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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment system monticello" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008

2

MONTICELLO PROJECTS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

09 09 January 2010 Doc. No. S06172 Page 1 1.3 Peripheral Properties (Private and City-Owned) * No land use or supplemental standards compliance issues were observed or reported by LTSM on-site staff. Monticello National Priorities List Sites Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: October 1-December 31, 2009 This report summarizes project status and activities implemented October through December 2009, and provides a schedule of near-term activities for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) sites. This report also includes disposal cell and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection reports, site meteorological data, and a performance summary for the ex situ groundwater treatment system.

3

MONTICELLO PROJECTS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

FFA Quarterly Report: April 1-June 30, 2009 FFA Quarterly Report: April 1-June 30, 2009 July 2009 Doc. No. S05572 Page 1 Monticello National Priorities List Sites Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: April 1-June 30, 2009 This report summarizes project status and activities implemented April through June 2009, and provides a schedule of near-term activities for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) sites. This report also includes disposal cell and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection reports, site meteorological data, and a performance summary for the ex situ groundwater treatment system. 1.0 MMTS Activities/Status 1.1 Disposal Cell and Pond 4 * Monthly and quarterly inspections of the repository identified livestock damage to a

4

Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 More Documents & Publications Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable

5

MONTICELLO NPL SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.. ' \ MONTICELLO NPL SITES FFA QUARTERLY REPORT: October 1 -December 31, 2008 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Dayvault JR 7CJ7 This report summarizes current project status and activities implemented during October tiU'ough December 2008, and provides a schedule of planned near term activities for the Monticello MIII Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) NPL sites. This report also includes repository and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection repmis, site meteorological data, and monitoring summary for tlw ex situ ground water treatment system. 1.0 MMTS Activities/Status Repository and Pond 4 · * Monthly and quarterly inspection of the repository identified no abnormalities (see attached repmis). .

6

MONTICELLO PROJECTS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Facility UDEQ Utah Department of Environmental Quality UDOT Utah Department of Transportation U.S. Department of Energy Monticello NPL Sites FFA Quarterly Report:...

7

MONTICELLO PROJECTS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

July 1-September 30, 2013 July 1-September 30, 2013 October 2013 LMS/MNT/S10439 This page intentionally left blank LMS/MNT/S10439 Monticello, Utah, National Priorities List Sites Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: July 1-September 30, 2013 October 2013 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Monticello NPL Sites FFA Quarterly Report: July-September 2013 October 2013 Doc. No. S10439 Page i Contents Abbreviations .................................................................................................................................. ii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................1 2.0 Monticello Vicinity Properties ...............................................................................................1

8

MONTICELLO PROJECTS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

1 1 July 2011 Doc. No. S07978 Page 1 Monticello, Utah, National Priorities List Sites Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: April 1-June 30, 2011 This report summarizes project status and activities implemented April through June 2011 and provides a schedule for near-term activities at the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) site and the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) located in and near Monticello, Utah. The MMTS and MVP were placed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989 and 1986, respectively. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) implemented remedial actions at the MVP in 1986 and at the MMTS in 1989, to conform to requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability

9

MONTICELLO PROJECTS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

31, 2011 31, 2011 April 2011 Doc. No. S07666 Page 1 Monticello, Utah, National Priorities List Sites Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: January 1-March 31, 2011 This report summarizes project status and activities implemented January through March 2011 and provides a schedule for near-term activities at the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) site and the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) located in and near Monticello, Utah. The MMTS and MVP were placed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989 and 1986, respectively. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) implemented remedial actions at the MVP in 1986 and at the MMTS in 1989, to conform to requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability

10

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update More Documents & Publications Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

11

MONTICELLO NPL SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MONTICELLO NPL SITES MONTICELLO NPL SITES FFA QUARTERLY REPORT: October 1 - December 31, 2007 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Maestas 1.0 MMTS Activities/Status Repository and Pond 4 * Monthly and quarterly inspection of the repository identified no problems that have not been addressed. (inspection checklists attached). * Monthly inspection of Pond 4 identified no unacceptable conditions. * Pond 4 leachate detection and removal systems continue to operate at normal levels (leachate pumping summary attached). * Repository leachate collection and removal system (LCRS) and leachate collection system (LDS) continue to operate at normal and acceptable levels (leachate pumping summary attached). * Portions of repository cover were planted with rabbitbrush seedlings to repair areas

12

Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site More Documents & Publications Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable

13

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Monticello  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Utah Utah Monticello, Utah, Disposal and Processing Sites A CERCLA and/or RCRA Site monticello_map Remediation at the Monticello Sites was conducted in accordance with Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. The sites transferred to the Office of Legacy Management in 2003 and require operation and maintenance of remedial action systems, routine inspection and maintenance, records-related activities, and stakeholder support. For more information about the Monticello sites, view the fact sheet. Site Documents and Links Contact Us Inspection/Sampling Schedule Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Administrative Record Database

14

monticello.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monticello, Utah, Disposal and Processing Sites Monticello, Utah, Disposal and Processing Sites This fact sheet provides information about the Monticello, Utah, Disposal and Processing Sites. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Monticello, Utah, Disposal and Processing Sites Site Descriptions and History The Monticello, Utah, Disposal and Processing Sites are located in and near the city of Monticello, Utah, in southeastern Utah about 250 miles southeast of Salt Lake City, Utah. The 2010 census population of Monticello was about 2,000. In 1942, the Defense Plant Corporation constructed the Monticello mill at a former uranium and vanadium ore-buying station, which had been constructed in 1940. The purpose of the mill was to produce vanadium and uranium for military purposes. Various government

15

monticello.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monticello, Monticello, Utah, Disposal and Processing Sites This fact sheet provides information about the Monticello, Utah, Disposal and Processing Sites. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Monticello, Utah, Processing Sites Disposal and Site Descriptions and History The Monticello, Utah, Disposal and Processing sites are located in and near the city of Monticello, Utah, in southeastern Utah about 250 miles southeast of Salt Lake City, Utah. The 2000 census population of Monticello was about 1,900. In 1942, the Defense Plant Corporation constructed the Monticello mill at a former uranium and vanadium ore-buying station, which had been constructed in 1940. The purpose of the mill was to produce vanadium and uranium for military purposes. Various government agencies operated the mill until 1948, when it was obtained by the U.S. Atomic

16

Monticello National Priorities List (NPL) Sites  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

National Priorities List (NPL) Sites National Priorities List (NPL) Sites Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: January 1 -March 31, 2009 Department of Energy Legacy Management (DOE LM) Site Manager: Jalena Dayvault This repott summarizes current project status and activities implemented during January through March 2009, and prqvides a schedule of planned near term activities for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) NPL sites. This repmt also includes disposal cell and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection reports, site meteorological data, and performance summary for the ex situ ground water treatment system. 1.0 MMTS Activities/Status Disposal Cell and Pond 4 . . * Monthly and quarterly inspection of the repository identified no abnormalities (see

17

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Monticello  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monticello" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

18

Monticello Mill Tailings, Operable Unit III Surface and Ground...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Action activities included millsite dewatering and treatment, initiation of a ground water management policy to prevent use Monticello Mill Tailings Site, Operable Unit III...

19

Completion of the Five-Year Reviews for the Monticello, Utah, Radioactively  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completion of the Five-Year Reviews for the Monticello, Utah, Completion of the Five-Year Reviews for the Monticello, Utah, Radioactively Contaminated Properties Site (Monticello Vicinity Properties) and the Monticello Mill Tailings Site Completion of the Five-Year Reviews for the Monticello, Utah, Radioactively Contaminated Properties Site (Monticello Vicinity Properties) and the Monticello Mill Tailings Site October 16, 2012 - 2:58pm Addthis DOE will continue monitoring excavations in Monticello's streets and will dispose of tailings that are found that had been used for fill around utility lines. Monitoring of groundwater at the former mill site and treatment of contaminated water east of the mill site will also continue. DOE will continue monitoring excavations in Monticello's streets and will dispose of tailings that are found that had been used for fill around

20

monticello_esd.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Explanation of Significant Difference (ESD) to provide the rationale for reevaluating the selected remedy for Operable Unit (OU) III, Surface Water and Ground Water, of the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS). The MMTS, added to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency National Priorities List in 1989, is located in southeast Utah, in and near the City of Monticello in San Juan County. OU III is one of three operable units at the MMTS and addresses surface and groundwater contamination which resulted from past operations at the former mill site. OU III encompasses contaminated groundwater and surface water at and hydraulically downgradient of the Monticello mill site, a former uranium and vanadium-ore processing site.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment system monticello" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

monticello_esd.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

The The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Explanation of Significant Difference (ESD) to provide the rationale for reevaluating the selected remedy for Operable Unit (OU) III, Surface Water and Ground Water, of the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS). The MMTS, added to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency National Priorities List in 1989, is located in southeast Utah, in and near the City of Monticello in San Juan County. OU III is one of three operable units at the MMTS and addresses surface and ground water contamination which resulted from past operations at the former mill site. OU III encompasses contaminated ground water and surface water at and hydraulically downgradient of the Monticello mill site, a former uranium and vanadium-ore processing site. F A C T S H E E T This fact sheet provides information about the Explanation of Significant Difference for Operable

22

MRAP MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MRAP MRAP MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT REPORT May/June 2005 Report Period: May 1 -June 30, 2005 DOE Project Coordinator: Art Kleinrath HIGHLIGHTS DOE constmction, as identified in the Millsite Restoration Plan, was substantially completed on June 3. Seeding of disturbed areas was completed on June 15. MSG DOE completed constmction of the permeable reactive treatment cell and initiated operations in June. The cell is an enhancement to the existing pe1meable reactive ban·ier and was designed to alleviate ground water mounding. MVP Approximately one cubic yard of contaminated material was identified in a City of Monticello excavation near the golf course. This material was transferred to the Temporary Storage Facility located at the DOE Monticello Office.

23

MONTICELLO NPL SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

April 1 - June 30, 2008 April 1 - June 30, 2008 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Maestas This report summarizes current project status, activities implemented during April through June 2008, and provides a schedule of planned near term activities, for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) NPL sites. This report also includes repository and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection results, and site meteorological monitoring data. 1.0 MMTS Activities/Status Repository and Pond 4 * Monthly and quarterly inspection of the repository identified no abnormalities. * Shrub seedlings planted last fall had a poor survival rate. * New damage to shrubs and vole infestation is not evident. * Monthly inspection of Pond 4 identified no abnormalities.

24

monticello_superfund.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AC AC T S H E E T The Monticello Project, except for the final selection of the remedy for surface water and groundwater at the former millsite at Monticello, Utah, was transferred to the U.S. Department of Energy Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program for maintenance of the final remedies on October 1, 2001. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters estab- lished the Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (LTSM) Program at the DOE Grand Junction Office (GJO) to provide stewardship to sites that contain low-level radioactive materials and have no ongoing mission. The LTSM Program is tasked with ensuring compliance with applicable regulations, licenses, and agreements and ensuring that disposal sites remain protective of human health and the environment.

25

MONTICELLO NPL SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

January 1 - March 31, 2008 January 1 - March 31, 2008 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Maestas This report summarizes current project status, activities implemented during January through March 2008, and provides a schedule of planned near term activities, for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) NPL sites. This report also includes repository and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection results, and site meteorological monitoring data. The first semi-annual FFA meeting of 2008 was held at UDEQ in Salt Lake City, Utah, March 26 and 27, 2008. Minutes and action items resulting from that meeting will be prepared under separate cover pending review and concurrence by EPA and UDEQ. Draft minutes and action items are scheduled for submittal by May 1, 2008.

26

Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal...

27

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Monticello  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Utah Utah Monticello, Utah, Disposal and Processing Sites This Site All Sites All LM Quick Search Key Documents and Links All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon Key Documents Fact Sheet Data Validation Package-April 2013 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at Monticello, Utah, Mill Tailings Site Explanation of Significant Difference for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Monticello NPL Sites Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Final Remedial Investigation Addendum/Focused Feasibility Study Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Post-Record of Decision Monitoring Plan Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Water Quality Compliance Strategy Record of Decision for the Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) Site Operable Unit III, Surface Water and Ground Water, Monticello, Utah

28

MSG MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

May/June 2004 May/June 2004 Report Period: May 1- June 30, 2004 DOE Project Coordinator: Art Kleinrath HIGHLIGHTS The Record of Decision for the Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) Site Operable Unit IlL Swface Water and Ground Water, Monticello, Utah, was signed by DOE, UDEQ, and EPA. The last signature was obtained on June 2, 2004, seven days before the scheduled completion date. Monitored Natnral Attenuation is the selected remedy. MRAP The water level in the Pond 4 Leak Detection System is monitored daily; the level is static and pumping is no longer necessary. MVP Approximately 40 cubic yards of bricks and mortar were removed by the owner from the Park Plaza Apartments (MS-00057) and placed near a city utility excavation. The bricks and mortar exceed the soil standard of 5 pCi/g Ra-226 above background and were

29

A comparison of factors impacting on radiation buildup at the Vermont Yankee and Monticello BWRs (boiling-water reactors): Interim report  

SciTech Connect

Design and operating features of the Monticello and Vermont Yankee BWRs were compared in an attempt to explain why shutdown radiation levels at Vermont Yankee were significantly higher than at Monticello. The plants were shown to be similar in many respects, for example, condenser and feedwater system design and materials, condensate treatment system design, feedwater iron and copper concentrations, reactor water piping materials and fabrication techniques, reactor water cleanup system flowrates and equipment type, fuel cycle lengths, and fuel failure history. Differences were noted in core power density, jet pump design, reactor water conductivity, volume of radwaste recycle, and the amount of Stellite bearing materials in the feedwater system. Corrosion films on reactor system decontamination flanges from the two plants also were very different. At Monticello, the film was typical of that observed at other BWRs. The Vermont Yankee film contained significantly higher levels of zinc, chromium, and cobalt. Since reactor water Co-60 concentrations at Monticello were about twice those at Vermont Yankee, the Vermont Yankee corrosion film must exhibit a greater tendency to incorporate Co-60.

Palino, G.F.; Hobart, R.L.; Sawochka, S.G.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell Cover Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell...

31

Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at...

32

Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive...

33

Monticello, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Monticello, Utah: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates...

34

MSG MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

August 2004 August 2004 Report Period: July 1- August 31, 2004 DOE Project Coordinator: Art Kleinrath HIGHLIGHTS Two monitoring wells were installed, which completed the monitoring network for OU III. The following documents have been completed: * · Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Post-Record of Decision Monitoring Plan * Remedial Action/Remedial Design Workplan for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III MRAP DOE is continuing discussions with the City of Monticello concerning adequate restoration of the former millsite. On July 27, the DOE Contracting Officer wrote a letter insisting that the City of Monticello explain its plans to remedy the failure of the restoration of the Monticello Millsite as required under a Cooperative Agreement between the City and DOE.

35

Completion of the Five-Year Reviews for the Monticello, Utah...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completion of the Five-Year Reviews for the Monticello, Utah, Radioactively Contaminated Properties Site (Monticello Vicinity Properties) and the Monticello Mill Tailings Site...

36

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Monticello Mill Site - UT 03  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mill Site - UT 03 Mill Site - UT 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Monticello Mill Site (UT.03) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Monticello, Utah, Disposal and Processing Sites Documents Related to Monticello Mill Site Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Interim Remedial Action Progress Report July 1999-July 2000. GJO-2000-163-TAR. September 2000 U.S. Department of Energy at Grand Junction 2003 Annual Inspection Monticello, Utah November 2003 2005 Annual Inspection of the Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) and Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties Sites December 2005 Office

37

Monticello Mill site Federal Facility Agreement, December 22, 1988  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Monticello Vicinity Properties NPL Site and Monticello Millsite Federal Facility AgreemPage 1 of 36 : Monticello Vicinity Properties NPL Site and Monticello Millsite Federal Facility AgreemPage 1 of 36 EM Home | Regulatory Compliance | Environmental Compliance Agreements Monticello (Utah) Site: Monticello Vicinity Properties NPL Site and Monticello Millsite Federal Facility Agreement Pursuant to CERCLA Section 120, December 22, 1988 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY REGION VIII and THE STATE OF UTAH DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH and THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY IN THE MATTER: UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY MONTICELLO (UTAH) SITE: MONTICELLO VICINITY PROPERTIES NPL SITE and MONTICELLO MILLSITE Federal Facility Agreement pursuant to Section 120 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and ) FEDERAL FACILITY ) AGREEMENT PURSUANT TO

38

MSG MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITIES AGREEMENT REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

FACILITIES AGREEMENT REPORT FACILITIES AGREEMENT REPORT Report Period: October 1- December 31, 2005 DOE Project Coordinator: Ray Plieness HIGHLIGHTS The Final Report-2005 Avian Wetland Surveys at the Monticello Mill Tailings Site and the Final Report-Monticello Mill Tailings Site Macroinvertebrate Sampling for 2005 were transmitted to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality (UDEQ) on December 13. These reports are required under the Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Post-Record of Decision Monitoring Plan, Section 6.0 Biomonitoring Plan, to determine whether selenium levels are present in environmental media at concentrations that could cause adverse effects on ecological receptors. MRAP The draft-flnal2005 Annual Inspection of the Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) and

39

MSG MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

August/September 2005 August/September 2005 Report Period: July 1- September 30, 2005 DOE Project Coordinator: Art Kleinrath HIGHLIGHTS The draft-final Monticello Long-Term Surveillance and Afaintenance Operating Procedures for Swface and Ground Water (Volume III) and draft-final Annual Data Summmy Report for Operable Unit Ill of the Monticello Mill Tailings Site, October 2004 through April 2005 were completed. MRAP The annual inspection of the Monticello Mill Tailings Site and the Monticello Vicinity Properties was conducted on September 14 and 15. Several high priority repair items (see page 3 of this report) were identified during the inspection and were repaired by September 30, 2005. MVP No significant activities to report. FFA Monthly Report July- September 2005

40

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update More Documents & Publications Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium Mill Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment system monticello" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Microsoft Word - Final monticello 10 7 04 JRW.DOC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Audit Operations Audit Operations Audit Report Restoration of the Monticello Mill Site at Monticello, Utah DOE/IG-0665 October 2004 REPORT ON RESTORATION OF THE MONTICELLO MILL SITE AT MONTICELLO, UTAH ______________________________________________________________________ TABLE OF CONTENTS Mill Site Restoration Details of Finding 1 Recommendations and Comments 6 Appendix Objective, Scope, and Methodology 8 MILL SITE RESTORATION ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ Page 1 Details of Findings Background The Department of Energy (Department) issued a Record of

42

Field Projects: Monticello, Utah | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance » Permeable Reactive Barriers » Field Projects: Monticello, Utah Field Projects: Monticello, Utah A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) of zero-valent iron is helping to clean up groundwater at a former uranium and vanadium ore processing mill at Monticello, Utah. LM managed remediation of tailings and tailings-contaminated material at this site. Cleanup of the mill site is regulated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Arsenic, molybdenum, nitrate, selenium, uranium, and vanadium are contaminants of concern in groundwater at the site. An Interim Record of Decision designated emplacement of a PRB hydraulically downgradient of the mill site to remove these contaminants. Results of both laboratory and

43

MSG MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

January/February 2005 January/February 2005 Report Period: January 1 -February 28, 2005 DOE Project Coordinator: Art Kleinrath HIGHLIGHTS The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Utah Department of Environmental Quality (UDEQ), and U.S. Department ofEnergy (DOE) agreed that the Monticello Administrative Manual and Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Operating Procedures will not be combined into a single manual. Instead, the Monticello LTSM Operating Procedures for Swface and Ground Water will be written to address Operable Unit III requirements. A draft of this manual will be delivered to EPA and UDEQ by April14, 2005, and a draft-final version will be completed by August 12, 2005. A Program Directive for conducting wildlife surveys at the Monticello wetland areas has been

44

MSG MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

November/December 2004 November/December 2004 Report Period: November 1- December 31, 2004 DOE Project Coordinator: Art Kleinrath HIGHLIGHTS The Program Directive for the wildlife survey is on schedule for completion by January 15. Comments from the Biological Technical Assistance group have been incorporated. MRAP A punchlist of mill site restoration items was prepared. DOE and the City of Monticello have agreed upon which entity will perform each item on the punchlist. MVP No significant activities to report. FF A Monthly Report November- December 2004 Page 2 of5 STATUS MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITIES AGREEMENT REPORT November/December 2004 Report Period: November 1- December 31, 2004 DOE Project Coordinator: Art Kleinrath Operable Units I and II DOE and the City of Monticello (City) are exploring the possibility of transferring the former

45

Monticello Mill site Federal Facility Agreement, December 22, 1988 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monticello Monticello Agreement Name Monticello (Utah) Site: Monticello Vicinity Properties NPL Site and Monticello Millsite Federal Facility Agreement Pursuant to CERCLA Section 120, December 22, 1988 State Utah Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA Scope Summary Establish a procedural framework and schedule for developing, implementing, and monitoring appropriate response actions at the Site Parties DOE; US EPA; State of Utah Department of Environmental Health Date 12/22/1988 SCOPE * Identify Interim Remedial Action (IRA) alternatives, if any, which are appropriate at the Site prior to the implementation of final remedial actions for the Site. * Evaluate all past investigative and response actions taken at the Site and documented

46

MSG MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

September/October 2004 September/October 2004 Report Period: September 1- October 31, 2004 DOE Project Coordinator: Art Kleinrath HIGHLIGHTS With the completion of all remedial action reports, installation of monitoring wells in accordance with the Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan, and an onsite inspection by EPA and UDEQ, EPA was able tci write and sign the Preliminmy Closeout Report for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS), Operable Units I, II, and III. With EPA's signature on this document (September 29, 2004), the MMTS was designated as "construction complete." MRAP The annual inspection oftheMMTS was conducted September 15-17,2004. With the exception of property now owned by the City of Monticello, the site is in good condition. Restoration and maintenance issues continue to exist on City owned property. DOE continues

47

Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah

48

Monticello Steam Electric Station, Mount Pleasant, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Why does Monticello, a 30 year old plant, deserve recognition as one of Power's Top Plants of 2006? Because TXU has been blending Powder River Basin (PRB) coal with local lignite at the plant for the past decade, and steady reductions in air-pollutant emission rates have been the result. That positive experience has made the company confident enough to propose building nearly 9,100 MW of new coal or lignite-fired capacity in Texas by 2010 at a cost of $10 billion. The article records some of the lessons that TXU has learned about handling PRB coal safely. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Javetski, J. [TXU Power (United States)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

U.S. Department of Energy at Grand Junction 2003 Annual Inspection⎯Monticello, Utah  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

at Grand Junction 2003 Annual Inspection⎯Monticello, Utah at Grand Junction 2003 Annual Inspection⎯Monticello, Utah November 2003 Page 1 2003 Annual Inspection of the Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) and Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties Sites Summary The Monticello site, which includes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties site, was inspected September 23-25, 2003. A follow-up inspection of the Soil and Sediment properties was conducted on October 8, 2003. The Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties site is also called the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) and will be referred to as MVP in this report. Restoration work at MVP is complete and is nearly complete at MMTS. MVP is in good

50

City of Monticello, Georgia (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Monticello, Georgia (Utility Company) Monticello, Georgia (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Monticello Place Georgia Utility Id 12851 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Electric Commercial Inside Commercial Electric Commercial Outside Commercial Electric Demand Inside Commercial Electric Residential Inside Commercial Electric Residential Outside Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0833/kWh Commercial: $0.1040/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

51

Monticello Lead Plant License Renewal Project Summary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes license renewal evaluation activities from the Monticello Lead Plant License Renewal Project (MLP Project) that were conducted between October 1988 and December 1992. The lessons learned during this first plant-specific license renewal evaluation provide valuable information that utilities can use when initiating a license renewal effort.

1996-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

52

Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Ecological Risk  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monticello Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Ecological Risk Assessment September 1998 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand JunctionOffice Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number MSG-035-0004-00-000 Document Number Q0002l 00 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC98-03 This page intentionally blank , ** 1 ( ( Document Number Q00021 00 Contents Contents Page Acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ix Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. xi 1.0 Introduction I-I 2.0 Problem Formulation : 2-1 2.1 Site Description 2-1 2.1.1 Physical Setting 2-1 2.1.2 Ecological Setting '.' 2-5 2.2 Ecological Contaminants of Concern 2-9 2.3 Contaminant Fate and Transport, Ecosystems Potentially at Risk, and Complete Exposure Pathways 2-11 i3.1

53

Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site

54

MSG MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT REPORT March!April2005  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

March!April2005 March!April2005 Report Period: March 1 - April30, 2005 DOE Project Coordinator: Art Kleinrath HIGHLIGHTS Semi-annual ground water and surface water samples were collected during the week of April4, in accordance with the Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operational Unit III Post- Record of Decision Monitoring Plan. DOE initiated biomonitoring at the wetland areas on the former millsite and down-gradient at the sediment pond as required by the Record of Decision for the Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) Site Operable Unit Ill, Swface and Ground Water, Monticello, Utah (May 2004). MRAP DOE submitted the final 2004 Annual Inspection of the Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) and Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties Sites to the Environmental Protection

55

This fact sheet describes wetlands in and around Monticello, Utah, and what the  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

wetlands in and around Monticello, Utah, and what the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is wetlands in and around Monticello, Utah, and what the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is doing to restore wetlands that are adversely affected by Monticello cleanup project activities. The purpose of the Monticello cleanup projects is to minimize risks to the public and the environment from exposure to uranium mill tailings and radon gas. The cleanup is being performed in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), also known as Superfund. Wetlands Background A wetland is an area along a waterway, body of water, spring, or seep where soils are saturated by surface water or ground water often enough to support vegetation that has adapted to such conditions. While some wetlands are extensive, a wetland also can be an

56

Microsoft Word - Apr-June 2012 Monticello Quarterly_S09178_FFA -final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

2 2 June 2012 Doc. No. S09178 Page 1 Monticello, Utah, National Priorities List Sites Federal Facility Agreement Quarterly Report: April 1-June 30, 2012 1.0 Introduction This report summarizes the status of the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) and the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS), located in and near Monticello, Utah, for the period of April through June 2012. The report also includes a summary of projected near-term activity and reporting requirements. Quarterly reports are submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality (UDEQ) to apprise project managers of project status and near-term schedule of activities and reporting requirements. The MMTS and MVP were placed on the EPA National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989 and 1986,

57

Microsoft Word - July-Sept 2012 FFA Monticello Quarterly Report.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

2 2 October 2012 Doc. No. S09401 Page 1 Monticello, Utah, National Priorities List Sites Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: July 1-September 30, 2012 1.0 Introduction This report summarizes the status of the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) and the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS), located in and near Monticello, Utah, for the period of July through September 2012. The report also includes a summary of projected near-term activity and reporting requirements. Quarterly reports are submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality (UDEQ) to apprise project managers of project status and the near-term schedule of activities and reporting requirements. The MMTS and MVP were placed on the EPA National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989 and 1986,

58

Microsoft Word - Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello df.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site Linda Sheader and Marilyn Kastens The Monticello Disposal Site, located just south of the town of Monticello, Utah, contains a uranium mill tailings disposal cell with a vegetated cover. Successful long-term performance of the cover is in part dependent upon the success of the cover's plantings. The plants remove moisture from the cover's soil layer, thus minimizing percolation through the tailings and preventing leaching of contaminants from the tailings into groundwater. Since 2000, when revegetation was complete, annual monitoring has been conducted at the site to track the development of the plant communities and to compare them to final success criteria. This paper summarizes changes in vegetation across the site over seven growing seasons.

59

FIVE YEAR REVIEW - MONTICELLO RADIOACTIVELY CONTAMINATED PROPERTIES - 06/11/2007  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Third Five-Year Review Report Third Five-Year Review Report for Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties Monticello, Utah San Juan County, Utah June 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1473 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy DOE-LM/1473-2007 Five-Year Review Report Third Five-Year Review Report For Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties Monticello, Utah San Juan County, Utah June 2007 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Approved by: Raymond M:'P' ness Deputy Director U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management Brent H. Everett

60

Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit Ill Interim Remedial Action  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Site Operable Unit Ill Interim Remedial Action Mark Perfxmed Under DOE Contrici No. DE-AC13-96CJ873.35 for th3 U.S. De[:ar!menf of Energy app~oveJioi'ptiL#ic re1ease;dCinWlionis Unlimilra' This page intentionally left blank Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit I11 Interim Remedial Action Annual Status Report August 1999 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Project Number MSG-035-0011-00-000 Document Number Q0017700 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC99-03 This page intentionally blank Document Number Q0017700 Acronyms Contents Page ACRONYMS .............................................................................................................................. V

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment system monticello" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

MSGOUID MONTICELLO PROJECTS ·FEDERAL FACILITIES AGREEMENT REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MSGOUID MSGOUID MONTICELLO PROJECTS ·FEDERAL FACILITIES AGREEMENT REPORT Report Period: Aprill -June 30, 2006 DOE Project Coordinator: Art Kleinrath HIGHLIGHTS DOE submitted the draft Consolidated LTSM Administrative mid Operating Procedures Manual to EPA and UDEQ on May 4, 2006. Document transmittal met the stipulated penalty milestone of May 6, 2006. Semi-annual ground water and surface water monitoring was completed in May 2006 as scheduled. Three FY 2006 Program Directives were prepared and issued for bio-monitoring tasks to assess selenium accumulation in the environment and identify potential ecological receptors. All field work for FY 2006 bio-monitoring task was completed (five waterfowl surveys in May and June, sediment and surface water sample collection in April for selenium analysis,

62

Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit I11 Remedial Investigation Addendum1  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monticello Mill Tailings Site Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit I11 Remedial Investigation Addendum1 Focused Feasibility Study January 2004 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC1342GJ79491 DOE Task Order No. ST03-205 Document N u m b e r Q0029500 S i g t ~ a t u r e Page Signature Page Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit I11 Remedial Investigation Addendud Focused Feasibility Study January 2004 Submitted By: Arthur W. Kleinrath, Project Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado U.S. Department of Energyat Gmnd Junction MMTS OU 111 Remedial Investigation AddendutdFocuscd Feasibilily Study January 2004 Final iii This page intentionally left blank Document Number Q0029500 Contents U.S. Department of Energy at Grand Junction MMTS OU III Remedial Investigation Addendum/Focused Feasibility Study

63

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Monticello AEC Ore Buying Station - UT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monticello AEC Ore Buying Station - Monticello AEC Ore Buying Station - UT 03A FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Monticello AEC Ore Buying Station (UT.03A ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and storage sites) that were operated during the period late-1949 through the mid-1960s. During this period the AEC established ore-buying stations in new uranium producing areas where it appeared that ore production would be sufficient to support a uranium milling operation. The

64

Implementation of a cut flower and seed production garden at Monticello  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The restored gardens of Monticello fulfill multiple roles, including the enhancement of the architectural and historical aspects of Thomas Jefferson's estate, a botanical garden, a site for historic plant preservation and a study in historic garden restoration. The gardens act as a vehicle for appreciation and education of not only the historical horticultural garden aspects, but also as a vehicle for understanding Thomas Jefferson, as a person. During the summer of 2001, I worked as an intern member of Monticello's Gardens and Grounds Department. The internship focused on the project of reestablishing a cutting flower and seed production garden. The internship also included horticultural maintenance activities within the various public gardens and grounds.

Felderhoff, Craig Anton

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

BWRVIP-199: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Testing and Evaluation of the Monticello 300 Degree Capsule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, a BWR Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) was developed to improve the surveillance of the U. S. BWR fleet. This report describes testing and evaluation of the Monticello 300 Capsule. These results will be used to monitor embrittlement as part of the BWRVIP ISP.

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

66

Portable treatment systems study  

SciTech Connect

In developing their Site Treatment Plans (STPs), many of the Department of Energy installations identified some form of portable treatment, to facilitate compliant disposition of select mixed low-level wastestreams. The Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology requested that a systems study be performed to better define the potential role of portable treatment with respect to mixed low-level waste, highlight obstacles to implementation, and identify opportunities for future research and development emphasis. The study was performed by first establishing a representative set of mixed waste, then formulating portable treatment system concepts to meet the required processing needs for these wastes. The portable systems that were conceptualized were evaluated and compared to a fixed centralized treatment alternative. The system evaluations include a life-cycle cost analysis and an assessment of regulatory, institutional, and technical issues associated with the potential use of portable systems. The results of this study show that when all costs are included, there are no significant cost differences between portable systems and fixed systems. However, it is also emphasized that many uncertainties exist that could impact the cost of implementing portable treatment systems. Portable treatment could be made more attractive through private sector implementation, although there is little economic incentive for a commercial vendor to develop small, specialized treatment capabilities with limited applicability. Alternatively, there may also be valid reasons why fixed units cannot be used for some problematic wastestreams. In any event, there are some site-specific problems that still need to be addressed, and there may be some opportunity for research and development to make a positive impact in these areas.

Sherick, M.J.; Schwinkendorf, W.E.; Bechtold, T.E.; Cole, L.T.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Field Examination and Hot Cell Post-Irradiation Examination of Fuel Channels from Monticello Nuclear Generating Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On January 20, 2007, Monticello Nuclear Generating Plant observed an unexpected no-settle condition at the 00 position in peripheral cell 42-11. Publication OE24588, "Control Rod Blade did not Move Normally at Monticello Nuclear Generating Plant," documented this event. This report gives field examination results of four symmetric channels including cell 42-11. Researchers sectioned channel coupons from two channels in cell 42-11 and sent them to Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC), Sunol, California for mor...

2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

68

Near Tank Treatment System  

Hanford High Level Waste: S/SX Tanks TEM Images of Actual Waste Boehmite 7 (a) 0.2 m (b) 0.2 m (c) 0.5 m (d) 0.2 m U and Mn particles . Near Tank Treatment System

69

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Aerobic Treatment Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aerobic units treat wastewater using the same process, only scaled down, as municipal wastewater treatment systems. This publication explains how aerobic units work, what their design requirements are, and how to maintain them.

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

MONTICELLO NPL SITES FFA QUARTERLY REPORT: October 1  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

October 1 October 1 - December 31,2006 DOE Project Coordinator: Art KJeinrath 1.0 MMTS Activities Repository and Pond 4 * Monthly and quarterly inspection of the repository identified no problems other than shmb damage by voles (inspection checklists attached) * Monthly inspection ofPond 4 identified no unacceptable conditions. * Pond 4 leachate detection and removal systems operated at normal levels (leachate pumping summary attached). * Repository leachate collection and removal system (LCRS) and leachate collection system (LOS) operated at normal levels (leachate pumping summary attached). Former Millsite * As a follow-up to the 2004 audit, DOE inspector general requested information regarding restoration expenditures by DOE. * No other major activity to report

71

Monticello NPL Sites Federal Facilities Agreement Meeting Minutes & Action Items  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NPL Sites NPL Sites Federal Facilities Agreement Meeting Minutes & Action Items Location Monticello, Utah- DOE Office of Legacy Management field office Date September 27,2006 Attendees David Bird- Utah Department of Environmental Quality Paul Mushovic- U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Att Kleinrath- U.S. Depmtment of Energy Tim Bartlett- S. M. Stoller Meeting topics and discussion points are summarized separately under the headings that follow. Attaclunent 1 to this report includes the agenda and handout materials provided at the meeting. This report also includes disposal cell and Pond 4 leachate collection data (Attachment 2), quarterly site inspection results (Attachment 3), and project schedule and deliverables through the next two qumters (October 2006 through March 2007). With this

72

MONTICELLO NPL SITES Minutes and Action Items of the Federal Facilities Agreement Meeting  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Minutes and Action Items of the Federal Facilities Agreement Meeting Minutes and Action Items of the Federal Facilities Agreement Meeting September 16 and 17,2008 Meeting Location U.S. Department of Energy Site Office, Monticello, Utah Meeting Attendees Jalena Dayvault- U.S. Department of Energy Tim Bartlett- S.M. Stoller Todd Moon- S.M. Stoller Linda Sheader- S. M. Stoller Paul Wetherstein- S.M. Stoller Brent Everett- Utah Department of Environmental Quality Duane Mortensen- Utah Department of Environmental Quality Paul Mushovic- U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Rob Stites- U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (participated by phone) Christina Wilson- U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (participated by phone) Meeting topics and discussion points are summarized under the headings listed below. The agenda and copies of handouts presented during the meeting are attached to this report.

73

Integrated nonthermal treatment system study  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a study of nonthermal treatment technologies. The study consisted of a systematic assessment of five nonthermal treatment alternatives. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The alternatives considered were innovative nonthermal treatments for organic liquids and sludges, process residue, soil and debris. Vacuum desorption or various washing approaches are considered for treatment of soil, residue and debris. Organic destruction methods include mediated electrochemical oxidation, catalytic wet oxidation, and acid digestion. Other methods studied included stabilization technologies and mercury separation of treatment residues. This study is a companion to the integrated thermal treatment study which examined 19 alternatives for thermal treatment of MLLW waste. The quantities and physical and chemical compositions of the input waste are based on the inventory database developed by the US Department of Energy. The Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) systems were evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 pounds per hour) as the Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems (ITTS). 48 refs., 68 figs., 37 tabs.

Biagi, C.; Bahar, D.; Teheranian, B.; Vetromile, J. [Morrison Knudsen Corp. (United States); Quapp, W.J. [Nuclear Metals (United States); Bechtold, T.; Brown, B.; Schwinkendorf, W. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swartz, G. [Swartz and Associates (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Wastewater and Wastewater Treatment Systems (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality administers regulations for waste water and waste water treatment systems. Construction of a municipal treatment work, non-industrial waste water...

75

Animal Waste Treatment System Loan Program (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of the Animal Waste Treatment System Loan Program is to finance animal waste treatment systems for independent livestock and poultry producers at below conventional interest rates. Loan...

76

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Liquid Chlorination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains the process, components, legal requirements, factors affecting performance, and maintenance needs of liquid chlorination systems for onsite wastewater treatment.

Weaver, Richard; Lesikar, Bruce J.; Richter, Amanda; O'Neill, Courtney

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

77

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Ultraviolet Light Disinfection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some onsite wastewater treatment systems include a disinfection component. This publication explains how homeowners can disinfect wastewater with ultraviolet light, what the components of such a system are, what factors affect the performance of a UV light disinfection system, and how to maintain such a system.

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

78

System and process for biomass treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system including an apparatus is presented for treatment of biomass that allows successful biomass treatment at a high solids dry weight of biomass in the biomass mixture. The design of the system provides extensive distribution of a reactant by spreading the reactant over the biomass as the reactant is introduced through an injection lance, while the biomass is rotated using baffles. The apparatus system to provide extensive assimilation of the reactant into biomass using baffles to lift and drop the biomass, as well as attrition media which fall onto the biomass, to enhance the treatment process.

Dunson, Jr., James B; Tucker, III, Melvin P; Elander, Richard T; Lyons, Robert C

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

79

WASTE TREATMENT BUILDING VENTILATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Treatment Building Ventilation System provides heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) for the contaminated, potentially contaminated, and uncontaminated areas of the Monitored Geologic Repository's (MGR) Waste Treatment Building (WTB). In the uncontaminated areas, the non-confinement area ventilation system maintains the proper environmental conditions for equipment operation and personnel comfort. In the contaminated and potentially contaminated areas, in addition to maintaining the proper environmental conditions for personnel comfort and equipment operation, the contamination confinement area ventilation system directs potentially contaminated air away from personnel in the WTB and confines the contamination within high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration units. The contamination confinement area ventilation system creates airflow paths and pressure zones to minimize the potential for spreading contamination with the building. The contamination confinement ventilation system also protects the environment and the public by limiting airborne releases of radioactive or other hazardous contaminants from the WTB. The Waste Treatment Building Ventilation System confines the radioactive and hazardous material within the building such that the release rates comply with regulatory limits, The system design, operations, and maintenance activities incorporate ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) principles to maintain personnel radiation doses to all occupational workers below regulatory limits and as low as is reasonably achievable. The system provides status of important system parameters and equipment operation, and provides audible and/or visual indication of off-normal conditions and equipment failures. The Waste Treatment Building Ventilation System interfaces with the Waste Treatment Building System by being located in the WTB, and by maintaining specific pressure, temperature, and humidity environments within the building. The system also depends on the WTB for normal electric power supply and the required supply of water for heating, cooling, and humidification. Interface with the Waste Treatment Building System includes the WTB fire protection subsystem for detection of fire and smoke. The Waste Treatment Building Ventilation System interfaces with the Site Radiological Monitoring System for continuous monitoring of the exhaust air and key areas within the WTB, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System for monitoring and control of system operations, and the Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System and Site Generated Hazardous, Non-Hazardous & Sanitary Waste Disposal System for routing of pretreated toxic, corrosive, and radiologically contaminated effluent from process equipment to the HEPA filter exhaust ductwork and air-cleaning unit.

P.A. Kumar

2000-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

80

Wellbottom fluid implosion treatment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for inducing implosion shock forces on perforation traversing earth formations with fluid pressure where an implosion tool is selected relative to a shut in well pressure and a tubing pressure to have a large and small area piston relationship in a well tool so that at a predetermined tubing pressure the pistons move a sufficient distance to open an implosion valve which permits a sudden release of well fluid pressure into the tubing string and produces an implosion force on the perforations. A pressure gauge on the well tool records tubing pressure and well pressure as a function of time.

Brieger, Emmet F. (HC 67 Box 58, Nogal, NM 88341)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment system monticello" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-letter-report-ins-l-09-02 Download Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction...

82

Enhanced integrated nonthermal treatment system study  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Enhanced Nonthermal Treatment Systems (ENTS) study is to evaluate alternative configurations of one of the five systems evaluated in the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) study. Five alternative configurations are evaluated. Each is designed to enhance the final waste form performance by replacing grout with improved stabilization technologies, or to improve system performance by improving the destruction efficiency for organic contaminants. AU enhanced systems are alternative configurations of System NT-5, which has the following characteristics: Nonthermal System NT-5: (1) catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) to treat organic material including organic liquids, sludges, and soft (or combustible) debris, (2) thermal desorption of inorganic sludge and process residue, (3) washing of soil and inorganic debris with treatment by CWO of removed organic material, (4) metal decontamination by abrasive blasting, (5) stabilization of treated sludge, soil, debris, and untreated debris with entrained contamination in grout, and (6) stabilization of inorganic sludge, salts and secondary waste in polymer. System NT-5 was chosen because it was designed to treat combustible debris thereby minimizing the final waste form volume, and because it uses grout for primary stabilization. The enhanced nonthermal systems were studied to determine the cost and performance impact of replacing grout (a commonly used stabilization agent in the DOE complex) with improved waste stabilization methods such as vitrification and polymer.

Biagi, C.; Schwinkendorf, B.; Teheranian, B.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Optimization of the microfiltration effluent treatment system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The X-705 effluent treatment system of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant was installed as a result of the impending closure of the RCRA-regulated X-701B holding pond. This pond was shutdown in order to comply with the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 which mandated that discharges to the pond be terminated prior to November 8, 1988. Startup and optimization of the effluent treatment system have been completed. A description of these activities is included in this report. Proposed NPDES discharge limits have also been developed. 4 tabs., 17 figs.

Cutlip, L.B.; Spaeth, R.; Upham, B.E.

1991-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

84

Improvements in patient treatment planning systems  

SciTech Connect

The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, Radiation treatment planning environment (BNCT-Rtpe) software system is used to develop treatment planning information. In typical use BNCT-Rtpe consists of three main components: (1) Semi-automated geometric modeling of objects (brain, target, eyes, sinus) derived from MRI, CT, and other medical imaging modalities, (2) Dose computations for these geometric models with rtt-MC, the INEL Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code, and (3) Dose contouring overlaid on medical images as well as generation of other dose displays. We continue to develop a planning system based on three-dimensional image-based reconstructions using Bspline surfaces. Even though this software is in an experimental state, it has been applied for large animal research and for an isolated case of treatment for a human glioma. Radiation transport is based on Monte Carlo, however there will be implementations of faster methods (e.g. diffusion theory) in the future. The important thing for treatment planning is the output which must convey, to the radiologist, the deposition of dose to healthy and target tissue. Many edits are available such that one can obtain contours registered to medical image, dose/volume histograms and most information required for treatment planning and response assessment. Recent work has been to make the process more automatic and easier to use. The interface, now implemented for contouring and reconstruction, utilizes the Xwindowing system and the MOTIF graphical users interface for effective interaction with the planner. Much work still remains before the tool can be applied in a routine clinical setting.

Wheeler, F.J.; Wessol, D.E.; Nigg, D.W.; Atkinson, C.A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Babcock, R.; Evans, J. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Medical waste treatment and decontamination system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention discloses a tandem microwave system consisting of a primary chamber in which hybrid microwave energy is used for the controlled combustion of materials. A second chamber is used to further treat the off-gases from the primary chamber by passage through a susceptor matrix subjected to additional hybrid microwave energy. The direct microwave radiation and elevated temperatures provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the treated off gases. The tandem microwave system can be utilized for disinfecting wastes, sterilizing materials, and/or modifying the form of wastes to solidify organic or inorganic materials. The simple design allows on-site treatment of waste by small volume waste generators.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC); Schulz, Rebecca L. (Aiken, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

K West integrated water treatment system subproject safety analysis document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Accident Analysis evaluates unmitigated accident scenarios, and identifies Safety Significant and Safety Class structures, systems, and components for the K West Integrated Water Treatment System.

SEMMENS, L.S.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

87

monticello.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

piles at four locations adjacent to Montezuma Creek near the mill. Tailings carried by wind or Montezuma Creek spread contamination to nearby properties. Throughout the operating...

88

Alloy Parts Heat Treatment Temperature Monitoring System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The paper provides an automatic solution for monitoring and managing the heat treatment of drill pipes. It improves the efficiency and accuracy ...

89

Integrated thermal treatment system sudy: Phase 2, Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the second phase of a study on thermal treatment technologies. The study consists of a systematic assessment of nineteen thermal treatment alternatives for the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the MLLW. The alternatives considered in Phase 2 were innovative thermal treatments with nine types of primary processing units. Other variations in the study examined the effect of combustion gas, air pollution control system design, and stabilization technology for the treatment residues. The Phase 1 study, the results of which have been published as an interim report, examined ten initial thermal treatment alternatives. The Phase 2 systems were evaluated in essentially the same manner as the Phase 2 systems. The assumptions and methods were the same as for the Phase 1 study. The quantities, and physical and chemical compositions, of the input waste used in he Phase 2 systems differ from those in the Phase 1 systems, which were based on a preliminary waste input database developed at the onset of the Integrated Thermal Treatment System study. The inventory database used in the Phase 2 study incorporates the latest US Department of Energy information. All systems, both primary treatment systems and subsystem inputs, have now been evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 lb/hr).

Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater April 13, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A water treatment system that can turn wastewater into clean water has been shown to reduce potential environmental impacts associated with producing natural gas from shale formations in the Appalachian basin. Altela Inc.'s AltelaRain® 4000 water desalination system was tested at BLX, Inc.'s Sleppy well site in Indiana County, Pa. as part of a National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)-sponsored demonstration. During nine continuous months of operation, the unit successfully treated 77 percent of the water stream onsite, providing distilled water as the product. The average treated water cost per barrel over the demonstration period was

91

Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater April 13, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A water treatment system that can turn wastewater into clean water has been shown to reduce potential environmental impacts associated with producing natural gas from shale formations in the Appalachian basin. Altela Inc.'s AltelaRain® 4000 water desalination system was tested at BLX, Inc.'s Sleppy well site in Indiana County, Pa. as part of a National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)-sponsored demonstration. During nine continuous months of operation, the unit successfully treated 77 percent of the water stream onsite, providing distilled water as the product. The average treated water cost per barrel over the demonstration period was

92

300 Area waste acid treatment system closure plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOERL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion includes closure plan documentation submitted for individual, treatment, storage, and/or disposal units undergoing closure, such as the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Whenever appropriate, 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. This 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System Closure Plan (Revision 2) includes a Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Part A, Form 3. Information provided in this closure plan is current as of April 1999.

LUKE, S.N.

1999-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

93

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Septic Tank/Soil Absorption Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For septic tank and soil absorption systems to work properly, homeowners must choose the right kind of system for their household size and soil type, and they must maintain them regularly. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation, and maintenance of septic tank and soil absorption systems.

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

94

Idaho waste treatment facility startup testing suspended to evaluate system  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

waste treatment facility startup testing suspended to waste treatment facility startup testing suspended to evaluate system response Idaho waste treatment facility startup testing suspended to evaluate system response June 20, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Brad Bugger 208-526-0833 Danielle Miller 208-526-5709 IDAHO FALLS, ID- On Saturday, June 16, startup testing was suspended at the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) located at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho Site. Testing and plant heat-up was suspended to allow detailed evaluation of a system pressure event observed during testing on Saturday. Facility startup testing has been ongoing for the past month, evaluating system and component operation and response during operating conditions. No radioactive or hazardous waste has been introduced into the facility,

95

300 Area waste acid treatment system closure plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This section provides a description of the Hanford Site, identifies the proposed method of 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System (WATS) closure, and briefly summarizes the contents of each chapter of this plan.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Summary - System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(DOE-EM) External Technical Review of System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at Hanford Why DOE-EM Did This Review Construction of the facilities of the Hanford site's...

97

Integrated thermal treatment system study -- Phase 2 results. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the second phase of a study on thermal treatment technologies. The study consists of a systematic assessment of nineteen thermal treatment alternatives for the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the MLLW. The alternatives considered in Phase 2 were innovative thermal treatments with nine types of primary processing units. Other variations in the study examined the effect of combustion gas, air pollution control system design, and stabilization technology for the treatment residues. The Phase 1 study examined ten initial thermal treatment alternatives. The Phase 2 systems were evaluated in essentially the same manner as the Phase 1 systems. The alternatives evaluated were: rotary kiln, slagging kiln, plasma furnace, plasma gasification, molten salt oxidation, molten metal waste destruction, steam gasification, Joule-heated vitrification, thermal desorption and mediated electrochemical oxidation, and thermal desorption and supercritical water oxidation. The quantities, and physical and chemical compositions, of the input waste used in the Phase 2 systems differ from those in the Phase 1 systems, which were based on a preliminary waste input database developed at the onset of the Integrated Thermal Treatment System study. The inventory database used in the Phase 2 study incorporates the latest US Department of Energy information. All systems, both primary treatment systems and subsystem inputs, have now been evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 lb/hr). 28 refs., 88 figs., 41 tabs.

Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Understanding and Maintaining your Septic System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is important that homeowners maintain their septic systems properly. Otherwise, problems that develop could threaten human health and the environment. In this publication you will learn how to maintain all the components of a septic system. There are checklists to remind you of important steps in maintaining the safety and integrity of your system.

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin; Alexander, Rachel

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

99

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Homeowner's Guide to Evaluating Service Contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This guide helps homeowners who are seeking maintenance services for their onsite wastewater treatment systems (such as septic systems). Included are definitions of common terms used in service contracts, types of service contracts available, and factors to consider when choosing a service provider.

Lesikar, Bruce J.; O'Neill, Courtney; Deal, Nancy; Loomis, George; Gustafson, David; Lindbo, David

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

100

Integrated thermal treatment systems study. Internal review panel report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) commissioned two studies to evaluate nineteen thermal treatment technologies for treatment of DOE mixed low-level waste. These studies were called the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) Phase I and Phase II. With the help of the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) Mixed Waste Focus Group, OTD formed an ITTS Internal Review Panel to review and comment on the ITTS studies. This Panel was composed of scientists and engineers from throughout the DOE complex, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the California EPA, and private experts. The Panel met from November 15-18, 1994 to review the ITTS studies and to make recommendations on the most promising thermal treatment systems for DOE mixed low-level wastes and on research and development necessary to prove the performance of the technologies. This report describes the findings and presents the recommendations of the Panel.

Cudahy, J.; Escarda, T.; Gimpel, R. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment system monticello" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Integrated thermal treatment system study: Phase 1 results. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated systems engineering approach is used for uniform comparison of widely varying thermal treatment technologies proposed for management of contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. Ten different systems encompassing several incineration design options are studied. All subsystems, including facilities, equipment, and methods needed for integration of each of the ten systems are identified. Typical subsystems needed for complete treatment of MLLW are incoming waste receiving and preparation (characterization, sorting, sizing, and separation), thermal treatment, air pollution control, primary and secondary stabilization, metal decontamination, metal melting, mercury recovery, lead recovery, and special waste and aqueous waste treatment. The evaluation is performed by developing a preconceptual design package and planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for each system. As part of the preconceptual design process, functional and operational requirements, flow sheets and mass balances, and conceptual equipment layouts are developed for each system. The PLCC components estimated are technology development, production facility construction, pre-operation, operation and maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning. Preconceptual design data and other technology information gathered during the study are examined and areas requiring further development, testing, and evaluation are identified and recommended. Using a qualitative method, each of the ten systems are ranked.

Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.; Hempill, H.G.; Groffie, F.J.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Low-level liquid waste treatment system start-up  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following removal of Cs-137 by ion exchange in the Supernatant Treatment System immediately upstream, the radioactive liquid waste is volume-reduced by evaporation. Trace amounts of Cs-137 in the resulting distillate are removed by ion exchange, then the distillate is discharged to the existing plant water treatment system. The concentrated product, 37 to 41 percent solids (by weight), is encapsulated in cement, producing a stable low-level waste form. This report provides a summary of work performed to test the Liquid Waste Treatment System following construction turnover and prior to radioactive operation. All mechanical and electrical components, piping, valves, pumps, tanks, controls, and instrumentation required to operate the system were tested; first with water, then with simulated waste. Subsystems (individual tanks, pumps, and control loops) were tested individually, then as a complete system. Finally, the system began a controlled start-up phase, which included the first four months of radioactive operation. Components were tested for operability then for performance data to verify the system`s ability to produce an acceptable waste form at design feed rates.

Baker, M.N.; Gessner, R.F.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Boiler System Efficiency Improves with Effective Water Treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water treatment is an important aspect of boiler operation which can affect efficiency or result in damage if neglected. Without effective water treatment, scale can form on boiler tubes, reducing heat transfer, and causing a loss of boiler efficiency and availability. Proper control of boiler blowdown is also important to assure clean boiler surfaces without wasting water, heat, and chemicals. Recovering hot condensate for reuse as boiler feedwater is another means of improving system efficiency. Condensate which is contaminated with corrosion products or process chemicals, however, is ill fit for reuse; and steam which leaks from piping, valves, traps and connections cannot be recovered. Effective chemical treatment, in conjunction with mechanical system improvements, can assure that condensate can be safely returned and valuable energy recovered.

Bloom, D.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Summary of comparative results integrated nonthermal treatment and integrated thermal treatment systems studies  

SciTech Connect

In July 1994, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), under a contract from U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environment Management Office of Science and Technology (OST, EM-50) published a report entitled {open_quotes}Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study - Phase 1 Results{close_quotes} (EGG-MS-11211). This report was the culmination of over a year of analysis involving scientists and engineers within the DOE complex and from private industry. The purpose of that study was {open_quotes}to conduct a systematic engineering evaluation of a variety of mixed low level waste (MLLW) treatment system alternatives.{close_quotes} The study also {open_quotes}identified the research and development, demonstrations, and testing and evaluation needed to assure unit operability in the most promising alternative system.{close_quotes} This study evaluated ten primary thermal treatment technologies, organized into complete {open_quotes}cradle-to-grave{close_quotes} systems (including complete engineering flow sheets), to treat DOE MLLW and calculated mass balances and 20-year total life cycle costs (TLCC) for all systems. The waste input used was a representative heterogenous mixture of typical DOE MLLW. An additional study was conducted, and then, based on response to these studies, additional work was started to investigate and evaluate non-thermal treatment options on a footing comparable to the effort devoted to thermal options. This report attempts to present a summary overview of the thermal and non-thermal treatment technologies which were examined in detail in the process of the above mentioned reviews.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEMS FOR WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory implemented a constructed wetland treatment system (CWTS) in 2000 to treat industrial discharge and stormwater from the Laboratory area. The industrial discharge volume is 3,030 m{sup 3} per day with elevated toxicity and metals (copper, zinc and mercury). The CWTS was identified as the best treatment option based on performance, capital and continuing cost, and schedule. A key factor for this natural system approach was the long-term binding capacity of heavy metals (especially copper, lead, and zinc) in the organic matter and sediments. The design required that the wetland treat the average daily discharge volume and be able to handle 83,280 m{sup 3} of stormwater runoff in a 24 hour period. The design allowed all water flow within the system to be driven entirely by gravity. The CWTS for A-01 outfall is composed of eight one-acre wetland cells connected in pairs and planted with giant bulrush to provide continuous organic matter input to the system. The retention basin was designed to hold stormwater flow and to allow controlled discharge to the wetland. The system became operational in October of 2000 and is the first wetland treatment system permitted by South Carolina DHEC for removal of metals. Because of the exceptional performance of the A-01 CWTS, the same strategy was used to improve water quality of the H-02 outfall that receives discharge and stormwater from the Tritium Area of SRS. The primary contaminants in this outfall were also copper and zinc. The design for this second system required that the wetland treat the average discharge volume of 415 m{sup 3} per day, and be able to handle 9,690 m{sup 3} of stormwater runoff in a 24 hour period. This allowed the building of a system much smaller than the A-01 CWTS. The system became operational in July 2007. Metal removal has been excellent since water flow through the treatment systems began, and performance improved with the maturation of the vegetation during the first season of growth of each system. Sediment samples after the first and third years of operation indicated that copper was being bound in the sediments very rapidly after entering the treatment system. The design of the system encourages low redox and sulfide production in the sediments. The objective is to stabilize metals, including mercury, as sulfide compounds in the sediments. Costs for maintenance and operation of the systems are minimal, consisting primarily of ensuring that the pipes are not clogged and that water is flowing through the system. The treatment cost per thousand gallons is many times less than conventional wastewater treatment facilities. Life expectancy and function of the biological system is based on the life of the engineering aspects and not the wetland ecology.

Nelson, E.

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

106

INTEC CPP-603 Basin Water Treatment System Closure: Process Design  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the engineering activities that have been completed in support of the closure plan for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) CPP-603 Basin Water Treatment System. This effort includes detailed assessments of methods and equipment for performing work in four areas: 1. A cold (nonradioactive) mockup system for testing equipment and procedures for vessel cleanout and vessel demolition. 2. Cleanout of process vessels to meet standards identified in the closure plan. 3. Dismantlement and removal of vessels, should it not be possible to clean them to required standards in the closure plan. 4. Cleanout or removal of pipelines and pumps associated with the CPP-603 basin water treatment system. Cleanout standards for the pipes will be the same as those used for the process vessels.

Kimmitt, Raymond Rodney; Faultersack, Wendell Gale; Foster, Jonathan Kay; Berry, Stephen Michael

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Effluent treatment options for nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A variety of approaches for handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests in an environmentally acceptable manner are discussed. The functional requirements of effluent treatment are defined and concept options are presented within the framework of these requirements. System concepts differ primarily in the choice of fission-product retention and waste handling concepts. The concept options considered range from closed cycle (venting the exhaust to a closed volume or recirculating the hydrogen in a closed loop) to open cycle (real time processing and venting of the effluent). This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of different methods to handle effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests.

Shipers, L.R.; Brockmann, J.E.

1992-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

108

An optical see-through augmented reality system for the treatment of phobia to small animals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an optical see-through (OST) Augmented Reality (AR) system for the treatment of phobia to small animals. Our group has already presented two AR systems for this treatment. The first system was a video see-through (VST) AR system. ... Keywords: augmented reality, optical see-through, phobia to small animals, virtual therapy

M. Carmen Juan; Mariano Alcaiz; Jrme Calatrava; Irene Zaragoz; Rosa Baos; Cristina Botella

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Innovative Distributed Multi-Pollutant Pot Gas Treatment System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arranging the gas treatment in decentralized installations as Distributed Decentralised ... Development of NEUI500kA Family High Energy Efficiency Aluminum...

110

In situ heat treatment process utilizing a closed loop heating system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systems and methods for an in situ heat treatment process that utilizes a circulation system to heat one or more treatment areas are described herein. The circulation system may use a heated liquid heat transfer fluid that passes through piping in the formation to transfer heat to the formation. In some embodiments, the piping may be positioned in at least two of the wellbores.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

111

IMRT Quality Assurance Using a Second Treatment Planning System  

SciTech Connect

We used a second treatment planning system (TPS) for independent verification of the dose calculated by our primary TPS in the context of patient-specific quality assurance (QA) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). QA plans for 24 patients treated with inverse planned dynamic IMRT were generated using the Nomos Corvus TPS. The plans were calculated on a computed tomography scan of our QA phantom that consists of three Solid Water slabs sandwiching radiochromic films, and an ion chamber that is inserted into the center slab of the phantom. For the independent verification, the dose was recalculated using the Varian Eclipse TPS using the multileaf collimator files and beam geometry from the original plan. The data was then compared in terms of absolute dose to the ion chamber volume as well as relative dose on isodoses calculated at the film plane. The calculation results were also compared with measurements performed for each case. When comparing ion chamber doses, the mean ratio was 0.999 (SD 0.010) for Eclipse vs. Corvus, 0.988 (SD 0.020) for the ionization chamber measurements vs. Corvus, and 0.989 (SD 0.017) for the ionization chamber measurements vs. Eclipse. For 2D doses with gamma histogram, the mean value of the percentage of pixels passing the criteria of 3%, 3 mm was 94.4 (SD 5.3) for Eclipse vs. Corvus, 85.1 (SD 10.6) for Corvus vs. film, and 93.7 (SD 4.1) for Eclipse vs. film; and for the criteria of 5%, 3 mm, 98.7 (SD 1.5) for Eclipse vs. Corvus, 93.0 (SD 7.8) for Corvus vs. film, and 98.0 (SD 1.9) for Eclipse vs. film. We feel that the use of the Eclipse TPS as an independent, accurate, robust, and time-efficient method for patient-specific IMRT QA is feasible in clinic.

Anjum, Muhammad Naeem [McGill University Health Center, Department of Medical Physics, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Department of Physics, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur (Pakistan); Parker, William, E-mail: william@medphys.mcgill.c [McGill University Health Center, Department of Medical Physics, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Ruo, Russell; Aldahlawi, Ismail [McGill University Health Center, Department of Medical Physics, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Afzal, Muhammad [Department of Physics, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur (Pakistan)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

An integrated system to remote monitor and control anaerobic wastewater treatment plants through the internet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and manages the problem. Keywords Anaerobic digestion, automation, control, fault detection and isolationAn integrated system to remote monitor and control anaerobic wastewater treatment plants through of the anaerobic wastewater treatment plants that do not benefit from a local expert in wastewater treatment

Bernard, Olivier

113

Design of Control Circuit of Seawater Treatment System Based on Microprocessor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among numerous seawater treatment methods, electrolysis belongs to a relatively ideal method with good treatment effect. Basically, it can reach the standards of safe, effective, economical and environment-friendly. The control circuit part design of ... Keywords: seawater treatment system, MCU, synchronous circuit, trigger module, data acquisition

Yanping Gao; Xianjiu Guo; Xianqiang Lv

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

MODIFIED REVERSE OSMOSIS SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report of ''Modified Reverse Osmosis System for Treatment of Produced Water,'' DOE project No. DE-FC26-00BC15326 describes work performed in the third year of the project. Several good results were obtained, which are documented in this report. The compacted bentonite membranes were replaced by supported bentonite membranes, which exhibited the same salt rejection capability. Unfortunately, it also inherited the clay expansion problem due to water invasion into the interlayer spaces of the compacted bentonite membranes. We noted that the supported bentonite membrane developed in the project was the first of its kind reported in the literature. An {alpha}-alumina-supported MFI-type zeolite membrane synthesized by in-situ crystallization was fabricated and tested. Unlike the bentonite clay membranes, the zeolite membranes maintained stability and high salt rejection rate even for a highly saline solution. Actual produced brines from gas and oil fields were then tested. For gas fields producing brine, the 18,300 ppm TDS (total dissolved solids) in the produced brine was reduced to 3060 ppm, an 83.3% rejection rate of 15,240 ppm salt rejection. For oilfield brine, while the TDS was reduced from 181,600 ppm to 148,900 ppm, an 18% rejection rate of 32,700 ppm reduction, the zeolite membrane was stable. Preliminary results show the dissolved organics, mainly hydrocarbons, did not affect the salt rejection. However, the rejection of organics was inconclusive at this point. Finally, the by-product of this project, the {alpha}-alumina-supported Pt-Co/Na Y catalytic zeolite membrane was developed and demonstrated for overcoming the two-step limitation of nonoxidation methane (CH{sub 4}) conversion to higher hydrocarbons (C{sub 2+}) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}). Detailed experiments to obtain quantitative results of H{sub 2} generation for various conditions are now being conducted. Technology transfer efforts included five manuscripts submitted to peer-reviewed journals and five conference presentations.

Robert L. Lee; Junghan Dong

2004-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

115

Constructed Wetland Treatment Systems for the Remediation of Metal-Bearing Aqueous Discharges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constructed wetland treatment systems potentially offer utilities an effective, relatively low-cost option for treating aqueous discharges that contain metals. This report provides a ready source of information on these systems and their use within the electric utility industry.

1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

116

Comparison of costs for alternative mixed low-level waste treatment systems  

SciTech Connect

Total life cycle costs (TLCCs), including disposal costs, of thermal, nonthermal and enhanced nonthermal systems were evaluated to guide future research and development programs for the treatment of mixed low-level waste (MLLW) consisting of RCRA hazardous and low-level radioactive wastes. In these studies, nonthermal systems are defined as those systems that process waste at temperatures less than 350 C. Preconceptual designs and costs were developed for thirty systems with a capacity (2,927 lbs/hr) to treat the DOE MLLW stored inventor y(approximately 236 million pounds) in 20 years in a single, centralized facility. A limited comparison of the studies` results is presented in this paper. Sensitivity of treatment costs with respect to treatment capacity, number of treatment facilities, and system availability were also determined. The major cost element is operations and maintenance (O and M), which is 50 to 60% of the TLCC for both thermal and nonthermal systems. Energy costs constitute a small fraction (< 1%) of the TLCCs. Equipment cost is only 3 to 5% of the treatment cost. Evaluation of subsystem costs demonstrate that receiving and preparation is the highest cost subsystem at about 25 to 30% of the TLCC for both thermal and nonthermal systems. These studies found no cost incentives to use nonthermal or hybrid (combined nonthermal treatment with stabilization by vitrification) systems in place of thermal systems. However, there may be other incentives including fewer air emissions and less local objection to a treatment facility. Building multiple treatment facilities to treat the same total mass of waste as a single facility would increase the total treatment cost significantly, and improved system availability decreases unit treatment costs by 17% to 30%.

Schwinkendorf, W.E.; Harvego, L. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cooley, C.R. [Dept. of Energy (United States); Biagi, C. [Morrison Knudsen (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

Surface Treatment of Carbon Fibers by Continuous Gaseous System  

SciTech Connect

The mechanical performance of carbon fiber-polymer composites strongly depends on interfacial adhesion, which is function of types of carbon fiber, surface chemistry, physical and chemical interactions, and mechanical interlocking. Untreated and unsized high strength carbon fibers were oxidized by continuous thermochemical and atmospheric plasma treatment. Surface properties were investigated before and after treatment (chemistry, topography), as well as their mechanical properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed a significant increase of the oxygen atomic content from 3% to around 20% and the analysis of the carbon peak showed that carboxylic acid functionalities and hydroxyl groups were generated. An observation of the fiber surface by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy did not show any dramatic change of the fiber morphology and surface topography. A Raman spectroscopy analysis exhibited that the weak boundary layers and debris remaining at the surface of untreated fibers were removed. No significant damage of the mechanical properties (tensile strength) was noticed. The influence of the changes of the surface properties on interfacial adhesion of carbon fiber-epoxy and -vinyl ester matrix was evaluated using 90 flexural and short beam shear tests with unidirectional coupons. A significant increase of the 90 flexural and short beam shear strength showed that the interfacial adhesion between carbon fibers and epoxy resins was improved. The observation of the fracture profile by scanning electron microcopy confirmed those results, as the rupture of the coupons after surface treatment was more cohesive.

Vautard, Frederic [ORNL; Paulauskas, Felix L [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL; Warren, Charles David [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Ozcan, Soydan [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Biogas Generation from a 2-Phase Sludge Treatment System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The degradation of sewage sludge in single stage and 2 phase anaerobic systems was investigated in bench-scale batch reactors. Average COD reduction efficiency in 2 phase system in this initial phase of the study was 4.5% (30 days HRT) and 3.3% (20 days ... Keywords: dge digestion, 2-phase, single stage, qPCR, microbial communities

Taranveer Singh Mann, Terence Goh, William Phay

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Flexible hybrid membrane treatment systems for tailored nutrient management: A new paradigm in urban wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the clay and glaze waste that previously was washed down the drain, reclaiming 15 gallons of glaze and 300 with a student team. Over 90% of irrigation systems are automated and connected to a weather station

120

Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project melter system preliminary design technical review meeting  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project sponsored a plasma are melter technical design review meeting to evaluate high-temperature melter system configurations for processing heterogeneous alpha-contaminated low-level radioactive waste (ALLW). Thermal processing experts representing Department of Energy contractors, the Environmental Protection Agency, and private sector companies participated in the review. The participants discussed issues and evaluated alternative configurations for three areas of the melter system design: plasma torch melters and graphite arc melters, offgas treatment options, and overall system configuration considerations. The Technical Advisory Committee for the review concluded that graphite arc melters are preferred over plasma torch melters for processing ALLW. Initiating involvement of stakeholders was considered essential at this stage of the design. For the offgas treatment system, the advisory committee raised the question whether to a use wet-dry or a dry-wet system. The committee recommended that the waste stream characterization, feed preparation, and the control system are essential design tasks for the high-temperature melter treatment system. The participants strongly recommended that a complete melter treatment system be assembled to conduct tests with nonradioactive surrogate waste material. A nonradioactive test bed would allow for inexpensive design and operational changes prior to assembling a system for radioactive waste treatment operations.

Eddy, T.L.; Raivo, B.D.; Soelberg, N.R.; Wiersholm, O.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment system monticello" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Independent peer review panel report on the integrated nonthermal treatment systems study and the comparison of integrated thermal and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for mixed low level waste  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) Office of Science and Technology (OST) has conducted studies of integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTS) for treating contact handled, alpha and non-alpha mixed low level radioactive waste (MLLW). The MLLW in the DOE complex consists of a wide variety of organic and inorganic solids and liquids contaminated with radioactive substances. Treatment systems are needed to destroy organic material and stabilize residues prior to land disposal. In May 1996 the Deputy Assistant Secretary for OST appointed an Independent Peer Review Panel to: (1) review and comment on the INTS Study; (2) make recommendations on the most promising thermal and nonthermal treatment systems; (3) make recommendations on research and development necessary to prove the performance of nonthermal and thermal technologies; and (4) review and comment on the preliminary draft of the ITTS/INTS Comparison Report. This report presents the primary conclusions and recommendations based on the review of the INTS study and the comparison report. System selection, overviews, comparisons, cost estimations and sensitivity analyses, and recommended R and D engineering needs are then described and discussed.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Functional integral treatment of some quantum nondemolition systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the scheme of a quantum nondemolition (QND) measurement, an observable is measured without perturbing its evolution. In the context of studies of decoherence in quantum computing, we examine the `open' quantum system of a two-level atom, or equivalently, a spin-1/2 system, in interaction with quantum reservoirs of either oscillators or spins, under the QND condition of the Hamiltonian of the system commuting with the system-reservoir interaction. For completeness, we also examine the well-known non-QND spin-Bose problem. For all these many-body systems, we use the methods of functional integration to work out the propagators. The propagators for the QND Hamiltonians are shown to be analogous to the squeezing and rotation operators, respectively, for the two kinds of baths considered. Squeezing and rotation being both phase space area-preserving canonical transformations, this brings out an interesting connection between the energy-preserving QND Hamiltonians and the homogeneous linear canonical transformations.

Subhashish Banerjee; R. Ghosh

2006-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

123

Development of a Simple Radioactive marker System to Reduce Positioning Errors in Radiation Treatment  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research is to implement an inexpensive, quick and simple monitor that provides an accurate indication of proper patient position during the treatment of cancer by external beam X-ray radiation and also checks for any significant changes in patient anatomy. It is believed that this system will significantly reduce the treatment margin, provide an additional, independent quality assurance check of positioning accuracy prior to all treatments and reduce the probability of misadministration of therapeutic dose.

William H. Miller; Dr. Jatinder Palta

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

124

Prediction analysis of a wastewater treatment system using a Bayesian network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is a complicated dynamic process, the effectiveness of which is affected by microbial, chemical, and physical factors. At present, predicting the effluent quality of wastewater treatment systems is difficult because of complex biological ... Keywords: Bayesian network, Inference, Modified sequencing batch reactor, Prediction analysis

Dan Li; Hai Zhen Yang; Xiao Feng Liang

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Integrated process analysis of treatment systems for mixed low level waste  

SciTech Connect

Selection of technologies to be developed for treatment of DOE`s mixed low level waste (MLLW) requires knowledge and understanding of the expected costs, schedules, risks, performance, and reliability of the total engineered systems that use these technologies. Thus, an integrated process analysis program was undertaken to identify the characteristics and needs of several thermal and nonthermal systems. For purposes of comparison, all systems were conceptually designed for a single facility processing the same amount of waste at the same rate. Thirty treatment systems were evaluated ranging from standard incineration to innovative thermal systems and innovative nonthermal chemical treatment. Treating 236 million pounds of waste in 20 years through a central treatment was found to be the least costly option with total life cycle cost ranging from $2.1 billion for a metal melting system to $3.9 billion for a nonthermal acid digestion system. Little cost difference exists among nonthermal systems or among thermal systems. Significant cost savings could be achieved by working towards maximum on line treatment time per year; vitrifying the final waste residue; decreasing front end characterization segregation and sizing requirements; using contaminated soil as the vitrifying agent; and delisting the final vitrified waste form from Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restriction (LDR) requirements.

Cooley, C.R. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Schwinkendorf, W.E. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.]|[Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bechtold, T.E. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Tomorrow`s energy today for cities and counties -- Alternative wastewater treatment: Advanced Integrated Pond systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a discussion of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the Advanced Integrated Pond System as an alternative for other more costly municipal waste water treatment plants.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Hanford Site Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Systems |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Systems Hanford Site Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Systems April 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The interior of a pump-and-treat system along the Columbia River at the Hanford Site. With the push of a button, workers can now power the site’s five systems along the river that are working to extract and treat contaminated groundwater. The interior of a pump-and-treat system along the Columbia River at the Hanford Site. With the push of a button, workers can now power the site's five systems along the river that are working to extract and treat contaminated groundwater. RICHLAND, Wash. - Engineers and operators supporting the Richland Operations Office at the Hanford site found a way to start and stop

128

Hanford Site Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Systems |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Hanford Site Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Systems Hanford Site Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Systems April 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The interior of a pump-and-treat system along the Columbia River at the Hanford Site. With the push of a button, workers can now power the site’s five systems along the river that are working to extract and treat contaminated groundwater. The interior of a pump-and-treat system along the Columbia River at the Hanford Site. With the push of a button, workers can now power the site's five systems along the river that are working to extract and treat contaminated groundwater. RICHLAND, Wash. - Engineers and operators supporting the Richland Operations Office at the Hanford site found a way to start and stop

129

Advanced Off-Gas Control System Design For Radioactive And Mixed Waste Treatment  

SciTech Connect

Treatment of radioactive and mixed wastes is often required to destroy or immobilize hazardous constituents, reduce waste volume, and convert the waste to a form suitable for final disposal. These kinds of treatments usually evolve off-gas. Air emission regulations have become increasingly stringent in recent years. Mixed waste thermal treatment in the United States is now generally regulated under the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. These standards impose unprecedented requirements for operation, monitoring and control, and emissions control. Off-gas control technologies and system designs that were satisfactorily proven in mixed waste operation prior to the implementation of new regulatory standards are in some cases no longer suitable in new mixed waste treatment system designs. Some mixed waste treatment facilities have been shut down rather than have excessively restrictive feed rate limits or facility upgrades to comply with the new standards. New mixed waste treatment facilities in the U. S. are being designed to operate in compliance with the HWC MACT standards. Activities have been underway for the past 10 years at the INL and elsewhere to identify, develop, demonstrate, and design technologies for enabling HWC MACT compliance for mixed waste treatment facilities. Some specific off-gas control technologies and system designs have been identified and tested to show that even the stringent HWC MACT standards can be met, while minimizing treatment facility size and cost.

Nick Soelberg

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Microsoft Word - S01902_As Built Report.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Construction Summary and As-Built Report Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site August 2005 DOE-LM/GJ930-2005 ESL-RPT-2005-05 DOE-LM/GJ930 2005 ESL-RPT-2005-05 Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site August 2005 Prepared for U. S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado U.S. Department of Energy Monticello, Utah⎯Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System

131

Microsoft Word - S01902_As Built Report.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Summary and As-Built Report Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site August 2005 DOE-LM/GJ930-2005 ESL-RPT-2005-05 DOE-LM/GJ930 2005 ESL-RPT-2005-05 Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site August 2005 Prepared for U. S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado U.S. Department of Energy Monticello, Utah⎯Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System

132

Transacting generation attributes across market boundaries: Compatible information systems and the treatment of imports and exports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy attribute laws and market rules have declared that recognizing such generators attributes may be contingent on the presence of a compatible informationinformation system or policy. In any market area where an energyMarket Boundaries: Compatible Information Systems and the Treatment of Imports and Exports Robert Grace Sustainable Energy

Grace, Robert; Wiser, Ryan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Sanitary Waste Water Treatment System for the Hanford Decontamination Laundry Facility  

SciTech Connect

This is an engineering report for the Decontamination Laundry Facility (DLF) which will be located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The proposed Sanitary Waste Treatment System is new and does not involve interfacing with existing sanitary waste treatment systems. It will utilize a subsurface soil absorption system (SSAS), which are frequently used to dispose of sanitary waste water from facilities at the Hanford Site, since a majority of its` facilities are located in remote areas. Construction of the DLF is scheduled to start in 1992 and startup of the DLF is planned during the summer of 1994.

Yanochko, R.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Sanitary Waste Water Treatment System for the Hanford Decontamination Laundry Facility  

SciTech Connect

This is an engineering report for the Decontamination Laundry Facility (DLF) which will be located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The proposed Sanitary Waste Treatment System is new and does not involve interfacing with existing sanitary waste treatment systems. It will utilize a subsurface soil absorption system (SSAS), which are frequently used to dispose of sanitary waste water from facilities at the Hanford Site, since a majority of its' facilities are located in remote areas. Construction of the DLF is scheduled to start in 1992 and startup of the DLF is planned during the summer of 1994.

Yanochko, R.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Study of Performance of Heat Pump Usage in Sewage Treatment and Fouling Impact on System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A heat pump using disposed sewage as a heat source to heat raw sewage is presented to solve the problem that sewage temperature is low in sewage biologic treatment in cold region. According to the status of one medicine factory in Harbin, China, system performances are simulated. Then the impact of fouling on system performance is emulated in detail. The results show that the novel system is feasible to be utilized in sewage treatment for its energy-saving and high efficient characteristics, and that raw sewage temperature can be enhanced to 29.569?, and EER of system can reach 4.177. Fouling impact on system not only depends on the fouling thermal resistance, but also is related to heat transfer coefficient. Increased fouling leads to severely deteriorated performance of the compressor, and a decrease in EER and refrigerant mass flow rate.

Song, Y.; Yao, Y.; Ma, Z.; Na, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Waste management system alternatives for treatment of wastes from spent fuel reprocessing  

SciTech Connect

This study was performed to help identify a preferred TRU waste treatment alternative for reprocessing wastes with respect to waste form performance in a geologic repository, near-term waste management system risks, and minimum waste management system costs. The results were intended for use in developing TRU waste acceptance requirements that may be needed to meet regulatory requirements for disposal of TRU wastes in a geologic repository. The waste management system components included in this analysis are waste treatment and packaging, transportation, and disposal. The major features of the TRU waste treatment alternatives examined here include: (1) packaging (as-produced) without treatment (PWOT); (2) compaction of hulls and other compactable wastes; (3) incineration of combustibles with cementation of the ash plus compaction of hulls and filters; (4) melting of hulls and failed equipment plus incineration of combustibles with vitrification of the ash along with the HLW; (5a) decontamination of hulls and failed equipment to produce LLW plus incineration and incorporation of ash and other inert wastes into HLW glass; and (5b) variation of this fifth treatment alternative in which the incineration ash is incorporated into a separate TRU waste glass. The six alternative processing system concepts provide progressively increasing levels of TRU waste consolidation and TRU waste form integrity. Vitrification of HLW and intermediate-level liquid wastes (ILLW) was assumed in all cases.

McKee, R.W.; Swanson, J.L.; Daling, P.M.; Clark, L.L.; Craig, R.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.; McCarthy, D.; Franklin, A.L.; Hazelton, R.F.; Lundgren, R.A.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ENGINEERED CONTAINER RETRIEVAL AND TRANSFER SYSTEM PRELIMINARY DESIGN HAZARD ANALYSIS SUPPLEMENT 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 'What/If' Hazards Analysis addresses hazards affecting the Sludge Treatment Project Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) NPH and external events at the preliminary design stage. In addition, the hazards of the operation sequence steps for the mechanical handling operations in preparation of Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC), disconnect STSC and prepare STSC and Sludge Transport System (STS) for shipping are addressed.

FRANZ GR; MEICHLE RH

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

138

Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems study: US Department of Energy Internal Review Panel report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) commissioned two studies to uniformly evaluate nineteen thermal treatment technologies. These studies were called the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) Phase I and Phase II. With the advice and guidance of the DOE Office of Environmental Management`s (EM`s) Mixed Waste Focus Group, OTD formed an ITTS Internal Review Panel, composed of scientists and engineers from throughout the DOE complex, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the California EPA, and private experts. The Panel met from November 15-18, 1994, to review and comment on the ITTS studies, to make recommendations on the most promising thermal treatment systems for DOE mixed low level wastes (MLLW), and to make recommendations on research and development necessary to prove the performance of the technologies on MLLW.

Cudahy, J.; Escarda, T.; Gimpel, R. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Monticello, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Louisiana: Energy Resources Louisiana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.5965262°, -91.394004° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.5965262,"lon":-91.394004,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

140

MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITIES AGREEMENT REPORT Report...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

O.l0006 0,0 0.0 " 51221200<; ""' 0.00 -6938.00 12006 0 0.0 0.0 " 1292006 O,Oil 0.00 0,00 -6938.00 6MOO< 0 o.O 0,0 " 6152006 0,00 0,00 0,00 -6938,00 7312006 0 0.0...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment system monticello" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

K West Basin Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) E-F Annular Filter Vessel Accident Calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three bounding accidents postdated for the K West Basin integrated water treatment system are evaluated against applicable risk evaluation guidelines. The accidents are a spray leak during fuel retrieval, spray leak during backflushing, and a hydrogen explosion. Event trees and accident probabilities are estimated. In all cases, the unmitigated dose consequences are below the risk evaluation guidelines.

RITTMANN, P.D.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

142

Design, Construction, and Field Testing of a Prototype Mobile Vault Water Treatment System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface vaults and manholes provide access to underground electric distribution equipment in many areas. These structures can accumulate water through storm water runoff or ground water seepage. The water must be removed before maintenance work can proceed. This report presents results of a project to design, construct, and test a mobile treatment system to manage vault waters.

2001-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

143

K West Basin Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) E-F Annular Filter Vessel Accident Calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four bounding accidents postulated for the K West Basin integrated water treatment system are evaluated against applicable risk evaluation guidelines. The accidents are a spray leak during fuel retrieval, spray leak during backflushing a hydrogen explosion, and a fire breaching filter vessel and enclosure. Event trees and accident probabilities are estimated. In all cases, the unmitigated dose consequences are below the risk evaluation guidelines.

PIEPHO, M.G.

2000-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

144

Oak Ridge National Lebroatory Liquid&Gaseous Waste Treatment System Strategic Plan  

SciTech Connect

Excellence in Laboratory operations is one of the three key goals of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Agenda. That goal will be met through comprehensive upgrades of facilities and operational approaches over the next few years. Many of ORNL's physical facilities, including the liquid and gaseous waste collection and treatment systems, are quite old, and are reaching the end of their safe operating life. The condition of research facilities and supporting infrastructure, including the waste handling facilities, is a key environmental, safety and health (ES&H) concern. The existing infrastructure will add considerably to the overhead costs of research due to increased maintenance and operating costs as these facilities continue to age. The Liquid Gaseous Waste Treatment System (LGWTS) Reengineering Project is a UT-Battelle, LLC (UT-B) Operations Improvement Program (OIP) project that was undertaken to develop a plan for upgrading the ORNL liquid and gaseous waste systems to support ORNL's research mission.

Van Hoesen, S.D.

2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

145

Can radiation therapy treatment planning system accurately predict surface doses in postmastectomy radiation therapy patients?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Skin doses have been an important factor in the dose prescription for breast radiotherapy. Recent advances in radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and new treatment schemes such as hypofractionated breast therapy have made the precise determination of the surface dose necessary. Detailed information of the dose at various depths of the skin is also critical in designing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of surface dose calculation by a clinically used treatment planning system and those measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) in a customized chest wall phantom. This study involved the construction of a chest wall phantom for skin dose assessment. Seven TLDs were distributed throughout each right chest wall phantom to give adequate representation of measured radiation doses. Point doses from the CMS Xio Registered-Sign treatment planning system (TPS) were calculated for each relevant TLD positions and results correlated. There were no significant difference between measured absorbed dose by TLD and calculated doses by the TPS (p > 0.05 (1-tailed). Dose accuracy of up to 2.21% was found. The deviations from the calculated absorbed doses were overall larger (3.4%) when wedges and bolus were used. 3D radiotherapy TPS is a useful and accurate tool to assess the accuracy of surface dose. Our studies have shown that radiation treatment accuracy expressed as a comparison between calculated doses (by TPS) and measured doses (by TLD dosimetry) can be accurately predicted for tangential treatment of the chest wall after mastectomy.

Wong, Sharon [National University of Singapore, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine (Singapore); Back, Michael [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia); Tan, Poh Wee; Lee, Khai Mun; Baggarley, Shaun [National University, Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, National University, Hospital, Tower Block (Singapore); Lu, Jaide Jay, E-mail: mdcljj@nus.edu.sg [National University of Singapore, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine (Singapore); National University, Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, National University, Hospital, Tower Block (Singapore)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Long-Term Performance of a Passive Wastewater Treatment System: The Albright Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Albright passive wastewater treatment system, which receives alkaline leachate from a closed coal combustion by-product landfill, has operated continuously for 19 years. It has undergone two major upgrades to incorporate new passive technologies. Monitoring parameters have included pH, alkalinity, acidity, aluminum, iron, manganese, nickel, zinc, total dissolved solids, and total suspended solids, along with several other trace metals present at very low concentrations. This report summarizes the his...

2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

147

The integrated melter off-gas treatment systems at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The West Valley Demonstration project was established by an act of Congress in 1980 to solidify the high level radioactive liquid wastes produced from operation of the Western New York Nuclear Services Center from 1966 to 1972. The waste will be solidified as borosilicate glass. This report describes the functions, the controlling design criteria, and the resulting design of the melter off-gas treatment systems.

Vance, R.F.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

EVALUATION OF ALTERNATE STAINLESS STEEL SURFACE TREATMENTS FOR MASS SPECTROSCOPY AND OTHER TRITIUM SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

There are specific components in the SRS Tritium Facilities that are required to introduce as few chemical impurities (such as protium and methane) as possible into the process gas. Two such components are the inlet systems for the mass spectroscopy facilities and hydrogen isotope mix standard containers. Two vendors now passivate stainless steel components for these systems, and both are relatively small businesses whose future viability can be questioned, which creates the need for new sources. Stainless steel containers were designed to evaluate alternate surface treatment vendors for tritium storage and handling for these high purity tritium systems. Five vendors applied their own 'best' surface treatments to two containers each - one was a current vendor, another was a chemical vapor deposited silicon coating, and the other three were electropolishing and chemical cleaning vendors. Pure tritium gas was introduced into all ten containers and the composition was monitored over time. The only observed impurities in the gas were some HT, less CT{sub 4}, and very small amounts of T{sub 2}O in all cases. The currently used vendor treated containers contained the least impurities. The chemical vapor deposited silicon treatment resulted in the highest impurity levels. Sampling one set of containers after about one month of tritium exposure revealed the impurity level to be nearly the same as that after more than a year of exposure - this result suggests that cleaning new stainless steel components by tritium gas contact for about a month may be a worthy operation.

Clark, E.; Mauldin, C.; Neikirk, K.

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

149

Microsoft Word - S07079_jul_sep_10.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

July 1-September 30, 2010 July 1-September 30, 2010 October 2010 Doc. No. S07079 Page 1 Monticello, Utah, National Priorities List (NPL) Sites Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: July 1-September 30, 2010 This report summarizes project status and activities implemented July through September 2010, and provides a schedule of near-term activities for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) Site. This report also includes disposal cell and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection reports, site meteorological data, and a performance summary for the ex situ groundwater treatment system. The annual inspection of the MMTS and MVP was conducted during the week of September 13, 2010. This quarterly report does not present the findings of that inspection.

150

Microsoft Word - S06430_JanMar.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

31, 2010 31, 2010 April 2010 Doc. No. S06430 Page 1 Monticello, Utah, National Priorities List Sites Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: January 1-March 31, 2010 This report summarizes project status and activities implemented January through March 2010, and provides a schedule of near-term activities for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) Site. This report also includes disposal cell and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection reports, site meteorological data, and a performance summary for the ex situ groundwater treatment system. 1.0 MMTS Activities and Status 1.1 Repository Site Inspections * Monthly and quarterly inspections of the repository site (waste disposal cell, Pond 4, and

151

Summary - System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Hanford EM Project: WTP ETR Report Date: November 2008 ETR-18 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at Hanford Why DOE-EM Did This Review Construction of the facilities of the Hanford site's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) are scheduled for completion in 2017, with radioactive waste processing scheduled to begin in 2019. An estimated 23 to 35 years will then be required to complete high-level waste (HLW) vitrification. However, vitrification of low-activity waste (LAW) may extend the WTP mission duration by decades more if supplemental LAW processing beyond the capacity of the present facility is not incorporated. The purpose of this independent review was to

152

Oak Ridge National Lebroatory Liquid&Gaseous Waste Treatment System Strategic Plan  

SciTech Connect

Excellence in Laboratory operations is one of the three key goals of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Agenda. That goal will be met through comprehensive upgrades of facilities and operational approaches over the next few years. Many of ORNL's physical facilities, including the liquid and gaseous waste collection and treatment systems, are quite old, and are reaching the end of their safe operating life. The condition of research facilities and supporting infrastructure, including the waste handling facilities, is a key environmental, safety and health (ES&H) concern. The existing infrastructure will add considerably to the overhead costs of research due to increased maintenance and operating costs as these facilities continue to age. The Liquid Gaseous Waste Treatment System (LGWTS) Reengineering Project is a UT-Battelle, LLC (UT-B) Operations Improvement Program (OIP) project that was undertaken to develop a plan for upgrading the ORNL liquid and gaseous waste systems to support ORNL's research mission.

Van Hoesen, S.D.

2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Use of Transportable Processing Systems for the Treatment of Radioactive Nuclear Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EnergySolutions has developed two major types of radioactive processing plants based on its experience in the USA and UK, and its exclusive North American access to the intellectual property and know-how developed over 50 years at the Sellafield nuclear site in the UK. Passive Secure Cells are a type of hot cell used in place of the Canyons typically used in US-designed radioactive facilities. They are used in permanent, large scale plants suitable for long term processing of large amounts of radioactive material. The more recently developed Transportable Processing Systems, which are the subject of this paper, are used for nuclear waste processing and clean-up when processing is expected to be complete within shorter timescales and when it is advantageous to be able to move the processing equipment amongst a series of geographically spread-out waste treatment sites. Such transportable systems avoid the construction of a monolithic waste processing plant which itself would require extensive decommissioning and clean-up when its mission is complete. This paper describes a range of transportable radioactive waste processing equipment that EnergySolutions and its partners have developed including: the portable MOSS drum-based waste grouting system, the skid mounted MILWPP large container waste grouting system, the IPAN skid-mounted waste fissile content non-destructive assay system, the Wiped Film Evaporator low liquid hold-up transportable evaporator system, the CCPU transportable solvent extraction cesium separation system, and the SEP mobile shielded cells for emptying radioactive debris from water-filled silos. Maximum use is made of proven, robust, and compact processing equipment such as centrifugal contactors, remote sampling systems, and cement grout feed and metering devices. Flexible, elastomer-based Hose-in-Hose assemblies and container-based transportable pump booster stations are used in conjunction with these transportable waste processing units for transferring radioactive waste from its source to the processing equipment. (authors)

Phillips, Ch.; Houghton, D.; Crawford, G. [EnergySolutions LLC., 2345 Stevens Drive, Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) at Fossil-Fueled Electric Generating Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Department of Energy-National Energy Technologies Laboratory (DOE-NETL) are evaluating and demonstrating integration of terrestrial carbon sequestration techniques at a coal-fired electric power plant through the use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system gypsum as a soil amendment and mulch, and coal fly ash pond process water for periodic irrigation. From January to March 2002, the Project Team initiated the construction of a 40 ha Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) near TVA's Paradise Fossil Plant on marginally reclaimed surface coal mine lands in Kentucky. The CCWESTRS is growing commercial grade trees and cover crops and is expected to sequester 1.5-2.0 MT/ha carbon per year over a 20-year period. The concept could be used to meet a portion of the timber industry's needs while simultaneously sequestering carbon in lands which would otherwise remain non-productive. The CCWESTRS includes a constructed wetland to enhance the ability to sequester carbon and to remove any nutrients and metals present in the coal fly ash process water runoff. The CCWESTRS project is a cooperative effort between TVA, EPRI, and DOE-NETL, with a total budget of $1,574,000. The proposed demonstration project began in October 2000 and has continued through December 2005. Additional funding is being sought in order to extend the project. The primary goal of the project is to determine if integrating power plant processes with carbon sequestration techniques will enhance carbon sequestration cost-effectively. This goal is consistent with DOE objectives to provide economically competitive and environmentally safe options to offset projected growth in U.S. baseline emissions of greenhouse gases after 2010, achieve the long-term goal of $10/ton of avoided net costs for carbon sequestration, and provide half of the required reductions in global greenhouse gases by 2025. Other potential benefits of the demonstration include developing a passive technology for water treatment for trace metal and nutrient release reductions, using power plant by-products to improve coal mine land reclamation and carbon sequestration, developing wildlife habitat and green-space around production facilities, generating Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) credits for the use of process water, and producing wood products for use by the lumber and pulp and paper industry. Project activities conducted during the five year project period include: Assessing tree cultivation and other techniques used to sequester carbon; Project site assessment; Greenhouse studies to determine optimum plant species and by-product application; Designing, constructing, operating, monitoring, and evaluating the CCWESTRS system; and Reporting (ongoing). The ability of the system to sequester carbon will be the primary measure of effectiveness, measured by accessing survival and growth response of plants within the CCWESTRS. In addition, costs associated with design, construction, and monitoring will be evaluated and compared to projected benefits of other carbon sequestration technologies. The test plan involves the application of three levels each of two types of power plant by-products--three levels of FGD gypsum mulch, and three levels of ash pond irrigation water. This design produces nine treatment levels which are being tested with two species of hardwood trees (sweet gum and sycamore). The project is examining the effectiveness of applications of 0, 8-cm, and 15-cm thick gypsum mulch layers and 0, 13 cm, and 25 cm of coal fly ash water for irrigation. Each treatment combination is being replicated three times, resulting in a total of 54 treatment plots (3 FGD gypsum levels X 3 irrigation water levels x 2 tree species x 3 replicates). Survival and growth response of plant species in terms of sequestering carbon in plant material and soil will be the primary measure of effectiveness of each treatment. Additionally, the ability of the site soils and unsaturated zone subsurface m

P. Alan Mays; Bert R. Bock; Gregory A. Brodie; L. Suzanne Fisher; J. Devereux Joslin; Donald L. Kachelman; Jimmy J. Maddox; N. S. Nicholas; Larry E. Shelton; Nick Taylor; Mark H. Wolfe; Dennis H. Yankee; John Goodrich-Mahoney

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS USING A SURFACTANT MODIFIED ZEOLITE/VAPOR PHASE BIOREACTOR SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. It is by some estimates the largest single waste stream in the country, aside from nonhazardous industrial wastes. Characteristics of produced water include high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component, and chemicals added during the oil-production process. While most of the produced water is disposed via reinjection, some of them must be treated to remove organic constituents before the water is discharged. Current treatment options are successful in reducing the organic content; however, they cannot always meet the levels of current or proposed regulations for discharged water. Therefore, an efficient, cost-effective treatment technology is needed. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been used successfully to treat contaminated ground water for organic and inorganic constituents. In addition, the low cost of natural zeolites makes their use attractive in water-treatment applications. Our previous DOE research work (DE-AC26-99BC15221) demonstrated that SMZ could successfully remove BTEX compounds from the produced water. In addition, SMZ could be regenerated through a simple air sparging process. The primary goal of this project is to develop a robust SMZ/VPB treatment system to efficiently remove the organic constituents from produced water in a cost-effective manner. This report summarizes work of this project from October 2002 to March 2003. In this starting stage of this study, we have continued our investigation of SMZ regeneration from our previous DOE project. Two saturation/stripping cycles have been completed for SMZ columns saturated with BTEX compounds. Preliminary results suggest that BTEX sorption actually increases with the number of saturation/regeneration cycles. Furthermore, the experimental vapor phase bioreactors for this project have been designed and are currently being assembled to treat the off-gas from the SMZ regeneration process.

Lynn E. Katz; Kerry A. Kinney; R.S. Bowman; E.J. Sullivan

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Low Molecular Weight Organic Contaminants in Advanced Treatment: Occurrence, Treatment and Implications to Desalination and Water Reuse Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. 1987] while produced water from natural gas fields inin desalinated water produced by reverse osmosis systems (of bromophenols in water produced by seawater desalination

Agus, Eva

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Biological Treatment of Ammonia-Rich Wastewaters by Natural Microbial Communities in the ATOXIC/ASSET Purification System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes along with high throughput 454 pyrosequencing technology were used to identify microbial communities present at a novel passive wastewater treatment system designed to remove ammonium, nitrate, and heavy metals from fossil plant effluents. Seasonal changes in microbial community composition were observed, however significant (p=0.001) changes were detected in bacterial and archaeal communities consistent with ammonium removal throughout the treatment systems. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed presence of potential ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), Nitrosomonas, Nitrosococcus, Planctomycetes, and OD1. Other bacteria, such as Nitrospira, Nitrococcus, Nitrobacter, Thiobacillus, -Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, which play roles in nitrification and denitrification, were also detected. The relative abundance of the potential ammonium-oxidizing archaea (AOA) (Thermoprotei within the phylum Crenarchaeota) increased with ammonium availability at the splitter box and zero-valent iron extraction trenches even though AOB removed half of the ammonium in the trickling filters at the beginning of the treatment system. The microbial community removed the ammonium from the wastewater within both pilot-scale treatment systems, thus the treatment system components provided an effective environment for the treatment of ammonium enriched wastewater from coal burning power plants equipped with selective catalytic reducers for nitrogen oxide removal.

Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Fisher, L. Suzanne [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); Brodie, Greg A [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Fate of As, Se, and Hg in a Passive Integrated System for Treatment of Fossil Plant Wastewater  

SciTech Connect

TVA is collaborating with EPRI and DOE to demonstrate a passive treatment system for removing SCR-derived ammonia and trace elements from a coal-fired power plant wastewater stream. The components of the integrated system consist of trickling filters for ammonia oxidation, reaction cells containing zero-valent iron (ZVI) for trace contaminant removal, a settling basin for storage of iron hydroxide floc, and anaerobic vertical-flow wetlands for biological denitrification. The passive integrated treatment system will treat up to 0.25 million gallons per day (gpd) of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) pond effluent, with a configuration requiring only gravity flow to obviate the need for pumps. The design of the system will enable a comparative evaluation of two parallel treatment trains, with and without the ZVI extraction trench and settling/oxidation basin components. One of the main objectives is to gain a better understanding of the chemical transformations that species of trace elements such as arsenic, selenium, and mercury undergo as they are treated in passive treatment system components with differing environmental conditions. This progress report details the design criteria for the passive integrated system for treating fossil power plant wastewater as well as performance results from the first several months of operation. Engineering work on the project has been completed, and construction took place during the summer of 2005. Monitoring of the passive treatment system was initiated in October 2005 and continued until May 18 2006. The results to date indicate that the treatment system is effective in reducing levels of nitrogen compounds and trace metals. Concentrations of both ammonia and trace metals were lower than expected in the influent FGD water, and additions to increase these concentrations will be done in the future to further test the removal efficiency of the treatment system. In May 2006, the wetland cells were drained of FGD water, refilled with less toxic ash pond water, and replanted due to low survival rates from the first planting the previous summer. The goals of the TVA-EPRI-DOE collaboration include building a better understanding of the chemical transformations that trace elements such as arsenic, selenium, and mercury undergo as they are treated in a passive treatment system, and to evaluate the performance of a large-scale replicated passive treatment system to provide additional design criteria and economic factors.

Terry Yost; Paul Pier; Gregory Brodie

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Treatment of municipal landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic digester and activated sludge system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of treating sanitary landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic and activated sludge system. A high-strength leachate from Shiraz municipal landfill site was treated using this system. A two-stage laboratory-scale anaerobic digester under mesophilic conditions and an activated sludge unit were used. Landfill leachate composition and characteristics varied considerably during 8 months experiment (COD concentrations of 48,552-62,150 mg/L). It was found that the system could reduce the COD of the leachate by 94% at a loading rate of 2.25 g COD/L/d and 93% at loading rate of 3.37 g COD/L/d. The anaerobic digester treatment was quite effective in removing Fe, Cu, Mn, and Ni. However, in the case of Zn, removal efficiency was about 50%. For the rest of the HMs the removal efficiencies were in the range 88.8-99.9%. Ammonia reduction did not occur in anaerobic digesters. Anaerobic reactors increased alkalinity about 3.2-4.8% in the 1st digester and 1.8-7.9% in the 2nd digester. In activated sludge unit, alkalinity and ammonia removal efficiency were 49-60% and 48.6-64.7%, respectively. Methane production rate was in the range of 0.02-0.04, 0.04-0.07, and 0.02-0.04 L/g COD{sub rem} for the 1st digester, the 2nd digester, and combination of both digesters, respectively; the methane content of the biogas varied between 60% and 63%.

Kheradmand, S. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Shiraz, Shiraz 7134851156 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimi-Jashni, A., E-mail: akarimi@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Shiraz, Shiraz 7134851156 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sartaj, M. [Department of Civil Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 841568311 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS USING A SURFACTANT MODIFIED ZEOLITE/VAPOR PHASE BIOREATOR SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry is by some estimates the largest single waste stream in the country, aside from nonhazardous industrial wastes. Characteristics of produced water include high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component, and chemicals added during the oil-production process. While most of the produced water is disposed via reinjection, some of them must be treated to remove organic constituents before the water is discharged. An efficient, cost-effective treatment technology is needed to remove these constituents. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been used successfully to treat contaminated ground water for organic and inorganic constituents. In addition, the low cost of natural zeolites makes their use attractive in water-treatment applications. Our previous DOE research work (DE-AC26-99BC15221) demonstrated that SMZ could successfully remove BTEX compounds from the produced water. In addition, SMZ could be regenerated through a simple air sparging process. The primary goal of this project is to develop a robust SMZ/VPB treatment system to efficiently remove the organic constituents from produced water in a cost-effective manner. This report summarizes work of this project from March 2003 through September 2003. We have continued our investigation of SMZ regeneration from our previous DOE project. Ten saturation/stripping cycles have been completed for SMZ columns saturated with BTEX compounds. The results suggest that BTEX sorption capacity is not lost after ten saturation/regeneration cycles. The composition of produced water from a site operated by Crystal Solutions Ltd. in Wyoming has been characterized and was used to identify key semi-volatile components. Isotherms with selected semi-volatile components have been initiated and preliminary results have been obtained. The experimental vapor phase bioreactors for this project have been designed and assembled to treat the off-gas from the SMZ regeneration process. These columns will be used both in the laboratory and in the proposed field testing to be conducted next year. Innocula for the columns that degrade all of the BTEX columns have been developed.

LYNN E. KATZ; KERRY A. KINNEY; R.S. BOWMAN; E.J. SULLIVAN

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment system monticello" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

Treatment of Produced Waters Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed on this project from October 2004 through March 2005. In previous work, a surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) was shown to be an effective system for removing BTEX contaminants from produced water. Additional work on this project demonstrated that a compost-based biofilter could biodegrade the BTEX contaminants found in the SMZ regeneration waste gas stream. However, it was also determined that the BTEX concentrations in the waste gas stream varied significantly during the regeneration period and the initial BTEX concentrations were too high for the biofilter to handle effectively. A series of experiments were conducted to determine the feasibility of using a passive adsorption column placed upstream of the biofilter to attenuate the peak gas-phase VOC concentrations delivered to the biofilter during the SMZ regeneration process. In preparation for the field test of the SMZ/VPB treatment system in New Mexico, a pilot-scale SMZ system was also designed and constructed during this reporting period. Finally, a cost and feasibility analysis was also completed. To investigate the merits of the passive buffering system during SMZ regeneration, two adsorbents, SMZ and granular activated carbon (GAC) were investigated in flow-through laboratory-scale columns to determine their capacity to handle steady and unsteady VOC feed conditions. When subjected to a toluene-contaminated air stream, the column containing SMZ reduced the peak inlet 1000 ppmv toluene concentration to 630 ppmv at a 10 second contact time. This level of buffering was insufficient to ensure complete removal in the downstream biofilter and the contact time was longer than desired. For this reason, using SMZ as a passive buffering system for the gas phase contaminants was not pursued further. In contrast to the SMZ results, GAC was found to be an effective adsorbent to handle the peak contaminant concentrations that occur early during the SMZ regeneration process. At a one second residence time, the GAC bed reduced peak contaminant concentrations by 97%. After the initial peak, the inlet VOC concentration in the SMZ regeneration gas stream drops exponentially with time. During this period, the contaminants on the GAC subsequently desorbed at a nearly steady rate over the next 45 hours resulting in a relatively steady effluent concentration of approximately 25 ppm{sub v}. This lower concentration is readily degradable by a downstream vapor phase biofilter (VPB) and the steady nature of the feed stream will prevent the biomass in the VPB from enduring starvation conditions between SMZ regeneration cycles. Repetitive sorption and desorption cycles that would be expected in the field were also investigated. It was determined that although the GAC initially lost some VOC sorption capacity, the adsorption and desorption profiles stabilized after approximately 6 cycles indicating that a GAC bed should be suitable for continuous operation. In preparation for the pilot field testing of the SMZ/VPB system, design, ''in-house'' construction and testing of the field system were completed during this project period. The design of the SMZ system for the pilot test was based on previous investigations by the PI's in Wyoming, 2002 and on analyses of the produced water at the field site in New Mexico. The field tests are scheduled for summer, 2005. A cost survey, feasibility of application and cost analyses were completed to investigate the long term effectiveness of the SMZ/VPB system as a method of treating produced water for re-use. Several factors were investigated, including: current costs to treat and dispose of produced water, end-use water quality requirements, and state and federal permitting requirements.

Soondong Kwon; Elaine B. Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Lynn E. Katz; Kerry A. Kinney; R. S. Bowman; E. J. Sullivan

2005-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

162

Compatibility of the ultraviolet light-ozone system for laundry waste water treatment in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

As an alternative treatment system for laundry waste water in nuclear power plants, a system was chosen in which such organic compounds as surfactant would be oxidized by ultraviolet (UV) light and ozone. The system compatibility, UV light source, and dissolved ozone concentration were examined through experiments. First, ozone gas was absorbed in the waste water. After the dissolved ozone concentration equilibrated at the desired value, the waste water was irradiated by a mercury lamp. Then, the time dependence of the concentrations of the organic compounds, the dissolved ozone, and the hydrogen peroxide were measured to estimate the treatment rate of the system. The mercury lamp with a 10{sup 5}-Pa vapor pressure achieved large UV radiation and a treatment rate increase, leading to a compatible system without secondary waste generation. The effect of the dissolved ozone concentration on the treatment rate was saturated when concentration was >3.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} mol/10{sup {minus}3} m{sup 3} at the time UV radiation was started. Numerical results indicated the saturation was due to hydrogen peroxide generation, which prevents hydroxyl radical generation.

Matsuo, Toshiaki; Nishi, Takashi; Matsuda, Masami; Izumida, Tatsuo [Hitachi, Ltd. (Japan)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Decontamination and inspection plan for Phase 3 closure of the 300 area waste acid treatment system  

SciTech Connect

This decontamination and inspection plan (DIP) describes decontamination and verification activities in support of Phase 3 closure of the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System (WATS). Phase 3 is the third phase of three WATS closure phases. Phase 3 attains clean closure conditions for WATS portions of the 334 and 311 Tank Farms (TF) and the 333 and 303-F Buildings. This DIP also describes designation and management of waste and debris generated during Phase 3 closure activities. Information regarding Phase 1 and Phase 2 for decontamination and verification activities closure can be found in WHC-SD-ENV-AP-001 and HNF-1784, respectively. This DIP is provided as a supplement to the closure plan (DOE/RL-90-11). This DIP provides the documentation for Ecology concurrence with Phase 3 closure methods and activities. This DIP is intended to provide greater detail than is contained in the closure plan to satisfy Ecology Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 requirement that closure documents describe the methods for removing, transporting, storing, and disposing of all dangerous waste at the unit. The decontamination and verification activities described in this DIP are based on the closure plan and on agreements reached between Ecology and the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) during Phase 3 closure activity workshops and/or project manager meetings (PMMs).

LUKE, S.N.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ENGINEERED CONTAINER RETRIEVAL AND TRANSFER SYSTEM PRELMINARY DESIGN HAZARD AND OPERABILITY STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Hazard and Operability (HAZOP) study addresses the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) preliminary design for retrieving sludge from underwater engineered containers located in the 105-K West (KW) Basin, transferring the sludge as a sludge-water slurry (hereafter referred to as 'slurry') to a Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) located in a Modified KW Basin Annex, and preparing the STSC for transport to T Plant using the Sludge Transport System (STS). There are six, underwater engineered containers located in the KW Basin that, at the time of sludge retrieval, will contain an estimated volume of 5.2 m{sup 3} of KW Basin floor and pit sludge, 18.4 m{sup 3} of 105-K East (KE) Basin floor, pit, and canister sludge, and 3.5 m{sup 3} of settler tank sludge. The KE and KW Basin sludge consists of fuel corrosion products (including metallic uranium, and fission and activation products), small fuel fragments, iron and aluminum oxide, sand, dirt, operational debris, and biological debris. The settler tank sludge consists of sludge generated by the washing of KE and KW Basin fuel in the Primary Clean Machine. A detailed description of the origin of sludge and its chemical and physical characteristics can be found in HNF-41051, Preliminary STP Container and Settler Sludge Process System Description and Material Balance. In summary, the ECRTS retrieves sludge from the engineered containers and hydraulically transfers it as a slurry into an STSC positioned within a trailer-mounted STS cask located in a Modified KW Basin Annex. The slurry is allowed to settle within the STSC to concentrate the solids and clarify the supernate. After a prescribed settling period the supernate is decanted. The decanted supernate is filtered through a sand filter and returned to the basin. Subsequent batches of slurry are added to the STSC, settled, and excess supernate removed until the prescribed quantity of sludge is collected. The sand filter is then backwashed into the STSC. The STSC and STS cask are then inerted and transported to T Plant.

CARRO CA

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Treatment of Produced Water Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. Produced waters typically contain a high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component as well as chemicals added during the oil-production process. It has been estimated that a total of 14 billion barrels of produced water were generated in 2002 from onshore operations (Veil, 2004). Although much of this produced water is disposed via reinjection, environmental and cost considerations can make surface discharge of this water a more practical means of disposal. In addition, reinjection is not always a feasible option because of geographic, economic, or regulatory considerations. In these situations, it may be desirable, and often necessary from a regulatory viewpoint, to treat produced water before discharge. It may also be feasible to treat waters that slightly exceed regulatory limits for re-use in arid or drought-prone areas, rather than losing them to reinjection. A previous project conducted under DOE Contract DE-AC26-99BC15221 demonstrated that surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) represents a potential treatment technology for produced water containing BTEX. Laboratory and field experiments suggest that: (1) sorption of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) to SMZ follows linear isotherms in which sorption increases with increasing solute hydrophobicity; (2) the presence of high salt concentrations substantially increases the capacity of the SMZ for BTEX; (3) competitive sorption among the BTEX compounds is negligible; and, (4) complete recovery of the SMZ sorption capacity for BTEX can be achieved by air sparging the SMZ. This report summarizes research for a follow on project to optimize the regeneration process for multiple sorption/regeneration cycles, and to develop and incorporate a vapor phase bioreactor (VPB) system for treatment of the off-gas generated during air sparging. To this end, we conducted batch and column laboratory SMZ and VPB experiments with synthetic and actual produced waters. Based on the results of the laboratory testing, a pilot scale study was designed and conducted to evaluate the combined SMZ/VPB process. An economic and regulatory feasibility analysis was also completed as part of the current study to assess the viability of the process for various water re-use options.

Lynn E. Katz; Kerry A. Kinney; Robert S. Bowman; Enid J. Sullivan; Soondong Kwon; Elaine B. Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Craig R. Altare

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Partitioning planning studies: Preliminary evaluation of metal and radionuclide partitioning the high-temperature thermal treatment systems  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary study of toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning during high-temperature processing of mixed waste has been conducted during Fiscal Year 1996 within the Environmental Management Technology Evaluation Project. The study included: (a) identification of relevant partitioning mechanisms that cause feed material to be distributed between the solid, molten, and gas phases within a thermal treatment system; (b) evaluations of existing test data from applicable demonstration test programs as a means to identify and understand elemental and species partitioning; and, (c) evaluation of theoretical or empirical partitioning models for use in predicting elemental or species partitioning in a thermal treatment system. This preliminary study was conducted to identify the need for and the viability of developing the tools capable of describing and predicting toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning in the most applicable mixed waste thermal treatment processes. This document presents the results and recommendations resulting from this study that may serve as an impetus for developing and implementing these predictive tools.

Liekhus, K.; Grandy, J.; Chambers, A. [and others] [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Application of the Analytic Hierarchy Process and the Analytic Network Process for the assessment of different wastewater treatment systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multicriteria analyses (MCAs) are used to make comparative assessments of alternative projects or heterogeneous measures and allow several criteria to be taken into account simultaneously in a complex situation. The paper shows the application of different ... Keywords: Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), Analytic Network Process (ANP), Sustainability assessment, decision support systems (DSS), wastewater treatment (WWT) technologies

Marta Bottero; Elena Comino; Vincenzo Riggio

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Treatment and prevention systems for acid mine drainage and halogenated contaminants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Embodiments include treatments for acid mine drainage generation sources (10 perhaps by injection of at least one substrate (11) and biologically constructing a protective biofilm (13) on acid mine drainage generation source materials (14). Further embodiments include treatments for degradation of contaminated water environments (17) with substrates such as returned milk and the like.

Jin, Song (Fort Collins, CO); Fallgren, Paul H. (Laramie, WY); Morris, Jeffrey M. (Laramie, WY)

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Commissioning of modulator-based IMRT with XiO treatment planning system  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the procedures for correction of the modulator thickness and commissioning of the XiO treatment planning system (TPS) for modulator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (M-IMRT). This modulator manufacturing system adopts a method in which the modulator is milled using a floor-type computer-aided numerical control milling machine (CNC-mill) with modulator data calculated by XiO TPS. XiO TPS uses only effective attenuation coefficients (EAC) for modulator thickness calculation. This article describes a modified method for assessing modulator thickness. A two-dimensional linear attenuation array was used to correct the modulator thickness calculated by XiO. Narrow-beam geometry was used for measuring the linear attenuation coefficient (LAC) at off-axis positions (OAP) for varying brass thicknesses. An equation for the two-dimensional LAC ratio (2D-LACR) can be used to calculate the corrected modulator thickness. It is assumed that the broad beam EAC of a small field varies with the brass thickness and the OAP distance in the same way as that of LACR, so the two-dimensional EAC (2D-EAC) is equal to the EAC corrected using the LACR. The dose distribution was evaluated for three geometric patterns and one clinical case on low energy x ray (4 MV) with a large field size (20x20 cm{sup 2}). The results using the proposed correction method of modulator thickness showed a good agreement between the measured dose distributions and the dose distributions calculated by TPS with the correction. Hence, the method is effective to improve the accuracy of M-IMRT in XiO TPS. An important problem for the brass modulator is the milling condition, such as the drill diameter and the cutting pitch size. It is necessary to improve the accuracy of M-IMRT for the ''softening'' and ''hardening'' effects of the beam to be considered in dose calculation in patients and the modulator profile design.

Oguchi, Hiroshi; Obata, Yasunori [Program in Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-20 Daiko Minami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan) and Shinshu University Hospital, Department of Radiology, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Department of Radiological Technology, Nagoya University School of Health Sciences, 1-1-20 Daiko Minami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Conceptual Design of a MEDE Treatment System for Sodium Bonded Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Unirradiated sodium bonded metal fuel and casting scrap material containing highly enriched uranium (HEU) is stored at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This material, which includes intact fuel assemblies and elements from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) reactors as well as scrap material from the casting of these fuels, has no current use under the terminated reactor programs for both facilities. The Department of Energy (DOE), under the Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel Treatment Record of Decision (ROD), has determined that this material could be prepared and transferred to an off-site facility for processing and eventual fabrication of fuel for commercial nuclear reactors. A plan is being developed to prepare, package and transfer this material to the DOE High Enriched Uranium Disposition Program Office (HDPO), located at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Disposition of the sodium bonded material will require separating the elemental sodium from the metallic uranium fuel. A sodium distillation process known as MEDE (Melt-Drain-Evaporate), will be used for the separation process. The casting scrap material needs to be sorted to remove any foreign material or fines that are not acceptable to the HDPO program. Once all elements have been cut and loaded into baskets, they are then loaded into an evaporation chamber as the first step in the MEDE process. The chamber will be sealed and the pressure reduced to approximately 200 mtorr. The chamber will then be heated as high as 650 C, causing the sodium to melt and then vaporize. The vapor phase sodium will be driven into an outlet line where it is condensed and drained into a receiver vessel. Once the evaporation operation is complete, the system is de-energized and returned to atmospheric pressure. This paper describes the MEDE process as well as a general overview of the furnace systems, as necessary, to complete the MEDE process.

Carl E. Baily; Karen A. Moore; Collin J. Knight; Peter B. Wells; Paul J. Petersen; Ali S. Siahpush; Matthew T. Weseman

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Evaluation of operating characteristics for a chabazite zeolite system for treatment of process wastewater at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory and pilot-scale testing were performed for development and design of a chabazite zeolite ion-exchange system to replace existing treatment systems at the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The process wastewater treatment systems at ORNL need upgrading to improve efficiency, reduce waste generation, and remove greater quantities of contaminants from the wastewater. Previous study indicated that replacement of the existing PWTP systems with an ion-exchange system using chabazite zeolite will satisfy these upgrade objectives. Pilot-scale testing of the zeolite system was performed using a commercially available ion-exchange system to evaluate physical operating characteristics and to validate smaller-scale column test results. Results of this test program indicate that (1) spent zeolite can be sluiced easily and completely from a commercially designed vessel, (2) clarification followed by granular anthracite prefilters is adequate pretreatment for the zeolite system, and (3) the length of the mass transfer zone was comparable with that obtained in smaller-scale column tests. Laboratory studies were performed to determine the loading capacity of the zeolite for selected heavy metals. These test results indicated fairly effective removal of silver, cadmium, copper, mercury, nickel, lead, and zinc from simple water solutions. Heavy-metals data collected during pilot-scale testing of actual wastewater indicated marginal removal of iron, copper, and zinc. Reduced effectiveness for other heavy metals during pilot testing can be attributed to the presence of interfering cations and the relatively short zeolite/wastewater contact time. Flocculating agents (polyelectrolytes) were tested for pretreatment of wastewater prior to the zeolite flow-through column system. Several commercially available polyelectrolytes were effective in flocculation and settling of suspended solids in process wastewater.

Kent, T.E.; Perona, J.J.; Jennings, H.L.; Lucero, A.J.; Taylor, P.A.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Non-Incineration Treatment to Reduce Benzene and VOC Emissions from Green Sand Molding Systems  

SciTech Connect

Final report describing laboratory, pilot scale and production scale evaluation of advanced oxidation systems for emissions and cost reduction in metal casting green sand systems.

Fred S. Cannon; Robert C. Voigt

2002-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

173

Guideline for benchmarking thermal treatment systems for low-level mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

A process for benchmarking low-level mixed waste (LLMW) treatment technologies has been developed. When used in conjunction with the identification and preparation of surrogate waste mixtures, and with defined quality assurance and quality control procedures, the benchmarking process will effectively streamline the selection of treatment technologies being considered by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for LLMW cleanup and management. Following the quantitative template provided in the benchmarking process will greatly increase the technical information available for the decision-making process. The additional technical information will remove a large part of the uncertainty in the selection of treatment technologies. It is anticipated that the use of the benchmarking process will minimize technology development costs and overall treatment costs. In addition, the benchmarking process will enhance development of the most promising LLMW treatment processes and aid in transferring the technology to the private sector. To instill inherent quality, the benchmarking process is based on defined criteria and a structured evaluation format, which are independent of any specific conventional treatment or emerging process technology. Five categories of benchmarking criteria have been developed for the evaluation: operation/design; personnel health and safety; economics; product quality; and environmental quality. This benchmarking document gives specific guidance on what information should be included and how it should be presented. A standard format for reporting is included in Appendix A and B of this document. Special considerations for LLMW are presented and included in each of the benchmarking categories.

Hoffman, D.P.; Gibson, L.V. Jr.; Hermes, W.H. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bastian, R.E. [Focus Environmental, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Davis, W.T. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-Traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assessed opportunities for improving water quality associated with coal-fired power generation including the use of non-traditional waters for cooling, innovative technology for recovering and reusing water within power plants, novel approaches for the removal of trace inorganic compounds from ash pond effluents, and novel approaches for removing biocides from cooling tower blowdown. This research evaluated specifically designed pilot-scale constructed wetland systems for treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters for reuse in thermoelectric power generation and other purposes. The overall objective of this project was to decrease targeted constituents in non-traditional waters to achieve reuse criteria or discharge limitations established by the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Clean Water Act (CWA). The six original project objectives were completed, and results are presented in this final technical report. These objectives included identification of targeted constituents for treatment in four non-traditional water sources, determination of reuse or discharge criteria for treatment, design of constructed wetland treatment systems for these non-traditional waters, and measurement of treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters, as well as determination of the suitability of the treated non-traditional waters for reuse or discharge to receiving aquatic systems. The four non-traditional waters used to accomplish these objectives were ash basin water, cooling water, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) water, and produced water. The contaminants of concern identified in ash basin waters were arsenic, chromium, copper, mercury, selenium, and zinc. Contaminants of concern in cooling waters included free oxidants (chlorine, bromine, and peroxides), copper, lead, zinc, pH, and total dissolved solids. FGD waters contained contaminants of concern including arsenic, boron, chlorides, selenium, mercury, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and zinc. Similar to FGD waters, produced waters contained contaminants of concern that are predominantly inorganic (arsenic, cadmium, chlorides, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, sulfide, zinc, total dissolved solids), but also contained some organics (benzene, PAHs, toluene, total organic carbon, total suspended solids, and oil and grease). Constituents of concern that may cause chemical scaling, biofouling and corrosion, such as pH, hardness and ionic strength, and nutrients (P, K, and N) may also be found in all four non-traditional waters. NPDES permits were obtained for these non-traditional waters and these permit limits are summarized in tabular format within this report. These limits were used to establish treatment goals for this research along with toxicity values for Ceriodaphnia dubia, water quality criteria established by the US EPA, irrigation standards established by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), and reuse standards focused on minimization of damage to the power plant by treated waters. Constructed wetland treatment systems were designed for each non-traditional water source based on published literature reviews regarding remediation of the constituents of concern, biogeochemistry of the specific contaminants, and previous research. During this study, 4 non-traditional waters, which included ash basin water, cooling water, FGD water and produced water (PW) were obtained or simulated to measure constructed wetland treatment system performance. Based on data collected from FGD experiments, pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment systems can decrease aqueous concentrations of elements of concern (As, B, Hg, N, and Se). Percent removal was specific for each element, including ranges of 40.1% to 77.7% for As, 77.6% to 97.8% for Hg, 43.9% to 88.8% for N, and no measureable removal to 84.6% for Se. Other constituents of interest in final outflow samples should have aqueous characteristics sufficient for discharge, with the exception of chlorides (<2000 mg/L). Based on total dissolved solids, co-

John Rodgers; James Castle

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

175

Followup of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process Systems Hazards Analysis Activity Review, March 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-WTP-2013-03-18 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Follow-up of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity Review Dates of Activity : 03/18/13 - 03/21/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) staff observed a limited portion of the restart of the Hazard Analysis (HA) for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter Process (LMP) System. The primary purpose of this HSS field activity, on March 18-21, 2013, was to observe and understand the revised approach

176

Followup of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process Systems Hazards Analysis Activity Review, March 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-WTP-2013-03-18 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Follow-up of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity Review Dates of Activity : 03/18/13 - 03/21/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) staff observed a limited portion of the restart of the Hazard Analysis (HA) for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter Process (LMP) System. The primary purpose of this HSS field activity, on March 18-21, 2013, was to observe and understand the revised approach

177

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 1350 of 29,416 results. 41 - 1350 of 29,416 results. Download EIS-0220: Supplemental Record of Decision Interim Management of Nuclear Materials http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0220-supplemental-record-decision Download Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site http://energy.gov/lm/downloads/construction-summary-and-built-report-ground-water-treatment-system Download Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Hanford Site- June 2011 Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program http://energy.gov/hss/downloads/independent-oversight-follow-review-hanford-site-june-2011

178

Method and apparatus for treating gaseous effluents from waste treatment systems  

SciTech Connect

Effluents from a waste treatment operation are incinerated and oxidized by passing the gases through an inductively coupled plasmas arc torch. The effluents are transformed into plasma within the torch. At extremely high plasma temperatures, the effluents quickly oxidize. The process results in high temperature oxidation of the gases without addition of any mass flow for introduction of energy.

Flannery, Philip A. (Ramsey, MT); Kujawa, Stephan T. (Butte, MT)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Guideline for the Evaluation and Treatment of Corrosion and Fouling in Fire Protection Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guideline document addresses the methods to control and mitigate corrosion, fouling, and microbiological growth in water-related fire protection systems (FPSs).

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

180

Uterine Artery Embolization Combined with Local Methotrexate and Systemic Methotrexate for Treatment of Cesarean Scar Pregnancy with Different Ultrasonographic Pattern  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This study was designed to compare the effectiveness of systemic methotrexate (MTX) with uterine artery embolization (UAE) combined with local MTX for the treatment of cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) with different ultrasonographic pattern, and to indicate the preferable therapy in CSP patients. Methods: The results of 21 CSP cases were reviewed. All subjects were initially administrated with systemic MTX (50 mg/m{sup 2} body surface area). UAE combined with local MTX was added to the patients who had failed systemic MTX. The transvaginal ultrasonography data were retrospectively assessed, and two different ultrasonographic patterns were found: surface implantation and deep implantation of amniotic sac. The management and its effectiveness for patients with the two ultrasonographic patterns were studied retrospectively. Ultrasound scan and serum {beta}-hCG were monitored during follow-up. Data were analyzed with the Student's t test. Results: Nine patients were successfully treated with systemic MTX. The remaining 12 cases were successfully treated with additional UAE combined with local MTX. According to the classification by Vial et al. of CSP on ultrasonography, most surface implanted CSPs (8/11, 72.7%) could be successfully treated with systemic MTX, whereas most deeply implanted CSPs (9/10, 90%) had failed systemic MTX but still could be successfully treated with additional UAE combined with local MTX. All patients recovered without severe side effects. Most patients with a future desire for reproduction achieved subsequent pregnancy. Conclusions: For CSP patients suitable for nonsurgical treatment, UAE combined with local MTX would be the superior option compared with systemic MTX in the cases with deep implantation of amniotic sac.

Lian Fan [The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology (China); Wang Yu, E-mail: wyfishking@hotmail.com; Chen Wei; Li Jiaping [The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Interventional Radiology (China); Zhan Zhongping; Ye Yujin [The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology (China); Zhu, Yunxiao [The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Ultrasonography (China); Huang Jia [The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics (China); Xu Hanshi; Yang Xiuyan; Liang Liuqin [The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology (China); Yang Jianyong [The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Interventional Radiology (China)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Numerical Treatment of the Loss of Hyperbolicity of the Two-Layer Shallow-Water System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is devoted to the numerical solution of the inviscid two-layer shallow water system. This system may lose the hyperbolic character when the shear between the layer is big enough. This loss of hyperbolicity is related to the appearance of ... Keywords: Complex eigenvalues, Finite volume method, Path-conservative, Two-layer shallow water

M. J. Castro-Daz; E. D. Fernndez-Nieto; J. M. Gonzlez-Vida; C. Pars-Madroal

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Spirasol : improvements to semi-continuous solar disinfection water treatment systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was carried out to determine the feasibility of an original point of use solar water disinfection system created by the author and named "Spirasol." The study primarily focused on the comparison of ...

Loux, Brian Michael, 1981-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Exhaust after-treatment system with in-cylinder addition of unburnt hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

Certain exhaust after-treatment devices, at least periodically, require the addition of unburnt hydrocarbons in order to create reductant-rich exhaust conditions. The present disclosure adds unburnt hydrocarbons to exhaust from at least one combustion chamber by positioning, at least partially within a combustion chamber, a mixed-mode fuel injector operable to inject fuel into the combustion chamber in a first spray pattern with a small average angle relative to a centerline of the combustion chamber and a second spray pattern with a large average angle relative to the centerline of the combustion chamber. An amount of fuel is injected in the first spray pattern into a non-combustible environment within the at least one combustion chamber during at least one of an expansion stroke and exhaust stroke. The exhaust with the unburnt amount of fuel is moved into an exhaust passage via an exhaust valve.

Coleman, Gerald N. (Corby, GB); Kesse, Mary L. (Peoria, IL)

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

Treatment of Mixed Wastewater of Slaughterhouse Wastewater and Biogas Slurry with Pilot Contact Oxidation System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a pilot contact oxidation system was used to different mixing ratio wastewater of slaughterhouse wastewater and biogas slurry. The results showed that when the mixing ratio of slaughterhouse wastewater and biogas slurry was 19:1 and the ... Keywords: contact oxidation process, slaughterhouse wastewater and biogas slurry, COD removal, ammonia removal

Peng Li; Qun-Hui Wang; Jie Zhang; Tian-Long Zheng; Juan Wang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

ONE SYSTEM INTEGRATED PROJECT TEAM: RETRIEVAL AND DELIVERY OF THE HANFORD TANK WASTES FOR VITRIFICATION IN THE WASTE TREATMENT PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed in late 2011 as a way for improving the efficiency of delivery and treatment of highly radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 586-square-mile Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The purpose of the One System IPT is to improve coordination and integration between the Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) contractor and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC). The vision statement is: One System is a WTP and TOC safety conscious team that, through integrated management and implementation of risk-informed decision and mission-based solutions, will enable the earliest start of safe and efficient treatment of Hanford's tank waste, to protect the Columbia River, environment and public. The IPT is a formal collaboration between Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), which manages design and construction of the WTP for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (DOEORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), which manages the TOC for ORP. More than fifty-six (56) million gallons of highly radioactive liquid waste are stored in one hundred seventy-seven (177) aging, underground tanks. Most of Hanford's waste tanks - one hundred forty-nine (149) of them - are of an old single-shell tank (SST) design built between 1944 and 1964. More than sixty (60) of these tanks have leaked in the past, releasing an estimated one million gallons of waste into the soil and threatening the nearby Columbia River. There are another twenty-eight (28) new double-shelled tanks (DSTs), built from 1968 to 1986, that provide greater protection to the environment. In 1989, DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) signed a landmark agreement that required Hanford to comply with federal and state environmental standards. It also paved the way for agreements that set deadlines for retrieving the tank wastes and for building and operating the WTP. The tank wastes are the result of Hanford's nearly fifty (50) years of plutonium production. In the intervening years, waste characteristics have been increasingly better understood. However, waste characteristics that are uncertain and will remain as such represent a significant technical challenge in terms of retrieval, transport, and treatment, as well as for design and construction ofWTP. What also is clear is that the longer the waste remains in the tanks, the greater the risk to the environment and the people of the Pacific Northwest. The goal of both projects - tank operations and waste treatment - is to diminish the risks posed by the waste in the tanks at the earliest possible date. About two hundred (200) WTP and TOC employees comprise the IPT. Individual work groups within One System include Technical, Project Integration & Controls, Front-End Design & Project Definition, Commissioning, Nuclear Safety & Engineering Systems Integration, and Environmental Safety and Health and Quality Assurance (ESH&QA). Additional functions and team members will be added as the WTP approaches the operational phase. The team has undertaken several initiatives since its formation to collaborate on issues: (1) alternate scenarios for delivery of wastes from the tank farms to WTP; (2) improvements in managing Interface Control Documents; (3) coordination on various technical issues, including the Defense Nuclear Facilities Nuclear Safety Board's Recommendation 2010-2; (4) deployment of the SmartPlant Foundation-Configuration Management System; and (5) preparation of the joint contract deliverable of the Operational Readiness Support Plan.

HARP BJ; KACICH RM; SKWAREK RJ

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

186

One System Integrated Project Team: Retrieval And Delivery Of The Hanford Tank Wastes For Vitrification In The Waste Treatment Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed in late 2011 as a way for improving the efficiency of delivery and treatment of highly radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 586-square-mile Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The purpose of the One System IPT is to improve coordination and integration between the Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) contractor and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC). The vision statement is: One System is a WTP and TOC safety conscious team that, through integrated management and implementation of risk-informed decision and mission-based solutions, will enable the earliest start of safe and efficient treatment of Hanford's tank waste, to protect the Columbia River, environment and public. The IPT is a formal collaboration between Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), which manages design and construction of the WTP for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (DOEORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), which manages the TOC for ORP. More than fifty-six (56) million gallons of highly radioactive liquid waste are stored in one hundred seventy-seven (177) aging, underground tanks. Most of Hanford's waste tanks - one hundred forty-nine (149) of them - are of an old single-shell tank (SST) design built between 1944 and 1964. More than sixty (60) of these tanks have leaked in the past, releasing an estimated one million gallons of waste into the soil and threatening the nearby Columbia River. There are another twenty-eight (28) new double-shelled tanks (DSTs), built from 1968 to 1986, that provide greater protection to the environment. In 1989, DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) signed a landmark agreement that required Hanford to comply with federal and state environmental standards. It also paved the way for agreements that set deadlines for retrieving the tank wastes and for building and operating the WTP. The tank wastes are the result of Hanford's nearly fifty (50) years of plutonium production. In the intervening years, waste characteristics have been increasingly better understood. However, waste characteristics that are uncertain and will remain as such represent a significant technical challenge in terms of retrieval, transport, and treatment, as well as for design and construction ofWTP. What also is clear is that the longer the waste remains in the tanks, the greater the risk to the environment and the people of the Pacific Northwest. The goal of both projects - tank operations and waste treatment - is to diminish the risks posed by the waste in the tanks at the earliest possible date. About two hundred (200) WTP and TOC employees comprise the IPT. Individual work groups within One System include Technical, Project Integration & Controls, Front-End Design & Project Definition, Commissioning, Nuclear Safety & Engineering Systems Integration, and Environmental Safety and Health and Quality Assurance (ESH&QA). Additional functions and team members will be added as the WTP approaches the operational phase. The team has undertaken several initiatives since its formation to collaborate on issues: (1) alternate scenarios for delivery of wastes from the tank farms to WTP; (2) improvements in managing Interface Control Documents; (3) coordination on various technical issues, including the Defense Nuclear Facilities Nuclear Safety Board's Recommendation 2010-2; (4) deployment of the SmartPlant? Foundation-configuration Management System; and (5) preparation of the joint contract deliverable of the Operational Readiness Support Plan.

Harp, Benton J. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Kacich, Richard M. [Bechtel National, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Skwarek, Raymond J. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

187

Emissions of volatile and potentially toxic organic compounds from waste-water treatment plants and collection systems (Phase 2). Volume 3. Waste-water treatment-plant emissions. Experimental phase. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume 3 describes the measurements and experimental data obtained to assess emissions from various points within a POTW. Included are a discussion of sampling methods development, emissions studies of activated carbon bed odor control units located at various points of a large municipal wastewater treatment plant and its collection system, upwind/downwind sampling from an activated sludge aeration basins at a large municipal wastewater treatment plant, and preliminary studies of haloform formation as a result of chlorination of wastewater.

Chang, D.P.Y.; Guensler, R.; Kim, J.O.; Chou, T.L.; Uyeminami, D.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

INEL Operable Unit 7-13 Retrieval/Ex Situ Thermal Treatment configuration options: INEL Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Systems Analysis project  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Systems Analysis project is to identify and evaluate cradle-to-grave systems for the remediation of Transuranic (TRU)Contaminated Waste Pits and Trenches within the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The BWID program will use the results of the BWID Systems Analysis in conjunction with identified Department of Energy (DOE) Complex buried waste needs to develop a long-term strategy for improving buried waste remediation capabilities throughout the DOE system. This report presents Buried Waste Retrieval/Ex Situ Thermal Treatment configuration option concepts in the form of block diagrams. These configuration options are: Retrieval/Melter Treatment; Retrieval/Metal Sort/Thermal Treatment; Retrieval/No Sort/Incineration/Melter Treatment; Retrieval/Interim Storage/Melter Treatment; Retrieval/Interim Storage/Metal Sort/Thermal Treatment; and Retrieval/Interim Storage/No Sort/Incineration/Melter Treatment. Each option is presented as a complete end-to-end system.

Richardson, J.G.; Rudin, M.J.; O' Brien, M.C.; Morrison, J.L.; Raivo, B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Treatment of Produced Waters Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed on this project from April 2005 through September 2005. In previous work, a series of laboratory scale experiments were conducted to determine the feasibility of using a SMZ system coupled with a VPB to remove and ultimately destroy the organic pollutants found in produced water. Based on the laboratory scale data, a field test of the process was conducted at the McGrath Salt Water Disposal facility in July and August of 2005. The system performed well over repeated feed and regeneration cycles demonstrating the viability of the process for long term operation. Of the BTEX components present in the produced water, benzene had the lowest adsorption affinity for the SMZ and thus controlled the sorption cycle length. Regeneration of the SMZ using air sparging was found to be sufficient in the field to maintain the SMZ adsorption capacity and to allow continuous operation of the system. As expected, the BTEX concentrations in the regeneration off gas stream were initially very high in a given regeneration cycle. However, a granular activated carbon buffering column placed upstream of the VPB reduced the peak BTEX concentrations to acceptable levels for the VPB. In this way, the VPB was able to maintain stable performance over the entire SMZ regeneration period despite the intermittent nature of the feed.

Soondong Kwon; Elaine B. Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Lynn E. Katz; Kerry A. Kinney; R. S. Bowman; E. J. Sullivan

2005-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

190

Treatment of Produced Waters Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work of this project from October 2003 through March 2004. The major focus of the research was to further investigate BTEX removal from produced water, to quantify metal ion removal from produced water, and to evaluate a lab-scale vapor phase bioreactor (VPB) for BTEX destruction in off-gases produced during SMZ regeneration. Batch equilibrium sorption studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of semi-volatile organic compounds commonly found in produced water on the sorption of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) onto surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) and to examine selected metal ion sorption onto SMZ. The sorption of polar semi-volatile organic compounds and metals commonly found in produced water onto SMZ was also investigated. Batch experiments were performed in a synthetic saline solution that mimicked water from a produced water collection facility in Wyoming. Results indicated that increasing concentrations of semi-volatile organic compounds increased BTEX sorption. The sorption of phenol compounds could be described by linear isotherms, but the linear partitioning coefficients decreased with increasing pH, especially above the pKa's of the compounds. Linear correlations relating partitioning coefficients of phenol compounds with their respective solubilities and octanol-water partitioning coefficients were developed for data collected at pH 7.2. The sorption of chromate, selenate, and barium in synthetic produced water were also described by Langmuir isotherms. Experiments conducted with a lab-scale vapor phase bioreactor (VPB) packed with foam indicated that this system could achieve high BTEX removal efficiencies once the nutrient delivery system was optimized. The xylene isomers and benzene were found to require the greatest biofilter bed depth for removal. This result suggested that these VOCs would ultimately control the size of the biofilter required for the produced water application. The biofilter recovered rapidly from shutdowns showing that the system was resilient to discontinuous feed conditions therefore provided flexibility on the SMZ regeneration process.

Lynn E. Katz; Kerry A. Kinney; R. S. Bowman; E. J. Sullivan

2004-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

191

Test results from the GA technologies engineering-scale off-gas treatment system  

SciTech Connect

One method for reducing the volume of HTGR fuel prior to reprocessing or spent fuel storage is to crush and burn the graphite fuel elements. The burner off-gas (BOG) contains radioactive components, principally H-3, C-14, Kr-85, I-129, and Rn-220, as well as chemical forms such as CO/sub 2/, CO, O/sub 2/, and SO/sub 2/. The BOG system employs components designed to remove these constitutents. Test results are reported for the iodine and SO/sub 2/ adsorbers and the CO/HT oxidizer. Silver-based iodine adsorbents were found to catalyze the premature conversion of CO to CO/sub 2/. Subsequent tests showed that iodine removal could not be performed downstream of the CO/HT oxidizer since iodine in the BOG system rapidly deactivated the Pt-coated alumina CO catalyst. Lead-exchanged zeolite (PbX) was found to be an acceptable alternative for removing iodine from BOG without CO conversion. Intermittent and steady-state tests of the pilot-plant SO/sub 2/ removal unit containing sodium-exchanged zeolite (NaX) demonstrated that decontamination factors greater than or equal to 100 could be maintained for up to 50 h. In a reprocessing flowsheet, the solid product from the burners is dissolved in nitric or Thorex acid. The dissolver off-gas (DOG) contains radioactive components H-3, Kr-85, I-129, Rn-220 plus chemical forms such as nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/). In the pilot-scale system at GA, iodine is removed from the DOG by adsorption. Tests of iodine removal have been conducted using either silver-exchanged mordenite (AgZ) or AgNO/sub 3/-impregnated silica gel (AC-6120). Although each sorbent performed well in the presence of NO/sub x/, the silica gel adsorbent proved more efficient in silver utilization and, thus, more cost effective.

Jensen, D.D.; Olguin, L.J.; Wilbourn, R.G.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Transacting generation attributes across market boundaries: Compatible information systems and the treatment of imports and exports  

SciTech Connect

Voluntary markets for ''green'' power, and mandatory policies such as fuel source disclosure requirements and renewables portfolio standards, each rely on the ability to differentiate electricity by the ''attributes'' of the generation. Throughout North America, electricity markets are devising accounting and verification systems for generation ''attributes'': those characteristics of a power plant's production such as fuel source and emissions that differentiate it from undifferentiated (or ''commodity'') electricity. These accounting and verification systems are intended to verify compliance with market mandates, create accurate disclosure labels, substantiate green power claims, and support emissions markets. Simultaneously, interest is growing in transacting (importing or exporting) generation attributes across electricity market borders, with or without associated electricity. Cross-border renewable attribute transactions have advantages and disadvantages. Broad access to markets may encourage more renewable generation at lower cost, but this result may conflict with desires to assure that at least some renewable resources are built locally to achieve either local policy goals or purchaser objectives. This report is intended to serve as a resource document for those interested in and struggling with cross-border renewable attribute transactions. The report assesses the circumstances under which renewable generation attributes from a ''source'' region might be recognized in a ''sink'' region. The report identifies several distinct approaches that might be used to account for and verify attribute import and export transactions, and assesses the suitability of these alternative approaches. Because policymakers have often made systems ''compatibility'' between market areas a pre-requisite to allowing cross-border renewable transactions, this report develops criteria for ''compatible information systems.'' Where fully compatible information systems do not exist, certain cross-border attribute transactions may still be deemed suitably credible and verifiable to be recognized; this report also identifies possible criteria for such ''compatible transactions.'' The importance of credibly addressing imports and exports of renewable energy attributes should be evident. A lack of clarity as to what generation can and cannot be recognized in various markets can paralyze investment in and contracting for renewable generation. The development of rules for imports and exports will also minimize the potential for ''double counting'' of renewable energy attributes, will help define where and at what cost renewable plants will be built, and will directly impact the location of the benefits that renewable generation provides. This report ultimately concludes that the ''correct'' approach to treating renewable energy imports and exports depends on the context and motivations behind the transaction or the mandate, and that the presence of practical constraints or multiple objectives of ten make selecting the best approach difficult. That said, the report urges those creating market rules to move quickly in defining valid cross-border transaction structures and to consider the implications of their decisions on the creation of viable markets for new renewable generation.

Grace, Robert; Wiser, Ryan

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Transacting generation attributes across market boundaries: Compatible information systems and the treatment of imports and exports  

SciTech Connect

Voluntary markets for ''green'' power, and mandatory policies such as fuel source disclosure requirements and renewables portfolio standards, each rely on the ability to differentiate electricity by the ''attributes'' of the generation. Throughout North America, electricity markets are devising accounting and verification systems for generation ''attributes'': those characteristics of a power plant's production such as fuel source and emissions that differentiate it from undifferentiated (or ''commodity'') electricity. These accounting and verification systems are intended to verify compliance with market mandates, create accurate disclosure labels, substantiate green power claims, and support emissions markets. Simultaneously, interest is growing in transacting (importing or exporting) generation attributes across electricity market borders, with or without associated electricity. Cross-border renewable attribute transactions have advantages and disadvantages. Broad access to markets may encourage more renewable generation at lower cost, but this result may conflict with desires to assure that at least some renewable resources are built locally to achieve either local policy goals or purchaser objectives. This report is intended to serve as a resource document for those interested in and struggling with cross-border renewable attribute transactions. The report assesses the circumstances under which renewable generation attributes from a ''source'' region might be recognized in a ''sink'' region. The report identifies several distinct approaches that might be used to account for and verify attribute import and export transactions, and assesses the suitability of these alternative approaches. Because policymakers have often made systems ''compatibility'' between market areas a pre-requisite to allowing cross-border renewable transactions, this report develops criteria for ''compatible information systems.'' Where fully compatible information systems do not exist, certain cross-border attribute transactions may still be deemed suitably credible and verifiable to be recognized; this report also identifies possible criteria for such ''compatible transactions.'' The importance of credibly addressing imports and exports of renewable energy attributes should be evident. A lack of clarity as to what generation can and cannot be recognized in various markets can paralyze investment in and contracting for renewable generation. The development of rules for imports and exports will also minimize the potential for ''double counting'' of renewable energy attributes, will help define where and at what cost renewable plants will be built, and will directly impact the location of the benefits that renewable generation provides. This report ultimately concludes that the ''correct'' approach to treating renewable energy imports and exports depends on the context and motivations behind the transaction or the mandate, and that the presence of practical constraints or multiple objectives of ten make selecting the best approach difficult. That said, the report urges those creating market rules to move quickly in defining valid cross-border transaction structures and to consider the implications of their decisions on the creation of viable markets for new renewable generation.

Grace, Robert; Wiser, Ryan

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Treatment of Produced Waters Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work performed on this project from April 2004 through September 2004. Our previous work demonstrated that a polyurethane foam biofilter could successfully biodegrade the BTEX contaminants found in the SMZ regeneration waste gas stream. However, establishing the biomass on the polyurethane foam packing was relatively time consuming and daily recirculation of a concentrated nutrient solution was required for efficient operation of the foam biofilter. To simplify the start up and operating requirements of the biofilter system, a simple, compost-based biofilter was investigated for its ability to treat the BTEX contaminants generated during the SMZ regeneration process. The investigation of the compost biofilter was divided into three experimental phases that spanned 180 days of biofilter operation. During Phase 1, the biofilter was continuously supplied a BTEX-contaminated waste gas stream. During Phase 2, a series of periodic shutdown tests were conducted to assess how the biofilter responded when the BTEX feed was discontinued for periods ranging from 1 day to 2.8 days. The Phase 3 experiments focused on determining how the biofilter would handle periodic spikes in inlet BTEX concentration as would be expected when it is coupled with an SMZ column. Results from the continuous feed (Phase 1) experiments demonstrated that the compost biofilter could maintain BTEX removals of greater than 98% within two weeks of startup. Results of the shutdown experiments indicated that benzene removal was the most sensitive to interruptions in the BTEX feed. Nevertheless, the BTEX removal efficiency exceeded 95% within 6 hours of reestablishing the BTEX feed to the biofilter. When the biofilter was subjected to periodic spikes in BTEX concentration (Phase 3), it was found that the total BTEX removal efficiency stabilized at approximately 75% despite the fact that the biofilter was only fed BTEX contaminants 8 hours per day. Finally, the effects of nutrient supply and EBCT on compost biofilter performance were also investigated. The bioreactor maintained greater than 95% removal efficiency for over 40 days without an additional supply of nutrients when a 10X concentrated HCMM was mixed with the compost packing at the beginning of the experiments. Results also suggest that an EBCT greater than 30 seconds is required to maintain high BTEX removal efficiencies in the compost biofilter system.

Lynn E. Katz; Kerry A. Kinney; R. S. Bowman; E. J. Sullivan

2004-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

195

Overview of Pulse Jet Mixer/Hybrid Mixing System Development to Support the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will process and treat radioactive waste that is stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. Pulse jet mixer (PJM) technology was selected for mixing the contents of many of the process vessels. Several of the tanks are expected to contain concentrated slurries that exhibit a non-Newtonian rheology and the understanding required to apply this technology to mobilize the non-Newtonian slurries was not mature. Consequently, an experimental testing effort was undertaken to investigate PJM performance in several scaled versions of WTP vessels and to develop mixing system configurations that met WTP requirements. This effort evolved into a large, multifaceted test program involving many different test facilities. Elements of the test program included theoretical analysis, development and characterization of simulants, development of instrumentation and measurement techniques, hundreds of tests at various scales in numerous test stands, and data analysis and application. This program provided the technical basis for the selection of pulse jet mixers along with air spargers and steady jets generated by recirculation pumps to provide mixing systems for several of the vessels with non-Newtonian slurries. This paper provides an overview of the testing program and a summary of the key technical results that formed the technical basis of the final mixing system configurations to be used in the WTP.

Kurath, Dean E.; Meyer, Perry A.; Stewart, Charles W.; Barnes, Steven M.

2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

196

Extracorporeal complexing hemodialysis system for the treatment of methylmercury poisoning. II. In vivo applications in the dog  

SciTech Connect

An extracorporeal regional complexing hemodialysis procedure is described which has been successfully applied for the enhancement of removal of methylmercury in the dog. The procedure utilizes the extracorporeal addition of cysteine to arterial blood entering a hemodialyzer, forming a large pool of complexed dialyzable methylmercury in plasma. Diffusion of this methylmercury complex across the dialyzer membrane into dialysate accounts for large amounts of methylmercury being removed from the animal. In conjunction with methylmercury removal, the majority of the infused cysteine is also removed resulting in comparatively low systemic doses of cysteine to the animal. At blood flow rates of 45 ml/min, and dialysate flow rates of approximately 550 ml/min, the mean percentage of methylmercury cleared from blood passing through the dialyzer was 39%. Rates of elimination of methylmercury from the dog could be increased by a factor of 100 during the extracorporeal regional complexing hemodialysis procedure. Regional collimated counting of radioactivity along the length of the dog revealed a decline in all areas including the head region. The procedure was void of any noticeable side effects during treatment or as evidence by histological evaluation of liver and kidney after treatment.

Kostyniak, P.J.; Clarkson, T.W.; Abbasi, A.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Management Alert - The 2020 Vision One System Proposal for Commissioning and Startup of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, IG-0871  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The 2020 Vision One System Proposal The 2020 Vision One System Proposal for Commissioning and Startup of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant DOE/IG-0871 October 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 3, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Management Alert on "The 2020 Vision One System Proposal for Commissioning and Startup of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant" IMMEDIATE CONCERN The Department of Energy is considering a proposal known at the 2020 Vision One System (2020 Vision) that would implement a phased approach to commissioning the $12.2 billion Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). As part of the phased approach, the Low-

198

Proton therapy dose distribution comparison between Monte Carlo and a treatment planning system for pediatric patients with ependymoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Compare dose distributions for pediatric patients with ependymoma calculated using a Monte Carlo (MC) system and a clinical treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: Plans from ten pediatric patients with ependymoma treated using double scatter proton therapy were exported from the TPS and calculated in our MC system. A field by field comparison of the distal edge (80% and 20%), distal fall off (80% to 20%), field width (50% to 50%), and penumbra (80% to 20%) were examined. In addition, the target dose for the full plan was compared. Results: For the 32 fields from the 10 patients, the average differences of distal edge at 80% and 20% on central axis between MC and TPS are -1.9 {+-} 1.7 mm (p out in bone or an air cavity, the 80% difference was -0.9 {+-} 1.7 mm (p= 0.09). The negative value indicates that MC was on average shallower than TPS. The average difference of the 63 field widths of the 10 patients is -0.7 {+-} 1.0 mm (p < 0.001), negative indicating on average the MC had a smaller field width. On average, the difference in the penumbra was 2.3 {+-} 2.1 mm (p < 0.001). The average of the mean clinical target volume dose differences is -1.8% (p= 0.001), negative indicating a lower dose for MC. Conclusions: Overall, the MC system and TPS gave similar results for field width, the 20% distal edge, and the target coverage. For the 80% distal edge and lateral penumbra, there was slight disagreement; however, the difference was less than 2 mm and occurred primarily in highly heterogeneous areas. These differences highlight that the TPS dose calculation cannot be automatically regarded as correct.

Jia Yingcui; Beltran, Chris; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Flampouri, Stella; Li, Zuofeng; Merchant, Thomas E. [St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, Tennessee 38120 (United States); Mayo Clinic, 200 First St SW, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, 2015 North Jefferson St, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States); St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, Tennessee 38120 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

One System Integreated Project Team Progress in Coordinating Hanford Tank Farms and the Waste Treatment Plant - 14214  

SciTech Connect

The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed at the Hanford Site in late 2011 as a way to improve coordination and itegration between the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) on interfaces between the two projects, and to eliminate duplication and exploit opportunities for synergy. The IPT is composed of jointly staffed groups that work on technical issues of mutal interest, front-end design and project definition, nuclear safety, plant engineering system integration, commissioning, planning and scheduling, and environmental, safety, health and quality (ESH&Q) areas. In the past year important progress has been made in a number of areas as the organization has matured and additional opportunities have been identified. Areas covered in this paper include: Support for development of the Office of Envirnmental Management (EM) framework document to progress the Office of River Protection's (ORP) River Protection Project (RPP) mission; Stewardship of the RPP flowsheet; Collaboration with Savannah River Site (SRS), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Operations programs integration, and; Further development of the waste acceptance criteria.

Skwarek, Raymond J.; Harp, Ben J.; Duncan, Garth M.

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

200

K-1435 Wastewater Treatment System for the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Wastewater at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper will discuss the design and performance of a wastewater treatment system installed to support the operation of a hazardous waste incinerator. The Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator (TSCAI), located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), is designed and permitted to treat Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) wastes including characteristic and listed wastes and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated mixed waste. The incinerator process generates acidic gases and particulates which consist of salts, metals, and radionuclides. These off-gases from the incinerator are treated with a wet off-gas scrubber system. The recirculated water is continuously purged (blow down), resulting in a wastewater to be treated. Additional water sources are also collected on the site for treatment, including storm water that infiltrates into diked areas and fire water from the incinerator's suppression system. To meet regulatory requirements for discharge, a wastewater treatment system (WWTS) was designed, constructed, and operated to treat these water sources. The WWTS was designed to provide for periodic fluctuation of contaminant concentrations due to various feed streams to the incinerator. Blow down consists of total suspended solids (TSS) and total dissolved solids (TDS), encompassing metals, radionuclide contamination and trace organics. The system design flow rate range is 7.95 to 17 cubic meters per hour (m3/hr) (35 to 75 gallons per minute; gpm). The system is designed with redundancy to minimize time off-line and to reduce impacts to the TSCAI operations. A novel treatment system uses several unit operations, including chemical feed systems, two-stage chemical reaction treatment, micro-filtration, sludge storage and dewatering, neutralization, granular activated carbon, effluent neutralization, and a complete programmable logic controller (PLC) and human-machine interface (HMI) control system. To meet the space requirements and to provide portability of the WWTS to other applications, the system was installed in three, over-the-road semi trailers, and interconnected with piping and power. Trailers were oriented on a small site footprint to facilitate ease of installation. A remote sump pump skid was provided to convey water from two holding sumps adjacent to the treatment process. An accumulation tank and pump were also provided to receive miscellaneous wastewaters for treatment if they meet the waste acceptance criteria. The paper will include details of the technology used in the design, the requirements for compliance, and the initial performance demonstration and jar testing results. The WWTS successfully allowed for highly efficient, high-volume treatment with compliant discharge to off-site surface water. (authors)

Beck, Ch.A. [Senior Project Manager, Golder Associates Inc. (United Kingdom); Tiepel, E.W. [Principal, Golder Associates Inc. (United Kingdom); Swientoniewski, M.D. [P.E. Senior Project Engineer, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (United States); Crow, K.R. [P.E., Project Manager, CDM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment system monticello" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

K-1435 Wastewater Treatment System for the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Wastewater at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the design and performance of a wastewater treatment system installed to support the operation of a hazardous waste incinerator. The Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator (TSCAI), located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), is designed and permitted to treat Resource ConservatioN and Recovery Act (RCRA) wastes including characteristic and listed wastes and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated mixed waste. the incinerator process generates acidic gases and particulates which consist of salts, metals, and radionuclides. These off-gases from the incinerator are treated with a wet off-gas scrubber system. The recirculated water is continuously purged (below down), resulting in a wastewater to be treated. Additional water sources are also collected on the site for treatment, including storm water that infiltrates into diked areas and fire water from the incinerator's suppression system. To meet regulatory requirements for discharge, a wastewater treatment system (WWTS) was designed, constructed, and operated to treat these water sources. The WWTS was designed to provide for periodic fluctuation of contaminant concentrations due to various feed streams to the incinverator. Blow down consists of total suspended solids (TSS) and total dissolved solids (TDS), encompassing metals, radionuclide contamination and trace organics. The system design flow rate range is 35 to 75 gallons per minute (gpm). The system is designed with redundancy to minimize time off-line and to reduce impacts to the TSCAI operations. A novel treatment system uses several unit operations, including chemical feed systems, two-stage chemical reaction treatment, microfiltration, sludge storage and dewatering, neutralization, granular activated carbon, effluent neutralization, and a complete programmable logic controller (PLC) and human-machine interface (HMI) control system. To meet the space requirements and to provide portability of the WWTS to other applications, the system was installed in three, over-the-road semi trailers, and interconnected with piping and power. Trailers were oriented on a small site footprint to facilitate ease of installation. A remote sump pump skid was provided to convey water from two holding sumps adjacent to the treatment process. An accumulation tank and pump were also provided to receive miscellaneous wastewaters for treatment if they meet the waste acceptance criteria. The paper includes details of the technology used in the design, the requirements for compliance, and the initial performance demonstration and jar testing results. The WWTS successfully allowed for highly efficient, high-volume treatment with compliant discharge to off-site surface water.

Swientoniewski M.D.

2008-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

202

DESIGN OF THE DEMOSNTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM FOR THE SUPPLEMENTAL TREATMENT OF LOW ACTIVITY TANK WASTE AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect

In June 2004, the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) was initiated with the intent to design, construct, and operate a full-scale bulk vitrification pilot-plant to treat low-activity tank waste from Hanford Tank 241-S-109. The DBVS facility uses In-Container Vitrification{trademark} (ICV{trademark}) at the core of the treatment process. The basic process steps combine liquid low-activity waste (LAW) and glassformers; dry the mixture; and then vitrify the mixture in a batch feed-while-melt process in a refractory lined steel container. Off-gases are processed through a state-of-the-art air pollution control system including sintered-metal filtration, thermal oxidation, acid gas scrubbing, and high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) and high-efficiency gas adsorber (HEGA) filtration. Testing has focused on development and validation of the waste dryer, ICV, and sintered-metal filters (SMFs) equipment, operations enhancements, and glass formulation. With a parallel testing and design process, testing has allowed improvements to the DBVS equipment configuration and operating methodology, since its original inception. Design improvements include optimization of refractory panels in the ICV, simplifying glassformer addition equipment, increasing the number of waste feed chutes to the ICV, and adding capability for remote clean-out of piping, In addition, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has provided an independent review of the entire DBVS process. While the review did not find any fatal flaws, some technical issues were identified that required a re-evaluation of the DBVS design and subsequent changes to the design. A 100 percent design package for the pilot plant will be completed and submitted to DOE for review in early 2008 that incorporates process improvements substantiated through testing and reviews. This paper provides a description of the bulk vitrification process and a discussion of major equipment design changes that have occurred based on full-scale testing over the past two years and DOE reviews.

VAN BEEK JE

2008-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

203

High Level Waste Remote Handling Equipment in the Melter Cave Support Handling System at the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

Cold war plutonium production led to extensive amounts of radioactive waste stored in tanks at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford site. Bechtel National, Inc. is building the largest nuclear Waste Treatment Plant in the world located at the Department of Energy's Hanford site to immobilize the millions of gallons of radioactive waste. The site comprises five main facilities; Pretreatment, High Level Waste vitrification, Low Active Waste vitrification, an Analytical Lab and the Balance of Facilities. The pretreatment facilities will separate the high and low level waste. The high level waste will then proceed to the HLW facility for vitrification. Vitrification is a process of utilizing a melter to mix molten glass with radioactive waste to form a stable product for storage. The melter cave is designated as the High Level Waste Melter Cave Support Handling System (HSH). There are several key processes that occur in the HSH cell that are necessary for vitrification and include: feed preparation, mixing, pouring, cooling and all maintenance and repair of the process equipment. Due to the cell's high level radiation, remote handling equipment provided by PaR Systems, Inc. is required to install and remove all equipment in the HSH cell. The remote handling crane is composed of a bridge and trolley. The trolley supports a telescoping tube set that rigidly deploys a TR 4350 manipulator arm with seven degrees of freedom. A rotating, extending, and retracting slewing hoist is mounted to the bottom of the trolley and is centered about the telescoping tube set. Both the manipulator and slewer are unique to this cell. The slewer can reach into corners and the manipulator's cross pivoting wrist provides better operational dexterity and camera viewing angles at the end of the arm. Since the crane functions will be operated remotely, the entire cell and crane have been modeled with 3-D software. Model simulations have been used to confirm operational and maintenance functional and timing studies throughout the design process. Since no humans can go in or out of the cell, there are several recovery options that have been designed into the system including jack-down wheels for the bridge and trolley, recovery drums for the manipulator hoist, and a wire rope cable cutter for the slewer jib hoist. If the entire crane fails in cell, the large diameter cable reel that provides power, signal, and control to the crane can be used to retrieve the crane from the cell into the crane maintenance area. (authors)

Bardal, M.A. [PaR Systems, Inc., Shoreview, MN (United States); Darwen, N.J. [Bechtel National, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

A virtual reality system for the treatment of stress-related disorders: A preliminary analysis of efficacy compared to a standard cognitive behavioral program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary efficacy data in a controlled study of the use of a virtual reality (VR) system for treating stress-related disorders (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, or PTSD; Pathological Grief, or PG; and Adjustment Disorders, or AD). ... Keywords: Adjustment Disorder, Pathological Grief, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Psychological treatments, Stress-related disorders, Virtual reality

R. M. Baos; V. Guillen; S. Quero; A. Garca-Palacios; M. Alcaniz; C. Botella

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the Basin Facility Basin Water Treatment System - Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan for the Basin Water Treatment System located in the Basin Facility (CPP-603), Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, was developed to meet future milestones established under the Voluntary Consent Order. The system to be closed includes units and associated ancillary equipment included in the Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan and Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank Systems INTEC-077 and INTEC-078 that were determined to have managed hazardous waste. The Basin Water Treatment System will be closed in accordance with the requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, to achieve "clean closure" of the tank system. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods of achieving those standards for the Basin Water Treatment Systems.

Evans, S. K.

2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

206

H2O[underscore]TREAT users' manual: An aid for evaluating water treatment requirements for aquifer thermal energy storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual addresses the use of a public-domain software package developed to aid engineers in the desip of water treatment systems for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). The software, H20[underscore]TREAT, which runs in the DOS or UNIX Environment, was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and targeted to engineers possessing limited or no experience in geochemistry. To do this, the software provides guidance on geochemical phenomena that can cause problems in ATES systems (i.e., the formation of scale in heat exchangers, clogging of wells, corrosion in piping and heat exchangers, and degradation of aquifer materials causing a reduction in permeability). Preventing such problems frequently requires the use of water treatment systems. Because individual water treatment methods vary in cost, effectiveness, environmental impact, corrosion potential, and acceptability to regulators, proper evaluation of treatment options is required to determine the feasibility of ATES systems. The software is available for DOS- and UNIX-based computers. It uses a recently revised geochemical model, MINTEQ, to calculate the saturation indices of selected carbonate, oxide, and hydroxide minerals based on water chemistry and temperature data provided by the user. The saturation index of a specific mineral defines the point at which that mineral is oversaturated and hence may precipitate at the specified temperature. Cost calculations are not performed by the software; however, treatment capacity requirements are provided. Treatments include Na and H ion exchanger, fluidized-bed heat exchanger or pellet reactors, and CO[sub 2] injection. The H2O[underscore]TREAT software also provides the user with warning of geochemical problems that must be addressed, such as Fe and Mn oxide precipitation, SiO[sub 2] precipitation at high temperatures, corrosion, and clay swelling and dispersion.

Vail, L.W.; Jenne, E.A.; Zipperer, J.P.; McKinley, M.I.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

H2O{underscore}TREAT users` manual: An aid for evaluating water treatment requirements for aquifer thermal energy storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual addresses the use of a public-domain software package developed to aid engineers in the desip of water treatment systems for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). The software, H20{underscore}TREAT, which runs in the DOS or UNIX Environment, was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and targeted to engineers possessing limited or no experience in geochemistry. To do this, the software provides guidance on geochemical phenomena that can cause problems in ATES systems (i.e., the formation of scale in heat exchangers, clogging of wells, corrosion in piping and heat exchangers, and degradation of aquifer materials causing a reduction in permeability). Preventing such problems frequently requires the use of water treatment systems. Because individual water treatment methods vary in cost, effectiveness, environmental impact, corrosion potential, and acceptability to regulators, proper evaluation of treatment options is required to determine the feasibility of ATES systems. The software is available for DOS- and UNIX-based computers. It uses a recently revised geochemical model, MINTEQ, to calculate the saturation indices of selected carbonate, oxide, and hydroxide minerals based on water chemistry and temperature data provided by the user. The saturation index of a specific mineral defines the point at which that mineral is oversaturated and hence may precipitate at the specified temperature. Cost calculations are not performed by the software; however, treatment capacity requirements are provided. Treatments include Na and H ion exchanger, fluidized-bed heat exchanger or pellet reactors, and CO{sub 2} injection. The H2O{underscore}TREAT software also provides the user with warning of geochemical problems that must be addressed, such as Fe and Mn oxide precipitation, SiO{sub 2} precipitation at high temperatures, corrosion, and clay swelling and dispersion.

Vail, L.W.; Jenne, E.A.; Zipperer, J.P.; McKinley, M.I.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management  

SciTech Connect

Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by nitrification helped to reduce the corrosivity and biocide demand. Also, the lower pH and alkalinity resulting from nitrification reduced the scaling to an acceptable level, without the addition of anti-scalant chemicals. Additional GAC adsorption treatment, MWW_NFG, yielded no net benefit. Removal of organic matter resulted in pitting corrosion in copper and cupronickel alloys. Negligible improvement was observed in scaling control and biofouling control. For all of the tertiary treatments, biofouling control was achievable, and most effectively with pre-formed monochloramine (2-3 ppm) in comparison with NaOCl and ClO2. Life cycle cost (LCC) analyses were performed for the tertiary treatment systems studied experimentally and for several other treatment options. A public domain conceptual costing tool (LC3 model) was developed for this purpose. MWW_SF (lime softening and sand filtration) and MWW_NF were the most cost-effective treatment options among the tertiary treatment alternatives considered because of the higher effluent quality with moderate infrastructure costs and the relatively low doses of conditioning chemicals required. Life cycle inventory (LCI) analysis along with integration of external costs of emissions with direct costs was performed to evaluate relative emissions to the environment and external costs associated with construction and operation of tertiary treatment alternatives. Integrated LCI and LCC analysis indicated that three-tiered treatment alternatives such as MWW_NSF and MWW_NFG, with regular chemical addition for treatment and conditioning and/or regeneration, tend to increase the impact costs and in turn the overall costs of tertiary treatment. River water supply and MWW_F alternatives with a single step of tertiary treatment were associated with lower impact costs, but the contribution of impact costs to overall annual costs was higher than all other treatment alternatives. MWW_NF and MWW_SF alternatives exhibited moderate external impact costs with moderate infrastructure and chemical conditioner dosing, which makes them (especially

David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

209

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems'', during the time-period January 1 through March 31, 2006. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, and the use of a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system downstream to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Generation Company LP, the Southern Company, and Duke Energy. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified catalyst materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months or longer at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests are being conducted periodically at each site to confirm the ability to scrub the catalytically oxidized mercury at high efficiency. This is the ninth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts primarily consisted of operating the catalyst pilot units at the TXU Generation Company LP's Monticello Steam Electric Station and at Georgia Power's Plant Yates. Two catalyst activity measurement trips were made to Plant Yates during the quarter. This Technical Progress Report presents catalyst activity results from the oxidation catalyst pilot unit at Plant Yates and discusses the status of the pilot unit at Monticello.

Gary M. Blythe

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems'', during the time-period January 1 through March 31, 2006. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, and the use of a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system downstream to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Generation Company LP, the Southern Company, and Duke Energy. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified catalyst materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months or longer at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests are being conducted periodically at each site to confirm the ability to scrub the catalytically oxidized mercury at high efficiency. This is the ninth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts primarily consisted of operating the catalyst pilot units at the TXU Generation Company LP's Monticello Steam Electric Station and at Georgia Power's Plant Yates. Two catalyst activity measurement trips were made to Plant Yates during the quarter. This Technical Progress Report presents catalyst activity results from the oxidation catalyst pilot unit at Plant Yates and discusses the status of the pilot unit at Monticello.

Gary M. Blythe

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

Emissions of volatile and potentially toxic organic compounds from waste-water treatment plants and collection systems (Phase 2). Volume 1. Project summaries. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the Phase II research project on emission of potentially toxic organic compounds (PTOCs) from wastewater treatment plants were fivefold: (1) assessment of the importance of gaseous emissions from municipal wastewater collection systems; (2) resolution of the discrepancy between the measured and estimated emissions (Phase I), from the Joint Water Pollution Control Plant (JWPCP) operated by the County Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County (CSDLAC); (3) determination of airborne concentrations of PTOCS immediately downwind of an activated sludge aeration process at the City of Los Angeles' Hyperion Treatment Plant (HTP); (4) a modeling assessment of the effects of transient loading on emissions during preliminary and primary treatment at a typical municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP); (5) a preliminary investigation of effects of chlorination practices on haloform production. Volume 1, for which the abstract was prepared, contains a summary of results from each project; Volume 2 contains the discussion regarding the modeling of collection system emissions; Volume 3 addresses methods development and field sampling efforts at the JWPCP and HTP, data on emissions from a mechanically ventilated sewer and results of some preliminary haloform formation studies in wastewaters; and Volume 4 discusses aspects of the emissions modeling problem.

Chang, D.P.Y.; Schroeder, E.D.; Corsi, R.L.; Guensler, R.; Meyerhofer, J.A.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Long Term Field Development of a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System for Treatment of Produced Waters for Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main goal of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using a combined physicochemical/biological treatment system to remove the organic constituents present in saline produced water. In order to meet this objective, a physical/chemical adsorption process was developed and two separate biological treatment techniques were investigated. Two previous research projects focused on the development of the surfactant modified zeolite adsorption process (DE-AC26-99BC15221) and development of a vapor phase biofilter (VPB) to treat the regeneration off-gas from the surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorption system (DE-FC26-02NT15461). In this research, the SMZ/VPB was modified to more effectively attenuate peak loads and to maintain stable biodegradation of the BTEX constituents from the produced water. Specifically, a load equalization system was incorporated into the regeneration flow stream. In addition, a membrane bioreactor (MBR) system was tested for its ability to simultaneously remove the aromatic hydrocarbon and carboxylate components from produced water. The specific objectives related to these efforts included the following: (1) Optimize the performance VPBs treating the transient loading expected during SMZ regeneration: (a) Evaluate the impact of biofilter operating parameters on process performance under stable operating conditions. (b) Investigate how transient loads affect biofilter performance, and identify an appropriate technology to improve biological treatment performance during the transient regeneration period of an SMZ adsorption system. (c) Examine the merits of a load equalization technology to attenuate peak VOC loads prior to a VPB system. (d) Evaluate the capability of an SMZ/VPB to remove BTEX from produced water in a field trial. (2) Investigate the feasibility of MBR treatment of produced water: (a) Evaluate the biodegradation of carboxylates and BTEX constituents from synthetic produced water in a laboratory-scale MBR. (b) Evaluate the capability of an SMZ/MBR system to remove carboxylates and BTEX from produced water in a field trial. Laboratory experiments were conducted to provide a better understanding of each component of the SMZ/VPB and SMZ/MBR process. Laboratory VPB studies were designed to address the issue of influent variability and periodic operation (see DE-FC26-02NT15461). These experiments examined multiple influent loading cycles and variable concentration loadings that simulate air sparging as the regeneration option for the SMZ system. Two pilot studies were conducted at a produced water processing facility near Farmington, New Mexico. The first field test evaluated SMZ adsorption, SMZ regeneration, VPB buffering, and VPB performance, and the second test focused on MBR and SMZ/MBR operation. The design of the field studies were based on the results from the previous field tests and laboratory studies. Both of the biological treatment systems were capable of removing the BTEX constituents in the laboratory and in the field over a range of operating conditions. For the VPB, separation of the BTEX constituents from the saline aqueous phase yielded high removal efficiencies. However, carboxylates remained in the aqueous phase and were not removed in the combined VPB/SMZ system. In contrast, the MBR was capable of directly treating the saline produced water and simultaneously removing the BTEX and carboxylate constituents. The major limitation of the MBR system is the potential for membrane fouling, particularly when the system is treating produced water under field conditions. The combined process was able to effectively pretreat water for reverse osmosis treatment and subsequent downstream reuse options including utilization in power generation facilities. The specific conclusions that can be drawn from this study are summarized.

Lynn Katz; Kerry Kinney; Robert Bowman; Enid Sullivan; Soondong Kwon; Elaine Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Craig Altare

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity, December 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Hanford Site the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity December 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background.......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope and Methodology... ................................................................................................................... 1

214

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity, December 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Hanford Site the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity December 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background.......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope and Methodology... ................................................................................................................... 1

215

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

216

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

217

Program on Technology Innovation: Treatment of Colloid-Facilitated Transport for Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has evaluated the potential importance of colloid-aided radionuclide transport from the candidate high level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. EPRI has been conducting independent assessments of the total system performance of Yucca Mountain since 1989. The purpose of this report is to provide a succinct summary of EPRI's independent evaluation of the importance of radionuclide transport via colloids. EPRI concludes th...

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

218

Water treatment on wheels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design options and combinations of fixed and mobile demineralization equipment give power plant operators the flexibility to continually optimize their water treatment system to meet rapidly changing needs. The article classifies water treatment service contracts for demineralized water into four categories and presents associated design, economic and operational advantages to power plant designers, constructors, owners and operators. 1 tab.

Taylor, R.T.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Tunable, self-powered integrated arc plasma-melter vitrification system for waste treatment and resource recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a relatively compact self-powered, tunable waste conversion system and apparatus which has the advantage of highly robust operation which provides complete or substantially complete conversion of a wide range of waste streams into useful gas and a stable, nonleachable solid product at a single location with greatly reduced air pollution to meet air quality standards. The system provides the capability for highly efficient conversion of waste into high quality combustible gas and for high efficiency conversion of the gas into electricity by utilizing a high efficiency gas turbine or by an internal combustion engine. The solid product can be suitable for various commercial applications. Alternatively, the solid product stream, which is a safe, stable material, may be disposed of without special considerations as hazardous material. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the arc plasma furnace and joule heated melter are formed as a fully integrated unit with a common melt pool having circuit arrangements for the simultaneous independently controllable operation of both the arc plasma and the joule heated portions of the unit without interference with one another. The preferred configuration of this embodiment of the invention utilizes two arc plasma electrodes with an elongated chamber for the molten pool such that the molten pool is capable of providing conducting paths between electrodes. The apparatus may additionally be employed with reduced or without further use of the gases generated by the conversion process. The apparatus may be employed as a self-powered or net electricity producing unit where use of an auxiliary fuel provides the required level of electricity production.

Titus, Charles H. (Newtown Square, PA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnuthill, MA); Surma, Jeffrey E. (Kennewick, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Devising wastewater treatment strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Troubleshooting a waste water treatment system takes basic knowledge of how the process is designed to work, tools, and a few resources. This paper describes a Seven Steps Program employed fopr troubleshooting. A well-designed troubleshooting program should be comprehensive, thoroughly tested and constantly revisited to maintain a reliable and efficient wastewater treatment system. Such a method includes each of the integral components including biological, human, mechanical, and chemical. This total systems approach can result in improved system operation and better bottom line results.

Hornby, L.E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment system monticello" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Implementation of Recommendations from the One System Comparative Evaluation of the Hanford Tank Farms and Waste Treatment Plant Safety Bases - 14137  

SciTech Connect

A Comparative Evaluation was conducted for One System Integrated Project Team to compare the safety bases for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project (WTP) and Tank Operations Contract (TOC) (i.e., Tank Fanns) by an Expert Review Team. The evaluation had an overarching purpose to facilitate effective integration between WTP and TOC safety bases. It was to provide One System management with an objective evaluation of identified differences in safety basis process requirements, guidance, direction, procedures, and products (including safety controls, key safety basis inputs and assumptions, and consequence calculation methodologies) between WTP and TOC. The evaluation identified 25 recommendations (Opportunities for Integration). The resolution of these recommendations resulted in 16 implementation plans. The completion of these implementation plans will help ensure consistent safety bases for WTP and TOC along with consistent safety basis processes. procedures, and analyses. and should increase the likelihood of a successful startup of the WTP. This early integration will result in long-term cost savings and significant operational improvements. In addition, the implementation plans lead to the development of eight new safety analysis methodologies that can be used at other U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) complex sites where URS Corporation is involved.

Garrett, Richard L.; Niemi, Belinda J.; Paik, Ingle K.; Buczek, Jeffrey A.; Lietzow, J.; McCoy, F.; Beranek, F.; Gupta, M.

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

222

Waste Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...rates, and batch collection volume requirements Water conservation possibilities What is required to meet discharge limits Availability and type of treatment chemicals How sludge will be dewatered, dried, and disposed...

223

Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Developing usable and robust mixed reality systems requires unique humancomputer interaction techniques and customized hardware systems. The design of the hardware is directed by the requirements of the rich 3D interactions that can be performed using immersive mobile MR systems. Geometry modeling and capture, navigational annotations, visualizations, and training simulations are all enhanced using augmented computer graphics. We present the design guidelines that have led us through 10 years of evolving mobile outdoor MR hardware systems.

Benjamin Avery; Ross T. Smith; Wayne Piekarski; Bruce H. Thomas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant LAW Melter and Melter Off-gas Process System Hazards Analysis _Oct 21-31  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-WTP-2013-10-21 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter and Melter Off-gas Process System Hazards Analysis Activities Dates of Activity : 10/21/13 - 10/31/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (Independent Oversight) reviewed the Insight software hazard evaluation (HE) tables for hazard analysis (HA) generated to date for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter and Off-gas systems, observed a

225

Deepening Treatment of the Low C/N Ratio Biogas Slurry at Mountainous Region Livestock Farming by Using Modified Two-Stage A/O System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intensive and fast development of livestock farming with ecological pattern of raisingCbiogasCirrigating is widely applied in China. After anaerobic fermentation the agricultural wastes can provides clean energy. However, there is problem by lacking ... Keywords: livestock farming, biogas slurry, low C/N ratio, deepening treatment

Wei-wei Yu; Zhi Zhang; Sheng-lan Bi; Shu-yang Li; Chao Liu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Idaho Waste Treatment Facility Startup Testing Suspended To Evaluate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idaho Waste Treatment Facility Startup Testing Suspended To Evaluate System IDAHO FALLS, ID- On Saturday, June 16, startup testing was suspended at the Integrated Waste Treatment...

227

Independent Oversight Activity Report for Catholic University of America Vitreous State Laboratory Tour and Discussion of Experiments Conducted in Support of Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Select Systems Design, November 18, 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Number: HIAR-VSL-2013-11-18 Site: Catholic University of America - Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Catholic University of America Vitreous State Laboratory Tour and Discussion of Experiments Conducted in Support of Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Select Systems Design Date of Activity : 11/18/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) is the contractor responsible for the design and construction of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection. BNI is

228

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 10060 of 28,905 results. 51 - 10060 of 28,905 results. Download Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 http://energy.gov/lm/downloads/dispersivity-testing-zero-valent-iron-treatment-cells-monticello-utah Download Microsoft Word- AL2000-05Attachment.doc http://energy.gov/management/downloads/microsoft-word-al2000-05attachmentdoc Download October 2012 APM Newsletter http://energy.gov/management/downloads/october-2012-apm-newsletter Page FAQs Topics: http://energy.gov/management/office-management/employee-services/faqs Download EA-1611: Final Environmental Assessment Interconnection Request for the Colorado Highlands Wind Project

229

Existing systems review of treatment media for the Bear Creek Valley treatability study, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ treatment has been proposed as a remediation alternative for surface water and groundwater contaminated with uranium and nitrate as a result of former waste disposal practices in the S-3 Ponds. Interceptor trenches containing reactive media have been proposed to treat groundwater, and constructed wetlands and/or algal mats are potential alternatives for treating surface water. This report presents the results from testing of ten different reactive media, and combinations of media, that are candidates for use in the proposed interceptor trenches to remove uranium and nitrate from groundwater. It also presents the results of testing and evaluation of algal mats and wetlands for removing uranium and nitrate from surface water.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Plasma treatment advantages for textiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The textile industry is searching for innovative production techniques to improve the product quality, as well as society requires new finishing techniques working in environmental respect. Plasma surface treatments show distinct advantages, because they are able to modify the surface properties of inert materials, sometimes with environment friendly devices. For fabrics, cold plasma treatments require the development of reliable and large systems. Such systems are now existing and the use of plasma physics in industrial problems is rapidly increasing. On textile surfaces, three main effects can be obtained depending on the treatment conditions: the cleaning effect, the increase of microroughness (anti-pilling finishing of wool) and the production of radicals to obtain hydrophilic surfaces. Plasma polymerisation, that is the deposition of solid polymeric materials with desired properties on textile substrates, is under development. The advantage of such plasma treatments is that the modification turns out to ...

Sparavigna, Amelia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

SU?E?T?225: A Comprehensive Evaluation of Real?Time Motion Tracking of a Surface Imaging System for Lung Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Applicability of the AlignRT surfaceimaging system was extensively investigated for real?time motion tracking in radiation therapy of lungcancer.Methods: A 4D computer?controlled motion phantom was employed to simulate a human breathing motion. An anthropomorphic thoracic phantom (a coronal cross?sectional area: ?1

H Jin; Z Su

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Biological treatment of refinery wastes  

SciTech Connect

A detailed study of the treatment situation at a Thai refinery that used an API separator with no equalization tank, followed by an activated-sludge system, showed that only 42% of the total COD and 57% of the soluble COD was degradable. In a study of the possibility of additional treatments, an aerated lagoon showed promising results. The wastewater composition of the three main Thai refineries was surveyed.

Mahmud, Z.; Thanh, N.C.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Water Treatment Strategies: Microorganism Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an overview of the fundamental concepts of microorganism control and a discussion about how these concepts can be applied for optimizing current prevention and mitigation strategies in nuclear power plant service water systems. A database has been established to facilitate development of treatment and operation strategies that meet the requirement for preventing microbiological problems while overcoming limitations with current water treatment technologies.

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

234

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant- December 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity

235

Colloids in Saturated and Partially-Saturated Porous Media: Approaches to the Treatment of Colloids in Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the Yucca Mountain Project, most contaminant transport modeling has considered the mobility of dissolved aqueous species but has neglected colloid transport. This report provides a survey of what is known about colloid-aided contaminant transport and the incorporation of this mechanism in Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs) for deep geologic disposal of radioactive wastes. The report concludes with several recommendations for appropriate approaches to assessing the importance of colloid-a...

1999-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

236

Review Treatment of Lyme borreliosis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato is the causative agent of Lyme borreliosis in humans. This inflammatory disease can affect the skin, the peripheral and central nervous system, the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular system and rarely the eyes. Early stages are directly associated with viable bacteria at the site of inflammation. The pathogenhost interaction is complex and has been elucidated only in part. B. burgdorferi is highly susceptible to antibiotic treatment and the majority of patients profit from this treatment. Some patients develop chronic persistent disease despite repeated antibiotics. Whether this is a sequel of pathogen persistence or a status of chronic auto-inflammation, auto-immunity or a form of fibromyalgia is highly debated. Since vaccination is not available, prevention of a tick bite or chemoprophylaxis is important. If the infection is manifest, then treatment strategies should target not only the pathogen by using antibiotics but also the chronic inflammation by using anti-inflammatory drugs.

Hermann J Girschick; Henner Morbach

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

ADVANCED NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE EFFECTS ON THE TREATMENT OF UNCERTAINTY IN THE LONG-TERM ASSESSMENT OF GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL SYSTEMS - EBS INPUT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign within the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Technology (FCT) program has been tasked with investigating the disposal of the nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level nuclear waste (HLW) for a range of potential waste forms and geologic environments. The planning, construction, and operation of a nuclear disposal facility is a long-term process that involves engineered barriers that are tailored to both the geologic environment and the waste forms being emplaced. The UFD Campaign is considering a range of fuel cycles that in turn produce a range of waste forms. The UFD Campaign is also considering a range of geologic media. These ranges could be thought of as adding uncertainty to what the disposal facility design will ultimately be; however, it may be preferable to thinking about the ranges as adding flexibility to design of a disposal facility. For example, as the overall DOE-NE program and industrial actions result in the fuel cycles that will produce waste to be disposed, and the characteristics of those wastes become clear, the disposal program retains flexibility in both the choice of geologic environment and the specific repository design. Of course, other factors also play a major role, including local and State-level acceptance of the specific site that provides the geologic environment. In contrast, the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) repository license application (LA) is based on waste forms from an open fuel cycle (PWR and BWR assemblies from an open fuel cycle). These waste forms were about 90% of the total waste, and they were the determining waste form in developing the engineered barrier system (EBS) design for the Yucca Mountain Repository design. About 10% of the repository capacity was reserved for waste from a full recycle fuel cycle in which some actinides were extracted for weapons use, and the remaining fission products and some minor actinides were encapsulated in borosilicate glass. Because the heat load of the glass was much less than the PWR and BWR assemblies, the glass waste form was able to be co-disposed with the open cycle waste, by interspersing glass waste packages among the spent fuel assembly waste packages. In addition, the Yucca Mountain repository was designed to include some research reactor spent fuel and naval reactor spent fuel, within the envelope that was set using the commercial reactor assemblies as the design basis waste form. This milestone report supports Sandia National Laboratory milestone M2FT-12SN0814052, and is intended to be a chapter in that milestone report. The independent technical review of this LLNL milestone was performed at LLNL and is documented in the electronic Information Management (IM) system at LLNL. The objective of this work is to investigate what aspects of quantifying, characterizing, and representing the uncertainty associated with the engineered barrier are affected by implementing different advanced nuclear fuel cycles (e.g., partitioning and transmutation scenarios) together with corresponding designs and thermal constraints.

Sutton, M; Blink, J A; Greenberg, H R; Sharma, M

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

238

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sludge Treatment Sludge Treatment Project - September 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - September 2013 November 2013 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System Operational Awareness Review and Sludge Treatment Project Independent Project Review [HIAR-RL-2013-09-18] This Independent Oversight Activity Report documents an oversight activity conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations on September 17-18, 2013, at the Hanford Sludge Treatment Project. The activity consisted of HSS staff performing an operational awareness review of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System. An HSS

239

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 9690 of 28,905 results. 81 - 9690 of 28,905 results. Download EIS-0389: Final Environmental Impact Statement Trinity Public Utilities District Direct Interconnection Project http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0389-final-environmental-impact-statement Download Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal SiteLinda Sheader and Marilyn Kastens http://energy.gov/lm/downloads/changes-vegetation-monticello-utah-disposal-site Download Impacts of Long-term Drought on Power Systems in the U.S. Southwest - July 2012 During the summer of 2012, 56 percent of the Lower 48 states were experiencing drought conditions as of May 8, almost twice the area compared to the same time the previous year, according to data... http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/impacts-long-term-drought-power-systems-us-southwest-july-2012

240

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 11120 of 28,905 results. 11 - 11120 of 28,905 results. Download Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell Cover Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell Cover http://energy.gov/lm/downloads/study-factors-affecting-shrub-establishment-monticello-utah-disposal Article DOE Signs Decision to Move Moab Tailings WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that a Record of Decision (ROD) clearing the way for the removal of 11.9 million tons of radioactive Uranium Mill Tailings... http://energy.gov/articles/doe-signs-decision-move-moab-tailings Page Long-Term Stewardship Related Information http://energy.gov/em/long-term-stewardship-related-information-0 Download Vulnerability Analysis of Energy Delivery Control Systems- 2011

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment system monticello" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Tablet Chlorination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wastewater that is sprayed onto lawns must first be disinfected to prevent odors and remove disease-causing organisms. This publication explains how tablet chlorinators disinfect wastewater and gives tips on how to maintain them.

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

242

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Graywater Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homeowners who use graywater to water their lawns need to understand the risks and safety issues associated with this practice. This publication discusses the constituents of graywater; their potential effects on human, soil, plant and environmental health and steps to prevent harm to them. 6 pp., 1 figure, 3 tables

Melton, Rebecca; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

243

Wastewater treatment and energy : an analysis on the feasibility of using renewable energy to power wastewater treatment plants in Singapore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is a very energy intensive industry. Singapore has a state-of-the-art wastewater treatment system that uses a number of sustainable techniques that greatly improve its overall efficiency. The centralized ...

Foley, Kevin John

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Enhanced Renewable Methane Production System  

treatment that enhances the heating value of biogas, delivering a gas that is close to pipeline quality. This system offers

245

Emergency Medical Treatment Required  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emergency Medical Treatment Required Non-Emergency Medical Treatment Required If possible, get help present if possible OptaComp will complete the "First Report of Injury or Illness" and authorize medical Investigation Report" to Environmental Health & Safety within 48 hours Emergency Medical Treatment Required

Weston, Ken

246

Independent Activity Report, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant- March 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Follow-up of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity Review [HIAR-WTP-2013-03-18

247

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for the DTF, its support systems, tools, and drum treatment activities identified in ORPS corrective actions, NCRs or CARS have been adequately resolved. b. Lessons learned from...

248

Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IWTU Integrated Waste Treatment Unit LCO Limiting Condition for Operation LSS Life Safety Systems MSA Management Self-Assessment OFI Opportunity for Improvement ORR Operational...

249

Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IWTU Integrated Waste Treatment Unit LCO Limiting Condition for Operation LSS Life Safety Systems MSA Management Self-Assessment OFI Opportunity for Improvement OGC Off-Gas...

250

Coordination of Care in Substance Abuse Treatment: An Interorganizational Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system-wide organizational strategies on the health statusorganizational social outcomes in a centrally governed healthorganizational relationships among drug abuse treatment organizations, 1990-2000. Health

Spear, Suzanne Evelyn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Flue gas desulfurization wastewater treatment primer  

SciTech Connect

Purge water from a typical wet flue gas desulfurization system contains myriad chemical constituents and heavy metals whose mixture is determined by the fuel source and combustion products as well as the stack gas treatment process. A well-designed water treatment system can tolerate upstream fuel and sorbent arranged in just the right order to produce wastewater acceptable for discharge. This article presents state-of-the-art technologies for treating the waste water that is generated by wet FGD systems. 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Higgins, T.E.; Sandy, A.T.; Givens, S.W.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Anaerobic treatment of gasifier effluents. Quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed during the quarter ending December 30, 1981. The major efforts have been directed toward the continued acclimation of two anaerobic treatment systems, start up of a third anaerobic treatment system, GC/MS characterization of the coal gasification wastewater, data acquisition for determination of distribution coefficients for the extraction of phenol from the wastewater using MIBK, and preliminary design of a solvent extraction system for wastewater pretreatment. The progress of these efforts are depicted in the Gannt Chart, along with project expenditures for the above contract, and are presented in detail in the following sections.

Cross, W.H.; Chian, E.S.K.; Pohland, F.G.; Giabbai, M.; Harper, S.R.; Kharkar, S.; Cheng, S.S.; Shuey, P.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Mixed Waste Treatment Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing integrated mixed waste program, EPRI has documented nuclear utility industry experience in the on-site treatment of mixed waste. This report reviews all available exclusions/exceptions to EPA permitting requirements for environmentally responsible on-site management of mixed waste. Included is a description of emerging mixed waste treatment technologies along with a detailed evaluation of off-site treatment/disposal facilities.

1996-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Demystifying water treatment  

SciTech Connect

Increasingly accountable for the environmental quality and cost of managing their waste and process water streams, customers require more precise data about the constituents in their water. This has forced suppliers to unlock some of the secrets of water treatment. In the open exchange of information, users are trading in esoteric formulations for products that are more chemical efficient and environmentally benign. Factoring more prominently in the water treatment equation are service and supply. This paper reviews some of these simpler treatments.

Hairston, D.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Design and Operating Guidelines Manual for Cooling-Water Treatment - Treatment of Recirculated Cooling Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This preliminary manual was developed to provide a systematic procedure for evaluating candidate strategies for the treatment of recirculated cooling water. It presents (1) a means of selecting optimal treatment methods and facilities on the basis of technical and economic considerations, and (2) guidelines for proper cooling-water system operation. Descriptions of, and user's manuals for, the cooling-system process and chemical equilibrium computer simulation models are included.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Hanford Treatment Facility Achieves First Gold Ranking for Sustainable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treatment Facility Achieves First Gold Ranking for Treatment Facility Achieves First Gold Ranking for Sustainable Design in EM Complex: New groundwater treatment facility will be Hanford's largest, greenest pump-and-treat system Hanford Treatment Facility Achieves First Gold Ranking for Sustainable Design in EM Complex: New groundwater treatment facility will be Hanford's largest, greenest pump-and-treat system May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers use a lift to access part of the 200 West Groundwater Treatment Facility. Workers use a lift to access part of the 200 West Groundwater Treatment Facility. Pump-and-treat construction managers David Fink (left) and Delise Pargmann (right) review information for the LEED gold certification of the main process building for the 200 West Groundwater Treatment Facility.

257

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR WASTE WATER TREATMENT MODIFICATIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WASTE WATER TREATMENT MODIFICATIONS WASTE WATER TREATMENT MODIFICATIONS FOR IMPROVED EFFLUENT COMPLIANCE BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK BROOKHAVEN SITE OFFICE JUNE 24, 2011 DOE/EA-1854 i Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... 1 2.0 SUMMARY ........................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 PURPOSE AND NEED ....................................................................................................17 4.0 ALTERNATIVES ..............................................................................................................17 4.1 Alternative 1 - Groundwater Recharge System (Preferred Alternative) .............. 17

258

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - February  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sludge Treatment Project - Sludge Treatment Project - February 2012 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - February 2012 February 2012 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project Operational Awareness Review [HIAR-RL-2012-02-27] The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed operational awareness reviews of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP), Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) during site visits. Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - February 2012 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - June 2011 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - April 2011 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - August 2011

259

Laser Heat Treatment [Laser Applications Laboratory] - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heat Treatment Heat Treatment Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Overview Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling Laser Heat Treatment Laser Welding of Metals On-line Monitoring Laser Beam Delivery Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails High Power Laser Beam Delivery Decontamination and Decommissioning Refractory Alloy Welding Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Laser Applications Laboratory Laser Heat Treatment Project description: Optimization of laser beam heat treatment. Category: Project with industrial partner (Caterpillar and USCAR) Bookmark and Share Heat treatment optics

260

InsideIllinoisAug. 4, 2005 Vol. 25, No. 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be made to its 40-year-old tower near Monticello. That work will be completed this fall. When the tower locally produced shows were broadcast live. UI expert: Governors' pact on electricity transmission for electric transmis- sion lines is a positive move to improve the reliability of the electric supply system

Braun, Paul

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment system monticello" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Water treatment program raises boiler operating efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details the boiler water treatment program which played a vital role in changing an aging steam plant into a profitable plant in just three years. Boiler efficiency increased from approximately 70 percent initially to 86 percent today. The first step in this water treatment program involves use of a sodium zeolite water softener that works to remove scale-forming ions from municipal water used in the system. A resin cleaner is also added to prolong the life of resins in the softener. The water is then passed through a new blow-down heat exchanger, which allows preheating from the continuous blow-down from the boiler system. The water gets pumped into a deaerator tank where sulfite treatment is added. The water then passes from feedpumps into the boiler system.

Not Available

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Microsoft Word - toc.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Louise Jones San Juan County Monticello, UT Utah Department of Transportation UDOT Price District Director Hugh Kirkham UDOT Price, UT UDOT Monticello Station Supervisor Chet...

263

Water Treatment Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to see the operation than have us explain it. Basically, most treatment plants remove the solid material and use living organisms and chlorine to clean up the water. Steve Sample...

264

Thermal treatment wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

LARGE-SCALE MECURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGY TESTING FOR LIGNITE-FIRED UTILITIES-OXIDATION SYSTEMS FOR WET FGD  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a consortium-based effort directed toward resolving the mercury (Hg) control issues facing the lignite industry. Specifically, the EERC team--the EERC, EPRI, URS, ADA-ES, Babcock & Wilcox, the North Dakota Industrial Commission, SaskPower, and the Mercury Task Force, which includes Basin Electric Power Cooperative, Otter Tail Power Company, Great River Energy, Texas Utilities (TXU), Montana-Dakota Utilities Co., Minnkota Power Cooperative, BNI Coal Ltd., Dakota Westmoreland Corporation, and the North American Coal Company--has undertaken a project to significantly and cost-effectively oxidize elemental mercury in lignite combustion gases, followed by capture in a wet scrubber. This approach will be applicable to virtually every lignite utility in the United States and Canada and potentially impact subbituminous utilities. The oxidation process is proven at the pilot-scale and in short-term full-scale tests. Additional optimization is continuing on oxidation technologies, and this project focuses on longer-term full-scale testing. The lignite industry has been proactive in advancing the understanding of and identifying control options for Hg in lignite combustion flue gases. Approximately 1 year ago, the EERC and EPRI began a series of Hg-related discussions with the Mercury Task Force as well as utilities firing Texas and Saskatchewan lignites. This project is one of three being undertaken by the consortium to perform large-scale Hg control technology testing to address the specific needs and challenges to be met in controlling Hg from lignite-fired power plants. This project involves Hg oxidation upstream of a system equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD). The team involved in conducting the technical aspects of the project includes the EERC, Babcock & Wilcox, URS, and ADA-ES. The host sites include Minnkota Power Cooperative Milton R. Young Unit 2 and TXU Monticello Unit 3. The work involves establishing Hg oxidation levels upstream of air pollution control devices (APCDs) and removal rates across existing ESP and FGD units, determining costs associated with those removal rates, investigating the possibility of the APCD acting as a multipollutant control device, quantifying the balance of plant impacts of the control technologies, and facilitating technology commercialization.

Michael J. Holmes; Steven A. Benson; Jeffrey S. Thompson

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Hedgehog Water Contaminant Removal System - Energy Innovation ...  

The in-tank recirculating treatment system reduces the levels of ... Energy Innovation ... laboratory environment which includes the integration and ...

267

Passive treatment of wastewater and contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect

A bioremediation system using inorganic oxide-reducing microbial consortia for the treatment of, inter alia coal mine and coal yard runoff uses a containment vessel for contaminated water and a second, floating phase for nutrients. Biodegradable oils are preferred nutrients.

Phifer, Mark A. (N. Augusta, SC); Sappington, Frank C. (Dahlonega, GA); Millings, Margaret R. (N. Augusta, SC); Turick, Charles E. (Aiken, SC); McKinsey, Pamela C. (Aiken, SC)

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

268

Treatment of Waste Soils / Solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About the 1996 International Symposium on Extraction and Processing for the Treatment and Minimization of Wastes: Treatment of Waste Soils / Solids...

269

Wrought Superalloy Heat Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 5   Effect of heat treatment on the properties of A-286...tensile strength Elongation % Reduction in area, % MPa ksi MPa ksi Life, h Elongation, % Reduction in area, % 980 °C (1800 °F) for 1 h, oil quench (OQ)

270

Situ treatment of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system for treating dissolved halogenated organic compounds in groundwater that relies upon electrolytically-generated hydrogen to chemically reduce the halogenated compounds in the presence of a suitable catalyst. A direct current is placed across at least a pair, or an array, of electrodes which are housed within groundwater wells so that hydrogen is generated at the cathode and oxygen at the anode. A pump is located within the well housing in which the cathode(s) is(are) located and draws in groundwater where it is hydrogenated via electrolysis, passes through a well-bore treatment unit, and then transported to the anode well(s) for reinjection into the ground. The well-bore treatment involves a permeable cylinder located in the well bore and containing a packed bed of catalyst material that facilitates the reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated organic compounds by hydrogen into environmentally benign species such as ethane and methane. Also, electro-osmatic transport of contaminants toward the cathode also contributes to contaminant mass removal. The only above ground equipment required are the transfer pipes and a direct circuit power supply for the electrodes. The electrode wells in an array may be used in pairs or one anode well may be used with a plurality of cathode wells. The DC current flow between electrode wells may be periodically reversed which controls the formation of mineral deposits in the alkaline cathode well-bore water, as well as to help rejuvenate the catalysis.

McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Ruiz, Roberto (Tracy, CA); Pico, Tristan M. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Tank 48 Treatment Process  

-Reduce elutriation of particulates containing coal System planning: Sludge batch planning/DWPF WAC-Evaluate Tank Farm and DWPF coal capability

272

Prevention & Treatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prevention and Treatment Prevention and Treatment These steps may help prevent the spread of respiratory illnesses such as the flu: Stay Healthy Vaccination Antivirals Stay Informed Stay Healthy Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze-throw the tissue away immediately after you use it. Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. If you are not near water, use an alcohol-based (60-95%) hand cleaner. Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too. If you get the flu, stay home from work, school, and social gatherings. This will help prevent others from catching your illness. Try not to touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. Germs often spread this way.

273

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, was the largest of three defense production sites in the U.S. Over the span of 40 years, it was used to produce 64 metric tons of plutonium, helping end World War II and playing a major role in military defense efforts during the Cold War. As a result, 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical wastes are now stored in 177 underground tanks on the Hanford Site. To address this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the "Vit Plant," will use vitrification to immobilize most of Hanford's dangerous tank waste.

274

A general water supply planning model: Evaluation of decentralized treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing population, diminishing supplies and variable climatic conditions can cause difficulties in meeting water demands; especially in arid regions where water resources are limited. Given the complexity of the system and the interactions among ... Keywords: Decentralized wastewater treatment system, System dynamics, Water conservation, Water supply

G. Chung; K. Lansey; P. Blowers; P. Brooks; W. Ela; S. Stewart; P. Wilson

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Mathematical treatment of uncertainty in the speech recognition process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the main difficulties in the speech recognition process is the treatment of the imprecisions around it. They have origin in the differences between the articulatory system of each person and the physical properties of the sound propagation. Moreover, ... Keywords: Hidden Markov model, fuzzy, interval analysis, mathematical treatment, speech recognition, uncertainty

Hesdras Oliveira Viana; Diogo Pereira Silva De Novais; Roque Mendes Prado Trindade

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Stabilization of a nonlinear anaerobic wastewater treatment model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nonlinear anaerobic digester model of wastewater treatment plants is considered. The stabilizability of the dynamic system is studied and a continuous stabilizing feedback, depending only on an on-line measurable variable, is proposed. Computer simulations ...

Neli S. Dimitrova; Mikhail I. Krastanov

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Retrieval/ex situ thermal treatment scoring interaction report  

SciTech Connect

A retrieval/ex situ thermal treatment technology process for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory transuranic waste pits and trenches is present. A system performance score is calculated, and assumptions, requirements, and reference baseline technologies for all subelements are included.

Raivo, B.D.; Richardson, J.G.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Explosive Waste Treatment Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

106 106 Environment a 1 Assessment for th.e Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory MASTER November 1995 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Washington, DOC. 20585 Portions of this document maly be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Table of Contents 1 . 0 2.0 3 . 0 4.0 5 . 0 6.0 7 . 0 8 . 0 Document Summary .............................................................. 1 Purpose and Need for Agency Action ............................................. 3 Description of the Proposed Action and Alternatives ............................ 4 3.1.1 Location ............................................................. 4

279

Thermomechanical treatment of alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article of an alloy of AISI 316 stainless steel is reduced in size to predetermined dimensions by cold working in repeated steps. Before the last reduction step the article is annealed by heating within a temperature range, specifically between 1010.degree. C. and 1038.degree. C. for a time interval between 90 and 60 seconds depending on the actual temperature. By this treatment the swelling under neutron bombardment by epithermal neutrons is reduced while substantial recrystallization does not occur in actual use for a time interval of at least of the order of 5000 hours.

Bates, John F. (Ogden, UT); Brager, Howard R. (Richland, WA); Paxton, Michael M. (Gaithersburg, MD)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Gas treatment by adsorption  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus and a process for treatment of gaseous hydrocarbons to recover condensable materials consist of 3 beds of adsorbent materials which are alternately subjected to adsorbing, regeneration, and cooling phases. The regeneration is accomplished by means of hot gas passing through the bed. When regeneration of a bed is substantially complete, a portion of the hot gas from that bed is fed into the bed, which is in the adsorption phase of the cycle. At the same time, cool lean gas is directed into the bed, which is on the regeneration phase. (6 claims)

Russell, G.F.

1969-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment system monticello" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Overview of non-thermal mixed waste treatment technologies: Treatment of mixed waste (ex situ); Technologies and short descriptions  

SciTech Connect

This compendium contains brief summaries of new and developing non- thermal treatment technologies that are candidates for treating hazardous or mixed (hazardous plus low-level radioactive) wastes. It is written to be all-encompassing, sometimes including concepts that presently constitute little more than informed ``ideas``. It bounds the universe of existing technologies being thought about or considered for application on the treatment of such wastes. This compendium is intended to be the very first step in a winnowing process to identify non-thermal treatment systems that can be fashioned into complete ``cradle-to-grave`` systems for study. The purpose of the subsequent systems paper studies is to investigate the cost and likely performance of such systems treating a representative sample of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mixed low level wastes (MLLW). The studies are called Integrated Non-thermal Treatment Systems (INTS) Studies and are being conducted by the Office of Science and Technology (OST) of the Environmental Management (EM) of the US Department of Energy. Similar studies on Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems have recently been published. These are not designed nor intended to be a ``downselection`` of such technologies; rather, they are simply a systems evaluation of the likely costs and performance of various non- thermal technologies that have been arranged into systems to treat sludges, organics, metals, soils, and debris prevalent in MLLW.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

RETRIEVAL & TREATMENT OF HANFORD TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Farms contain 53 million gal of radioactive waste accumulated during over 50 years of operations. The waste is stored in 177 single-shell and double-shell tanks in the Hanford 200 Areas. The single-shell tanks were put into operation from the early 1940s through the 1960s with wastes received from several generations of processing facilities for the recovery of plutonium and uranium, and from laboratories and other ancillary facilities. The overall hanford Tank Farm system represents one of the largest nuclear legacies in the world driving towards completion of retrieval and treatment in 2028 and the associated closure activity completion by 2035. Remote operations, significant radiation/contamination levels, limited access, and old facilities are just some of the challenges faced by retrieval and treatment systems. These systems also need to be able to successfully remove 99% or more of the waste, and support waste treatment, and tank closure. The Tank Farm retrieval program has ramped up dramatically in the past three years with design, fabrication, installation, testing, and operations ongoing on over 20 of the 149 single-shell tanks. A variety of technologies are currently being pursued to retrieve different waste types, applications, and to help establish a baseline for recovery/operational efficiencies. The paper/presentation describes the current status of retrieval system design, fabrication, installation, testing, readiness, and operations, including: (1) Saltcake removal progress in Tanks S-102, S-109, and S-112 using saltcake dissolution, modified sluicing, and high pressure water lancing techniques; (2) Sludge vacuum retrieval experience from Tanks C-201, C-202, C-203, and C-204; (3) Modified sluicing experience in Tank C-103; (4) Progress on design and installation of the mobile retrieval system for sludge in potentially leaking single-shell tanks, particularly Tank C-101; and (5) Ongoing installation of various systems in the next generation of tanks to be retrieved.

EACKER, J.A.; SPEARS, J.A.; STURGES, M.H.; MAUSS, B.M.

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

283

Innovative Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish Innovative Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish October 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Oak Ridge scientists Kelly Roy, left, and Trent Jett collect fish samples in 2011 to support research on the impacts of the treatment in Tims Branch, a small stream at the Savannah River Site. Oak Ridge scientists Kelly Roy, left, and Trent Jett collect fish samples in 2011 to support research on the impacts of the treatment in Tims Branch, a small stream at the Savannah River Site. The M1 Air Stripper system at Savannah River Site, pictured here, was modified in 2007 to remove mercury. The M1 Air Stripper system at Savannah River Site, pictured here, was modified in 2007 to remove mercury. Oak Ridge scientists Kelly Roy, left, and Trent Jett collect fish samples in 2011 to support

284

Independent Activity Report, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2013 Independent Activity Report, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2013 March 2013 Follow-up of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity Review [HIAR-WTP-2013-03-18] The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) staff observed a limited portion of the restart of the Hazard Analysis (HA) for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter Process (LMP) System. The primary purpose of this HSS field activity, on March 18-21, 2013, was to observe and understand the revised approach implemented by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), the contractor responsible for the design and construction of WTP for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of

285

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Waste Treatment and Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - June 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - June 2013 June 2013 Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Off-gas Process System Hazards Analysis Activity Observation [HIAR-WTP-2013-05-13] This Independent Activity Report documents an oversight activity conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations from May 13 - June 28, 2013, at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The activity consisted of HSS staff observing a limited portion of the start of the hazard analysis (HA) for WTP Low Activity Waste (LAW) Primary Off-gas System. The primary purpose of this HSS field activity was to observe and

286

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - July 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - July 2013 July 2013 Operational Awareness of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity [HIAR-WTP-2013-07-31] This Independent Activity Report documents an oversight activity conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations from July 31 - August 5, 2013, at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The activity consisted of HSS staff observing a limited portion of the hazards analysis (HA) for WTP Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter Process system. The primary purpose of this HSS field activity was to observe and

287

Water_Treatment.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Since dewatering at the Weldon Spring site began in Since dewatering at the Weldon Spring site began in 1992, more than 290 million gallons of contaminated water have been treated and released into the Missouri River from two similar water treatment facilities at the site and the nearby Quarry. On September 30, 1999, dewatering efforts at the Chemical Plant site were completed, meeting one of the most substantial milestones of the project and bringing to an end a part of history that was started nearly 5 decades ago. From 1955 to 1966, uranium materials were processed at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's Uranium Feed Materials Plant. The ore was processed in a nitric acid solution that separated the uranium from other chemicals. The by-product, called raffinate, was neutralized with lime, then placed in four settling basins,

288

Treatment of organic waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic waste containing at least one element selected from the group consisting of strontium, cesium, iodine and ruthenium is treated to achieve a substantial reduction in the volume of the waste and provide for fixation of the selected element in an inert salt. The method of treatment comprises introducing the organic waste and a source of oxygen into a molten salt bath maintained at an elevated temperature to produce solid and gaseous reaction products. The gaseous reaction products comprise carbon dioxide and water vapor, and the solid reaction products comprise the inorganic ash constituents of the organic waste and the selected element which is retained in the molten salt. The molten salt bath comprises one or more alkali metal carbonates, and may optionally include from 1 to about 25 wt.% of an alkali metal sulfate.

Grantham, LeRoy F. (Calabasas, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Geothermal waste treatment biotechnology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technical feasibility of a biotechnology based on biochemical reactions for detoxification of geothermal brines has been demonstrated. Laboratory-scale studies have shown that the emerging biotechnology is versatile and is applicable to a variety of geothermal sludges and materials with similar geochemical properties. Materials suitable for treatment are those which may contain few or many metals in concentrations exceeding those allowed by regulatory agencies. Comparison of several possible types of bioreactors and processes have led to the conclusion that a number of variables have to be considered in the design and development of a biochemical plant for the detoxification of geothermal type sludges. These include reactor size, effects of agitation, mixed cultures, state of the biomass, pH and dissolved oxygen, concentration of residual sludge, residence time, and temperature. Under optimum conditions, high rates of metal removal can be achieved. Some recent studies, dealing with the process variables and their optimization, will be discussed. 6 refs., 3 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Specifically Designed Constructed Wetlands: A Novel Treatment Approach for Scrubber Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pilot-scale wetland treatment system was specifically designed and constructed at Clemson University to evaluate removal of mercury, selenium, and other constituents from flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater. Specific objectives of this research were: (1) to measure performance of a pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment system in terms of decreases in targeted constituents (Hg, Se and As) in the FGD wastewater from inflow to outflow; (2) to determine how the observed performance is achieved (both reactions and rates); and (3) to measure performance in terms of decreased bioavailability of these elements (i.e. toxicity of sediments in constructed wetlands and toxicity of outflow waters from the treatment system). Performance of the pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment systems was assessed using two criteria: anticipated NPDES permit levels and toxicity evaluations using two sentinel toxicity-testing organisms (Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas). These systems performed efficiently with varied inflow simulations of FGD wastewaters removing As, Hg, and Se concentrations below NPDES permit levels and reducing the toxicity of simulated FGD wastewater after treatment with the constructed wetland treatment systems. Sequential extraction procedures indicated that these elements (As, Hg, and Se) were bound to residual phases within sediments of these systems, which should limit their bioavailability to aquatic biota. Sediments collected from constructed wetland treatment systems were tested to observe toxicity to Hyalella azteca or Chironomus tetans. Complete survival (100%) was observed for H. azteca in all cells of the constructed wetland treatment system and C. tentans had an average of 91% survival over the three treatment cells containing sediments. Survival and growth of H. azteca and C. tentans did not differ significantly between sediments from the constructed wetland treatment system and controls. Since the sediments of the constructed wetland treatment system are repositories for As, Hg, and Se and the bioavailability of these elements decreased after deposition, the pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment system contributed significantly to mitigation of risks to aquatic life from these elements.

John H. Rodgers Jr; James W. Castle; Chris Arrington: Derek Eggert; Meg Iannacone

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Microsoft Word - S04040_tracer.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah November 2005 Through February 2008 April 2008 DOE LM/1587 2008 - - ESL RPT 2008 02 - - - Work Performed nder DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. by the S.M. Stoller Corporation u DE AM01 07LM00060 - - Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1587-2007 ESL-RPT-2008-02 Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 April 2008 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AM01-07LM00060 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally left blank

292

Microsoft Word - S03840_MNT ZVI Treat Cells_Feb08.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells January 2008 DOE LM/1560 2008 - - ESL RPT 2008-01 - - Work Performed nder DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. by the S.M. Stoller Corporation u DE AC01 02GJ79491 - - Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Environmental Sciences Laboratory Environmental Sciences Laboratory Environmental Sciences Laboratory Environmental Sciences Laboratory Environmental Sciences Laboratory This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1560-2007 ESL-RPT-2008-01 Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells

293

Microsoft Word - S04040_tracer.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah November 2005 Through February 2008 April 2008 DOE LM/1587 2008 - - ESL RPT 2008 02 - - - Work Performed nder DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. by the S.M. Stoller Corporation u DE AM01 07LM00060 - - Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1587-2007 ESL-RPT-2008-02 Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 April 2008 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AM01-07LM00060 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally left blank

294

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 22380 of 26,764 results. 71 - 22380 of 26,764 results. Download Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells http://energy.gov/lm/downloads/ground-water-table-and-chemical-changes-alluvial-aquifer-during Download DOE-STD-3006-2000 Planning and Conduct of Operational Readiness Reviews Replaced by DOE-STD-3006-2010 | Superseding DOE-STD-3006-95 (November 1995) DOE O 425.1B specifies the conditions and circumstances when an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) or a Readiness Assessment (RA) is required as part of a new start or restart process. This standard provides guidance on the

295

Underground Coal Thermal Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coal??s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Efforts focused on: ? Constructing a suite of three different coal pyrolysis reactors. These reactors offer the ability to gather heat transfer, mass transfer and kinetic data during coal pyrolysis under conditions that mimic in situ conditions (Subtask 6.1). ? Studying the operational parameters for various underground thermal treatment processes for oil shale and coal and completing a design matrix analysis for the underground coal thermal treatment (UCTT). This analysis yielded recommendations for terms of targeted coal rank, well orientation, rubblization, presence of oxygen, temperature, pressure, and heating sources (Subtask 6.2). ? Developing capabilities for simulating UCTT, including modifying the geometry as well as the solution algorithm to achieve long simulation times in a rubblized coal bed by resolving the convective channels occurring in the representative domain (Subtask 6.3). ? Studying the reactive behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with limestone, sandstone, arkose (a more complex sandstone) and peridotite, including mineralogical changes and brine chemistry for the different initial rock compositions (Subtask 6.4). Arkose exhibited the highest tendency of participating in mineral reactions, which can be attributed to the geochemical complexity of its initial mineral assemblage. In experiments with limestone, continuous dissolution was observed with the release of CO{sub 2} gas, indicated by the increasing pressure in the reactor (formation of a gas chamber). This occurred due to the lack of any source of alkali to buffer the solution. Arkose has the geochemical complexity for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2} as carbonates and is also relatively abundant. The effect of including NH{sub 3} in the injected gas stream was also investigated in this study. Precipitation of calcite and trace amounts of ammonium zeolites was observed. A batch geochemical model was developed using Geochemists Workbench (GWB). Degassing effect in the experiments was corrected using the sliding fugacity model in GWB. Experimental and simulation results were compared and a reasonable agreement between the two was observed.

P. Smith; M. Deo; E. Eddings; A. Sarofim; K. Gueishen; M. Hradisky; K. Kelly; P. Mandalaparty; H. Zhang

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Ozone Alternative Disinfection Study for a Large-Scale Wastewater Treatment Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a feasibility study for the use of an ozonation disinfection system for the treatment of wastewater in the Passaic Valley.

1999-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

297

Cryogenic Treatment of Metal Parts  

SciTech Connect

Cryogenic treatment and its variables have been described. Results of eight engineering tests carried out on cryotreated parts have been presented. Cryogenic treatment of metal parts enhances useful properties which in turn, improves various strengths. Our tests viz. Abrasion, Torsion, Fatigue, Tensile, Shear, Hardness and Impact on Mild steel, Cast Iron, Brass and Copper show that the cryogenic treatment improved useful properties of mild steel parts appreciably but did not show promise with brass and copper parts.

Chillar, Rahul [S. P. College of Engineering, Andheri (W), Mumbai - 400 058 (India); Agrawal, S. C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai - 400 005 (India)

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

Treatment and Disposal of Unanticipated 'Scavenger' Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site often generates wastewater for disposal that is not included as a source to one of the site's wastewater treatment facilities that are permitted by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control. The techniques used by the SRS contract operator (Westinghouse Savannah River Company) to evaluate and treat this unanticipated 'scavenger' wastewater may benefit industries and municipalities who experience similar needs. Regulations require that scavenger wastewater be treated and not just diluted. Each of the pollutants that are present must meet effluent permit limitations and/or receiving stream water quality standards. if a scavenger wastewater is classified as 'hazardous' under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) its disposal must comply with RCRA regulations. Westinghouse Savannah River Company obtained approval from SCDHEC to dispose of scavenger wastewater under specific conditions that are included within the SRS National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit. Scavenger wastewater is analyzed in a laboratory to determine its constituency. Pollutant values are entered into spreadsheets that calculate treatment plant removal capabilities and instream concentrations. Disposal rates are computed, ensuring compliance with regulatory requirements and protection of treatment system operating units. Appropriate records are maintained in the event of an audit.

Payne, W.L.

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Computerized Energy and Treatment Cost Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A computer program has been developed that quickly calculates blowdown heat loss as a function of makeup water, boiler water chemistry, and blowdown recovery equipment. By inputting water analysis, basic system parameters, and type of fuel, the cost of heat loss in the blowdown can be quickly and accurately determined. Present operating systems can quickly be evaluated as to potential cost savings on the addition of a blowdown flash tank and/or a recovery heat exchanger. Proposed systems can be engineered from the start with an eye to decreasing energy loss and saving money. In addition, the proper internal treatment is recommended along with appropriate products. Cost of energy lost in the blowdown is calculated based on different levels of blowdown heat recovery. Accurate calculations are readily available to make more intelligent decisions on the purchase of recovery equipment, rather than depending on very tedious, potentially inaccurate determinations by long hand.

Trace, W. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Treatment of Radioactive Reactive Mixed Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PacificEcoSolutions, Inc. (PEcoS) has installed a plasma gasification system that was recently modified and used to destroy a trimethyl-aluminum mixed waste stream from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL.) The unique challenge in handling reactive wastes like trimethyl-aluminum is their propensity to flame instantly on contact with air and to react violently with water. To safely address this issue, PacificEcoSolutions has developed a new feed system to ensure the safe containment of these radioactive reactive wastes during transfer to the gasification unit. The plasma gasification system safely processed the radioactively contaminated trimethyl-metal compounds into metal oxides. The waste stream came from LANL research operations, and had been in storage for seven years, pending treatment options. (authors)

Colby, S.; Turner, Z.; Utley, D. [Pacific EcoSolutions, Inc., 2025 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Duy, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory - LA-UR-05-8410, Post Office Box 1663 MS J595, Los Alamos, New Mexico 97545 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment system monticello" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project Review, June 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-06-17 1-06-17 Site: DOE-Richland Operations Office Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Project Dates of Activity : 06/13/2011 - 06/17/2011 Report Preparer: Jake Wechselberger Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed operational awareness reviews of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP), Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) during site visits. Result: During the period June 13-17, 2011, an HSS representative participated in tours of the STP test facility. The HSS representative was also briefed by the CHPRC STP Test Director and the DOE-Richland Operations Office principal support

302

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project, August 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8-25 8-25 Site: DOE-Richland Operations Office Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Project Dates of Activity : 08/22/2011 - 08/25/2011 Report Preparer: Jake Wechselberger Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed operational awareness reviews of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP), Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) during site visits. Result: During the period August 22-25, 2011, an HSS representative attended the STP ECRTS Design Review, Value Engineering. The design review was attended by virtually all STP designated personnel, including managers and experts, representing

303

Mixed waste characterization, treatment & disposal focus area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (referred to as the Mixed Waste Focus Area or MWFA) is to provide treatment systems capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste in partnership with users, and with continual participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA deals with the problem of eliminating mixed waste from current and future storage in the DOE complex. Mixed waste is waste that contains both hazardous chemical components, subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and radioactive components, subject to the requirements of the Atomic Energy Act. The radioactive components include transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste (LLW). TRU waste primarily comes from the reprocessing of spent fuel and the use of plutonium in the fabrication of nuclear weapons. LLW includes radioactive waste other than uranium mill tailings, TRU, and high-level waste, including spent fuel.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Cryogenic treatment of gas  

SciTech Connect

Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

Bravo, Jose Luis (Houston, TX); Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan (Kingwood, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

305

Treatment methods for geothermal brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey is made of commercially available methods currently in use as well as those which might be used to prevent scaling and corrosion in geothermal brines. More emphasis is placed on scaling. Treatments are classified as inhibitors, alterants and coagulants; they are applied to control scaling and corrosion in fresh and waste geothermal brines. Recommendations for research in brine treatment are described.

Phillips, S.L.; Mathur, A.K.; Garrison, W.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Effect of heat treatment temperature on binder thermal conductivities  

SciTech Connect

The effect of heat treatment on the thermal conductivities of a pitch and a polyfurfuryl alcohol binder residue was investigated. Graphites specially prepared with these two binders were used for the experiments. Measured thermal conductivities were treated in terms of a two-component system, and the binder thermal conductivities were calculated. Both binder residues showed increased thermal conductivity with increased heat treatment temperature. (auth)

Wagner, P.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Arsenic and Selenium Treatment Technology Summary for Power Plant Wastewaters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the most suitable technologies available for the removal of arsenic and selenium from power plant wastewaters. The information stems from literature searches and the authors' experience in wastewater treatment systems from generally non-power plant sources since there are limited operating experiences for power plant applications. The report lists existing and potential technologies that meet the treatment goals of reducing arsenic and selenium to the levels set for U.S. En...

2004-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

308

Mixed and low-level waste treatment facility project. Volume 3, Waste treatment technologies (Draft)  

SciTech Connect

The technology information provided in this report is only the first step toward the identification and selection of process systems that may be recommended for a proposed mixed and low-level waste treatment facility. More specific information on each technology will be required to conduct the system and equipment tradeoff studies that will follow these preengineering studies. For example, capacity, maintainability, reliability, cost, applicability to specific waste streams, and technology availability must be further defined. This report does not currently contain all needed information; however, all major technologies considered to be potentially applicable to the treatment of mixed and low-level waste are identified and described herein. Future reports will seek to improve the depth of information on technologies.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Evaluation of biological treatment for the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a wastewater treatment plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon can be an effective treatment method applied to control oil pollution in both fresh water and marine environments. Hydrocarbon degraders, both indigenous and exogenous, are responsible for utilizing petroleum hydrocarbon as their substrate for growth and energy, thereby degrading them. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons is often enhanced by bioaugmentation and biostimulation depending on the contaminated environment and the competence of the hydrocarbon degraders present. An evaluation of the performance of the biological treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon by the hydrocarbon degrading microbes at the Brayton Fire School??s 4 million gallon per day (MGD) wastewater treatment plant was the main research objective. Samples were taken for two seasons, winter (Nov 03 ?? Jan 03) and summer (Jun 04 ?? Aug 04), from each of the four treatment units: the inlet tank, equalization tank, aeration tank and the outfall tank. The population of aliphatic hydrocarbon degraders were enumerated and nutrient availability in the system were used to evaluate the effectiveness of on-going bioaugmentation and biostimulation. Monitoring of general effluent parameters was conducted to evaluate the treatment plant??s removal efficiency and to determine if effluent discharge was in compliance with the TCEQ permit. The aeration tank is an activated sludge system with no recycling. Hydrocarbon degraders are supplied at a constant rate with additional nutrient supplement. There was a significant decrease in the population of microbes that was originally fed to the system and the quantity resident in the aeration tank. Nutrient levels in the aeration tank were insufficient for the concentration of hydrocarbon degraders, even after the application of dog food as a biostimulant. The use of dog food is not recommended as a nutrient supplement. Adding dog food increases the nitrogen and phosphorus concentration in the aeration tank but the amount of carbon being added with the dog food increases the total chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). An increase in the concentration of total COD and BOD further increases the nitrogen and phosphorus requirement in the system. The main objective of supplying adequate nutrients to the hydrocarbon degraders would never be achieved as there would be an additional demand of nutrients to degrade the added carbon source. This research study was conducted to identify the drawbacks in the treatment plant which needs further investigation to improve efficiency.

Basu, Pradipta Ranjan

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Medical Treatment Authorization Form _____________________________________________________________________ DOB___/____/____  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical Treatment Authorization Form if they are in excess of other valid and collectible insurance. 1. List any medical conditions that camp personnel): _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ 2. List any medications currently taking

311

Microsoft Word - IR-mnt Apr 2009.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site//Monticello Vicinity Properties Information Repository Subject Index, April 2009 Site//Monticello Vicinity Properties Information Repository Subject Index, April 2009 File Index: MNT 010.02 Page 1 of 45 Information Repository for the U.S. Department of Energy Monticello Mill Tailings Site/Monticello Vicinity Properties Monticello, Utah Subject Index Note: This Information Repository contains Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) Operable Units I, II and III and Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) documents generated after signatory acceptance of the MMTS OU I & II, MVP, and MMTS OU III Records of Decision. Documents leading up to the Record of Decision are located in the Monticello Mill Tailings Site/Monticello Vicinity Properties Administrative Record and in the MMTS OU III Administrative Record. In October 2004, OU III documents began to be integrated into the Information Repository collection of documents. Complete

312

Window treatments for cold climates  

SciTech Connect

Design considerations for various types of energy conserving window treatments to avoid condensation related maintenance problems are discussed. The window heat losses, dew point temperatures and allowable relative humidities at which condensation may occur on interior glass surfaces at an interior temperature of 65 DEGF (degrees Fahrenheit) and exterior temperatures from -50 to 30 DEGF were calculated by computer. Vapor pressures were also computed to show the importance of vapor (air) tight weather stripping and coverings for window treatments.

Carlson, A.R.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

SURFACE TREATMENT OF METALLIC URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The treatment of metallic uranium to provide a surface to which adherent electroplates can be applied is described. Metallic uranium is subjected to an etchant treatment in aqueous concentrated hydrochloric acid, and the etched metal is then treated to dissolve the resulting black oxide and/or chloride film without destroying the etched metal surface. The oxide or chloride removal is effected by means of moderately concentrated nitric acid in 3 to 20 seconds.

Gray, A.G.; Schweikher, E.W.

1958-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

314

Installation of reactive metals groundwater collection and treatment systems  

SciTech Connect

Three groundwater plumes contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and radionuclides at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site are scheduled for remediation by 1999 based on the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) (DOE, 1996). These three plumes are among the top 20 environmental cleanup sites at Rocky Flats. One of these plumes, the Mound Site Plume, is derived from a previous drum storage area, and daylights as seeps near the South Walnut Creek drainage. Final design for remediation of the Mound Site Plume has been completed based on use of reactive metals to treat the contaminated groundwater, and construction is scheduled for early 1998. The two other plumes, the 903 Pad/Ryan`s Pit and the East Trenches Plumes, are derived from VOCs either from drums that leaked or that were disposed of in trenches. These two plumes are undergoing characterization and conceptual design in 1998 and construction is scheduled in 1999. The contaminants of concern in these plumes are tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene, carbon tetrachloride and low levels of uranium and americium.

Hopkins, J.K.; Primrose, A.L. [Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, LLC, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Vogan, J. [EnviroMetal Technologies, Inc., Guelph, Ontario (Canada); Uhland, J. [Kaiser-Hill, LLC, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Developing a water treatment system for Subsea Gas processing plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The petroleum industry is currently moving to meet the ever-rising demand for oil and gas production. As onshore fields become depleted and decline in production, (more)

Honer Badi M Nazhat, Dana

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Water Conserving On-site Wastewater Treatment Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For persons with disabilities, this document is available upon request in other formats. To submit a request, please call 1-888-586-9427 (TDD/TTY 1-800-833-6388). Para personas discapacitadas, este documento est disponible a su pedido en otros formatos.

On-site Wastewater; Mary Selecky

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Injection with seawater: problems in the operation of a seawater treatment plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reservoir pressure elevation by means of water injection in the production formation is a technique that improves production efficiency. In offshore activities, seawater is available for injection, but it has a high level of solids in suspension and also ions and dissolved gases that may cause problems in the water injection system. Therefore, a seawater treatment plant is necessary for preparation of the injection water. The treatment system has the following components for physical treatment: colander, which prevents the intake of large objects to the system; filters, which include flocculation for coagulation means for the removal of microscopic particles that can pass through the colander; deaerator; and system controls.

Garbis, S.J.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Idaho Site Contractor Achieves Treatment Project Milestone | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractor Achieves Treatment Project Milestone Contractor Achieves Treatment Project Milestone Idaho Site Contractor Achieves Treatment Project Milestone March 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - The Idaho site's main cleanup contractor recently achieved a major performance milestone by successfully passing an operational readiness review for a first-of-a-kind facility that will treat the remaining 900,000 gallons of liquid radioactive waste generated by the site's legacy cleanup mission. CH2M-WG Idaho's (CWI) Contractor Operational Readiness Review for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) focused on plant equipment and systems, management competency, personnel operational proficiency, procedures and emergency response to validate operational preparedness. The 16-member team that completed the review identified nine pre-start

319

Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Treatment Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 7, 2011 June 7, 2011 Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Treatment Facility RICHLAND, Wash. - Construction of the largest ground- water treatment facility at the Hanford Site - a major American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project - is on schedule and more than 70 percent complete. Recovery Act workers with DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company are on pace to finish con- struction of the 200 West Groundwater Treatment Facil- ity this year. Funding for the project comes from the $1.6 billion the Richland Operations Office received from the Recovery Act. The 52,000-square-foot facility will pump contaminated water from the ground, remove contaminants with a combination of treatment technologies, and return clean water to the aquifer. The system will have the capacity to

320

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 2013 October 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - October 2013 October 2013 Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter and Melter Off-gas Process System Hazards Analysis Activities [HIAR-WTP-2013-10-21] This Independent Activity Report documents an oversight activity conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations from October 21-31, 2013, at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The activity consisted of HSS staff reviewing the Insight software hazard evaluation (HE) tables for hazard analysis (HA) generated to date for the WTP Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter and Off-gas systems, observed a limited portion of the HA for the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment system monticello" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

An Energy Savings Model for the Heat Treatment of Castings  

SciTech Connect

An integrated system of software, databases, and design rules have been developed, verified, and to be marketed to enable quantitative prediction and optimization of the heat treatment of aluminum castings to increase quality, increase productivity, reduce heat treatment cycle times and reduce energy consumption. The software predicts the thermal cycle in critical locations of individual components in a furnace, the evolution of microstructure, and the attainment of properties in heat treatable aluminum alloy castings. The model takes into account the prior casting process and the specific composition of the component. The heat treatment simulation modules can be used in conjunction with software packages for simulation of the casting process. The system is built upon a quantitative understanding of the kinetics of microstructure evolution in complex multicomponent alloys, on a quantitative understanding of the interdependence of microstructure and properties, on validated kinetic and thermodynamic databases, and validated quantitative models.

Y. Rong; R. Sisson; J. Morral; H. Brody

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

Thermal Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater Treatment Processes for Zero Liquid Discharge Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a worldwide inventory of power plant flue gas desulfurization (FGD) blowdown treatment systems using thermal technologies to achieve zero liquid discharge (ZLD) water management. The number of thermal treatment systems presently operating is very few, with the majority using chemical pretreatment followed by evaporation in a brine concentrator and crystallizer and finally dewatering of the residual salts. Of the operating thermal ZLD systems identified, six are located in Italy and o...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Second edition of the Peabody Treatment Progress Battery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Second edition of the Peabody Treatment Progress Battery (PTPB 2nd ed.) http://peabody.vanderbilt.edu/ptpb A cohesive, comprehensive, and evidence-based mental health assessment battery for youths 11-18. Available Battery (2nd ed.) is one component of an automated, self-scoring, and clinically oriented feedback system

Bordenstein, Seth

324

Independent Oversight Review, Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review, Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project - April 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project - April 2013 April 2013 Review of Radiation...

325

Treatment of Light Metal Wastes - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for the Treatment and Minimization of Wastes: Treatment of Light Metal Wastes ... A Decade of Gestation: S. Street, G. Brooks and H.K. Worner, Materials Eng.

326

Laser research shows promise for cancer treatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

treatment Laser research shows promise for cancer treatment Scientists have observed for the first time how a laser penetrates dense, electron-rich plasma to generate ions. August...

327

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - May 2013 May 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The U.S....

328

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2013 March 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The U.S....

329

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011 February 2011 Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Construction Quality Assurance Review ARPT-WTP-2011-002...

330

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - October 2012 October 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The U. S....

331

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2012 March 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality The...

332

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - November 2011 November 2011 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality The...

333

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - August 2011 August 2011 Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The Office of Safety...

334

ADVANCED MIXED WASTE TREATMENT PROJECT (AMWTP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ADVANCED MIXED WASTE TREATMENT PROJECT Idaho Treatment Group, LLC (ITG) Contract No. DE-EM0001467 You are here: DOE-ID Home > Contracts, Financial Assistance & Solicitations >...

335

TRAITEMENT DES EFFLUENTS WASTE TREATMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRAITEMENT DES EFFLUENTS WASTE TREATMENT Anaerobic digestion of pig manure B. DE LA FARGE Michèle properties of the methanized effluemt are preserved. A trial on anaerobic digestion of untreated pig manure technique du Porc, Station expérimentale, Les Cabrière.l, 12200 Villefranche-de-Rouer/(ue Frctnce Anaerobic

Recanati, Catherine

336

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

337

Analysis of Assembly Bill 1000: Cancer Treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

health treatment; prescription drugs; rehabilitative and habilitative services and devices; laboratory

California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Energy consumption, conservation and recovery in municipal wastewater treatment: an overview  

SciTech Connect

The potentials for energy consumption, conservation, and recovery at municipal wastewater treatment plants are relatively small compared to the national energy figures. Nevertheless they are significant, particularly to local owners and operators. Estimates of energy consumption, as well as opportunities for conservation and energy recovery in municipal wastewater treatment operations, are reviewed. The relationship between energy conservation and aquaculture based wastewater treatment systems is also introduced. Finally, current DOE activities in this area are presented.

Bender, M F

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Pilot chargeback system program plan  

SciTech Connect

This planning document outlines the steps necessary to develop, test, evaluate, and potentially implement a pilot chargeback system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for the treatment, storage, and disposal of current waste. This pilot program will demonstrate one system that can be used to charge onsite generators for the treatment and disposal of low-level radioactive waste. In FY 1997, mock billings will begin by July 15, 1997. Assuming approvals are received to do so, FY 1998 activities will include modifying the associated automated systems, testing and evaluating system performance, and estimating the amount generators will spend for waste storage, treatment, and disposal in FY 1999. If the program is fully implemented in FY 1999, generators will pay actual, automated bills for waste management services from funds transferred to their budgets from Environmental Management.

Smith, P.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Liquid low level waste management expert system  

SciTech Connect

An expert system has been developed as part of a new initiative for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) systems analysis program. This expert system will aid in prioritizing radioactive waste streams for treatment and disposal by evaluating the severity and treatability of the problem, as well as the final waste form. The objectives of the expert system development included: (1) collecting information on process treatment technologies for liquid low-level waste (LLLW) that can be incorporated in the knowledge base of the expert system, and (2) producing a prototype that suggests processes and disposal technologies for the ORNL LLLW system. 4 refs., 9 figs.

Ferrada, J.J.; Abraham, T.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Jackson, J.R. (Southwest Baptist Univ., Bolivar, MO (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment system monticello" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Treatment of Wood Preserving Wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The wastewater produced by the wood preserving industry presents a difficult problem to treat economically. A review of the literature indicates the size of the industry has limited the pursuit of an orderly and economic solution. Atmospheric evaporation was one possible means of treatment which had not been studied to any great degree. Two bench scale evaporation units were employed to determine the fundamental relationships affecting wastewater quality during such treatment. In batch evaporation tests, it was repeatedly demonstrated that a constant rate of total organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand removal occurred as the wastewater was evaporated. A procedure for designing atmospheric evaporation ponds was developed and applied to a hypothetical wood preserving plant. From this example design estimates of equivalent hydrocarbon concentrations in the air downwind of the pond are made. Various other design considerations such as the input data, modifications to the design procedure, solids accumulation, and miscellaneous design aspects are discussed. A treatment scheme incorporating atmospheric evaporation ponds after chemical coagulation and settling is proposed.

Reynolds, T. D.; Shack, P. A.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Distributed digital processing and closed loop computer control of wastewater treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of digital computer control to municipal wastewater treatment processes is steadily gaining popularity. Within the next few years this mode of control is expected to become a standard feature of larger wastewater treatment plants. The ... Keywords: Closed loop systems, PID control, computer application, computer control, digital control, direct digital control, ecology, feedback, feedforward, water pollution

Bipin Mishra

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Forecast of total nitrogen in wastewater treatment plants by means techniques of soft computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prediction in Wastewater Treatment Plants is an important purpose for decision-making. The complexity of the biological processes happening and, on the other hand, the uncertainty and incompleteness of the real data lead us to treat this problem modelling ... Keywords: environmental modelling, fuzzy systems, genetic algoritms, neural networks, soft computing, total nitrogen, wastewater treatment plant

Narcis Clara

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Reservoir-based devices for the monitoring and treatment of disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cancer mortality still remains high despite significant investments in diagnostics, drug development, and treatment. The systemic route is convenient both for routine monitoring and for drug administration. Local cancer ...

Kim, Grace Young

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 2013 November 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - November 2013 December 2013 Catholic University of America Vitreous State Laboratory Tour and Discussion of Experiments Conducted in Support of Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Select Systems Design [HIAR-VSL-2013-11-18] This Independent Activity Report documents an oversight activity conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations on November 18, 2013, at the Catholic University of America Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL). Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) is the contractor responsible for the design and construction of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) for the

346

Radiation delivery system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation delivery system and method are described. The system includes a treatment configuration such as a stent, balloon catheter, wire, ribbon, or the like, a portion of which is covered with a gold layer. Chemisorbed to the gold layer is a radiation-emitting self-assembled monolayer or a radiation-emitting polymer. The radiation delivery system is compatible with medical catheter-based technologies to provide a therapeutic dose of radiation to a lesion following an angioplasty procedure.

Sorensen, Scott A. (Overland Park, KS); Robison, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig M. V. (Jemez Springs, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Treatment of mercury containing waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for the treatment of mercury containing waste in a single reaction vessel which includes a) stabilizing the waste with sulfur polymer cement under an inert atmosphere to form a resulting mixture and b) encapsulating the resulting mixture by heating the mixture to form a molten product and casting the molten product as a monolithic final waste form. Additional sulfur polymer cement can be added in the encapsulation step if needed, and a stabilizing additive can be added in the process to improve the leaching properties of the waste form.

Kalb, Paul D. (Wading River, NY); Melamed, Dan (Gaithersburg, MD); Patel, Bhavesh R (Elmhurst, NY); Fuhrmann, Mark (Babylon, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Microsoft Word - TR12-14.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Inspection of the Inspection of the Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) and Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties Sites December 2006 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1399 2006 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy 2006 Annual Inspection⎯Monticello, Utah December 2006 Page 1 2006 Annual Inspection of the Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) and Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties Sites Summary Annual inspections of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) (the Monticello NPL sites) were

349

Microsoft Word - TR12-30.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

of the Monticello of the Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) and Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties Sites December 2005 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/GJ1065-2005 -L U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy 2005 Annual Inspection⎯Monticello, Utah October 2005 Page 1 (Revised December 2005 to include final comments) 2005 Annual Inspection of the Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) and Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties Sites Summary The Monticello site, which includes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Monticello Mill

350

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project … 5-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONDUCT OF OPERATIONS (OP) CONDUCT OF OPERATIONS (OP) Objective: OP.1 Adequate and correct procedures and safety limits are in place for operating the DTF ventilation system and conducting treatment activities. (CR1, CR-10) Criteria: a. All required procedures, AMOWs, PTWs, and work orders have been prepared, validated, and approved for all routine treatment and support activities. b. Procedures include actions for anticipated abnormal or emergency conditions. c. Workers have demonstrated their familiarity and knowledge of the procedures during interviews and mockup operations. Objective: OP.2 Routine drills have been prepared and conducted for the DTF drum treatment activities. (CR11) Criteria; a. Drills have been prepared that address the anticipated abnormal and

351

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project … 5-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NUCLEAR SAFETY (NS) NUCLEAR SAFETY (NS) Objective: NS.1 Facility safety documentation is in place and has been implemented that describes the "safety envelope" of the facility. (CR 7) Criterion: An unreviewed safety question (USQ) screen/evaluation has been completed and approved for the installation and use of the DTF for drum treatment in the DTF. Objective: NS.2 The facility systems and procedures, for the DTF and drum treatment activities, are consistent with the description of the facility, procedures, and accident analysis included in the safety basis. (CR9) Criterion: The DTF and drum treatment activities are adequately described in the documented safety analysis (DSA) or changes have been identified for inclusion in the next annual update.

352

Power Plant Wastewater Treatment Technology Review Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing power plant water management options means screening an increasing number of wastewater treatment technologies. This report provides engineers with detailed information on treatment process performance, economics, and applications to complete rapid, yet meaningful, technology screening evaluations.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Turbine Generator Auxiliary Systems Volume 1: Turbine Generator Lubrication System Maintenance Guide -- 2012 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides nuclear and fossil plant personnel with current maintenance information on lubrication system components and specifications, treatment, and analysis of the lubricating oil.BackgroundInput from member utilities indicated that maintenance guides were needed for the turbine-generator auxiliary systems. The first auxiliary system selected was the turbine-generator lubrication system used in nuclear and ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

354

Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Southeast Water Pollution Control Plant Case Study Title Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Southeast Water Pollution Control Plant Case Study Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6056E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Olsen, Daniel, Sasank Goli, David Faulkner, and Aimee T. McKane Date Published 12/2012 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords market sectors, technologies Abstract This report details a study into the demand response potential of a large wastewater treatment facility in San Francisco. Previous research had identified wastewater treatment facilities as good candidates for demand response and automated demand response, and this study was conducted to investigate facility attributes that are conducive to demand response or which hinder its implementation. One years' worth of operational data were collected from the facility's control system, submetered process equipment, utility electricity demand records, and governmental weather stations. These data were analyzed to determine factors which affected facility power demand and demand response capabilities.

355

Energy Efficiency Strategies for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Water and wastewater systems are significant energy consumers with an estimated 3%-4% of total U.S. electricity consumption used for the movement and treatment of water and wastewater. Water-energy issues are of growing importance in the context of water shortages, higher energy and material costs, and a changing climate. In this economic environment, it is in the best interest for utilities to find efficiencies, both in water and energy use. Performing energy audits at water and wastewater treatment facilities is one way community energy managers can identify opportunities to save money, energy, and water. In this paper the importance of energy use in wastewater facilities is illustrated by a case study of a process energy audit performed for Crested Butte, Colorado's wastewater treatment plant. The energy audit identified opportunities for significant energy savings by looking at power intensive unit processes such as influent pumping, aeration, ultraviolet disinfection, and solids handling. This case study presents best practices that can be readily adopted by facility managers in their pursuit of energy and financial savings in water and wastewater treatment. This paper is intended to improve community energy managers understanding of the role that the water and wastewater sector plays in a community's total energy consumption. The energy efficiency strategies described provide information on energy savings opportunities, which can be used as a basis for discussing energy management goals with water and wastewater treatment facility managers.

Daw, J.; Hallett, K.; DeWolfe, J.; Venner, I.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Mixed and low-level waste treatment facility project  

SciTech Connect

The technology information provided in this report is only the first step toward the identification and selection of process systems that may be recommended for a proposed mixed and low-level waste treatment facility. More specific information on each technology will be required to conduct the system and equipment tradeoff studies that will follow these preengineering studies. For example, capacity, maintainability, reliability, cost, applicability to specific waste streams, and technology availability must be further defined. This report does not currently contain all needed information; however, all major technologies considered to be potentially applicable to the treatment of mixed and low-level waste are identified and described herein. Future reports will seek to improve the depth of information on technologies.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

No Chemical, Zero Bleed Cooling Tower Water Treatment Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a process to treat cooling tower water by means of a fully automated and chemical free mechanical water treatment process. This is an alternative to conventional chemical treatment. Beginning with a suction pump to draw water out of the tower sump, water goes through a permanent magnetic descaler to increase the water solubility and begin the scale inhibition process. This also descales existing scale build-up in the system. Ozone is manufactured from ambient air and injected into the bypass system through a venturi type injector. This kills algae, slime and bacteria and enhances the magnetic descaling process. The final stage filter separates solids from the water to prevent corrosion from impingement. These solids are automatically purged to the sanitary drain. Clarified water is returned to the sump where the process repeats on a 10%-20% by volume side stream basis.

Coke, A. L.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Update on the treatment of genital warts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

treatment of genital warts Noah Scheinfeld MD DermatologyCorrespondence: Noah Scheinfeld MD: Scheinfeld@earthlink.net

Scheinfeld, Noah

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Scanned Treatment of Mixed Incin. Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treatment of Mixed Incinerable Treatment of Mixed Incinerable Waste DOE/IG-0588 March 2003 Page 17 Page 18 Use of Treatment Resources Details of Finding ........................................................................1 Recommendations and Comments ............................................6 Appendices Prior Reports ...............................................................................8 Objective, Scope, and Methodology ...........................................9 Management Comments ...........................................................11 TREATMENT OF MIXED INCINERABLE WASTE TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1 Waste Stored Rather Than Treated We found the Department of Energy (Department) was not treating its mixed incinerable solid waste expeditiously or cost-effectively.

360

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reverse Osmosis Vapor Compression Evaporation Crystalli~such as crystallization, vapor compression evaporation, andstep treatments such as vapor compression evaporation,

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment system monticello" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Treatment of biomass-gasification wastewater  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results obtained in innovative biological wastewater treatment process studies and a solvent extraction study are reported. (MHR)

Maxham, J.V.; Bell, N.E.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Hanford ETR Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) Review Report Hanford ETR Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) Review Report Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Hanford ETR Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) Review Report Summary - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) for Low-Actvity Waste at Hanford More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - November 2013 SRS Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project Technology Readiness Assessment External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process

363

Algorithmic parameterization of mixed treatment comparisons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mixed Treatment Comparisons (MTCs) enable the simultaneous meta-analysis (data pooling) of networks of clinical trials comparing 2 alternative treatments. Inconsistency models are critical in MTC to assess the overall consistency between evidence sources. ... Keywords: Algorithm, Evidence consistency, Indirect comparisons, Mixed treatment comparison, Model generation, Network meta-analysis

Gert Valkenhoef; Tommi Tervonen; Bert Brock; Hans Hillege

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Apparatus and process for water treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is disclosed utilizing permeable treatment media for treatment of contaminated water, along with a method for enhanced passive flow of contaminated water through the treatment media. The apparatus includes a treatment cell including a permeable structure that encloses the treatment media, the treatment cell may be located inside a water collection well, exterior to a water collection well, or placed in situ within the pathway of contaminated groundwater. The passive flow of contaminated water through the treatment media is maintained by a hydraulic connection between a collecting point of greater water pressure head, and a discharge point of lower water pressure head. The apparatus and process for passive flow and groundwater treatment utilizes a permeable treatment media made up of granular metal, bimetallics, granular cast iron, activated carbon, cation exchange resins, and/or additional treatment materials. An enclosing container may have an outer permeable wall for passive flow of water into the container and through the enclosed treatment media to an effluent point. Flow of contaminated water is attained without active pumping of water through the treatment media. Remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons and other water contaminants to acceptable regulatory concentration levels is accomplished without the costs of pumping, pump maintenance, and constant oversight by personnel.

Phifer, Mark A. (North Augusta, SC); Nichols, Ralph L. (North Augusta, SC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Microwave off-gas treatment apparatus and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention discloses a microwave off-gas system in which microwave energy is used to treat gaseous waste. A treatment chamber is used to remediate off-gases from an emission source by passing the off-gases through a susceptor matrix, the matrix being exposed to microwave radiation. The microwave radiation and elevated temperatures within the combustion chamber provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the gas waste stream.

Schulz, Rebecca L. (Aiken, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Wicks, George G. (North Aiken, SC)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Results of acid treatments in hydrothermal direct heat experiment wells  

SciTech Connect

Matrix acid treatments have been employed in two low-to-moderate temperature hydrothermal wells with successful results. These two wells showed flow rate increases of 40% and 50%. The increased flow reduced the payback periods for the heating systems to nearly one-half of what they were before acidization. It is recommended that well designs in certain areas consider accommodating such acid stimulation techniques, if testing suggests they are warranted as a well completion tool.

Strawn, J.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Microsoft Word - 12104891 DVP  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Groundwater and Surface Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Monticello, Utah, Mill Tailings Site December 2012 LMS/MNT/S01012 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-October 2012, Monticello, Utah December 2012 RIN 12104891 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Planned Sampling Map, Monticello, UT, Processing and Disposal Site, October 2012 (Sheet 1) ...........................................................................................................................................5 Planned Sampling Map, Monticello, UT, Processing and Disposal Site, October 2012 (Sheet 2) ...........................................................................................................................................6

368

NETL: Gasification Systems - Feed Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Gasification Systems Feed Systems Research on commercial gasifier feed systems is occurring in two primary areas of fuel (i.e. coal, biomass, etc.) feed and advanced...

369

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project … 5-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RADIATION PROTECTION (RP) RADIATION PROTECTION (RP) Objective: RP.1 Adequate and correct contamination control procedures and safety limits are in place for operating the DTF ventilation system and conducting drum treatment operations in the DTF. (CR1, CR10) a. A thorough hazard analysis addressing contamination control and radiation protection has been completed for drum treatment activities in the DTF. b. The design of the DTF and ventilation system is adequate to prevent the spread of contamination. The adequacy has been demonstrated by testing and mockup operations. c. Appropriate limits, contamination control methods, and radiation protection practices have been identified and included in the applicable AMOW, PTW and procedures. d. Adequate radiation monitoring instruments are installed and properly located

370

TREATMENT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The treatment of waste solutions obtained in the processing of neutron- irradiated uranium containing fission products and ammonium nitrate is described. The object of this process is to provide a method whereby the ammonium nitrate is destroyed and removed from the solution so as to permit subsequent concentration of the solution.. In accordance with the process the residual nitrate solutions are treated with an excess of alkyl acid anhydride, such as acetic anhydride. Preferably, the residual nitrate solution is added to an excess of the acetic anhydride at such a rate that external heat is not required. The result of this operation is that the ammonium nitrate and acetic anhydride react to form N/sub 2/ O and acetic acid.

Boyer, T.W.; MacHutchin, J.G.; Yaffe, L.

1958-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

371

DOE mixed waste treatment capacity analysis  

SciTech Connect

This initial DOE-wide analysis compares the reported national capacity for treatment of mixed wastes with the calculated need for treatment capacity based on both a full treatment of mixed low-level and transuranic wastes to the Land Disposal Restrictions and on treatment of transuranic wastes to the WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The status of treatment capacity is reported based on a fifty-element matrix of radiation-handling requirements and functional treatment technology categories. The report defines the classifications for the assessment, describes the models used for the calculations, provides results from the analysis, and includes appendices of the waste treatment facilities data and the waste stream data used in the analysis.

Ross, W.A.; Wehrman, R.R.; Young, J.R.; Shaver, S.R.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Computational Modeling and Real-Time Control of Patient-Specific Laser Treatment of Cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractAn adaptive feedback control system is presented which employs a computational model of bioheat transfer in living tissue to guide, in real-time, laser treatments of prostate cancer monitored by magnetic resonance thermal imaging. The system is built on what can be referred to as cyberinfrastructurea complex structure of high-speed network, large-scale parallel computing devices, laser optics, imaging, visualizations, inverse-analysis algorithms, mesh generation, and control systems that guide laser therapy to optimally control the ablation of cancerous tissue. The computational system has been successfully tested on in vivo, canine prostate. Over the course of an 18 min laser-induced thermal therapy performed at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) in Houston, Texas, the computational models were calibrated to intra-operative real-time thermal imaging treatment data and the calibrated models controlled the bioheat transfer to within 5 C of the predetermined treatment plan. The computational arena is in Austin, Texas and managed at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES). The system is designed to control the bioheat transfer remotely while simultaneously providing real-time remote visualization of the on-going treatment. Post-operative histology of the canine prostate reveal that the damage region was within the targeted 1.2 cm diameter treatment objective. KeywordsHyperthermia, Real-time computing, Medical imaging, Cancer treatment, Cyberinfrastructure, PDE

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Predictive Maintenance, Design, Construction, and Maintenance for Passive Treatment of Wastewaters and the PT2 Passive Treatment Planning Tool V1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual provides an approach to evaluating, designing, constructing, and maintaining passive treatment systems for select wastewater contaminants. It is intended for environmental managers and engineering design staff to assess the applicability of passive technologies to treat wastewater discharges. The manual's guidelines are a work-in-progress as the understanding of passive treatment increases with time. Readers are advised to seek expert advice when encountering wastewater conditions varying sig...

2002-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

374

Modern Palliative Radiation Treatment: Do Complexity and Workload Contribute to Medical Errors?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To examine whether treatment workload and complexity associated with palliative radiation therapy contribute to medical errors. Methods and Materials: In the setting of a large academic health sciences center, patient scheduling and record and verification systems were used to identify patients starting radiation therapy. All records of radiation treatment courses delivered during a 3-month period were retrieved and divided into radical and palliative intent. 'Same day consultation, planning and treatment' was used as a proxy for workload and 'previous treatment' and 'multiple sites' as surrogates for complexity. In addition, all planning and treatment discrepancies (errors and 'near-misses') recorded during the same time frame were reviewed and analyzed. Results: There were 365 new patients treated with 485 courses of palliative radiation therapy. Of those patients, 128 (35%) were same-day consultation, simulation, and treatment patients; 166 (45%) patients had previous treatment; and 94 (26%) patients had treatment to multiple sites. Four near-misses and 4 errors occurred during the audit period, giving an error per course rate of 0.82%. In comparison, there were 10 near-misses and 5 errors associated with 1100 courses of radical treatment during the audit period. This translated into an error rate of 0.45% per course. An association was found between workload and complexity and increased palliative therapy error rates. Conclusions: Increased complexity and workload may have an impact on palliative radiation treatment discrepancies. This information may help guide the necessary recommendations for process improvement for patients who require palliative radiation therapy.

D'Souza, Neil, E-mail: neil.dsouza@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Holden, Lori [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Robson, Sheila [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mah, Kathy; Di Prospero, Lisa; Wong, C. Shun; Chow, Edward; Spayne, Jacqueline [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

IMRT treatment of anal cancer with a scrotal shield  

SciTech Connect

The risk of sterility in males undergoing radiotherapy in the pelvic region indicates the use of a shielding device, which offers protection to the testes for patients wishing to maintain fertility. The use of such devices in the realm of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the pelvic region can pose many obstacles during simulation, treatment planning, and delivery of radiotherapy. This work focuses on the development and execution of an IMRT plan for the treatment of anal cancer using a scrotal shielding device on a clinical patient. An IMRT plan was developed using Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), using a wide array of gantry angles as well as fixed jaw and fluence editing techniques. When possible, the entire target volume was encompassed by the treatment field. When the beam was incident on the scrotal shield, the jaw was fixed to avoid the device and the collimator rotation optimized to irradiate as much of the target as possible. This technique maximizes genital sparing and allows minimal irradiation of the gonads. When this fixed-jaw technique was found to compromise adequate coverage of the target, manual fluence editing techniques were used to avoid the shielding device. Special procedures for simulation, imaging, and treatment verification were also developed. In vivo dosimetry was used to verify and ensure acceptable dose to the gonads. The combination of these techniques resulted in a highly conformal plan that spares organs and risk and avoids the genitals as well as entrance of primary radiation onto the shielding device.

Hood, Rodney C., E-mail: Rodney.Hood@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Wu, Q. Jackie; McMahon, Ryan; Czito, Brian; Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Information Sources for Small Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managers of small waters systems must have information about a variety of topics. This publication lists essential printed and electronic resources on disaster preparedness, national drinking water standards, private water well management, water treatment, and many other topics.

Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

377

Wastewater treatment: Dye and pigment industry. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning treatment of wastewater containing dyes and pigments. The citations discuss the of dyes and pigments in wastewater treatment systems, biodegradation of dyes, absorption and adsorption processes to remove dyes from wastewater, environmental effects from the disposal of dye-containing wastes, and methods of analysis for dyes in waste streams. Treatment methods such as ozonation, reverse osmosis, activated charcoal filtration, activated sludge, electrochemical treatments, thermal treatments, simple filtration, and absorption media are included. (Contains a minimum of 112 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Wastewater Treatment and Gypsum Handling Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Wastewater Treatment and Gypsum Handling Area provides fossil plant maintenance personnel with current maintenance information on these systems. This guide will assist plant maintenance personnel in improving the reliability and reducing the maintenance costs for these areas of their scrubber system.

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

379

Alter EGO Impact Ego Hot Oil Treatment with Garlic (Original ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alter EGO Impact Ego Hot Oil Treatment with Garlic (Original) 1000ml best seller, Hair Loss Treatment, Alter EGO Impact Ego Hot Oil Treatment with ...

380

Thermal Treatment of Solid Wastes Using the Electric Arc Furnace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thermal waste treatment facility has been developed at the Albany Research Center (ARC) over the past seven years to process a wide range of heterogeneous mixed wastes, on a scale of 227 to 907 kg/h (500 to 2,000 lb/h). The current system includes a continuous feed system, a 3-phase AC, 0.8 MW graphite electrode arc furnace, and a dedicated air pollution control system (APCS) which includes a close-coupled thermal oxidizer, spray cooler, baghouse, and wet scrubber. The versatility of the complete system has been demonstrated during 5 continuous melting campaigns, ranging from 11 to 25 mt (12 to 28 st) of treated wastes per campaign, which were conducted on waste materials such as (a) municipal incinerator ash, (b) simulated low-level radioactive, high combustible-bearing mixed wastes, (c) simulated low-level radioactive liquid tank wastes, (d) heavy metal contaminated soils, and (e) organic-contaminated dredging spoils. In all cases, the glass or slag products readily passed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxicity Characteristic Leachability Program (TCLP) test. Additional studies are currently under way on electric utility wastes, steel and aluminum industry wastes, as well as zinc smelter residues. Thermal treatment of these solid waste streams is intended to produce a metallic product along with nonhazardous glass or slag products.

O'Connor, W.K.; Turner, P.C.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment system monticello" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility: Environmental Information Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the treatment of radioactive liquid waste is an integral function of the LANL mission: to assure U.S. military deterrence capability through nuclear weapons technology. As part of this mission, LANL conducts nuclear materials research and development (R&D) activities. These activities generate radioactive liquid waste that must be handled in a manner to ensure protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Radioactive liquid waste currently generated at LANL is treated at the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF), located at Technical Area (TA)-50. The RLWTF is 30 years old and nearing the end of its useful design life. The facility was designed at a time when environmental requirements, as well as more effective treatment technologies, were not inherent in engineering design criteria. The evolution of engineering design criteria has resulted in the older technology becoming less effective in treating radioactive liquid wastestreams in accordance with current National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Department of Energy (DOE) regulatory requirements. Therefore, to support ongoing R&D programs pertinent to its mission, LANL is in need of capabilities to efficiently treat radioactive liquid waste onsite or to transport the waste off site for treatment and/or disposal. The purpose of the EID is to provide the technical baseline information for subsequent preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the RLWTF. This EID addresses the proposed action and alternatives for meeting the purpose and need for agency action.

Haagenstad, H.T.; Gonzales, G.; Suazo, I.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Nuclear waste treatment program: Annual report for FY 1987  

SciTech Connect

Two of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear waste management-related goals are to ensure that waste management is not an obstacle to the further development of light-water reactors and the closure of the nuclear fuel cycle and to fulfill its institutional responsibility for providing safe storage and disposal of existing and future nuclear wastes. As part of its approach to achieving these goals, the Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology of DOE established what is now called the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program (NWTP) at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory during the second half of FY 1982. To support DOE's attainment of its goals, the NWTP is to provide technology necessary for the design and operation of nuclear waste treatment facilities by commercial enterprises as part of a licensed waste management system and problem-specific treatment approaches, waste form and treatment process adaptations, equipment designs, and trouble-shooting assistance, as required to treat existing wastes. This annual report describes progress during FY 1987 towards meeting these two objectives. 24 refs., 59 figs., 24 tabs.

Brouns, R.A.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project  

SciTech Connect

Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. This report documents those studies so the project can continue with an evaluation of programmatic options, system tradeoff studies, and the conceptual design phase of the project. This report, appendix B, comprises the engineering design files for this project study. The engineering design files document each waste steam, its characteristics, and identified treatment strategies.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Sandusky Wastewater Treatment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Treatment Treatment Jump to: navigation, search Name Sandusky Wastewater Treatment Facility Sandusky Wastewater Treatment Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Sandusky Wastewater Treatment Energy Purchaser Sandusky Wastewater Treatment Location Sandusky OH Coordinates 41.452091°, -82.723523° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.452091,"lon":-82.723523,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

385

Treatment of plutonium-bearing solutions: A brief survey of the DOE complex  

SciTech Connect

With the abrupt shutdown of some DOE facilities, a significant volume of in-process material was left in place and still requires treatment for interim storage. Because the systems containing these process streams have deteriorated since shutdown, a portable system for treating the solutions may be useful. A brief survey was made of the DOE complex on the need for a portable treatment system to treat plutonium-bearing solutions. A survey was completed to determine (1) the compositions and volumes of solutions and heels present, (2) the methods that have been used to treat these solutions and heels in the past, and (3) the potential problems that exist in removing and treating these solutions. Based on the surveys and on the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 94-1, design criteria for a portable treatment system were generated.

Conner, C.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Chen, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Membrane Research for Water and Wastewater Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes two research projects involving the use of membranes in water treatment: o Technologies for Improving Water Desalination -- The objectives of this study were to compare capacitive deionization (CDI) with carbon aerogel and reverse osmosis (RO) for salinity reduction using conventional treatment, conventional treatment with ozone and biologically active filters, and microfiltration as the pretreatment step. o Membrane Pretreatment of Reclaimed Wastewater for Reverse Osmosis Desali...

2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

387

Energy-Efficient Industrial Waste Treatment Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rising energy costs coupled with the continuing need for effective environmental treatment methods have stimulated interest in advanced energy-efficient technologies. EPRI has reviewed a wide variety of electricity-based processes for industrial air pollution control, wastewater treatment, and solid waste treatment along with some closely related competing technologies. These technologies ranged from untested concepts to well-established ones. While most offer process cost savings and improvements over e...

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

ENERGY STAR Score for Wastewater Treatment Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

!! !! July 2013 ENERGY STAR Score for Wastewater Treatment Plants in the United States Page 1 ENERGY STAR Score for Wastewater Treatment Plants in the United States Technical Reference OVERVIEW ! The ENERGY STAR Score for Wastewater Treatment Plants applies to primary, secondary, and advanced treatment facilities with or without nutrient removal capacity. The objective of the ENERGY STAR score is to provide a fair assessment of the energy performance of a property relative to its peers, taking into account the climate, weather, and business activities at the property. To identify the aspects of building activity that are significant drivers of energy

389

Water Discharge from Waste Treatment - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 1996 ... TMS Logo. About the 1996 International Symposium on Extraction and Processing for the Treatment and Minimization of Wastes...

390

Specifically Designed Constructed Wetlands; A Novel Treatment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generic parameters such as biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) may also be targeted constituents for treatment. The specific targeted constituents...

391

Research Progress on Perfume Wastewater Treatment Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improvement of Spectrometric Determination of COD by Microwave ... Influence of sewage pipe network on COD reduction efficiency in sewage treatment plant.

392

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project, August 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Project Dates of Activity : 08222011 - 08252011 Report Preparer: Jake...

393

ENERGY STAR Score for Wastewater Treatment Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 to 100 percentile ranking of performance, relative to the national population. Property Types. The ENERGY STAR score for wastewater treatment plants applies to primary,...

394

Endoscopic Radiation Revolutionizes Cancer Treatment - Energy ...  

Conventional X-ray radiation and electron beam therapy: a comparison. Left: Conventional treatment depositing energy into tissue as a function of distance for three ...

395

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(VSL). Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) is the contractor responsible for the design and construction of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) for the...

396

Energy Efficiency Strategies for Municipal Wastewater Treatment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities J. Daw and K. Hallett National Renewable Energy Laboratory J. DeWolfe and I. Venner Malcolm Pirnie, the Water Division of ARCADIS...

397

Surface Treatment to Increase Metal Fatigue Life  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An easy, safe, inexpensive, and low environmental impact surface-treatment has been ... First-Principles Calculation of Finite Temperature APB Energies in the...

398

Pyrochemical Treatment of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Over the last 10 years, pyrochemical treatment of spent nuclear fuel has progressed from demonstration activities to engineering-scale production operations. As part of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative within the U.S. Department of Energys Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology, pyrochemical treatment operations are being performed as part of the treatment of fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II at the Idaho National Laboratory. Integral to these treatment operations are research and development activities that are focused on scaling further the technology, developing and implementing process improvements, qualifying the resulting high-level waste forms, and demonstrating the overall pyrochemical fuel cycle.

K. M. Goff; K. L. Howden; G. M. Teske; T. A. Johnson

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

conducted an independent review of selected aspects of construction quality at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Project (WTP). The review, which was performed May...

400

Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Construction Quality Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARPT-WTP-2011-002 Site: DOE Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Subject: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment system monticello" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

System to measure heart performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systems to measureheart condition are applied to patients with early or chronic cardiac problems with the aim of diagnosing and exactly locat? ing the problem. Two very important factors exist that are taken into account in order to obtain a reliable diagnosis and to be able to give suitable medical treatment. One of them is the volume of blood that the heart pumps

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Double barrier system for an in situ conversion process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A barrier system for a subsurface treatment area is described. The barrier system includes a first barrier formed around at least a portion of the subsurface treatment area. The first barrier is configured to inhibit fluid from exiting or entering the subsurface treatment area. A second barrier is formed around at least a portion of the first barrier. A separation space exists between the first barrier and the second barrier.

McKinzie, Billy John [Houston, TX; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; Cowan, Kenneth Michael [Sugar land, TX; Deeg, Wolfgang Friedrich Johann [Houston, TX; Wong, Sau-Wai [Rijswijk, NL

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

403

Review of the Hanford Sludge Treatment Project, February 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-RL-2012-02-27 Site: DOE-Richland Operations Office Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Project Dates of Activity : 02/27/2012 - 03/01/2012 Report Preparer: Jake Wechselberger Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed operational awareness reviews of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP), Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) during site visits. Result: During the period February 27 - March 1, 2012, an HSS representative attended the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

404

Review of the Hanford Sludge Treatment Project, February 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-RL-2012-02-27 Site: DOE-Richland Operations Office Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Project Dates of Activity : 02/27/2012 - 03/01/2012 Report Preparer: Jake Wechselberger Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed operational awareness reviews of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP), Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) during site visits. Result: During the period February 27 - March 1, 2012, an HSS representative attended the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

405

Croatian refiner meets waste water treatment standards, reduces fines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new approach to waste water treatment at a refinery in Croatia produces effluent that not only meets the region`s regulations for disposal into the Adriatic Sea, but also surpasses the refinery`s specifications for recycling process water. Key to the dramatic reduction in pollutants was the installation of a Sandfloat unit developed by Krofta Engineering Corp. The Sandfloat unit is a dissolved air flotation clarifier that combines flocculation, flotation, and multilayer filtration to produce high-quality effluent. In fact, the effluent from the unit has a lower hydrocarbon concentration than water from the underground wells that supply process water to the refinery. While similar systems have been used for decades in industrial applications, this is the first time a Sandfloat unit has been installed in an oil refinery. The article describes the problem, refinery operations, treatment costs, and effluent recycling.

Meier, A.L. [Krofta Engineering Corp., Lenox, MA (United States); Nikolic, O. [INA Oil Refinery, Rijeka (Croatia)

1995-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

406

Carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals is provided, in steps including, heating a part formed of boron, chromium, hafnium, molybdenum, niobium, tantalum, titanium, tungsten or zirconium, or alloys thereof, in an evacuated chamber and then introducing reaction gases including nitrogen and hydrogen, either in elemental or water vapor form, which react with a source of elemental carbon to form carbon-containing gaseous reactants which then react with the metal part to form the desired surface layer. Apparatus for practicing the method is also provided, in the form of a carbide and carbonitride surface treatment system including a reaction chamber, a source of elemental carbon, a heating subassembly and a source of reaction gases. Alternative methods of providing the elemental carbon and the reaction gases are provided, as well as methods of supporting the metal part, evacuating the chamber with a vacuum subassembly and heating all of the components to the desired temperature. 5 figs.

Meyer, G.A.; Schildbach, M.A.

1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

407

Preliminary analysis of treatment strategies for transuranic wastes from reprocessing plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a comparison of six treatment options for transuranic wastes (TRUW) resulting from the reprocessing of commercial spent fuel. Projected transuranic waste streams from the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP), the reference fuel reprocessing plant in this report, were grouped into the five categories of hulls and hardware, failed equipment, filters, fluorinator solids, and general process trash (GPT) and sample and analytical cell (SAC) wastes. Six potential treatment options were selected for the five categories of waste. These options represent six basic treatment objectives: (1) no treatment, (2) minimum treatment (compaction), (3) minimum number of processes and products (cementing or grouting), (4) maximum volume reduction without decontamination (melting, incinerating, hot pressing), (5) maximum volume reduction with decontamination (decontamination, treatment of residues), and (6) noncombustible waste forms (melting, incinerating, cementing). Schemes for treatment of each waste type were selected and developed for each treatment option and each type of waste. From these schemes, transuranic waste volumes were found to vary from 1 m/sup 3//MTU for no treatment to as low as 0.02 m/sup 3//MTU. Based on conceptual design requirements, life-cycle costs were estimated for treatment plus on-site storage, transportation, and disposal of both high-level and transuranic wastes (and incremental low-level wastes) from 70,000 MTU. The study concludes that extensive treatment is warranted from both cost and waste form characteristics considerations, and that the characteristics of most of the processing systems used are acceptable. The study recommends that additional combinations of treatment methods or strategies be evaluated and that in the interim, melting, incineration, and cementing be further developed for commercial TRUW. 45 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

Ross, W.A.; Schneider, K.J.; Swanson, J.L.; Yasutake, K.M.; Allen, R.P.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Platinum/Chromium-Based Stents Approved for Treatment of Peripheral Artery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Platinum/Chromium-Based Stents Approved for Treatment of Peripheral Platinum/Chromium-Based Stents Approved for Treatment of Peripheral Artery Disease Platinum/Chromium-Based Stents Approved for Treatment of Peripheral Artery Disease November 14, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A new stent that incorporates an innovative metal alloy developed by scientists at Boston Scientific Corporation and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has received European approval for use in the treatment of certain peripheral arterial diseases. Initially developed for use as a coronary stent, the new PROMUS ELEMENT™ PLUS BTK drug-eluting stent system is designed for treatment of critical limb ischemia, a severe obstruction of arteries within the extremities which reduces blood flow and can damage tissues. Restoring and maintaining peripheral blood flow in

409

Photovoltaic system in system LABI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is prepared a new model marked as DE10 to extens the system LABI. It is a photovoltaic system. Utilizing of model is into the field of university studying and as a pilot test system for all extern experts. A special parts of model are measurement ... Keywords: automation, measurement, photovoltaic system, sun energy

Hruska Frantisek

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Overview of Integrated Waste Treatment Unit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Overview Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Overview Overview for the DOE High Level Waste Corporate Board March 5, 2009 safety  performance  cleanup  closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management 2 2 Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Mission * Mission - Project mission is to provide treatment of approximately 900,000 gallons of tank farm waste - referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) - stored at the Idaho Tank Farm Facility to a stable waste form suitable for disposition at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). - Per the Idaho Cleanup Project contract, the resident Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) facility, shall have the capability for future packaging and shipping of the existing high level waste (HLW) calcine to the geologic

411

B Plant treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) units inspection plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This inspection plan is written to meet the requirements of WAC 173-303 for operations of a TSD facility. Owners/operators of TSD facilities are required to inspection their facility and active waste management units to prevent and/or detect malfunctions, discharges and other conditions potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. A written plan detailing these inspection efforts must be maintained at the facility in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC), Chapter 173-303, ``Dangerous Waste Regulations`` (WAC 173-303), a written inspection plan is required for the operation of a treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) facility and individual TSD units. B Plant is a permitted TSD facility currently operating under interim status with an approved Part A Permit. Various operational systems and locations within or under the control of B Plant have been permitted for waste management activities. Included are the following TSD units: Cell 4 Container Storage Area; B Plant Containment Building; Low Level Waste Tank System; Organic Waste Tank System; Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW) Tank System; Low Level Waste Concentrator Tank System. This inspection plan complies with the requirements of WAC 173-303. It addresses both general TSD facility and TSD unit-specific inspection requirements. Sections on each of the TSD units provide a brief description of the system configuration and the permitted waste management activity, a summary of the inspection requirements, and details on the activities B Plant uses to maintain compliance with those requirements.

Beam, T.G.

1996-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

412

Microsoft Word - S05949_IR.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Annual Inspection of the Annual Inspection of the Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) and Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties Sites December 2009 LMS/MNT/S05949 This page intentionally left blank LMS/MNT/S05949 2009 Annual Inspection of the Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) and Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties Sites December 2009 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy 2009 Annual Inspection-Monticello, Utah December 2009 Doc. No. S05949 Page i Contents Executive Summary....................................................................................................................... iii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................1

413

Microsoft Word - S07118_IR  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Annual Inspection of the Annual Inspection of the DOE Monticello, Utah, Mill Tailings Site and Monticello Vicinity Properties December 2010 LMS/MNT/S07118 This page intentionally left blank LMS/MNT/S07118 2010 Annual Inspection of the DOE Monticello, Utah, Mill Tailings Site and Monticello Vicinity Properties December 2010 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy 2010 Annual Inspection-Monticello, Utah December 2010 Doc. No. S07118 Page i Contents Executive Summary ....................................................................................................................... iii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................1

414

Treatment Facility F: Accelerated Removal and Validation Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Accelerated Removal and Validation (ARV) phase of remediation at the Treatment Facility F (TFF) site at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was designed to accelerate removal of gasoline from the site when compared to normal, single shift, pump-and-treat operations. The intent was to take advantage of the in-place infrastructure plus the increased underground temperatures resulting from the Dynamic Underground Stripping Demonstration Project (DUSDP). Operations continued 24-hours (h) per day between October 4 and December 12, 1993. Three contaminant removal rate enhancement approaches were explored during the period of continuous operation. First, we tried several configurations of the vapor pumping system to maximize the contaminant removal rate. Second, we conducted two brief trials of air injection into the lower steam zone. Results were compared with computer models, and the process was assessed for contaminant removal rate enhancement. Third, we installed equipment to provide additional electrical heating of contaminated low-permeability soil. Four new electrodes were connected into the power system. Diagnostic capabilities at the TFF site were upgraded so that we could safely monitor electrical currents, soil temperatures, and water treatment system processes while approximately 300 kW of electrical energy was being applied to the subsurface.

Sweeney, J.J.; Buettner, M.H.; Carrigan, C.R. [and others

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Mesdi Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SolidEnergy Systems SolidEnergy Systems Massachusetts Institute of Technology SolidEnergy Systems developed cutting-edge battery technologies to meet the world's growing energy storage demand. The Polymer Ionic Liquid (PIL) rechargeable lithium battery has four times the energy density of a conventional lithium-ion battery. Learn More Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process, termed "CANDO", for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen. The CANDO technology improves the efficiency of nitrogen treatment by lowering energy inputs and enabling energy recovery from waste nitrogen. Learn More NuMat Technologies, Inc. Northwestern University NuMat Technologies, Inc is a cleantech spin-out that computationally

416

File Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

File Systems File Systems File Systems For a general description of the different file systems available on PDSF please see Eliza File Systems and Other File Systems. Below is a summary of how STAR uses the various systems: /common The STAR software is installed on /common. For 32sl44 it is under /common/star/star44 and for sl53 it is under /common/star/star53. In both cases the software consists primarily of a STAR-specific ROOT installation on which releases of the STAR libraries are built as shown on the Local STAR Libraries page. /eliza3, /eliza6, /eliza9, /eliza14, /eliza15, /eliza17 STAR has space on 6 elizas as shown in the table below. File System star space (TB) use eliza3 39 production eliza6 9 production eliza9 39 production eliza14 34 production, user space under /eliza14/star/pwg

417

Sour gas injection for use with in situ heat treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for providing acidic gas to a subsurface formation is described herein. The method may include providing heat from one or more heaters to a portion of a subsurface formation; producing fluids that include one or more acidic gases from the formation using a heat treatment process. At least a portion of one of the acidic gases may be introduced into the formation, or into another formation, through one or more wellbores at a pressure below a lithostatic pressure of the formation in which the acidic gas is introduced.

Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX)

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

418

Proposed Outline for DOE-LM / NRC Working Group Meeting  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Agenda Agenda Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) Operable Unit III Biomonitoring Scope and Status Future Scope of Groundwater Treatment June 27, 2011 (8 a.m. - 1 p.m.) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8, Denver, CO 8:00 a.m. Introduction Objectives and Expected Outcomes: 1. Concur Upon Future Scope of Biomonitoring Program 2. Concur Upon Satisfied OU III Technical Impracticability (TI) Requirements and Identify Data Needs Biomonitoring Scope & Status 8:15 a.m. MMTS Biomonitoring: March 2011 Report Summary and Presentation* 8:45 a.m. Group Discussion Objectives: Review findings: Ensure common understanding of historical & ecological context

419

Superalloy Surface Treatment for Improved Metal Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superalloy Surface Treatment Superalloy Surface Treatment for Improved Metal Performance Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Method to Improve Superalloy Resistance by Surface Treatment." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Overview To produce power more efficiently and cleanly, the next generation of power and aero turbines along with other essential components will have to operate at extreme temperatures and pressures. Currently advanced single crystal nickel-based superalloys are used in such extreme environments. Even though these components are coated with a bond

420

THE TREATMENT OF LOW ACTIVITY AQUEOUS WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The equipment and treatment methods for processing low-activity aqueous wastes at the Latina nuclear power station are discussed. The effluent treatment plant serves two purposes: purification of cooling pond water and decontamination of aqueous wastes from such outlets as regenerant solutions, active laundry and change houses, decontamination center, coffin washing, and charge machine washing. The treatment process consists of chemical precipitation followed by filtration of the sludges thus produced. The process is then followed by ion exchange on a natural inorganic material such as vermiculite and evaporation. This process produces a decontamination factor of l0/sup 3/ to 10/ sup 4/. (N.W.R.)

Cartwright, A.C.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment system monticello" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

System Effectiveness  

SciTech Connect

An effective risk assessment system is needed to address the threat posed by an active or passive insider who, acting alone or in collusion, could attempt diversion or theft of nuclear material. It is critical that a nuclear facility conduct a thorough self-assessment of the material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system to evaluate system effectiveness. Self-assessment involves vulnerability analysis and performance testing of the MPC&A system. The process should lead to confirmation that mitigating features of the system effectively minimize the threat, or it could lead to the conclusion that system improvements or upgrades are necessary to achieve acceptable protection against the threat. Analysis of the MPC&A system is necessary to understand the limits and vulnerabilities of the system to internal threats. Self-assessment helps the facility be prepared to respond to internal threats and reduce the risk of theft or diversion of nuclear material. MSET is a self-assessment or inspection tool utilizing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology to calculate the system effectiveness of a nuclear facility's MPC&A system. MSET analyzes the effectiveness of an MPC&A system based on defined performance metrics for MPC&A functions based on U.S. and international best practices and regulations. A facility's MC&A system can be evaluated at a point in time and reevaluated after upgrades are implemented or after other system changes occur. The total system or specific subareas within the system can be evaluated. Areas of potential performance improvement or system upgrade can be assessed to determine where the most beneficial and cost-effective improvements should be made. Analyses of risk importance factors show that sustainability is essential for optimal performance. The analyses reveal where performance degradation has the greatest detrimental impact on total system risk and where performance improvements have the greatest reduction in system risk. The risk importance factors show the amount of risk reduction achievable with potential upgrades and the amount of risk reduction actually achieved after upgrades are completed. Applying the risk assessment tool gives support to budget prioritization by showing where budget support levels must be sustained for MC&A functions most important to risk. Results of the risk assessment are also useful in supporting funding justifications for system improvements that significantly reduce system risk.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Gasification Systems Projects & Performers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Gasification Systems Projects & Performers Gasification Systems - Key Technologies Feed Systems Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems Syngas...

423

Advanced Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Systems: Advanced Systems: high Performance fenestration systems Research areas: Research activities to improve the performance of windows and other fenestration products must address window systems issues as well as Glazing Materials research. LBNL activities in the area of Advanced Systems include research at both the product level and the building envelope and building systems levels. Highly insulating windows - using non structural center layers Lower cost solutions to more insulating three layer glazing systems, with the potential to turn windows in U.S. heating dominated residential applications into net-energy gainers. Highly Insulating Window Frames In collaboration with the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, we are researching the potentials for highly insulating window frames. Our initial work examines European frames with reported U-factors under 0.15 Btu/hr-ft2-F. Future research aims to analyze these designs, verify these performance levels and ensure that procedures used to calculate frame performance are accurate.

424

Mixed and Low-Level Treatment Facility Project  

SciTech Connect

This appendix contains the mixed and low-level waste engineering design files (EDFS) documenting each low-level and mixed waste stream investigated during preengineering studies for Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. The EDFs provide background information on mixed and low-level waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. They identify, characterize, and provide treatment strategies for the waste streams. Mixed waste is waste containing both radioactive and hazardous components as defined by the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, respectively. Low-level waste is waste that contains radioactivity and is not classified as high-level waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or 11e(2) byproduct material as defined by DOE 5820.2A. Test specimens of fissionable material irradiated for research and development only, and not for the production of power or plutonium, may be classified as low-level waste, provided the concentration of transuranic is less than 100 nCi/g. This appendix is a tool that clarifies presentation format for the EDFS. The EDFs contain waste stream characterization data and potential treatment strategies that will facilitate system tradeoff studies and conceptual design development. A total of 43 mixed waste and 55 low-level waste EDFs are provided.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Treatment of Mixed Wastes via Fixed Bed Gasification  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the details of research performed under USDOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-96MC33258 to evaluate the ChemChar hazardous waste system for the destruction of mixed wastes, defined as those that contain both RCRA-regulated haz- ardous constituents and radionuclides. The ChemChar gasification system uses a granular carbonaceous char matrix to immobilize wastes and feed them into the gasifier. In the gasifier wastes are subjected to high temperature reducing conditions, which destroy the organic constituents and immobilize radionuclides on the regenerated char. Only about 10 percent of the char is consumed on each pass through the gasifier, and the regenerated char can be used to treat additional wastes. When tested on a 4-inch diameter scale with a continuous feed unit as part of this research, the ChemChar gasification system was found to be effective in destroying RCRA surrogate organic wastes (chlorobenzene, dichloroben- zene, and napht.halene) while retaining on the char RCRA heavy metals (chromium, nickel, lead, and cadmium) as well as a fission product surrogate (cesium) and a plutonium surrogate (cerium). No generation of harmful byproducts was observed. This report describes the design and testing of the ChemChar gasification system and gives the operating procedures to be followed in using the system safely and effectively for mixed waste treatment.

None

1998-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

426

Technical area status report for chemical/physical treatment. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) was established by the Department of Energy (DOE) to direct and coordinate waste management and site remediation programs and activities throughout the DOE Complex. The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) was created by the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) to develop, deploy, and complete appropriate technologies for the treatment of an DOE low-level mixed waste (LLMW). The MWIP mission includes development of strategies related to enhanced waste form production, improvements to and testing of the EM-30 baseline flowsheet for mixed waste treatment, programmatic oversight for ongoing technical projects, and specific technical tasks related to the site specific Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA). The MWIP has established five Technical Support Groups (TSGs) based on primary functional areas of the Mixed Waste Treatment Plant) identified by EM-30. These TSGs are: (1) Front-End Waste Handling, (2) Chemical/Physical Treatment, (3) Waste Destruction and Stabilization, (4) Second-stage Destruction and Offgas Treatment, and (5) Final Waste Forms. The focus of this document is the Chemical/Physical Treatment System (CPTS). The CPTS performs the required pretreatment and/or separations on the waste streams passing through the system for discharge to the environment or efficient downstream processing. Downstream processing can include all system components except Front-End Waste Handling. The primary separations to be considered by the CPTS are: (1) removal of suspended and dissolved solids from aqueous and liquid organic streams, (2) separation of water from organic liquids, (3) treatment of wet and dry solids, including separation into constituents as required, for subsequent thermal treatment and final form processing, (4) mercury removal and control, and (5) decontamination of equipment and waste classified as debris.

Brown, C.H. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schwinkendorf, W.E. [BDM Federal, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment Report Herb G. Sutter Michael Poirier Art W. Etchells Gary Smith Kris Thomas Jim J. Davis Paul Macbeth November 16, 2009 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment Report November 16, 2009 ii Herbert G. Sutter, Team Lead Date Michael Poirier, Team Member Date Arthur W. Etchells, Team Member Date Gary Smith, Team Member Date Kris Thomas, Team Member Date Jim J. Davis, Team Member Date Paul Macbeth, Team Member Date Signatures 11/09/2009 11/09/2009 11/09/2009 K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment Report November 16, 2009

428

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Thermal Treatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

range from 75 to 150ton (Bansal and Sugiarto 1999). Many factors can impact treatment costs, including oil and moisture content of the waste, particle size distribution of the...

429

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

III, "Method of Breaking Shale Oil-Water Emulsion," U. S.and Biological Treatment of Shale Oil Retort Water, DraftPA (1979). H. H. Peters, Shale Oil Waste Water Recovery by

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waters from Green River Oil Shale," Chem. and Ind. , 1. ,Effluents from In-Situ oil Shale Processing," in Proceedingsin the Treatment of Oil Shale Retort Waters," in Proceedings

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Oak Ridge Reservation Invasive Plant Treatment Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge Reservation Invasive Plant Treatment Update All 33,000 acres of the ORR All 33,000 acres of the ORR ORR Invasive Plant Management Plan Surveys and Monitoring ...

432

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2013 January 2013 Review of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Black-Cell and Hard-To-Reach Pipe Spools Procurement Process and the Office of River...

433

FY-2001 Accomplishments in Off-gas Treatment Technology Development  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the efforts funded by the Tank Focus Area to investigate nitrogen oxide (NOx) destruction (a.k.a. deNOx) technologies and off-gas scrubber system designs. The primary deNOx technologies that were considered are staged combustion (a.k.a. NOx reburning), selective catalytic reduction, selective non-catalytic reduction, and steam reformation. After engineering studies and a team evaluation were completed, selective catalytic reduction and staged combustion were considered the most likely candidate technologies to be deployed in a sodium-bearing waste vitrification facility. The outcome of the team evaluation factored heavily in the establishing a baseline configuration for off-gas and secondary waste treatment systems.

Marshall, Douglas William

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

FERRATES: SYNTHESIS, PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS IN WATER AND WASTEWATER TREATMENT.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The higher oxidation states of iron (Fe(VI) and Fe(V) in particular) have been shown to be strongly oxidizing in enzymatic systems, where they can carry out aliphatic hydrogen abstraction. In addition, they have been postulated as intermediates in Fenton-type systems. Fe(VI) itself is relatively stable and has been shown to have potential as an oxidant in the so-called ''green'' treatment of polluted waters. By contrast, Fe(V) is a relatively short-lived transient when produced in aqueous solution in the absence of strongly bonding ligands other than hydroxide, a feature that has limited studies of its reactivity. Fe(VI) has been proposed to be useful in battery design and a very interesting study suggested that ferrate may be able to oxidize insoluble chromium to chromate and thus serve to remove chromium contamination in the Hanford radioactive waste tanks.

CABELLI, D.E.; SHARMA, V.K.

2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

435

Chemical aspects of nuclear waste treatment  

SciTech Connect

The chemical aspects of the treatment of gaseous, liquid, and solid wastes are discussed in overview. The role of chemistry and the chemical reactions in waste treatment are emphasized. Waste treatment methods encompass the chemistry of radioactive elements from every group of the periodic table. In most streams, the radioactive elements are present in relatively low concentrations and are often associated with moderately large amounts of process reagents, or materials. In general, it is desirable that waste treatment methods are based on chemistry that is selective for the concentration of radionuclides and does not require the addition of reagents that contribute significantly to the volume of the treated waste. Solvent extraction, ion exchange, and sorbent chemistry play a major role in waste treatment because of the high selectivity provided for many radionuclides. This paper deals with the chemistry of the onsite treatment methods that is typically used at nuclear installations and is not concerned with the chemistry of the various alternative materials proposed for long-term storage of nuclear wastes. The chemical aspects are discussed from a generic point of view in which the chemistry of important radionuclides is emphasized.

Bond, W.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

System modeling, analysis, and optimization methodology for diesel exhaust after-treatment technologies; Diesel exhaust after-treatment technologies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Developing new aftertreatment technologies to meet emission regulations for diesel engines is a growing problem for many automotive companies and suppliers. Balancing manufacturing cost, meeting (more)

Graff, Christopher Dominic

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Low Molecular Weight Organic Contaminants in Advanced Treatment: Occurrence, Treatment and Implications to Desalination and Water Reuse Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concern are produced when chlorine is used as pretreatment.These prior studies suggested that chlorine, chloramineand chlorine dioxide all pose potential risks in desalinated

Agus, Eva

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Low Molecular Weight Organic Contaminants in Advanced Treatment: Occurrence, Treatment and Implications to Desalination and Water Reuse Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water reuse and desalination are increasingly considered as viable sources of potable water because improvements in materials and designs have decreased the cost of reverse (more)

Agus, Eva

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Low Molecular Weight Organic Contaminants in Advanced Treatment: Occurrence, Treatment and Implications to Desalination and Water Reuse Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power plant cooling water, intakes for desalination systemsimmediately after the intake water storage tank. Prior toconcentrations in pilot plant intake water potentially due

Agus, Eva

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z