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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Shell structures for biogas plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shell structures designed for biogas plants of the fixed-dome type by the Bremen Overseas Research and Development Association are described. Biogas digesters of the design described have been successfully tested in Rwanda and India without structural or contractural problems.

Sasse, L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Introduction to a Large-Scale Biogas Plant in a Dairy Farm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes a large-scale biogas plant in a dairy farm located in the Tongzhou District of Beijing. It is has a treatment capacity of 30t manure and 30t wastewater per day, a total of 60t/d with a residence time of 20 days. Input material ... Keywords: Large scale biogas plant, CHP, Biogas storage within digestor

Xiaolin Fan; Zifu Li; Tingting Wang; Fubin Yin; Xin Jin

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

5. oktober 2009 Precision control of biogas plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5. oktober 2009 Precision control of biogas plants Final report Henrik B. Møller, Anders M. Nielsen: "Precision control of biogas plants", J. Nr. 33031-0028, funded by EUDP 2005. The final report consists. Danish summary of the results: Det har været formålet at udvikle drift og design af biogas anlæg med

4

Simulation, optimization and instrumentation of agricultural biogas plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??During the last two decades, the production of renewable energy by anaerobic digestion (AD) in biogas plants has become increasingly popular due to its applicability (more)

Wolf, Christian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Techno-socio-economic study of bio-gas plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study covers technological, social and economic aspects of the biogas program in Chitawan, Nepal. Many interesting facts are revealed which may be useful for future planning of Nepalese biogas programs. Concerning the social aspects, only big farmers (having more than 4 bighas of land and more than 10 domestic animals) were found to have biogas plants. No farmer who had a biogas plant was illiterate. As for the technical aspects of the total gas ovens used in the area, 66% were of BTI design. Most of the ovens were of 0.45-m/sup 3/ capacity. The life of BTI ovens was found to be shorter than the life of ovens of other companies. BTI ovens are not useful when farmers have to use a big pot for cooking. All farmers of the area were found to be convinced of the utility of the biogas plant. With regard to the economic aspects of using biogas plants, farmers were able to save 53% of the total expenditure which they had been spending for fuel. Wood consumption was reduced to 50% by using biogas. The internal rate of return of a 2.8-m/sup 3/ biogas plant was found to be 14% assuming that the plant would last for 20 years. Most of the farmers in the area did not have biogas plants. The main reason given was that there were not enough capital and cattle to begin such an operation.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

An economic evaluation of community size biogas plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic evaluation of community size biogas plants has been performed in terms of the cost of the gas produced from such systems. The analysis takes into account the initial investment, life time, interest rate, maintenance cost and operating cost. Numerical calculations corresponding to 8 biogas systems show that if the manure can be sold at a price of Rs. 100 per ton, the pay back period varies from 3 to 6 years.

Sharma, J.P.; Vasudevan, P.; Bansal, N.K.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Title: Net Energy Ratio and Greenhouse Gas Analysis of a Biogas Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a Biogas Power Plant Author: W. Bauer Author Affiliation: Department and greenhouse gas analysis for a 1.45 MW (0.71 MW electrical) biogas power plant

Bauer, Wolfgang

8

Biogas - future fuel for power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current fuel cells mix natural gas with steam to release hydrogen, which enters the fuel cell and combines with oxygen in the air. This formation of water is a chemical reaction which releases energy and heat. SMUD already has two 200 kw fuel cells in operation. SMUD`s desire to use alternative and renewable fuel sources is prompting research into using biogas as a cogenerator.

NONE

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Performance evaluation of Janata and Deenbandhu biogas plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance of the Janata and Deenbandhu fixed dome biogas plants for anaerobic digestion of dairy manure was evaluated under the conditions of a hilly region. In contrast to Janata, the Deenbandhu biogas plant was found to be not only cheaper on the basis of cost/m{sup 3} rated capacity of the plant, but it also produced more gas per unit of manure fed and per unit of digester volume in addition to maintaining a consistent rate of gas production during subsequent years from initial charging. The higher production of gas by 28.5% and 12.5% per kg of manure fed and 49.5% and 28.9% per m{sup 3} of digester volume was observed from this plant for highest 24 C and lowest 14 C digester temperatures of the plants for the months of July and December, respectively.

Kalia, A.K.; Kanwar, S.S. [H P Krishi Vishvavidyalaya, Palampur (India). Dept. of Agricultural Engineering

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Anaerobic co-digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste with FOG waste from a sewage treatment plant: Recovering a wasted methane potential and enhancing the biogas yield  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobic digestion is applied widely to treat the source collected organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (SC-OFMSW). Lipid-rich wastes are a valuable substrate for anaerobic digestion due to their high theoretical methane potential. Nevertheless, although fat, oil and grease waste from sewage treatment plants (STP-FOGW) are commonly disposed of in landfill, European legislation is aimed at encouraging more effective forms of treatment. Co-digestion of the above wastes may enhance valorisation of STP-FOGW and lead to a higher biogas yield throughout the anaerobic digestion process. In the present study, STP-FOGW was evaluated as a co-substrate in wet anaerobic digestion of SC-OFMSW under mesophilic conditions (37 {sup o}C). Batch experiments carried out at different co-digestion ratios showed an improvement in methane production related to STP-FOGW addition. A 1:7 (VS/VS) STP-FOGW:SC-OFMSW feed ratio was selected for use in performing further lab-scale studies in a 5 L continuous reactor. Biogas yield increased from 0.38 {+-} 0.02 L g VS{sub feed}{sup -1} to 0.55 {+-} 0.05 L g VS{sub feed}{sup -1} as a result of adding STP-FOGW to reactor feed. Both VS reduction values and biogas methane content were maintained and inhibition produced by long chain fatty acid (LCFA) accumulation was not observed. Recovery of a currently wasted methane potential from STP-FOGW was achieved in a co-digestion process with SC-OFMSW.

Martin-Gonzalez, L., E-mail: lucia.martin@uab.ca [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Colturato, L.F. [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Font, X.; Vicent, T. [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambiental (ICTA) Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

A Comprehensive Model for Evaluation of Carbon Footprint and Greenhouse Gages Emission in Household Biogas Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on Life Cycle Assessment and other related methods, this paper introduced a comprehensive model for the evaluation of the carbon footprint and greenhouse gases emission in household biogas plants including nearly all the processes of the household ... Keywords: Biogas Plant, Carbon Footprint, Life Cycle, Greenhouse Gas

Jie Zhou; Shubiao Wu; Wanqin Zhang; Changle Pang; Baozhi Wang; Renjie Dong; Li Chen

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Evaluation of Cellruptor pre-treatment on biogas yield from various substrates.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this thesis work, Cellruptor pre-treatment was evaluated in order to increase biogas yield. Initially, the effects of residence time (30, 60, 90, 120 (more)

Thiruvenkadam, Selvakumar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Exploitation of biogas power plantClean Development Mechanism project, Vizelj, Serbia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study of biogas power plant is designed in accordance with the existing energy policy that recognizes producers of energy from renewable sources as producers with privileged status and guarantees the purchase of energy at subsidized prices. The investor company revised its own energy policy and aligned it with the priorities of sustainable energypolicy of Serbia. The paper presents an analysis of biogas power plant output (electrical and thermal energy)

Mirjana Goluin; Sinia Dodi?; Damjan Vu?urovi?; Aleksandar Ostoji?; Larisa Jovanovi?

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Handbook for Utility Participation in Biogas-Fueled Electric Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biogas is a methane-rich gas produced from the controlled biological degradation of organic wastes. Biogas is produced as part of the treatment of four general classes of wet waste streams: Wastewater Treatment Plant Sludge Animal Manure Industrial Wastes Municipal Solid Waste in Sealed Landfills. The high methane content of biogas makes it suitable for fueling electric power generation. As energy prices increase, generation of electric power form biogas becomes increasingly attractive and the number of ...

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

15

Guidebook on biogas development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guidebook covers the practical aspects of small-scale biogas development suitable for use in rural areas in developing countries, especially those of the ESCAP region. It is intended that all aspects of biogas are covered so that someone with no knowledge of the subject can, with confidence, design, build, operate and maintain a biogas plant. Information on biogas technology in China is also included. Chapters cover: the biogas process; factors effecting gas-plant design and operation; the classification and design principles of plants; design, size and site selection; the construction of digesters; gas holders and pipes; household gas appliances and their use; starting and operating a biogas digester; servicing and safety; improving gas-plant performance; commercial uses of biogas; the effluent and its uses, biogas-plant development programmes; community plants; and economics. In the annexes, designs for biogas plants of the fixed-dome, bag and floating gas-holder type are presented. 9 references.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Modelling regional input markets with numerous processing plants: The case of green maize for biogas production in Germany  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The location of first generation processing plants for biogas using bulky inputs is a prominent example of locational decisions of plants that face high per unit transport costs of feedstock and simultaneously depend to a large extent on feedstock availability. ... Keywords: Biogas, Biomass transportation, Competitive facility location, Modelling, Transport costs

Ruth Delzeit; Wolfgang Britz; Karin Holm-Mller

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A GIS-BASED APPROACH FOR OPTIMIZING THE DEVELOPMENT OF COLLECTIVE BIOGAS PLANTS T. Bioteau, F. Boret, O. Tretyakov, F. Bline, M. Balynska, R. Girault,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A GIS-BASED APPROACH FOR OPTIMIZING THE DEVELOPMENT OF COLLECTIVE BIOGAS PLANTS T. Bioteau, F 2012 (117) A GIS-BASED APPROACH FOR OPTIMIZING THE DEVELOPMENT OF COLLECTIVE BIOGAS PLANTS T. Bioteau of potential development of collective biogas plants in France, the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS

18

Uppgradering av biogas i systemperspektiv med avseende p miljpverkan och kostnader; Biogas upgrading in a systems perspective with respect to environmental impact and economic cost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Swedish biogas is currently produced mainly by anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge at sewage treatment plants, landfills and anaerobic digestion of household or industrial (more)

Kovac, Elvedin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Utvrdering av substrat fr biogasproduktion; Evaluation of substrates for biogas production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this study was to evaluate the different substrates that enter the digestion on Sundet wastewater treatment plant for production of biogas. (more)

Tiinus, My

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Biogas Resources Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biogas Resources Characterization Biogas Resources Characterization Project Summary Full Title: Biogas Resources Characterization Project ID: 259 Principal Investigator: Ali Jalalzadeh-Azar Brief Description: This project intends to develop a cost-analysis tool based on the H2A Production model, collect global information system (GIS) / cost data, and perform techno-economic analyses of upgrading biogas and utilizing the resulting bio-methane. Keywords: Biogas; Bio-methane; Landfill; Dairy farm; Sewage treatment plant; Fuel cell Purpose Fuel cells operating on bio-methane or on hydrogen derived from bio-methane can mitigate energy and environmental issues and provide an opportunity for their commercialization. This project can provide valuable insights and information to the stakeholders-utilities, municipalities, and policy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact: Biorecycling Technologies, Inc., Noble Biogas and Fertilizer Plant, Fresno County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is considering a proposal from the California Energy Commission for partial funding up to $1,500,000 of the construction of the biorecycling Technologies, Inc., (BTI) Noble Biogas and Fertilizer Plant in Fresno County, California. BTI along with its contractors and business partners would develop the plant, which would use manure and green waste to produce biogas and a variety of organic fertilizer products. The California Energy Commission has requested funding from the DOE Commercialization Ventures program to assist in the construction of the plant, which would produce up to one megawatt of electricity by burning biogas in a cogeneration unit. The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to provide DOE and the public with information on potential environmental impacts associated with funding development of the proposed project.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Sludge storage lagoon biogas recovery and use  

SciTech Connect

The City of Memphis has two wastewater treatment plants. The SWTP employs two large anaerobic digestion sludge lagoons as part of the overall sludge treatment system. Although these lagoons are effective in concentrating and digesting sludge, they can generate offensive odors. The SWTP uses aerobic digesters to partially stabilize the sludge and help reduce objectionable odors before it enters the lagoons. The anaerobic digestion of sludge in the lagoons results in the dispersion of a large quantity of biogas into the atmosphere. The City realized that if the lagoons could be covered, the odor problem could be resolved, and at the same, time, biogas could be recovered and utilized as a source of energy. In 1987, the City commissioned ADI International to conduct a feasibility study to evaluate alternative methods of covering the lagoons and recovering and utilizing the biogas. The study recommended that the project be developed in two phases: (1) recovery of the biogas and (2) utilization of the biogas. Phase 1 consists of covering the two lagoons with an insulated membrane to control odor and temperature and collect the biogas. Phase 1 was found to be economically feasible and offered a unique opportunity for the City to save substantial operating costs at the treatment facility. The Memphis biogas recovery project is the only application in the world where a membrane cover has been used on a municipal wastewater sludge lagoon. It is also the largest lagoon cover system in the world.

Muller, D.; Norville, C. (Memphis and Shelby County Div. of Planning and Development, TN (United States))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Updated guidebook on biogas development  

SciTech Connect

On the practical aspects of small-scale biogas development suitable for use in rural areas of developing countries reviews biogas development throughout the ESCAP region and examines each of the steps involved in developing and operating a biogas plant. It details both the process and the microbiology of biogas fermentation and analyses the factors affecting gas plant design and operation. Also covered are the classification and design principles of plants, design, site, and site selection; starting and operating a gas plant; servicing and safety; and efficient plant performance. Also considered are the commercial uses of biogas and possible use of effluent.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Biogas-Fueled Electric Power: An Assessment of Systems and Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the practice of generating electric power from biogas, a mixture of methane and carbon dioxide with trace contaminants, produced as a byproduct of biological treatment of organic waste under anaerobic (no oxygen) conditions. Biogas is commonly produced during treatment of municipal solid waste in sealed landfills and anaerobic digestion of wastewater treatment plant sludge, animal manure, and organic industrial waste. Power generation from biogas is distributed generation as it is ...

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

25

Two-Stage Fungal Pre-Treatment for Improved Biogas Production from Sisal Leaf Decortication Residues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Sisal leaf decortications residue (SLDR) is amongst the most abundant agroindustrial residues in Tanzania and is a good feedstock for biogas production. Pretreatment of the residue prior to its anaerobic digestion (AD) was investigated using a twostage pre-treatment approach with two fungal strains, CCHT-1 and Trichoderma reesei in succession in anaerobic batch bioreactors. AD of the pre-treated residue with CCTH-1 at 10 % (wet weight inoculum/SLDR) inoculum concentration incubated for four days followed by incubation for eight days with 25 % (wet weight inoculum/SLDR) of T. reesei gave a methane yield of 0.292 0.04 m 3 CH4/kg volatile solids (VS)added. On reversing the pre-treatment succession of the fungal inocula using the same parameters followed by AD, methane yield decreased by about 55%. Generally, an increment in the range of 30101% in methane yield in comparison to the un-treated SLDR was obtained. The results confirmed the potential of CCHT-1 followed by Trichoderma reesei fungi pre-treatment prior to AD to achieve significant improvement in biogas production from SLDR.

Mutemi Muthangya; Anthony Manoni Msh; Amelia Kajumulo Kivaisi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Treatment of Mixed Wastewater of Slaughterhouse Wastewater and Biogas Slurry with Pilot Contact Oxidation System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a pilot contact oxidation system was used to different mixing ratio wastewater of slaughterhouse wastewater and biogas slurry. The results showed that when the mixing ratio of slaughterhouse wastewater and biogas slurry was 19:1 and the ... Keywords: contact oxidation process, slaughterhouse wastewater and biogas slurry, COD removal, ammonia removal

Peng Li; Qun-Hui Wang; Jie Zhang; Tian-Long Zheng; Juan Wang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Energikartlggning av biogasanlggningen, Kungsngens grd; Energy mapping at the biogas plant, Kungsngens grd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this thesis was to make an energy survey and quantify energy flows of individual unit operations associated with the biogas production (more)

Andersson, Mats

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Biomass: Biogas Generator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

waste for biogas production. Some feel that organic plant waste should be used for compost, and that manure should be used for fertilizer. They point out that a lot of natural...

29

Biogas Potential on Long Island, New York: A Quantification Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biogas is the product of anaerobic digestion of waste, whether occurring spontaneously in landfills or under controlled conditions in digesters. Biogas is viewed as an important energy source in current efforts to reduce the use of fossil fuels and dependency on imported resources. Several studies on the assessment of biogas potential have been made at regional, national, and global scales. However, because it is not economically feasible to transport biogas feedstock over long distances, it is more appropriate to consider local waste sources for their potential to produce biogas. An assessment of the biogas potential on Long Island, based on the review of local landfills, wastewater treatment plants, solid waste generation and management, and agricultural waste, found that 234 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} of methane (CH{sub 4}) from biogas might be harvestable, although substantial barriers for complete exploitation exist. This number is equivalent to 2.52 TW-h of electricity, approximately 12% of fossil fuel power generation on Long Island. This work can serve as a template for other areas to rapidly create or approximate biogas potentials, especially for suburban U.S. locations that are not usually thought of as sources of renewable energy.

Mahajan, D.; Patel, S.; Tonjes, D.

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

30

Sludge storage lagoon biogas recovery and use. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The City of Memphis has two wastewater treatment plants. The SWTP employs two large anaerobic digestion sludge lagoons as part of the overall sludge treatment system. Although these lagoons are effective in concentrating and digesting sludge, they can generate offensive odors. The SWTP uses aerobic digesters to partially stabilize the sludge and help reduce objectionable odors before it enters the lagoons. The anaerobic digestion of sludge in the lagoons results in the dispersion of a large quantity of biogas into the atmosphere. The City realized that if the lagoons could be covered, the odor problem could be resolved, and at the same, time, biogas could be recovered and utilized as a source of energy. In 1987, the City commissioned ADI International to conduct a feasibility study to evaluate alternative methods of covering the lagoons and recovering and utilizing the biogas. The study recommended that the project be developed in two phases: (1) recovery of the biogas and (2) utilization of the biogas. Phase 1 consists of covering the two lagoons with an insulated membrane to control odor and temperature and collect the biogas. Phase 1 was found to be economically feasible and offered a unique opportunity for the City to save substantial operating costs at the treatment facility. The Memphis biogas recovery project is the only application in the world where a membrane cover has been used on a municipal wastewater sludge lagoon. It is also the largest lagoon cover system in the world.

Muller, D.; Norville, C. [Memphis and Shelby County Div. of Planning and Development, TN (United States)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Refeeding biogas digester solids  

SciTech Connect

Biosolid, the digester residue from a biogas plant, must be of economical use to ensure the financial feasibility of biogas facilities. This paper sumarizes work performed for a Department of Energy study in the Imperial Valley of California. Feeding trials show that biosolid can only be used as a small proportion of feed rations. Apart from bacterial debris, biosolid is composed larely of non-nutritive residues. 5 refs.

Licht, L.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anaerobic digestion is biogas which contains 5070 percentPlant collects this biogas and uses it in the cogeneration

Thompson, Lisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Janata biogas technology and fodder production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An effective bio-gas program leads to efficient use of cow dung for gas recovery and partial supplement to plant nutrient requirements. Bio-gas program leads to improvement in rural living including rural sanitation. The Janata biogas plant designed by the State Planning Institute, Lucknow, based on biogas technology, has proved to be efficient and economical. This book contains the various papers presented at the seminar held to review this technology. The various topics covered are: Status of Biogas Program in India; Role of Extension Agencies in Developing Program of Energy Utilization; Introduction to Drumless Biogas Plant; Principles and Application of Anaerobic Fermentation and Biogas Production, Operational System of Gobar Gas in Rural India; Complete Recycling of Cattle Shed Wastes through Biogas Plant; Chemical Composition of Cattle Excreta and Its Manurial Value; Profitability of Biogas Plant; Biogas Production from Various Organic Wastes; Performance of Janata Biogas Plant and Biogas Utilization in Appliances; Utilization of Solar Energy for Domestic Purposes; and Conservation of Forages. Plant requirements and cost estimates have been given for several units.

Neelakantan, S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Understanding biogas generation. Technical paper  

SciTech Connect

Biogas is a by-product of the biological breakdown - under oxygen-free conditions - of organic wastes such as plants, crop residues, wood and bark residues, and human and animal manure. Biogas generators or digesters yield two products: the biogas itself, and a semi-solid by-product called effluent or sludge. Biogas systems are most popular for their ability to produce fuel from products that might otherwise be wasted-crop residues, manures, etc. The fuel is a flammable gas suitable for cooking, lighting, and fueling combustion engines. The digested waste--sludge--is a high quality ferterlizer.

Mattocks, R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Water Treatment Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to see the operation than have us explain it. Basically, most treatment plants remove the solid material and use living organisms and chlorine to clean up the water. Steve Sample...

36

biogas for rural communities TD390 Supervised learning: Study report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0 biogas for rural communities TD390 Supervised learning: Study report Vaibhav Nasery Roll No. 08D highly successful rural biogas models wherein biogas is produced and utilized as a cooking fuel by the villagers. The two models studied are the Community Biogas plant established by SUMUL Dairy at Bhintbudrak

Sohoni, Milind

37

Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report: Proceedings from the Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop, Golden, Colorado, June 11-13, 2012  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) held a Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop June 11-13, 2012, in Golden, Colorado, to discuss biogas and waste-to-energy technologies for fuel cell applications. The overall objective was to identify opportunities for coupling renewable biomethane with highly efficient fuel cells to produce electricity; heat; combined heat and power (CHP); or combined heat, hydrogen and power (CHHP) for stationary or motive applications. The workshop focused on biogas sourced from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), landfills, and industrial facilities that generate or process large amounts of organic waste, including large biofuel production facilities (biorefineries).

Not Available

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Abwicklungsgesellschaft Biogas I AG Formerly Schmack Biogas AG | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Abwicklungsgesellschaft Biogas I AG Formerly Schmack Biogas AG Abwicklungsgesellschaft Biogas I AG Formerly Schmack Biogas AG Jump to: navigation, search Name Abwicklungsgesellschaft Biogas I AG (Formerly Schmack Biogas AG) Place Schwandorf, Bavaria, Germany Zip 92421 Product Germany-based company that specialises in biogas production technology. It provides turn-key biogas plants including project development, technical and biological commissioning. Coordinates 49.327703°, 12.108496° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":49.327703,"lon":12.108496,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

39

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, was the largest of three defense production sites in the U.S. Over the span of 40 years, it was used to produce 64 metric tons of plutonium, helping end World War II and playing a major role in military defense efforts during the Cold War. As a result, 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical wastes are now stored in 177 underground tanks on the Hanford Site. To address this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the "Vit Plant," will use vitrification to immobilize most of Hanford's dangerous tank waste.

40

Deepening Treatment of the Low C/N Ratio Biogas Slurry at Mountainous Region Livestock Farming by Using Modified Two-Stage A/O System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intensive and fast development of livestock farming with ecological pattern of raisingCbiogasCirrigating is widely applied in China. After anaerobic fermentation the agricultural wastes can provides clean energy. However, there is problem by lacking ... Keywords: livestock farming, biogas slurry, low C/N ratio, deepening treatment

Wei-wei Yu; Zhi Zhang; Sheng-lan Bi; Shu-yang Li; Chao Liu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Institute for Renewable Energy Ltd Preparation of a pilot biogas CHP plant integrated with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plant integrated with a converted wood-chip fired municipal district heating system. As a result-chip district heating, fuel switch, public-private partnership End-user area Target Audience Technical New Planning issues Transport companies District Heating Sustainable communities Utilities Solar energy User

42

Economic viability of biogas technology  

SciTech Connect

Biogas has emerged as a suitable technology for providing alternative and additional sources of energy, especially for rural areas of developing countries. Although the experience gained in China and India established its technological success, social scientists are still involved in the controversial issue of its economic viability. The available literature presents very contradictory situations, ranging between the two extreme poles of high economic viability and nonviability. Such contradictory conclusions are derived since economic benefits from the technology are influenced by a number of factors. A review of the literature reveals that various factors are either not considered, or that the economics have been worked out assuming a very ideal situation, while biogas plants are operating under very different conditions. Using the coal replacement method even as coal is seldom used by villages is only a single example of this approach. In most of the developing countries, rural populations depend mainly on non-commercial fuels like firewood, dungcakes, agricultural wastes and leaves for cooking and heating purposes. Under the present technological limitations, biogas can most commonly be used for cooking and lighting. For testing the economic viability of biogas systems, a number of authors have considered the benefits in terms of savings in traditional fuels. But considering the actual thermal efficiency of different non-commercial fuel items, as well as biogas, it has still be be decided at what point of the market prices of fuel items that the biogas system becomes economically viable and remains viable. The present paper thus reviews different approaches adopted and suggested for working out the economics or the cost-benefit ratio of the biogas technology at the first stage, and then spells out the factors influencing the economic benefits of the technology under various situations, with the help of empirical

Agrawal, S.C.; Agrawal, S.; Khare, O.P.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011 February 2011 Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Construction Quality Assurance Review ARPT-WTP-2011-002...

44

Biogas from waste in Belgium  

SciTech Connect

This article describes plans for a dry anaerobic composting plant in Brecht, Belgium. The new plant will utilize dry conditions and thermophilic temperatures to produce an average of 6 to 8 volumes of biogas per volume of reactor per day could be produced from vegetable, fruit, garden and paper waste, and a soil amendment from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste according to researchers.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Preventing Biogas Generation in Low Level Waste: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report describes actions that can be taken to control and prevent biogas generation in waste containers and plant systems. In addition, it describes additional work in progress that will form the basis for the final report. This research was undertaken in response to nuclear power stations experiencing biogas generation from plant systems and low level waste containers.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

46

Biogas in Vietnam : a proposed business model in biogas sector.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this thesis was to discover a biogas opportunity in the Mekong Delta area in Vietnam. The discussed biogas production is derived from (more)

Phan, Thi Thanh Thao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

RPSEA biogas report final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are bioconverted. 2. Identify organisms within microbial consortia associated with biogas generation from coal. 3. Characterize the influence of culture growth amendments and...

48

Biogas Production Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agricultural Engineering University of California, Davis Email: rhzhang@ucdavis.edu Biogas and Fuel Cell Workshop National Renewable Energy Laboratory June 12, 2012 Presentation...

49

Biogas and Cattle Organs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? A study has been conducted to assess the possibilities to introduce dead cattle organs as the raw material for biogas generation at the rural (more)

Jamil, Adnan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Grdsbaserad biogas p Nya Skottorp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Biogas is an expanding sector within the broad field of agriculture and animal production. Small-scale biogas offers local combined power and heating production and (more)

Kaln, Jonas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

State Level Incentives for Biogas-Fuel Cell Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LEVEL INCENTIVES LEVEL INCENTIVES FOR BIOGAS-FUEL CELL PROJECTS Norma McDonald Vice Chair, American Biogas Council North American Sales Manager, Organic Waste Systems, Inc. www.americanbiogascouncil.org FIGURES * FOUNDED IN 1988 * SALES: $25-35 MILLION * 75 EMPLOYEES ACTIVITIES * BIOGAS CONSULTANCY & SUPPORT * BIODEGRADATION TESTING AND WASTE MANAGEMENT CONSULTANCY * DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION OF ANAEROBIC DIGESTION PLANTS FOR ORGANIC WASTE AND RESIDUALS * NO FORMAL STATE CHAPTERS - YET * MEMBER DRIVEN EFFORTS * LOCAL "TOUCH" IS ESSENTIAL * REAPPLY BEST PRACTICES/POLICIES * PROMOTE/ADVOCATE FOR POLICY PARITY FOR BIOGAS www.americanbiogascouncil.org DYNAMICS SHAPING STATE INCENTIVES * BUDGET WOES, ARRA FUNDS NOW RUNNING OUT

52

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biogas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biogas to someone by Biogas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biogas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biogas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biogas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biogas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biogas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biogas on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels Renewable Natural Gas (Biogas) Biogas-also known as biomethane, swamp gas, landfill gas, or digester gas-is the gaseous product of anaerobic digestion (decomposition without oxygen) of organic matter. In addition to providing electricity and heat, biogas is useful as a vehicle fuel. When processed to purity standards,

53

Biogas Markets and Federal Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

americanbiogascouncil.org americanbiogascouncil.org Promoting the Anaerobic Digestion and Biogas Industries 1 americanbiogascouncil.org Biogas Markets and Federal Policy Patrick Serfass, Executive Director www.americanbiogascouncil.org Promoting the Anaerobic Digestion and Biogas Industries www.americanbiogascouncil.org Promoting the Anaerobic Digestion and Biogas Industries American Biogas Council: The Voice of the US Biogas Industry  The only U.S. organization representing the biogas and anaerobic digestion industry  151 Organizations in the U.S., Germany, Italy, Canada, Sweden, Denmark, Belgium, Brazil, the Netherlands and the UK  All Industry Sectors Represented:  Landowners, waste managers  Project developers/owners  Manufacturers  Fuel refiners

54

Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from soils amended with biogas waste compared to otherCrutzen et al. 2008). Biogas production from organicamounts of fermentation effluent (biogas waste) remain after

Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

biogas | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

biogas biogas Dataset Summary Description Freedom Field is a not-for-profit organization formed to facilitate development and commercialization of renewable energy solutions. The organization has installed a variety of renewable energy generating technologies at their facility (located at Rock River Water Reclamation in Rockford, IL), with the intention of serving as a demonstration facility. The facility monitors data (at 5-minute intervals) from a weather station, 12.4 kW of PV panels (56 220-watt panels), a 10kW wind turbine (HAWT), a 1.2 kW wind turbine (VAWT), an absorption cooling system, and biogas burners. Source Freedom Field Date Released July 19th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biogas monitoring data PV radiance solar temperature

56

Communal Polyethylene Biogas Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In Lembang, a farming community on western Java, family-sized, plug-flow, polyethylene biogas systems fed with cow dung, are being used as an integrated solution (more)

Stoddard, Isak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Oak Ridge Reservation Invasive Plant Treatment Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge Reservation Invasive Plant Treatment Update All 33,000 acres of the ORR All 33,000 acres of the ORR ORR Invasive Plant Management Plan Surveys and Monitoring ...

58

Preventing Biogas Generation in Low Level Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of U.S. utilities have experienced gassing in radwaste, with a few encountering the refusal and return of resin shipments from the Barnwell disposal site due to this problem. This report describes actions that can be taken to control and prevent biogas generation in waste containers and plant systems.

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

59

GHG REDUCTION POTENTIAL OF BIOGAS RESOURCE UTILZATION IN HOLBKS HEATING AND ELECTRICITY SECTOR.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project is set out to identify the GHG reduction potentials of the 3 identified biogas plants in the Holbk municipality. The GHG reduction of (more)

DAO, THI THU HUONG DIU

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

ENERGY STAR Score for Wastewater Treatment Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 to 100 percentile ranking of performance, relative to the national population. Property Types. The ENERGY STAR score for wastewater treatment plants applies to primary,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Construction Quality Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARPT-WTP-2011-002 Site: DOE Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Subject: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the...

62

Power Plant Wastewater Treatment Technology Review Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing power plant water management options means screening an increasing number of wastewater treatment technologies. This report provides engineers with detailed information on treatment process performance, economics, and applications to complete rapid, yet meaningful, technology screening evaluations.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Biogas Technologies and Integration with Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL BIOGAS WORKSHOP NREL BIOGAS WORKSHOP BIOGAS TECHNOLOGIES AND INTEGRATION WITH FUEL CELLS Ian Handley Ros Roca Envirotec USA American Biogas Council SUMMARY * Introduction and Background * Anaerobic Digestion * Biogas Utilization * Biogas Upgrading Technology * Biogas Specification * Biogas to Fuel Cell * Conclusions Promoting the use of Biogas and Anaerobic Digestion O 149 Members from the U.S., Germany, Italy, Canada and the UK O All Industry Sectors Represented Key Industry Goals: O Promote biogas markets, technologies and infrastructure O Achieve policy parity O Promote as a best practice for environmental stewardship and greenhouse gas reduction www.americanbiogascouncil.org Products and technologies for environmental protection Pneumatic waste

64

ENERGY STAR Score for Wastewater Treatment Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

!! !! July 2013 ENERGY STAR Score for Wastewater Treatment Plants in the United States Page 1 ENERGY STAR Score for Wastewater Treatment Plants in the United States Technical Reference OVERVIEW ! The ENERGY STAR Score for Wastewater Treatment Plants applies to primary, secondary, and advanced treatment facilities with or without nutrient removal capacity. The objective of the ENERGY STAR score is to provide a fair assessment of the energy performance of a property relative to its peers, taking into account the climate, weather, and business activities at the property. To identify the aspects of building activity that are significant drivers of energy

65

Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - External Flowsheet Review Team (Technical) Report Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - External Flowsheet Review Team (Technical) Report Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - External Flowsheet Review Team (Technical) Report Summary - Flowsheet for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant More Documents & Publications Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility

66

Biogas as a source of rural energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hilly state of Himachal Pradesh, with nearly 2.15 million cattle and 0.7 million buffalo, has the potential to install 0.64 million biogas plants of 1 m{sup 3} size. These plants could generate nearly 4.90 x 105 m{sup 3} of biogas, equivalent to 3.07 x 10{sup 5} L kerosene per day to meet domestic energy needs of nearly one-fourth of its rural population. During 1982--1998, only 12.8% of this potential was achieved. The percent of possible potential achieved in plant installations in 12 districts of this state, namely, Bilaspur, Chamba, Hamirpur, Kangra, Kinnaur, Kullu, Lahul-Spiti, Mandi, Shimla, Sirmour, Solan, and Una, are 35.35, 1.70, 20.96, 8.67, 1.54, 6.96, 0.00, 18.49, 3.84, 8.521, 18.29, and 13.23%, respectively. There is a need to strengthen biogas promotion, particularly in the districts of Kangra, Mandi, Solan, and Una, which range from mid-hill to low-hill terrain and which have large potential due to high concentration of bovine population. Increased costs and comparatively low rate of subsidies has resulted in a decreasing rate of plant installation annually, from 3,500 during 1987--1992 to fewer than 1,200 during 1995--1998. The percentage of functioning plants was 82% in 1987--1988 but has decreased to 63%. To ensure proper installation and functionality of plants, the authors discuss the needed improvements in the biogas promotion program.

Kalia, A.K.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Missouri Water Treatment Plant Upgraded | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Treatment Plant Upgraded Missouri Water Treatment Plant Upgraded July 13, 2010 - 11:30am Addthis The high service pumps at the St. Peters Water Treatment Plant are almost 30...

68

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011 February 2011 Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Construction Quality Assurance Review [ARPT-WTP-2011-002] The purpose of the visit was to perform a review of construction quality assurance at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site activities concurrently with the Department of Energy (DOE) WTP staff. One focus area for this visit was piping and pipe support installations. Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011 More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - August 2011 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant -

69

Bioenergy systems report. April 1984: innovations in biogas systems and technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive review of recent innovations in the design and operation of biogas systems is presented. The report contains information on about sixty distinct designs for biogas plants. These include plants designed for use by individual families, larger farm plants, plants used for the digestion of agroindustrial residues, and plants producing or recovering biogas from human wastes and residues. Some have been designed for use in developing countries; others have been used primarily in developed countries but may involve design elements that could be utilized in developing countries.

Mahin, D.B.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Production of Biogas from Wastewaters of Food Processing Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Process used in converting biodegradable, soluble, organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters to a directly-burnable biogas composed mainly of methane has been developed, tested, and commercially applied in Holland. Operations on wastewater from the processing of sugar beets have shown hydraulic retention times of less than 10 hours with reactor loadings of at least 10 Kg COD per m3 digester volume per day and purification efficiencies exceeding 90%. Biogas production is at a rate of about 1 therm (100000 BTU) per 10 Kg COD treated. A moderately sized (1000 m3) wastewater treatment plant processing the order of 10000 Kg COD per day will, therefore, produce the order of 1000 therms of energy per day while, at the same time, reducing the COD level in the effluent by an order of magnitude. The set of conditions required for efficient operation of this anaerobic process will be discussed. The process is unique in its mixed sludge bed approach allowing for tolerance of swings in Ph (6-8) at relatively low temperatures (32 C - 38 C) which can be readily achieved from most wastewater streams with little expenditure of additional energy. Sludge production is remarkably low, only about 5% of the COD loading, greatly alleviating disposal problems. These characteristics are conducive for the use of the anaerobic process to recover energy from a variety of wastewaters rich in carbohydrate-type substances as produced routinely as a by product of many types of food processing activities.

Sax, R. I.; Holtz, M.; Pette, K. C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Hanford ETR - Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - - Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - Estimate at Completion (Cost) Report Hanford ETR - Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - Estimate at Completion (Cost) Report This is a comprehensive review ofthe Hanford WTP estimate at completion - assessing the project scope, contract requirements, management execution plant, schedule, cost estimates, and risks. Hanford ETR - Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - Estimate at Completion (Cost) Report More Documents & Publications TBH-0042 - In the Matter of Curtis Hall

72

Archea Biogas N V | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biogas N V Jump to: navigation, search Name Archea Biogas N.V. Place Hessisch Oldendorf, Lower Saxony, Germany Zip 31840 Product Design, analysis, planning and construction of...

73

Biogas Direct LCC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Biogas Direct LCC Jump to: navigation, search Name Biogas Direct LCC Place Spring Green,...

74

Nya renings- och uppgraderingstekniker fr biogas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Biogas is a renewable energy source that is produced by anaerobic digestion of organic mate-rial. In Sweden, biogas predominately comes from sewage water sludge (more)

Benjaminsson, Johan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Wastewater treatment plant instrumentation handbook. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instruments are required for proper operation of wastewater plants. To be of use the instruments must be operable and maintainable. This requires care in the selection, application and installation of instruments and control equipment. Contents of the handbook address the how-to of designing and applying instrumentation and controls for waste treatment operations. Special focus is given to problems, causes and solutions. The handbook covers instruments, valves and pumps commonly used in wastewater plants.

Manross, R.C.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Construction Quality Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARPT-WTP-2011-002 ARPT-WTP-2011-002 Site: DOE Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Subject: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Construction Quality Review Dates of Activity 02/14/2011 - 02/17/2011 Report Preparer Joseph Lenahan Activity Description/Purpose: The purpose of the visit was to perform a review of construction quality assurance at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site activities concurrently with the Department of Energy (DOE) WTP staff. One focus area for this visit was piping and pipe support installations. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) attended several Bechtel National Incorporated (BNI) project meetings, reviewed the WTP project quality assurance program, reviewed DOE-WTP inspection reports completed by the DOE-WTP

77

Climate balance of biogas upgrading systems  

SciTech Connect

One of the numerous applications of renewable energy is represented by the use of upgraded biogas where needed by feeding into the gas grid. The aim of the present study was to identify an upgrading scenario featuring minimum overall GHG emissions. The study was based on a life-cycle approach taking into account also GHG emissions resulting from plant cultivation to the process of energy conversion. For anaerobic digestion two substrates have been taken into account: (1) agricultural resources and (2) municipal organic waste. The study provides results for four different upgrading technologies including the BABIU (Bottom Ash for Biogas Upgrading) method. As the transport of bottom ash is a critical factor implicated in the BABIU-method, different transport distances and means of conveyance (lorry, train) have been considered. Furthermore, aspects including biogas compression and energy conversion in a combined heat and power plant were assessed. GHG emissions from a conventional energy supply system (natural gas) have been estimated as reference scenario. The main findings obtained underlined how the overall reduction of GHG emissions may be rather limited, for example for an agricultural context in which PSA-scenarios emit only 10% less greenhouse gases than the reference scenario. The BABIU-method constitutes an efficient upgrading method capable of attaining a high reduction of GHG emission by sequestration of CO{sub 2}.

Pertl, A., E-mail: andreas.pertl@boku.ac.a [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water, Atmosphere and Environment, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna, Muthgasse 107, A-1190 Wien (Austria); Mostbauer, P.; Obersteiner, G. [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water, Atmosphere and Environment, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna, Muthgasse 107, A-1190 Wien (Austria)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Microcontroller-Based Fuzzy System to Optimize the Anaerobic Digestion in Biogas Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a fuzzy-system for the optimization of the yield of biogas at biogas plants. The algorithm introduced allows the transformation of a PC supported developed fuzzy-model to a microcontroller-system. This system can be utilised as a ...

Steffen Patzwahl; Thomas Nacke; Dieter Frense; Dieter Beckmann; Klaus-Dietrich Kramer; Tobias Tautz; Gerd-Rainer Vollmer

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Biogas-fueled Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a case study of the use of digester gas produced at two wastewater treatment plants in Omaha, NE to fuel electric power generators.

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

80

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant Pretreatment Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Pretreatment Facility L. Holton D. Alexander M. Johnson H. Sutter August 2007 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection Richland, Washington, 99352 07-DESIGN-047 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Pretreatment Facilities L. Holton D. Alexander M. Johnson H. Sutter August 2007 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 07-DESIGN-047 iii Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) and the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Project Recovery has completed a Technology Readiness

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Captazione di biogas da discarica: analisi del biogas e scelta impiantistica ottimale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Studio della struttura e della costruzione di una discarica, con particolare attenzione alla problematica del biogas. Esame delle caratteristiche e della composizione del biogas e (more)

Dal Pastro, Filippo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Uppgradering av biogas med aska frn trdbrnslen; Upgrading of biogas using ash from wood fuels.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The Swedish production of biogas was 1,5 TWh 2011. About half of the production was used as vehicle fuels. The cost for upgrading biogas (more)

Andersson, Johan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant- December 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity

84

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treatment and Immobilization Treatment and Immobilization Plant - November 2011 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - November 2011 November 2011 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality The Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security conducted an independent review of selected aspects of construction quality at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project (WTP). The independent oversight review, which was performed September 12-15, 2011, was the latest in a series of ongoing quarterly assessments of construction quality at the WTP construction site. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant -

85

Plant for the treatment of waste  

SciTech Connect

A plant is described that is comprised of a post combustion chamber connected to the combustion chamber of a household rubbish incineration furnace whose hot gases it uses in order, by means of suitable berners to heat sewage sludges and industrial liquids and a circuit for the treatment of the smoke and residues coming from the post combustion. This circuit, which is held under vacuum by a blower, comprises a dry cooling tower employing semi-liquid sludges as cooling agent, an absorption tower employing a solution adapted to ombine the predominantly acid gases of the smoke, and a separating tower in which the liquids in suspension are removed. A recycle circuit for the solution and liquid separated and means of recovering metallic particles and compounds complete this plant.

Barkhuus, P.W.; Faldt, I.

1980-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

86

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory (LAB),  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory (LAB), Balance of Facilities (BOF) and Low-Activity Waste Vitrification Facilities (LAW) Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory (LAB), Balance of Facilities (BOF) and Low-Activity Waste Vitrification Facilities (LAW) Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory (LAB), Balance of Facilities (BOF) and Low-Activity Waste Vitrification Facilities (LAW) Summary - WTP Analytical Lab, BOF and LAW Waste Vitrification Facilities More Documents & Publications Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant Pretreatment Facility Compilation of TRA Summaries

87

Appropriate technology for rural India to produce biogas from vegetative wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the huge amount (91%) of energy in rural India is used as domestic fuel. Forest wood constitutes half of this energy, which could be saved by providing an alternative kitchen fuel. Biogas provides the only viable alternative. While the basics of biogas production have been known for several decades, serious research efforts are required to evolve appropriate technology of biogas production for Indian villages. It is easy to design devices which work on the economy of large scale; it is a formidable task to achieve the same at down-to-earth level of economy. Considering the vast majority of small farmers, a cheap, manual, continuous fermentation straw gas plant is likely to offer appropriate technology. Efforts have continued since 1965 to develop such a plant: the latest model is quite competitive in all respects with the KVIC biogas plant, except for its stirring system. Efforts are being made to develop a suitable stirring system.

Goswami, K.P. (College of Agriculture, Gujarat Agricultural Univ., Anand (IN))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Introduction to biogas production on the farm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of farmers, ranchers, and engineers received support from the US Department of Energy Appropriate Technology Small Grants Program to design, construct, and demonstrate biogas production systems. Many of these projects generated more than just biogas; grantees' work and results have contributed to a growing body of information about practical applications of this technology. This publication was developed to share some of that information, to answer the basic questions about biogas production, and to lead farmers to more information. Section I introduces biogas and the various components of a biogas production system, discusses the system's benefits and liabilities, and provides a brief checklist to determine if biogas production may be applicable to an individual's particular situation. Section II features descriptions of four biogas projects of various sizes. Section III provides sources of additional information including descriptions of other biogas production projects.

Not Available

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Team Bug Bag Biogas For Nicaragua  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Team Bug Bag Biogas For Nicaragua Project Recap The task for Team Bug Bag was to create for under $100 (USD), and be able to produce biogas that could boil water for a thirty minute time period

Demirel, Melik C.

90

Biogas production from broiler manure, wastewater treatment plant sludge, and greenhouse waste by anaerobic co-digestion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inappropriate management of organic wastes can cause serious damage to the environment by polluting water and air

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Solar Farm Going Strong at Water Treatment Plant in Pennsylvania |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Farm Going Strong at Water Treatment Plant in Pennsylvania Farm Going Strong at Water Treatment Plant in Pennsylvania Solar Farm Going Strong at Water Treatment Plant in Pennsylvania October 8, 2010 - 10:39am Addthis Aqua Pennsylvania, Inc. installed a 1 MW solar farm at its Ingram’s Mill Water Treatment Plant in East Bradford, Pa. The solar project is saving the water company $77,000 a year. | File photo Aqua Pennsylvania, Inc. installed a 1 MW solar farm at its Ingram's Mill Water Treatment Plant in East Bradford, Pa. The solar project is saving the water company $77,000 a year. | File photo Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE It takes a lot of energy to run a water treatment plant round-the-clock. And pumping 35 million gallons of water a day to hundreds of thousands businesses and residents can get expensive.

92

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 2013 March 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2013 March 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security, conducted an independent review of selected aspects of construction quality at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The review, which was performed November 26-30, 2012, was the latest in a series of ongoing quarterly assessments of construction quality performed by Independent Oversight at the WTP construction site. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2013

93

Independent Activity Report, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant- March 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Follow-up of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity Review [HIAR-WTP-2013-03-18

94

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 2012 October 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - October 2012 October 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security, conducted an independent review of selected aspects of construction quality at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The review, which was performed August 6-10, 2012, was the latest in a series of ongoing quarterly assessments of construction quality performed by Independent Oversight at the WTP construction site. Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant -

95

Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(the percentage of actual operating time). 1 Comprehensive Review of the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Flowsheet and Throughput Specifically, the following questions were...

96

Activity Report for Waste Treatment and Immobilizationi Plant...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Off-gas Process...

97

Energy recovery at Chi?in?u wastewater treatment plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Possibilities for energy recovery from sludge at Chi?in?u wastewater treatment plant have been investigated and evaluated. One way of recovering energy from sludge is (more)

Graan, Daniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Biogas project advances in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has given a `thumbs up` rating to the high solids anaerobic digester project which is designed to produce biogas. The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD), the local utility, is considering the use of biogas to run a fuel cell pilot project. The designs for the three digesters are state-of-the-art, with each containing a horizontal trough measuring 120 feet long, 32 feet wide and 22 feet tall. NREL was asked by the PIA to review the mixing method in the digesters and analyze the overall potential success of the operation. The design employs a redundant system for foam removal from the digester gas, and has provisions to remove moisture from the biogas. However, there are no systems specified to reduce hydrogen sulfide levels. Since hydrogen sulfide is known to be corrosive, it may be destructive to the ultimate use as biogas in fuel cells. A suggested remedy from NREL is to add redundant iron sponge systems to remove hydrogen sulfide gases. A redundant system would allow regenerating one while the other is in service. In general, the lab found the design offers low construction costs, relative ease of operation, and a reasonably high level of anticipated success in operation. Therefore, NREL recommends proceeding with the current digester design plans, once the modifications as indicated are made.

Wittrup, L. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Economic evaluation of biogas as energy and fertilizer in rural northeast Thailand  

SciTech Connect

In the aftermath of the 1974 oil crisis, Thailand faces a complex problem: agriculture is characterized by low productivity, and an increasing burden is now being placed on national forest reserves as the primary source of fuel. The nation is forced to choose: land for forests and fuel, or land for agriculture and food. In either case, current levels of land use are having serious environmental consequences. Biogas has been proposed as a possible remedy to alleviate these problems. In this study, three sizes of biogas plants are studied to facilitate cost estimates, and two Thai villages provide case studies of actual applications. Then a stratified random sample of 60 households is selected from the two villages, based on economic class groupings. The central question is to inquire whether biogas is feasible and profitable for villages with differing characteristics, for different income groups within those villages, and whether technological viability is affected by plant size. The results show that there are increasing returns to scale for larger biogas plants; that the poorer village obtains more benefits per unit of output than the more modernized village; that the poorest households within each village have the highest potential gains from biogas. It is recommended that Thailand implement biogas technology in those regions and for those villages where benefit-cost analysis demonstrates its economic feasibility.

Sombuntham, S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Model-based optimisation of Wastewater Treatment Plants design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the mathematical basis and some illustrative examples of a model-based decision-making method for the automatic calculation of optimum design parameters in modern Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTP). The starting point of the proposed ... Keywords: Mathematical modelling, Optimum design, Wastewater Treatment Plants

A. Rivas; I. Irizar; E. Ayesa

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Thermal energy from a biogas engine/generator system  

SciTech Connect

A biogas fueled engine/generator equipped with heat recovery apparatus and thermal storage is described. The thermal energy is used to fuel a liquid fuel plant. Heat recovery is quantified and the static and dynamic performance of the thermal storage is described. At 1260 rpm the engine/generator produces 21 kW of electric power and 2500 kJ/min of thermal energy.

Stahl, T.; Fischer, J.R.; Harris, F.D.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Arsenic and Selenium Treatment Technology Summary for Power Plant Wastewaters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the most suitable technologies available for the removal of arsenic and selenium from power plant wastewaters. The information stems from literature searches and the authors' experience in wastewater treatment systems from generally non-power plant sources since there are limited operating experiences for power plant applications. The report lists existing and potential technologies that meet the treatment goals of reducing arsenic and selenium to the levels set for U.S. En...

2004-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

103

Air Liquide - Biogas & Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquide - Biogas & Fuel Cells Liquide - Biogas & Fuel Cells ■ Hydrogen Energy ■ Biogas Upgrading Technology 12 June 2012 Charlie.Anderson@airliquide.com 2 Air Liquide, world leader in gases for industry, health and the environment Renewable H 2 to Fuel Cell, Integrated Concept Purified Biogas 3 Air Liquide, world leader in gases for industry, health and the environment Renewable H 2 to Fuel Cell, Non-Integrated Concept Landfill WWTP digester Biogas membrane Pipeline quality methane CH4 Pipeline Hydrogen Production To Fuel Cell Vehicles Stationary Fuel Cells With H2 purification Stationary Fuel Cells Direct Conversion Directed Biomethane 4 Air Liquide, world leader in gases for industry, health and the environment Biogas Sources in the US ■ Landfill gas dominates (~4,000 Nm3/h typical)

104

Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BIOGAS AND FUEL CELLS WORKSHOP AGENDA BIOGAS AND FUEL CELLS WORKSHOP AGENDA National Renewable Energy Laboratory Research Support Facility, Beaver Creek Conference Room Golden, Colorado June 11-13, 2012 WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES: * Discuss current state-of-the art for biogas and waste-to-energy technologies for fuel cell applications. * Identify key challenges (both technical and non-technical) preventing or delaying the widespread near term deployment of biogas fuel cells projects. * Identify synergies and opportunities for biogas and fuel cell technologies. * Identify and prioritize opportunities to address the challenges, and determine roles and opportunities for both government and industry stakeholders. * Develop strategies for accelerating the use of biogas for stationary fuel cell power and/or

105

How China utilizes biogas in rural areas  

SciTech Connect

An outline is presented of how China utilizes biogas in rural areas. Already, 7,140,000 small biogas digesters have been built. Sichuan province has 4,160,000 digesters including about 20,000 large digesters which operate diesel engines to generate electricity. This is seen as the key area for further research and development. In rural areas, biogas is used principally for cooking and to power stationary units such as grinding mills, electric generators and crop driers.

Ji, M.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Biogas production from a systems analytical perspective.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Anaerobic digestion and the production of biogas can provide an efficient means of meeting several objectives concerning energy, environmental and waste management policy. Interest in (more)

Berglund, Maria

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Potential of Floriculture Residue For Biogas Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Production of methane reach biogas through anaerobic digestion of organic material provides versatile carrier of renewable energy, as methane can be used in replacement for (more)

TAMRAT, ASNAKE

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

A Case Study to Bottle the Biogas in Cylinders as Source of Power for Rural Industries Development in Pakistan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Pakistan is one of the developing countries with very low energy consumption, correspondingly low standard of living and high population growth. The country is trying to improve its living standards by increasing its energy consumption and establishing appropriate industries. It has immense hydropower potential, which is almost untapped at the present time. Employment generation and poverty alleviation are the two main issues related with rural development. These issues can be tackled by rural industrialization using local resources and appropriate technologies. However, sufficient number of industries can not be set up in rural areas so far due to scarcity of energy supply i.e. electricity, diesel etc. Biogas, a renewable fuel may be able to fill the gap in energy availability in the rural areas. Biogas can supply energy near to biogas plant which makes it hindrance in its wide spread application and therefore mobility of biogas is must, which is achieved by bottling of biogas. Here a model is conceptualized to bottle the biogas in cylinders and then use it to power the rural industries. It is found that use of bottled biogas can save diesel of the worth US $ 147 in 12 hours and also generate employment for 12 persons. Key words: Employment rural industries biogas bottling

Syed Zafar Ilyas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Summary - Flowsheet for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment Plant Waste Treatment Plant ETR Report Date: March 2006 ETR-1 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Flowsheet for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 53 million gallons of radioactive waste, separate it into high- and low-activity fractions, and produce canisters of high-level (HLW) glass (left) and containers of low-activity waste (LAW) glass (right). At the time of this review, the Plant was at approximately 70% design and 30% construction completion. The external review objective was to determine how well the WTP would meet its throughput capacities based on the current design,

110

Biogas and Biomass to Energy Grant Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biogas and Biomass to Energy Grant Program Biogas and Biomass to Energy Grant Program Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit...

111

Two Different Approaches to Funding Farm-Based Biogas Projects...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two Different Approaches to Funding Farm-Based Biogas Projects in Wisconsin and California Title Two Different Approaches to Funding Farm-Based Biogas Projects in Wisconsin and...

112

Roosevelt Biogas 1 Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Roosevelt Biogas 1 Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Roosevelt Biogas 1 Biomass...

113

Biogas Purification: H2S Removal using Biofiltration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biogas, composed principally of methane, has limited use in energy generation due to the presence of hydrogen sulphide (H2S). Biogas cannot be burned directly in (more)

Fischer, Mary Elizabeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

A New Method to Evaluate Hydrogen Sulfide Removal from Biogas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydrogen sulfide in biogas fuel increases the speed at which the system utilizing the biogas corrodes. This corrosion may be prevented by separating and removing (more)

Martin, Jerry H II

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Biogas Potential in the United States (Fact Sheet), Energy Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Analysis Biogas Potential in the United States Biogas is the gaseous product of anaerobic digestion, a biological process in which microorganisms break down biodegradable...

116

Independent Oversight Assessment, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2012 January 2012 Assessment of the Nuclear Safety Culture and Management of Nuclear Safety Concerns at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent assessment at the DOE Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to evaluate the current status of the nuclear safety culture and the effectiveness of DOE and contractor management in addressing nuclear safety concerns at WTP. This assessment provides DOE management with a follow-up on the October 2010 HSS review of the WTP

117

Independent Activity Report, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2013 Independent Activity Report, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2013 March 2013 Follow-up of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity Review [HIAR-WTP-2013-03-18] The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) staff observed a limited portion of the restart of the Hazard Analysis (HA) for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter Process (LMP) System. The primary purpose of this HSS field activity, on March 18-21, 2013, was to observe and understand the revised approach implemented by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), the contractor responsible for the design and construction of WTP for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of

118

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project - October 2010 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project - October 2010 October 2010 Review of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) conducted an independent review of the nuclear safety culture at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) project at the Hanford Site during August and September 2010. The HSS team performed the review in response to a request in a July 30, 2010, memorandum from the Assistant Secretary for the DOE Headquarters Office of Environmental Management (EM), which referred to nuclear safety concerns raised by a contractor employee

119

Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

conducted an independent review of selected aspects of construction quality at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Project (WTP). The review, which was performed May...

120

Life-cycle assessment of wastewater treatment plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a general model for the carbon footprints analysis of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. In previous research, the issue of global warming is often related ...

Dong, Bo, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Support Task Order Modified | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment Plant Support Task Order Modified Waste Treatment Plant Support Task Order Modified Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Support Task Order Modified March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Lynette Chafin, 513-246-0461 Lynette.Chafin@emcbc.doe.gov Cincinnati - The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a modification to a task order to Aspen Resources Limited, Inc. of Boulder, Colorado for support of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site. The modification increased the value of the task order to $1.6 million from $833,499. The task order modification has a one-year performance period and two one-year option periods. The Task Order was awarded under an Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (ID/IQ) master Contract. Aspen Resources Limited, Inc. is a small-disadvantaged business under the Small Business Administration's

122

West Point Treatment Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Point Treatment Plant Biomass Facility Point Treatment Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name West Point Treatment Plant Biomass Facility Facility West Point Treatment Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location King County, Washington Coordinates 47.5480339°, -121.9836029° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.5480339,"lon":-121.9836029,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

123

Managing Manure with Biogas Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions and capture biogas--a useful source of energy. About Anaerobic Digestion Biogas recovery systems are sometimes known as anaerobic digesters, because they use a process called anaerobic digestion. (Conventional lagoons oper- ate on the same biological principle.) During anaerobic digestion, bacteria break down

Mukhtar, Saqib

124

Optimization of Biogas Production with Computational Intelligence A Comparative Study ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biogas plants are reliable sources of energy based on renewable materials including organic waste. There is a high demand from industry to run these plants efficiently, which leads to a highly complex simulation and optimization problem. A comparison of several algorithms from computational intelligence to solve this problem is presented in this study. The sequential parameter optimization was used to determine improved parameter settings for these algorithms in an automated manner. We demonstrate that genetic algorithm and particle swarm optimization based approaches were outperformed by differential evolution and covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy. Compared to previously presented results, our approach required only one tenth of the number of function evaluations. 1

Jrg Ziegenhirt; Thomas Bartz-beielstein; Oliver Flasch; Wolfgang Konen; Martin Zaefferer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - August 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - August 2012 August 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security, conducted independent reviews of selected aspects of construction quality at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Project (WTP). The reviews for this report were performed on site during February 6-10, 2012 and April 30 - May 4, 2012, and were the latest in a series of ongoing quarterly assessments of construction quality performed by Independent Oversight at the WTP.

126

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - August 2011 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - August 2011 August 2011 Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (Independent Oversight) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) conducted an independent review of selected aspects of construction quality at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Project (WTP). The review, which was performed May 9-12, 2011, was the latest in a series of ongoing quarterly assessments of construction quality performed by Independent Oversight at the WTP construction site. HSS determined that construction quality at WTP was adequate in the areas

127

Liquid membrane purification of biogas  

SciTech Connect

Conventional gas purification technologies are highly energy intensive. They are not suitable for economic removal of CO{sub 2} from methane obtained in biogas due to the small scale of gas production. Membrane separation techniques on the other hand are ideally suited for low gas production rate applications due to their modular nature. Although liquid membranes possess a high species permeability and selectivity, they have not been used for industrial applications due to the problems of membrane stability, membrane flooding and poor operational flexibility, etc. A new hollow-fiber-contained liquid membrane (HFCLM) technique has been developed recently. This technique overcomes the shortcomings of the traditional immobilized liquid membrane technology. A new technique uses two sets of hydrophobic, microporous hollow fine fibers, packed tightly in a permeator shell. The inter-fiber space is filled with an aqueous liquid acting as the membrane. The feed gas mixture is separated by selective permeation of a species through the liquid from one fiber set to the other. The second fiber set carries a sweep stream, gas or liquid, or simply the permeated gas stream. The objectives (which were met) of the present investigation were as follows. To study the selective removal of CO{sub 2} from a model biogas mixture containing 40% CO{sub 2} (the rest being N{sub 2} or CH{sub 4}) using a HFCLM permeator under various operating modes that include sweep gas, sweep liquid, vacuum and conventional permeation; to develop a mathematical model for each mode of operation; to build a large-scale purification loop and large-scale permeators for model biogas separation and to show stable performance over a period of one month.

Majumdar, S.; Guha, A.K.; Lee, Y.T.; Papadopoulos, T.; Khare, S. (Stevens Inst. of Tech., Hoboken, NJ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering)

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Biogas Production through the Syntrophic Acetate-Oxidising Pathway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biogas Production through the Syntrophic Acetate-Oxidising Pathway Characterisation and Detection Uppsala 2012 #12;Acta Universitatis agriculturae Sueciae 2012:45 #12;Biogas production through 1.1 Aims of the thesis 12 2 Biogas production 15 2.1 Biogas production in Europe 16 2.2 Substrate

129

Biogas production from Jatropha curcas press-cake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seeds of the tropical plant Jatropha curcas (purge nut, physic nut) are used for the production of oil. Several methods for oil extraction have been developed. In all processes, about 50% of the weight of the seeds remain as a press cake containing mainly protein and carbohydrates. Investigations have shown that this residue contains toxic compounds and cannot be used as animal feed without further processing. Preliminary experiments have shown that the residue is a good substrate for biogas production. Biogas formation was studied using a semicontinous upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor; a contact-process and an anaerobic filter each reactor having a total volume of 110 L. A maximum production rate of 3.5 m{sup 3} m{sup -3} d{sup -1} was obtained in the anaerobic filter with a loading rate of 13 kg COD m{sup -3} d{sup -1}. However, the UAS reactor and the contact-process were not suitable for using this substrate. When using an anaerobic filter with Jatropha curcas seed cake as a substrate, 76% of the COD was degraded and 1 kg degraded COD yielded 355 L of biogas containing 70% methane. 28 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Staubmann, R.; Guebitz, G.M.; Lafferty, R.M. [Graz Technical Univ. (Austria)] [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Wastewater Treatment Gas to Energy for Federal Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

15 miles) should explore whether the plant is of sufficient size to produce excess biogas, the availability of the biogas, and what end-use application would make economic...

131

Biogas, compost and fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pilot project now under development in Folsom, California, incorporates an anaerobic digestion/aerobic composting process that could eventually supply enough biogas to a fuel cell. The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) has two fuel cells in operation and is participating in the research project. Recently, the California Prison Industry Authority (PIA) began operating a processing facility at the Folsom prison, designed for 100 tons/day of mixed waste from the City of Folsom. The 35,000 square foot Correctional Resource Recovery Facility (CRRF) uses minimum security inmates from Folsom`s Return to Custody Facility to manually separate recyclables and compostable materials from the waste stream. The PIA will be using a new technology, high solids anaerobic digestion, to compost the organic fraction (representing approximately 60 to 70 percent of the waste stream). Construction began in June on a 40-foot wide by 120-foot long and 22-foot deep anaerobic digester. Once the vessel is operational in 1995, the composting process and the gradual breakdown of organic material will produce biogas, which SMUD hopes to use to power an adjacent two megawatt fuel cell. The electricity generated will serve SMUD customers, including the waste facility and nearby correctional institutions. 1 fig.

Wichert, B.; Wittrup, L.; Robel, R. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery - Masking the Environmental Consequences of Industrial Concentrated Livestock Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery-Masking theII. METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAs RECOVERY- IN THE2011] METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAS RECOVERY methane, and 64%

Di Camillo, Nicole G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Assessment of Biogas-Fueled Electric Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an assessment of technologies, opportunities, and markets for generation of electricity from biogas sources. Topics covered include sources of biogas; typical characteristics of biogas as produced from various waste products; engines and associated equipment to convert biogas to electricity; electrical design and connection issues; and markets for heat and power produced by biogas to electricity systems. The report describes the process of anaerobic digestion for converting organic w...

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Passive solar technology aids biogas digesters  

SciTech Connect

Farming communities throughout China rely on biogas generators as a primary source of light and heat, as well as using the sludge as a nitrogen-rich fertilizer. Now researchers at Beijing's Solar Energy Laboratory have improved efficiency by building a rectangular tank out of concrete slabs, with one slanted surface painted black and covered with glass. According to a report in New Scientist, this passive solar panel generates heat in the same way as a greenhouse, raising inside temperatures by 10{degree}C and increasing biogas production by 50%. Another advantage of the new tanks is easy access, since the tank's lid sites in wells of water which form a seal against oxygen. (Old biogas tanks were made of soil, sand and a little concrete, prone to developing severe cracks which would allow oxygen to enter thus slowing down anaerobic reaction). Explains Debora MacKenzie of New Scientist: with the new tank, the farmer can simply remove the lid and attack the contents with a spade. This means that the mixture can comprise more than 10% solids. Greater density allows smaller tanks. Rural families need one cubic meter of biogas daily for light and heat; instead of the former 8 cm biogas generator, the new tanks need only be 1 cm. The prediction is that the smaller size could make biogas more popular in China's crowded towns. The biogas department is headed by He Shao Qi, who is also investigating ways to reduce production costs for the tanks.

Not Available

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 2013 January 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2013 January 2013 Review of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Black-Cell and Hard-To-Reach Pipe Spools Procurement Process and the Office of River Protection Audit of That Process The Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted a concurrent independent review with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) of selected aspects of the Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) procurement processes for WTP black-cell (BC) and hard-to-reach (HtR) pipe spools. The Independent Oversight review was performed by the HSS Office of Safety and

136

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2012 March 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security, conducted an independent review of selected aspects of construction quality at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The review, which was performed November 14-17, 2011, was the latest in a series of ongoing quarterly assessments of construction quality performed by Independent Oversight at the WTP construction site. Independent Oversight determined that construction quality at WTP was adequate in the areas reviewed. BNI Engineering has developed appropriate

137

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 2013 January 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2013 January 2013 Review of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Black-Cell and Hard-To-Reach Pipe Spools Procurement Process and the Office of River Protection Audit of That Process The Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted a concurrent independent review with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) of selected aspects of the Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) procurement processes for WTP black-cell (BC) and hard-to-reach (HtR) pipe spools. The Independent Oversight review was performed by the HSS Office of Safety and

138

Radiological Monitoring of Waste Treatment Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scheduled waste in West Malaysia is handled by Concession Company and is stored and then is incinerated. It is known that incineration process may result in naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) to be concentrated. In this study we have measured three samples consist of by-product from the operation process such as slag, filter cake and fly ash. Other various environmental media such as air, surface water, groundwater and soil within and around the plant have also been analysed for their radioactivity levels. The concentration of Ra-226, Ac-228 and K-40 in slag are 0.062 Bq/g, 0.016 Bq/g and 0.19 Bq/g respectively. The total activity (Ra{sub eq}) in slag is 99.5 Bq/kg. The concentration in fly ash is 0.032 Bq/g, 0.16 Bq/g and 0.34 Bq/g for Ra-226, Ac-228 and K-40 respectively resulting in Raeq of 287.0 Bq/kg. For filter cake, the concentration is 0.13 Bq/g, 0.031 Bq/g and 0.33 Bq/g for Ra-226, Ac-228 and K-40 respectively resulting in Raeq of 199.7 Bq/kg. The external radiation level ranges from 0.08 {mu}Sv/h (Administrative building) to 0.35 {mu}Sv/h (TENORM storage area). The concentration level of radon and thoron progeny varies from 0.0001 to 0.0016 WL and 0.0006 WL to 0.002 WL respectively. For soil samples, the activity ranges from 0.11 Bq/g to 0.29 Bq/g, 0.06 Bq/g to 0.18 Bq/g and 0.065 Bq/g to 0.38 Bq/g for Ra-226, Ac-228 and K-40 respectively. While activity in water, except for a trace of K-40, it is non-detectable.

Amin, Y. M. [Physics Dept, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Nik, H. W. [Asialab (Malaysia) Sdn Bhd, 14 Jalan Industri USJ 1, 47600 Subang Jaya (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

139

Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality, August 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Review Report Independent Review Report Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality May 2011 August 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope .................................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results .................................................................................................................................................. 2

140

NORDIC WASTE WATER TREATMENT SLUDGE TREATMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biogas, electricity and fertilizer from 30 000 tons of annually waste. The plant was opened in March 2008 together it an- nually produces 18,9 GWh biogas and around 10 GWh of elec- tricity. The Cambi THP ­process

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 2012 August 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - August 2012 August 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security, conducted independent reviews of selected aspects of construction quality at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Project (WTP). The reviews for this report were performed on site during February 6-10, 2012 and April 30 - May 4, 2012, and were the latest in a series of ongoing quarterly assessments of construction quality performed by Independent Oversight at the WTP. Independent Oversight determined that construction quality at WTP is

142

Construction of Industrial Electron Beam Plant for Wastewater Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pilot plant for treating 1,000 m3/day of dyeing wastewater with e-beam has been constructed and operated since 1998 in Daegu, Korea together with the biological treatment facility. The wastewater from various stages of the existing purification process has been treated with electron beam in this plant, and it gave rise to elaborate the optimal technology of the electron beam treatment of wastewater with increased reliability at instant changes in the composition of wastewater. Installation of the e-beam pilot plant resulted in decolorizing and destructive oxidation of organic impurities in wastewater, appreciable to reduction of chemical reagent consumption, in reduction of the treatment time, and in increase in flow rate limit of existing facilities by 30-40%. Industrial plant for treating 10,000 m3/day, based upon the pilot experimental result, is under construction and will be finished by 2005. This project is supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Korean Government.

Han, B.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y.; Kim, S.; Lee, M.; Choi, J.; Ahn, S.; Makarov, I.E.; Ponomarev, A.V.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

143

MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL POWER PLANT LOCATED AT TERMINAL ISLAND WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) has developed one of the most recognized fuel cell demonstration programs in the United States. In addition to their high efficiencies and superior environmental performance, fuel cells and other generating technologies that can be located at or near the load, offers several electric utility benefits. Fuel cells can help further reduce costs by reducing peak electricity demand, thereby deferring or avoiding expenses for additional electric utility infrastructure. By locating generators near the load, higher reliability of service is possible and the losses that occur during delivery of electricity from remote generators are avoided. The potential to use renewable and locally available fuels, such as landfill or sewage treatment waste gases, provides another attractive outlook. In Los Angeles, there are also many oil producing areas where the gas by-product can be utilized. In June 2000, the LADWP contracted with FCE to install and commission the precommercial 250kW MCFC power plant. The plant was delivered, installed, and began power production at the JFB in August 2001. The plant underwent manufacturer's field trials up for 18 months and was replace with a commercial plant in January 2003. In January 2001, the LADWP contracted with FCE to provide two additional 250kW MCFC power plants. These commercial plants began operations during mid-2003. The locations of these plants are at the Terminal Island Sewage Treatment Plant at the Los Angeles Harbor (for eventual operation on digester gas) and at the LADWP Main Street Service Center east of downtown Los Angeles. All three carbonate fuel cell plants received partial funding through the Department of Defense's Climate Change Fuel Cell Buydown Program. This report covers the technical evaluation and benefit-cost evaluation of the Terminal Island 250kW MCFC power plant during its first year of operation from June 2003 to July 2004.

William W. Glauz

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Landfills Convert Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on AddThis.com... May 25, 2013 Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas

145

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) held a Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop June 11-13, 2012, in...

146

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office:...

147

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW Waste Vitrification Facility L. Holton D. Alexander C. Babel H. Sutter J. Young August 2007 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection Richland, Washington, 99352 07-DESIGN-046 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW Waste Vitrification Facility L. Holton D. Alexander C. Babel H. Sutter J. Young August 2007 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 07-DESIGN-046 iii Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) and the DOE Office of Environmental and Radioactive Waste Management (EM), Office of Project Recovery have completed a

148

Life Cycle Assessment of Biogas from Separated slurry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life Cycle Assessment of Biogas from Separated slurry Lorie Hamelin, Marianne Wesnæs and Henrik AND ALTERNATIVES 28 2.2.1 Reference Scenario (Scenario A) 28 2.2.2 Biogas from raw pig slurry and fibre fraction from chemical- mechanical separation (Scenario F) 29 2.2.3 Biogas from raw cow slurry and fibre

149

Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Sets Massive Protective Shield door in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment Plant Sets Massive Protective Shield door Waste Treatment Plant Sets Massive Protective Shield door in Pretreatment Facility Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Sets Massive Protective Shield door in Pretreatment Facility January 12, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis The carbon steel doors come together to form an upside-down L-shape. The 102-ton door was set on top of the 85-ton door that was installed at the end of December. The carbon steel doors come together to form an upside-down L-shape. The 102-ton door was set on top of the 85-ton door that was installed at the end of December. The 102-ton shield door measures 52 feet wide and 15 feet tall The 102-ton shield door measures 52 feet wide and 15 feet tall The carbon steel doors come together to form an upside-down L-shape. The 102-ton door was set on top of the 85-ton door that was installed at the end of December.

150

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

treatment plants release biogas through the decomposition oforganic matter. The biogas (mostly methane) can be capturedgenerate electricity from biogas and they have the same rate

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Why Sequencea Biogas-Producing Microbial Community?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Biogas-Producing Microbial Community? a Biogas-Producing Microbial Community? The world population is steadily growing, and so is the amount of waste produced by human activity. For example, an estimated 236 million tons of municipal solid waste are produced annually in the U.S., 50% of which is biomass. At the same time, energy sources are rapidly depleting. Converting organic waste to renewable biofuel by anaerobic digestion hence represents one appealing option to mitigate this problem. Biogas is a natural by-product of the decomposition of organic matter in an oxygen-free environment and comprises primarily methane and carbon dioxide. This naturally occurring process has been known for more than a century. More recently, it has been gaining importance as more efficient anaerobic digestion technologies have been developed to treat and recover energy (in

152

Fuel Cells on Bio-Gas (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

The conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Fuel cells operating on bio-gas offer a pathway to renewable electricity generation; (2) With federal incentives of $3,500/kW or 30% of the project costs, reasonable payback periods of less than five years can be achieved; (3) Tri-generation of electricity, heat, and hydrogen offers an alternative route to solving the H{sub 2} infrastructure problem facing fuel cell vehicle deployment; and (4) DOE will be promoting bio-gas fuel cells in the future under its Market Transformation Programs.

Remick, R. J.

2009-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

153

Process for electric power production using a biogas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is described for the production of electric power with a biogas used as a fuel for an electric power producing combustion turbine which drives a generator. The turbine will accept such a biogas only at a temperature below a predetermined temperature, wherein a biomass is gasified to produce a hot stream of a biogas. The biogas is at temperatures of between about 650/sup 0/-875/sup 0/C and contains vaporized tar components and solid particulate matter. It is characterized in that: the hot stream of biogas, consisting essentially of a biogas, vaporized tars and solid particulate matter, has water injected thereto partially cool the biogas to a temperature below the predetermined temperature by vaporization of the water. However, the biogas is above a temperature at which the vaporized tars in the biogas would condense out of the stream; filtering the partially cooled biogas to remove the particulate matter; and directly charging the partially cooled, filtered biogas containing the vaporized water and vaporized tars to an electric power producing combustion turbine to produce electric power.

Archer, D.H.; Bauer, F.I.; Vidt, E.J.

1987-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

154

Quebec Biogas Program (Quebec, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quebec Biogas Program (Quebec, Canada) Quebec Biogas Program (Quebec, Canada) Quebec Biogas Program (Quebec, Canada) < Back Eligibility Industrial Program Info Funding Source Government of Quebec State Quebec Program Type Grant Program Provider Bureau des changements climatiques, Ministère du Développement durable, de l'Environnement et des Parcs In 2005, the Quebec government adopted a regulation aimed to minimize the impact of biogas from landfills. The Regulation is in respect to landfills and incineration of residual materials, particularly those that bury more than 50,000 tons of waste per year, to capture the biogas ideally enhance or eliminate them. The Quebec government created the Biogas Program to financially support projects to capture or dispose of biogas from landfill sites not covered by

155

B Plant treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) units inspection plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This inspection plan is written to meet the requirements of WAC 173-303 for operations of a TSD facility. Owners/operators of TSD facilities are required to inspection their facility and active waste management units to prevent and/or detect malfunctions, discharges and other conditions potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. A written plan detailing these inspection efforts must be maintained at the facility in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC), Chapter 173-303, ``Dangerous Waste Regulations`` (WAC 173-303), a written inspection plan is required for the operation of a treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) facility and individual TSD units. B Plant is a permitted TSD facility currently operating under interim status with an approved Part A Permit. Various operational systems and locations within or under the control of B Plant have been permitted for waste management activities. Included are the following TSD units: Cell 4 Container Storage Area; B Plant Containment Building; Low Level Waste Tank System; Organic Waste Tank System; Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW) Tank System; Low Level Waste Concentrator Tank System. This inspection plan complies with the requirements of WAC 173-303. It addresses both general TSD facility and TSD unit-specific inspection requirements. Sections on each of the TSD units provide a brief description of the system configuration and the permitted waste management activity, a summary of the inspection requirements, and details on the activities B Plant uses to maintain compliance with those requirements.

Beam, T.G.

1996-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

156

Energy efficiency in municipal wastewater treatment plants: Technology assessment  

SciTech Connect

The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) estimates that municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in New York State consume about 1.5 billion kWh of electricity each year for sewage treatment and sludge management based on the predominant types of treatment plants, the results of an energy use survey, and recent trends in the amounts of electricity WWTPs use nationwide. Electric utilities in New York State have encouraged demand-side management (DSM) to help control or lower energy costs and make energy available for new customers without constructing additional facilities. This report describes DSM opportunities for WWTPs in New York State; discusses the costs and benefits of several DSM measures; projects energy impact statewide of the DSM technologies; identifies the barrier to implementing DSM at WWTPs; and outlines one possible incentive that could stimulate widespread adoption of DSM by WWTP operators. The DSM technologies discussed are outfall hydropower, on-site generation, aeration efficiency, time-of-day electricity pricing, and storing wastewater.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Utilization of farm-produced biogas  

SciTech Connect

Utilization of biogas for production of heat and electricity is discussed on basis of tests of various types of components. The necessary conversions and readjustments of boilers and four types of engines (motor-generators) are reported. The amount of available energy and suitable generator size is related to herd size and mode of operation. 13 refs.

Persson, S.P.E.; Bartlett, H.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

ABO Wind Biogas Sachsen Anhalt GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ABO Wind Biogas Sachsen Anhalt GmbH Co KG ABO Wind Biogas Sachsen Anhalt GmbH Co KG Jump to: navigation, search Name ABO Wind Biogas Sachsen-Anhalt GmbH & Co. KG Place Wiesbaden, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany Zip 65193 Product Company set up to build and operate three biogas plants in Saxony-Anhalt Germany. Coordinates 50.084592°, 8.242302° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":50.084592,"lon":8.242302,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

159

Ideal detonation characteristics of biogas-hydrogen and -hydrogen peroxide mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports the ideal detonation characteristics of various mixtures of biogas-hydrogen and biogas-hydrogen peroxide with air. The results obtained by the chemical equilibrium calculations reveal the fundamental improvement of the biogas detonation ... Keywords: bio-energy, biogas detonation, biogas utilization, equilibrium thermochemistry, hydrogen, hydrogen peroxide

Khalid M. Saqr; Hassan I. Kassem; Mohsin M. Sies; Mazlan A. Wahid

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

BioGas Project Applications for Federal Agencies and Utilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternate Energy Systems, Inc. Alternate Energy Systems, Inc. Natural Gas / Air Blenders for BioGas Installations BioGas Project Applications for Federal Agencies and Utilities Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting - October 20-21, 2010 Rapid City, SD 1 BioGas Project Applications for Federal Agencies and Utilities Wolfgang H. Driftmeier Alternate Energy Systems, Inc. 210 Prospect Park - Peachtree City, GA 30269 wdriftmeier@altenergy.com www.altenergy.com 770 - 487 - 8596 Alternate Energy Systems, Inc. Natural Gas / Air Blenders for BioGas Installations BioGas Project Applications for Federal Agencies and Utilities Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting - October 20-21, 2010 Rapid City, SD 2 BioGas Project Applications for Federal Agencies and Utilities Objective

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Gender Mainstreaming Guide for the Africa Biogas Partnership Program | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gender Mainstreaming Guide for the Africa Biogas Partnership Program Gender Mainstreaming Guide for the Africa Biogas Partnership Program Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Gender Mainstreaming Guide for the Africa Biogas Partnership Program Agency/Company /Organization: ENERGIA: International Network on Gender and Sustainability Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.energia.org/fileadmin/files/media/pubs/Guide%20on%20gender%20mains Gender Mainstreaming Guide for the Africa Biogas Partnership Program Screenshot References: Gender Mainstreaming Guide for the Africa Biogas Partnership Program[1] Overview "The Africa Biogas Partnership Programme (ABPP) is a six country initiative

162

Energy Extraction from Horse Manure Biogas plant vs. Heating Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Wngen is a trotting school located in Alsen region in Mid Sweden. Currently they keep almost 105 horses in their premises, which produce 2 (more)

Moazedian, Amitis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Co-digestion of sewage sludge with glycerol to boost biogas production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of adding crude glycerol from the biodiesel industry to the anaerobic digesters treating sewage sludge in wastewater treatment plants was studied in both batch and continuous experiments at 35 {sup o}C. Glycerol addition can boost biogas yields, if it does not exceed a limiting 1% (v/v) concentration in the feed. Any further increase of glycerol causes a high imbalance in the anaerobic digestion process. The reactor treating the sewage sludge produced 1106 {+-} 36 ml CH{sub 4}/d before the addition of glycerol and 2353 {+-} 94 ml CH{sub 4}/d after the addition of glycerol (1% v/v in the feed). The extra glycerol-COD added to the feed did not have a negative effect on reactor performance, but seemed to increase the active biomass (volatile solids) concentration in the system. Batch kinetic experiments showed that the maximum specific utilization rate ({mu}{sub max}) and the saturation constant (K{sub S}) of glycerol were 0.149 {+-} 0.015 h{sup -1} and 0.276 {+-} 0.095 g/l, respectively. Comparing the estimated values with the kinetics constants for propionate reported in the literature, it can be concluded that glycerol uptake is not the rate-limiting step during the process.

Fountoulakis, M.S., E-mail: mfountoul@steg.teiher.g [School of Agricultural Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Petousi, I.; Manios, T. [School of Agricultural Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Biogas Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells Dennis Papadias and Shabbir Ahmed Argonne National Laboratory Presented at the Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Golden, CO June 11-13, 2012 Biogas is the product of anaerobic decomposition of organic waste Municipal solid wastes (MSW)  For every 1 million tons of MSW: - 432,000 cubic feet per day of landfill gas (LFG) for a period of 20 years - 1 MW of electricity 1 Sewage sludge/waste water (WWTP or ADG)  A typical WWTP processes 100 gallons per day (GD) for every person served - 1 cubic foot of digester gas can be produced per 100 gallons of wastewater  100 kW of electricity 1 can be generated from 4.5 MGD of waste water Agricultural waste (i.e. dairy waste)  About 70-100 ft 3 /day of digester gas is produced

165

Biomass/Biogas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass/Biogas Biomass/Biogas < Biomass Jump to: navigation, search Agricultural residues are defined as the residues from production of the following crops. * Corn * Wheat * Soybeans * Cotton * Sorghum * Barley * Oats * Rice * Rye * Canola * Beans * Peas * Peanuts * Potatoes * Safflower * Sunflower * Sugarcane * Flaxseed Forest residues are defined as logging residues and other removals. These include material already utilized as well as material that is disposed as waste. Logging residues are the unused portions of trees cut by logging (tops and branches) and left to be burned or decay in the woods. Other removals include trees removed as a part of thinning projects, land clearings, and forest health uses that are not directly associated with round wood product harvests. Primary mill residues include wood materials

166

Biogas digesters in the Peoples Republic of China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is a report on the use of biogas in China. The authors traveled in China from May 8 to June 12, 1982 during which time they visited several institutes doing research on biogas and many communes where biogas was produced and used. About 7,000,000 digesters are in actual use in China almost all of which are the small household type used for cooking and lighting.

Liljedahl, J.B.; Butler, J.; Caldwell, J.S.; Tyner, W.E.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Biogas Potential in the United States (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Biogas has received increased attention as an alternative energy source in the United States. The factsheet provides information about the biogas (methane) potential from various sources in the country (by county and state) and estimates the power generation and transportation fuels production (renewable natural gas) potential from these biogas sources. It provides valuable information to the industry, academia and policy makers in support of their future decisions.

Not Available

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Biogas engines for agricultural motor-generators  

SciTech Connect

Tests were run on biogas, natural gas and liquid fuel with four engines of 1.1 and 2.8 L displacement at 1800 rpm, intended for motor-generators. One engine was diesel engine modified to high compression spark-ignition. Optimum timing, fuel consumption and knocking were determined at various load levels between full load and idling. Considerable differences in efficiency were found. Recommendations are given on choice, equipment and operation. 13 refs.

Persson, S.P.E.; Bartlett, H.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Evaluation of biological treatment for the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a wastewater treatment plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon can be an effective treatment method applied to control oil pollution in both fresh water and marine environments. Hydrocarbon degraders, both indigenous and exogenous, are responsible for utilizing petroleum hydrocarbon as their substrate for growth and energy, thereby degrading them. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons is often enhanced by bioaugmentation and biostimulation depending on the contaminated environment and the competence of the hydrocarbon degraders present. An evaluation of the performance of the biological treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon by the hydrocarbon degrading microbes at the Brayton Fire School??s 4 million gallon per day (MGD) wastewater treatment plant was the main research objective. Samples were taken for two seasons, winter (Nov 03 ?? Jan 03) and summer (Jun 04 ?? Aug 04), from each of the four treatment units: the inlet tank, equalization tank, aeration tank and the outfall tank. The population of aliphatic hydrocarbon degraders were enumerated and nutrient availability in the system were used to evaluate the effectiveness of on-going bioaugmentation and biostimulation. Monitoring of general effluent parameters was conducted to evaluate the treatment plant??s removal efficiency and to determine if effluent discharge was in compliance with the TCEQ permit. The aeration tank is an activated sludge system with no recycling. Hydrocarbon degraders are supplied at a constant rate with additional nutrient supplement. There was a significant decrease in the population of microbes that was originally fed to the system and the quantity resident in the aeration tank. Nutrient levels in the aeration tank were insufficient for the concentration of hydrocarbon degraders, even after the application of dog food as a biostimulant. The use of dog food is not recommended as a nutrient supplement. Adding dog food increases the nitrogen and phosphorus concentration in the aeration tank but the amount of carbon being added with the dog food increases the total chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). An increase in the concentration of total COD and BOD further increases the nitrogen and phosphorus requirement in the system. The main objective of supplying adequate nutrients to the hydrocarbon degraders would never be achieved as there would be an additional demand of nutrients to degrade the added carbon source. This research study was conducted to identify the drawbacks in the treatment plant which needs further investigation to improve efficiency.

Basu, Pradipta Ranjan

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Biogas yield and quality improvement and purification with natural minerals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Research goal and objective. To investigate the possibilities of the use of mineral raw materials of local origin for the purification of biogas produced from (more)

?iutelyt?, R?ta

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

A technoeconomic assessment of solar-assisted biogas systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biogas has been recognized as one of the best available renewable and decentralized sources of energy and organic fertilizer for a country like India. There is enough evidence to prove that temperature has a profound influence on the rate of biogas production. In temperate climates, where the winters are mild, solar energy systems can be effectively used to increase the temperature of the biogas digester to the desired level. This paper examines various techniques, such as a solar greenhouse on the biogas digester, a shallow solar pond water heater, insulation, and a heat exchanger, and their technoeconomic viability.

Bansal, N.K. (Centre of Energy Studies Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi Hauz Khas, New Delhi-110016 (IN))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Biogas production through the syntrophic acetate-oxidising pathway.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biogas produced from wastes, residues and energy crops has promising potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to secure future energy supply. Methane is the (more)

Westerholm, Maria

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

The private biogas sector in Tanzania: The companies are coming.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abstract Biogas is a form of renewable energy that can be used on a small scale. This is ideal for rural areas that are far (more)

Dijkstra, A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

BIOGAS PRODUCTION SYSTEM DESIGN FOR CONDOMINIUM AND ITS FEASIBILITY.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The research is concerned with designing of Biogas Production System for Condominium and studying its Feasibility by crosschecking field survey and information from literatures. The (more)

Bekele, Gaddisa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Potential for biogas production fromslaughter houses residues in Bolivia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Residues from slaughter houses offer an abundant resource in Bolivia. The residues can beused for biogas production with biofertilizer as a bi-product. These resources (more)

Tesfaye Tefera, Tadious

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Pretreaments of Chinese Agricultural residues to increase biogas production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Development of biological conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biogas is one approach to utilize straw comprehensively. However, high lignin contents of lignocellulosic materials results (more)

Wang, Yu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Biogas and Biomass to Energy Grant Program (Illinois) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

modified on December 6, 2012. Financial Incentive Program Place Illinois Name Biogas and Biomass to Energy Grant Program Incentive Type State Grant Program Applicable Sector...

178

Evaluation of magnetic biomass carriers for biogas production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis evaluates a novel technique to increase the active biomass inside continuously stirred tank biogas reactors with possible benefits of shorter retention times, (more)

Moestedt Hellman, Jan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Livestock waste treatment systems of the future: A challenge to environmental quality, food safety, and sustainability. OECD Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

through aerobic processes or closed anaerobic digestion, but good management is critical. Biogas of ammonia in biogas plant digested manure that combines the anammox process with new material sciences environmental benefits and production of a clean, renewable fuel - the biogas - for multiple utilizations

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

180

Biogas upgrade through exhaust gas reforming process for use in CI engines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biogas is not ideal for combustion in diesel engines mainly due to its low energy content. The upgrading of biogas into high quality syngas through (more)

Lau, Chia Sheng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Achieving Low Emissions from a Biogas Fuelled SI Engine Using a Catalytic Converter.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A spark ignition engine was retrofitted to operate on biogas fuel. Biogas was synthetically generated through the mixing of various pure gases. The air-fuel ratio (more)

Tadrous, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

An integrated system to remote monitor and control anaerobic wastewater treatment plants through the internet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and manages the problem. Keywords Anaerobic digestion, automation, control, fault detection and isolationAn integrated system to remote monitor and control anaerobic wastewater treatment plants through of the anaerobic wastewater treatment plants that do not benefit from a local expert in wastewater treatment

Bernard, Olivier

183

Hanford ETR - Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - Estimate at Completion (Cost) Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Comprehensive Review of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Estimate at Completion Assessment Conducted by an Independent Team of External Experts March 2006 Comprehensive Review of the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Estimate at Completion Page i of vi Executive Summary Following an August 2005 corporate commitment to the Secretary of Energy, Bechtel National, Inc. chartered a team of industry experts to review the technical, cost, and schedule aspects of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) project. This summary reflects the observations and recommendations of the EAC Review Team (ERT), comprised of six senior industry consultants, six retired Bechtel employees, one current Bechtel employee, three employees of Bechtel's competitors, and

184

Mason and Enterprise Development under the Biogas Program in Vietnam: An Impact Study of the Effects of the Biogas Program.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The research proposed to analyze the impact of a renewable energy project entitled The Biogas Project Program for the department of Animal Husbandry and livestock (more)

Schaart, I.G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Treatability of emerging contaminants in wastewater treatment plants during wet weather flows.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Municipal wastewater treatment plants have traditionally been designed to treat conventional pollutants found in sanitary wastewaters. However, many synthetic pollutants, such as pharmaceuticals and personal (more)

Goodson, Kenya L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from reject water of municipal wastewater treatment plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Reject water, the liquid fraction produced after dewatering of anaerobically digested activated sludge on a municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWWTP), contains from 750 to 1500 (more)

Guo, Chenghong.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Remote handling equipment at the hanford waste treatment plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cold war plutonium production led to extensive amounts of radioactive waste stored in tanks at the Department of Energy's Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. The storage tanks could potentially leak into the ground water and into the Columbia River. The solution for this risk of the leaking waste is vitrification. Vitrification is a process of mixing molten glass with radioactive waste to form a stable condition for storage. The Department of Energy has contracted Bechtel National, Inc. to build facilities at the Hanford site to process the waste. The waste will be separated into high and low level waste. Four major systems will process the waste, two pretreatment and two high level. Due to the high radiation levels, high integrity custom cranes have been designed to remotely maintain the hot cells. Several critical design parameters were implemented into the remote machinery design, including radiation limitations, remote operations, Important to Safety features, overall equipment effectiveness, minimum wall approaches, seismic constraints, and recovery requirements. Several key pieces of equipment were designed to meet these design requirements - high integrity crane bridges, trolleys, main hoists, mast hoists, slewing hoists, a monorail hoist, and telescoping mast deployed tele-robotic manipulator arms. There were unique and challenging design features and equipment needed to provide the remotely operated high integrity crane/manipulator systems for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. The cranes consist of a double girder bridge with various main hoist capacities ranging from one to thirty ton and are used for performing routine maintenance. A telescoping mast mounted tele-robotic manipulator arm with a one-ton hook is deployed from the trolley to perform miscellaneous operations in-cell. A dual two-ton slewing jib hoist is mounted to the bottom of the trolley and rotates 360 degrees around the mast allowing the closest hook wall approaches. Each of the two hoists on this slewer is mounted 180 degrees opposite each other. Another system utilizes a single one-ton slewing jib hoist that can extend and retract as well as rotate 270 degrees around the mast. Yet, another system utilizes an under-hung monorail trolley with one-ton hoist capacity mounted to the bottom of the bridge girder. The main, slewer and monorail hoists each have power-rotating hooks for installing and removing equipment in the hot cell. (authors)

Bardal, M.A. [PaR Systems, Inc., Shoreview, MN, (United States); Roach, J.D. [Bechtel National, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Crop residue conversion to biogas by dry fermentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple 'dry fermentation' process has been developed that may enable economical conversion of drier crop residues to biogas. Results from two years of process definition and scale-up to a 110 m/sup 3/ prototype show that biogas production rates exceeding those necessary to make the dry fermentor competitive have been achieved. 13 refs.

Jewell, W.J.; Dell'Orto, S.; Fanfoni, K.J.; Fast, S.J.; Jackson, D.A.; Kabrick, R.M.; Gottung, E.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Co-generation of electricity and heat from biogas  

SciTech Connect

Biogas powered co-generation of electricity and hot water is being documented in a full scale demonstration with a 25 kW capacity system. The performance characteristics and effects of operating on biogas for 1400 hours are presented in this paper.

Koelsch, R.K.; Cummings, R.J.; Harrison, C.E.; Jewell, W.J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Stranded Biogas Decision Tool for Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stranded Biogas Decision Tool for Fuel Cell Co-Production Stranded Biogas Decision Tool for Fuel Cell Co-Production Project Summary Full Title: Stranded Biogas Decision Tool for Fuel Cell Co-Production Project ID: 257 Principal Investigator: Michael Ulsh Brief Description: This project will explore the feasibility and utility of using stranded biogas resources in fuel cell co-production networks as well as lay the basis for development of analysis and decision-making tools for potential biogas sources and energy end-users to evaluate the economic feasibility of deploying these systems. Performer Principal Investigator: Michael Ulsh Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Address: 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 Telephone: 303-275-3842 Email: michael.ulsh@nrel.gov Website: http://www.nrel.gov

191

Operation and Maintenance Manual for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This Operation and Maintenance Manual lists operator and management responsibilities, permit standards, general operating procedures, maintenance requirements and monitoring methods for the Sewage Treatment Plant at the Central Facilities Area at the Idaho National Laboratory. The manual is required by the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03) the sewage treatment plant.

Norm Stanley

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Forecast of total nitrogen in wastewater treatment plants by means techniques of soft computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prediction in Wastewater Treatment Plants is an important purpose for decision-making. The complexity of the biological processes happening and, on the other hand, the uncertainty and incompleteness of the real data lead us to treat this problem modelling ... Keywords: environmental modelling, fuzzy systems, genetic algoritms, neural networks, soft computing, total nitrogen, wastewater treatment plant

Narcis Clara

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Technoeconomic Analysis of Biomethane Production from Biogas and Pipeline Delivery (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes "A Technoeconomic Analysis of Biomethane Production from Biogas and Pipeline Delivery".

Jalalzadeh-Azar, A.

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

194

Geology of the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, DOE-ORP initiated the Seismic Boreholes Project (SBP) to emplace boreholes at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site in order to obtain direct Vs measurements and other physical property measurements in Columbia River basalt and interbedded sediments of the Ellensburg Formation. The goal was to reduce the uncertainty in the response spectra and seismic design basis, and potentially recover design margin for the WTP. The characterization effort within the deep boreholes included 1) downhole measurements of the velocity properties of the suprabasalt, basalt, and sedimentary interbed sequences, 2) downhole measurements of the density of the subsurface basalt and sediments, and 3) confirmation of the geometry of the contact between the various basalt and interbedded sediments through examination of retrieved core from the corehole and data collected through geophysical logging of each borehole. This report describes the results of the geologic studies from three mud-rotary boreholes and one cored borehole at the WTP. All four boreholes penetrated the entire Saddle Mountains Basalt and the upper part of the Wanapum Basalt where thick sedimentary interbeds occur between the lava flows. The basalt flows penetrated in Saddle Mountains Basalt included the Umatilla Member, Esquatzel Member, Pomona Member and the Elephant Mountain Member. The underlying Priest Rapids Member of the Wanapum Basalt was also penetrated. The Ellensburg Formation sediments consist of the Mabton Interbed, the Cold Creek Interbed, the Selah Interbed and the Rattlesnake Ridge Interbed; the Byron Interbed occurs between two flows of the Priest Rapids Member. The Mabton Interbed marks the contact between the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains Basalts. The thicknesses of the basalts and interbedded sediments were within expected limits. However, a small reverse fault was found in the Pomona Member flow top. This fault has three periods of movement and less than 15 feet of repeated section. Most of the movement on the fault appears to have occurred before the youngest lava flow, the 10.5 million year old Elephant Mountain Member was emplaced above the Pomona Member.

Barnett, D. BRENT; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fecht, Karl R.; Lanigan, David C.; Reidel, Steve; Rust, Colleen F.

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

195

Benefits of supplementing an industrial waste anaerobic digester with energy crops for increased biogas production  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study demonstrates the feasibility of co-digestion food industrial waste with energy crops. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laboratory batch co-digestion led to improved methane yield and carbon to nitrogen ratio as compared to mono-digestion of industrial waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-digestion was also seen as a means of degrading energy crops with nutrients addition as crops are poor in nutrients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was concluded that co-digestion led an over all economically viable process and ensured a constant supply of feedstock. - Abstract: Currently, there is increasing competition for waste as feedstock for the growing number of biogas plants. This has led to fluctuation in feedstock supply and biogas plants being operated below maximum capacity. The feasibility of supplementing a protein/lipid-rich industrial waste (pig manure, slaughterhouse waste, food processing and poultry waste) mesophilic anaerobic digester with carbohydrate-rich energy crops (hemp, maize and triticale) was therefore studied in laboratory scale batch and continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) with a view to scale-up to a commercial biogas process. Co-digesting industrial waste and crops led to significant improvement in methane yield per ton of feedstock and carbon-to-nitrogen ratio as compared to digestion of the industrial waste alone. Biogas production from crops in combination with industrial waste also avoids the need for micronutrients normally required in crop digestion. The batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. This was done based on the ratio of methane yields observed for laboratory batch and CSTR experiments compared to full scale CSTR digestion of industrial waste. The economy of crop-based biogas production is limited under Swedish conditions; therefore, adding crops to existing industrial waste digestion could be a viable alternative to ensure a constant/reliable supply of feedstock to the anaerobic digester.

Nges, Ivo Achu, E-mail: Nges.Ivo_Achu@biotek.lu.se [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Escobar, Federico; Fu Xinmei; Bjoernsson, Lovisa [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007). A byproduct of anaerobic digestion is biogas whichthe byproduct of the anaerobic digestion of solids removedgas produced from anaerobic digestion at no cost. CalPower,

Thompson, Lisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Saving Energy at 24/7 Wastewater Treatment Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy at 24/7 Wastewater Treatment Plant Energy at 24/7 Wastewater Treatment Plant Saving Energy at 24/7 Wastewater Treatment Plant July 29, 2010 - 4:11pm Addthis How does it work? Longview, Texas received $781,900 in Recovery Act funding. Co-generation power plant to save 16,571 kWh annually. Local utility to provide the city $150 rebate for every kW of peak demand reduced. In the city of Longview, Texas, the wastewater treatment facility uses more electricity than any other public building. Making investments to permanently cut energy costs at the plant is important for this East Texas city of approximately 77,000. "Our city has felt the effects of the recession. Several companies have laid 100-200 folks off and many are still waiting to be hired back," said Shawn Raney, a safety specialist with the Longview city government. "The

198

Geology of the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy initiated the Seismic Boreholes Project (SBP) to emplace boreholes at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site in order to obtain direct shear wave velocity (Vs) measurements and other physical property measurements in Columbia River basalt and interbedded sediments of the Ellensburg Formation. The goal was to reduce the uncertainty in the response spectra and seismic design basis, and potentially recover design margin for the WTP. The characterization effort within the deep boreholes included 1) downhole measurements of the velocity properties of the suprabasalt, basalt, and sedimentary interbed sequences, 2) downhole measurements of the density of the subsurface basalt and sediments, and 3) geologic studies to confirm the geometry of the contact between the various basalt and interbedded sediments through examination of retrieved core from the core hole and data collected through geophysical logging of each borehole. This report describes the results of the geologic studies from three mud-rotary boreholes and one cored borehole at the WTP. All four boreholes penetrated the entire Saddle Mountains Basalt and the upper part of the Wanapum Basalt where thick sedimentary interbeds occur between the lava flows. The basalt flows penetrated in Saddle Mountains Basalt included the Umatilla Member, Esquatzel Member, Pomona Member, and the Elephant Mountain Member. The underlying Priest Rapids Member of the Wanapum Basalt also was penetrated. The Ellensburg Formation sediments consist of the Mabton Interbed, the Cold Creek Interbed, the Selah Interbed, and the Rattlesnake Ridge Interbed; the Byron Interbed occurs between two flows of the Priest Rapids Member. The Mabton Interbed marks the contact between the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains Basalts. The thicknesses of the basalts and interbedded sediments were within expected limits. However, a small reverse fault was found in the Pomona Member flow top. This fault has three periods of movement and less than 15 ft of repeated section. Most of the movement on the fault appears to have occurred before the youngest lava flow, the 10.5-million-year-old Elephant Mountain Member, was emplaced above the Pomona Member.

Barnett, D. Brent; Fecht, Karl R.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Rust, Colleen F.

2007-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

199

BioGas Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BioGas Energy Inc BioGas Energy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name BioGas Energy Inc Address 4509 Interlake Ave N # 222 Place Seattle, Washington Zip 98103 Sector Biomass Product Makes anaerobic digesters that convert manure into methane for fuel Website http://www.biogas-energy.com/s Coordinates 47.6163159°, -122.3463563° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.6163159,"lon":-122.3463563,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

200

EA-1907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas 907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas EA-1907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE and USDA to provide funding to Western Plains Energy, LLC (WPE) to construct, purchase equipment, and operate a new Biogas Anaerobic Digester at WPE's existing Ethanol Facility, located at 3022 County Road 18, Grinnell Township (Oakley), Gove County, Kansas. The proposed facility will include a receiving building, digester, and related infrastructure. Based on the analysis in USDA's Final EA and FONSI, DOE has determined that DOE's proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human or natural environment.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Profile and perceptions of biogas as automobile fuel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? From an environmental- and health perspective, biogas and other biomass-based fuels have several advantages; nevertheless the majority of motorists fill their cars with petroleum-based (more)

Larsson, Anneli

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Profile and Perceptions of Biogas as Automobile Fuel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? From an environmental- and health perspective, biogas and other biomass-based fuels have several advantages; nevertheless the majority of motorists fill their cars with petroleum-based (more)

Larsson, Anneli

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Biogas and Biomass to Energy Grant Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biogas and Biomass to Energy Grant Program Biogas and Biomass to Energy Grant Program Biogas and Biomass to Energy Grant Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Energy Sources Maximum Rebate Feasibility Studies: $2,500 Biogas to Energy Systems: $225,000 Biomass to Energy Systems: $500,000 Program Info Start Date 12/16/1997 State Illinois Program Type State Grant Program Rebate Amount Up to 50% of project cost Provider University of Illinois at Chicago '''The most recent application period closed April 30, 2012. Check the program web site for updates on future solicitations. ''' The Renewable Energy Resources Program (RERP) promotes the development of

204

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

compounds VSL Vitreous State Laboratory of the Catholic University of America WESP Wet Electrostatic Precipitator WGI Washington Group International WTP Waste Treatment and...

205

Independent Activity Report, Office of River Protection Waste Treatment Plant and Tank Farms- February 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Site Familiarization and Introduction of New Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead for the Office of River Protection Waste Treatment Plant and Tank Farms [HIAR-HANFORD-2013-02-25

206

Multi-criteria analysis of wastewater treatment plant design and control scenarios under uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment plant control and monitoring can help to achieve good effluent quality, in a complex, highly non-linear process. The Benchmark Simulation Model no. 2 (BSM2) is a useful tool to competitively evaluate plant-wide control on a long-term ... Keywords: Activated sludge model, Anaerobic digestion, Anoxic volume, BSM2, Cascade controller, Monte Carlo simulation, Multi-criteria assessment

L. Benedetti; B. De Baets; I. Nopens; P. A. Vanrolleghem

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Pilot project of biogas production from pig manure and urine mixture at ambient temperature in Ventanilla (Lima, Peru)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parque Porcino de Ventanilla has an extension of 840 ha with 2200 farmers dedicated to pig production. There is a lack of services in the area (i.e., water supply, electricity, or waste collection). Anaerobic treatment of pig manure would replace current dumping and incineration, reducing environmental pollution and hazards to public health, as well as providing an organic fertilizer and biogas. The objective of the present work was to study the viability of ambient temperature anaerobic digestion of pig manure diluted in urine, by means of on-site pilot scale reactors. The final goal was to establish design parameters for anaerobic digesters to be implemented; since it was part of a project to improve life conditions for the farmers through the incorporation of better management techniques. Experiments were carried out in a low-cost pilot plant, which consists of three anaerobic digesters (225 L total volume), without heating or agitation, placed in a greenhouse. The start-up of the digestion process was performed with a mixture of temperature adapted pig manure-sludge and fresh rumen, and showed a good performance regardless of the dilution of pig manure with water or urine, which is a key parameter due to the scarcity of water in the area under study.

Ferrer, I. [Environmental Engineering Division, Department of Hydraulic Maritime and Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), C/Jordi Girona 1-3, Modul D1, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); GIRO Technological Center, Rambla Pompeu Fabra 1, 08100 Mollet del Valles, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: ivet.ferrer@upc.edu; Gamiz, M. [Environmental Engineering Division, Department of Hydraulic Maritime and Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), C/Jordi Girona 1-3, Modul D1, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Almeida, M.; Ruiz, A. [Ciudad Saludable NLO, Av. Jorge Basadre 255, Of. 401, Lima 27 (Peru)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

WASTE TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY PROCESS DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT LOW ACTIVITY WASTE RECYCLE  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Process Development Plan is to summarize the objectives and plans for the technology development activities for an alternative path for disposition of the recycle stream that will be generated in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility (LAW Recycle). This plan covers the first phase of the development activities. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to recycle it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be concentrated by evaporation and returned to the LAW vitrification facility. Because this stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are also problematic for the glass waste form, they accumulate in the Recycle stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and reducing the halides in the Recycle is a key component of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, this stream does not have a proven disposition path, and resolving this gap becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and to develop a process that will remove radionuclides from this stream and allow its diversion to another disposition path, greatly decreasing the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. The origin of this LAW Recycle stream will be from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover or precipitates of scrubbed components (e.g. carbonates). The soluble components are mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet, and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, causing uncertainty in its composition, particularly the radionuclide content. This plan will provide an estimate of the likely composition and the basis for it, assess likely treatment technologies, identify potential disposition paths, establish target treatment limits, and recommend the testing needed to show feasibility. Two primary disposition options are proposed for investigation, one is concentration for storage in the tank farms, and the other is treatment prior to disposition in the Effluent Treatment Facility. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in high concentration in this LAW Recycle stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc), a long-lived radionuclide with a half-life of 210,000 years. Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass, which will be disposed in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Because {sup 99}Tc has a very long half-life and is highly mobile, it is the largest dose contributor to the Performance Assessment (PA) of the IDF. Other radionuclides that are also expected to be in appreciable concentration in the LAW Recycle are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am. The concentrations of these radionuclides in this stream will be much lower than in the LAW, but they will still be higher than limits for some of the other disposition pathways currently available. Although the baseline process will recycle this stream to the Pretreatment Facility, if the LAW facility begins operation first, this stream will not have a disposition path internal to WTP. One potential solution is to return the stream to the tank farms where it can be evaporated in the 242- A evaporator, or perhaps deploy an auxiliary evaporator to concentrate it prior to return to the tank farms. In either case, testing is needed to evalua

McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

209

YEAR","UTILITY_ID","UTILITY_NAME","PLANT_ID","PLANT_NAME","SCHEDULE...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

to 3 decimal places)" 2001,10393,"PUD No 1 of Klickitat County",7832,"Roosevelt Biogas 1",9,"Line 1","GAS TURBINE","Kind of Plant" 2001,10393,"PUD No 1 of Klickitat...

210

Pretreatment of Pulp Mill Wastewater Treatment Residues to Improve Their Anaerobic Digestion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Anaerobic digestion of excess biological wastewater treatment sludge (WAS) from pulp mills has the potential to reduce disposal costs and to generate energy through biogas (more)

Wood, Nicholas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality, November 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality May 2011 November 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope .................................................................................................................................................... 1

212

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality, November 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality May 2011 November 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope .................................................................................................................................................... 1

213

Review: Data-derived soft-sensors for biological wastewater treatment plants: An overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper surveys and discusses the application of data-derived soft-sensing techniques in biological wastewater treatment plants. Emphasis is given to an extensive overview of the current status and to the specific challenges and potential that allow ... Keywords: Data-driven models, Soft-sensors, Wastewater treatment, Water quality monitoring

Henri Haimi, Michela Mulas, Francesco Corona, Riku Vahala

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality, August 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality May 2011 August 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope .................................................................................................................................................... 1

215

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality, August 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality May 2011 August 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope .................................................................................................................................................... 1

216

Biomass, Leaf Area, and Resource Availability of Kudzu Dominated Plant Communities Following Herbicide Treatment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Kudzu is an exotic vine that threatens the forests of the southern U.S. Five herbicides were tested with regard to their efficacy in controlling kudzu, community recover was monitored, and interactions with planted pines were studied. The sites selected were old farm sites dominated by kudzu.These were burned following herbicide treatment. The herbicides included triclopyr, clopyralid, metsulfuron, tebuthiuron, and picloram plus 2,4-D. Pine seedlings were planted the following year. Regression equations were developed for predicting biomass and leaf area. Four distinct plant communities resulted from the treatments. The untreated check continued to be kudzu dominated. Blackberry dominated the clopyradid treatment. Metsulfron, trychlopyr and picloram treated sites resulted in herbaceous dominated communities. The tebuthiuron treatment maintained all vegetation low.

L.T. Rader

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Biogas end-use in the European community  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Europe over the past few years the generation of biogas for energy and environmental purposes has been gaining in importance. Industrial wastewaters, cattle manure, sewage sludges, urban wastes, crop residues, algae and aquatic biomass are all typical of the materials being utilized. In contrast to the extensive inventory of biomethanation processes which has been carried out within the EEC, until recently a detailed, up-to-date investigation of the end-sues of biogas had not been undertaken. To supply the necessary information, the Commission of the European Communities and the Belgian Science Policy Office jointly entrusted a study to the Unit of Bioengineering at the Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium. This book is record of the study and has the following key features: it gives a broad overview of the ongoing use of biogas in Europe; it summarizes available data on storage, purification and engines using biogas; it draws several conclusions concerning the technical and economic viability of the processes; it discusses the problems of using biogas; and it outlines recommendations and future R and D and demonstration projects in the field.

Constant, M.; Naveau, H.; Nyns, E.J. (Unite de Genie Biologique, Universite Catholique de Louvain (BE)); Ferrero, G.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Interim Guidance - Amine Treatments in Fossil Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of neutralizing amines has been the subject of an evaluation focused on the improvement of the pH conditions in the low-pressure (LP) evaporators and economizers of heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), the phase transition zone (PTZ) of the LP steam turbine, the condensing steam in air-cooled condensers (ACCs), and the pH conditions at two-phase flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) locations such as in feedwater heater drains. This report examines actual field use of amine treatments and the therm...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

219

The Effects of Different Anaerobic Fermentation Temperature on Biogas Fermentation of Swine Manure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biogas yields and methane productivity were studied at different temperatures (15, 20, 25, 30 and 35) by the way of anaerobic fermentation experiment which takes wine manure as biogas fermentation raw material, and ... Keywords: Temperature, Biogas, Swine manure, Anaerobic fermentation

Zhu Zongqiang; Cheng Guanwen; Zhu Yinian; Zeng Honghu; Wei Rongrong; Wei Caichun

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Ilchmann, Achim; Pahl, M. : Adaptive Multivariable pH Regulation of a Biogas Tower Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ilchmann, Achim; Pahl, M. : Adaptive Multivariable pH Regulation of a Biogas Tower Reactor Zuerst. The adaptive controller was successlullytesteclover il pcriod of tu'o nonths at a biogas tower reuetoriu pilot are not applicable to the biogas tower reüctor.since a dontinatingf-eatureof the new reactol' prir-rciplc-is its

Knobloch,Jürgen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 206 Risk assessment of biogas exposure in kitchens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 206 Risk assessment of biogas exposure in kitchens C to pollutants while using biogas for cooking was assessed following the methodology described by the US - National Research Council. Information of hazardous compounds and compositions of several biogas types were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

222

Two Different Approaches to Funding Farm-Based Biogas Projects in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two Different Approaches to Funding Farm-Based Biogas Projects in Wisconsin and California Kevin in developing biogas projects from livestock manure, but have targeted this renewable energy application the energy, economic, and environmental benefits of biogas systems and act as a catalyst for the development

223

Treatment Technology Summary For Critical Pollutants of Concern in Power Plant Wastewaters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the most promising technologies available for the removal of aluminum, arsenic, boron, copper, mercury and selenium from power plant FGD wastewaters. Remediation of the high chloride levels in FGD waters is also discussed. The information for this technology summary stems from literature searches, technology supplier and vendor interviews and the authors' experience in power plant and other wastewater treatment systems. The report lists existing and potential technologies that meet...

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

The Department of Energy's $12.2 Billion Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Quality Assurance Issues  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Department of Energy's $12.2 Billion The Department of Energy's $12.2 Billion Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Quality Assurance Issues - Black Cell Vessels DOE/IG-0863 April 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 April 25, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Department of Energy's $12.2 Billion Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Quality Assurance Issues - Black Cell Vessels" INTRODUCTION The Office of Inspector General received allegations concerning aspects of the quality assurance program at the Department of Energy's $12.2 billion Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

225

Membrane filtration waste treatment technology comes of age in battery manufacturing plants  

SciTech Connect

A new waste treatment system from MEMTEK Corporation incorporates membrane filtration, and makes possible the effective treatment of waste streams containing a number of toxic heavy metals. Using this membrane technology, MEMTEK is capable of treating the wastewater in battery manufacturing plants to meet even the strictest limits imposed by local regulatory agencies and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Lead and zinc in the treated effluent are typically below 0.1 ppm. The typical battery manufacturing processes introduce metals, primarily lead, into plant effluents, especially from formation, battery wash, and laundry operation. Due to the high usage of acid in the plant, the wastewater is also usually of a low pH, typically 2 or less. The dissolved and particulate contaminants in this effluent must be removed to very low levels before the water can be released to the sewer or the environment. The waste treatment process is described.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

DNFSB Recommendation 2010-2, Pulse Jet Mixing at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant WTP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DNFSB Rec. 2010-2, Rev.0, Nov.10, 2011 DNFSB Rec. 2010-2, Rev.0, Nov.10, 2011 i Department of Energy Plan to Address Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Vessel Mixing Issues Revision 0 Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Safety Board Recommendation 2010-2 November 10, 2011 DNFSB Rec. 2010-2, Rev.0, Nov.10, 2011 ii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY On December 17, 2010, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 2010-2, Pulse Jet Mixing at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. The recommendation addressed the need for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure that the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), in conjunction with the Hanford tank farm waste feed delivery system, will operate safely and effectively during a

227

Municipal wastewater treatment with special reference to the central wastewater treatment plant in Poznan, Poland.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wastewater treatment is becoming a more critical topic due to diminishing water resources, increasing cost of disposing wastewater and also stricter measures and legislations set (more)

Orukpe, Otaigbe Stephen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

ENERGY STAR Score for Wastewater Treatment Plants | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wastewater Treatment Plants Wastewater Treatment Plants Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

229

Estimation dynamical model of an anaerobic digestion of shrimp culture pond sediment in a biogas process using genetic algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biogas is one type of renewable energy which is important to the energy and environmental planning of Thailand. The study and analysis of the dynamical model of the biogas process can be explained the variables that affect biogas process and optimization. ... Keywords: anaerobic digestion, artificial intelligence, biogas process, mass balance equation, system identification

Jiraphon Srisertpol; Prasit Srinakorn; Adtavirod Kheawnak; Kontorn Chamniprasart; Arthit Srikaew

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Preliminary analysis of treatment strategies for transuranic wastes from reprocessing plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a comparison of six treatment options for transuranic wastes (TRUW) resulting from the reprocessing of commercial spent fuel. Projected transuranic waste streams from the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP), the reference fuel reprocessing plant in this report, were grouped into the five categories of hulls and hardware, failed equipment, filters, fluorinator solids, and general process trash (GPT) and sample and analytical cell (SAC) wastes. Six potential treatment options were selected for the five categories of waste. These options represent six basic treatment objectives: (1) no treatment, (2) minimum treatment (compaction), (3) minimum number of processes and products (cementing or grouting), (4) maximum volume reduction without decontamination (melting, incinerating, hot pressing), (5) maximum volume reduction with decontamination (decontamination, treatment of residues), and (6) noncombustible waste forms (melting, incinerating, cementing). Schemes for treatment of each waste type were selected and developed for each treatment option and each type of waste. From these schemes, transuranic waste volumes were found to vary from 1 m/sup 3//MTU for no treatment to as low as 0.02 m/sup 3//MTU. Based on conceptual design requirements, life-cycle costs were estimated for treatment plus on-site storage, transportation, and disposal of both high-level and transuranic wastes (and incremental low-level wastes) from 70,000 MTU. The study concludes that extensive treatment is warranted from both cost and waste form characteristics considerations, and that the characteristics of most of the processing systems used are acceptable. The study recommends that additional combinations of treatment methods or strategies be evaluated and that in the interim, melting, incineration, and cementing be further developed for commercial TRUW. 45 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

Ross, W.A.; Schneider, K.J.; Swanson, J.L.; Yasutake, K.M.; Allen, R.P.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality, May 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality May 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology ....................................................................................................................................... 2

232

Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality, December 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality December 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope .................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1

233

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality, October 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality May 2011 October 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology ........................................................................................................................................

234

Reducing the Anaerobic Digestion Model N1 for its application to an industrial wastewater treatment plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Anaerobic Digestion Model N°1 for its application to an industrial wastewater treatment plant treating 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 2 Abstract The Anaerobic Digestion Model N°1 (ADM1., 2005). Anaerobic digestion process involves many interactions between species that may not all have

235

Borehole Summary Report for Core Hole C4998 Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic borehole C4998 was cored through the upper portion of the Columbia River Basalt Group and Ellensburg Formation to provide detailed lithologic information and intact rock samples that represent the geology at the Waste Treatment Plant. This report describes the drilling of borehole C4998 and documents the geologic data collected during the drilling of the cored portion of the borehole.

Barnett, D. BRENT; Garcia, Benjamin J.

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality, October 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality May 2011 October 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology ........................................................................................................................................

237

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality, March 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality May 2011 March 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope .................................................................................................................................................... 1

238

Biogas-Fueled Distributed Generation: Three Manure Digester Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biogas produced from the anaerobic digestion of livestock waste can provide electrical and thermal energy while solving environmental challenges, including waste management and greenhouse gas reduction. The three manure digester gas projects described in this report demonstrate the potential of such systems to provide co-generated power and heat.

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

239

The Design of the ADALINE Sensor of the Biogas Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper used the ADALINE (adaptive linear neuron) structure rotate-speed recognizing method and applies the adaptive linear neuron to the non-velocity sensor combined with actual application conditions. The simulation results are get from MATLAB simulating ... Keywords: Biogas generator, ADALINE, Non-velocity sensor

Zuo-Xun Wang; Ying-Chun Zhang; Gui-Juan Wang

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Injection with seawater: problems in the operation of a seawater treatment plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reservoir pressure elevation by means of water injection in the production formation is a technique that improves production efficiency. In offshore activities, seawater is available for injection, but it has a high level of solids in suspension and also ions and dissolved gases that may cause problems in the water injection system. Therefore, a seawater treatment plant is necessary for preparation of the injection water. The treatment system has the following components for physical treatment: colander, which prevents the intake of large objects to the system; filters, which include flocculation for coagulation means for the removal of microscopic particles that can pass through the colander; deaerator; and system controls.

Garbis, S.J.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Report: EM Tank Waste Subcommittee Full Report for Waste Treatment Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 1000 INDEPENDENCE AVENUE SW WASHINGTON DC 20585 September 30, 2010 Dr. Inés R. Triay Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management 1000 Independence Avenue SW Washington, DC 20585 Dear Dr. Triay: As discussed during our September 15th public meeting, enclosed please find the Environmental Management Advisory Board EM Tank Waste Subcommittee Report for Waste Treatment Plant; Report Number EMAB EM-TWS WTP-001, September 30, 2010, in accordance with the Work Plan directive dated May 10, 2010. This report covers the work plan observations and recommendations concerning the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant at Hanford (WTP). The charge is summarized below. Charge 1: Verification of closure of Waste Treatment and Immobilization

242

Biogas Generation from a 2-Phase Sludge Treatment System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The degradation of sewage sludge in single stage and 2 phase anaerobic systems was investigated in bench-scale batch reactors. Average COD reduction efficiency in 2 phase system in this initial phase of the study was 4.5% (30 days HRT) and 3.3% (20 days ... Keywords: dge digestion, 2-phase, single stage, qPCR, microbial communities

Taranveer Singh Mann, Terence Goh, William Phay

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is dependent on the confidence that DOE has in the long term mission for T Plant, is proposed: (1) If the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is high, then the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) would continue to implement the path forward previously described in the Alternatives Report (HNF-39744). Risks to the sludge project can be minimized through the establishment of an Interface Control Document (ICD) defining agreed upon responsibilities for both the STP and T Plant Operations regarding the transfer and storage of sludge and ensuring that the T Plant upgrade and operational schedule is well integrated with the sludge storage activities. (2) If the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is uncertain, then the ASF conceptual design should be pursued on a parallel path with preparation of T Plant for sludge storage until those uncertainties are resolved. (3) Finally, if the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is low, then the ASF design should be selected to provide independence from the T Plant mission risk.

RUTHERFORD WW; GEUTHER WJ; STRANKMAN MR; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER DD; BLACK DM; POTTMEYER JA

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

244

Project C-018H, 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Process Condensate Treatment Facility, functional design criteria. Revision 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the Functional Design Criteria (FDC) for Project C-018H, the 242-A Evaporator and Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant Condensate Treatment Facility (Also referred to as the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility [ETF]). The project will provide the facilities to treat and dispose of the 242-A Evaporator process condensate (PC), the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant process condensate (PDD), and the PUREX Plant ammonia scrubber distillate (ASD).

Sullivan, N.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

245

Feasibility study for alternate fuels production: unconventional natural gas from wastewater treatment plants. Volume II, Appendix D. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data are presented from a study performed to determined the feasibility of recovering methane from sewage at a typical biological secondary wastewater treatment plant. Three tasks are involved: optimization of digester gas; digester gas scrubbing; and application to the East Bay Municipal Utility District water pollution control plant. Results indicate that excess digester gas can be used economically at the wastewater treatment plant and that distribution and scrubbing can be complex and costly. (DMC) 193 references, 93 figures, 26 tables.

Overly, P.; Tawiah, K.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report: Proceedings from the Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop, Golden, Colorado, June 11-13, 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report Proceedings from the Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Golden, Colorado June 11-13, 2012 Workshop Proceedings NREL/BK-5600-56523 January 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report Proceedings from the Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Golden, Colorado June 11-13, 2012 Prepared under Task No. H279.1710 Workshop Proceedings NREL/BK-5600-56523

247

Wetland biomass - suitable for biogas production?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Wetlands have long been used as natural waste water treatment systems to remove excess nutrients from agriculture or other waste waters. Common reed (Phragmites (more)

Akula, Viswa Raj

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Transition Plan for the K-1203 Sewage Treatment Plant, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The K-1203 Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) was previously used to treat and process all sanitary sewage waste from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The plant was shut down on May 29, 2008 as a result of the transition of sewage treatment for ETTP to the City of Oak Ridge. The City of Oak Ridge expanded the Rarity Ridge Sewage Treatment Plant (RRSTP) to include capacity to treat the waste from the ETTP and the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET) constructed a new ETTP lift station and force main to RRSTP. In preparation for the shutdown of K-1203, the US Department of Energy (DOE) in conjunction with Operation Management International (OMI) developed a shut down plan to outline actions that need to occur prior to the transition of the facility to Bechtel Jacob Company, LLC (BJC) for decontamination and demolition (D and D). This plan outlines the actions, roles, and responsibilities for BJC in order to support the transition of the K-1203 STP from OMI to the BJC Surveillance and Maintenance (S and M) and D and D programs. The D and D of the K-1203 Facilities is planned under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Remaining Facilities D and D Action Memorandum in the Balance of Site-Utilities D and D Subproject in fiscal year (FY) 2014.

Hoffmeister J.

2008-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

249

Thermal sludge dryer demonstration: Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant, Buffalo, NY. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Buffalo Sewer Authority (BSA), in cooperation with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (Energy Authority), commissioned a demonstration of a full scale indirect disk-type sludge dryer at the Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant (BIWWTP). The purpose of the project was to determine the effects of the sludge dryer on the sludge incineration process at the facility. Sludge incineration is traditionally the most expensive, energy-intensive unit process involving solids handling at wastewater treatment plants; costs for incineration at the BIWWTP have averaged $2.4 million per year. In the conventional method of processing solids, a series of volume reduction measures, which usually includes thickening, digestion, and mechanical dewatering, is employed prior to incineration. Usually, a high level of moisture is still present within sewage sludge following mechanical dewatering. The sludge dryer system thermally dewaters wastewater sludge to approximately 26%, (and as high as 38%) dry solids content prior to incineration. The thermal dewatering system at the BIWWTP has demonstrated that it meets its design requirements. It has the potential to provide significant energy and other cost savings by allowing the BSA to change from an operation employing two incinerators to a single incinerator mode. While the long-term reliability of the thermal dewatering system has yet to be established, this project has demonstrated that installation of such a system in an existing treatment plant can provide the owner with significant operating cost savings.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) at Fossil-Fueled Electric Generating Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Department of Energy-National Energy Technologies Laboratory (DOE-NETL) are evaluating and demonstrating integration of terrestrial carbon sequestration techniques at a coal-fired electric power plant through the use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system gypsum as a soil amendment and mulch, and coal fly ash pond process water for periodic irrigation. From January to March 2002, the Project Team initiated the construction of a 40 ha Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) near TVA's Paradise Fossil Plant on marginally reclaimed surface coal mine lands in Kentucky. The CCWESTRS is growing commercial grade trees and cover crops and is expected to sequester 1.5-2.0 MT/ha carbon per year over a 20-year period. The concept could be used to meet a portion of the timber industry's needs while simultaneously sequestering carbon in lands which would otherwise remain non-productive. The CCWESTRS includes a constructed wetland to enhance the ability to sequester carbon and to remove any nutrients and metals present in the coal fly ash process water runoff. The CCWESTRS project is a cooperative effort between TVA, EPRI, and DOE-NETL, with a total budget of $1,574,000. The proposed demonstration project began in October 2000 and has continued through December 2005. Additional funding is being sought in order to extend the project. The primary goal of the project is to determine if integrating power plant processes with carbon sequestration techniques will enhance carbon sequestration cost-effectively. This goal is consistent with DOE objectives to provide economically competitive and environmentally safe options to offset projected growth in U.S. baseline emissions of greenhouse gases after 2010, achieve the long-term goal of $10/ton of avoided net costs for carbon sequestration, and provide half of the required reductions in global greenhouse gases by 2025. Other potential benefits of the demonstration include developing a passive technology for water treatment for trace metal and nutrient release reductions, using power plant by-products to improve coal mine land reclamation and carbon sequestration, developing wildlife habitat and green-space around production facilities, generating Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) credits for the use of process water, and producing wood products for use by the lumber and pulp and paper industry. Project activities conducted during the five year project period include: Assessing tree cultivation and other techniques used to sequester carbon; Project site assessment; Greenhouse studies to determine optimum plant species and by-product application; Designing, constructing, operating, monitoring, and evaluating the CCWESTRS system; and Reporting (ongoing). The ability of the system to sequester carbon will be the primary measure of effectiveness, measured by accessing survival and growth response of plants within the CCWESTRS. In addition, costs associated with design, construction, and monitoring will be evaluated and compared to projected benefits of other carbon sequestration technologies. The test plan involves the application of three levels each of two types of power plant by-products--three levels of FGD gypsum mulch, and three levels of ash pond irrigation water. This design produces nine treatment levels which are being tested with two species of hardwood trees (sweet gum and sycamore). The project is examining the effectiveness of applications of 0, 8-cm, and 15-cm thick gypsum mulch layers and 0, 13 cm, and 25 cm of coal fly ash water for irrigation. Each treatment combination is being replicated three times, resulting in a total of 54 treatment plots (3 FGD gypsum levels X 3 irrigation water levels x 2 tree species x 3 replicates). Survival and growth response of plant species in terms of sequestering carbon in plant material and soil will be the primary measure of effectiveness of each treatment. Additionally, the ability of the site soils and unsaturated zone subsurface m

P. Alan Mays; Bert R. Bock; Gregory A. Brodie; L. Suzanne Fisher; J. Devereux Joslin; Donald L. Kachelman; Jimmy J. Maddox; N. S. Nicholas; Larry E. Shelton; Nick Taylor; Mark H. Wolfe; Dennis H. Yankee; John Goodrich-Mahoney

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

Expanding the Use of Biogas with Fuel Cell Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

eere.energy.gov eere.energy.gov Biogas with Fuel Cells Workshop National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado Sunita Satyapal U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Program Manager 6/11/2012 Expanding the Use of Biogas with Fuel Cell Technologies U.S. Energy Consumption U.S. Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector Renewable Electric Power Energy 8% Coal 21% Nuclear Energy 9% Industrial Residential & Commercial Petroleum 37% Natural Gas 25% Transportation Total U.S. Energy = 98 Quadrillion Btu/yr Source: Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Review 2010, Table 1.3 Fuel Cells can apply to diverse sectors Share of Energy Consumed by Major Sectors of the Economy, 2010 Electric Power 29% Residential 16% Commercial 13%

252

Farm scale biogas-fueled engine/induction generator system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 3.6 liter spark ignition engine coupled to an induction generator produced 21 kW of electric power at 1260 rpm operating on biogas (55% methane, 45% carbon dioxide). Power output increased by 3.55 kW for a 10 rpm increase in shaft speed. Operating at over 16 kW output, power factor was greater than .8 and generator efficiency was greater than 85%. Engine operation is insensitive to small changes in spark advance. Recommended spark advance for a biogas engine is about 45/sup 0/. Minimum brake specific fuel consumption of 270 g CH/sub 4//kWh occurs at a manifold vacuum of 5 cmHg and an equivalence ratio in the range of .6 to .8.

Stahl, T.; Fischer, J.R.; Harris, F.D.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Costo del capitale e valutazione del rischio in investimenti in energie rinnovabili: il caso del biogas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??La tesi dopo aver discusso i modelli pi importanti per la stima del costo del capitale, propone l'analisi industriale degli impianti a biogas. La terza (more)

Simonetto, Stefano

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Hygiene aspects of the biogas process with emphasis on spore-forming bacteria.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biogas is a renewable source of energy which can be obtained from processing of biowaste. The digested residues can be used as fertiliser. Biowaste intended (more)

Bagge, Elisabeth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

"just like fingernail and flesh": Community forestry, biogas, and environmental governmentality in Nepal.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Community forestry and household biogas digesters that reduce firewood dependence for cooking are two complimentary and relatively successful programs in Nepal. Both have their roots (more)

Barnhart, Shaunna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY OF UPGRADING DAIRY MANURE-DERIVED BIOGAS FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis was to evaluate the current technical and economical feasibility of processing dairy manure-derived biogas to natural gas quality for injection (more)

Saikkonen, Kelly

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Modeling and Experimental Analysis of Biogas in Diesel and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Generators.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biogas is a green fuel generally produced by agricultural or household waste, whose range of applications has become wider and wider in recent years. The (more)

Quesito, Francesco

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Biogas yield performance with co-digestion of pig manure and slaughterhouse wastes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Utilization of renewable energy is an important component of the current sustainable global energy strategy. Currently, biogas is considered one of the most economic (more)

Mamun, Abdulla

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Biogas in the United Kingdom & Sweden - A Technological Innovation System Based Analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The production of biogas via anaerobic digestion is an effective technology for converting organic waste into renewable fuel. Using the Technological Innovation System (TIS) (more)

Gordon, Niall

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Overview of An Analysis Project for Renewable Biogas / Fuel Cell Technologies (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on renewable biogas: as an opportunity for commercialization of fuel cells presented as part of a panel discussion at the 2009 Fuel Cell Seminar, Palm Springs, CA.

Jalalzadeh-Azar, A.

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Bio-Gas Technologies, LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bio-Gas Technologies, LLC Bio-Gas Technologies, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Bio-Gas Technologies, LLC Address 2025 George St. Place Sandusky, Ohio Zip 44870 Sector Biomass, Renewable Energy, Wind energy Product Agriculture;Business and legal services;Consulting; Energy provider: power production;Energy provider: wholesale;Engineering/architectural/design;Installation;Investment/finances;Maintenance and repair;Manufacturing Phone number 419-663-8000 Website http://www.biogastech.com Coordinates 41.4369°, -82.747133° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4369,"lon":-82.747133,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

262

Investigation of the use of biogas in a gas hob$$hand the feasibility of upgrading it on a household scale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Incldes abstract. The production and use of biogas on a household scale is becoming more common. The biogas is mainly used for lighting and cooking. (more)

Trautmann, Christina.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Process and installation for simultaneously producing compost and biogas from organic waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is described for the simultaneous treatment of solid or semi-solid organic waste and liquid organic waste with a view to the simultaneous production of compost and biogas, wherein the liquid organic waste is subjected to a liquid-solid separation. The liquid phase from this separation is subjected to anaerobic fermentation in at least one closed digester, the solid phase from the liquid-solid separation is mixed with the solid or semi-solid organic waste, and the resulting mixture is subjected to aerobic fermentation at the periphery of the digester and in contact therewith. Mud, clarified liquid and gas are respectively discharged from the digester whereas compost from the aerobic fermentation of the solid or semi-solid waste is recovered at the periphery of the digester wherein the digester is characterized by two superimposed compartments, an upper compartment at low pressure and a lower compartment at high pressure, the compartments communicating together through at least one lateral pipe and through a central siphon. A means is provided for lowering the pressure of the lower compartment when the liquid reaches a predetermined level therein. An installation is described for the simultaneous treatment of solid or semi-solid organic waste and liquid waste with a view to the simultaneous production of compost and biogas. This comprises: means for separating the liquid organic waste into a solid phase and a liquid phase; at least one closed digester; means for introducing the liquid phase into the digester; means for mixing the solid phase with the solid or semi-solid waste; means for bringing the resulting mixture to the periphery of the digester in contact therewith; and means for discharging respectively from the digester the gas which is formed therein by anaerobic fermentation and the sludges which are deposited therein.

Lebesgue, Y.; Zeana, A.

1986-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

264

Emissions of volatile and potentially toxic organic compounds from waste-water treatment plants and collection systems (Phase 2). Volume 3. Waste-water treatment-plant emissions. Experimental phase. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume 3 describes the measurements and experimental data obtained to assess emissions from various points within a POTW. Included are a discussion of sampling methods development, emissions studies of activated carbon bed odor control units located at various points of a large municipal wastewater treatment plant and its collection system, upwind/downwind sampling from an activated sludge aeration basins at a large municipal wastewater treatment plant, and preliminary studies of haloform formation as a result of chlorination of wastewater.

Chang, D.P.Y.; Guensler, R.; Kim, J.O.; Chou, T.L.; Uyeminami, D.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Volatile organic compound emissions from usaf wastewater treatment plants in ozone nonattainment areas. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), this research conducts an evaluation of the potential emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from selected Air Force wastewater treatment plants. Using a conservative mass balance analysis and process specific simulation models, volatile organic emission estimates are calculated for four individual facilities--Edwards AFB, Luke AFB, McGuire AFB, and McClellan AFB--which represent a cross section of the current inventory of USAF wastewater plants in ozone nonattainment areas. From these calculations, maximum facility emissions are determined which represent the upper limit for the potential VOC emissions from these wastewater plants. Based on the calculated emission estimates, each selected wastewater facility is evaluated as a potential major stationary source of volatile organic emissions under both Title I of the 1990 CAAA and the plant's governing Clean Air Act state implementation plan. Next, the potential impact of the specific volatile organics being emitted is discussed in terms of their relative reactivity and individual contribution to tropospheric ozone formation. Finally, a relative comparison is made between the estimated VOC emissions for the selected wastewater facilities and the total VOC emissions for their respective host installations.

Ouellette, B.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Onondaga County Department of Water Environment Protection: Process Optimization Saves Energy at Metropolitan Syracuse Wastewater Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This DOE Industrial Technologies Program spotlight describes how Onondaga County, New York, is saving nearly 3 million kWh and 270 million Btu annually at a wastewater treatment plant after replacing inefficient motors and upgrading pumps.

Not Available

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Borehole Summary Report for Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Borehole C4996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the field-generated borehole log, lithologic summary, and the record of samples collected during the recent drilling and sampling of the basalt interval of borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) on the Hanford Site. Borehole C4996 was one of four exploratory borings, one core hole and three boreholes, drilled to investigate and acquire detailed stratigraphic and down-hole seismic data. This data will be used to define potential seismic impacts and refine design specifications for the Hanford Site WTP.

Adams , S. C.; Ahlquist, Stephen T.; Fetters, Jeffree R.; Garcia, Ben; Rust, Colleen F.

2007-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

268

Energy Requirement Analysis of Large-Scale Biogas Project in High-Cold Region of China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual mean temperature is very low in high cold region of china. The insulating and heating measures on the basis of the energy requirement analysis of biogas project are needed to ensure the normal running of fermentation process. In this paper, ... Keywords: High-cold, Biogas, Fermentation, Heat

Yinsheng Yang; Lili Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Modeling of biogas generation in bioreactor landfills using neuro-fuzzy system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biogas generation in anaerobic bioreactor landfills is modeled using the neuro-fuzzy system. The implemented inference system was an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). The fuzzy logic controller featured a Multi-Input-Single-Output (MISO) ... Keywords: biogas generation, bioreactor landfills, neuro-fuzzy model

Mohamed S. Abdallah; Leta Fernandes; Mostafa A. Warith

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Effluent Quality Prediction of Wastewater Treatment Plant Based on Fuzzy-Rough Sets and Artificial Neural Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effluent ammonia-nitrogen (NH3-N), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total nitrogen (TN) removals are the most common environmental and process performance indicator for all types of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In this paper, a soft computing ... Keywords: neural network, fuzzy rough sets, input variable selection, wastewater treatment, prediction, soft computing

Fei Luo; Ren-hui Yu; Yu-ge Xu; Yan Li

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

On-farm biogas systems information dissemination project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to study how farmers manage anaerobic digesters on three New York State dairy farms. Two years of data collected were from both plug-flow and tower-type mixed-flow digesters at regular intervals over a three-year period revealed that the financial return from the energy produced by a biogass system in the late 1980`s is marginal. Little difficulty was experienced in operation of the anaerobic digester; however, several farms utilizing congeneration to convert biogas into electricity and heat suffered from not applying maintenance to the congenerator in a timely fashion.

Campbell, J.K.; Koelsch, R.K.; Guest, R.W.; Fabian, E.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Waste Treatment Plant Support Program: Summaries of Reports Produced During Fiscal Years 1999-2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) being built on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site will be the largest chemical processing plant in the United States. Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) is the designer and constructor for the WTP. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has provided significant research and testing support to the WTP. This report provides a summary of reports developed initially under PNNLs 1831 use agreement and later PNNLs 1830 prime contract with DOE in support of the WTP. In March 2001, PNNL under its 1831 use agreement entered into a contract with BNI to support their research and testing activities. However, PNNL support to the WTP predates BNI involvement. Prior to March 2001, PNNL supported British Nuclear Fuels Ltd. in its role as overall designer and constructor. In February 2007, execution of PNNLs support to the WTP was moved under its 1830 prime contract with DOE. Documents numbered PNWD-XXXX were issued under PNNLs 1831 use agreement. Documents numbered PNNL-XXXX were issued under PNNLs 1830 prime contract with DOE. The documents are sorted by fiscal year and categorized as follows: ? Characterization ? HLW (High Level Waste) ? Material Characterization ? Pretreatment ? Simulant Development ? Vitrification ? Waste Form Qualification. This report is intended to provide a compendium of reports issued by PNWD/PNNL in support of the Waste Treatment Plant. Copies of all reports can be obtained by clicking on http://www.pnl.gov/rpp-wtp/ and downloading the .pdf file(s) to your computer.

Beeman, Gordon H.

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

273

Storing carbon dioxide in saline formations : analyzing extracted water treatment and use for power plant cooling.  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to address the potential to scale up of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture and sequestration in the United States saline formations, an assessment model is being developed using a national database and modeling tool. This tool builds upon the existing NatCarb database as well as supplemental geological information to address scale up potential for carbon dioxide storage within these formations. The focus of the assessment model is to specifically address the question, 'Where are opportunities to couple CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use for existing and expanding power plants, and what are the economic impacts of these systems relative to traditional power systems?' Initial findings indicate that approximately less than 20% of all the existing complete saline formation well data points meet the working criteria for combined CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water treatment systems. The initial results of the analysis indicate that less than 20% of all the existing complete saline formation well data may meet the working depth, salinity and formation intersecting criteria. These results were taken from examining updated NatCarb data. This finding, while just an initial result, suggests that the combined use of saline formations for CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use may be limited by the selection criteria chosen. A second preliminary finding of the analysis suggests that some of the necessary data required for this analysis is not present in all of the NatCarb records. This type of analysis represents the beginning of the larger, in depth study for all existing coal and natural gas power plants and saline formations in the U.S. for the purpose of potential CO{sub 2} storage and water reuse for supplemental cooling. Additionally, this allows for potential policy insight when understanding the difficult nature of combined potential institutional (regulatory) and physical (engineered geological sequestration and extracted water system) constraints across the United States. Finally, a representative scenario for a 1,800 MW subcritical coal fired power plant (amongst other types including supercritical coal, integrated gasification combined cycle, natural gas turbine and natural gas combined cycle) can look to existing and new carbon capture, transportation, compression and sequestration technologies along with a suite of extracting and treating technologies for water to assess the system's overall physical and economic viability. Thus, this particular plant, with 90% capture, will reduce the net emissions of CO{sub 2} (original less the amount of energy and hence CO{sub 2} emissions required to power the carbon capture water treatment systems) less than 90%, and its water demands will increase by approximately 50%. These systems may increase the plant's LCOE by approximately 50% or more. This representative example suggests that scaling up these CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration technologies to many plants throughout the country could increase the water demands substantially at the regional, and possibly national level. These scenarios for all power plants and saline formations throughout U.S. can incorporate new information as it becomes available for potential new plant build out planning.

Dwyer, Brian P.; Heath, Jason E.; Borns, David James; Dewers, Thomas A.; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse D.; McNemar, Andrea; Krumhansl, James Lee; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Postgraduate Programme Renewable Energy (PPRE) --Biogas Workshop --01. -04. Feb. 2010 --Oldenburg University --venue: TGO, Marie-Curie-Strae 1, 26129 Oldenburg Programme Part 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Postgraduate Programme Renewable Energy (PPRE) -- Biogas Workshop -- 01. - 04. Feb. 2010 -- Oldenburg University -- venue: TGO, Marie-Curie-Stra?e 1, 26129 Oldenburg Programme Part 1: Domestic Biogas Biogas ­ Introduction: Relevance of biogas for Development (JL) 09:45 Coffee Break 10:00 From Waste

Damm, Werner

275

The Impact of Advanced Wastewater Treatment Technologies and Wastewater Strength on the Energy Consumption of Large Wastewater Treatment Plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process often requiring the use of advanced treatment technologies. Stricter effluent standards have resulted in an increase in the (more)

Newell, Timothy Stephen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Pyrochemical treatment of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant high-level waste calcine  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), has reprocessed irradiated nuclear fuels for the US Department of Energy (DOE) since 1951 to recover uranium, krypton-85, and isolated fission products for interim treatment and immobilization. The acidic radioactive high-level liquid waste (HLLW) is routinely stored in stainless steel tanks and then, since 1963, calcined to form a dry granular solid. The resulting high-level waste (HLW) calcine is stored in seismically hardened stainless steel bins that are housed in underground concrete vaults. A research and development program has been established to determine the feasibility of treating ICPP HLW calcine using pyrochemical technology.This technology is described.

Todd, T.A.; DelDebbio, J.A.; Nelson, L.O.; Sharpsten, M.R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Federal involvement in: municipal wastewater treatment plant sludge energy recovery and conservation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are presented of a study concerning federal involvement in municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWWTP) sludge energy recovery and conservation. The objectives of the study were to: determine and report the major agency programs and related MWWTP sludge energy recovery and conservation projects; determine and summarize the coordination efforts between federal agencies involved in MWWTP sludge; and recommend future U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) involvement in MWWTP sludge energy recovery and conservation projects. Specific federal agencies designated for surveying include ERDA, EPA, USDA, Bureau of Mines, National Science Foundation, and National Commission on Water Quality. Past (post-1966), present, and planned federal involvement in MWWTP sludge energy recovery and conservation, research and development, demonstration, and study projects were considered.

None

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Borehole Summary Report for Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Borehole C4993  

SciTech Connect

A core hole (C4998) and three boreholes (C4993, C4996, and C4997) were drilled to acquire stratigraphic and downhole seismic data to model potential seismic impacts and to refine design specifications and seismic criteria for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction on the Hanford Site. Borehole C4993 was completed through the Saddle Mountains Basalt, the upper portion of the Wanapum Basalt, and associated sedimentary interbeds, to provide a continuous record of the rock penetrated by all four holes and to provide access to the subsurface for geophysical measurement. Presented and compiled in this report are field-generated records for the deep mud rotary borehole C4993 at the WTP site. Material for C4993 includes borehole logs, lithologic summary, and record of rock chip samples collected during drilling through the months of August through early October. The borehole summary report also includes documentation of the mud rotary drilling, borehole logging, and sample collection.

Rust, Colleen F.; Barnett, D. BRENT; Bowles, Nathan A.; Horner, Jake A.

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

279

Evaluation of cooling tower and wastewater treatment operations at the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to provide a technical assessment of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant Wastewater Treatment System. This Scope of Work consisted of five primary tasks described as follows: Task 1 - Determine the quantity of hydantoins in the stripped gas liquor (SGL), their precursors, and the kinetics of their formation in condensed liquor for the Great Plains Gasification Associates (GPGA) gasification facility. The University of North Dakota Energy Research Center (UNDERC) has measured a high concentration of hydantoins in the gas liquor from their slagging gasifier. UNDERC has tested the use of SGL in a pilot cooling tower and they witnessed some adverse effects in the cooling tower and heat exchanger systems. Task 2 - Investigate the adverse Department of Energy (DOE) findings at UNDERC with regard to corrosion, foaming, biological and organic fouling, chemical attack on concrete and organic emissions resulting from the use of SGL in a pilot plant cooling tower. Task 3 - Validate the heat load on the cooling tower for both summer and winter operation and determine the adequacy of the surge pond to store the maximum predicted amount of excess water accumulated during winter operation. Task 4 - Assess potential fouling, foaming and organic carry-over problems associated with operability of the multiple-effect evaporator and develop recommendations on possible alternate use of evaporator condensate to alleviate possible problems in disposing of excess wastewater. Task 5 - Provide DOE with recommendations on the wastewater treatment backup design and test program already committed to by GPGA. This paper presents Fluor's findings regarding the five primary tasks. 12 refs., 4 figs., 15 tabs.

Lang, R.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE F0RhqE.R SITE OF THE RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT PLANT (TA-45)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

CERTIFICATION DOCKET CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE F0RhqE.R SITE OF THE RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT PLANT (TA-45) AND THE EFFLUENT RECEIVING AREAS OF ACID, PUEBLO, AND LOS ALAMOS CANYOM, LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action Division of Remedial Action Projects -. CONTENTS A Page - Introduction to the Certification Docket for the Former Site of the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Plant (TA-45) and the Effluent Receiving Areas of Acid, Pueblo, and Los Alamos Canyons, Los Alamos, New Mexico Description of the Formeriy Utilized Sites Program at the Former Site of the T.4-45 Treatment Plant and Acid, Pueblo, and Los Alamos Canyons Purpose Property Identification Docket Contents

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

RECENT IMPROVEMENTS IN INTERFACE MANAGEMENT FOR HANFORDS WASTE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION PLANT - 13263  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for management and completion of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, which comprises both the Hanford Site tank farms operations and the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The RPP mission is to store, retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste; store and dispose of treated wastes; and close the tank farm waste management areas and treatment facilities by 2047. The WTP is currently being designed and constructed by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) for DOE-ORP. BNI relies on a number oftechnical services from other Hanford contractors for WTP's construction and commissioning. These same services will be required of the future WTP operations contractor. The WTP interface management process has recently been improved through changes in organization and technical issue management documented in an Interface Management Plan. Ten of the thirteen active WTP Interface Control Documents (ICDs) have been revised in 2012 using the improved process with the remaining three in progress. The value of the process improvements is reflected by the ability to issue these documents on schedule.

ARM ST; PELL MJ; VAN MEIGHEM JS; DUNCAN GM; HARRINGTON C

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

283

2011 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2010, through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: (1) Site description; (2) Facility and system description; (3) Permit required monitoring data and loading rates; (4) Status of special compliance conditions and activities; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2011 permit year, approximately 1.22 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

Michael G. Lewis

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

2010 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Sites Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2009, through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: Site description Facility and system description Permit required monitoring data and loading rates Status of special compliance conditions Discussion of the facilitys environmental impacts. During the 2010 permit year, approximately 2.2 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

Mike lewis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

2012 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Sites Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2011, through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: Site description Facility and system description Permit required monitoring data and loading rates Status of compliance conditions and activities Discussion of the facilitys environmental impacts. During the 2012 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Wastewater treatment and energy : an analysis on the feasibility of using renewable energy to power wastewater treatment plants in Singapore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is a very energy intensive industry. Singapore has a state-of-the-art wastewater treatment system that uses a number of sustainable techniques that greatly improve its overall efficiency. The centralized ...

Foley, Kevin John

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

O'Brien Biogas IV LLC Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

O'Brien Biogas IV LLC Biomass Facility O'Brien Biogas IV LLC Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name O'Brien Biogas IV LLC Biomass Facility Facility O'Brien Biogas IV LLC Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Middlesex County, New Jersey Coordinates 40.4111363°, -74.3587473° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4111363,"lon":-74.3587473,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

288

Hanford Waste Simulants Created to Support the Research and Development on the River Protection Project - Waste Treatment Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of nonradioactive waste simulants to support the River Protection Project - Waste Treatment Plant bench and pilot-scale testing is crucial to the design of the facility. The report documents the simulants development to support the SRTC programs and the strategies used to produce the simulants.

Eibling, R.E.

2001-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

289

Feasibility of geothermal heat use in the San Bernardino Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant. Final report, September 1980-June 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of the feasibility study for utilizing low temperature geothermal heat in the City of San Bernardino Wastewater Treatment Plant are summarized. The study is presented in terms of preliminary engineering design, economic analysis, institutional issues, environmental impacts, resource development, and system implementation.

Racine, W.C.; Larson, T.C.; Stewart, C.A.; Wessel, H.B.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Closure Plan - Plutonium Finishing Plant Treatment Unit Glovebox HA-20MB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This closure plan describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) glovebox HA-20MB that housed an interim status ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' (RCRA) of 1976 treatment unit. This closure plan is certified and submitted to Ecology for incorporation into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit (HF RCRA Permit) in accordance with Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement; TPA) Milestone M-83-30 requiring submittal of a certified closure plan for ''glovebox HA-20MB'' by July 31, 2003. Glovebox HA-20MB is located within the 231-5Z Building in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility. Currently glovebox HA-20MB is being used for non-RCRA analytical purposes. The schedule of closure activities under this plan supports completion of TPA Milestone M-83-44 to deactivate and prepare for dismantlement the above grade portions of the 234-5Z and ZA, 243-Z, and 291-Z and 291-Z-1 stack buildings by September 30, 2015. Under this closure plan, glovebox HA-20MB will undergo clean closure to the performance standards of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 with respect to all dangerous waste contamination from glovebox HA-20MB RCRA operations. Because the intention is to clean close the PFP treatment unit, postclosure activities are not applicable to this closure plan. To clean close the unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or is environmentally impractical, the closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. Any information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. Clearance form only sent to RHA.

PRIGNANO, A.L.

2003-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

291

A methodology to estimate greenhouse gases emissions in Life Cycle Inventories of wastewater treatment plants  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this paper is to present the Direct Emissions Estimation Model (DEEM), a model for the estimation of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O emissions from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). This model is consistent with non-specific but widely used models such as AS/AD and ASM no. 1 and presents the benefits of simplicity and application over a common WWTP simulation platform, BioWin Registered-Sign , making it suitable for Life Cycle Assessment and Carbon Footprint studies. Its application in a Spanish WWTP indicates direct N{sub 2}O emissions to be 8 times larger than those associated with electricity use and thus relevant for LCA. CO{sub 2} emissions can be of similar importance to electricity-associated ones provided that 20% of them are of non-biogenic origin. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A model has been developed for the estimation of GHG emissions in WWTP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Model was consistent with both ASM no. 1 and AS/AD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N{sub 2}O emissions are 8 times more relevant than the one associated with electricity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emissions are as important as electricity if 20% of it is non-biogenic.

Rodriguez-Garcia, G., E-mail: gonzalo.rodriguez.garcia@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Hospido, A., E-mail: almudena.hospido@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Bagley, D.M., E-mail: bagley@uwyo.edu [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Wyoming, 82072 Laramie, WY (United States); Moreira, M.T., E-mail: maite.moreira@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Feijoo, G., E-mail: gumersindo.feijoo@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Anaerobic treatment of sludge from a nitrification-denitrification landfill leachate plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The viability of anaerobic digestion of sludge from a MSW landfill leachate treatment plant, with COD values ranging between 15,000 and 19,400 mg O{sub 2} dm{sup -3}, in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor was studied. The reactor employed had a useful capacity of 9 l, operating at mesophilic temperature. Start-up of the reactor was carried out in different steps, beginning with diluted sludge and progressively increasing the amount of sludge fed into the reactor. The study was carried out over a period of 7 months. Different amounts of methanol were added to the feed, ranging between 6.75 and 1 cm{sup 3} dm{sup -3} of feed in order to favour the growth of methanogenic flora. The achieved biodegradation of the sludge using an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket Reactor was very high for an HRT of 9 days, obtaining decreases in COD of 84-87% by the end of the process. Purging of the digested sludge represented {approx}16% of the volume of the treated sludge.

Maranon, E. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Higher Polytechnic School of Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus of Viesques, 33204 Gijon (Spain)]. E-mail: emara@uniovi.es; Castrillon, L. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Higher Polytechnic School of Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus of Viesques, 33204 Gijon (Spain); Fernandez, Y. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Higher Polytechnic School of Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus of Viesques, 33204 Gijon (Spain); Fernandez, E. [COGERSA, 33697 Serin, Gijon (Spain)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Cesium Ion Exchange Program at the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will use cesium ion exchange to remove Cs-137 from Low Activity Waste (LAW) down to a maximum activity of 0.3 Ci/m3 in the Immobilized LAW (ILAW) product. The WTP Project baseline for cesium ion exchange is the elutable SuperLig(R) 644 (SL-644) resin (registered trademark of IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Fork, UT) or a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) approved equivalent. SL-644 is solely available through IBC Advanced Technologies. The WTP Project is conducting a three-stage process for selecting and qualifying an alternative ion exchange resin. Resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) is being pursued as a potential alternative to SL-644, to provide a backup resin supply. Resin cost relative to SL-644 is a primary driver. Phase I of the testing plan examined the viability of RF resin and recommended that a spherical form of RF resin be examined further. Phases II and III, now underway, include batch testing to determine the isotherm of this resin, kinetics to address the impacts of bead diameter and high sodium feed levels on processing Hanford waste with the resin, and multicycle column testing to determine how temperature and chemical cycling affects waste processing. Phases II and III also examine resin performance against simulated WTP feeds, radiolytic and thermal stability, and scale-up to pilot scale performance. We will discuss early results obtained from Phase II testing here.

CHARLES, NASH

2005-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

294

A study of biogas digesters as an animal waste management tool on livestock farming systems in Fiji.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ever since 1976, livestock farmers in Fiji have been intrigued about biogas digesters as an animal waste management measure, but the concept has never evolved (more)

Tukana, Andrew

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Updated Site Response Analyses for the Waste Treatment Plant, DOE Hanford, Site, Washington.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the calculations performed to develop updated relative amplification functions for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facility at the DOE Hanford Site, Washington State. The original 2,000-year return period design spectra for the WTP were based on the results of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) performed for the DOE Hanford Site by Geomatrix (1996). Geomatrix (1996) performed the PSHA using empirical soil-site ground motion models based primarily on recordings from California. As part of that study, site response analyses were performed to evaluate ground motions at the Hanford sites and California deep soil sites. As described in Appendix A of Geomatrix (1996), characteristic site profiles and dynamic soil properties representative of conditions at various Hanford sites and California deep soil strong motion recording stations were defined. Relative site responses of the Hanford profiles and California profiles were then compared. Based on the results of those site response analyses, it was concluded that ground motions at the Hanford sites underlain by deep soil deposits are similar in character to those on California deep soil sites and it was judged appropriate to use empirical deep soil site attenuation relationships based primarily on California ground motion data to develop design spectra for the Hanford sites. In a subsequent analysis, Geomatrix (2003) updated the site response analyses of Geomatrix (1996, Appendix A) to incorporate randomization of the California and Hanford profiles. The results of that analysis also led to the conclusion that the response of the Hanford profiles was similar to the response of deep soil sites in California.

Youngs, Robert R.

2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

296

Scaled Testing to Evaluate Pulse Jet Mixer Performance in Waste Treatment Plant Mixing Vessels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford is being designed and built to pre-treat and vitrify the waste in Hanfords 177 underground waste storage tanks. Numerous process vessels will hold waste at various stages in the WTP. These vessels have pulse jet mixer (PJM) systems. A test program was developed to evaluate the adequacy of mixing system designs in the solids-containing vessels in the WTP. The program focused mainly on non-cohesive solids behavior. Specifically, the program addressed the effectiveness of the mixing systems to suspend settled solids off the vessel bottom, and distribute the solids vertically. Experiments were conducted at three scales using various particulate simulants. A range of solids loadings and operational parameters were evaluated, including jet velocity, pulse volume, and duty cycle. In place of actual PJMs, the tests used direct injection from tubes with suction at the top of the tank fluid. This gave better control over the discharge duration and duty cycle and simplified the facility requirements. The mixing system configurations represented in testing varied from 4 to 12 PJMs with various jet nozzle sizes. In this way the results collected could be applied to the broad range of WTP vessels with varying geometrical configurations and planned operating conditions. Data for just-suspended velocity, solids cloud height, and solids concentration vertical profile were collected, analyzed, and correlated. The correlations were successfully benchmarked against previous large-scale test results, then applied to the WTP vessels using reasonable assumptions of anticipated waste properties to evaluate adequacy of the existing mixing system designs.

Fort, James A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

2010-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

297

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES--INTEGRATED LIFE-CYCLE OPTIMIZATION INITIATIVES FOR THE HANFORD RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT--WASTE TREATMENT PLANT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the ongoing integrated life-cycle optimization efforts to achieve both design flexibility and design stability for activities associated with the Waste Treatment Plant at Hanford. Design flexibility is required to support the Department of Energy Office of River Protection Balance of Mission objectives, and design stability to meet the Waste Treatment Plant construction and commissioning requirements in order to produce first glass in 2007. The Waste Treatment Plant is a large complex project that is driven by both technology and contractual requirements. It is also part of a larger overall mission, as a component of the River Protection Project, which is driven by programmatic requirements and regulatory, legal, and fiscal constraints. These issues are further complicated by the fact that both of the major contractors involved have a different contract type with DOE, and neither has a contract with the other. This combination of technical and programmatic drivers, constraints, and requirements will continue to provide challenges and opportunities for improvement and optimization. The Bechtel National, Inc. team is under contract to engineer, procure, construct, commission and test the Waste Treatment Plant on or ahead of schedule, at or under cost, and with a throughput capacity equal to or better than specified. The Department of Energy is tasked with the long term mission of waste retrieval, treatment, and disposal. While each mission is a compliment and inextricably linked to one another, they are also at opposite ends of the spectrum, in terms of expectations of one another. These mission requirements, that are seemingly in opposition to one another, pose the single largest challenge and opportunity for optimization: one of balance. While it is recognized that design maturation and optimization are the normal responsibility of any engineering firm responsible for any given project, the aspects of integrating requirements and the management of issues across contract boundaries is a more difficult matter. This aspect, one of a seamless systems approach to the treatment of tank wastes at the Hanford site, is the focus of the Optimization Studies. This ''big O''Optimization of Life-Cycle operations is what is meant when the term ''optimization'' is used on the River Protection Project and initiatives cited in this paper. From the early contractor centric methods and processes used to move toward an integrated solution, through extensive partnering approaches, to the current quality initiatives with multi-organizational participation, significant progress is being made towards achieving the goal of truly integrated life-cycle optimization for the Department of Energy's River Protection Project and Waste Treatment Plant.

Auclair, K. D.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

298

PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) 241-Z LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY DEACTIVATION AND DEMOLITION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) is proud to submit the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) 241-Z liquid Waste Treatment Facility Deactivation and Demolition (D&D) Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2008. The decommissioning of the 241-Z Facility presented numerous challenges, many of which were unique with in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. The majority of the project budget and schedule was allocated for cleaning out five below-grade tank vaults. These highly contaminated, confined spaces also presented significant industrial safety hazards that presented some of the most hazardous work environments on the Hanford Site. The 241-Z D&D Project encompassed diverse tasks: cleaning out and stabilizing five below-grade tank vaults (also called cells), manually size-reducing and removing over three tons of process piping from the vaults, permanently isolating service utilities, removing a large contaminated chemical supply tank, stabilizing and removing plutonium-contaminated ventilation ducts, demolishing three structures to grade, and installing an environmental barrier on the demolition site . All of this work was performed safely, on schedule, and under budget. During the deactivation phase of the project between November 2005 and February 2007, workers entered the highly contaminated confined-space tank vaults 428 times. Each entry (or 'dive') involved an average of three workers, thus equaling approximately 1,300 individual confined -space entries. Over the course of the entire deactivation and demolition period, there were no recordable injuries and only one minor reportable skin contamination. The 241-Z D&D Project was decommissioned under the provisions of the 'Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order' (the Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), the 'Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976' (RCRA), and the 'Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980' (CERCLA). The project completed TPA Milestone M-083-032 to 'Complete those activities required by the 241-Z Treatment and Storage Unit's RCRA Closure Plan' four years and seven months ahead of this legally enforceable milestone. In addition, the project completed TPA Milestone M-083-042 to 'Complete transition and dismantlement of the 241-2 Waste Treatment Facility' four years and four months ahead of schedule. The project used an innovative approach in developing the project-specific RCRA closure plan to assure clear integration between the 241-Z RCRA closure activities and ongoing and future CERCLA actions at PFP. This approach provided a regulatory mechanism within the RCRA closure plan to place segments of the closure that were not practical to address at this time into future actions under CERCLA. Lessons learned from th is approach can be applied to other closure projects within the DOE Complex to control scope creep and mitigate risk. A paper on this topic, entitled 'Integration of the 241-Z Building D and D Under CERCLA with RCRA Closure at the PFP', was presented at the 2007 Waste Management Conference in Tucson, Arizona. In addition, techniques developed by the 241-Z D&D Project to control airborne contamination, clean the interior of the waste tanks, don and doff protective equipment, size-reduce plutonium-contaminated process piping, and mitigate thermal stress for the workers can be applied to other cleanup activities. The project-management team developed a strategy utilizing early characterization, targeted cleanup, and close coordination with PFP Criticality Engineering to significantly streamline the waste- handling costs associated with the project . The project schedule was structured to support an early transition to a criticality 'incredible' status for the 241-Z Facility. The cleanup work was sequenced and coordinated with project-specific criticality analysis to allow the fissile material waste being generated to be managed in a bulk fashion, instead of individual waste packages. This approach negated the need for real-time assay of individ

JOHNSTON GA

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Followup of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process Systems Hazards Analysis Activity Review, March 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-WTP-2013-03-18 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Follow-up of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity Review Dates of Activity : 03/18/13 - 03/21/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) staff observed a limited portion of the restart of the Hazard Analysis (HA) for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter Process (LMP) System. The primary purpose of this HSS field activity, on March 18-21, 2013, was to observe and understand the revised approach

300

Followup of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process Systems Hazards Analysis Activity Review, March 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-WTP-2013-03-18 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Follow-up of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity Review Dates of Activity : 03/18/13 - 03/21/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) staff observed a limited portion of the restart of the Hazard Analysis (HA) for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter Process (LMP) System. The primary purpose of this HSS field activity, on March 18-21, 2013, was to observe and understand the revised approach

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Biologically induced concrete deterioration in a wastewater treatment plant assessed by combining microstructural analysis with thermodynamic modeling  

SciTech Connect

In the nitrification basins of wastewater treatment plants, deterioration of the concrete surface can occur due to acid attack caused by a nitrifying biofilm covering the concrete. To identify the mechanism of deterioration, concrete cubes of different composition were suspended in an aerated nitrification basin of a wastewater treatment plant for two years and analyzed afterwards. The microstructural investigation reveals that not only dissolution of hydrates takes place, but that calcite precipitation close to the surface occurs leading to the formation of a dense layer. The degree of deterioration of the different cubes correlates with the CaO content of the different cements used. Cements which contain a high fraction of CaO form more calcite offering a better protection against the acid attack. The presence of slag, which lowers the amount CaO in the cement, leads to a faster deterioration of the concrete than observed for samples produced with pure OPC.

Leemann, A., E-mail: andreas.leemann@empa.c [Empa, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Lothenbach, B.; Hoffmann, C. [Empa, Duebendorf (Switzerland)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Fate of As, Se, and Hg in a Passive Integrated System for Treatment of Fossil Plant Wastewater  

SciTech Connect

TVA is collaborating with EPRI and DOE to demonstrate a passive treatment system for removing SCR-derived ammonia and trace elements from a coal-fired power plant wastewater stream. The components of the integrated system consist of trickling filters for ammonia oxidation, reaction cells containing zero-valent iron (ZVI) for trace contaminant removal, a settling basin for storage of iron hydroxide floc, and anaerobic vertical-flow wetlands for biological denitrification. The passive integrated treatment system will treat up to 0.25 million gallons per day (gpd) of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) pond effluent, with a configuration requiring only gravity flow to obviate the need for pumps. The design of the system will enable a comparative evaluation of two parallel treatment trains, with and without the ZVI extraction trench and settling/oxidation basin components. One of the main objectives is to gain a better understanding of the chemical transformations that species of trace elements such as arsenic, selenium, and mercury undergo as they are treated in passive treatment system components with differing environmental conditions. This progress report details the design criteria for the passive integrated system for treating fossil power plant wastewater as well as performance results from the first several months of operation. Engineering work on the project has been completed, and construction took place during the summer of 2005. Monitoring of the passive treatment system was initiated in October 2005 and continued until May 18 2006. The results to date indicate that the treatment system is effective in reducing levels of nitrogen compounds and trace metals. Concentrations of both ammonia and trace metals were lower than expected in the influent FGD water, and additions to increase these concentrations will be done in the future to further test the removal efficiency of the treatment system. In May 2006, the wetland cells were drained of FGD water, refilled with less toxic ash pond water, and replanted due to low survival rates from the first planting the previous summer. The goals of the TVA-EPRI-DOE collaboration include building a better understanding of the chemical transformations that trace elements such as arsenic, selenium, and mercury undergo as they are treated in a passive treatment system, and to evaluate the performance of a large-scale replicated passive treatment system to provide additional design criteria and economic factors.

Terry Yost; Paul Pier; Gregory Brodie

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

An Expert System to Estimate the Capacity of Harvesting Energy from Biogas and its Capacity in TRNC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In TRNC, the electricity is been obtained from fuel oil, which is most expensive production in the world. The aim of this research is to produce electricity from biogas to reduce the cost of electricity in TRNC. Our researches proved that the potential ... Keywords: Expert system, Biogas, Capacity determination

Hasan H. Onder

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Population dynamics of iron-oxidizing communities in pilot plants for the treatment of acid mine waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The iron-oxidizing microbial community in two pilot plants for the treatment of acid mine water was monitored to investigate the influence of different process parameters such as pH, iron concentration, and retention time on the stability of the system to evaluate the applicability of this treatment technology on an industrial scale. The dynamics of the microbial populations were followed using T-RFLP (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism) over a period of several months. For a more precise quantification, two TaqMan assays specific for the two prominent groups were developed and the relative abundance of these taxa in the iron-oxidizing community was verified by real-time PCR. The investigations revealed that the iron-oxidizing community was clearly dominated by two groups of Betaproteobacteria affiliated with the poorly known and not yet recognized species 'Ferrovum myxofaciens' and with strains related to Gallionella ferruginea, respectively. These taxa dominated the microbial community during the whole investigation period and accelerated the oxidation of ferrous iron despite the changing characteristics of mine waters flowing into the plants. Thus, it is assumed that the treatment technology can also be applied to other mine sites and that these organisms play a crucial role in such treatment systems. 32 refs., 4 figs. 1 tab.

Elke Heinzel; Eberhard Janneck; Franz Glombitza; Michael Schlmann; Jana Seifert [TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Freiberg (Germany). Interdisciplinary Ecological Center

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Comparative analysis of environmental impacts of maize-biogas and photovoltaics on a land use basis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study aims to stimulate the discussion on how to optimize a sustainable energy mix from an environmental perspective and how to apply existing renewable energy sources in the most efficient way. Ground-mounted photovoltaics (PV) and the maize-biogas-electricity route are compared with regard to their potential to mitigate environmental pressure, assuming that a given agricultural area is available for energy production. Existing life cycle assessment (LCA) studies are taken as a basis to analyse environmental impacts of those technologies in relation to conventional technology for power and heat generation. The life-cycle-wide mitigation potential per area used is calculated for the impact categories non-renewable energy input, green house gas (GHG) emissions, acidification and eutrophication. The environmental performance of each system depends on the scenario that is assumed for end energy use (electricity and heat supply have been contemplated). In all scenarios under consideration, PV turns out to be superior to biogas in almost all studied impact categories. Even when maize is used for electricity production in connection with very efficient heat usage, and reduced PV performance is assumed to account for intermittence, PV can still mitigate about four times the amount of green house gas emissions and non-renewable energy input compared to maize-biogas. Soil erosion, which can be entirely avoided with PV, exceeds soil renewal rates roughly 20-fold on maize fields. Regarding the overall Eco-indicator 99 (H) score under most favourable assumptions for the maize-biogas route, PV has still a more than 100% higher potential to mitigate environmental burden. At present, the key advantages of biogas are its price and its availability without intermittence. In the long run, and with respect to more efficient land use, biogas might preferably be produced from organic waste or manure, whereas PV should be integrated into buildings and infrastructures. (author)

Graebig, Markus; Fenner, Richard [Centre for Sustainable Development, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bringezu, Stefan [Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy. P.B. 100480, 42004 Wuppertal (Germany)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

H2A Biomethane Model Documentation and a Case Study for Biogas From Dairy Farms  

SciTech Connect

The new H2A Biomethane model was developed to estimate the levelized cost of biomethane by using the framework of the vetted original H2A models for hydrogen production and delivery. For biomethane production, biogas from sources such as dairy farms and landfills is upgraded by a cleanup process. The model also estimates the cost to compress and transport the product gas via the pipeline to export it to the natural gas grid or any other potential end-use site. Inputs include feed biogas composition and cost, required biomethane quality, cleanup equipment capital and operations and maintenance costs, process electricity usage and costs, and pipeline delivery specifications.

Saur, G.; Jalalzadeh, A.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study  

SciTech Connect

This case study enhances the understanding of open automated demand response opportunities in municipal wastewater treatment facilities. The report summarizes the findings of a 100 day submetering project at the San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant, a municipal wastewater treatment facility in Oceanside, California. The report reveals that key energy-intensive equipment such as pumps and centrifuges can be targeted for large load reductions. Demand response tests on the effluent pumps resulted a 300 kW load reduction and tests on centrifuges resulted in a 40 kW load reduction. Although tests on the facility?s blowers resulted in peak period load reductions of 78 kW sharp, short-lived increases in the turbidity of the wastewater effluent were experienced within 24 hours of the test. The results of these tests, which were conducted on blowers without variable speed drive capability, would not be acceptable and warrant further study. This study finds that wastewater treatment facilities have significant open automated demand response potential. However, limiting factors to implementing demand response are the reaction of effluent turbidity to reduced aeration load, along with the cogeneration capabilities of municipal facilities, including existing power purchase agreements and utility receptiveness to purchasing electricity from cogeneration facilities.

Thompson, Lisa; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee; Piette, Mary Ann

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

308

Ozone Alternative Disinfection Study for a Large-Scale Wastewater Treatment Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a feasibility study for the use of an ozonation disinfection system for the treatment of wastewater in the Passaic Valley.

1999-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

309

Site-Specific Seismic Site Response Model for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The seismic design basis for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, was established in 1999 based on an extensive probabilistic seismic hazard analysis completed in 1996 by Geomatrix Consultants, Inc. In subsequent years, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) staff questioned the some of the assumptions used in developing the seismic design basis, particularly the adequacy of the site geotechnical surveys. Existing site-specific shear wave velocity data were considered insufficient to reliably use California earthquake response data to directly predict ground motions at the Hanford Site. To address this concern, the Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed and executed a plan for acquiring site-specific soil data down to approximately 500 feet, and for reanalyzing the effects of deeper layers of sediments interbedded with basalt. New geophysical data were acquired, analyzed, and interpreted with respect to existing geologic information gathered from other Hanford-related projects in the WTP area. Existing data from deep boreholes were assembled and interpreted to produce a model of the deeper rock layers consisting of inter-layered basalts and sedimentary interbeds. These data were analyzed statistically to determine the variability of seismic velocities. The earthquake ground motion response was simulated on a large number of models resulting from a weighted logic tree approach that addressed the geologic and geophysical uncertainties. Weights in the logic tree were chosen by a working group based on the strength or weakness of the available data for each combination of logic tree parameters. Finally, interim design ground motion spectra were developed to envelope the remaining uncertainties. The results of this study demonstrate that the site-specific soil structure (Hanford and Ringold formations) beneath the WTP is thinner than was assumed in the 1996 Hanford Site-wide model. This thinness produces peaks in the response spectra (relative to those in 1996) near 2 Hz and 5 Hz. The soil geophysical properties, shear wave velocity, and nonlinear response to the earthquake ground motions are known sufficiently, and alternative interpretations consistent with this data did not have a strong influence on the results. The structure of the upper four basalt flows (Saddle Mountains Basalt), which are inter-layered with sedimentary interbeds (Ellensburg Formation), produces strong reductions in the earthquake ground motions that propagate through them to reach the surface. Uncertainty in the strength of velocity contrasts between these basalts and interbeds resulted from an absence of measured shear wave velocities (Vs) in the interbeds. For this study, Vs in the interbeds was estimated from older, limited compressional wave (Vp) data using estimated ranges for the ratio of the two velocities (Vp/Vs) based on analogues in similar materials. The Vs for the basalts, where Vp/Vs is well defined, still is limited by the quality and quantity of the Vp data. A range of possible Vs for the interbeds and basalts was included in the logic trees that produced additional uncertainty in the resulting response spectra. The uncertainties in these response spectra were enveloped at approximately the 84. percentile (based on the logic tree) to produce conservative design spectra. This conservatism increased the seismic design basis by up to 40% compared to the 1999 values. Because of the sensitivity of the calculated response spectra to the velocity contrasts between the basalts and interbedded sediments, additional boreholes and direct Vs measurements through these layers are now being planned. The new measurements are expected to reduce the uncertainty in the site response that is caused by the lack of direct knowledge of the Vs contrasts within these layers. (authors)

Rohay, A.C.; Reidel, S.P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Opportunities for Utility-Owned CHP at Dry-Mill Fuel Ethanol Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report quantifies opportunities to co-locate natural-gas-fueled combined heat and power (CHP) facilities with corn dry-mill fuel ethanol plants in the upper Midwest. It also evaluates the opportunity to generate renewable power by fueling the CHP plants with biogas produced by anaerobic digestion of the byproducts of the corn wet-milling process.

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

311

The carbon footprint analysis of wastewater treatment plants and nitrous oxide emissions from full-scale biological nitrogen removal processes in Spain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a general model for the carbon footprint analysis of advanced wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with biological nitrogen removal processes, using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. Literature ...

Xu, Xin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Integrated Fault Detection and Isolation: Application to a Winery's Wastewater Treatment Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an integrated object-oriented fuzzy logic fault detection and isolation (FDI) module for a biological wastewater treatment process is presented. The defined FDI strategy and the software implementation are detailed. Using experimental ... Keywords: anaerobic digestion, fuzzy logic, object-oriented programming, on-line fault detection and isolation (FDI), wastewater treatment

Antoine Genovesi; Jrme Harmand; Jean-Philippe Steyer

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Selective ensemble extreme learning machine modeling of effluent quality in wastewater treatment plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Real-time and reliable measurements of the effluent quality are essential to improve operating efficiency and reduce energy consumption for the wastewater treatment process. Due to the low accuracy and unstable performance of the traditional effluent ... Keywords: Wastewater treatment process, effluent quality prediction, extreme learning machine, genetic algorithm, selective ensemble model

Li-Jie Zhao; Tian-You Chai; De-Cheng Yuan

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Expanding the potential for saline formations : modeling carbon dioxide storage, water extraction and treatment for power plant cooling.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Water, Energy and Carbon Sequestration simulation model (WECSsim) is being developed to address the question, 'Where in the current and future U.S. fossil fuel based electricity generation fleet are there opportunities to couple CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use, and what are the economic and water demand-related impacts of these systems compared to traditional power systems?' The WECSsim collaborative team initially applied this framework to a test case region in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. Recently, the model has been expanded to incorporate the lower 48 states of the U.S. Significant effort has been spent characterizing locations throughout the U.S. where CO{sub 2} might be stored in saline formations including substantial data collection and analysis efforts to supplement the incomplete brine data offered in the NatCarb database. WECSsim calculates costs associated with CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) for the power plant to saline formation combinations including parasitic energy costs of CO{sub 2} capture, CO{sub 2} pipelines, water treatment options, and the net benefit of water treatment for power plant cooling. Currently, the model can identify the least-cost deep saline formation CO{sub 2} storage option for any current or proposed coal or natural gas-fired power plant in the lower 48 states. Initial results suggest that additional, cumulative water withdrawals resulting from national scale CCS may range from 676 million gallons per day (MGD) to 30,155 MGD depending on the makeup power and cooling technologies being utilized. These demands represent 0.20% to 8.7% of the U.S. total fresh water withdrawals in the year 2000, respectively. These regional and ultimately nation-wide, bottom-up scenarios coupling power plants and saline formations throughout the U.S. can be used to support state or national energy development plans and strategies.

Not Available

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Supplemnental Volume - Independent Oversight Assessment of the Nuclear Safety Culture and Management of Nuclear Safety Concerns at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, January 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Volume Volume Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture and Management of Nuclear Safety Concerns at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant January 2012 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS i Independent Oversight Assessment of Safety Culture and Management of Nuclear Safety Concerns at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Supplemental Volume Table of Contents Foreword ...................................................................................................................................................... iii Acronyms ...................................................................................................................................................... v

316

Industrial Plant for Flue Gas Treatment with High Power Electron Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

Fossil fuel combustion leads to acidic pollutants, like SO2, NOx, HCl emission. Different control technologies are proposed however, the most popular method is combination of wet FGD (flue gas desulfurization) and SCR (selective catalytic reduction). First, using lime or limestone slurry leads to SO2 capture, and gypsum is a product. The second process where ammonia is used as reagent and nitrogen oxides are reduced over catalyst surface to gaseous nitrogen removes NOx. New advanced method using electron accelerators for simultaneous SO2 and NOx removal has been developed in Japan, the USA, Germany and Poland. Both pollutants are removed with high efficiency and byproduct can be applied as fertilizer. Two industrial plants have been already constructed. One in China and second in Poland, third one is under construction in Japan. Information on the Polish plant is presented in the paper. Plant has been constructed at Power Station Pomorzany, Szczecin (Dolna Odra Electropower Stations Group) and treats flue gases from two Benson boilers 60 MWe and 100 MWth each. Flow rate of the flue gas stream is equal to 270 000 Nm3/h. Four transformer accelerators, 700 keV electron energy and 260 kW beam power each were applied. With its 1.05 MW total beam power installed it is a biggest radiation facility over the world, nowadays. Description of the plant and results obtained has been presented in the paper.

Chmielewski, Andrzej G. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); University of technology, faculty of Process and Chemical Engineering, Warsaw (Poland); Tyminski, Bogdan; Zimek, Zbigniew; Pawelec, Andrzej [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Licki, Janusz [Institute of Atomic Energy, Swierk (Poland)

2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

317

Use of ion exchange for the treatment of liquids in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

The current and future use of ion exchange (demineralization) as a method for treating liquid radioactive streams at nuclear power plants was investigated. Pertinent data were obtained by contacting utility companies, nuclear-steam-supply system vendors, selected AEC-operated facilities, as well as ion exchange resin and equipment manufacturers. Principal emphasis was on obtaining data concerning the decontamination of aqueous solutions characterized by levels of radioactivity that range from 10/sup -7/ to 1 mu Ci/ml. Ion exchange media commonly used in nuclear power plants are synthetic organic resins of polystyrene matrix. They are utilized primarily in the mixed-bed (deep-bed) ion exchange system. Powdered resin (mixed) systems (so-called filter- demineralizer'') are also used in several recent boiling-water-reactor plants. The term decontamination factor (DF), the ratio of the feed to effluent concentration, is widely used and is assumed by designers and operators of the plants to express the ion exchange system performance. In some cases, such DF values may not represent the true system performance. To achieve a desired DF, the feed and effiuent must be sampled for the nuclides of interest and the processing discontinued when the desired effluent concentration is exceeded. Average DF values that can be obtained for various ion-exchange systems and various groups of radionuclides if good engineering practice is used in the design and operation of these systems are listed. These values are based on ion- exchange fundamentals, literature data, laboratory experiments, and plant operating experience. They represent time-average values expected under normal operating conditions rather than maximum values attainable under optimum conditions. (auth)

Lin, K.H.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Summary Report of Geophysical Logging For The Seismic Boreholes Project at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment Plant.  

SciTech Connect

During the period of June through October 2006, three deep boreholes and one corehole were drilled beneath the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The boreholes were drilled to provide information on ground-motion attenuation in the basalt and interbedded sediments underlying the WTP site. This report describes the geophysical logging of the deep boreholes that was conducted in support of the Seismic Boreholes Project, defined below. The detailed drilling and geological descriptions of the boreholes and seismic data collected and analysis of that data are reported elsewhere.

Gardner, Martin G.; Price, Randall K.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Regional factors governing performance and sustainability of wastewater treatment plants in Honduras : Lake Yojoa Subwatershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lake Yojoa, the largest natural lake in Honduras, is currently experiencing eutrophication from overloading of nutrients, in part due to inadequate wastewater treatment throughout the Lake Yojoa Subwatershed. Some efforts ...

Walker, Kent B. (Kent Bramwell)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Assessment of sludge management options in a waste water treatment plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is part of a larger project which began in response to a request by the Spanish water agengy, Cadagua, for advice on life cycle assessment (LCA) and environmental impacts of Cadagua operated wastewater treatment ...

Lim, Jong hyun, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Analysis of microbial diversity and optimal conditions for enhanced biogas production from swine waste anaerobic digestion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Swine wastewater pretreated by solidliquid separation was optimized for biogas production and water purification. Dynamic diversity of the bacterial community in the anaerobic plug flow reactor was investigated under various temperatures and hydraulic retention times (HRT). Results of batch experiments indicated that under optimal operating conditions

Hsiao-Hsien Lin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

IEA-Renewable Energy Technologies, Bioenergy Agreement Task 37: Energy from Biogas and Landfill Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Landfill Gas Teknologiområde: Anvendt forskning og udvikling, herunder viden formidling, -udveksling og-Bioenergy, Task 37- Energy from Biogas and Landfill Gas", via samarbejde, informationsudveksling, fælles analyser and landfill gas. I dette tidsinterval er en række aktiviteter blevet gennemført, herunder deltagelse til task

323

A Study on Biogas from Anaerobic Digestion with the Distiller's Grains via Lactic Acid Fermentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The methane production of the distillers grains via lactic acid fermentation (shorter for the fermentation residue) was investigated, and the variable trend of pH values, alkali concentration and volatile fatty acids were examined. The results ... Keywords: the residue of distillers' grains via lactic acid fermentation, biomass wastes, anaerobic digestion, volatile fatty acids, biogas production

Li-Hong Wang; Wang Qunhui; Sun Xiaohong; Xin Zhao

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Compatibility of the ultraviolet light-ozone system for laundry waste water treatment in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

As an alternative treatment system for laundry waste water in nuclear power plants, a system was chosen in which such organic compounds as surfactant would be oxidized by ultraviolet (UV) light and ozone. The system compatibility, UV light source, and dissolved ozone concentration were examined through experiments. First, ozone gas was absorbed in the waste water. After the dissolved ozone concentration equilibrated at the desired value, the waste water was irradiated by a mercury lamp. Then, the time dependence of the concentrations of the organic compounds, the dissolved ozone, and the hydrogen peroxide were measured to estimate the treatment rate of the system. The mercury lamp with a 10{sup 5}-Pa vapor pressure achieved large UV radiation and a treatment rate increase, leading to a compatible system without secondary waste generation. The effect of the dissolved ozone concentration on the treatment rate was saturated when concentration was >3.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} mol/10{sup {minus}3} m{sup 3} at the time UV radiation was started. Numerical results indicated the saturation was due to hydrogen peroxide generation, which prevents hydroxyl radical generation.

Matsuo, Toshiaki; Nishi, Takashi; Matsuda, Masami; Izumida, Tatsuo [Hitachi, Ltd. (Japan)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Feasibility of geothermal heat use in the San Bernardino Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant. Final report, September 1980-June 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system was developed for utilizing nearby low temperature geothermal energy to heat two high-rate primary anaerobic digesters at the San Bernardino Wastewater Treatment Plant. The geothermal fluid would replace the methane currently burned to fuel the digesters. A summary of the work accomplished on the feasibility study is presented. The design and operation of the facility are examined and potentially viable applications selected for additional study. Results of these investigations and system descriptions and equipment specifications for utilizing geothermal energy in the selected processes are presented. The economic analyses conducted on the six engineering design cases are discussed. The environmental setting of the project and an analysis of the environmental impacts that will result from construction and operation of the geothermal heating system are discussed. A Resource Development Plan describes the steps that the San Bernardino Municipal Water Department could follow in order to utilize the resource. A preliminary well program and rough cost estimates for the production and injection wells also are included. The Water Department is provided with a program and schedule for implementing a geothermal system to serve the wastewater treatment plant. Regulatory, financial, and legal issues that will impact the project are presented in the Appendix. An outline of a Public Awareness Program is included.

Racine, W.C.; Larson, T.C.; Stewart, C.A.; Wessel, H.B.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

HYDROTHERMAL TREATMENT OF WHEAT STRAW ON PILOT PLANT SCALE Anders Thygesena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solid material is one of the most important factors for production of bioethanol. Conversion for production of sugars for bio ethanol and an alkali free solid material for combustion in an incineration). After combined hydrothermal treatment and enzymatic hydrolysis the maximum sugar, yields were 30 g

327

Steam Plant, 6% Irrigation,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is required. The anaerobic stage will remove 90% of the organics generating biogas rich in methane that can

Zhou, Pei

328

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a schematic of the project, and Figure 10 shows the main site. This water treatment plant contains the biogas digestor with waste-wood-fired heat, the biogas engines, and a battery bank. Under an agreement

329

Microturbine Economic Competitiveness: A Study of Two Potential Adopters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a schematic of the project, and Figure 10 shows the main site. This water treatment plant contains the biogas digestor with waste-wood-fired heat, the biogas engines, and a battery bank. Under an agreement

330

A Pilot Study for the Extraction and Treatment of Groundwater From a Manufactured Gas Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a pilot study of groundwater remediation at a former MGP site. The project included hydrogeologic investigations, bench- and pilot-scale treatability studies, and a cost analysis. The report documents influent and effluent levels of contaminants in groundwaters classified as high-strength, medium-strength, and low-strength, depending on the degree of contamination. Detailed descriptions of the treatment systems and practical observations are also included.

1997-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

331

Enhanced biogas production by increasing organic loadrate in mesophilic anaerobic digestion with sludgerecirculation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? For enhancing anaerobic sludge digestion and biogas recovery, an increase in organic load rate (OLR) from 1.0 to 3.0kgVS/(m3day) was imposed upon a new (more)

Huang, Zhanzhao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Quantification of syntrophic fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing bacteria in a mesophilic biogas reactor by oligonucleotide probe hybridization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small-subunit rRNA sequences were obtained for two saturated fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, Syntrophomonas sapovorans and Syntrophomonas wolfei LYB, and sequence analysis confirmed their classification as members of the family Syntrophomonadaceae. S.wolfei LYB was closely related to S.wolfei subsp. solfei, but S. sapovorans did not cluster with the other members of the genus Syntrophomonas. Five oligonucleotide probes targeting the small-subunit rRNA of different groups within the family Syntrophomonadaceae, which contains all currently known saturated fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, were developed and characterized. The probes were designed to be specific at the family, genus, and species levels and were characterized by temperature-of-dissociation and specificity studies. To demonstrate the usefulness of the probes for the detection and quantification of saturated fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria in methanogenic environments, the microbial community structure of a sample from a full-scale biogas plant was determined. Hybridization results with probes for syntrophic bacteria and methanogens were compared to specific methanogenic activities and microbial numbers determined with most-probable-number estimates. Most of the methanogenic rRNA was comprised of Methanomicrobiales rRNA, suggesting that members of this order served as the main hydrogen-utilizing microorganisms. Between 0.2 and 1% of the rRNA was attributed to the Syntrophomonadaceae, or which the majority was accounted for by the genus Syntrophomonas.

Hansen, K.H.; Ahring, B.K.; Raskin, L.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Energy integrated dairy farm system in Georgia: Technical manual, Mathis/P and M Dairy Farm, Social Circle, Georgia. [Cogeneration using biogas; heat recovery  

SciTech Connect

This manual describes a project sponsored to optimize energy generation and utilization in the agricultural or food processing industry. The particular project involves the Mathis/P and M Dairy Farm located in Social Circle, Georgia (about 60 miles east of Atlanta). The farm is designed for a 550 milking cow herd and produces certified raw milk for sale to a processing plant located in Atlanta. The project converted the Mathis/P and and M Dairy into an energy integrated dairy farm system (EIDFS) in which the interaction of the subsystems and components are modified such that the energy resources of the farm are optimized. This manual is a description of the system, subsystems and components composing the Mathis EIDFS and is primarily intended for farmers, extension agents, and equipment manufacturers who might be involved in future EIDFS projects. Cogeneration using biogas from manures and heat recovery from the refrigeration machinery were among the options chosen.

Walsh, J.L. Jr.; Ross, C.C.; Lamade, R.M.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Combustion testing and heat recovery study: Frank E. Van Lare Wastewater Treatment Plant, Monroe County. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the study were to record and analyze sludge management operations data and sludge incinerator combustion data; ascertain instrumentation and control needs; calculate heat balances for the incineration system; and determine the feasibility of different waste-heat recovery technologies for the Frank E. Van Lare (FEV) Wastewater Treatment Plant. As an integral part of this study, current and pending federal and state regulations were evaluated to establish their impact on furnace operation and subsequent heat recovery. Of significance is the effect of the recently promulgated Federal 40 CFR Part 503 regulations on the FEV facility. Part 503 regulations were signed into law in November 1992, and, with some exceptions, affected facilities must be in compliance by February 19, 1994. Those facilities requiring modifications or upgrades to their incineration or air pollution control equipment to meet Part 503 regulations must be in compliance by February 19, 1995.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Interim report VII, production test IP-549-A half-plant low alum feed water treatment at F Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A half-plant low alum water treatment test began at F Reactor on January 16, 1963. The test, which had been prompted by the analysis of ledge corrosion attack on fuel elements, will demonstrate whether or not high alum feed is responsible for increasing the frequency of ledge and groove corrosion attack on fuel element surfaces. The effect will be evaluated by comparing visual examination results obtained from the normal production fuel irradiated in process water treated with two different alum feed rates. Six 20-column fuel discharges, ten columns from each side of the reactor, have been taken during the test as follows: (1) One discharge prior to the start of the test. (2) One discharge such that the test side was exposed to coolant treated with both high and low alum feed. (3) Four discharges under test conditions. This report discusses the results obtained from the fifth discharge under test conditions.

Geier, R.G.

1964-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

336

One System Integreated Project Team Progress in Coordinating Hanford Tank Farms and the Waste Treatment Plant - 14214  

SciTech Connect

The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed at the Hanford Site in late 2011 as a way to improve coordination and itegration between the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) on interfaces between the two projects, and to eliminate duplication and exploit opportunities for synergy. The IPT is composed of jointly staffed groups that work on technical issues of mutal interest, front-end design and project definition, nuclear safety, plant engineering system integration, commissioning, planning and scheduling, and environmental, safety, health and quality (ESH&Q) areas. In the past year important progress has been made in a number of areas as the organization has matured and additional opportunities have been identified. Areas covered in this paper include: Support for development of the Office of Envirnmental Management (EM) framework document to progress the Office of River Protection's (ORP) River Protection Project (RPP) mission; Stewardship of the RPP flowsheet; Collaboration with Savannah River Site (SRS), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Operations programs integration, and; Further development of the waste acceptance criteria.

Skwarek, Raymond J.; Harp, Ben J.; Duncan, Garth M.

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

337

Management Alert - The 2020 Vision One System Proposal for Commissioning and Startup of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, IG-0871  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The 2020 Vision One System Proposal The 2020 Vision One System Proposal for Commissioning and Startup of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant DOE/IG-0871 October 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 3, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Management Alert on "The 2020 Vision One System Proposal for Commissioning and Startup of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant" IMMEDIATE CONCERN The Department of Energy is considering a proposal known at the 2020 Vision One System (2020 Vision) that would implement a phased approach to commissioning the $12.2 billion Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). As part of the phased approach, the Low-

338

Department of EneDepartment of Energy Quality Assurance: Design Control for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant at the Hanford Sitergy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Quality Department of Energy Quality Assurance: Design Control for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant at the Hanford Site DOE/IG-0894 September 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 30, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Department of Energy Quality Assurance: Design Control for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant at the Hanford Site" INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy is constructing the $12.2 billion Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to vitrify approximately 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemically hazardous

339

High Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H2 from Biogas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Fuel Cell Research Center, 2012 1/22 National Fuel Cell Research Center, 2012 1/22 High Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H 2 from Biogas Jack Brouwer, Ph.D. June 19, 2012 DOE/ NREL Biogas Workshop - Golden, CO © National Fuel Cell Research Center, 2012 2/22 Outline * Introduction and Background * Tri-Generation/Poly-Generation Analyses * OCSD Project Introduction © National Fuel Cell Research Center, 2012 3/22 Introduction and Background * Hydrogen fuel cell vehicle performance is outstanding * Energy density of H 2 is much greater than batteries * Rapid fueling, long range ZEV * H 2 must be produced * energy intensive, may have emissions, fossil fuels, economies of scale * Low volumetric energy density of H 2 compared to current infrastructure fuels (@ STP)

340

Realizzazione di un modello Simulink di un impianto a biogas con rete di teleriscaldamento ed applicazione ad un impianto da 250 kWel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Il modello calcola i flussi di potenza che transitano su un impianto a biogas secondo una logica di bilancio di primo principio. All'utente data (more)

Marsotto, Giuseppe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for 2014 as follows: biogas (45 MW), biomass (40 MW), wind (Additions (MW) biomass, biogas, hydro geothermal wind windwind, geothermal, biomass, biogas, hydropower, and solar. In

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

ONE SYSTEM INTEGRATED PROJECT TEAM: RETRIEVAL AND DELIVERY OF THE HANFORD TANK WASTES FOR VITRIFICATION IN THE WASTE TREATMENT PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed in late 2011 as a way for improving the efficiency of delivery and treatment of highly radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 586-square-mile Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The purpose of the One System IPT is to improve coordination and integration between the Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) contractor and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC). The vision statement is: One System is a WTP and TOC safety conscious team that, through integrated management and implementation of risk-informed decision and mission-based solutions, will enable the earliest start of safe and efficient treatment of Hanford's tank waste, to protect the Columbia River, environment and public. The IPT is a formal collaboration between Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), which manages design and construction of the WTP for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (DOEORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), which manages the TOC for ORP. More than fifty-six (56) million gallons of highly radioactive liquid waste are stored in one hundred seventy-seven (177) aging, underground tanks. Most of Hanford's waste tanks - one hundred forty-nine (149) of them - are of an old single-shell tank (SST) design built between 1944 and 1964. More than sixty (60) of these tanks have leaked in the past, releasing an estimated one million gallons of waste into the soil and threatening the nearby Columbia River. There are another twenty-eight (28) new double-shelled tanks (DSTs), built from 1968 to 1986, that provide greater protection to the environment. In 1989, DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) signed a landmark agreement that required Hanford to comply with federal and state environmental standards. It also paved the way for agreements that set deadlines for retrieving the tank wastes and for building and operating the WTP. The tank wastes are the result of Hanford's nearly fifty (50) years of plutonium production. In the intervening years, waste characteristics have been increasingly better understood. However, waste characteristics that are uncertain and will remain as such represent a significant technical challenge in terms of retrieval, transport, and treatment, as well as for design and construction ofWTP. What also is clear is that the longer the waste remains in the tanks, the greater the risk to the environment and the people of the Pacific Northwest. The goal of both projects - tank operations and waste treatment - is to diminish the risks posed by the waste in the tanks at the earliest possible date. About two hundred (200) WTP and TOC employees comprise the IPT. Individual work groups within One System include Technical, Project Integration & Controls, Front-End Design & Project Definition, Commissioning, Nuclear Safety & Engineering Systems Integration, and Environmental Safety and Health and Quality Assurance (ESH&QA). Additional functions and team members will be added as the WTP approaches the operational phase. The team has undertaken several initiatives since its formation to collaborate on issues: (1) alternate scenarios for delivery of wastes from the tank farms to WTP; (2) improvements in managing Interface Control Documents; (3) coordination on various technical issues, including the Defense Nuclear Facilities Nuclear Safety Board's Recommendation 2010-2; (4) deployment of the SmartPlant Foundation-Configuration Management System; and (5) preparation of the joint contract deliverable of the Operational Readiness Support Plan.

HARP BJ; KACICH RM; SKWAREK RJ

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

343

One System Integrated Project Team: Retrieval And Delivery Of The Hanford Tank Wastes For Vitrification In The Waste Treatment Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed in late 2011 as a way for improving the efficiency of delivery and treatment of highly radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 586-square-mile Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The purpose of the One System IPT is to improve coordination and integration between the Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) contractor and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC). The vision statement is: One System is a WTP and TOC safety conscious team that, through integrated management and implementation of risk-informed decision and mission-based solutions, will enable the earliest start of safe and efficient treatment of Hanford's tank waste, to protect the Columbia River, environment and public. The IPT is a formal collaboration between Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), which manages design and construction of the WTP for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (DOEORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), which manages the TOC for ORP. More than fifty-six (56) million gallons of highly radioactive liquid waste are stored in one hundred seventy-seven (177) aging, underground tanks. Most of Hanford's waste tanks - one hundred forty-nine (149) of them - are of an old single-shell tank (SST) design built between 1944 and 1964. More than sixty (60) of these tanks have leaked in the past, releasing an estimated one million gallons of waste into the soil and threatening the nearby Columbia River. There are another twenty-eight (28) new double-shelled tanks (DSTs), built from 1968 to 1986, that provide greater protection to the environment. In 1989, DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) signed a landmark agreement that required Hanford to comply with federal and state environmental standards. It also paved the way for agreements that set deadlines for retrieving the tank wastes and for building and operating the WTP. The tank wastes are the result of Hanford's nearly fifty (50) years of plutonium production. In the intervening years, waste characteristics have been increasingly better understood. However, waste characteristics that are uncertain and will remain as such represent a significant technical challenge in terms of retrieval, transport, and treatment, as well as for design and construction ofWTP. What also is clear is that the longer the waste remains in the tanks, the greater the risk to the environment and the people of the Pacific Northwest. The goal of both projects - tank operations and waste treatment - is to diminish the risks posed by the waste in the tanks at the earliest possible date. About two hundred (200) WTP and TOC employees comprise the IPT. Individual work groups within One System include Technical, Project Integration & Controls, Front-End Design & Project Definition, Commissioning, Nuclear Safety & Engineering Systems Integration, and Environmental Safety and Health and Quality Assurance (ESH&QA). Additional functions and team members will be added as the WTP approaches the operational phase. The team has undertaken several initiatives since its formation to collaborate on issues: (1) alternate scenarios for delivery of wastes from the tank farms to WTP; (2) improvements in managing Interface Control Documents; (3) coordination on various technical issues, including the Defense Nuclear Facilities Nuclear Safety Board's Recommendation 2010-2; (4) deployment of the SmartPlant? Foundation-configuration Management System; and (5) preparation of the joint contract deliverable of the Operational Readiness Support Plan.

Harp, Benton J. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Kacich, Richard M. [Bechtel National, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Skwarek, Raymond J. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

344

biogas to indian buses come home, dad biosensor lab in singapore sexy statistics world university No reason to rush homeLiU alumna Klara Tiitso enjoys her life in London | page 30  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biogas to indian buses come home, dad biosensor lab in singapore sexy statistics world university an Indian Master's student whose studies at Linköping inspired him to use biogas as fuel for busses. He

Zhao, Yuxiao

345

Emissions of volatile and potentially toxic organic compounds from waste-water treatment plants and collection systems (Phase 2). Volume 1. Project summaries. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the Phase II research project on emission of potentially toxic organic compounds (PTOCs) from wastewater treatment plants were fivefold: (1) assessment of the importance of gaseous emissions from municipal wastewater collection systems; (2) resolution of the discrepancy between the measured and estimated emissions (Phase I), from the Joint Water Pollution Control Plant (JWPCP) operated by the County Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County (CSDLAC); (3) determination of airborne concentrations of PTOCS immediately downwind of an activated sludge aeration process at the City of Los Angeles' Hyperion Treatment Plant (HTP); (4) a modeling assessment of the effects of transient loading on emissions during preliminary and primary treatment at a typical municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP); (5) a preliminary investigation of effects of chlorination practices on haloform production. Volume 1, for which the abstract was prepared, contains a summary of results from each project; Volume 2 contains the discussion regarding the modeling of collection system emissions; Volume 3 addresses methods development and field sampling efforts at the JWPCP and HTP, data on emissions from a mechanically ventilated sewer and results of some preliminary haloform formation studies in wastewaters; and Volume 4 discusses aspects of the emissions modeling problem.

Chang, D.P.Y.; Schroeder, E.D.; Corsi, R.L.; Guensler, R.; Meyerhofer, J.A.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Overview of Pulse Jet Mixer/Hybrid Mixing System Development to Support the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will process and treat radioactive waste that is stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. Pulse jet mixer (PJM) technology was selected for mixing the contents of many of the process vessels. Several of the tanks are expected to contain concentrated slurries that exhibit a non-Newtonian rheology and the understanding required to apply this technology to mobilize the non-Newtonian slurries was not mature. Consequently, an experimental testing effort was undertaken to investigate PJM performance in several scaled versions of WTP vessels and to develop mixing system configurations that met WTP requirements. This effort evolved into a large, multifaceted test program involving many different test facilities. Elements of the test program included theoretical analysis, development and characterization of simulants, development of instrumentation and measurement techniques, hundreds of tests at various scales in numerous test stands, and data analysis and application. This program provided the technical basis for the selection of pulse jet mixers along with air spargers and steady jets generated by recirculation pumps to provide mixing systems for several of the vessels with non-Newtonian slurries. This paper provides an overview of the testing program and a summary of the key technical results that formed the technical basis of the final mixing system configurations to be used in the WTP.

Kurath, Dean E.; Meyer, Perry A.; Stewart, Charles W.; Barnes, Steven M.

2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

347

Co-digestion of cattle manure with food waste and sludge to increase biogas production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small increase in methane production was observed applying sonication pretreatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biogas productions between 720 and 1100 mL/Lreactor day were achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Volatile solids removal efficiencies ranged between 53% and 60%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lower methane yields were obtained when operating under thermophilic conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimum OLR in lab-scale CSTR was 1.2-1.3 g VS/L day (HRT: 20 days). - Abstract: Anaerobic co-digestion strategies are needed to enhance biogas production, especially when treating certain residues such as cattle/pig manure. This paper presents a study of co-digestion of cattle manure with food waste and sewage sludge. With the aim of maximising biogas yields, a series of experiments were carried out under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions using continuously stirred-tank reactors, operating at different hydraulic residence times. Pretreatment with ultrasound was also applied to compare the results with those obtained with non-pretreated waste. Specific methane production decreases when increasing the OLR and decreasing HRT. The maximum value obtained was 603 LCH{sub 4}/kg VS{sub feed} for the co-digestion of a mixture of 70% manure, 20% food waste and 10% sewage sludge (total solid concentration around 4%) at 36 Degree-Sign C, for an OLR of 1.2 g VS/L day. Increasing the OLR to 1.5 g VS/L day led to a decrease of around 20-28% in SMP. Lower methane yields were obtained when operating at 55 Degree-Sign C. The increase in methane production when applying ultrasound to the feed mixtures does not compensate for the energy spent in this pretreatment.

Maranon, E., E-mail: emara@uniovi.es [Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology, University Institute of Technology of Asturias, Campus of Gijon, University of Oviedo, 33203 Gijon (Spain); Castrillon, L.; Quiroga, G.; Fernandez-Nava, Y. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology, University Institute of Technology of Asturias, Campus of Gijon, University of Oviedo, 33203 Gijon (Spain); Gomez, L.; Garcia, M.M. [Zero Emissions Technology, 41018 Seville (Spain)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A byproduct of this process is biogas which contains 50 70%Partners LLC 2007). This biogas can be used to generate heatmethane fermentation and biogas recovery (Green 1995).

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Tri-Generation Success World's First Tri-Gen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

station uses anaerobically digested biogas from the municipal wastewater treatment plant as the fuel SAE protocols for rapid 3-minute complete tank refueling. Gas or Biogas H2 is produced at anode Gas the versatility of fuel cells to utilize multiple feedstocks, such as biogas and natural gas, to produce power

350

Biological Removal of Siloxanes from Landfill and Digester Gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

volatilize from waste at landfills and wastewater treatment plants (1). As a result, biogas produced, as well as an increase in maintenance costs (6, 7). The presence of VMSs in biogas is thus a challenge recommended by most equipment manufacturers for un- hindered use (6). Of all VMSs in biogas

351

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Sulphide Laden Biogas in a Process Integrated Afterprocessing company, uses biogas in its afterburners (Caddet,1995). The biogas is produced by their on-site wastewater

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity, December 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Hanford Site the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity December 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background.......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope and Methodology... ................................................................................................................... 1

353

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity, December 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Hanford Site the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity December 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background.......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope and Methodology... ................................................................................................................... 1

354

CX-000978: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Virginia Water Authority's Roanoke Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant Biogas Combined Heat and Power CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 02192010 Location(s): Roanoke...

355

Virginia | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Virginia Water Authority's Roanoke Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant Biogas Combined Heat and Power CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 02192010 Location(s): Roanoke...

356

JEA - Clean Power Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

energy sources by 2015. Eligible renewable-energy resources include solar, biomass, biogas (methane from landfills and sewage treatment plants), and wind, as well as specific...

357

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Virginia Water Authority's Roanoke Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant Biogas Combined Heat and Power CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 02192010 Location(s): Roanoke...

358

Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Fuel Cell Research Center, points out the tri-generation facility that uses biogas from Orange County Sanitation Districts wastewater treatment plant to produce...

359

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

petroleum gas (LPG, consisting predominantly of propane) or renewable fuels such as biogas from wastewater treatments plants. Fuel cells for auxiliary power units in trucks will...

360

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Fueling the Next Generation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California, is currently posted on the Energy Department's blog. The facility uses biogas from the Orange County Sanitation District's wastewater treatment plant and a fuel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and heat. The hydrogen, heat, and power are pro- duced using anaerobically digested biogas from the municipal wastewater treatment plant in a high temperature molten carbon- ate...

362

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination East Pennsboro Wastewater Treatment Plant Biogas Recovery and Utilization Using Combined Heat and Power Project CX(s) Applied: A9,...

363

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

energy sources by 2015. Eligible renewable-energy resources include solar, biomass, biogas (methane from landfills and sewage treatment plants), and wind, as well as specific...

364

High Level Waste Remote Handling Equipment in the Melter Cave Support Handling System at the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

Cold war plutonium production led to extensive amounts of radioactive waste stored in tanks at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford site. Bechtel National, Inc. is building the largest nuclear Waste Treatment Plant in the world located at the Department of Energy's Hanford site to immobilize the millions of gallons of radioactive waste. The site comprises five main facilities; Pretreatment, High Level Waste vitrification, Low Active Waste vitrification, an Analytical Lab and the Balance of Facilities. The pretreatment facilities will separate the high and low level waste. The high level waste will then proceed to the HLW facility for vitrification. Vitrification is a process of utilizing a melter to mix molten glass with radioactive waste to form a stable product for storage. The melter cave is designated as the High Level Waste Melter Cave Support Handling System (HSH). There are several key processes that occur in the HSH cell that are necessary for vitrification and include: feed preparation, mixing, pouring, cooling and all maintenance and repair of the process equipment. Due to the cell's high level radiation, remote handling equipment provided by PaR Systems, Inc. is required to install and remove all equipment in the HSH cell. The remote handling crane is composed of a bridge and trolley. The trolley supports a telescoping tube set that rigidly deploys a TR 4350 manipulator arm with seven degrees of freedom. A rotating, extending, and retracting slewing hoist is mounted to the bottom of the trolley and is centered about the telescoping tube set. Both the manipulator and slewer are unique to this cell. The slewer can reach into corners and the manipulator's cross pivoting wrist provides better operational dexterity and camera viewing angles at the end of the arm. Since the crane functions will be operated remotely, the entire cell and crane have been modeled with 3-D software. Model simulations have been used to confirm operational and maintenance functional and timing studies throughout the design process. Since no humans can go in or out of the cell, there are several recovery options that have been designed into the system including jack-down wheels for the bridge and trolley, recovery drums for the manipulator hoist, and a wire rope cable cutter for the slewer jib hoist. If the entire crane fails in cell, the large diameter cable reel that provides power, signal, and control to the crane can be used to retrieve the crane from the cell into the crane maintenance area. (authors)

Bardal, M.A. [PaR Systems, Inc., Shoreview, MN (United States); Darwen, N.J. [Bechtel National, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Automated Sampling and Sample Pneumatic Transport of High Level Tank Wastes at the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development work, and design and engineering tasks performed, to provide a fully automated sampling system for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) project at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, USA. WTP is being built to enable the emptying and immobilization of highly active waste resulting from processing of irradiated nuclear fuel since the 1940's. The Hanford Tank Wastes are separated into Highly Level Waste (HLW), and Low Active Waste (LAW) fractions, which are separately immobilized by vitrification into borosilicate glass. Liquid samples must be taken of the waste and Glass Forming Chemicals (GFCs) before vitrification, and analyzed to insure the glass products will comply with specifications established in the WTP contract. This paper describes the non-radioactive testing of the sampling of the HLW and LAW melter feed simulants that was performed ahead of final equipment design. These trials were essential to demonstrate the effectiveness and repeatability of the integrated sampling system to collect representative samples, free of cross-contamination. Based on existing tried and proven equipment, the system design is tailored to meet the WTP project's specific needs. The design provides sampling capabilities from 47 separate sampling points and includes a pneumatic transport system to move the samples from the 3 separate facilities to the centralized analytical laboratory. The physical and rheological compositions of the waste simulants provided additional challenges in terms of the sample delivery, homogenization, and sample capture equipment design requirements. The activity levels of the actual waste forms, specified as 486 E9 Bq/liter (Cs-137), 1.92 E9 Bq/liter (Co-60), and 9.67 E9 Bq/liter (Eu-154), influenced the degree of automation provided, and justified the minimization of manual intervention needed to obtain and deliver samples from the process facilities to the analytical laboratories. Maintaining high integrity primary and secondary confinement, including during the cross-site transportation of the samples, is a key requirement that is achieved and assured at all times. (authors)

Phillips, C.; Richardson, J. E. [BNG America, 2345 Stevens Drive, Richland, WA, 99354 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Isolation of High-Efficient Low-Temperature Methanogen and Comparation on Flora in Anaerobic Fermentation Production Biogas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Hun gate anaerobic techniques, a low-temperature methanogen strain was isolated from sludge in De Qing Alpine region from Tibet, named XZF21. The colony is white, not transparent, Gram-negative, uses formate as the substrate forCH4 formation, ... Keywords: methane, purification, sludge, anaerobic fermentation, biogas

Fan Tingting; Wang Jinhua; Lei Yanmin; Liu Siying; Wang Zhi; Wang Yongze

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Life Cycle Environmental and Cost Impacts of Dairy Wastewater Treatment Using Algae Brendan Higgins, Dr. Alissa Kendall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

displacement. The cost of wastewater treatment using the ATS was estimated to be $1.23 per m3 wastewater Wastewater Processing Algae Processing Biogas Processing Equipment and Material Data Sources Fixed filmLife Cycle Environmental and Cost Impacts of Dairy Wastewater Treatment Using Algae Brendan Higgins

California at Davis, University of

368

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Wastewater Treatment Capability Upgrade, Project NO. 96-D-122 Pantex Plant Amarillo, Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) addresses the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action regarding an upgrade of the Pantex Plant Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF). Potential environmental consequences associated with the proposed action and alternative actions are provided. DOE proposes to design, build, and operate a new WWTF, consistent with the requirements of Title 30 of the Texas Administrative Code (TAC), Chapter 317, ''Design Criteria for Sewage Systems,'' capable of supporting current and future wastewater treatment requirements of the Plant. Wastewater treatment at Pantex must provide sufficient operational flexibility to meet Pantex Plant's anticipated future needs, including potential Plant mission changes, alternative effluent uses, and wastewater discharge permit requirements. Treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water maybe used for irrigation on DOE-owned agricultural land. Five factors support the need for DOE action: (1) The current WWTF operation has the potential for inconsistent permit compliance. (2) The existing WWTF lies completely within the 100-year floodplain. (3) The Pantex Plant mission has the potential to change, requiring infrastructure changes to the facility. (4) The life expectancy of the existing facility would be nearing its end by the time a new facility is constructed. (5) The treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water would have a beneficial agricultural use through irrigation. Evaluation during the internal scoping led to the conclusion that the following factors are present and of concern at the proposed action site on Pantex Plant: (1) Periodic wastewater effluent permit exceedances; (2) Wetlands protection and floodplain management; (3) Capability of the existing facility to meet anticipated future needs of Pantex (4) Existing facility design life; and (5) Use of treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water for irrigation. Evaluation during the internal scoping led to the conclusion that the following conditions are not present, nor of concern at the proposed site on Pantex Plant, and no further analysis was conducted: (1) State or national parks, forests, or other conservation areas; (2) Wild and scenic rivers; (3) Natural resources, such as timber, range, soils, minerals; (4) Properties of historic, archeological, or architectural significance; (5) Native American concerns; (6) Minority and low-income populations; and (7) Prime or unique farmland. In this document, DOE describes the proposed action and a reasonable range of alternatives to the proposed action, including the ''No-Action'' alternative. The proposed action cited in the ''U.S. Department of Energy Application for a Texas Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit Modifying Permit to Dispose of Waste, No. 02296,'' December 1998, included the construction of a new wastewater treatment facility, a new irrigation storage pond, and the conversion of the current wastewater treatment facility into an irrigation storage pond. Although a permit modification application has been filed, if a decision on this EA necessitates it, an amendment to the permit application would be made. The permit application would be required for any of the alternatives and the filing does not preclude or predetermine selection of an alternative considered by this EA. This permit change would allow Pantex to land-dispose treated wastewater by irrigating agricultural land. This construction for the proposed action would include designing two new lagoons for wastewater treatment. One of the lagoons could function as a facultative lagoon for treatment of wastewater. The second lagoon would serve as an irrigation storage impoundment (storage pond), with the alternative use as a facultative lagoon if the first lagoon is out of service for any reason. The new facultative lagoon and irrigation water storage pond would be sited outside of the 100-year flood plain. The existing WWTF lagoon would be used as a storage pond for treated wastewater effluent for irrigation water, as needed. The two new lagoons would be li

N /A

1999-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

369

Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management  

SciTech Connect

Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by nitrification helped to reduce the corrosivity and biocide demand. Also, the lower pH and alkalinity resulting from nitrification reduced the scaling to an acceptable level, without the addition of anti-scalant chemicals. Additional GAC adsorption treatment, MWW_NFG, yielded no net benefit. Removal of organic matter resulted in pitting corrosion in copper and cupronickel alloys. Negligible improvement was observed in scaling control and biofouling control. For all of the tertiary treatments, biofouling control was achievable, and most effectively with pre-formed monochloramine (2-3 ppm) in comparison with NaOCl and ClO2. Life cycle cost (LCC) analyses were performed for the tertiary treatment systems studied experimentally and for several other treatment options. A public domain conceptual costing tool (LC3 model) was developed for this purpose. MWW_SF (lime softening and sand filtration) and MWW_NF were the most cost-effective treatment options among the tertiary treatment alternatives considered because of the higher effluent quality with moderate infrastructure costs and the relatively low doses of conditioning chemicals required. Life cycle inventory (LCI) analysis along with integration of external costs of emissions with direct costs was performed to evaluate relative emissions to the environment and external costs associated with construction and operation of tertiary treatment alternatives. Integrated LCI and LCC analysis indicated that three-tiered treatment alternatives such as MWW_NSF and MWW_NFG, with regular chemical addition for treatment and conditioning and/or regeneration, tend to increase the impact costs and in turn the overall costs of tertiary treatment. River water supply and MWW_F alternatives with a single step of tertiary treatment were associated with lower impact costs, but the contribution of impact costs to overall annual costs was higher than all other treatment alternatives. MWW_NF and MWW_SF alternatives exhibited moderate external impact costs with moderate infrastructure and chemical conditioner dosing, which makes them (especially

David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

370

WASTE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION PLANT U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF RIVER PROTECTION SUBMERGED BED SCRUBBER CONDENSATE DISPOSITION PROJECT - ABSTRACT # 13460  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will generate an off-gas treatment system secondary liquid waste stream [submerged bed scrubber (SBS) condensate], which is currently planned for recycle back to the WTP Low Activity Waste (LAW) melter. This SBS condensate waste stream is high in Tc-99, which is not efficiently captured in the vitrified glass matrix. A pre-conceptual engineering study was prepared in fiscal year 2012 to evaluate alternate flow paths for melter off-gas secondary liquid waste generated by the WTP LAW facility. This study evaluated alternatives for direct off-site disposal of this SBS without pre-treatment, which mitigates potential issues associated with recycling.

YANOCHO RM; CORCORAN C

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

DEVELOPMENT OF A MACRO-BATCH QUALIFICATION STRATEGY FOR THE HANFORD TANK WASTE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION PLANT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has evaluated the existing waste feed qualification strategy for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) based on experience from the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) waste qualification program. The current waste qualification programs for each of the sites are discussed in the report to provide a baseline for comparison. Recommendations on strategies are then provided that could be implemented at Hanford based on the successful Macrobatch qualification strategy utilized at SRS to reduce the risk of processing upsets or the production of a staged waste campaign that does not meet the processing requirements of the WTP. Considerations included the baseline WTP process, as well as options involving Direct High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) processing, and the potential use of a Tank Waste Characterization and Staging Facility (TWCSF). The main objectives of the Hanford waste feed qualification program are to demonstrate compliance with the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), determine waste processability, and demonstrate unit operations at a laboratory scale. Risks to acceptability and successful implementation of this program, as compared to the DWPF Macro-Batch qualification strategy, include: ? Limitations of mixing/blending capability of the Hanford Tank Farm; ? The complexity of unit operations (i.e., multiple chemical and mechanical separations processes) involved in the WTP pretreatment qualification process; ? The need to account for effects of blending of LAW and HLW streams, as well as a recycle stream, within the PT unit operations; and ? The reliance on only a single set of unit operations demonstrations with the radioactive qualification sample. This later limitation is further complicated because of the 180-day completion requirement for all of the necessary waste feed qualification steps. The primary recommendations/changes include the following: ? Collection and characterization of samples for relevant process analytes from the tanks to be blended during the staging process; ? Initiation of qualification activities earlier in the staging process to optimize the campaign composition through evaluation from both a processing and glass composition perspective; ? Definition of the parameters that are important for processing in the WTP facilities (unit operations) across the anticipated range of wastes and as they relate to qualification-scale equipment; ? Performance of limited testing with simulants ahead of the waste feed qualification sample demonstration as needed to determine the available processing window for that campaign; and ? Demonstration of sufficient mixing in the staging tank to show that the waste qualification sample chemical and physical properties are representative of the transfers to be made to WTP. Potential flowcharts for derivatives of the Hanford waste feed qualification process are also provided in this report. While these recommendations are an extension of the existing WTP waste qualification program, they are more in line with the processes currently performed for SRS. The implementation of these processes at SRS has been shown to offer flexibility for processing, having identified potential processing issues ahead of the qualification or facility processing, and having provided opportunity to optimize waste loading and throughput in the DWPF.

Herman, C.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

372

Biogas From Municipal WWTPs: Fuel Cells Viewed as a Value Proposition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

From Municipal WWTPs From Municipal WWTPs Fuel Cells Viewed as a Value Proposition Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado June 12, 2012 WWTP Anaerobic Digestion * Common method of processing sludge to reduce volume of solids & volatile content * Reduces sludge disposal cost & increases outlets for disposal * Since motivation is disposal rather than digester gas (DG) production, the DG is available at no cost * This is unlike many other organic waste digestion facilities, where the energy project must bear cost of the digester(s) WWTP Anaerobic Digestion * WWTP anaerobic digesters require heat * Typically a portion of the DG is used to produce steam or hot water to provide the heat * The heat required varies seasonally,

373

Studio di fattibilit per un impianto a biogas nel settore vitivinicolo: il caso della "Cantina Valpantena Verona S.c.a.".  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Analisi del settore biogas dal punto di vista energetico,tecnico e normativo, con riferimento al DM 6 luglio 2012 (Decreto rinnovabili).Il caso di studio specifico riguarda (more)

Bonfante, Nicola

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Effects of total solids concentrations of poultry, cattle, and piggery waste slurries on biogas yield  

SciTech Connect

The effects of total solids concentrations of poultry, cattle and piggery waste slurries on biogas yield was investigated. Twelve laboratory-size anaerobic batch digesters with 25 L volume were constructed and used for the experiments. Three replicates of 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% TS concentrations of poultry, cattle, and piggery waste slurries were anaerobically digested for a 30-day detention period and gas yield was measured by the method of water displacement. Temperature variation within the digesters was measured with a maximum and minimum thermometer. Anaerobic digestion of the slurries was undertaken in the mesophilic temperature range (20--40 C). The carbon:nitrogen ratio of each of the slurries digested was determined. The carbon content was determined using the wackley-Black method, and nitrogen content was determined by the regular kjeldhal method. The pH was measured weekly during the period of digestion from a digital pH meter. Gas quality (% methane fraction) was also measured weekly from an analyzer. Coefficient of variation was computed to ascertain the status of the digestion process. Analysis of variance was used to determine the significant difference in gas yield at p < 0.05. Duncan's New Multiple Range Test at p < 0.05 was used to analyze the difference in gas yield among the various TS concentrations of the slurries investigated. The results indicate that biogas yield is of the order: 5% TS > 10% TS > 15% TS > 20% TS. This result shows that gas yield increases with decreasing TS concentration of the slurries. The ANOVA showed that the gas yield from the various TS % was significantly different (p < 0.05). DNMRT showed that there was significant difference in gas yield from the slurries and wastetypes investigated. Poultry waste slurries had the greatest gas yield (L CH4/kg TS) as the gas yield from the waste types was of the order: Poultry > Piggery > Cattle. The pH of the slurries was of the range 5.5 to 6.8 (weakly acidic). The C:N of the slurries varied between 6:1 and 9:1. The Coefficient of Variation (CV) for 10 consecutive days of digestion was less than 10% indicating a steady state in all the digesters.

Itodo, I.N.; Awulu, J.O.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

& Immobilization Plant Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the current mixing, erosion, corrosion, instrumentation and monitoring challenges at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) in Hanford. The "black cell" design concept and the use of...

376

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - May 2013 May 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The U.S....

377

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2013 March 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The U.S....

378

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - October 2012 October 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The U. S....

379

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2012 March 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality The...

380

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - November 2011 November 2011 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality The...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - August 2011 August 2011 Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The Office of Safety...

382

Independent Oversight Assessment of the Nuclear Safety Culture and Management of Nuclear Safety Concerns at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, January 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety and Security HSS Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture and Management of Nuclear Safety Concerns at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant January 2012 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Enforcement and Oversight Abbreviations Used in this Report i Executive Summary iii Recommendations xi 1.0 Introduction 1 1.1 Background 2 1.2 Scope and Methodology 6 2.0 Current Safety Culture 9 2.1 Background 9 2.2 Scope and Methods 10 2.3 ORP (including DOE-WTP) 11 2.4 BNI 11 2.5 WTP Project 12 3.0 ORP Management of Safety Concerns 15 3.1 Corrective Actions for the 2010 HSS Review 15 3.2 Processes for Managing Issues 16

383

December 27, 2011, Department letter transmitting the Implementation Plan for Board Recommendation 2011-1, Safety Culture at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 27,2011 December 27,2011 The Honorable Peter S. Winokur Chairman Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 625 Indiana Avenue, NW, Suite 700 Washington, DC 20004 Dear Mr. Chairman: Enclosed is the Depmiment of Energy's (DOE's) Implementation Plan (IP) for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) Recommendation 2011-1, Safety Culture at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). On June 30, 20 II, the Department accepted Recommendation 20 Il-l in a letter to the Board, which was published in the Federal Register. On August 12,2011, the Board sought additional clarification about this acceptance, and on September 19,2011, I transmitted clarification to the Board, which was also published in the Federal Register. The IP provides DOE's approach to address the Board's three sub-recommendations

384

Review of Documented Safety Analysis Development for the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (LBL Facilities), April 23, 2013 (HSS CRAD 45-58, Rev. 0)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of U.S. Department of Energy Subject: Review of Documented Safety Analysis Development for the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immob ilization Plant (LBL Facilities) - C riteria and Review Approach D oc um~ HS: HSS CRAD 45-58 Rev: 0 Eff. Date: April 23, 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Acting Di rec or, Office of Safety and Emergency Nltanagement Evaluations Date: Apri l 23 , 20 13 Criteria and Review Approach Document ~~ trd,James Low Date: April 23 , 20 13 1.0 PURPOSE Within the Office of H.ealth, Safety and Security (HSS), the Office of Enforcement and Overs ight, Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) miss io n is to assess the effectiveness of the environment, safety, health, and emergency management systems and practices used by line and

385

Independent Oversight Assessment of the Nuclear Safety Culture and Management of Nuclear Safety Concerns at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, January 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety and Security HSS Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture and Management of Nuclear Safety Concerns at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant January 2012 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Enforcement and Oversight Abbreviations Used in this Report i Executive Summary iii Recommendations xi 1.0 Introduction 1 1.1 Background 2 1.2 Scope and Methodology 6 2.0 Current Safety Culture 9 2.1 Background 9 2.2 Scope and Methods 10 2.3 ORP (including DOE-WTP) 11 2.4 BNI 11 2.5 WTP Project 12 3.0 ORP Management of Safety Concerns 15 3.1 Corrective Actions for the 2010 HSS Review 15 3.2 Processes for Managing Issues 16

386

Assessment of Waste Treatment Plant Lab C3V (LB-S1) Stack Sampling Probe Location for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a series of tests used to assess the proposed air sampling location in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Lab C3V (LB-S1) exhaust stack with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Federal regulations require that an air sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack in accordance with the criteria of American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream.

Glissmeyer, John A.; Geeting, John GH

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Technical progress and community relations activities for the fluidized bed thermal treatment process at the Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect

A fluidized bed system is being developed at Rocky Flats for the treatment of mixed waste (a mixture of radioactive and chemically hazardous waste). The current program builds on experience gained in the 1970's and 1980's in tests with bench-scale, pilot-scale, and demonstration-scale fluidized bed incinerators. Rocky Flat's fluidized bed system operates at low temperatures ([approximately]525--600[degrees]C) which eliminates many of the disadvantages associated with high temperature thermal treatment processes. The bed makes use of in situ neutralization of acidic off-gases by incorporating either sodium carbonate or a mixture of sodium carbonate and bicarbonate (Trona) in the bed media. This obviates using wet scrubbers to treat the off-gas. It is expected that once in production, the fluidized bed process will yield up to a 40:1 reduction in the volume of the waste feed. The current development program for the full-scale system is a nationwide effort incorporating input from national laboratories, universities, regulatory agencies, and private companies to assure the most current technology is utilized and that regulatory concerns are addressed. In addition to resolving technological issues, the fluidized bed program is addressing public concerns with a proactive community relations program.

Semones, G.B.; Williams, P.M.; Stiefvater, S.P.; Mitchell, D.L.; Roecker, B.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Technical progress and community relations activities for the fluidized bed thermal treatment process at the Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect

A fluidized bed system is being developed at Rocky Flats for the treatment of mixed waste (a mixture of radioactive and chemically hazardous waste). The current program builds on experience gained in the 1970`s and 1980`s in tests with bench-scale, pilot-scale, and demonstration-scale fluidized bed incinerators. Rocky Flat`s fluidized bed system operates at low temperatures ({approximately}525--600{degrees}C) which eliminates many of the disadvantages associated with high temperature thermal treatment processes. The bed makes use of in situ neutralization of acidic off-gases by incorporating either sodium carbonate or a mixture of sodium carbonate and bicarbonate (Trona) in the bed media. This obviates using wet scrubbers to treat the off-gas. It is expected that once in production, the fluidized bed process will yield up to a 40:1 reduction in the volume of the waste feed. The current development program for the full-scale system is a nationwide effort incorporating input from national laboratories, universities, regulatory agencies, and private companies to assure the most current technology is utilized and that regulatory concerns are addressed. In addition to resolving technological issues, the fluidized bed program is addressing public concerns with a proactive community relations program.

Semones, G.B.; Williams, P.M.; Stiefvater, S.P.; Mitchell, D.L.; Roecker, B.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Evaluation of Confining Layer Integrity Beneath the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, Dade County, Florida  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review has been performed of existing information that describes geology, hydrogeology, and geochemistry at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, which is operated by the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, in Dade County, Florida. Treated sanitary wastewater is injected into a saline aquifer beneath the plant. Detection of contaminants commonly associated with treated sanitary wastewater in the freshwater aquifer that overlies the saline aquifer has indicated a need for a reevaluation of the ability of the confining layer above the saline aquifer to prevent fluid migration into the overlying freshwater aquifer. Review of the available data shows that the geologic data set is not sufficient to demonstrate that a competent confining layer is present between the saline and freshwater aquifers. The hydrogeologic data also do not indicate that a competent confining layer is present. The geochemical data show that the freshwater aquifer is contaminated with treated wastewater, and the spatial patterns of contamination are consistent with upward migration through localized conduits through the Middle Confining Unit, such as leaking wells or natural features. Recommendations for collection and interpretation of additional site characterization data are provided.

Starr, R.C.; Green, T.S.; Hull, L.C.

2001-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

390

Evaluation of Confining Layer Integrity Beneath the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, Dade County, Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review has been performed of existing information that describes geology, hydrogeology, and geochemistry at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, which is operated by the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, in Dade County, Florida. Treated sanitary wastewater is injected into a saline aquifer beneath the plant. Detection of contaminants commonly associated with treated sanitary wastewater in the freshwater aquifer that overlies the saline aquifer has indicated a need for a reevaluation of the ability of the confining layer above the saline aquifer to prevent fluid migration into the overlying freshwater aquifer. Review of the available data shows that the geologic data set is not sufficient to demonstrate that a competent confining layer is present between the saline and freshwater aquifers. The hydrogeologic data also do not indicate that a competent confining layer is present. The geochemical data show that the freshwater aquifer is contaminated with treated wastewater, and the spatial patterns of contamination are consistent with upward migration through localized conduits through the Middle Confining Unit, such as leaking wells or natural features. Recommendations for collection and interpretation of additional site characterization data are provided.

Starr, Robert Charles; Green, Timothy Scott; Hull, Laurence Charles

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Waste treatment: Beverage industry. (Latest citations from Food Science & Technology Abstracts (FSTA)). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning waste treatment in the alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverage industries. Brewery effluent and wastewater management and disposal are reviewed. References cover aerobic treatment, sources of effluents, waste reduction, waste fermentation, effluent purification, and cost-effectiveness evaluation. The use of wastes for biogas production and for building material manufacture is examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Sources of methane in China: A program to estimate emissions from rice paddy fields, bio-gas pits, and urban areas: Annual progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are measuring methane from rice paddy fields and bio-gas pits. The project has produced new results that we are using to sharply focus the present study. We measured ambient concentrations at Minqin, Beijing, and Chendu. We obtained flux measurements from bio-gas pits, and flux measurements from rice paddy fields. Minqin is a background site with no large local sources of methane such as rice fields or urban areas. It serves as control for the experiment. Beijing is representative of a large industrialized Chinese city not affected by rice agriculture but heavily dependent on burning coal for cooking and heating. Chendu is in the heart of the rice producing areas of China where rice paddies cover millions of acres and methane from bio-gas pits is an important source of energy. Further progress was impeded by a lack of a formal agreement between the US and PRC, which was not signed until August 1987. 9 figs.

Rasmussen, R.A.; Khalil, M.A.K.

1987-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

393

Experimental co-digestion of corn stalk and vermicompost to improve biogas production  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobic co-digestion of corn stalk and vermicompost (VC) as well as mono-digestion of corn stalk were investigated. Batch mono-digestion experiments were performed at 35 {+-} 1 {sup o}C and initial total solid loading (TSL) ranged from 1.2% to 6.0%. Batch co-digestion experiments were performed at 35 {+-} 1 {sup o}C and initial TSL of 6% with VC proportions ranged from 20% to 80% of total solid (TS). For mono-digestion of corn stalk, a maximum methane yield of 217.60 {+-} 13.87 mL/g TS{sub added} was obtained at initial TSL of 4.8%, and acidification was found at initial TSL of 6.0% with the lowest pH value of 5.10 on day 4. Co-digestion improved the methane yields by 4.42-58.61% via enhancing volatile fatty acids (VFAs) concentration and pH value compared with mono-digestion of corn stalk. The maximum biogas yield of 410.30 {+-} 11.01 mL/g TS{sub added} and methane yield of 259.35 {+-} 13.85 mL/g TS{sub added} were obtained for 40% VC addition. Structure analysis by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) showed that the lowest crystallinity of 35.04 of digested corn stalk was obtained from co-digestion with 40% VC, which decreased 29.4% compared to 49.6 obtained from un-treated corn stalk. It is concluded that co-digestion with VC is beneficial for improving biodigestibility and methane yield from corn stalk.

Chen Guangyin [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zheng Zheng, E-mail: zzhenghj@fudan.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yang Shiguan [National Engineering Laboratory of Biomass Power Generation Equipment, School of Renewable Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Fang Caixia; Zou Xingxing; Luo Yan [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Malavi Power Plant Ltd MPPL pltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Malavi Power Plant Ltd MPPL pltd Malavi Power Plant Ltd MPPL pltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Malavi Power Plant Ltd. (MPPL pltd) Place Bangalore, India Zip 560 001 Sector Biomass Product Biomass/biogas project developer and plant operator. Coordinates 12.97092°, 77.60482° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":12.97092,"lon":77.60482,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

395

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

396

Decision Document for the Storm Water Outfalls/Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant, Pesticide Rinse Area, Old Fire Fighting Training Pit, Illicit PCB Dump Site, and the Battery Acid Pit Fort Lewis, Washington  

SciTech Connect

PNNL conducted independent site evaluations for four sites at Fort Lewis, Washington, to determine their suitability for closure on behalf of the installation. These sites were recommended for "No Further Action" by previous invesitgators and included the Storm Water Outfalls/Industrial Waste Water Treatment Plant (IWTP), the Pesticide Rinse Area, the Old Fire Fighting Training Pit, and the Illicit PCB Dump Site.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Liikala, Terry L.; Strenge, Dennis L.; Taira, Randal Y.

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

397

Quantitative Analyses of Anaerobic Wastewater Treatment Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-generation biodiesel, ethanol, or biogas to the transport sector to be blended with fossil fuels. Still under

Timmer, Jens

398

REPORT ON QUALITATIVE VALIDATION EXPERIMENTS USING LITHIUM-ALUMINUM LAYERED DOUBLE-HYDROXIDES FOR THE REDUCTION OF ALUMINUM FROM THE WASTE TREATMENT PLANT FEEDSTOCK  

SciTech Connect

A process for removing aluminum from tank waste simulants by adding lithium and precipitating Li-Al-dihydroxide (Lithiumhydrotalcite, [LiAl{sub 2}(OH){sub 6}]{sup +}X{sup -}) has been verified. The tests involved a double-shell tank (DST) simulant and a single-shell tank (SST) simulant. In the case of the DST simulant, the product was the anticipated Li-hydrotalcite. For the SST simulant, the product formed was primarily Li-phosphate. However, adding excess Li to the solution did result in the formation of traces of Li-hydrotalcite. The Li-hydrotalcite from the DST supernate was an easily filterable solid. After four water washes the filter cake was a fluffy white material made of < 100 {micro}m particles made of smaller spheres. These spheres are agglomerates of {approx} 5 {micro}m diameter platelets with < 1 {micro}m thickness. Chemical and mineralogical analyses of the filtrate, filter cake, and wash waters indicate a removal of 90+ wt% of the dissolved Al for the DST simulant. For the SST simulant, the main competing reaction to the formation of lithium hydrotalcite appears to be the formation of lithium phosphate. In case of the DST simulant, phosphorus co-precipitated with the hydrotalcite. This would imply the added benefit of the removal of phosphorus along with aluminum in the pre-treatment part of the waste treatment and immobilization plant (WTP). For this endeavor to be successful, a serious effort toward process parameter optimization is necessary. Among the major issues to be addressed are the dependency of the reaction yield on the solution chemistry, as well as residence times, temperatures, and an understanding of particle growth.

HUBER HJ; DUNCAN JB; COOKE GA

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

399

!ncredible Kerala? A Political Ecological Analysis of Organic Agriculture in the "Model for Development"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vermi- composting and biogas slurry. 8.4 Formulate specialshould be given for use of biogas plants, solar energy and

Thottathil, Sapna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Implementation of Recommendations from the One System Comparative Evaluation of the Hanford Tank Farms and Waste Treatment Plant Safety Bases - 14137  

SciTech Connect

A Comparative Evaluation was conducted for One System Integrated Project Team to compare the safety bases for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project (WTP) and Tank Operations Contract (TOC) (i.e., Tank Fanns) by an Expert Review Team. The evaluation had an overarching purpose to facilitate effective integration between WTP and TOC safety bases. It was to provide One System management with an objective evaluation of identified differences in safety basis process requirements, guidance, direction, procedures, and products (including safety controls, key safety basis inputs and assumptions, and consequence calculation methodologies) between WTP and TOC. The evaluation identified 25 recommendations (Opportunities for Integration). The resolution of these recommendations resulted in 16 implementation plans. The completion of these implementation plans will help ensure consistent safety bases for WTP and TOC along with consistent safety basis processes. procedures, and analyses. and should increase the likelihood of a successful startup of the WTP. This early integration will result in long-term cost savings and significant operational improvements. In addition, the implementation plans lead to the development of eight new safety analysis methodologies that can be used at other U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) complex sites where URS Corporation is involved.

Garrett, Richard L.; Niemi, Belinda J.; Paik, Ingle K.; Buczek, Jeffrey A.; Lietzow, J.; McCoy, F.; Beranek, F.; Gupta, M.

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Breweries: An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001). Assessment of Biogas Use as an Energy Source fromin the wastewater into a biogas that can be used on site.

Galitsky, Christina; Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Lehman, Bryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gasolines and diesels, biogas, synthetic natural gas,manure- biodigesters (biogas). Biomethane has similarin landfill gas Methane in biogas from waste-water treatment

Farrell, Alexander; Sperling, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

The soil organic matter dynamic by using different compost organic manure in a vegetable system in North China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to cattle manure compost and biogas residue compost. Higherafter crop harvest in biogas residue compost treatment.2) cattle compost, 3) biogas residue, 4) control, no

Sun, Qinping; Li, Jijin; Liu, Bensheng; Zou, Guoyuan; Liu, Baocun

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sludge treatment to increase biogas production. Available atal. , no date) Use of biogas from anaerobic sludge digestionsludge are mass reduction, biogas production, and improved

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

manure- biodigesters (biogas). Biomethane has similargasolines and diesels, biogas, synthetic natural gas,in landfill gas Methane in biogas from waste-water treatment

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant LAW Melter and Melter Off-gas Process System Hazards Analysis _Oct 21-31  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-WTP-2013-10-21 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter and Melter Off-gas Process System Hazards Analysis Activities Dates of Activity : 10/21/13 - 10/31/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (Independent Oversight) reviewed the Insight software hazard evaluation (HE) tables for hazard analysis (HA) generated to date for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter and Off-gas systems, observed a

407

Independent Oversight Activity Report for Catholic University of America Vitreous State Laboratory Tour and Discussion of Experiments Conducted in Support of Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Select Systems Design, November 18, 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Number: HIAR-VSL-2013-11-18 Site: Catholic University of America - Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Catholic University of America Vitreous State Laboratory Tour and Discussion of Experiments Conducted in Support of Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Select Systems Design Date of Activity : 11/18/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) is the contractor responsible for the design and construction of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection. BNI is

408

Optimization of Energy and Water Consumption in Cornbased Ethanol Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

developed for cheaper production of DME from natural gas, syngas (and, in the future, biogas).2 Moreover

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

409

OCTOBER 2011 CEC3002011009SD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.......................................................................................................................................... 17 Biogas..............................................................................................................................54 Biogas

410

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilizati...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - December 2013 December 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality This report...

411

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site Waste Treatment and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, August 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, August 2013 August 2013 Review of the...

412

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WTP Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant ii Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality 1.0 PURPOSE The U....

413

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WTP Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant ii Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality 1.0 PURPOSE The...

414

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project 1 Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality 1.0...

415

An Interdisciplinary Study on Farm Based Biogas Production in Southern Brazil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Today the use of anaerobic digestion technique emerges as an alternative to the conventional treatment method of pig slurry to the pig producers in (more)

Hjort, Anders

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Water treatment on wheels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design options and combinations of fixed and mobile demineralization equipment give power plant operators the flexibility to continually optimize their water treatment system to meet rapidly changing needs. The article classifies water treatment service contracts for demineralized water into four categories and presents associated design, economic and operational advantages to power plant designers, constructors, owners and operators. 1 tab.

Taylor, R.T.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) General Contingency Plan for Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant  

SciTech Connect

This contingency plan provides a description of the Y-12 plant and its waste units and prescribes control procedures and emergency response procedures. It lists emergency and spill response equipment, provides information on coordination agreements with local agencies, and describes the evacuation plan and reporting requirements.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Microbiological characterization and specific methanogenic activity of anaerobe sludges used in urban solid waste treatment  

SciTech Connect

This study presents the microbiological characterization of the anaerobic sludge used in a two-stage anaerobic reactor for the treatment of organic fraction of urban solid waste (OFUSW). This treatment is one alternative for reducing solid waste in landfills at the same time producing a biogas (CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}) and an effluent that can be used as biofertilizer. The system was inoculated with sludge from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) (Rio Frio Plant in Bucaramanga-Colombia) and a methanogenic anaerobic digester for the treatment of pig manure (Mesa de los Santos in Santander). Bacterial populations were evaluated by counting groups related to oxygen sensitivity, while metabolic groups were determined by most probable number (MPN) technique. Specific methanogenic activity (SMA) for acetate, formate, methanol and ethanol substrates was also determined. In the acidogenic reactor (R1), volatile fatty acids (VFA) reached values of 25,000 mg L{sup -1} and a concentration of CO{sub 2} of 90%. In this reactor, the fermentative population was predominant (10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} MPN mL{sup -1}). The acetogenic population was (10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}) and the sulphate-reducing population was (10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}). In the methanogenic reactor (R2), levels of CH{sub 4} (70%) were higher than CO{sub 2} (25%), whereas the VFA values were lower than 4000 mg L{sup -1}. Substrate competition between sulphate-reducing (10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}) and methanogenic bacteria (10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}) was not detected. From the SMA results obtained, acetoclastic (2.39 g COD-CH{sub 4} g{sup -1} VSS{sup -1} day{sup -1}) and hydrogenophilic (0.94 g COD-CH{sub 4} g{sup -1} VSS{sup -1} day{sup -1}) transformations as possible metabolic pathways used by methanogenic bacteria is suggested from the SMA results obtained. Methanotrix sp., Methanosarcina sp., Methanoccocus sp. and Methanobacterium sp. were identified.

Sandoval Lozano, Claudia Johanna [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Ambientales, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Calle 9A Carrera 27, Aptdo Aereo 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia)], E-mail: ceiam@uis.edu.co; Vergara Mendoza, Marisol; Carreno de Arango, Mariela; Castillo Monroy, Edgar Fernando [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Ambientales, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Calle 9A Carrera 27, Aptdo Aereo 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Parameter identification in dynamical models of anaerobic waste water treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

remain the implementation of biogas, moving farms and implementing regulations, they could nevertheless priority on the growth of production. Two main measures are pro- moted: the development of biogas systems, of the VAC kind, usually owning a biogas digester and located outside the village. - semi-intensive "gia trai

Timmer, Jens

420

Green Industrial Policy: Trade and Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of solar water heaters, biogas plants and other projects.through black pipes and tanks. Biogas plants (used often foran estimated 50 million biogas plants, funded in part by low

Karp, Larry; Stevenson, Megan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Membrane Filtration and Ozonation of Poultry Chiller Overflow Water: Study of Membrane Treatment To Reduce Water Use and Ozonation for Sanitation at a Poultry Processing Plant in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Poultry processing plants use large volume of water and the cost of obtaining and disposal of water is increasing rapidly. HACCP quality control procedures introduced recently have increased the water and compounded the situation. Chlorine is widely used in sanitation of poultry operations. Chlorine generates several byproducts that are proven to be harmful from food safety and environmental points of view. The search for alternatives to chlorine in poultry operations, particularly in the chiller, is of ...

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Idaho | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act REEZ Nampa Wastewater Treatment Plant Biogas Boiler Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07082010 Location(s): Nampa, Idaho...

423

CX-000976: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Town of Christiansburg Wastewater Treatment Plant Combined Heat and Power from Biogas CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B1.31, B5.1 Date: 02192010 Location(s): Christiansburg,...

424

CX-002959: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act REEZ Nampa Wastewater Treatment Plant Biogas Boiler Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07082010 Location(s): Nampa, Idaho...

425

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestme...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Town of Christiansburg Wastewater Treatment Plant Combined Heat and Power from Biogas CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B1.31, B5.1 Date: 02192010 Location(s): Christiansburg,...

426

Energy Department Applauds World's First Fuel Cell and Hydrogen...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Fountain Valley tri-generation fuel cell and hydrogen energy station uses biogas from the municipal wastewater treatment plant as the fuel for a fuel cell. The system...

427

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Town of Christiansburg Wastewater Treatment Plant Combined Heat and Power from Biogas CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B1.31, B5.1 Date: 02192010 Location(s): Christiansburg,...

428

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Golden Field Office | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act REEZ Nampa Wastewater Treatment Plant Biogas Boiler Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07082010 Location(s): Nampa, Idaho...

429

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act REEZ Nampa Wastewater Treatment Plant Biogas Boiler Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07082010 Location(s): Nampa, Idaho...

430

Anaerobic treatment in decentralised and source ... - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

and biogas production provide good biomass- wastewater contact. Reductions of total COD from sewage up to 8090% are reported. At tem- peratures above...

431

Plant Operational Status - Pantex Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status Plant Operational Status Page Content Operational Status Shift 1 - Day The Pantex Plant is open for normal operations. All personnel are to report for duty according to...

432

Environmental Assessment for the Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the US Department of Energy`s Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

The glass melter would thermally treat mixed waste (hazardous waste contaminated with radioactive constituents largely tritium, Pu-238, and/or Th-230) that was generated at the Mound Plant and is now in storage, by stabilizing the waste in glass blocks. Depending on the radiation level of the waste, the glass melter may operate for 1 to 6 years. Two onsite alternatives and seven offsite alternatives were considered. This environmental assessment indicates that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA, and therefore the finding of no significant impact is made, obviating the need for an environmental impact statement.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Formal verification of wastewater treatment processes using events detected from continuous signals by means of artificial neural networks. Case study: SBR plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a modular architecture for the analysis and the validation of wastewater treatment processes. An algorithm using neural networks is used to extract the relevant qualitative patterns, such as ''apexes'', ''knees'' and ''steps'', from ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks, Business process management, Event detection, Intelligent systems, Rule-based management system, SBR

Luca Luccarini; Gianni Luigi Bragadin; Gabriele Colombini; Maurizio Mancini; Paola Mello; Marco Montali; Davide Sottara

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Ir. Charles Mussche 8 Spruce St, New York  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Electricity Assessments, Biogas Plant Feasibility Assessments and Investment Payback, PV for the construction of a biogas plant resulting in a 74% reduction in electricity needs

435

Optimization criteria for the stabilization of sewage sludge and biogas production through anaerobic digestion: an example of an environmental biotechnology application  

SciTech Connect

According to environmental protection and energy conservation principles, anaerobic digestion of activated sludges should have two main purposes: to stabilize the sludge within allowable limits and to increase biogas production as much as possible, in order to meet ecological requirement without neglecting a particular energy source. This implies optimization procedures for the design of the process, based upon its actual kinetics. This optimization has been developed in the present paper on the basis of experimental results on anaerobic digestion kinetics achieved in previous research.

Ferraiolo, G.; Del Borghi, M.; Gardi, R.; Solisio, C.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Cooling Towers GE Global Research will develop treatment technologies to enable power plant use of non-traditional waters. Using effective treatment methods to make...

437

Exploitation of olive mill wastewater and liquid cow manure for biogas production  

SciTech Connect

Co-digestion of organic waste streams is an innovative technology for the reduction of methane/greenhouse gas emissions. Different organic substrates are combined to generate a homogeneous mixture as input to the anaerobic reactor in order to increase process performance, realize a more efficient use of equipment and cost-sharing by processing multiple waste streams in a single facility. In this study, the potential of anaerobic digestion for the treatment of a mixture containing olive mill wastewater (OMW) and liquid cow manure (LCM) using a two-stage process has been evaluated by using two continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) under mesophilic conditions (35 {sup o}C) in order to separately monitor and control the processes of acidogenesis and methanogenesis. The overall process was studied with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 19 days. The digester was continuously fed with an influent composed (v/v) of 20% OMW and 80% LCM. The average removal of dissolved and total COD was 63.2% and 50%, respectively. The volatile solids (VS) removal was 34.2% for the examined mixture of feedstocks operating the system at an overall OLR of 3.63 g CODL{sub reactor}{sup -1}d{sup -1}. Methane production rate at the steady state reached 0.91 L CH{sub 4}L{sub reactor}{sup -1}d{sup -1} or 250.9 L CH{sub 4} at standard temperature and pressure conditions (STP) per kg COD fed to the system.

Dareioti, Margarita A.; Dokianakis, Spyros N.; Stamatelatou, Katerina; Zafiri, Constantina [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, 1 Karatheodori St., GR 26500 Patras (Greece); Kornaros, Michael, E-mail: kornaros@chemeng.upatras.g [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, 1 Karatheodori St., GR 26500 Patras (Greece)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Site Familiarization and Introduction of New Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead for the Office of River Protection Waste Treatment Plant and Tank Farms, February 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HIAR-HANFORD-2013-02-25 HIAR-HANFORD-2013-02-25 Site: Hanford - Office of River Production Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Site Familiarization and Introduction of New Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead Dates of Activity : 02/25/13 - 03/07/13 and 03/18-28/13 Report Preparer: Robert E. Farrell Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) assigned a new Site Lead to provide continuous oversight of activities at the Office of River Protection (ORP) Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and tank farms. To gain familiarity with the site programs and personnel, the new Site Lead made

439

Site Familiarization and Introduction of New Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead for the Office of River Protection Waste Treatment Plant and Tank Farms, February 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HIAR-HANFORD-2013-02-25 HIAR-HANFORD-2013-02-25 Site: Hanford - Office of River Production Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Site Familiarization and Introduction of New Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead Dates of Activity : 02/25/13 - 03/07/13 and 03/18-28/13 Report Preparer: Robert E. Farrell Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) assigned a new Site Lead to provide continuous oversight of activities at the Office of River Protection (ORP) Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and tank farms. To gain familiarity with the site programs and personnel, the new Site Lead made

440

The Social Complexity of Renewable Energy Production in the Countryside  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in one case. Biomass or Biogas plants for electricityand heat production 24 Biogas plants use manure and energythat they do not run on biogas but biological waste or wood.

Kunze, Conrad; Busch, Henner

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EA-1190: Wastewater Treatment Capability Upgrade, Amarillo, Texas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed upgrade of the U.S. Department of Energy Pantex Plant Wastewater Treatment Plant in Amarillo, Texas.

442

Existing systems review of treatment media for the Bear Creek Valley treatability study, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ treatment has been proposed as a remediation alternative for surface water and groundwater contaminated with uranium and nitrate as a result of former waste disposal practices in the S-3 Ponds. Interceptor trenches containing reactive media have been proposed to treat groundwater, and constructed wetlands and/or algal mats are potential alternatives for treating surface water. This report presents the results from testing of ten different reactive media, and combinations of media, that are candidates for use in the proposed interceptor trenches to remove uranium and nitrate from groundwater. It also presents the results of testing and evaluation of algal mats and wetlands for removing uranium and nitrate from surface water.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Frozen plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frozen plants Frozen plants Name: janicehu Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Why do some plants freeze and others do not? Replies: The main reason some plants freeze and others do not is that some plants do not have much water in them. Pine tree leaves have little water and are therefore difficult to freeze. Another reason is that some plants make chemicals to put into their fluids that reduce the freezing temperature. Salts and oils are some. The polyunsaturated fats found in many plants freeze at a lower temperature than the saturated fats found in many animals. Therefore plant fats are liquid (oils) at room temperature, and animal fats are solid. Plants could not use so many saturated fats as warm blooded animals do or they would freeze up solid at higher temperatures. I know little of plants but many animals can make ethylene glycol to keep themselves from freezing. Ethylene glycol is the active ingredient in car anti-freeze

444

Renewable LNG: Update on the World's Largest Landfill Gas to LNG Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LNG LNG Update on the world's largest landfill gas to LNG plant Mike McGowan Head of Government Affairs Linde NA, Inc. June 12, 2012 $18.3 billion global sales A leading gases and engineering company Linde North America Profile $2.3 billion in gases sales revenue in North America in 2011 5,000 employees throughout the U.S., Canada and the Caribbean Supplier of compressed and cryogenic gases and technology Atmospheric gases - oxygen, nitrogen, argon Helium LNG and LPG Hydrogen Rare gases Plant engineering and supply LNG Petrochemicals Natural gas processing Atmospheric gases 3 Linde's alternative fuels portfolio Green hydrogen production - Magog, Quebec Renewable liquefied natural gas production - Altamont, CA Biogas fueling, LNG import terminal - Sweden

445

Comparison of different procedures to stabilize biogas formation after process failure in a thermophilic waste digestion system: Influence of aggregate formation on process stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanism of process recovery with calcium oxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of insoluble calcium salts with long chain fatty acids and phosphate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption of VFAs by the precipitates resulting in the formation of aggregates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acid uptake and phosphate release by the phosphate-accumulating organisms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microbial degradation of volatile fatty acids in the aggregates. - Abstract: Following a process failure in a full-scale biogas reactor, different counter measures were undertaken to stabilize the process of biogas formation, including the reduction of the organic loading rate, the addition of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and the introduction of calcium oxide (CaO). Corresponding to the results of the process recovery in the full-scale digester, laboratory experiments showed that CaO was more capable of stabilizing the process than NaOH. While both additives were able to raise the pH to a neutral milieu (pH > 7.0), the formation of aggregates was observed particularly when CaO was used as the additive. Scanning electron microscopy investigations revealed calcium phosphate compounds in the core of the aggregates. Phosphate seemed to be released by phosphorus-accumulating organisms, when volatile fatty acids accumulated. The calcium, which was charged by the CaO addition, formed insoluble salts with long chain fatty acids, and caused the precipitation of calcium phosphate compounds. These aggregates were surrounded by a white layer of carbon rich organic matter, probably consisting of volatile fatty acids. Thus, during the process recovery with CaO, the decrease in the amount of accumulated acids in the liquid phase was likely enabled by (1) the formation of insoluble calcium salts with long chain fatty acids, (2) the adsorption of volatile fatty acids by the precipitates, (3) the acid uptake by phosphorus-accumulating organisms and (4) the degradation of volatile fatty acids in the aggregates. Furthermore, this mechanism enabled a stable process performance after re-activation of biogas production. In contrast, during the counter measure with NaOH aggregate formation was only minor resulting in a rapid process failure subsequent the increase of the organic loading rate.

Kleyboecker, A.; Liebrich, M.; Kasina, M. [Microbial GeoEngineering, Helmholtz Centre Potsdam, GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Kraume, M. [Chemical and Process Engineering, Technical University Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Wittmaier, M. [Institute for Recycling and Environmental Protection, Bremen University of Applied Sciences, 28199 Bremen (Germany); Wuerdemann, H., E-mail: wuerdemann@gfz-potsdam.de [Microbial GeoEngineering, Helmholtz Centre Potsdam, GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Carnivorous Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carnivorous Plants Carnivorous Plants Nature Bulletin No. 597-A March 27, 1976 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CARNIVOROUS PLANTS Plants, generally, are eaten by insects or furnish other food for them. But there are a few families of strange plants that, instead, "eat" insects and other small animals. About 500 species are distributed over the world, from the arctic to the tropics. Most of them have peculiar leaves that not only attract insects but are equipped to trap and kill their victims. Even more remarkable is the fact that some have glands which secrete a digestive juice that softens and decomposes the animal until it is absorbed by the plant in much the same way as your stomach digests food.

447

348 P U R S U I T A N D P R O M O T I O N O F S C I E N C E ndia is endowed with abundant sunlight,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy technologies which include improved cooking stoves, biogas plants, biomass gasifiers, solar systems/devices such as biogas plants, improved wood stoves, wind pumps, biomass gasifiers, solar cookers.2 million family size biogas plants, 3400 community/institutional biogas plants, 33.4 million improved cook

Srinivasan, N.

448

Wastewater treatment: New insight provided by interactive multiobjective optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe a new interactive tool developed for wastewater treatment plant design. The tool is aimed at supporting the designer in designing new wastewater treatment plants as well as optimizing the performance of already available plants. ... Keywords: Decision support, IND-NIMBUS, Interactive methods, Multicriteria optimization, Simulation-based optimization, Wastewater treatment planning

Jussi Hakanen; Kaisa Miettinen; Kristian Sahlstedt

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Research Progress on Perfume Wastewater Treatment Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improvement of Spectrometric Determination of COD by Microwave ... Influence of sewage pipe network on COD reduction efficiency in sewage treatment plant.

450

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(VSL). Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) is the contractor responsible for the design and construction of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) for the...

451

Cogeneration Development and Market Potential in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant change i n biogas development is the recentwere supplied w i t h biogas fuel b y large-scale digestoro n y u a n to large-scale biogas digestor plants w h i c h

Yang, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

ENERGY GENERATION RESEARCH PIER Energy Generation Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..................... 9 Figure 3: Dairy Biogas Digesters Developed During 2000s in California ....................... 8 Table 6: Livestock Manure Biogas Power Plants Developed in California for new applications of bioenergy, including electricity, biogas, and biofuels. · Maximize

453

Waste Treatment Plant and Tank Farm Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This photo shows the Pretreatment Facility control room building pad at the Office of River Protection at the Hanford site. The Low-Activity Waste Facility is in the background.

454

Waste Treatment Plant River Protection Project  

UFP Equipment in Hot Cell Front/Right View. UFP System Design Issues Flowsheet chemistry must keep aluminum in solution Must add adequate caustic ...

455

Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Construction Quality Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of concrete in the forms, provisions for protection of the concrete from cold weather, and records documenting results of testing performed on the concrete,...

456

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant Pretreatment Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

pressure and vacuum optimum range to minimize air entrainment. - Validation of the TEMPEST CFD model of the PJMs using the data generated in the small tank. A mixing time...

457

NETL Water and Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water and Power Plants Review Water and Power Plants Review A review meeting was held on June 20, 2006 of the NETL Water and Power Plants research program at the Pittsburgh NETL site. Thomas Feeley, Technology Manager for the Innovations for Existing Plants Program, gave background information and an overview of the Innovations for Existing Plants Water Program. Ongoing/Ending Projects Alternative Water Sources Michael DiFilippo, a consultant for EPRI, presented results from the project "Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities". John Rodgers, from Clemson University, presented results from the project "An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation".

458

Bog Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bog Plants Bog Plants Nature Bulletin No. 385-A June 6, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation BOG PLANTS Fifty years ago there were probably more different kinds of plants within a 50 mile radius from the Loop than anywhere else in the Temperate Zone. Industrial, commercial and residential developments, plus drainage and fires have erased the habitats where many of the more uncommon kinds flourished, including almost all of the tamarack swamps and quaking bogs. These bogs were a heritage from the last glacier. Its front had advanced in a great curve, from 10 to 20 miles beyond what is now the shoreline of Lake Michigan, before the climate changed and it began to melt back. Apparently the retreat was so rapid that huge blocks of ice were left behind, surrounded by the outwash of boulders, gravel and ground-up rock called "drift". These undrained depressions; became lakes. Sphagnum moss invaded many of them and eventually the thick floating mats of it supported a variety of bog-loving plants including certain shrubs, tamarack, and a small species of birch. Such lakes became bogs.

459

Medicinal Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medicinal Plants Medicinal Plants Nature Bulletin No. 187 April 11, 1981 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation MEDICINAL PLANTS In springtime, many years ago, grandma made her family drink gallons of tea made by boiling roots of the sassafras. That was supposed to thin and purify the blood. Children were sent out to gather dandelion, curly dock, wild mustard, pokeberry and other greens as soon as they appeared -- not only because they added welcome variety to the diet of bread, meat, potatoes and gravy, but because some of them were also laxatives. For a bad "cold on the lungs," she slapped a mustard plaster on the patient's back, and on his chest she put a square of red flannel soaked in goose grease. For whooping cough she used a syrup of red clover blossoms. She made cough medicine from the bloodroot plant, and a tea from the compass plant of the prairies was also used for fevers and coughs. She made a pleasant tea from the blossoms of the linden or basswood tree. For stomach aches she used tea from any of several aromatic herbs such as catnip, fennel, yarrow, peppermint, spearmint, sweetflag, wild ginger, bergamot and splice bush.

460

Poisonous Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plants Plants Nature Bulletin No. 276 October 1, 1983 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation POISONOUS PLANTS In the autumn of 1818, Nancy Hanks Lincoln died of milk sickness and left her son, Abe, motherless before he was ten years old. Since colonial times, in most of the eastern half of the United States, that dreaded disease has been a hazard in summer and fall, wherever cattle graze in woodlands or along wooded stream banks. In the 1920s it was finally traced to white snakeroot -- an erect branched plant, usually about 3 feet tall, with a slender round stem, sharply-toothed nettle-like leaves and, in late summer, several small heads of tiny white flowers. Cows eating small amounts over a long period develop a disease called "trembles", and their milk may bring death to nursing calves or milk sickness to humans. When larger amounts are eaten the cow, herself, may die.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "treatment plant biogas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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461

A Realistic Technology and Engineering Assessment of Algae Biofuel Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

microalgae biofuel technologies for both oil and biogas production, provides an initial assessment of the US or wastewater treatment, (2) biofuel outputs--either biogas only or biogas plus oil, and (3) farm size

Quinn, Nigel

462

Burbank Water and Power SBX1 2 Compliance Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and verifying compliance with the RPS. Keywords: Biodiesel, biogas, biomass, biomethane, certificates ........................................................................................................................................ 24 2. Biogas (including pipeline biomethane with the reduction of solid waste and treatment benefits created by the use of biomass or biogas fuels. In addition

463

Staff Draft GUIDEBOOK RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for tracking and verifying compliance with the RPS. Keywords: Biodiesel, biogas, biomass, biomethane ...........................................................................................................................19 2. Biogas (including pipeline biomethane with the reduction of solid waste and treatment benefits created by the use of biomass or biogas fuels. In addition

464

Appendix B Forms Note: Current versions of these forms (downloadable) are available on-line at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for tracking and verifying compliance with the RPS. Keywords: Biodiesel, biogas, biomass, biomethane ...........................................................................................................................19 2. Biogas (including pipeline biomethane with the reduction of solid waste and treatment benefits created by the use of biomass or biogas fuels. In addition

465

California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compliance with the RPS. Keywords: Biodiesel, biogas, biomass, certificates, certification, conduit ...........................................................................................................................17 2. Biogas and treatment benefits created by the use of biomass or biogas fuels. In addition, PUC Section 399

466

Bagdad Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bagdad Plant Bagdad Plant 585 Silicon Drive Leechburg, P A 15656 * ATI Allegheny "'I Ludlum e-mail: Raymond.Polinski@ATImetals.com Mr. James Raba U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Building Technologies Program 1000 Independence Avenue SW Washington, DC 205585-0121 Raymond J. Polinski General Manager Grain-Oriented Electrical Steel RE: Distribution Transformers Rulemaking Docket Number EE-2010-STD-0048 RIN 1904-AC04 Submitted 4-10-12 via email Mr. Raba, I was planning to make the following closing comments at the DOE Public Meeting on February 23, 2012, but since the extended building evacuation caused the meeting to run well past the scheduled completion time I decided to submit my comments directly to you for the record.

467