. Treatment of Wood Preserving Wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, T. D.; Shack, P. A.

    accumulation, and miscellaneous design aspects are discussed. A treatment scheme incorporating atmospheric evaporation ponds after chemical coagulation and settling is proposed....

  13. Combustible radioactive waste treatment by incineration and chemical digestion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stretz, L.A.; Crippen, M.D.; Allen, C.R.

    1980-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A review is given of present and planned combustible radioactive waste treatment systems in the US. Advantages and disadvantages of various systems are considered. Design waste streams are discussed in relation to waste composition, radioactive contaminants by amount and type, and special operating problems caused by the waste.

  14. Thermal treatment of dyes from military munitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed thermal treatment equipment to treat Navy smoke and dye compounds. Navy smokes were burned in the Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) in the early 1980s. These test results were used in the development of a portable system consisting of a Thermal Treatment Unit (TTU), feed preparation and pumping skid, utility skid, and control trailer. This equipment was started up at Navy facilities at China Lake, CA where several destruction removal efficiency tests were completed in 1993 burning smoke compositions. The equipment was set up at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in 1996 where tests were completed burning green Navy spotting dyes. Operating and test results from the NTS efforts resulted in clearer understanding of equipment deficiencies, dye characteristics and composition, and secondary wastes generated. Future tests, scheduled for July, 1996 will demonstrate higher bum rates, better pH measurement and control, and stack emission test results for other colored dyes.

  15. Mixed waste characterization, treatment & disposal focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (referred to as the Mixed Waste Focus Area or MWFA) is to provide treatment systems capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste in partnership with users, and with continual participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA deals with the problem of eliminating mixed waste from current and future storage in the DOE complex. Mixed waste is waste that contains both hazardous chemical components, subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and radioactive components, subject to the requirements of the Atomic Energy Act. The radioactive components include transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste (LLW). TRU waste primarily comes from the reprocessing of spent fuel and the use of plutonium in the fabrication of nuclear weapons. LLW includes radioactive waste other than uranium mill tailings, TRU, and high-level waste, including spent fuel.

  16. Mixed and low-level waste treatment facility project. Volume 3, Waste treatment technologies (Draft)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology information provided in this report is only the first step toward the identification and selection of process systems that may be recommended for a proposed mixed and low-level waste treatment facility. More specific information on each technology will be required to conduct the system and equipment tradeoff studies that will follow these preengineering studies. For example, capacity, maintainability, reliability, cost, applicability to specific waste streams, and technology availability must be further defined. This report does not currently contain all needed information; however, all major technologies considered to be potentially applicable to the treatment of mixed and low-level waste are identified and described herein. Future reports will seek to improve the depth of information on technologies.

  17. Surfactants containing radioactive run-offs: Ozone treatment, influence on nuclear power plants water waste special treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prokudina, S.A.; Grachok, M.A. [Belarussian State Economic Univ., Minsk (Belarus)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors discuss the problems encountered in the efficiency of radioactive waste treatment in nuclear power plants in Kursk. The ozonization of aqueous solutions of surfactants was carried out in the laboratory`s ozonization system. The surfactants which are discharged to the ion exchangers deteriorate resins, clog up the ion exchangers, and decrease filtration velocity. Therefore, this investigation focused on finding a method to increase the efficiency of this treatment process.

  18. Cryogenic treatment of gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bravo, Jose Luis (Houston, TX); Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan (Kingwood, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

  19. Computerized Energy and Treatment Cost Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trace, W. L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    6 summarizes the products and control limits that would be necessary to control scale and corrosion throughout the boiler system. DE!\\i1N ERALIZAnON Let us now consider using the same raw water analysis, but using demineralization as treatment... - Demineralization Energy and Material Balance 55 ESL-IE-81-04-09 Proceedings from the Third Industrial Energy Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 26-29, 1981 PIEPAIl?lI FOa. IIIIlUSfIIUL EIlElClY CUiFElEM:E FOIl 5VSIUc JllOlIIII IiIIILITE Y5 DBl...

  20. Computerized Energy and Treatment Cost Calculations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trace, W. L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    6 summarizes the products and control limits that would be necessary to control scale and corrosion throughout the boiler system. DE!\\i1N ERALIZAnON Let us now consider using the same raw water analysis, but using demineralization as treatment... - Demineralization Energy and Material Balance 55 ESL-IE-81-04-09 Proceedings from the Third Industrial Energy Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 26-29, 1981 PIEPAIl?lI FOa. IIIIlUSfIIUL EIlElClY CUiFElEM:E FOIl 5VSIUc JllOlIIII IiIIILITE Y5 DBl...

  1. Monticello Mill Tailings, Operable Unit III Surface and Ground Water Remedial Investigation Addendum/Focused Feasibility Study

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year38Report3 Through AprilSiteS H E

  2. Wastewater Effluent Polishing Systems of Anaerobic Baffled Reactor Treating Black-water from Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    %, respectively. The highest treatment performances in the sand filter and constructed wetland units were reached systems for the treatment of domestic blackwater, aimed at determining the treatment performance of different integrated low-cost wastewater treatment systems, comprising one ABR as first treatment step

  3. Erysipelas after breast cancer treatment (26 cases)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Erysipelas after breast cancer treatment. Tunis Med, 2002 ,after breast cancer treatment (26 cases) A Masmoudi 1 , Iof 5.23 years after cancer treatment (3 months to 15 years)

  4. Treatment of dredged sludge by mechanical dehydration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maekawa, T.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sludge deposits in the water area damage the ecosystems and environments; their elimination has always been an urgent task for human communities. Generally, sludge deposits are dredged out of the bottom of the water area, transported to, and discharged at a large disposal area on land. Recently, however, it has become increasingly difficult to secure disposal areas and routes of speedy transportation for disposal of dredged sludge. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to reduce both the volume of dredged sludge and the size of the disposal area. This mechanical method is different from the conventional engineering dehydration by loading, consolidation, and drainage in that the dredged sludge is separated into sludge cakes and clean water that can be returned to the water area through mechanical centrifugal dehydration. Sludge deposits are distributed thin and wide on the bottom of the water area, and a pump dredge has been proved effective in many cases for dredging the upper layers of sludge deposits accurately and without creating turbidity in water. This mechanical sludge treatment technique can be most efficient when used in combination with a pump dredge. This method offers the following advantages: (a) It requires smaller space for treatment and disposal of dredged sludge than the conventional method. (b) Facilities and costs for transportation can be reduced. (c) Various systems can be adopted for transportation of sludge cakes. (d) This system is transportable and compact and can be constructed anywhere either on land or on water.

  5. Application of chlorine dioxide as an oilfield facilities treatment fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romaine, J.; Strawser, T.G.; Knippers, M.L.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both mechanical and chemical treatments are used to clean water flood injection distribution systems whose efficiency has been reduced as a result of plugging material such as iron sulfide sludge. Most mechanical treatments rely on uniform line diameter to be effective, while chemical treatments require good contact with the plugging material for efficient removal. This paper describes the design and operation of a new innovative application using chlorine dioxide for the removal of iron sulfide sludge from water flood injection distribution systems. This technology has evolved from the use of chlorine dioxide in well stimulation applications. The use of chlorine dioxide for continuous treatment of injection brines will also be discussed. Exxon USA`s Hartzog Draw facility in Gillette, Wyoming was the site for the application described. 4,500 barrels of chlorine dioxide was pumped in three phases to clean sixty-six miles of the water flood distribution system. Results indicate that chlorine dioxide was effective in cleaning the well guard screens, the injection lines, frac tanks used to collect the treatment fluids and the injection wells.

  6. Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Jump to: navigation, search Name Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission)...

  7. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project - October 2010 October 2010 Review of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant...

  8. Innovative Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish Innovative Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish October 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Oak Ridge scientists Kelly Roy, left, and Trent Jett...

  9. WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J.P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and sludges produced by retort water treatment should bewaters woulp not require treatment since they are producedtreatment technology. Mine waters, by contrast, are produced

  10. Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment September 24, 2013 | Tags: Biological and Environmental Research...

  11. Independent Oversight Assessment, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2012 January 2012 Assessment of the...

  12. An Energy Savings Model for the Heat Treatment of Castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Rong; R. Sisson; J. Morral; H. Brody

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated system of software, databases, and design rules have been developed, verified, and to be marketed to enable quantitative prediction and optimization of the heat treatment of aluminum castings to increase quality, increase productivity, reduce heat treatment cycle times and reduce energy consumption. The software predicts the thermal cycle in critical locations of individual components in a furnace, the evolution of microstructure, and the attainment of properties in heat treatable aluminum alloy castings. The model takes into account the prior casting process and the specific composition of the component. The heat treatment simulation modules can be used in conjunction with software packages for simulation of the casting process. The system is built upon a quantitative understanding of the kinetics of microstructure evolution in complex multicomponent alloys, on a quantitative understanding of the interdependence of microstructure and properties, on validated kinetic and thermodynamic databases, and validated quantitative models.

  13. Post-Treatment Hemodynamics of a Basilar Aneurysm and Bifurcation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortega, J; Hartman, J; Rodriguez, J; Maitland, D

    2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Aneurysm re-growth and rupture can sometimes unexpectedly occur following treatment procedures that were initially considered to be successful at the time of treatment and post-operative angiography. In some cases, this can be attributed to surgical clip slippage or endovascular coil compaction. However, there are other cases in which the treatment devices function properly. In these instances, the subsequent complications are due to other factors, perhaps one of which is the post-treatment hemodynamic stress. To investigate whether or not a treatment procedure can subject the parent artery to harmful hemodynamic stresses, computational fluid dynamics simulations are performed on a patient-specific basilar aneurysm and bifurcation before and after a virtual endovascular treatment. The simulations demonstrate that the treatment procedure produces a substantial increase in the wall shear stress. Analysis of the post-treatment flow field indicates that the increase in wall shear stress is due to the impingement of the basilar artery flow upon the aneurysm filling material and to the close proximity of a vortex tube to the artery wall. Calculation of the time-averaged wall shear stress shows that there is a region of the artery exposed to a level of wall shear stress that can cause severe damage to endothelial cells. The results of this study demonstrate that it is possible for a treatment procedure, which successfully excludes the aneurysm from the vascular system and leaves no aneurysm neck remnant, to elevate the hemodynamic stresses to levels that are injurious to the immediately adjacent vessel wall.

  14. CDC Lead Poisoning Prevention and Treatment Recommendations for Refugee Children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CDC Lead Poisoning Prevention and Treatment Recommendations for Refugee Children 1. Background: · Lead poisoning remains one of the most common and preventable pediatric environmental conditions in the United States. · Lead is a poison that affects virtually every system in the human body. · Lead

  15. TRAITEMENT DES EFFLUENTS WASTE TREATMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    residence time the production of biogas (7l-78 p. 100 CH,) was 237 1 per kg dry matter, i.e. 479 1 of CH to obtain the same amount of biogas four times quicklier. The treatment yield was improved (65 p. 100 COD). The mean production was 4931 biogas/kg degraded COD. It seems to be possible to apply that procedure

  16. Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

  17. Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

    2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

  18. Review of metallic surface treatments for corrosion mitigation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hock, V.F.; Rigsbee, J.M.; Boy, J.H.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Innovative metallic surface treatments for corrosion protection of facility systems and components were reviewed, including plasma spraying, electroless nickel plating, and ion plating. The work is part of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers effort to find coatings with properties superior to conventional polymeric types. The three methods were judged for adhesion, corrosion and erosion resistance, rust mitigation, and possible use in electromagnetic shielding. A brief description of physics is given for these methods along with case studies documenting their performance. Such metallic treatments may be a cost-effective, long-term corrosion protection alternative to traditional polymeric coatings, depending on component design and purpose.

  19. Sludge drying reed beds for septage treatment: towards design and operation recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : the future of the septage. The aim of this paper is to assess the feasibility of septage treatment by SDRB). Nowadays, septic tank facilities have a widespread distribution, providing a first treatment to household effluent consisting of a solid/liquid separation. Operation efficiency of these systems is subject

  20. Systems Modeling for Prognostic Cancer Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maccabe, Barney

    goal of this research is the development of personalized treatments in cancer, based on the genomic and treatment. A major challenge in contemporary cancer diagnosis and treatment is the development Systems Modeling for Prognostic Cancer Biology Xuefei Wang1 , BaiLian Li2 , Cheryl L. Willman

  1. Examples of Department of Energy Successes for Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater: Permeable Reactive Barrier and Dynamic Underground Stripping ASTD Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purdy, C.; Gerdes, K.; Aljayoushi, J.; Kaback, D.; Ivory, T.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management has funded the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) Program to expedite deployment of alternative technologies that can save time and money for the environmental cleanup at DOE sites across the nation. The ASTD program has accelerated more than one hundred deployments of new technologies under 76 projects that focus on a broad spectrum of EM problems. More than 25 environmental restoration projects have been initiated to solve the following types of problems: characterization of the subsurface using chemical, radiological, geophysical, and statistical methods; treatment of groundwater contaminated with DNAPLs, metals, or radionuclides; and other projects such as landfill covers, purge water management systems, and treatment of explosives-contaminated soils. One of the major goals of the ASTD Program is to deploy a new technology or process at multiple DOE sites. ASTD projects are encouraged to identify subsequent deployments at other sites. Some of the projects that have successfully deployed technologies at multiple sites focusing on cleanup of contaminated groundwater include: Permeable Reactive Barriers (Monticello, Rocky Flats, and Kansas City), treating uranium and organics in groundwater; and Dynamic Underground Stripping (Portsmouth, and Savannah River), thermally treating DNAPL source zones. Each year more and more new technologies and approaches are being used at DOE sites due to the ASTD program. DOE sites are sharing their successes and communicating lessons learned so that the new technologies can replace the baseline or standard approaches at DOE sites, thus expediting cleanup and saving money.

  2. Detection and treatment of chemical weapons and/or biological pathogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mariella Jr., Raymond P.

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for detection and treatment of chemical weapons and/or biological pathogens uses a detector system, an electrostatic precipitator or scrubber, a circulation system, and a control. The precipitator or scrubber is activated in response to a signal from the detector upon the detection of chemical weapons and/or biological pathogens.

  3. A sensitivity analysis of the treatment of wind energy in the AEO99 version of NEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborn, Julie G.; Wood, Frances; Richey, Cooper; Sanders, Sandy; Short, Walter; Koomey, Jonathan

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Documentation Report: Wind Energy Submodule (WES). DOE/EIA-The Economic Value of Wind Energy at High Power SystemOF THE TREATMENT OF WIND ENERGY IN THE AEO99 VERSION OF NEMS

  4. Reservoir-based devices for the monitoring and treatment of disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Grace Young

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cancer mortality still remains high despite significant investments in diagnostics, drug development, and treatment. The systemic route is convenient both for routine monitoring and for drug administration. Local cancer ...

  5. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Leaching Chambers (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2000-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    drenaje. El equipo podr?a da?arlo. Costo estimado El costo de instalaci?n fluct?a entre $3.000 y $6.000, seg?n el tipo de suelo, el tama?o de la casa y otros factores. Los costos de mantenimiento del tanque s?ptico son m?s o menos $75 al a?o, si lo bombea... cada 3 a?os. Si se lleva a cabo un mantenimiento m?s frecuente el costo aumentar?. La serie de publicaciones, Sistemas individuales para el tratamiento de aguas negras, es resultado de la colaboraci?n de varias agencias, organizaciones y fuentes de...

  6. adjuvant systemic treatment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    obviates the need for extensive infrastructure development and expenditures. The use of a sand filter, a submerged flow constructed... Pillai, Suresh D.; Lesikar, Bruce A. 53...

  7. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Subsurface Drip Distribution (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Producido por AgriLife Communications and Marketing, El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M Las publicaciones de Texas AgriLife Extension se pueden encontrar en Internet en: http://AgriLifebookstore.org Los programas educativos de Texas Agri...

  8. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Spray Distribution (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Producido por AgriLife Communications and Marketing, El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M Las publicaciones de Texas AgriLife Extension se pueden encontrar en Internet en: http://AgriLifebookstore.org Los programas educativos de Texas Agri...

  9. Ozone treatment in a closed culture system for Macrobrachium rosenbergii 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamaguchi, Ryoji

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    removed from test aquaria, OTN reagent was added and color development was measured spectrophotometrically. Air mixed with ozone gas was injected into test solutions by diffuser (aquarium air stone) under specified conditions of temperature (28 C... of its high reactivity, ozone has been used for treating water to remove dissolved organic and inorganic wastes (Torricelli, 1959; Diaper, 1972) . The effectiveness of ozonation has been discussed by Dickerman et al. (1954), Fetner and Ingols (1959...

  10. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Subsurface Drip Distribution (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Producido por AgriLife Communications and Marketing, El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M Las publicaciones de Texas AgriLife Extension se pueden encontrar en Internet en: http://AgriLifebookstore.org Los programas educativos de Texas Agri...

  11. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Spray Distribution (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Producido por AgriLife Communications and Marketing, El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M Las publicaciones de Texas AgriLife Extension se pueden encontrar en Internet en: http://AgriLifebookstore.org Los programas educativos de Texas Agri...

  12. air treatment system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solar air collector PV-panel fannon-return valve DHW tank mantle cold waterhot water roof Solar Energy Centre Denmark Danish Technological Institute SEC-R-29 12;Solar air heating...

  13. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Sand Filters (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2000-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    debidamente, el filtro de arena produce un efluente de muy alta calidad. Los filtros de arena son lechos o camas de material granular, o arena, y drenados o escurridos por debajo para que las aguas negras pretrata- das puedan ser tratadas, recogidas y...: http://texaserc.tamu.edu/pubs/ewaste Los programas educacionales del Servicio de Extensi?n Agr?cola de Texas est?n disponibles para todas las personas, sin distinci?n de raza, color, sexo, minusvalid?z, religi?n, edad u origen nacional. Emitido en...

  14. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Trickling Filter (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2002-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    mejorar la calidad del efluente. Para orientaci?n sobre la operaci?n y el mantenimiento de los tanques s?pticos y los campos de aplicaci?n superficial, vea las publ- icaciones de Extensi?n Cooperativa sobre esos temas. Se pueden pedir del Servicio de... aplicaci?n al suelo. Distribuye el agua tratada por debajo de la superficie del suelo. Aunque los filtros percoladores son una tecnolog?a sencilla para mejorar la calidad de las aguas negras, algunos fabricantes los venden ya armados. Las compa...

  15. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Evapotranspiration Bed (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2002-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Fosa s?ptica de dos compartimentos Suelo arcilloso Piedra quebrada Cama de evapotranspiraci?n Mecha de absorci?n Sistemas individuales para el tratamiento de aguas negras Cama de evapotranspiraci?n Bruce Lesikar y Juan Enciso Promotores... Especialistas en Ingenier?a Agr?cola El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M L-5228S 4-02 Figure 1: Un sistema de lecho de evapotranspiraci?n. U na cama de evapotranspiraci?n (ET) trata las aguas negras usando la evapotranspiraci?n, la p?rdida de agua del suelo por...

  16. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Leaching Chambers (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2000-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Fosa s?ptica de dos compartimientos C?mara de percolaci?n Campo de absorci?n L-5342S 8-00 Figura 1: Los sistemas de c?mara de percolaci?n pueden tener campos de drenaje m?s peque?os que los de sistemas convencionales. Sistemas individuales para el... tratamiento de aguas negras C?maras de percolaci?n Bruce Lesikar, Juan Enciso y Russell Persyn Promotores Especialistas de Ingenier?a Agr?cola, Promotor Adjunto de Conservaci?n del Agua El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M Un sistema de c?mara de percola- ci...

  17. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetlands (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2002-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    microbios para mejorar la calidad de las aguas negras. Los humedales naturales por lo general tienen agua visible en el sistema. Sin embargo, en los de casa, el agua corre por debajo de la superficie del suelo, lo que limita el contacto de los residentes con...Fosa s?ptica de dos compartimentos Campo de absorci?n Humedal artificial Sistemas individuales para el tratamiento de aguas negras Humedales artificiales Bruce Lesikar y Juan Enciso Promotores Especialistas en Ingenier?a Agr?cola El Sistema...

  18. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Operation and Maintenance (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2000-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Suelo del campo de absorci?n Tanque s?ptico de dos compartimientos Tuber?a perforada para distribuir aguas residuales Suelo arenoso/limoso Grava Tela geotextil L-5347S 7-00 Figura 1: Un tanque s?ptico y su sistema de campo de absorci?n. Sistemas... individuales para el tratamiento de aguas negras Operaci?n y mantenimiento Bruce Lesikar y Juan Enciso Promotores Especialistas de Ingenier?a Agr?cola El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M S i su casa o negocio usa un sistema individual para el tratamiento de...

  19. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Sand Filters (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2000-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Arena filtrante Fosa s?ptica de dos compartimientos con c?mara de bombeo Descarga al campo de absorci?n L-5229S 8-00 Figura 1: Un sistema de filtro de arena. Sistemas individuales para el tratamiento de aguas negras Filtro de arena Bruce Lesikar y... Juan Enciso Promotores Especialistas de Ingenier?a Agr?cola El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M L a filtraci?n por arena es una de las tecnolog?as de tratamiento de aguas negras m?s antiguas que se conoce. Si se dise?a, construye, opera y mantiene...

  20. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Tablet Chlorination (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Richard; Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    L-5344S 01-06 Figura 1: La manera m?s com?n de desinfectar los sistemas individuales es la cloraci?n con pastilla. Sistemas individuales para el tratamiento de aguas negras Cloraci?n con pastilla Richard Weaver, Bruce Lesikar y Juan Enciso Profesor... de Microbiolog?a del Medio Ambiente y del Suelo, Promotores Especialistas de Ingenier?a Agr?cola El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M L as aguas negras rociadas al c?sped deben desinfectarse primero para evitar malos olores y eliminar microorganismos...

  1. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Pump Tank (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2000-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Sistema de tratamiento de aguas negras Tanque bomba Sistema de distribuci?n por rociado L-5346S 8-00 Figura 1: Un tanque bomba recolecta las aguas negras tratadas y las dosifica en intervalos al suelo. Sistemas individuales para el tratamiento de... aguas negras Tanque bomba Bruce Lesikar y Juan Enciso Promotores Especialistas de Ingenier?a Agr?cola El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M L os tanques bomba son contendores de hormig?n, fibra de vidrio o polietileno que recolectan las aguas negras que ser...

  2. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Trickling Filter (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2002-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Campo de absorci?n Tanque s?ptico Tanque de dosificaci?n/Clarificador Filtro percolador Sistemas individuales para el tratamiento de aguas negras Filtro percolador Bruce Lesikar y Juan Enciso Promotores Especialistas en Inenier?a Agr?cola El Sistema... Universitario Texas A&M L-5345S 4-02 Figura 1: Los filtros percoladores son tecnolog?a sencilla para tratar las aguas negras. U n filtro percolador es una cama de grava o un medio pl?stico sobre el cual se roc?an las aguas negras pretratadas. En este sistema de...

  3. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Trickling Filter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2000-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A trickling filter is a bed of gravel or plastic media over which pretreated wastewater is sprayed. This publication explains how trickling filters treat wastewater and gives tips on how to maintain them....

  4. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Graywater Use and Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin; Alexander, Rachel

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    : To reuse graywater, a homeowner first must decide which graywater sources to collect. Us- ing graywater from all sources will increase the risk of pollutants in the graywater. Before using graywater, evaluate what it is to be used for and what... using it to water plants that thrive in acidic soils. To prevent salt accumulation, ? distribute graywater over a large surface area and rotate distribu- tion from one area to another. Select reuse applications appro- ? priate for the amount of water...

  5. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Trickling Filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2000-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A trickling filter is a bed of gravel or plastic media over which pretreated wastewater is sprayed. This publication explains how trickling filters treat wastewater and gives tips on how to maintain them....

  6. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Evapotranspiration Bed (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2002-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    . Dise?o Una cama de ET contiene zanjas de almacenamiento, relleno de suelo arcilloso alrededor de las zanjas y arena arcillosa arriba sobre el relleno de suelo arcilloso para que crezca c?sped. Por lo general, el ?rea super- ficial requerida de la cama... se divide entre dos camas. Esto permite cambiar de una cama a otra para evitar la sobrecarga. Se coloca un revestimiento y un colch?n de arena en el suelo, y el sistema de almacenamiento se coloca en el fondo de la cama. Normalmente, el sistema de...

  7. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Operation and Maintenance (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2000-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    de 30 pulgadas (m?nimo) Conexi?n "T" alterna Conexi?n "T" 3 H?gale una limpieza al tanque s?ptico antes de que el lodo acumulado llegue a la parte inferior del dispositivo de desag?e. Si se acumula lodo o suciedad hasta ese nivel, los s?lidos se saldr...?a sobrecargar el ?rea de drenaje, y de esa manera causar que el agua se estanque en la superficie. Tambi?n podr?a hacer salir el agua por el sistema, lo que podr?a llevar s?lidos m?s all? del dispositivo de tratamiento. 3 No conecte el desag?e de l...

  8. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Pump Tank (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2000-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    . Cada uno tiene de dispositivo de tratamiento, un tanque bomba y un sistema de distribuci?n (Figura 1). Un tanque bomba est? compuesto de: 3 Una bomba. Esta empuja el agua del tanque bomba hacia el sistema de distribuci?n. 3 Un flotador que controla al... las aguas negras hayan sido tratadas en un tanque s?ptico o en un dispositivo de tratamiento avanzado. El tipo de bomba que se escoja tambi?n depende de lo que requiera el sistema de distribuci?n de aguas negras de la casa o instalaci?n. Hay dos tipos...

  9. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Tablet Chlorination (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Richard; Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    pastilla por lo general tienen cuatro componentes: ? Las pastillas de cloro. ? Un tubo que sostiene las pastillas. ? Un dispositivo de contacto que pone a las pastillas de cloro en contacto con las aguas negras. ? Un tanque de almacenamiento, por... lo general un tanque bomba, donde las aguas negras se almacenan antes de que sean distribuidas. Antes de ser tratadas con cloro, las aguas negras de una casa son tratadas por un dispositivo de trata- miento secundario, general-mente en una...

  10. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetlands (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2002-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    tiene dispositivos que distribuyen las aguas negras que entran al sistema y otros que recolectan las aguas negras que salen. El agua que va a tratarse corre horizontalmente por el lecho, permaneciendo por debajo de la superficie de la grava. Las plantas... afectar el rendimiento y el dimensionamiento del humedal. La profundidad del humedal puede variar, pero por lo general fluct?a entre 1 y 2 pies. Un humedal de 1 pie de profundidad tiene dos veces el ?rea superficial para el mismo volumen de almacenamiento...

  11. Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell DirectorThe Water Power Program, partEnergy DC -

  12. Idaho waste treatment facility startup testing suspended to evaluate system

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy: Thomas P.Department of EnergyLessons Learned Report, NNSA,

  13. Ozone treatment in a closed culture system for Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamaguchi, Ryoji

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    media was brought to 3. 0 ppt with "Instant Ocean" salt and pH was adjusted with either sodium hydroxide or sulfuric acid. 2. The accumulation of residual ozone was investigated in the tap water-based culture medium alone and with 12 ppm total ammonia..., turbidity and other organic substances was very effective, but no significant reduction in ammonia nitrogen content wss achieved, unless an oyster shell filter was introduced in the media. fea lty f tf 1 * 9 11 9 b*Mt ~btt demonstrated. Ozone...

  14. CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding Removal OngoingCERCLA SitesCHICAGO HOUSE PARTIES SHOW heat

  15. Enhanced Renewable Methane Production System Benefits Wastewater Treatment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovation Portal Industrial

  16. ORS 454 - Sewage Treatment and Disposal Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellence SeedNunn, Colorado:CablesOECD-AOPC LLCRecreation54 -

  17. Oregon Application for Onsite Sewage Treatment System | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOfficeOhio:OpowerOrchard Lake439.300Information

  18. Idaho Waste Treatment Facility Startup Testing Suspended To Evaluate System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT | NationalMentoring Program31,2010Idaho

  19. Idaho waste treatment facility startup testing suspended to evaluate system

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),Energy Petroleum Technology VisionImproper UseIdahoDecades Ago

  20. Metal behavior during fluidized bed thermal treatment of soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, T.C.; Lee, H.T.; Shiao, C.C.; Hopper, J.R. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Bostick, W.D. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemistry Dept.] [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Superfund dumpsites are frequently composed of soils contaminated with hazardous organic constituents and toxic heavy metals. While thermal treatment is an effective method of remediating the contaminated soils, the major environmental concerns are the emissions of toxic metal fumes during the treatment and the leaching of metals from the treated soil. The US EPA has reported that metals can account for almost all of the identified cancer risks from waste incineration systems. Research leading to better understanding of their behavior and better controlling of their emissions is urgently needed. In this study, the behavior of metals during the fluidized bed thermal treatment of artificially prepared metal-contaminated clay was experimentally and theoretically investigated. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of operating conditions on metal volatilization and metal leachability associated with the process. Metal experiments were carried out in a well instrumented 76 mm (3 inch) i.d. fluidized bed incinerator. The metals involved were compounds of lead and cadmium and the operating parameters included metal concentration, air flow rate, treatment temperature and treatment duration. The observed results indicated that metal volatilization is mainly a function of treatment temperature and treatment duration. The degree of volatilization was observed to range from 5 to 40% depending on the operating conditions. Cadmium leachability was observed to be relatively high compared to that of lead. In addition to the experimental study, a theoretical model based on the laws of heat and mass transfer operations and reaction kinetics was derived to simulate the metal volatilization process. The derived model was found to predict reasonably well the experimental observations.

  1. Conceptual Thermal Treatment Technologies Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suer, A.

    1996-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a conceptual Thermal Treatment Technologies Feasibility Study (FS) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) focusing exclusively on thermal treatment technologies for contaminated soil, sediment, or sludge remediation projects.

  2. 11/17/11 Treatment Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    11/17/11 1 Treatment Wetlands Dr. Andrea Ludwig Biosystems Engineering TerOary) ­ nutrient removal Uses of Treatment Wetlands for Improved Water Wetland Ecology ­ November 17, 2011 Mississippi River Flooding 2011 Gulf

  3. Energy Efficiency Strategies for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daw, J.; Hallett, K.; DeWolfe, J.; Venner, I.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water and wastewater systems are significant energy consumers with an estimated 3%-4% of total U.S. electricity consumption used for the movement and treatment of water and wastewater. Water-energy issues are of growing importance in the context of water shortages, higher energy and material costs, and a changing climate. In this economic environment, it is in the best interest for utilities to find efficiencies, both in water and energy use. Performing energy audits at water and wastewater treatment facilities is one way community energy managers can identify opportunities to save money, energy, and water. In this paper the importance of energy use in wastewater facilities is illustrated by a case study of a process energy audit performed for Crested Butte, Colorado's wastewater treatment plant. The energy audit identified opportunities for significant energy savings by looking at power intensive unit processes such as influent pumping, aeration, ultraviolet disinfection, and solids handling. This case study presents best practices that can be readily adopted by facility managers in their pursuit of energy and financial savings in water and wastewater treatment. This paper is intended to improve community energy managers understanding of the role that the water and wastewater sector plays in a community's total energy consumption. The energy efficiency strategies described provide information on energy savings opportunities, which can be used as a basis for discussing energy management goals with water and wastewater treatment facility managers.

  4. Simulation of open quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florian Mintert; Eric J. Heller

    2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an approach for the semiclassical treatment of open quantum systems. An expansion into localized states allows restriction of a simulation to a fraction of the environment that is located within a predefined vicinity of the system. Adding and dropping environmental particles during the simulation yields an effective reduction of the size of the system that is being treated.

  5. Treatment of mercury containing waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalb, Paul D. (Wading River, NY); Melamed, Dan (Gaithersburg, MD); Patel, Bhavesh R (Elmhurst, NY); Fuhrmann, Mark (Babylon, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for the treatment of mercury containing waste in a single reaction vessel which includes a) stabilizing the waste with sulfur polymer cement under an inert atmosphere to form a resulting mixture and b) encapsulating the resulting mixture by heating the mixture to form a molten product and casting the molten product as a monolithic final waste form. Additional sulfur polymer cement can be added in the encapsulation step if needed, and a stabilizing additive can be added in the process to improve the leaching properties of the waste form.

  6. Apparatus and process for water treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phifer, Mark A. (North Augusta, SC); Nichols, Ralph L. (North Augusta, SC)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is disclosed utilizing permeable treatment media for treatment of contaminated water, along with a method for enhanced passive flow of contaminated water through the treatment media. The apparatus includes a treatment cell including a permeable structure that encloses the treatment media, the treatment cell may be located inside a water collection well, exterior to a water collection well, or placed in situ within the pathway of contaminated groundwater. The passive flow of contaminated water through the treatment media is maintained by a hydraulic connection between a collecting point of greater water pressure head, and a discharge point of lower water pressure head. The apparatus and process for passive flow and groundwater treatment utilizes a permeable treatment media made up of granular metal, bimetallics, granular cast iron, activated carbon, cation exchange resins, and/or additional treatment materials. An enclosing container may have an outer permeable wall for passive flow of water into the container and through the enclosed treatment media to an effluent point. Flow of contaminated water is attained without active pumping of water through the treatment media. Remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons and other water contaminants to acceptable regulatory concentration levels is accomplished without the costs of pumping, pump maintenance, and constant oversight by personnel.

  7. A MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF THE CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC TREATMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebowitz, Joel

    A MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF THE CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC TREATMENT OF ACUTE MYELOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA S. 1 leukemia has been the introduction of the L-2 protocol in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia protocol has been intro- duced for the treatment of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) and of related

  8. Simultaneous wastewater treatment and biological electricity generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simultaneous wastewater treatment and biological electricity generation B.E. Logan Department accomplishing wastewater treatment in processes based on microbial fuel cell technologies. When bacteria oxidize.4 £ 106 L of wastewater, a wastewater treatment plant has the potential to become a 2.3 MW power plant

  9. Mixed and low-level waste treatment facility project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology information provided in this report is only the first step toward the identification and selection of process systems that may be recommended for a proposed mixed and low-level waste treatment facility. More specific information on each technology will be required to conduct the system and equipment tradeoff studies that will follow these preengineering studies. For example, capacity, maintainability, reliability, cost, applicability to specific waste streams, and technology availability must be further defined. This report does not currently contain all needed information; however, all major technologies considered to be potentially applicable to the treatment of mixed and low-level waste are identified and described herein. Future reports will seek to improve the depth of information on technologies.

  10. Surrogate formulations for thermal treatment of low-level mixed waste, Part II: Selected mixed waste treatment project waste streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Chiang, J.M.; Hermes, W.H.; Gibson, L.V. Jr.; Richmond, A.A. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mayberry, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Frazier, G. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the formulation of surrogate waste packages, representing the major bulk constituent compositions for 12 waste stream classifications selected by the US DOE Mixed Waste Treatment Program. These waste groupings include: neutral aqueous wastes; aqueous halogenated organic liquids; ash; high organic content sludges; adsorbed aqueous and organic liquids; cement sludges, ashes, and solids; chloride; sulfate, and nitrate salts; organic matrix solids; heterogeneous debris; bulk combustibles; lab packs; and lead shapes. Insofar as possible, formulation of surrogate waste packages are referenced to authentic wastes in inventory within the DOE; however, the surrogate waste packages are intended to represent generic treatability group compositions. The intent is to specify a nonradiological synthetic mixture, with a minimal number of readily available components, that can be used to represent the significant challenges anticipated for treatment of the specified waste class. Performance testing and evaluation with use of a consistent series of surrogate wastes will provide a means for the initial assessment (and intercomparability) of candidate treatment technology applicability and performance. Originally the surrogate wastes were intended for use with emerging thermal treatment systems, but use may be extended to select nonthermal systems as well.

  11. Suggested Treatment of CHP Within an EERS Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chittum, A.; Elliott, R. N.; Trombley, D.; Watson, S.

    Discussion Draft: Do not cite SUGGESTED TREATMENT OF CHP WITHIN AN EERS CONTEXT Anna Chittum Research Associate R. Neal Elliott, Ph.D., P.E. Associate Director for Research Dan Trombley Engineering Associate Suzanne Watson Policy... Director American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy Washington, DC ABSTRACT Reliable monitoring and measurement of the energy savings resulting from the installation of combined heat and power (CHP) systems and power recovered from waste...

  12. Microwave off-gas treatment apparatus and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schulz, Rebecca L. (Aiken, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Wicks, George G. (North Aiken, SC)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention discloses a microwave off-gas system in which microwave energy is used to treat gaseous waste. A treatment chamber is used to remediate off-gases from an emission source by passing the off-gases through a susceptor matrix, the matrix being exposed to microwave radiation. The microwave radiation and elevated temperatures within the combustion chamber provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the gas waste stream.

  13. Copyright Awwa Research Foundation 2006 Advanced Water Treatment Impacts onAdvanced Water Treatment Impacts on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    , brackish groundwater, produced water, etc.produced water, etc. Advanced treatmentAdvanced treatment Water© Copyright Awwa Research Foundation 2006 Advanced Water Treatment Impacts onAdvanced Water Treatment Impacts on EnergyEnergy--Water LinkagesWater Linkages (The Water Utility Perspective)(The Water

  14. DOE mixed waste treatment capacity analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, W.A.; Wehrman, R.R.; Young, J.R.; Shaver, S.R.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This initial DOE-wide analysis compares the reported national capacity for treatment of mixed wastes with the calculated need for treatment capacity based on both a full treatment of mixed low-level and transuranic wastes to the Land Disposal Restrictions and on treatment of transuranic wastes to the WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The status of treatment capacity is reported based on a fifty-element matrix of radiation-handling requirements and functional treatment technology categories. The report defines the classifications for the assessment, describes the models used for the calculations, provides results from the analysis, and includes appendices of the waste treatment facilities data and the waste stream data used in the analysis.

  15. ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John R. Gallagher

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During the production of oil and gas, large amounts of water are brought to the surface and must be disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner. This is an especially difficult problem in offshore production facilities where space is a major constraint. The chief regulatory criterion for produced water is oil and grease. Most facilities have little trouble meeting this criterion using conventional oil-water separation technologies. However, some operations have significant amounts of naphthenic acids in the water that behave as oil and grease but are not well removed by conventional technologies. Aerobic biological treatment of naphthenic acids in simulated-produced water has been demonstrated by others; however, the system was easily overloaded by the large amounts of low-molecular-weight organic acids often found in produced waters. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of an anaerobic biological system to treat these organic acids in a simulated produced water and to examine the potential for biodegradation of the naphthenic acids in the anaerobic environment. A small fixed-film anaerobic biological reactor was constructed and adapted to treat a simulated produced water. The bioreactor was tubular, with a low-density porous glass packing material. The inocula to the reactor was sediment from a produced-water holding pond from a municipal anaerobic digester and two salt-loving methanogenic bacteria. During start-up, the feed to the reactor contained glucose as well as typical produced-water components. When glucose was used, rapid gas production was observed. However, when glucose was eliminated and the major organic component was acetate, little gas was generated. Methane production from acetate may have been inhibited by the high salt concentrations, by sulfide, or because of the lack, despite seeding, of microbes capable of converting acetate to methane. Toluene, a minor component of the produced water (0.1 g/L) was removed in the reactor. Batch tests were conducted to examine naphthenic acid biodegradability under several conditions. The conditions used were seed from the anaerobic reactor, wetland sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and a sterile control. The naphthenic acid was from a commercial source isolated from Gulf Coast petroleum as was dosed at 2 mg/mL. The incubations were for 30 days at 30 C. The results showed that the naphthenic acids were not biodegraded under anaerobic conditions, but were degraded under aerobic conditions. Despite poor performance of the anaerobic reactor, it remains likely that anaerobic treatment of acetate, toluene, and, potentially, other produced-water components is feasible.

  16. Feeding Frenzy: Shark Cartilage as Treatment for Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saben, Jamie

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over Shark Cartilage as Cancer Treatment." Journal of thewith shark cartilage as cancer treatment and are especiallyshark cartilage as a cancer treatment, assess the public's

  17. Diffusion MRI Methods for Improved Treatment Monitoring in Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliu, Sheye

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.9 Breast Cancer Treatment . . . . . . . 2.9.1. Localassessing antivascular cancer treatments. Br J Radiol, 2003.imaging, for breast cancer treatment monitoring. To achieve

  18. Coordination of Care in Substance Abuse Treatment: An Interorganizational Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spear, Suzanne Evelyn

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    substance abuse treatment under the Affordable Care Act.Coordination of Care in Substance Abuse Treatment: AnCoordination of Care in Substance Abuse Treatment: An

  19. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record, Waste Treatment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    system (LMH), the melter equipment support handling system (LSH), the radioactive solid waste handling system (RWH), and the radioactive liquid waste disposal system (RLD)....

  20. Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification for Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Professor Robert C. Voigt

    2003-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The science of heat treatment has been well studied and is the basis from which existing specifications and practices for the heat treatment of steel castings have been developed. Although these existing specifications address the general needs of steel castings to be heat-treated, they do not take into account the variability in the parameters that govern the processes. The need for a heat treatment qualification procedure that accounts for this variability during heat treatment is an important step toward heat treatment quality assurance. The variability in temperatures within a heat treatment furnace is one such variable that a foundry has to contend with in its day-to-day activity. Though specifications indicate the temperatures at which a particular heat treatment has to be conducted, heat treatment specifications do not adequately account for all aspects of heat treatment quality assurance. The heat treatment qualification procedure will comprise of a robust set of rules and guidelines that ensure that foundries will still be able to operate within the set of constraints imposed on them by non-deterministic elements within the processes.

  1. Mobile water treatment plant special study. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of the level and extent of groundwater contamination in the vicinity of Title I mill sites began during the surface remedial action stage (Phase 1) of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Some of the contamination in the aquifer(s) at the abandoned sites is attributable to milling activities during the years the mills were in operation. To begin implementation of Phase 11 groundwater remediation, the US Department of Energy (DOE) requested that (1) the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) conduct a study to provide for the design of a mobile water treatment plant to treat groundwater extracted during site characterization studies at completed Phase I UMTRA sites, and (2) the results of the TAC investigations be documented in a special study report. This special study develops the design criteria for a water treatment plant that can be readily transported from one UMTRA site to another and operated as a complete treatment system. The 1991 study provides the basis for selecting a mobile water treatment system to meet the operating requirements recommended in this special study. The scope of work includes the following: Determining contaminants, flows, and loadings. Setting effluent quality criteria. Sizing water treatment unit(s). Evaluating non-monetary aspects of alternate treatment processes. Comparing costs of alternate treatment processes. Recommending the mobile water treatment plant design criteria.

  2. Nuclear waste treatment program. Annual report for FY 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, J.A. (ed.)

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear waste management-related goals are: (1) to ensure that waste management is not an obstacle to the further deployment of light-water reactors (LWR) and the closure of the nuclear fuel cycle and (2) to fulfill its institutional responsibility for providing safe storage and disposal of existing and future nuclear wastes. As part of its approach to achieving these goals, the Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action of DOE established what is now called the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program (NWTP) at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) during the second half of FY 1982. To support DOE's attainment of its goals, the NWTP is to provide (1) documented technology necessary for the design and operation of nuclear waste treatment facilities by commercial enterprises as part of a licensed waste management system and (2) problem-specific treatment approaches, waste form and treatment process adaptations, equipment designs, and trouble-shooting assistance, as required, to treat existing wastes. This annual report describes progress during FY 1985 toward meeting these two objectives. The detailed presentation is organized according to the task structure of the program.

  3. Cyanide treatment options in coke plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minak, H.P.; Lepke, P. [Krupp Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper discusses the formation of cyanides in coke oven gas and describes and compares waste processing options. These include desulfurization by aqueous ammonia solution, desulfurization using potash solution, desulfurization in oxide boxes, decomposition of NH{sub 3} and HCN for gas scrubbing. Waste water treatment methods include chemical oxidation, precipitation, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, and biological treatment. It is concluded that biological treatment is the most economical process, safe in operation and requires a minimum of manpower.

  4. Maraging superalloys and heat treatment processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korenko, Michael K. (Wexford, PA); Gelles, David S. (W. Richland, WA); Thomas, Larry E. (Richland, WA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Described herein are nickel-chromium-iron maraging, gamma prime strengthened superalloys containing about 18 to 25 weight percent nickel, about 4 to 8 weight percent chromium, gamma prime forming elements such as aluminum and/or titanium, and a solid solution strengthening element, such as molybdenum. After heat treatment, which includes at least one ausaging treatment and at least one maraging treatment, a microstructure containing gamma prime phase and decomposed Fe-Ni-Cr type martensite is produced.

  5. Tolerance doses for treatment planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyman, J.T.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data for the tolerance of normal tissues or organs to (low-LET) radiation has been compiled from a number of sources which are referenced at the end of this document. This tolerance dose data are ostensibly for uniform irradiation of all or part of an organ, and are for either 5% (TD/sub 5/) or 50% (TD/sub 50/) complication probability. The ''size'' of the irradiated organ is variously stated in terms of the absolute volume or the fraction of the organ volume irradiated, or the area or the length of the treatment field. The accuracy of these data is questionable. Much of the data represents doses that one or several experienced therapists have estimated could be safely given rather than quantitative analyses of clinical observations. Because these data have been obtained from multiple sources with possible different criteria for the definition of a complication, there are sometimes different values for what is apparently the same endpoint. The data from some sources shows a tendancy to be quantized in 5 Gy increments. This reflects the size of possible round off errors. It is believed that all these data have been accumulated without the benefit of 3-D dose distributions and therefore the estimates of the size of the volume and/or the uniformity of the irradiation may be less accurate than is now possible. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    August 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality This report documents the results of an independent oversight review of...

  7. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2013 May 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight...

  8. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality This report documents the results of an independent oversight review of...

  9. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2013 March 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight...

  10. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    October 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality This report documents the results of an independent review of selected...

  11. Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - Dangerous Waste Treatment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - Dangerous Waste Treatment Storage Disposal Facility New Permit Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web...

  12. ORISE: REAC/TS Radiation Treatment Medications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Treatment Medications The Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) is a valuable resource in the use of drug therapies to treat radiation exposure. REACTS...

  13. Independent Oversight Review, Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    April 2013 Review of Radiation Protection Program Implementation at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project of the Idaho Site This report documents an independent review of...

  14. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Engineering Activities and Tank Farm Operations HIAR-HANFORD-2014-01-13 This Independent Oversight Activity Report documents...

  15. Pyrochemical Treatment of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. M. Goff; K. L. Howden; G. M. Teske; T. A. Johnson

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last 10 years, pyrochemical treatment of spent nuclear fuel has progressed from demonstration activities to engineering-scale production operations. As part of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative within the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology, pyrochemical treatment operations are being performed as part of the treatment of fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II at the Idaho National Laboratory. Integral to these treatment operations are research and development activities that are focused on scaling further the technology, developing and implementing process improvements, qualifying the resulting high-level waste forms, and demonstrating the overall pyrochemical fuel cycle.

  16. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record, Waste Treatment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The review was conducted August 18-28, 2014. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - December 2014 More Documents &...

  17. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record, Waste Treatment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    tables. The review was conducted June 2-19, 2014. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - December 2014 More Documents &...

  18. Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Construction Quality Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Construction Quality Review Dates of Activity 02142011 - 02172011 Report Preparer Joseph...

  19. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Plant - August 2011 August 2011 Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality This report documents the results of an independent oversight review of...

  20. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2011 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality This report documents the results of an independent oversight review of...

  1. Identifying client-by-treatment interactions in couple therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castellani, Angela Marie

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Treatment-matching research involves matching clients to the best fitting treatment to enhance overall treatment efficacy. Specific matching hypotheses are supported by superior treatment gains in matched cases over mismatched cases...

  2. A Hybrid Microbial Fuel Cell Membrane Bioreactor with a Conductive Ultrafiltration Membrane Biocathode for Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Hybrid Microbial Fuel Cell Membrane Bioreactor with a Conductive Ultrafiltration Membrane-biocathode microbial fuel cell- membrane bioreactor (MFC-MBR) system was developed to achieve simultaneous wastewater that some of these systems require wastewater aeration. Treatment technologies such as membrane bioreactors

  3. Thermal Treatment of Solid Wastes Using the Electric Arc Furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, W.K.; Turner, P.C.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal waste treatment facility has been developed at the Albany Research Center (ARC) over the past seven years to process a wide range of heterogeneous mixed wastes, on a scale of 227 to 907 kg/h (500 to 2,000 lb/h). The current system includes a continuous feed system, a 3-phase AC, 0.8 MW graphite electrode arc furnace, and a dedicated air pollution control system (APCS) which includes a close-coupled thermal oxidizer, spray cooler, baghouse, and wet scrubber. The versatility of the complete system has been demonstrated during 5 continuous melting campaigns, ranging from 11 to 25 mt (12 to 28 st) of treated wastes per campaign, which were conducted on waste materials such as (a) municipal incinerator ash, (b) simulated low-level radioactive, high combustible-bearing mixed wastes, (c) simulated low-level radioactive liquid tank wastes, (d) heavy metal contaminated soils, and (e) organic-contaminated dredging spoils. In all cases, the glass or slag products readily passed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxicity Characteristic Leachability Program (TCLP) test. Additional studies are currently under way on electric utility wastes, steel and aluminum industry wastes, as well as zinc smelter residues. Thermal treatment of these solid waste streams is intended to produce a metallic product along with nonhazardous glass or slag products.

  4. Croatian refiner meets waste water treatment standards, reduces fines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, A.L. [Krofta Engineering Corp., Lenox, MA (United States); Nikolic, O. [INA Oil Refinery, Rijeka (Croatia)

    1995-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach to waste water treatment at a refinery in Croatia produces effluent that not only meets the region`s regulations for disposal into the Adriatic Sea, but also surpasses the refinery`s specifications for recycling process water. Key to the dramatic reduction in pollutants was the installation of a Sandfloat unit developed by Krofta Engineering Corp. The Sandfloat unit is a dissolved air flotation clarifier that combines flocculation, flotation, and multilayer filtration to produce high-quality effluent. In fact, the effluent from the unit has a lower hydrocarbon concentration than water from the underground wells that supply process water to the refinery. While similar systems have been used for decades in industrial applications, this is the first time a Sandfloat unit has been installed in an oil refinery. The article describes the problem, refinery operations, treatment costs, and effluent recycling.

  5. Produced Water Treatment Using Microbial Fuel Cell Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borole, A. P.; Campbell, R. [Campbell Applied Physics

    2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL has developed a treatment for produced water using a combination of microbial fuel cells and electrosorption. A collaboration between Campbell Applied Physics and ORNL was initiated to further investigate development of the technology and apply it to treatment of field produced water. The project successfully demonstrated the potential of microbial fuel cells to generate electricity from organics in produced water. A steady voltage was continuously generated for several days using the system developed in this study. In addition to the extraction of electrical energy from the organic contaminants, use of the energy at the representative voltage was demonstrated for salts removal or desalination of the produced water. Thus, the technology has potential to remove organic as well as ionic contaminants with minimal energy input using this technology. This is a novel energy-efficient method to treat produced water. Funding to test the technology at larger scale is being pursued to enable application development.

  6. Carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, G.A.; Schildbach, M.A.

    1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals is provided, in steps including, heating a part formed of boron, chromium, hafnium, molybdenum, niobium, tantalum, titanium, tungsten or zirconium, or alloys thereof, in an evacuated chamber and then introducing reaction gases including nitrogen and hydrogen, either in elemental or water vapor form, which react with a source of elemental carbon to form carbon-containing gaseous reactants which then react with the metal part to form the desired surface layer. Apparatus for practicing the method is also provided, in the form of a carbide and carbonitride surface treatment system including a reaction chamber, a source of elemental carbon, a heating subassembly and a source of reaction gases. Alternative methods of providing the elemental carbon and the reaction gases are provided, as well as methods of supporting the metal part, evacuating the chamber with a vacuum subassembly and heating all of the components to the desired temperature. 5 figs.

  7. Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS) is an automated, non-destructive inspection system based on positron annihilation, which characterizes a material's in situatomic-level properties during the manufacturing processes of formation, solidification, and heat treatment. Simultaneous manufacturing and quality monitoring now are possible. Learn more about the lab's project on our facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  8. Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS) is an automated, non-destructive inspection system based on positron annihilation, which characterizes a material's in situatomic-level properties during the manufacturing processes of formation, solidification, and heat treatment. Simultaneous manufacturing and quality monitoring now are possible. Learn more about the lab's project on our facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  9. Influence of wastewater-treatment effluent on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Influence of wastewater- treatment effluent on concentrations and fluxes of solutes in the Bush of treated effluents from wastewater-treatment plants (WWTPs) will increasingly affect the chemical biological processes associated with very low flow conditions, such as denitrification and sulfate reduction

  10. Guide to treatment technology for contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tran, H.; Aylward, R.

    1992-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a guide for the screening of alternative treatment technologies for contaminated soils. The contents of this guide are organized into: 1. Introduction, II. Utilizing the table, III. Tables: Contamination Versus Technology, TV. Contaminant Waste Groups, and V. References. The four Contaminations Versus Technology tables are designed to identify the effectiveness and/or potential applicability of technologies to some or all compounds within specific waste groups. The tables also present limitations and special use considerations for the particular treatment technology. The phase of development of the technology is also included in the table. The phases are: Available, Innovative, and Emerging technologies. The technologies presented in this guide are organized according to the method of treatment. The four (4) treatment methods are Biological, Solidification/Stabilization, Thermal, and Chemical/Physical Treatment. There are several processing methods; some are well developed and proven, and others are in the development stage.

  11. Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (1 slide) Project Objective Develop and demonstrate advanced hybrid industrial water treatment system that will... Cost-effectively enable at least 50% water reuse...

  12. Ultra Efficient Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power System - Fact...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    metal treatment and other industrial processes. Excess reducing gas can be utilized in a low-temperature, bottoming cycle fuel cell incorporated into the CHHP system to increase...

  13. Treatment Facility F: Accelerated Removal and Validation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, J.J.; Buettner, M.H.; Carrigan, C.R. [and others

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Accelerated Removal and Validation (ARV) phase of remediation at the Treatment Facility F (TFF) site at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was designed to accelerate removal of gasoline from the site when compared to normal, single shift, pump-and-treat operations. The intent was to take advantage of the in-place infrastructure plus the increased underground temperatures resulting from the Dynamic Underground Stripping Demonstration Project (DUSDP). Operations continued 24-hours (h) per day between October 4 and December 12, 1993. Three contaminant removal rate enhancement approaches were explored during the period of continuous operation. First, we tried several configurations of the vapor pumping system to maximize the contaminant removal rate. Second, we conducted two brief trials of air injection into the lower steam zone. Results were compared with computer models, and the process was assessed for contaminant removal rate enhancement. Third, we installed equipment to provide additional electrical heating of contaminated low-permeability soil. Four new electrodes were connected into the power system. Diagnostic capabilities at the TFF site were upgraded so that we could safely monitor electrical currents, soil temperatures, and water treatment system processes while approximately 300 kW of electrical energy was being applied to the subsurface.

  14. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into the Applicability of the CIRS Solar Aquatic Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into the Applicability of the CIRS Solar Aquatic Wastewater Treatment System at UBC Farm Noah Joy Peter Lillos Steven Lam An Investigation into the Applicability of the CIRS Solar Aquatic Wastewater Treatment System at UBC Farm Authors of a project/report. #12;ii ABSTRACT The UBC Farm is currently looking for a sustainable solution to treat

  15. In situ scanning tunneling microscope tip treatment device for spin polarization imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, An-Ping [Oak Ridge, TN; Jianxing, Ma [Oak Ridge, TN; Shen, Jian [Knoxville, TN

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A tip treatment device for use in an ultrahigh vacuum in situ scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The device provides spin polarization functionality to new or existing variable temperature STM systems. The tip treatment device readily converts a conventional STM to a spin-polarized tip, and thereby converts a standard STM system into a spin-polarized STM system. The tip treatment device also has functions of tip cleaning and tip flashing a STM tip to high temperature (>2000.degree. C.) in an extremely localized fashion. Tip coating functions can also be carried out, providing the tip sharp end with monolayers of coating materials including magnetic films. The device is also fully compatible with ultrahigh vacuum sample transfer setups.

  16. B Plant treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) units inspection plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, T.G.

    1996-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This inspection plan is written to meet the requirements of WAC 173-303 for operations of a TSD facility. Owners/operators of TSD facilities are required to inspection their facility and active waste management units to prevent and/or detect malfunctions, discharges and other conditions potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. A written plan detailing these inspection efforts must be maintained at the facility in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC), Chapter 173-303, ``Dangerous Waste Regulations`` (WAC 173-303), a written inspection plan is required for the operation of a treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) facility and individual TSD units. B Plant is a permitted TSD facility currently operating under interim status with an approved Part A Permit. Various operational systems and locations within or under the control of B Plant have been permitted for waste management activities. Included are the following TSD units: Cell 4 Container Storage Area; B Plant Containment Building; Low Level Waste Tank System; Organic Waste Tank System; Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW) Tank System; Low Level Waste Concentrator Tank System. This inspection plan complies with the requirements of WAC 173-303. It addresses both general TSD facility and TSD unit-specific inspection requirements. Sections on each of the TSD units provide a brief description of the system configuration and the permitted waste management activity, a summary of the inspection requirements, and details on the activities B Plant uses to maintain compliance with those requirements.

  17. Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Munsterman, Erwin Henh (Amsterdam, NL); Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus (Amsterdam, NL); Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius (Amsterdam, NL)

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

  18. Sour gas injection for use with in situ heat treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX)

    2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for providing acidic gas to a subsurface formation is described herein. The method may include providing heat from one or more heaters to a portion of a subsurface formation; producing fluids that include one or more acidic gases from the formation using a heat treatment process. At least a portion of one of the acidic gases may be introduced into the formation, or into another formation, through one or more wellbores at a pressure below a lithostatic pressure of the formation in which the acidic gas is introduced.

  19. Waste treatment and metal recovery at the Robbins Company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, P.

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Robbins Company, of Attleboro, Massachusetts, a medium-sized jewelry manufacturing and plating company, installed a new wastewater treatment and metal recovery system, which forms a closed-loop, completed in February, 1988. The company now generates very small quantities of hazardous wastes non-contact cooling water from the annealing furnaces, and intends to complete it`s water conservation program by installing one or more chillers on the furnaces. Since 1986, chemical usage has dropped 81.8%, hazardous waste generation 89% and water usage by 47.7%, generating an annual savings of over $71,000.

  20. Radiation delivery system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sorensen, Scott A. (Overland Park, KS); Robison, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig M. V. (Jemez Springs, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation delivery system and method are described. The system includes a treatment configuration such as a stent, balloon catheter, wire, ribbon, or the like, a portion of which is covered with a gold layer. Chemisorbed to the gold layer is a radiation-emitting self-assembled monolayer or a radiation-emitting polymer. The radiation delivery system is compatible with medical catheter-based technologies to provide a therapeutic dose of radiation to a lesion following an angioplasty procedure.

  1. Technical area status report for chemical/physical treatment. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, C.H. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schwinkendorf, W.E. [BDM Federal, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) was established by the Department of Energy (DOE) to direct and coordinate waste management and site remediation programs and activities throughout the DOE Complex. The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) was created by the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) to develop, deploy, and complete appropriate technologies for the treatment of an DOE low-level mixed waste (LLMW). The MWIP mission includes development of strategies related to enhanced waste form production, improvements to and testing of the EM-30 baseline flowsheet for mixed waste treatment, programmatic oversight for ongoing technical projects, and specific technical tasks related to the site specific Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA). The MWIP has established five Technical Support Groups (TSGs) based on primary functional areas of the Mixed Waste Treatment Plant) identified by EM-30. These TSGs are: (1) Front-End Waste Handling, (2) Chemical/Physical Treatment, (3) Waste Destruction and Stabilization, (4) Second-stage Destruction and Offgas Treatment, and (5) Final Waste Forms. The focus of this document is the Chemical/Physical Treatment System (CPTS). The CPTS performs the required pretreatment and/or separations on the waste streams passing through the system for discharge to the environment or efficient downstream processing. Downstream processing can include all system components except Front-End Waste Handling. The primary separations to be considered by the CPTS are: (1) removal of suspended and dissolved solids from aqueous and liquid organic streams, (2) separation of water from organic liquids, (3) treatment of wet and dry solids, including separation into constituents as required, for subsequent thermal treatment and final form processing, (4) mercury removal and control, and (5) decontamination of equipment and waste classified as debris.

  2. Mixed and Low-Level Treatment Facility Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix contains the mixed and low-level waste engineering design files (EDFS) documenting each low-level and mixed waste stream investigated during preengineering studies for Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. The EDFs provide background information on mixed and low-level waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. They identify, characterize, and provide treatment strategies for the waste streams. Mixed waste is waste containing both radioactive and hazardous components as defined by the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, respectively. Low-level waste is waste that contains radioactivity and is not classified as high-level waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or 11e(2) byproduct material as defined by DOE 5820.2A. Test specimens of fissionable material irradiated for research and development only, and not for the production of power or plutonium, may be classified as low-level waste, provided the concentration of transuranic is less than 100 nCi/g. This appendix is a tool that clarifies presentation format for the EDFS. The EDFs contain waste stream characterization data and potential treatment strategies that will facilitate system tradeoff studies and conceptual design development. A total of 43 mixed waste and 55 low-level waste EDFs are provided.

  3. Paracetamol poisoning and its treatment in man 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pakravan, Nasrin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paracetamol is the most common drug taken in overdose in the UK. Although it has been used in overdose for about 50 years, there are many aspects of its toxicity and treatment that are not fully understood. In this thesis ...

  4. Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    February 2012 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project Operational Awareness Review HIAR-RL-2012-02-27 The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within...

  5. WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J.P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waters from Green River Oil Shale," Chem. and Ind. , 1. ,Effluents from In-Situ oil Shale Processing," in Proceedingsin the Treatment of Oil Shale Retort Waters," in Proceedings

  6. Thermal treatment of organic radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrubasik, A.; Stich, W. [NUKEM GmbH, Alzenau (Germany)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The organic radioactive waste which is generated in nuclear and isotope facilities (power plants, research centers and other) must be treated in order to achieve a waste form suitable for long term storage and disposal. Therefore the resulting waste treatment products should be stable under influence of temperature, time, radioactivity, chemical and biological activity. Another reason for the treatment of organic waste is the volume reduction with respect to the storage costs. For different kinds of waste, different treatment technologies have been developed and some are now used in industrial scale. The paper gives process descriptions for the treatment of solid organic radioactive waste of low beta/gamma activity and alpha-contaminated solid organic radioactive waste, and the pyrolysis of organic radioactive waste.

  7. WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J.P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    III, "Method of Breaking Shale Oil-Water Emulsion," U. S.and Biological Treatment of Shale Oil Retort Water, DraftPA (1979). H. H. Peters, Shale Oil Waste Water Recovery by

  8. Economies of size in municipal water treatment technologies: Texas lower Rio Grande Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Christopher Neil

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    .e., public), a 0.0% risk rate is applied for comparison purposes. Under the State of Texas Water Code chapter 67, a political subdivision may be contracted by the private entity to administrate the bonds, resulting in a virtually risk free bond (Texas... cost of $0.06 per kWh. life for the facility and distribution system, as well as an 8.0% discount rate. They concluded that economies of size do exist for the combined water treatment facility and distribution system, but individually, the treatment...

  9. The effects of surfactant concentration on grease removal by air flotation in municipal sewage treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Larry Eugene

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systems, high grease loading contributes to the formation of scum blankets which reduce operating efficiency and may lead to expensive shut-down and clean-out operations. Normally, influent wastewater to biological treatment systems with oil and grease... are forcing engineers to take a closer look at specif1c aspects of wastewater treatment. One such aspect is that of remov1ng oil and grease from wastewater streams. The average ind1vidual is well aware of the effects of discharging oily substances...

  10. Hydrophilization of Liquid Surfaces by Plasma Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor Multanen; Gilad Chaniel; Roman Grynyov; Ron Yosef Loew; Naor Siany; Edward Bormashenko

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of the cold radiofrequency air plasma on the surface properties of silicone oils (polydimethylsiloxane) was studied. Silicone oils of various molecular masses were markedly hydrophilized by the cold air plasma treatment. A pronounced decrease of the apparent water contact angles was observed after plasma treatment. A general theoretical approach to the calculation of apparent contact angles is proposed. The treated liquid surfaces demonstrated hydrophobic recovery. The characteristic time of the hydrophobic recovery grew with the molecular mass of the silicone oil.

  11. Evolving treatment plan quality criteria from institution-specific experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruan, D.; Shao, W.; DeMarco, J.; Tenn, S.; King, C.; Low, D.; Kupelian, P.; Steinberg, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The dosimetric aspects of radiation therapy treatment plan quality are usually evaluated and reported with dose volume histogram (DVH) endpoints. For clinical practicality, a small number of representative quantities derived from the DVH are often used as dose endpoints to summarize the plan quality. National guidelines on reference values for such quantities for some standard treatment approaches are often used as acceptance criteria to trigger treatment plan review. On the other hand, treatment prescription and planning approaches specific to each institution warrants the need to report plan quality in terms of practice consistency and with respect to institution-specific experience. The purpose of this study is to investigate and develop a systematic approach to record and characterize the institution-specific plan experience and use such information to guide the design of plan quality criteria. In the clinical setting, this approach will assist in (1) improving overall plan quality and consistency and (2) detecting abnormal plan behavior for retrospective analysis. Methods: The authors propose a self-evolving methodology and have developed an in-house prototype software suite that (1) extracts the dose endpoints from a treatment plan and evaluates them against both national standard and institution-specific criteria and (2) evolves the statistics for the dose endpoints and updates institution-specific criteria. Results: The validity of the proposed methodology was demonstrated with a database of prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy cases. As more data sets are accumulated, the evolving institution-specific criteria can serve as a reliable and stable consistency measure for plan quality and reveals the potential use of the ''tighter'' criteria than national standards or projected criteria, leading to practice that may push to shrink the gap between plans deemed acceptable and the underlying unknown optimality. Conclusions: The authors have developed a rationale to improve plan quality and consistency, by evolving the plan quality criteria from institution-specific experience, complementary to national standards. The validity of the proposed method was demonstrated with a prototype system on prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) cases. The current study uses direct and indirect DVH endpoints for plan quality evaluation, but the infrastructure proposed here applies to general outcome data as well. The authors expect forward evaluation together with intelligent update based on evidence-based learning, which will evolve the clinical practice for improved efficiency, consistency, and ultimately better treatment outcome.

  12. In situ treatment of mixed contaminants in groundwater: Application of zero-valence iron and palladized iron for treatment of groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene and technetium-99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korte, N.E.; Muck, M.T.; Zutman, J.L.; Schlosser, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Liang, L.; Gu, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Siegrist, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Houk, T.C. [Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, OH (United States); Fernando, Q. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this portion of the project was to package one or more unit processes, as modular components in vertical and/or horizontal recirculation wells, for treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) [e.g., trichloroethene (TCE)] and radionuclides [e.g., technetium (Tc){sup 99}] in groundwater. The project was conceived, in part, because the coexistence of chlorinated hydrocarbons and radionuclides has been identified as the predominant combination of groundwater contamination in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Thus, a major component of the project was the development of modules that provide simultaneous treatment of hydrocarbons and radionuclides. The project objectives included: (1) evaluation of horizontal wells for inducing groundwater recirculation, (2) development of below-ground treatment modules for simultaneous removal of VOCs and radionuclides, and (3) demonstration of a coupled system (treatment module with recirculation well) at a DOE field site where both VOCs and radionuclides are present in the groundwater. This report is limited to the innovative treatment aspects of the program. A report on pilot testing of the horizontal recirculation system was the first report of the series (Muck et al. 1996). A comprehensive report that focuses on the engineering, cost and hydrodynamic aspects of the project has also been prepared (Korte et al. 1997a).

  13. Prostate Bed Motion During Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klayton, Tracy; Price, Robert; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Sobczak, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Greenberg, Richard [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Li, Jinsheng; Keller, Lanea; Sopka, Dennis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kutikov, Alexander [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Horwitz, Eric M., E-mail: eric.horwitz@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Conformal radiation therapy in the postprostatectomy setting requires accurate setup and localization of the prostatic fossa. In this series, we report prostate bed localization and motion characteristics, using data collected from implanted radiofrequency transponders. Methods and Materials: The Calypso four-dimensional localization system uses three implanted radiofrequency transponders for daily target localization and real-time tracking throughout a course of radiation therapy. We reviewed the localization and tracking reports for 20 patients who received ultrasonography-guided placement of Calypso transponders within the prostate bed prior to a course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy at Fox Chase Cancer Center. Results: At localization, prostate bed displacement relative to bony anatomy exceeded 5 mm in 9% of fractions in the anterior-posterior (A-P) direction and 21% of fractions in the superior-inferior (S-I) direction. The three-dimensional vector length from skin marks to Calypso alignment exceeded 1 cm in 24% of all 652 fractions with available setup data. During treatment, the target exceeded the 5-mm tracking limit for at least 30 sec in 11% of all fractions, generally in the A-P or S-I direction. In the A-P direction, target motion was twice as likely to move posteriorly, toward the rectum, than anteriorly. Fifteen percent of all treatments were interrupted for repositioning, and 70% of patients were repositioned at least once during their treatment course. Conclusion: Set-up errors and motion of the prostatic fossa during radiotherapy are nontrivial, leading to potential undertreatment of target and excess normal tissue toxicity if not taken into account during treatment planning. Localization and real-time tracking of the prostate bed via implanted Calypso transponders can be used to improve the accuracy of plan delivery.

  14. Treatment of Mixed Wastes via Fixed Bed Gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1998-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the details of research performed under USDOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-96MC33258 to evaluate the ChemChar hazardous waste system for the destruction of mixed wastes, defined as those that contain both RCRA-regulated haz- ardous constituents and radionuclides. The ChemChar gasification system uses a granular carbonaceous char matrix to immobilize wastes and feed them into the gasifier. In the gasifier wastes are subjected to high temperature reducing conditions, which destroy the organic constituents and immobilize radionuclides on the regenerated char. Only about 10 percent of the char is consumed on each pass through the gasifier, and the regenerated char can be used to treat additional wastes. When tested on a 4-inch diameter scale with a continuous feed unit as part of this research, the ChemChar gasification system was found to be effective in destroying RCRA surrogate organic wastes (chlorobenzene, dichloroben- zene, and napht.halene) while retaining on the char RCRA heavy metals (chromium, nickel, lead, and cadmium) as well as a fission product surrogate (cesium) and a plutonium surrogate (cerium). No generation of harmful byproducts was observed. This report describes the design and testing of the ChemChar gasification system and gives the operating procedures to be followed in using the system safely and effectively for mixed waste treatment.

  15. Integrated demonstration of molten salt oxidation with salt recycle for mixed waste treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, P.C.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal, nonflame process that has the inherent capability of completely destroying organic constituents of mixed wastes, hazardous wastes, and energetic materials while retaining inorganic and radioactive constituents in the salt. For this reason, MSO is considered a promising alternative to incineration for the treatment of a variety of organic wastes. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has prepared a facility and constructed an integrated pilot-scale MSO treatment system in which tests and demonstrations are performed under carefully controlled (experimental) conditions. The system consists of a MSO processor with dedicated off-gas treatment, a salt recycle system, feed preparation equipment, and equipment for preparing ceramic final waste forms. This integrated system was designed and engineered based on laboratory experience with a smaller engineering-scale reactor unit and extensive laboratory development on salt recycle and final forms preparation. In this paper we present design and engineering details of the system and discuss its capabilities as well as preliminary process demonstration data. A primary purpose of these demonstrations is identification of the most suitable waste streams and waste types for MSO treatment.

  16. SCADA System Security ECE 478 Network Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water treatment systems; electric power transmission, distribution, and generation; petroleum storage variety of industries including Electric power generation, transmission, and distribution, Environmental. A Human-machine interface allows the operator to view the state of the plant equipment. Dumb terminals

  17. Prevalence and Treatment Management of Oropharyngeal Candidiasis in Cancer Patients: Results of the French Candidoscope Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gligorov, Joseph [APHP Tenon, APREC, University Paris VI, Paris (France); Bastit, Laurent [Centre Frederic Joliot, Rouen (France); Gervais, Honorine [Hopital Saint Antoine, Paris (France); Henni, Mehdi [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Paris (France); Kahila, Widad [Centre Jean Perrin, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Lepille, Daniel [Clinique Chirurgicale Pasteur, Evreux (France); Luporsi, Elisabeth [Centre Alexis Vautrin, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Sasso, Giuseppe [Centre Medical Forcilles, Ferolles-Attily (France); Varette, Charles [Centre Hospitalier Prive Claude Galien, Quincy-sous-Senart (France); Azria, David, E-mail: David.Azria@valdorel.fnclcc.f [Crlc Val d'Aurelle, Inserm U860, Universite Montpellier I, Montpellier (France)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The aim of this pharmaco-epidemiological study was to evaluate the prevalence of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Signs and symptoms of OPC were noted for all patients. Antifungal therapeutic management was recorded in OPC patients. Patients receiving local antifungal treatments were monitored until the end of treatment. Results: Enrolled in the study were 2,042 patients with solid tumor and/or lymphoma treated with chemotherapy and/or another systemic cancer treatment and/or radiotherapy. The overall prevalence of OPC was 9.6% (95% confidence interval, 8.4%-11.0%]in this population. It was most frequent in patients treated with combined chemoradiotherapy (22.0%) or with more than two cytotoxic agents (16.9%). Local antifungal treatments were prescribed in 75.0% of OPC patients as recommended by guidelines. The compliance to treatment was higher in patients receiving once-daily miconazole mucoadhesive buccal tablet (MBT; 88.2%) than in those treated with several daily mouthwashes of amphotericin B (40%) or nystatin (18.8%). Conclusion: OPC prevalence in treated cancer patients was high. Local treatments were usually prescribed as per guidelines. Compliance to local treatments was better with once-daily drugs.

  18. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Low-Pressure Dosing System (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Producido por AgriLife Communications and Marketing, El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M Las publicaciones de Texas AgriLife Extension se pueden encontrar en Internet en: http://AgriLifebookstore.org Los programas educativos de Texas Agri...

  19. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Low-Pressure Dosing System (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Producido por AgriLife Communications and Marketing, El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M Las publicaciones de Texas AgriLife Extension se pueden encontrar en Internet en: http://AgriLifebookstore.org Los programas educativos de Texas Agri...

  20. Applications of Energy Efficiency Technologies in Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, S.; Werner, L.; Wu, Y. Y.; Ganji, A. R.

    "Depending on the level and type of treatment, municipal wastewater treatment (WWT) can be an energy intensive process, constituting a major cost for the municipal governments. According to a 1993 study wastewater treatment plants consume close to 1...

  1. Acid diversion is critical in horizontal gas well treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, S.A. [Chevron USA Production Co., New Orleans, LA (United States); Bui, H.N. [Chevron USA Production Co., Lafayette, LA (United States); Edwards, M.B. [Baker Hughes INTEQ, Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An acid treatment design for a horizontal well in the West Cameron area of the Gulf of Mexico successfully used alternating stages of foamed and nitrified 15% HCl for diversion. The subject well was drilled with a sized-salt fluid system to 3,493-ft MD including a 1,274-ft, 8{1/2}-in. horizontal openhole section. The horizontal openhole section was completed with 1,042 ft of 5-in., 0.008-gauge, 40.60-mesh dual prepack screen. Following placement of the completion assembly, the 10.5-ppg sized salt system used in the horizontal section was dislaced with a 50-bbl, sheared, high-viscosity push pill, followed by 50 bbl of 10.0-ppg filtered, NaCl solution. A 50-bbl, 15% HCl acid breaker solution was then spotted across the formation and allowed to soak on the remaining filter cake for 6 hours. The breaker was then circulated out with 9.5-ppg NaCl brine. Chlorides were monitored to determine the relative amount of filter cake cleanup. This paper reviews the operation and resulting performance of this treatment.

  2. Waste Treatment Technology Process Development Plan For Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.

    2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Process Development Plan is to summarize the objectives and plans for the technology development activities for an alternative path for disposition of the recycle stream that will be generated in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility (LAW Recycle). This plan covers the first phase of the development activities. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to recycle it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be concentrated by evaporation and returned to the LAW vitrification facility. Because this stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are also problematic for the glass waste form, they accumulate in the Recycle stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and reducing the halides in the Recycle is a key component of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, this stream does not have a proven disposition path, and resolving this gap becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and to develop a process that will remove radionuclides from this stream and allow its diversion to another disposition path, greatly decreasing the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. The origin of this LAW Recycle stream will be from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover or precipitates of scrubbed components (e.g. carbonates). The soluble components are mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet, and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, causing uncertainty in its composition, particularly the radionuclide content. This plan will provide an estimate of the likely composition and the basis for it, assess likely treatment technologies, identify potential disposition paths, establish target treatment limits, and recommend the testing needed to show feasibility. Two primary disposition options are proposed for investigation, one is concentration for storage in the tank farms, and the other is treatment prior to disposition in the Effluent Treatment Facility. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in high concentration in this LAW Recycle stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc), a long-lived radionuclide with a half-life of 210,000 years. Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass, which will be disposed in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Because {sup 99}Tc has a very long half-life and is highly mobile, it is the largest dose contributor to the Performance Assessment (PA) of the IDF. Other radionuclides that are also expected to be in appreciable concentration in the LAW Recycle are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am. The concentrations of these radionuclides in this stream will be much lower than in the LAW, but they will still be higher than limits for some of the other disposition pathways currently available. Although the baseline process will recycle this stream to the Pretreatment Facility, if the LAW facility begins operation first, this stream will not have a disposition path internal to WTP. One potential solution is to return the stream to the tank farms where it can be evaporated in the 242-A evaporator, or perhaps deploy an auxiliary evaporator to concentrate it prior to return to the tank farms. In either case, testing is needed to evaluat

  3. Double barrier system for an in situ conversion process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKinzie, Billy John [Houston, TX; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; Cowan, Kenneth Michael [Sugar land, TX; Deeg, Wolfgang Friedrich Johann [Houston, TX; Wong, Sau-Wai [Rijswijk, NL

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A barrier system for a subsurface treatment area is described. The barrier system includes a first barrier formed around at least a portion of the subsurface treatment area. The first barrier is configured to inhibit fluid from exiting or entering the subsurface treatment area. A second barrier is formed around at least a portion of the first barrier. A separation space exists between the first barrier and the second barrier.

  4. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    River Protection, to conduct system-by-system HAs as part of developing the documented safety analysis for the WTP LAW, Balance of Facility, and Analytical Laboratory nuclear...

  5. Independent Activity Report, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Protection (ORP), to conduct system-by-system HAs as part of developing the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the WTP LAW, Balance of Facility, and Analytical Laboratory...

  6. additional thermomechanical treatment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Treatments Subsequent to Addition of the CiteSeer Summary: The development and testing of word-retrieval treatments for aphasia has generally focused on approaches that...

  7. PH/sub 3/ treatment for polymer stabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymers are stabilized against oxidative degradation by treatment with phosphine gas. The treatment can be used in situ on polymeric components already in use.

  8. DOE Selects Seven Contractors for Waste Treatment Basic Ordering...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Selects Seven Contractors for Waste Treatment Basic Ordering Agreements DOE Selects Seven Contractors for Waste Treatment Basic Ordering Agreements June 4, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis...

  9. antidepressant treatment response: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the treatment of MDD, that could improve treatment efficacy and reduce health care Reilly, James P. 115 Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response...

  10. affect treatment response: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the treatment of MDD, that could improve treatment efficacy and reduce health care Reilly, James P. 111 Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response...

  11. Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than 6 million in cost savings, 3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin...

  12. CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities This document explores...

  13. Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment. Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment. Abstract: Non-toxic magnetic...

  14. Three-Dimensional Thermal Tomography Advances Cancer Treatment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Three-Dimensional Thermal Tomography Advances Cancer Treatment Technology available for licensing: A 3D technique to detect early skin changes due to radiation treatment in breast...

  15. alternative thermomechanical treatments: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Treatment of Nickel-Titanium Instruments Ya Zheng, Yufeng 2 Casimir force: an alternative treatment CERN Preprints Summary: The Casimir force between two parallel...

  16. Employee-Driven Initiative Increases Treatment Capacity, Reduces...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Employee-Driven Initiative Increases Treatment Capacity, Reduces Clean Water Demands Employee-Driven Initiative Increases Treatment Capacity, Reduces Clean Water Demands June 30,...

  17. Final Hanford Offsite Waste Shipment Leaves Idaho Treatment Facility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Final Hanford Offsite Waste Shipment Leaves Idaho Treatment Facility Final Hanford Offsite Waste Shipment Leaves Idaho Treatment Facility August 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Idaho...

  18. adults treatment results: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California eScholarship Repository Summary: alcohol use disorders. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment,treatment of the older alcoholic patient. American Journal of Drug and...

  19. acne treatment outcome: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of change University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: in substance abuse treatment. Drug and alcohol dependence,abuse treatment outcomes. Journal of Studies on...

  20. adults initiating treatment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California eScholarship Repository Summary: alcohol use disorders. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment,treatment of the older alcoholic patient. American Journal of Drug and...

  1. assess treatment effect: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    treatment effects Niebur, Ernst 11 Functional Assessment for a Proposed Stormwater Treatment Wetland. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Urbanization can...

  2. Treasury, Energy Announce Guidance for Tax Treatment of Smart...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Treasury, Energy Announce Guidance for Tax Treatment of Smart Grid Investment Grants Treasury, Energy Announce Guidance for Tax Treatment of Smart Grid Investment Grants March 10,...

  3. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Achieves Impressive Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Achieves Impressive Safety and Production Marks Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Achieves Impressive Safety and Production Marks June...

  4. Idaho Waste Treatment Facility Improves Worker Safety and Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Treatment Facility Improves Worker Safety and Efficiency, Saves Taxpayer Dollars Idaho Waste Treatment Facility Improves Worker Safety and Efficiency, Saves Taxpayer Dollars...

  5. Coalbed methane produced water management guide treatment and discharge to surface waters: Black Warrior Basin, Alabama. Final report, April 1991-May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, H.A.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To assist coalbed methane in their efforts to manage produced waters in an environmentally acceptable manner, GRI, in cooperation with the member companies of the Coalbed Methane Association of Alabama, developed a guidance manual that presents the state-of-the-art methodology for managing Black Warrior Basin produced water through the use of treatment ponds and National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits. Six treatment pond systems were studied to develop information for the manual. Topics included in the manual are produced water characteristics, NPDES permit requirements, sample collection and testing, pond based treatment methods, treatment pond management, and process troubleshooting.

  6. Oxidative particle mixtures for groundwater treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegrist, Robert L. (Boulder, CO); Murdoch, Lawrence C. (Clemson, SC)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a method and a composition of a mixture for degradation and immobilization of contaminants in soil and groundwater. The oxidative particle mixture and method includes providing a material having a minimal volume of free water, mixing at least one inorganic oxidative chemical in a granular form with a carrier fluid containing a fine grained inorganic hydrophilic compound and injecting the resulting mixture into the subsurface. The granular form of the inorganic oxidative chemical dissolves within the areas of injection, and the oxidative ions move by diffusion and/or advection, therefore extending the treatment zone over a wider area than the injection area. The organic contaminants in the soil and groundwater are degraded by the oxidative ions, which form solid byproducts that can sorb significant amounts of inorganic contaminants, metals, and radionuclides for in situ treatment and immobilization of contaminants. The method and composition of the oxidative particle mixture for long-term treatment and immobilization of contaminants in soil and groundwater provides for a reduction in toxicity of contaminants in a subsurface area of contamination without the need for continued injection of treatment material, or for movement of the contaminants, or without the need for continuous pumping of groundwater through the treatment zone, or removal of groundwater from the subsurface area of contamination.

  7. Library System Library System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    Library System #12;Library System 5150 Anthony Wayne Drive David Adamany Undergraduate Library that for the current fiscal year, we've been given an additional $600,000 for our library materials budget. We're very subscriptions. The Wayne State University Libraries are deeply committed to providing our faculty and students

  8. A review of treatment technologies for MTBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, D. [Groundwater Technology, Inc., Norwood, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Available treatment technologies for methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) contamination in soil, groundwater, and recovered groundwater are reviewed and assessed. MTBE contamination is becoming an important issue due to the increasing prevalence and regulation of this gasoline additive. In addition, MTBE is more soluble and more mobile in groundwater than most hydrocarbons, so it is usually the first gasoline constituent to reach sensitive receptors. Treatment of MTBE is complicated by its Henry`s constant, which is lower than most other gasoline constituents. Furthermore, evidence of biodegradability of MTBE is mixed, and MTBE does not degrade rapidly abiotically. Groundwater pumping is usually employed to contain and collect MTBE-contaminated groundwater, often successfully because of its high aqueous solubility. Air sparging/soil vapor extraction is also successfully employed to treat MTBE, but its effectiveness is reduced by the low Henry`s constant of MTBE. Sparging and other aerobic bioremediation approaches are hampered by the poor biodegradability of MTBE. Oxidation technologies, such as ozone injection, hold promise for rapid in situ remediation of MTBE. Treatment of recovered groundwater contaminated with MTBE is also problematic. MTBE adsorbs poorly to granular activated carbon; advanced oxidation processes are effective on MTBE, but entail high capital and operating costs; bioreactors are of questionable effectiveness on MTBE. Air stripping is usually the most cost-effective treatment technology for MTBE so long as the off gas from the air stripper can be discharged without treatment. However, off gas treatment is expensive, so groundwater is sometimes heated to reduce the requirement for stripping air.

  9. Sludge treatment facility preliminary siting study for the sludge treatment project (A-13B)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WESTRA, A.G.

    1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates various sites in the 100 K area and 200 areas of Hanford for locating a treatment facility for sludge from the K Basins. Both existing facilities and a new standalone facility were evaluated. A standalone facility adjacent to the AW Tank Farm in the 200 East area of Hanford is recommended as the best location for a sludge treatment facility.

  10. Universal Access to HIV Treatment versus Universal `Test and Treat': Transmission, Drug Resistance & Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blower, Sally

    Universal Access to HIV Treatment versus Universal `Test and Treat': Transmission, Drug Resistance a universal `test and treat' (T&T) strategy to try to eliminate HIV in SA; treatment reduces infectivity in need or not. This would require treating 5 million individuals almost immediately and providing

  11. PHYSICS CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DESIGN OF NCSX1 D.A. Monticello, G.Y. Fu, R. Goldston, L.P. Ku, H. Mynick, R. Nazikian, G. Neilson,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    state operation without the need for current drive (with its large recirculating power requirement fixed and the optimizer is requested to find an solution whose surface transform is different from this procedure. The optimizer strategy that produced this configuration asked for 40% of the transform to c

  12. TREATMENT OF PRODUCED OIL AND GAS WATERS WITH SURFACTANT-MODIFIED ZEOLITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn E. Katz; R.S. Bowman; E.J. Sullivan

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. It is by some estimates the largest single waste stream in the country, aside from nonhazardous industrial wastes. Characteristics of produced water include high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component, and chemicals added during the oil-production process. While most of the produced water is disposed via reinjection, some must be treated to remove organic constituents before the water is discharged. Current treatment options are successful in reducing the organic content; however, they cannot always meet the levels of current or proposed regulations for discharged water. Therefore, an efficient, cost-effective treatment technology is needed. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been used successfully to treat contaminated ground water for organic and inorganic constituents. In addition, the low cost of natural zeolites makes their use attractive in water-treatment applications. This report summarizes the work and results of this four-year project. We tested the effectiveness of surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) for removal of BTEX with batch and column experiments using waters with BTEX concentrations that are comparable to those of produced waters. The data from our experimental investigations showed that BTEX sorption to SMZ can be described by a linear isotherm model, and competitive effects between compounds were not significant. The SMZ can be readily regenerated using air stripping. We field-tested a prototype SMZ-based water treatment system at produced water treatment facilities and found that the SMZ successfully removes BTEX from produced waters as predicted by laboratory studies. When compared to other existing treatment technologies, the cost of the SMZ system is very competitive. Furthermore, the SMZ system is relatively compact, does not require the storage of potentially hazardous chemicals, and could be readily adapted to an automated system.

  13. Radioactive waste treatment technologies and environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HORVATH, Jan; KRASNY, Dusan [JAVYS, PLc. - Nuclear and Decommisioning Company, PLc. (Slovakia)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radioactive waste treatment and conditioning are the most important steps in radioactive waste management. At the Slovak Electric, plc, a range of technologies are used for the processing of radioactive waste into a form suitable for disposal in near surface repository. These technologies operated by JAVYS, PLc. Nuclear and Decommissioning Company, PLc. Jaslovske Bohunice are described. Main accent is given to the Bohunice Radwaste Treatment and Conditioning Centre, Bituminization plant, Vitrification plant, and Near surface repository of radioactive waste in Mochovce and their operation. Conclusions to safe and effective management of radioactive waste in the Slovak Republic are presented. (authors)

  14. Capital gains tax treatment and the cattleman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major Subject: Agricultural Economics CAPITAL GAINS TAX TREATMENT AND THE CATTLEMAN A Thesis by M I LTDN EDWARD R I STE R Approved as to style and content by: airman o ommi e Dr. Ronald R. Kay Head o D artment Dr. John opkin Mem er Dr. Donald... R. Levi e er Dr. Howard Hesby December 1976 ABSTRACT Capital Gains Tax Treatment and the Catt leman. (December 1976) Milton Edward Rister, B. S. , Texas ASM University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Or. Ronald D. Kay The federal tax...

  15. KKP-waste treatment and disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaser, W.; Grundke, E. [NPP Philippsburg (Germany)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of the radwaste treatment in nuclear power plants in order to minimize the repository volume of the waste and the necessity of minimizing nuclear transports leads to new waste processing methods. The volume reduction effects of the new processing methods compared with the former ones is significant. Various types of operational waste of the two NPP`s in Philippsburg are generated as a result of the different kind of plants and their different mode of operation. Therefore the necessity of adequate waste treatment requires a new concept.

  16. Endovascular Treatment of the Carotid Stump Syndrome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nano, Giovanni; Dalainas, Ilias, E-mail: hdlns@freemail.gr; Casana, Renato; Malacrida, Giovanni; Tealdi, Domenico G. [University of Milan, Istituto Policlinico San Donato-School of Vascular Surgery (Italy)

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In patients with an occluded internal carotid artery, the carotid stump syndrome is a potential source of microemboli that pass through the ipsilateral external carotid artery and the ophthalmic artery to the territory of the middle cerebral artery. Thus, the syndrome is associated with carotid territory symptoms although the internal carotid artery is occluded. Surgical exclusion of the internal carotid artery associated with endarterectomy of the external carotid artery has been described as the gold standard of treatment by many authors. This report is the second case, to our knowledge, of endovascular treatment of the carotid stump syndrome with the use of a stent-graft.

  17. Integrated treatment and handling of highly activated components from nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, K.A.; Kiolbassa, A.; Rose, K.A. [NUKEM GmbH, Alzenau (Germany); Raymont, J.M. Jr. [WasteChem, Houston, TX (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete Underwater Treatment System (UTS) is described for activated/contaminated components of various origins in the nuclear industry. The system comprises different kinds of cutting/compacting equipment: the USC (Underwater Shear/compactor), the SCS (Stellite Corner Shear), the VLS (Velocity Limiter Shear) and the LCS (Light Crusher Shear). Transfer and loading equipment, the STB (Shielded Transfer Bell) provides safe and economic loading of containers with cut components. Operating experience and performance data are presented.

  18. Optimal Siting of Regional Fecal Sludge Treatment Facilities: St. Elizabeth, Jamaica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    Optimal Siting of Regional Fecal Sludge Treatment Facilities: St. Elizabeth, Jamaica Ana Martha- ated with their mismanagement and deterioration. Historically, fecal sludge management has been-9496 2008 134:1 55 CE Database subject headings: Sludge; System analysis; Waste stabilization ponds

  19. Treatment of septage in sludge drying reed beds: a case study on pilot-scale beds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Treatment of septage in sludge drying reed beds: a case study on pilot-scale beds S. Troesch***, A systems by local authorities. This will result in a large increase of the quantity of sludge from septic to treat this sludge because they may have reached their nominal load or they are not so numerous in rural

  20. Description of recommended non-thermal mixed waste treatment technologies: Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains description of the technologies selected for inclusions in the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) Study. The purpose of these descriptions is to provide a more complete description of the INTS technologies. It supplements the summary descriptions of candidate nonthermal technologies that were considered for the INTS.