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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Interactive simulations to help teenagers cope when a parent has a traumatic brain injury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of long-term disability and death worldwide. This article describes an ongoing research project to design, develop, and evaluate interactive learning simulations that integrate educational materials for ... Keywords: IDtension, Interactive learning simulations, pedagogical drama, traumatic brain injury

Jean E. Dumas; Nicolas Szilas; Urs Richle; Thomas Boggini

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Fluid-filled helmet liner concept for protection against blast-induced traumatic brain injury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to changes in modem warfare threats, as well as advances in body armor, soldier survivability in combat has increased, but blast-induced Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) has become a prevalent injury in the battlefield. ...

Yost, Allison L. (Allison Lynne)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Design of a composite combat helmet liner for prevention of blast-induced traumatic brain injury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air blast-induced traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) represent a significant percentage of military personnel injuries observed in Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). Prevalence of blast-induced ...

Vechart, Andrew (Andrew Peter)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Transcranial LED therapy for cognitive dysfunction in chronic, mild traumatic brain injury: Two case reports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two chronic, traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases are presented, where cognitive function improved following treatment with transcranial light emitting diodes (LEDs). At age 59, P1 had closed-head injury from a motor vehicle ...

Hamblin, Michael R.

5

Mixing oil and water: transcending method boundaries in assistive technology for traumatic brain injury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prototype assistive technology for traumatic brain injury has been developed using a combination of formative experiments and contextual design. Both approaches have proved to be essential to the development of a simple communication program using ... Keywords: HCI design and evaluation techniques, assistive technology, brain-body interface, contextual inquiry and design

Eamon Doherty; Gilbert Cockton; Chris Bloor; Dennis Benigno

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Improved Cognitive Function After Transcranial, Light-Emitting Diode Treatments in Chronic, Traumatic Brain Injury: Two Case Reports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objective: Two chronic, traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases, where cognition improved following treatment with red and near-infrared light-emitting diodes (LEDs), applied transcranially to forehead and scalp areas, are ...

Naeser, Margaret A.

7

Reply to Moss et al.: Military and medically relevant models of blast-induced traumatic brain injury vs. ellipsoidal heads and helmets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Moss et al. (1) acknowledge the second main conclusion of Nyein et al. (2): that a face shield may significantly mitigate blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, they obviate the first and most important ...

Nyein, Michelle K.

8

Distinguishing Realistic Military Blasts from Firecrackers in Mitigation Studies of Blast Induced Traumatic Brain Injury  

SciTech Connect

In their Contributed Article, Nyein et al. (1,2) present numerical simulations of blast waves interacting with a helmeted head and conclude that a face shield may significantly mitigate blast induced traumatic brain injury (TBI). A face shield may indeed be important for future military helmets, but the authors derive their conclusions from a much smaller explosion than typically experienced on the battlefield. The blast from the 3.16 gm TNT charge of (1) has the following approximate peak overpressures, positive phase durations, and incident impulses (3): 10 atm, 0.25 ms, and 3.9 psi-ms at the front of the head (14 cm from charge), and 1.4 atm, 0.32 ms, and 1.7 psi-ms at the back of a typical 20 cm head (34 cm from charge). The peak pressure of the wave decreases by a factor of 7 as it traverses the head. The blast conditions are at the threshold for injury at the front of the head, but well below threshold at the back of the head (4). The blast traverses the head in 0.3 ms, roughly equal to the positive phase duration of the blast. Therefore, when the blast reaches the back of the head, near ambient conditions exist at the front. Because the headform is so close to the charge, it experiences a wave with significant curvature. By contrast, a realistic blast from a 2.2 kg TNT charge ({approx} an uncased 105 mm artillery round) is fatal at an overpressure of 10 atm (4). For an injury level (4) similar to (1), a 2.2 kg charge has the following approximate peak overpressures, positive phase durations, and incident impulses (3): 2.1 atm, 2.3 ms, and 18 psi-ms at the front of the head (250 cm from charge), and 1.8 atm, 2.5 ms, and 16.8 psi-ms at the back of the head (270 cm from charge). The peak pressure decreases by only a factor of 1.2 as it traverses the head. Because the 0.36 ms traversal time is much smaller than the positive phase duration, pressures on the head become relatively uniform when the blast reaches the back of the head. The larger standoff implies that the headform locally experiences a nearly planar blast wave. Also, the positive phase durations and blast impulses are much larger than those of (1). Consequently, the blast model used in (1) is spatially and temporally very different from a military blast. It would be useful to repeat the calculations using military blast parameters. Finally, (1) overlooks a significant part of (5). On page 1 and on page 3, (1) states that (5) did not consider helmet pads. But pages pages 3 and 4 of (5) present simulations of blast wave propagation across an ACH helmeted head form with and without pads. (5) states that when the pads are present, the 'underwash' of air under the helmet is blocked when compared to the case without. (1) reaches this same conclusion, but reports it as a new result rather than a confirmation of that already found in (5).

Moss, W C; King, M J; Blackman, E G

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

9

Molecular mechanisms of traumatic brain injury; the missing link in management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JAR: The association between APOE ?4, age and outcome after head injury: a prospective cohort study. Brain 2005, 128:2556-2561. 46. Fine EM, Delis DC, Wetter SR, Jacobson MW, Jak AJ, McDonald CR, Braga JC, Thal LJ, Salmon DP, Bondi MW: Cognitive...

Veenith, Tonny; Goon, Serena H; Burnstein, Rowan M

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

10

European Society of Intensive Care Medicine study of therapeutic hypothermia (32-35degreesC) for intracranial pressure reduction after traumatic brain injury (the Eurotherm3235Trial)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.trialsjournal.com/content/12/1/8 (12 January 2011) S T U D Y P R O T O C O L Open Acces s European society of intensive care medicine study of therapeutic hypothermia (32-35°C) for intracranial pressure reduction after traumatic brain injury (the Eurotherm3235Trial) Peter JD... which is completed at hospital discharge. Paper copies of all CRFs are available to centres with lit- tle or no access to the internet. All CRFs must be com- pleted in English and is managed by Lincoln, Paris. Blinded and patient identifiable data...

Andrews, Peter J D; Sinclair, Helen Louise K; Battison, Claire G; Polderman, Kees K; Citerio, Giuseppe K; Mascia, Luciana K; Harris, Bridget A; Murray, Gordon D; Stocchetti, Nino K; Menon, David K; Shakur, Haleema K; De Backer, Daniel K; Eurotherm3235Trial Collaborators

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

11

Hydrogen is Neuroprotective against Surgically Induced Brain Injury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

induced brain injury. Medical Gas Research 2011 1:7. Submitand Eckermann et al. Medical Gas Research 2011, 1:7 http://MEDICAL GAS RESEARCH Hydrogen is neuroprotective against

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Traumatic Brain Injury Protection: Blast Pressure Sensors in ...  

Giving animals in need a HOME. November 14, 2013. LLNL, Intel, Cray produce big data machine. ... for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration

13

Traumatic Brain Injury Protection: Blast Pressure Sensors in ...  

Wind Energy; Partners (27) ... More information can be found in a Science & Technology Review article and an LLNL press ... independent of what they self-report, ...

14

MR of brain radiation injury: experimental studies in cats  

SciTech Connect

Two of six cats receiving small-field, single-dose, brain irradiation of 35 Gy with 6 MeV photons developed brain abnormalities in the irradiated area on MR images at 6 and 8 months, respectively, after treatment. The lesions were of high intensity on T2-weighted images and did not enhance after IV administration of gadolinium-DTPA. An additional lesion in one of these cats displayed high signal on T2-weighted images and enhanced on T1-weighted images after IV gadolinium-DTPA. Pathologic correlation revealed that the nonenhancing T2-weighted lesions consisted of edema or demyelinated regions without inflammation while the gadolinium-enhanced lesion demonstrated necrosis with inflammatory infiltrate. Focal brain irradiation may produce noninflammatory demyelination and necrosis. These histologic entities may be potentially distinguished on MR with IV gadolinium-DTPA.

Hecht-Leavitt, C.; Grossman, R.I.; Curran, W.J. Jr.; McGrath, J.T.; Biery, D.N.; Joseph, P.M.; Nelson, D.F.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Clinical validation of a virtual environment test for safe street crossing in the assessment of acquired brain injury patients with and without neglect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acquired brain injury (ABI) is a complex disease that involves loss of brain functions related to cognitive and motor capabilities and that can produce unilateral spatial neglect (USN). The heterogeneity of the symptoms of these disorders causes a lack ... Keywords: acquired brain injury, cognitive assessment, pencil-and-paper tests, rehabilitation, unilateral spatial neglect, virtual reality

Patricia Mesa-Gresa; Jose A. Lozano; Roberto Llórens; Mariano Alcańiz; María Dolores Navarro; Enrique Noé

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Occupational Injuries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injuries Injuries Jacqueline Agnew, PhD Burden of Occupational Injury and Illness in U.S. * Study by Leigh et al., 1997 * Estimated incidence, mortality, direct & indirect costs- occupational injury & illness * 1992 data- primary and secondary sources o Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries o National Traumatic Occupational Fatality Study o Annual Survey of Occ. Injuries & Illnesses o Bureau of Labor Statistics, Health Care Financing Administration, etc. Direct & Indirect Costs * Indirect * Lost earnings * Fringe benefits * Home production * Training, restaffing, disruption * Time delays Direct & Indirect Costs * Direct * Physicians, hospitals, nursing homes, rehabilitation, medication * Medical and indemnity insurance administration expenses

17

Traumatic brain injury and recovery mechanisms: peptide modulation of periventricular neurogenic regions by the choroid plexus–CSF nexus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Á Neuropeptides Abbreviations ANP Atrial natriuretic peptideNathanson 1987) and reduces ICP. ANP increases the number ofmodulator of CSF formation, ANP is regarded putatively as a

Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Baird, Andrew; Sharma, Hari

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Transcranial Low-Level Laser Therapy Improves Neurological Performance in Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice: Effect of Treatment Repetition Regimen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been clinically applied around the world for a spectrum of disorders requiring healing, regeneration and prevention of tissue death. One area that is attracting growing interest ...

Hamblin, Michael R.

19

Shock induces a deficit in the recovery of function after a contusion injury: identifying the relative contributions of the brain and spinal cord  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prior studies have shown that exposure to uncontrollable stimulation can have a variety of adverse consequences on plasticity. For example, as little as 30 min of uncontrollable shock to the tail disrupts both the capacity for instrumental learning and the recovery of locomotor function following spinal cord injury (SCI). Whereas evidence suggests that the disruption of instrumental learning depends on maladaptive plasticity within spinal cord neurons, it is still unknown whether the disruptive effects of shock on locomotor recovery following SCI reflects a brain or spinally-mediated effect. The present experiments address this research question by determining whether shock exposure induces an alteration within the spinal cord of contused rats and testing the effects of disrupting communication between the spinal cord and brain during shock exposure to see if this manipulation protects animals from the effects of shock on locomotor recovery. Experiment 1 found that contused rats transected prior to shock exposure failed to acquire the instrumental response when tested 24 hours later. In addition, contused animals transected after shock exposure also failed to learn when tested, though this effect was less robust. Given the results of Experiment 1, it is plausible that impaired spinal function is sufficient to explain the effects of shock on locomotor recovery. Experiments 2 and 3 addressed this possibility by manipulating communication between the brain and spinal cord prior to shock exposure. In Experiment 2 intrathecal lidocaine was applied rostral to the injury to temporarily disrupt transmission. In Experiment 3, normal brain function was inhibited with intraperitoneal injection of pentobarbital. Interestingly, both manipulations showed that disrupting normal communication between the spinal cord and brain during shock exposure protected animals from the adverse consequences of shock on locomotor recovery. The data suggest that, following SCI, blocking communication between the brain and spinal cord protects animals from the adverse consequences of uncontrollable stimulation.

Bopp, Anne Caroline

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

In vitro models of cartilage degradation following joint injury : mechanical overload, inflammatory cytokines and therapeutic approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of joint disorder. Individuals who have sustained an acute traumatic joint injury are at greater risk for the development of OA. The mechanisms by which injury causes cartilage ...

Lu, Yihong C. S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Chernobyl Birds Have Smaller Brains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Animals living in areas contaminated by radioactive material from Chernobyl suffer from increased oxidative stress and low levels of antioxidants. Therefore, normal development of the nervous system is jeopardized as reflected by high frequencies of developmental errors, reduced brain size and impaired cognitive abilities in humans. Alternatively, associations between psychological effects and radiation have been attributed to post-traumatic stress in humans. Methodology/Principal Finding: Here we used an extensive sample of 550 birds belonging to 48 species to test the prediction that even in the absence of post-traumatic stress, there is a negative association between relative brain size and level of background radiation. We found a negative association between brain size as reflected by external head volume and level of background radiation, independent of structural body size and body mass. The observed reduction in brain size in relation to background radiation amounted to 5 % across the range of almost a factor 5,000 in radiation level. Species differed significantly in reduction in brain size with increasing background radiation, and brain size was the only morphological character that showed a negative relationship with radiation. Brain size was significantly smaller in yearlings than in older individuals. Conclusions/Significance: Low dose radiation can have significant effects on normal brain development as reflected by brain size and therefore potentially cognitive ability. The fact that brain size was smaller in yearlings than in older individuals

Anders Pape Mřller; Andea Bonisoli-alquati; Geir Rudolfsen; Timothy A. Mousseau

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

HEAD INJURY ASSESSMENT IN JUVENILE CHINOOK USING THE ALPHA II-SPECTRIN BIOMARKER: EFFECTS OF PRESSURE CHANGES AND PASSAGE THROUGH A REMOVABLE SPILLWAY WEIR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cytoskeletal protein alpha II-spectrin has specifi c neurodegenerative mechanisms that allow the necrotic (injury-induced) and apoptotic (non-injury-induced) pathways of proteolysis to be differentiated in an immunoblot. Consequently, ?II-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs) are potential biomarkers for diagnosing traumatic brain injury (TBI). The purpose of the following investigation, consisting of two studies, was to evaluate the utility of the spectrin biomarker in diagnosing TBI in fi sh that travel through hydroelectric dams in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. The fi rst study used hyperbaric pressure chambers to simulate the pressure changes that affect fi sh during passage through a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Kaplan turbine. The second study tested the effect of a removable spillway weir (RSW) on the passage of juvenile chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). This study was conducted in tandem with a balloon-tag study by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Brain samples from fi sh were collected and analyzed using an immunoblot for SBDPs, and imaging software was used to quantify the protein band density and determine the ratio of cleaved protein to total protein. The biomarker analyses found higher SBDP expression levels in fi sh that were exposed to lower pressure nadirs and fi sh that passed through the RSW at a deep orientation. In general, the incidence of injuries observed after treatment positively correlated with expression levels, suggesting that the biomarker method of analysis is comparable to traditional methods of injury assessment. It was also found that, for some treatments, the 110 kDa spectrin fragment (SBDP 110) correlated more strongly with necrotic head injury incidence and mortality rates than did the total cleaved protein or the 120 kDa fragment. These studies will be informative in future decisions regarding the design of turbines and fi sh passage structures in hydroelectric dams and will hopefully contribute to the development of faster and more accurate techniques for diagnosing TBI in fi sh.

Jonason, C.; Miracle, A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Endovascular Treatment of Blunt Traumatic Abdominal Aortic Occlusion With Kissing Stent Placement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blunt traumatic abdominal aortic dissection is extremely rare and potentially deadly. We present the case of a 62-year-old man involved in a frontal car crash. After emergency undergoing laparotomy for bowel injuries, he was referred to our hospital due to acute ischemia of bilateral lower extremities on day 3 after the trauma. Computed tomography and aortography showed an aortobiiliac dissection with complete occlusion. This injury was successfully treated by endovascular treatment with 'kissing'-technique stent placement, which appears to be a safe, effective, and minimally invasive treatment.

Idoguchi, Koji, E-mail: idoguchi@ares.eonet.ne.jp; Yamaguchi, Masato; Okada, Takuya [Kobe University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Center for Endovascular Therapy (Japan); Nomura, Yoshikatsu [Kobe University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Kobe University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Center for Endovascular Therapy (Japan); Okita, Yutaka [Kobe University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (Japan); Sugimoto, Koji [Kobe University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Center for Endovascular Therapy (Japan)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Illness and Injury Concerns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Emergencies and Injuries. Minor injuries will be treated with first aid. ... In the case of a severe injury or medical emergency: ...

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

25

Optical spectroscopy for the detection of ischemic tissue injury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical method and apparatus is utilized to quantify ischemic tissue and/or organ injury. Such a method and apparatus is non-invasive, non-traumatic, portable, and can make measurements in a matter of seconds. Moreover, such a method and apparatus can be realized through optical fiber probes, making it possible to take measurements of target organs deep within a patient's body. Such a technology provides a means of detecting and quantifying tissue injury in its early stages, before it is clinically apparent and before irreversible damage has occurred.

Demos, Stavros (Livermore, CA); Fitzgerald, Jason (Sacramento, CA); Troppmann, Christoph (Sacramento, CA); Michalopoulou, Andromachi (Athens, GR)

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

26

Post-traumatic stress disorder: opportunities & challenges for computing technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a condition in which a person responds to a traumatic event, such as war, a car accident, or physical abuse, with prolonged feelings of fear, helplessness, or horror. This disorder can have a significant detrimental ... Keywords: healthcare, mental disorders, mental health, mobile technologies, post-traumatic stress disorder, ptsd, tele-health, trauma, veterans

Brian M. Landry; Eun Kyoung Choe; Stephen McCutcheon; Julie A. Kientz

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

2012 Tillingate Living Case Study Feedback Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... traumatic brain injury, but it does not provide ... strategic planning and objectives do not appear ... Living ensures its ability to execute the strategic plan, ...

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

28

Acute Heart Failure Classification, and Related Heart Failure Issues.............................. 20  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Post traumatic seizures........................................................................................................ 7 Cognitive deficits related to Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Neurological Conditions. 8 Escherichia coli- expansion for O157:H7........................................................................ 10 Personal history of corrected congenital malformations.................................................. 11

Congestive Heart; Failure Issues

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Brain usage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

usage Name: A W Chen Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: For my science fair project I would like to know if every part of the brain is used all the...

30

Brain Usage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Usage Name: Matt Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: what percentage of the brain does the average human use? Replies: This is a very difficult question to address. Your...

31

Development of a helmet liner for protection against blast induced trauma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traumatic brain injuries caused by shock waves have attracted increased medical and scientific attention due to the large percentage of combat troops that have sustained such injuries in recent conflict theatres. To this ...

Christou, George Alexander

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Firefighter Fatality & Injury Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Firefighter Fatality & Injury Studies. Wind-Driven Fire in a Ranch-Style House in Texas, 2009. On April 12, 2009, a fire in ...

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

33

Real-time brain-machine interface architectures : neural decoding from plan to movement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) aim to enable motor function in individuals with neurological injury or disease, by recording the neural activity, mapping or 'decoding' it into a motor command, and then controlling a device ...

Modir Shanechi, Maryam

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Singing the Brain Electric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Singing the Brain Electric Brain pacemakers, scientists have found, can treat depression by correcting neural circuitry gone haywire. This thesis examines how such technology - a technique known as deep-brain stimulation, ...

Chua, Grace (Grace W. J.)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Designing Against Head Injury While Considering Neck Injury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Without a doubt, the major concern of vehicle design is safety ¨C increasing the survival chance of driver and passenger during a crash and decreasing the risk of injury. Safety features, such as seat belt, seat cushion with crash tubing, or frontal ... Keywords: HIC, head injury criterion, neck injury, whiplash

Simon M. Hsiang; Stephen Ekwaro-Osire; Taek Hyun Jang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Mechanisms of brain ventricle development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The brain ventricles are a conserved system of fluid-filled cavities within the brain that form during the earliest stages of brain development. Abnormal brain ventricle development has been correlated with neurodevelopmental ...

Lowery, Laura Anne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Damage and repair of irradiated mammalian brain  

SciTech Connect

We have demonstrated that focal charged particle irradiation of the rabbit brain can create well-defined lesions which are observable by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging techniques. These are similar, in terms of location and characteristic NMR and PET features, to those that occur in the brain of about 10% of clinical research human subjects, who have been treated for intracranial vascular malformations with stereotactic radiosurgery. These lesions have been described radiologically as vasogenic edema of the deep white matter,'' and the injury is of variable intensity and temporal duration, can recede or progress to serious neurologic sequelae, and persist for a considerable period of time, frequently 18 mon to 3 yr. 8 refs., 6 figs.

Frankel, K.; Lo, E.; Phillips, M.; Fabrikant, J.; Brennan, K.; Valk, P.; Poljak, A.; Delapaz, R.; Woodruff, K. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Medical Center; Brookside Hospital, San Pablo, CA (USA))

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Study of an advanced helmet liner concept to reduce TBI : experiments & simulation using sandwich structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large percentage of combat troops suffered Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI) due to Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) in recent wars in the Middle East. The majority of TBIs were caused by exposure to blast waves. Use of ...

Goel, Rahul, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Illness and Injury Surveillance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Illness and Injury Surveillance supports the DOE's only multi-site health information database linked to current workers. The program uses health and demographic data already...

40

Comparison of morphological and wavelet based methods in intracranial pressure signal analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of Intracranial Pressure signal (ICP) to predict the abrupt increases is extremely important, because this sudden elevation can be life threatening and sign of secondary brain injury. Segments with three minute duration were then constructed ... Keywords: intracranial hypertension, intracranial pressure (ICP), traumatic brain injury (TBI)

Nooshin Nabizadeh; Kayvan Najarian

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The lived experience of post-traumatic stress disorder as described by motor vehicle accident victims in Jordan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Aim: To explore the lived experience of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as described by individuals who have been involved in a motor vehicle accident (MVA)… (more)

Al-Kofahy, Lilibeth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Effect of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 on recovery from spinal cord injury in rats given uncontrollable stimulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The eventual outcome of spinal cord injury is largely influenced by damage that occurs after the injury. Damaged connections between spinal cord cells and the brain allow a positive feedback mechanism to go unchecked when activated by ascending pain messages. Over-excitation then causes secondary damage. This study examines whether a pharmacological manipulation that should attenuate over-excitation reduces the adverse effects of shock treatment. Rats received spinal impact injuries and, the next day, were given the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 (0.08 mg/kg, i.p.) or its vehicle before receiving either a bout of uncontrollable stimulation or identical treatment without the stimulation itself. Their hindlimb motor activity was monitored for 21 days. Results indicate a significant effect of the drug on rats that received uncontrollable stimulation. The study has clinical implications for the treatment of spinal cord injuries in humans.

Petrich, Christine

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

43

Injury assessment for physics-based characters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determining injury levels for virtual characters is an important aspect of many games. For characters that are animated using simulated physics, it is possible assess injury levels based on physical properties, such as accelerations and forces. We have ...

Thomas Geijtenbeek; Diana Vasilescu; Arjan Egges

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Leukocytosis as a Predictor of Severe Injury in Blunt Trauma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

should heighten suspicion for occult injury. Address forshould heighten suspicion for occult injury. [WestJEM. 2008;

Santucci, Claudia A; Purcell, Thomas B; Mejia, Carlo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Refinery, petrochemical plant injuries decline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Petroleum Refiners Association (NPRA) reports a 7% reduction in workplace injury and illness incidence rates for refineries in 1993, and a 21% decrease for petrochemical plants. The report summarizes data from 135 of the 162 US member refineries, and 117 of the 172 US member petrochemical plants. This paper summarizes the report findings.

Not Available

1994-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

46

Methods for assisting recovery of damaged brain and spinal cord using arrays of X-Ray microplanar beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of assisting recovery of an injury site of brain or spinal cord injury includes providing a therapeutic dose of X-ray radiation to the injury site through an array of parallel microplanar beams. The dose at least temporarily removes regeneration inhibitors from the irradiated regions. Substantially unirradiated cells surviving between the microplanar beams migrate to the in-beam irradiated portion and assist in recovery. The dose may be administered in dose fractions over several sessions, separated in time, using angle-variable intersecting microbeam arrays (AVIMA). Additional doses may be administered by varying the orientation of the microplanar beams. The method may be enhanced by injecting stem cells into the injury site.

Dilmanian, F. Avraham (Yaphank, NY); McDonald, III, John W. (Baltimore, MD)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

47

Information Processing in Brain Microtubules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Models of the mind are based on the possibility of computing in brain microtubules. From this point of view, information processing is the fundamental issue for understanding the brain mechanisms that produce consciousness. The cytoskeleton polymers could store and process information through their dynamic coupling mediated by mechanical energy. We analyze the problem of information transfer and storage in brain microtubules, considering them as a communication channel. We discuss the implications of assuming that consciousness is generated by the subneuronal process.

Jean Faber; Renato Portugal; Luiz Pinguelli Rosa

2004-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

48

Mining Your Brain For Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, COM 2011. Symposium, WORLD GOLD. Presentation Title, Mining Your Brain For Safety: A New Approach To Utilizing Your Best ...

49

Melatonin and the aging brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mitochondrial decay of aging. Mol. Aspects Med. 26, Ames,the degenerative diseases of aging. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.2004. Retardation of brain aging by chronic treatment with

BONDY, S; SHARMAN, E

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Audit of Department of Energy Contractor Occupational Injury...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractor Occupational Injury and Illness Reporting Practices, IG-0404 Audit of Department of Energy Contractor Occupational Injury and Illness Reporting Practices, IG-0404 Audit...

51

Rapid brain scanning radiopharmaceutical  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for detecting the blood flow in animals, particularly in the brain, is provided wherein a detectable amount of a novel radioactive compound of the formula I is administered to one animal: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are independently alkyl of 1 to 6 carbon atoms or benzyl; R.sub.3 is alkyl of 1 to 6 carbon atoms, benzyl, cyclopropylalkyl of 4 to 6 carbon atoms, or cyanoalkyl of 2 to 6 carbon atoms; R.sub.4 is hydrogen, benzyl or alkyl of 1 to 6 carbon atoms; with the provisos that R.sub.4 is not isopropyl and when R.sub.4 is methyl, R.sub.3 is not benzyl; and X is a radioactive halogen.

Sargent, III, Thornton W. (Berkeley, CA); Shulgin, Alexander T. (Lafayette, CA); Mathis, Chester A. (Oakland, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Catestatin in heart and brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATP,  atrial naturetic peptide (ANP), and brain naturetic contain CgA, catecholamines, ANP, etc.  Interestingly, the or goat polyclonal anti?ANP  antibody in PBS containing 2% 

Curello, Erica L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Methods for functional brain imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has demonstrated the potential for non-invasive mapping of structure and function (fMRI) in the human brain. In this thesis, we propose a series of methodological developments towards ...

Witzel, Thomas, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

BrainMap `95 workshop  

SciTech Connect

The fourth annual BrainMap workshop was held at La Mansion del Rio Hotel in San Antonio December 3--4, 1995. The conference title was ``Human Brain Mapping and Modeling.`` The meeting was attended by 137 registered participants and 30 observers from 82 institutions representing 12 countries. The meeting focused on the technical issues associated with brain mapping and modeling. A total of 23 papers were presented covering the following topics: spatial normalization and registration; functional image analysis; metanalysis and modeling; and new horizons in biological databases. The full program with abstracts was available on the Research Imaging Center`s web site. A book will be published by John Wiley and Sons prior to the end of 1998.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

55

Injury experience in coal mining, 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Mine and Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for 1989. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and anthracite or bituminous coal. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison between coal mining and the metal and nonmetal mineral mining industries, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. 3 figs., 46 tabs.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Injury experience in coal mining, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for 1992. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and anthracite or bituminous coal. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison between coal mining and the metal and nonmetal mineral mining industries, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

Reich, R.B.; Hugler, E.C.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Solar Brain Srl | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Solar Brain Srl Place Rome, Italy Zip 189 Sector Solar Product Rome-based solar and alternative energy company. References Solar Brain Srl1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

58

Session 1: Fatal Construction Injuries Guiding Construction Injury Research: Data Coupled with Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of examining current construction injury research, identifying research gaps, and developing a strategic research plan. Through existing injury surveillance data systems, much is known about the leading causes of fatal (falls, motor vehicles, machines, and electrocutions) and nonfatal injury (overexertion, falls, and struck by objects) in the construction industry; however, little research has focused on identifying injury problems for specific subsectors of the construction industry. Research that is focused on specific injury problems and specific types of construction work (e.g., falls during truss installation) may lead more directly to identification of effective interventions than research on general injury categories in the construction industry as a whole (e.g., falls in construction). Three high-risk construction industry sectors (highway and street construction, residential building construction, and roofing and truss installation) were selected based on a review of fatal and nonfatal injury data, the number of workers at risk, current trends in the construction industry, OSHA’s regulatory agenda, an external

Casini V; Furrow K; Hause M; Linn H; Washenitz F

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Brain-computer interaction: can multimodality help?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is a short introduction to a special ICMI session on brain-computer interaction. During this paper, we first discuss problems, solutions, and a five-year view for brain-computer interaction. We then talk further about unique issues with multimodal ... Keywords: bandwidth, brain-computer interaction, hybrid BCIs, multimodal interaction

Anton Nijholt; Brendan Z. Allison; Rob J.K. Jacob

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

The Underreporting of Lightning injuries and Deaths in Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable statistics on lightning deaths and injuries are needed to raise the awareness of the community to the lightning threat and to educate the public to avoid situations vulnerable to lightning injuries. The principal source of information ...

Raúl E. López; Ronald L. Holle; Todd A. Heitkamp; Michael Boyson; Michael Cherington; Kenneth Langford

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal Year 2011 EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal Year 2011 February 1, 2012...

62

Chemical/Injury Report Form Department of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical/Injury Report Form Department of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences This form is to be used for small injuries or chemical related incidents involving University property, personnel or students

Machel, Hans

63

Injury experience in coal mining, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for 1991. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and anthracite or bituminous coal. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison between coal mining and the metal and nonmetal mineral mining industries, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. Data used in compiling this report were reported by operators of coal mines and preparation plants on a mandatory basis as required under the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977, Public Law 91-173,as amended by Public Law 95-164. Since January 1, 1978, operators of mines or preparation plants or both which are subject to the Act have been required under 30 CFR, Part 50, to submit reports of injuries, occupational illnesses, and related data.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Performing Injury Investigations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injury Review & Analysis Injury Review & Analysis Investigation Team Roles Data Gathering Personnel Time Space Activity Hazards Work Authorizations Equipment Human Factors Slips, Trips, & Falls Ergonomics ISM Analysis Core Func./Guiding Princ. ISM Builder Examples Corrective Action Dev. CHESS Login CHESS User's Manual Accident Statistics Occupational Injury and Illness Review Paul Alivisatos photo Lab Director Paul Alivisatos shares guiding principles to be used during incident anlayses. This tutorial introduces the LBNL Injury Review Program and provides a 'toolkit' that to help you in the injury review process. The tool kit includes tools for data gathering, ISM analysis, and corrective action development. LBNL employees must report report all work-related injuries or illnesses to their supervisor and Health Services. A work-related injury (or

65

2010 Savannah River Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

66

2010 Hanford Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

67

2010 Idaho National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

68

2010 Pantex Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

69

2010 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

70

2010 Idaho National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

71

2010 Pantex Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

72

2010 Savannah River Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

73

2010 Hanford Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

74

2010 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

75

2010 Argonne National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

76

2010 Kansas City Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

77

2010 Sandia National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

78

2007 Pantex Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

2006 Pantex Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

80

2010 Kansas City Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

2006 Kansas City Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

82

2010 Sandia National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

83

2007 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

NIF Warehouse Group celebrates 15 injury-free years | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Warehouse Group celebrates 15 injury-free years | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

85

A New Microcontroller-Based Human Brain Hypothermia System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many studies show that artificial hypothermia of brain in conditions of anesthesia with the rectal temperature lowered down to 33żC produces pronounced prophylactic effect protecting the brain from anoxia. Out of the methods ... Keywords: brain hypothermia, microcontroller, thermoelectric cooler

Metin Kapidere; Ra?it Ahiska; ?nan Güler

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Brain dynamics promotes function Carlos Lourenco  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dynamics? At this point in brain research, we are happy if we can at least provide a partial answer. Key. Natural scientists look for correlations between measured electrical signals and behavior or mental states by considering the so-called dynamical complex- ity as revealed e.g. by the measurement of the brain's electrical

87

Brain---computer interfaces for space applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent experiments have shown the possibility to use the brain electrical activity to directly control the movement of robots. Such a kind of brain---computer interface is a natural way to augment human capabilities by providing a new interaction link ... Keywords: Astronauts, BCI, Space operations

Cristina Negueruela; Michael Broschart; Carlo Menon; José R. Millán

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

i FIREARM INJURY PREVENTION Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American College of Physicians believes that gun violence and the prevention of firearms injuries and deaths is a public health issue of major and growing concern. It must be dealt with as a high priority public health issue, as well as a criminal justice concern. Physicians must become more active in counseling patients about gun safety and involved in community efforts to restrict the ownership and sale of handguns. This position paper outlines some of the steps that can and should be taken. It reaffirms previous recommendations and sets forth additional public policy positions. The paper reaffirms the following recommendations of the 1995 position paper, Preventing Firearm Violence: A Public Health Imperative: 1 1. The College supports legislative and regulatory measures that would limit the availability of firearms, with particular emphasis on reducing handgun accessibility. These measures should support restrictions to make handgun ownership more difficult, to reduce the number of handguns in homes, and to eliminate assault weapons. 2. The College urges internists to inform patients about the dangers of keeping firearms, particularly handguns, in the home and to advise them on ways to reduce the risk of injury. If

unknown authors

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Visualizing Brain Metals in Health and Disease  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visualizing Brain Metals in Health and Visualizing Brain Metals in Health and Disease figure 1 Fig. 1. Rapid-scanning x-ray fluorescence mapping ex perimental setup. Synchrotron x-rays at 11 keV passed through a 50 µm aperture (Ap). The beam intensity was monitored with a N2-filled ion chamber (I0). The brain slice was mounted vertically on a motorized stage (St) at 45° to the incident x-ray beam and raster scanned in the beam. A 13-element Ge detector (Ge) was positioned at a 90° angle to the beam. We all require iron, copper and zinc for normal brain function but metal metabolism becomes dysregulated in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Metals accumulate in Alzheimer's dementia and Parkinson's disease and are deficient in Menkes disease. Whether excess metals appear as a cause or a

90

More Clues About Obesity From Brain Imaging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 20, 2002 June 20, 2002 Electronic newsroom 02-51 More Clues About Obesity Revealed by Brain-Imaging Study UPTON, NY — The idea that obese people eat too much because they find food more palatable than lean people do has gained support from a new brain-imaging study at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory. The study reveals that the parts of the brain responsible for sensation in the mouth, lips, and tongue are more active in obese people than in normal-weight control subjects. “This enhanced activity in brain regions involved with sensory processing of food could make obese people more sensitive to the rewarding properties of food, and could be one of the reasons they overeat,” said Brookhaven physician Gene-Jack Wang, lead author of the study.

91

Nanotools for Neuroscience and Brain Activity Mapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neuroscience is at a crossroads. Great effort is being invested into deciphering specific neural interactions and circuits. At the same time, there exist few general theories or principles that explain brain function. We ...

Alivisatos, A. Paul

92

Encoding Probabilistic Brain Atlases Using Bayesian Inference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of creating probabilistic brain atlases from manually labeled training data. Probabilistic atlases are typically constructed by counting the relative frequency of occurrence of labels in ...

Van Leemput, Koen

93

Aging and functional brain networks  

SciTech Connect

Aging is associated with changes in human brain anatomy and function and cognitive decline. Recent studies suggest the aging decline of major functional connectivity hubs in the 'default-mode' network (DMN). Aging effects on other networks, however, are largely unknown. We hypothesized that aging would be associated with a decline of short- and long-range functional connectivity density (FCD) hubs in the DMN. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated resting-state data sets corresponding to 913 healthy subjects from a public magnetic resonance imaging database using functional connectivity density mapping (FCDM), a voxelwise and data-driven approach, together with parallel computing. Aging was associated with pronounced long-range FCD decreases in DMN and dorsal attention network (DAN) and with increases in somatosensory and subcortical networks. Aging effects in these networks were stronger for long-range than for short-range FCD and were also detected at the level of the main functional hubs. Females had higher short- and long-range FCD in DMN and lower FCD in the somatosensory network than males, but the gender by age interaction effects were not significant for any of the networks or hubs. These findings suggest that long-range connections may be more vulnerable to aging effects than short-range connections and that, in addition to the DMN, the DAN is also sensitive to aging effects, which could underlie the deterioration of attention processes that occurs with aging.

Tomasi D.; Tomasi, D.; Volkow, N.D.

2011-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

94

Illness and Injury Surveillance Program Guidelines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1190-2007 DOE-STD-1190-2007 DOE STANDARD ILLNESS AND INJURY SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM GUIDELINES U.S. Department of Energy AREA OCSH Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1190-2007 Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-STD-1190-2007 Foreword 1. Use of this standard is not mandatory. Users should review the document and determine if it meets their purpose. 2. Comments (recommendations, additions, and deletions) that may be of use in improving this document should be addressed to: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, c/o Dr. Cliff

95

Radiation inhibition of intimal hyperplasia after arterial injury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To demonstrate the effect of {gamma} radiation on proliferating smooth muscle cells in vivo, a standardized bilateral carotid balloon catheter arterial injury was produced in 45 rats and doses from 0-20 Gy were delivered to the right carotid artery at 24 h after injury. At 20 days after injury, cross-sectional area of intima was determined from axial histological sections. Compared to contralateral, nonirradiated balloon-injured arteries, radiation produced a significant dose-dependent reduction in intimal cross-sectional area, with a 50% decrease at 5-7.5 Gy. To determine the effect of timing of irradiation on intimal hyperplasia, 30 rats with bilateral carotid injury received unilateral cervical irradiation at doses of 1,5 or 10 Gy administered at either 1,3 or 5 days after injury. The radiation dose, timing of irradiation and an interaction between timing and dose were significantly associated with reduction in neointimal cross-sectional area. To determine the effects of radiation on intimal hyperplasia at later intervals, rats irradiated with 15 or 20 Gy were euthanized at 3 months after injury. A significant persistent reduction in intimal cross-sectional area for irradiated arteries at 3 months was associated with minimal apparent radiation effects upon adjacent tissue. These data suggest that external {gamma} irradiation at the single doses used effectively inhibits smooth muscle proliferation and intimal hyperlasia in the rat balloon catheter injury model in a time- and dose-dependent manner. 54 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Mayberg, M.R.; Luo, Z.; London, S.; Gajdusek, C.; Rasey, J.S. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Predicting injury among nursing personnel using personal risk factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis was to develop a means of predicting future injury among nursing personnel working in a hospital system. Nursing has one of the highest incidence rates of musculoskeletal injuries among U.S. occupations. Endemic to the job are tasks such as rolling, sitting, standing, and transferring large, and often times, uncooperative patients. These tasks often place large biomechanical stresses on the musculoskeletal system and, in some cases, contribute to or cause a musculoskeletal injury. Given the current nursing shortage, it is imperative to keep nurses injury-free and productive so they can provide patient care services. Even though a large number of nursing personnel are injured every year and most are exposed to these high levels of biomechanical stress, the majority of nurses are injury-free. The question then arises "Why do some nurses have injuries while others do not?" The purpose of this thesis was to determine whether individual attributes in a population of nurses were associated with risk of future injury. The subject population was comprised of 140 nursing personnel at a local hospital system hired between April 1995 and February 1999. Data on individual attributes, such as patient demographics, previous injuries, posture, joint range of motion, flexibility, and muscular strength, was ascertained during a post-offer screening on these personnel. Twenty six (19%) nurses experienced an injury associated with the axial skeleton. Chi square test for homogeneity for the categorical predictor variables, and the Student's T-test for continuous predictor variables were used to determine if any individual attributes were associated with future injuries. None of the variables were associated with a risk of future axial skeletal injury. Practical application of these results for St. Joseph Regional Health Center, and possibly other acute care facilities, directs us to stop costly pre-employment/post-offer testing for the purpose of identifying injury prone nurse applicants. Secondly, it allows the focus of limited resources to be on making the job safer through administrative and engineering controls.

Gjolberg, Ivar Henry

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Child head injury criteria investigation through numerical simulation of real world trauma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Finite element modelling has been used for decades in the study of adult head injury biomechanics and determination of injury criteria. Interest is recently growing in investigation on pediatric head injury which requires elaboration of biofidelic models ... Keywords: Accident reconstructions, Child head, Finite element modelling, Neurological injuries

Sebastien Roth; Jonathan Vappou; Jean-Sebastien Raul; Rémy Willinger

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Accident Investigation of the Fall Injury at the Savannah River...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Accident Investigation Report Fall Injury Accident at the Savannah River Site on July 1, 2011 August 8, 2011 Disclaimer...

99

Personnel injuries/illnesses associated with natural environment hazards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how an existing Department of Energy (DOE) resource can be used to gain valuable insight concerning injury/illness incidents. That resource is the Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System (CAIRS) module of DOE's Safety Performance Measurement System (SPMS). Although this demonstration could have been performed by analyzing reports associated with any numbers of hazards (e.g., noise, chemicals, explosives, electricity, or tools-power/hand), the CAIRS data selected for analysis were the 1981--1991 DOE injury/illness reports that cited a natural environment hazard'' as either the direct or indirect cause of the injury/illness. Specifically, injury/illness reports were selected for analysis if they had a causal factor link to one or more of four natural environment hazard categories; weather, animal life, vegetation, or specific acts of nature (e.g., floods, earthquakes, and lightning strikes).

Hill, J.R. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health, Washington, DC (United States). Risk Analysis and Technology Div.); Miller, C.F. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Personnel injuries/illnesses associated with natural environment hazards  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how an existing Department of Energy (DOE) resource can be used to gain valuable insight concerning injury/illness incidents. That resource is the Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System (CAIRS) module of DOE`s Safety Performance Measurement System (SPMS). Although this demonstration could have been performed by analyzing reports associated with any numbers of hazards (e.g., noise, chemicals, explosives, electricity, or tools-power/hand), the CAIRS data selected for analysis were the 1981--1991 DOE injury/illness reports that cited a ``natural environment hazard`` as either the direct or indirect cause of the injury/illness. Specifically, injury/illness reports were selected for analysis if they had a causal factor link to one or more of four natural environment hazard categories; weather, animal life, vegetation, or specific acts of nature (e.g., floods, earthquakes, and lightning strikes).

Hill, J.R. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health, Washington, DC (United States). Risk Analysis and Technology Div.; Miller, C.F. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

2009 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

102

2008 Idaho National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

103

2009 Hanford Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

2009 Argonne National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

105

2009 Pantex Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

2008 Savannah River Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

107

2007 Kansas City Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

108

2008 Kansas City Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

109

2008 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

110

Adaptive online brain-computer interface for interpretation and visualization of desired reach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high- performance brain-computer interface,” Nature, vol.classi?cation for brain- computer interfaces,” IEEE Trans.the 3rd International Brain- Computer Interface Workshop and

Hammon, Paul S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Ozone injury to tobacco plants in South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Ozone injury symptoms appeared on tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Turkish in the greenhouse and on Wisconsin 38 in field plots at Brookings, South Dakota in 1970. In 1971, ozone injury appeared on greenhouse and field-grown plants of Bel-W3, Bel-C, and Turkish. Ozone fleck was most severe in southeast and east-central South Dakota. A decreasing amount of injury was observed in northeast, central, west-central and southwest South Dakota. Bel-W3 showed injury at eight locations while Turkish, Bel-C and Bel-B were injured only in the eastern parts of the State. Bel-W3 was a reliable monitor of air pollution episodes when plants were continuously produced and observed in the greenhouse at Brookings. New injury appeared on newly matured leaves and older leaves as dark gray to black flecks that turned brown to tan to white with age. Periodic ozone occurrences were recorded by new flecks appearing generally on tissue of younger age. Plant indicators for the pollutants peroxyacetyl-nitrate, fluoride and sulfur dioxide showed no injury in South Dakota. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

Gardner, W.S.

1973-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Radiography Of Brain Mockup Proton Radiography Of Brain Mockup Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup The use of such a high-energy proton beam is ideal for imaging small tumors within patients for targeted proton therapy. March 25, 2013 Proton radiograph of a high-fidelity mockup of a human head Proton radiograph of a high-fidelity mockup of a human head. Proton radiography, which was invented at Los Alamos, employs a high-energy proton beam to image the properties and behavior of materials. Los Alamos researchers and German collaborators have investigated the application of giga-electron volt (GeV, or billion electron volts) energy proton beams for medical imaging in combination with proton radiation treatment for cancer. The use of such a high-energy proton beam is ideal

113

Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Radiography Of Brain Mockup Proton Radiography Of Brain Mockup Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup The use of such a high-energy proton beam is ideal for imaging small tumors within patients for targeted proton therapy. March 25, 2013 Proton radiograph of a high-fidelity mockup of a human head Proton radiograph of a high-fidelity mockup of a human head. Proton radiography, which was invented at Los Alamos, employs a high-energy proton beam to image the properties and behavior of materials. Los Alamos researchers and German collaborators have investigated the application of giga-electron volt (GeV, or billion electron volts) energy proton beams for medical imaging in combination with proton radiation treatment for cancer. The use of such a high-energy proton beam is ideal

114

Microglial activation induced by brain trauma is suppressed by post-injury treatment with a PARP inhibitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 activity suppresses NF-kB-dependent gene transcription andinhibition suppresses NF-kB- dependent gene transcription inof PARP inhibitors to block NF-kB - mediated inflammatory

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The formation and function of the brain ventricular system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The brain ventricular system is composed of a highly conserved set of cavities that contain cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a protein-rich fluid essential for brain function. However, little is known about the function of ...

Chang, Jessica T. (Jessica Tzung-Min)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Compartmentalization and axon guidance in the Drosophila brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Drosophila brain is composed of many morphologically and functionally distinct processing centers and brain morphogenesis depends on the creation and maintenance of distinct boundaries between adjacent regions to prevent ...

Tayler, Timothy D., 1972-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

ORIGINAL RESEARCH Brain responses evoked by high-frequency repetitive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Kicic D, Savolainen P, Makela JP, Kahkonen S. Reproduc- ibility of TMS-evoked EEG responses. Human Brain

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

118

Parallel multiscale simulations of a brain aneurysm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cardiovascular pathologies, such as a brain aneurysm, are affected by the global blood circulation as well as by the local microrheology. Hence, developing computational models for such cases requires the coupling of disparate spatial and temporal scales ... Keywords: Atomistic-continuum coupling, Blood microrheology, Dissipative particle dynamics, Domain decomposition, Parallel computing, Spectral elements, Thrombosis

Leopold Grinberg, Dmitry A. Fedosov, George Em Karniadakis

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Probing brain oxygenation with near infrared spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamentals of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) are reviewed. This technique allows to measure the oxygenation of the brain tissue. The particular problems involved in detecting regional brain oxygenation (rSO2) are discussed. The dominant chromophore (light absorber) in tissue is water. Only in the NIR light region of 650-1000 nm, the overall absorption is sufficiently low, and the NIR light can be detected across a thick layer of tissues, among them the skin, the scull and the brain. In this region, there are many absorbing light chromophores, but only three are important as far as the oxygenation is concerned. They are the hemoglobin (HbO2), the deoxy-hemoglobin (Hb) and cytochrome oxidase (CtOx). In the last 20 years there was an enormous growth in the instrumentation and applications of NIRS. . The devices that were used in our experiments were : Somanetics's INVOS Brain Oximeter (IBO) and Toomim's HEG spectrophotometer. The performances of both devices were compared including their merits and draw...

Gersten, Alexander; Raz, Amir; Fried, Robert

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Brain-controlled finite state machine for wheelchair navigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This proposal is about a brain-controlled electrically powered wheelchair. The system comprises a brain-computer interface based on steady-state visual evoked potentials and a processing unit relying on a finite state machine (FSM). Results of first ... Keywords: brain-computer interface (bci), finite state machine (fsm), human-computer interaction, stea dy-state visual evoked potentials (ssvep)

Amir Teymourian; Thorsten Lueth; Axel Graeser; Torsten Felzer; Rainer Nordmann

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Weighted graph comparison techniques for brain connectivity analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of brain connectivity is a vast field in neuroscience with a frequent use of visual representations and an increasing need for visual analysis tools. Based on an in-depth literature review and interviews with neuroscientists, we explore ... Keywords: brain connectivity analysis, brain connectivity visualization, graph comparison

Basak Alper; Benjamin Bach; Nathalie Henry Riche; Tobias Isenberg; Jean-Daniel Fekete

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

A model of computation and representation in the brain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The brain is first and foremost a control system that is capable of building an internal representation of the external world, and using this representation to make decisions, set goals and priorities, formulate plans, and control behavior with intent ... Keywords: Brain modeling, Cognitive modeling, Human neocortex, Image processing, Knowledge representation, Perception, Reverse engineering the brain, Segmentation, Signals to symbols

James S. Albus

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Helmets Designed by Supercomputers Help Warfighters at Home | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Helmets Designed by Supercomputers Help Warfighters at Home Helmets Designed by Supercomputers Help Warfighters at Home Helmets Designed by Supercomputers Help Warfighters at Home December 26, 2012 - 1:40pm Addthis Paul Taylor, right, and John Ludwigsen, center, both researchers with Sandia’s Terminal Ballistics Technology Department, and Corey Ford, a neurologist at the University of New Mexico's Health Sciences Center, discuss their research on traumatic brain injuries. | Photo by Randy Montoya Paul Taylor, right, and John Ludwigsen, center, both researchers with Sandia's Terminal Ballistics Technology Department, and Corey Ford, a neurologist at the University of New Mexico's Health Sciences Center, discuss their research on traumatic brain injuries. | Photo by Randy Montoya Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs

124

UCSC Injury and Illness Prevention Program Revised 10/01 University of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UCSC Injury and Illness Prevention Program Revised 10 Code of Regulations 8-3203 INJURY AND ILLNESS PREVENTION PROGRAM DEPARTMENTAL PLAN #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS Statement of Purpose 1 Authority and Responsibility 2 Compliance with Safe Work Practices 3

California at Santa Cruz, University of

125

Occupational Health & Safety Annual Report 2000: Injury & Illness in the Electric Energy Workforce, 1995-1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has established an ongoing health and safety database that is designed to provide more precise and detailed information about workplace injury and illness occurrence. Electric energy company health and safety professionals can use this information for establishing and evaluating injury prevention programs. The database provides the capability for epidemiological monitoring, annual injury/illness reporting, program evaluation, and occupational health and injury research. This report presents the firs...

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

126

A Note on the Estimation of the Multinomial Logistic Model with Correlated Responses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show how multinomial logistic models with correlated responses can be estimated within SAS software. To achieve this, random effects and marginal models are introduced and the respective SAS code is given. An example data set on physicians ’ recommendations and preferences in traumatic brain injury rehabilitation is used for illustration. The main motivation for this work are two recent papers that recommend estimating multinomial logistic models with correlated responses by using a Poisson likelihood which is statistically correct but computationally inefficient.

Oliver Kuss; Dale Mclerran

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Brain-Computer Interfaces and Quantum Robots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The actual (classical) Brain-Computer Interface attempts to use brain signals to drive suitable actuators performing the actions corresponding to subject's intention. However this goal is not fully reached, and when BCI works, it does only in particular situations. The reason of this unsatisfactory result is that intention cannot be conceived simply as a set of classical input-output relationships. It is therefore necessary to resort to quantum theory, allowing the occurrence of stable coherence phenomena, in turn underlying high-level mental processes such as intentions and strategies. More precisely, within the context of a dissipative Quantum Field Theory of brain operation it is possible to introduce generalized coherent states associated, within the framework of logic, to the assertions of a quantum metalanguage. The latter controls the quantum-mechanical computing corresponding to standard mental operation. It thus become possible to conceive a Quantum Cyborg in which a human mind controls, through a quantum metalanguage, the operation of an artificial quantum computer.

Eliano Pessa; Paola zizzi

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

128

Analyzing Injury in Canadian Youth Ice Hockey through a Mixed Method Observational Design: Moving Beyond the Mechanisms of Injury to the Socio-Cultural Complexities of Implementing Injury Prevention Strategies .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ice hockey is a sport known for its speed and skill. However, its intensely physical nature is associated with the potential risk of injury, which… (more)

Adams, Stephen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Tsunami-related injury in Aceh Province, Indonesia * C. Robinsona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tsunami-related injury in Aceh Province, Indonesia S. Doocya * C. Robinsona , C. Moodieb and G; Indonesia Introduction The 2004 Asian tsunami resulted in over 175,000 deaths, nearly 50,000 missing, and over 1.7 million people displaced in the Indian Ocean region (USAID 2005). Indonesia's Aceh Province

Scharfstein, Daniel

130

Shorter-Course Whole-Brain Radiotherapy for Brain Metastases in Elderly Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Many patients with brain metastases receive whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone. Using 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy in 2 weeks is the standard regimen in most centers. Regarding the extraordinarily poor survival prognosis of elderly patients with multiple brain metastases, a shorter WBRT regimen would be preferable. This study compared 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy with 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy in elderly patients ({>=}65 years). Methods and Materials: Data from 455 elderly patients who received WBRT alone for brain metastases were retrospectively analyzed. Survival and local (= intracerebral) control of 293 patients receiving 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy were compared with 162 patients receiving 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy. Eight additional potential prognostic factors were investigated including age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), primary tumor, number of brain metastases, interval from tumor diagnosis to WBRT, extracerebral metastases, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class. Results: The 6-month overall survival rates were 29% after 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy and 21% after 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy (p = 0.020). The 6-month local control rates were 12% and 10%, respectively (p = 0.32). On multivariate analysis, improved overall survival was associated with KPS {>=} 70 (p < 0.001), only one to three brain metastases (p = 0.029), no extracerebral metastasis (p = 0.012), and lower RPA class (p < 0.001). Improved local control was associated with KPS {>=} 70 (p < 0.001), breast cancer (p = 0.029), and lower RPA class (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Shorter-course WBRT with 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy was not inferior to 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy with respect to overall survival or local control in elderly patients. 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy appears preferable for the majority of these patients.

Rades, Dirk, E-mail: rades.dirk@gmx.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Lubeck (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Evers, Jasmin N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Lubeck (Germany); Veninga, Theo [Department of Radiotherapy, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lohynska, Radka [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, Prague (Czech Republic); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Arizona (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Memory Function Before and After Whole Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With and Without Brain Metastases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To prospectively compare the effect of prophylactic and therapeutic whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) on memory function in patients with and without brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Adult patients with and without brain metastases (n = 44) were prospectively evaluated with serial cognitive testing, before RT (T0), after starting RT (T1), at the end of RT (T2), and 6-8 weeks (T3) after RT completion. Data were obtained from small-cell lung cancer patients treated with prophylactic cranial irradiation, patients with brain metastases treated with therapeutic cranial irradiation (TCI), and breast cancer patients treated with RT to the breast. Results: Before therapy, prophylactic cranial irradiation patients performed worse than TCI patients or than controls on most test scores. During and after WBRT, verbal memory function was influenced by pretreatment cognitive status (p radiation effects on verbal memory function were only observed in TCI patients (p = 0.031). Subacute (T3) radiation effects on verbal memory function were observed in both TCI and prophylactic cranial irradiation patients (p = 0.006). These effects were more pronounced in patients with above-average performance at baseline. Visual memory and attention were not influenced by WBRT. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that WBRT causes cognitive dysfunction immediately after the beginning of RT in patients with brain metastases only. At 6-8 weeks after the end of WBRT, cognitive dysfunction was seen in patients with and without brain metastases. Because cognitive dysfunction after WBRT is restricted to verbal memory, patients should not avoid WBRT because of a fear of neurocognitive side effects.

Welzel, Grit [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany)], E-mail: grit.welzel@radonk.ma.uni-heidelberg.de; Fleckenstein, Katharina [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Schaefer, Joerg; Hermann, Brigitte; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Mai, Sabine K.; Wenz, Frederik [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Cognitive informatics and denotational mathematical means for brain informatics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cognitive informatics studies the natural intelligence and the brain from a theoretical and a computational approach, which rigorously explains the mechanisms of the brain by a fundamental theory known as abstract intelligence, and formally models the ... Keywords: RTPA, abstract intelligence, artificial intelligence, brain informatics, cognitive computers, cognitive computing, cognitive informatics, computational intelligence, concept algebra, denotational mathematics, ebrain, engineering applications, granular algebra, machinable intelligence, natural intelligence, system algebra, visual semantic algebra

Yingxu Wang

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

NIST Mini-sensor Measures Magnetic Activity in Human Brain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to measure alpha waves in the brain associated with a person opening and closing their eyes as well as signals resulting from stimulation of the ...

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

134

High-Tech Brain Implant Predicts, Prevents Epileptic Seizures ...  

This ground-breaking technology consists of miniature brain implants for automatic prediction and control of seizures ... A system and method for ...

135

A fuzzified BRAIN algorithm for learning DNF from incomplete data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aim of this paper is to address the problem of learning Boolean functions from training data with missing values. We present an extension of the BRAIN algorithm, called U-BRAIN (Uncertainty-managing Batch Relevance-based Artificial INtelligence), conceived for learning DNF Boolean formulas from partial truth tables, possibly with uncertain values or missing bits. Such an algorithm is obtained from BRAIN by introducing fuzzy sets in order to manage uncertainty. In the case where no missing bits are present, the algorithm reduces to the original BRAIN.

Rampone, Salvatore

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Positron Scanner for Locating Brain Tumors  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A system is described that makes use of positron emitting isotopes for locating brain tumors. This system inherently provides more information about the distribution of radioactivity in the head in less time than existing scanners which use one or two detectors. A stationary circular array of 32 scintillation detectors scans a horizontal layer of the head from many directions simultaneously. The data, consisting of the number of counts in all possible coincidence pairs, are coded and stored in the memory of a Two-Dimensional Pulse-Height Analyzer. A unique method of displaying and interpreting the data is described that enables rapid approximate analysis of complex source distribution patterns. (auth)

Rankowitz, S.; Robertson, J. S.; Higinbotham, W. A.; Rosenblum, M. J.

1962-03-00T23:59:59.000Z

137

Neuronal oxidative injury and dendritic damage induced by carbofuran: Protection by memantine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbamate insecticides mediate their neurotoxicity by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inactivation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats acutely intoxicated with the carbamate insecticide carbofuran (1.5 mg/kg, sc) developed hypercholinergic signs within 5-7 min of exposure, with maximal severity characterized by seizures within 30-60 min, lasting for about 2 h. At the time of peak severity, compared with controls, AChE was maximally inhibited (by 82-90%), radical oxygen species (ROS) markers (F{sub 2}-isoprostanes, F{sub 2}-IsoPs; and F{sub 4}-neuroprostanes, F{sub 4}-NeuroPs) were elevated 2- to 3-fold, and the radical nitrogen species (RNS) marker citrulline was elevated 4- to 8-fold in discrete brain regions (cortex, amygdala, and hippocampus). In addition, levels of high-energy phosphates (HEPs) were significantly reduced (ATP, by 43-56%; and phosphocreatine, by 37-48%). Values of total adenine nucleotides and total creatine compounds declined markedly (by 41-56% and 35-45%, respectively), while energy charge potential remained unchanged. Quantitative morphometric analysis of pyramidal neurons of the hippocampal CA1 region revealed significant decreases in dendritic lengths (by 64%) and spine density (by 60%). Pretreatment with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist memantine (18 mg/kg, sc), in combination with atropine sulfate (16 mg/kg, sc), significantly attenuated carbofuran-induced changes in AChE activity and levels of F{sub 2}-IsoPs and F{sub 4}-NeuroPs, declines in HEPs, as well as the alterations in morphology of hippocampal neurons. MEM and ATS pretreatment also protected rats from carbofuran-induced hypercholinergic behavioral activity, including seizures. These findings support the involvement of ROS and RNS in seizure-induced neuronal injury and suggest that memantine by preventing carbofuran-induced neuronal hyperactivity blocks pathways associated with oxidative damage in neurons.

Gupta, Ramesh C. [Toxicology Department, Murray State University, Breathitt Veterinary Center, P.O. Box 2000, 715 North Drive, Hopkinsville, KY 42240-2000 (United States)]. E-mail: ramesh.gupta@murraystate.edu; Milatovic, Snjezana [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Dettbarn, Wolf-D. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Aschner, Michael [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Milatovic, Dejan [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Fighting fatalities and injuries: what to expect in 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the measures being taken by safety associations and agencies to reduce fatalities and disabling injuries among coal miners. A survey was conducted among the top 18 coal producing states' agencies and associations and national coal mining associations. The most common causes of fatalities are roof falls, haulage accidents, machinery accidents, and falls from a highwall. Drowning, electrocution, explosion, coal rockbusts, and overconfidence were also reported. Material handling, roof and rib falls, machinery, haulage, and electrical accidents were reported as the most frequent causes of disabling injuries, along with reaching, lifting, pushing, bending, and slips, trips and falls. The survey revealed that most of the largest coal producing states do have active safety programs, and that the states that lack safety program generally have a low fatality rate. Safety programs and materials are available, so it is up to the individual firms and coal miners to use them and to practice safe coal mining.

Erhart, P.P.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Evaluation of Fish Injury and Mortality Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considerable efforts have been underway to develop hydrokinetic energy resources in tidal and riverine environments throughout North America. Potential for fish to be injured or killed if they encounter hydrokinetic turbines is an issue of significant interest to resource and regulatory agencies. To address this issue, flume studies were conducted that exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral reactions and avoidance. Also, a theoreti...

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

140

Thionyl-chloride-induced lung injury and bronchiolitis obliterans  

SciTech Connect

Thionyl-chloride (TCl) is used in the manufacture of lithium batteries, producing SO2 and HCl fumes on contact with water. We report two cases of accidental TCl exposure resulting in lung injury that may vary from a relatively mild and reversible interstitial lung disease to a severe form of bronchiolitis obliterans causing, after a latent period, an acute/chronic respiratory failure as well as other complications (spontaneous pneumothorax and bronchopleural fistula), previously unreported in TCl fume inhalation.

Konichezky, S.; Schattner, A.; Ezri, T.; Bokenboim, P.; Geva, D. (Kaplan Hospital, Rehovot (Israel))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Title and sub-title: A Review of Field Hockey Injuries and Countermeasures for Prevention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hockey is an ancient sport thought to be the forerunner of all ‘stick and ball ’ games. The modern game of hockey is played in 132 countries around the world and is second only in popularity to soccer as a team sport. Epidemiological studies have consistently shown that injuries in hockey are numerous and can be serious. Most serious injuries result from being struck by the stick or the ball. Overuse injuries to the ankles and lower back are also frequently reported. Players aged between 10 and 19 years account for 50 % of all Victorian hospital emergency department presentations for hockey injuries. Most injuries presenting to hospitals are to the upper limb (mostly injuries to the hand and forearm), face (mostly struck by stick or ball) and lower limb (mostly ankle, foot and knee injuries). Injuries to the eyes are infrequent, although tend to be severe. The aim of this report is to critically review both formal research literature and informal sources of information in the context of the available epidemiological data, which describe preventive strategies and countermeasures to hockey injury. Countermeasures for preventing hockey injuries with some evidence to support effectiveness include: enforcing rules aimed at preventing dangerous use of the hockey stick and careless play of the ball; modifying rules

Shauna Sherker; Erin Cassell; Shauna Sherker; Erin Cassell

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Addiction circuitry in the human brain (*).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major challenge in understanding substance-use disorders lies in uncovering why some individuals become addicted when exposed to drugs, whereas others do not. Although genetic, developmental, and environmental factors are recognized as major contributors to a person's risk of becoming addicted, the neurobiological processes that underlie this vulnerability are still poorly understood. Imaging studies suggest that individual variations in key dopamine-modulated brain circuits, including circuits involved in reward, memory, executive function, and motivation, contribute to some of the differences in addiction vulnerability. A better understanding of the main circuits affected by chronic drug use and the influence of social stressors, developmental trajectories, and genetic background on these circuits is bound to lead to a better understanding of addiction and to more effective strategies for the prevention and treatment of substance-use disorders.

Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Tomasi, D.

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

143

2006 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

144

2010 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

145

2010 East Tennessee Technology Park Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

146

2010 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

147

2010 Y-12 National Security Complex Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

2010 Nevada National Security Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

149

2010 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

150

2010 Nevada National Security Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

151

2010 Y-12 National Security Complex Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

2010 East Tennessee Technology Park Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

153

An improved dosimetric model of the head and brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the last decade, various brain imaging methods using radionuclides have become available. Due to the introduction of new techniques, a small-scale dosimetry study of the brain, and more specifically the organs of the head (brain, eyes thyroid, skull, skin) was needed. However, the brain and head models developed in the past were crude representations of the human. In this research, a new brain model has been developed which includes eight subregions. This head model was included in a revised head model developed by Posion et al. in 1984. Some corrections and improvements were added to this head model such as the development of a new spinal region and a new cranium region in order to incorporate the cerebrospinal fluid. This model was used with a Monte Carlo code, EGS4, to calculate absorbed fraction of energy and specific absorbed fraction of energy for photon and electron sources located in one of thirteen chosen source regions. These calculations were made for radiations in the energy range 10 keV to 4 MeV. All twenty-three regions included in the revised head and brain model were taken as target regions. S-values were also calculated for several radionuclides used in brain imaging, and also deposited in the thyroid, the skull or the spinal skeleton. The S-values were calculated using discrete energy points on the beta emission spectrum of the radionuclides.

Bouchet, Lionel Gerard

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Brain scanning with 201 Thallium. Comparative study with D. T. P. A. sup(99m)Tc brain radioangiogram  

SciTech Connect

Data of brain scans with /sup 201/Th and sup(99m)Tc - D.T.P.A. are studied in 43 patients. Some of the results sustained earlier data form Ancri (1978): lack of interest through vascular diseases, good sensitivity for the focalized brain lesions (24/25). But new features are underlined: occurrence of false-positive, intermediary patterns laying between normal scan and focal pathologic distributions but without etiologic correspondance. The quantified contrast is usually better with sup(99m)Tc - D.T.P.A. than with /sup 201/Th: these data challenge Ancri's ones. Actual indications of Thallium brain scan are discussed.

Steinling, M.; Marchandise, X.; Destee, A.; Coequyt, S.; Warot, P.; Vergnes, R. (C.H.U. Lille (France))

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

ATP and ADP hydrolysis in brain membranes of zebrafish (Danio rerio)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Characterization of a synaptosomal ATP diphosphohydrolase from the eletric organ of Torpedo marmorata. Brain

Eizirik, Eduardo

156

Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

157

Brain shows ability to recover from some meth damage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For more information, contact: Karen McNulty Walsh, 631 344-8350, or Mona S. Rowe, 631 344-5056 go to home page 01-91 Dec. 1, 2001 Brain Shows Ability to Recover From Some...

158

Structure-function relationships in human brain development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The integration of anatomical, functional, and developmental approaches in cognitive neuroscience is essential for generating mechanistic explanations of brain function. In this thesis, I first establish a proof-of-principle ...

Saygin, Zeynep Mevhibe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Aging and Gene Expression in the Primate Brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Issue 9 | e274 Primate Brain Aging mask ?le for chimpanzee185 p. 2. Harman D (1956) Aging: A theory based on freeThe free radical theory of aging matures. Physiol Rev 78:

Fraser, Hunter B.; Khaitovich, Philipp; Plotkin, Joshua B.; Paabo, Svante; Eisen, Michael B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Right-lateralized brain oscillations in human spatial navigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During spatial navigation, lesion and functional imaging studies suggest that the right hemisphere has a unique functional role. However, studies of direct human brain recordings have not reported interhemisphere differences in navigation-related oscillatory ...

Joshua Jacobs; Igor O. Korolev; Jeremy B. Caplan; Arne D. Ekstrom; Brian Litt; Gordon Baltuch; Itzhak Fried; Andreas Schulze-Bonhage; Joseph R. Madsen; Michael J. Kahana

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Fearmonger Alert: Freeze Injury Potential for Early-Planted Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corn planting has been proceeding at a record pace in Indiana thus far in the 2004 growing season. Reasonably warm soil temperatures throughout April have also encouraged faster emergence than usually occurs with such early-planted corn. Such early planting and emergence of corn is always at higher calendar risk of injury by frost events or lethal cold temperatures. Of these two risk factors, lethal cold temperature is the more worrisome one since a corn plant’s growing point region is relatively protected from the effects of simple frost while it remains below the soil surface. Lethal cold temperatures (28F or less) can penetrate the upper inch or two of soil, especially dry surface soils, and kill plant tissue directly, including coleoptiles and growing points. Non-lethal injury by cold temperatures may cause deformed elongation of the mesocotyl or physical damage to the coleoptile in nonemerged seedlings, resulting in the proverbial “cork-screw ” symptom and subsequent leafing out underground. Air temperatures in northern areas of Indiana dipped to the low 30’s early in the morning of 3 May, with lower-lying areas likely less than 30F. Given the risk of frost or chilling

R. L. (bob Nielsen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Transcriptional signature of an adult brain tumor in Drosophila  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was extracted from dissected adult brains, and hybridization of labeled cRNA to commercially available full-genome Gene Chips involved a signal amplification step (DrosGenome1, experiment B; see materials and methods). Moreover, in this second experiment... in the larval brain, suggesting that asp may play a role in spindle pole organ- ization during mitosis [39]. fzy encodes a product involved in cyclin catabolism and fzy mutants also show metaphase arrest with compact condensed chromosomes like asp mutants [40...

Loop, Thomas; Leemans, Ronny; Stiefel, Urs; Hermida, Leandro; Egger, Boris; Xie, Fukang; Primig, Michael; Certa, Ulrich; Fischbach, Karl-Friedrich; Reichert, Heinrich; Hirth, Frank

2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

164

An analysis of injury claims from low-seam coal mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The restricted workspace present in low-seam coal mines forces workers to adopt awkward working postures (kneeling and stooping), which place high physical demands on the knee and lower back. This article provides an analysis of injury claims for eight mining companies operating low-seam coal mines during calendar years 1996-2008. All cost data were normalized using data on the cost of medical care (MPI) as provided by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Results of the analysis indicate that the knee was the body part that led in terms of claim cost ($4.2 million), followed by injuries to the lower back ($2.7 million). While the average cost per injury for these body parts was $13,100 and $14,400, respectively (close to the average cost of an injury overall), the high frequency of these injuries resulted in their pre-eminence in terms of cost. Analysis of data from individual mining companies suggest that knee and lower back injuries were a consistent problem across companies, as these injuries were each among the top five most costly part of body for seven out of eight companies studied. Results of this investigation suggest that efforts to reduce the frequency of knee and low back injuries in low-seam mines have the potential to create substantial cost savings.

Gallagher, S.; Moore, S.; Dempsey, P.G. [NIOSH, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

DOE-Flex Bulletin-Worker Injury While on a DOE-Flex Arrangement |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-Flex Bulletin-Worker Injury While on a DOE-Flex Arrangement DOE-Flex Bulletin-Worker Injury While on a DOE-Flex Arrangement DOE-Flex Bulletin-Worker Injury While on a DOE-Flex Arrangement This bulletin responds to questions that have surfaced regarding DOE's liability for an injury to an employee while working at an alternative workplace, particularly at home. It is the position of the DOE Office of General Council that the case decision cited in this document should be relied upon as the prevailing administrative law at this time. DOE-Flex Bulletin-Worker Injury While on a DOE-Flex Arrangement Responsible Contacts Bruce Murray HR Policy Advisor E-mail bruce.murray@hq.doe.gov Phone 202-586-3372 More Documents & Publications Desk Reference on DOE-Flex The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Energy Assurance Planning

166

An economic analysis of recordable injuries at Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc  

SciTech Connect

The William-Steiger Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) was passed by the Congress and signed by the President of the United States in 1970. This law required all companies with more than 25 employees to maintain information about each recordable injury, which is defined as any occupational illness or any work-related injury requiring more extensive treatment than first aid. However, compliance with OSHA standards did not require employers to keep records regarding the costs of recordable injuries or illnesses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate actual recordable US Department of Energy injuries (as defined by OSHA standards) at a multi-plant corporation during a six-month period to determine the average costs of such injuries on the basis of site and payroll classification.

Johnson, E.K.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

An economic analysis of recordable injuries at Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc.  

SciTech Connect

The William-Steiger Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) was passed by the Congress and signed by the President of the United States in 1970. This law required all companies with more than 25 employees to maintain information about each recordable injury, which is defined as any occupational illness or any work-related injury requiring more extensive treatment than first aid. However, compliance with OSHA standards did not require employers to keep records regarding the costs of recordable injuries or illnesses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate actual recordable US Department of Energy injuries (as defined by OSHA standards) at a multi-plant corporation during a six-month period to determine the average costs of such injuries on the basis of site and payroll classification.

Johnson, E.K.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

NeuCube evospike architecture for spatio-temporal modelling and pattern recognition of brain signals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The brain functions as a spatio-temporal information processing machine and deals extremely well with spatio-temporal data. Spatio- and spectro-temporal data (SSTD) are the most common data collected to measure brain signals and brain activities, along ... Keywords: EEG, computational neuro-genetic modelling, evolving neurogenetic brain cube, fMRI, gene regulatory networks, pattern recognition, personalized modeling, probabilistic modeling, spatio/spectro-temporal brain data, spiking neural networks

Nikola Kasabov

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The epidemiology and etiology of visitor injuries in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. National Park Service has recognized visitor health and safety as an important component of protected area management. Despite this recognition, research investigating visitor health and safety issues in national parks is lacking. In order to improve the understanding of the factors contributing to visitor injuries, the purpose of this study was to: 1) identify the distribution of injuries in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, 2) examine the relationship between visitor factors and the severity of visitor injuries in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, 3) examine the relationship between environmental factors and the severity of visitor injuries in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, and 4) determine the effectiveness of sign placement and indirect supervision on controlling visitor injuries in the park. Data for this study consisted of 5,947 incident reports recorded in Hawaii Volcanoes between January 1, 1993 and December 31, 2002. The results found that even though 26% of the injuries in the park occur in frontcountry regions, 53% of all visitor injuries took place at the Eruption Site. As well, 130 of the 268 (49%) fatalities occurred on roadway environments and 1,179 of the 1,698 (69%) severe injuries occurred at the Eruption Site. Logistic regression analysis used to examine the relationship between visitor factors and injury severity in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park found that female visitors, visitors wearing minimal footwear and clothing, and visitors carrying no flashlight and minimal drinking water are factors significantly associated with fatal injuries. Visitors wearing minimal footwear and clothing, visitors carrying no flashlight and minimal drinking water, visitors entering restricted areas, visitors with pre-existing health conditions, and visitors aged 50-59 years of age are factors significantly associated with severe injuries. Logistic regression analysis found no built environment factor to be significantly associated with visitor fatalities or severe injuries. However, darkness and rugged terrain were significantly associated with visitor fatalities. Chi-square tests of independence found the combined treatment of sign placement and indirect supervision to have no effect on reducing the frequency and severity of visitor injuries at the Eruption Site.

Heggie, Travis Wade

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Occupational Injury Rate Estimates in Magnetic Fusion Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In nuclear facilities, there are two primary aspects of occupational safety. The first aspect is radiological safety, which has rightly been treated in detail in nuclear facilities. Radiological exposure data have been collected from the existing tokamaks to serve as forecasts for ITER radiation safety. The second aspect of occupational safety, “traditional” industrial safety, must also be considered for a complete occupational safety program. Industrial safety data on occupational injury rates from the JET and TFTR tokamaks, three accelerators, and U.S. nuclear fission plants have been collected to set industrial safety goals for the ITER operations staff. The results of this occupational safety data collection and analysis activity are presented here. The data show that an annual lost workday case rate of 0.3 incidents per 100 workers is a conceivable goal for ITER operations.

cadwallader, lee

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Angiotensin II receptor binding sites in brain microvessels  

SciTech Connect

The authors assessed the specific binding of /sup 125/I-labeled angiotensin II (/sup 125/I-Ang II) to particulate fractions of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum and to microvessels obtained by bulk isolation from these two brain regions in the dog. /sup 125/I-Ang II binds to cerebral and cerebellar microvessels in a specific, saturable, and reversible manner and with high affinity (dissociation constant about 1 nM). Maximal binding of /sup 125/I-Ang II to brain microvessels was about 2-fold higher than the maximal binding to particulate fractions of the cerebellum and more than 15-fold higher than that of the cerebral cortex. Furthermore, finding that analogues of Ang II displace specific /sup 125/I-Ang II binding to brain microvessels in a rank order that correlates with their pharmacological activities confers biological relevance on the ligand-binding studies. These results strongly suggest that specific Ang II receptor binding sites are present in brain microvessels. Such Ang II receptors may have an important role in regulating the microcirculation of the brain.

Speth, R.C.; Harik, S.I.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

A 3-D Link between Antibiotic Resistance and Brain Disease  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A 3-D Link between Antibiotic Resistance and Brain Disease A 3-D Link between Antibiotic Resistance and Brain Disease The story of what makes certain types of bacteria resistant to a specific antibiotic has a sub-plot that gives insight into the cause of a rare form of brain degeneration among children, according to investigators at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. The story takes a twist as key differences among the structures of its main molecular characters disappear and reappear as they are assembled in the cell. The story is based on a study of the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of an enzyme called pantothenate kinase, which triggers the first step in the production coenzyme A (CoA), a molecule that is indispensable to all forms of life. Enzymes are proteins that speed up biochemical reactions. CoA plays a pivotal role in the cells' ability to extract energy from fatty

173

Brain teasers traveling exhibit opens at Los Alamos National Laboratory's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brain teasers exhibit opens at museum Brain teasers exhibit opens at museum Brain Teasers traveling exhibit opens at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Bradbury Science Museum The interactive exhibit is a collection of more than 20 puzzles and mind benders. December 4, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact

174

Regulation of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in the rat brain  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the localization, kinetics, and regulation of receptors for the circulating form of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP; 99-126) in the rat brain. Quantitative autoradiographic techniques and a /sup 125/I-labeled ligand, /sup 125/I-ANP (99-126), were employed. After in vitro autoradiography, quantification was achieved by computerized microdensitometry followed by comparison with /sup 125/I-standards. ANP receptors were discretely localized in the rat brain, with the highest concentrations in circumventricular organs, the choroid plexus, and selected hypothalamic nuclei involved in the production of the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin and in blood-pressure control. Spontaneously (genetic) hypertensive rats showed much lower numbers of ANP receptors than normotensive controls in the subfornical organ, the area postrema, the nucleus of the solitary tract, and the choroid plexus. These changes are in contrast to those observed for receptors of angiotensin II, another circulating peptide with actions opposite to those of ANP. Under conditions of acute dehydration after water deprivation, as well as under conditions of chronic dehydration such as those present in homozygous Brattleboro rats, there was an up-regulation of ANP receptors in the subfornical organ. Our results indicate that in the brain, circumventricular organs contain ANP receptors which could respond to variations in the concentration of circulating ANP. In addition, brain areas inside the blood-brain barrier contain ANP receptors probably related to the endogenous, central ANP system. The localization of ANP receptors and the alterations in their regulation present in genetically hypertensive rats and after dehydration indicate that brain ANP receptors are probably related to fluid regulation, including the secretion of vasopressin, and to cardiovascular function.

Saavedra, J.M.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

NMR CAT scanner: a new look at the brain  

SciTech Connect

Thin-section transverse axial scans of the healthy human brain have been produced by nuclear magnetic resonance, and these are of sufficient quality to be compared to X-ray CAT scans of the same sections. Not unexpectedly, there are marked differences in the contrast shown by various structures within the brain. It seems even at this early stage that NMR CAT scanning could well become a hazard-free and possibly cheaper alternative method, with considerable potential. The precise technique used and its implementation are discussed, and the methods are compared, particularly with a view to future diagnostic use.

Moore, W.S. (Univ. of Nottingham, University Park, England); Holland, G.N.; Kreel, L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Surveillance Guide - OSS 19.11 Injury and Illness Record Keeping  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INJURY AND ILLNESS RECORDKEEPING INJURY AND ILLNESS RECORDKEEPING 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the contractor's process for identifying and recording data pertaining to occupational injuries and illnesses. The Facility Representative will benchmark the existing records regarding injuries and illnesses, against the source data maintained by individual field medical facilities. In addition, the Facility Representative will evaluate the contractor's compliance with the Department of Energy's (DOE) key requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE N 231.1, Environmental, Safety and Health Reporting Notice 2.2 DOE M 231.1, Environmental, Safety, and Health Reporting Manual 2.3 DOE Order 440.1A "Worker Protection Management for

177

Tornado-Related Deaths and Injuries in Oklahoma due to the 3 May 1999 Tornadoes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the evening hours of 3 May 1999, 58 tornadoes occurred in Oklahoma. One tornado reached F5 intensity and left a widespread path of death, injury, and destruction in and around the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. Other communities across ...

Sheryll Brown; Pam Archer; Elizabeth Kruger; Sue Mallonee

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Poisson Regression Analysis of Illness and Injury Surveillance Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) uses illness and injury surveillance to monitor morbidity and assess the overall health of the work force. Data collected from each participating site include health events and a roster file with demographic information. The source data files are maintained in a relational data base, and are used to obtain stratified tables of health event counts and person time at risk that serve as the starting point for Poisson regression analysis. The explanatory variables that define these tables are age, gender, occupational group, and time. Typical response variables of interest are the number of absences due to illness or injury, i.e., the response variable is a count. Poisson regression methods are used to describe the effect of the explanatory variables on the health event rates using a log-linear main effects model. Results of fitting the main effects model are summarized in a tabular and graphical form and interpretation of model parameters is provided. An analysis of deviance table is used to evaluate the importance of each of the explanatory variables on the event rate of interest and to determine if interaction terms should be considered in the analysis. Although Poisson regression methods are widely used in the analysis of count data, there are situations in which over-dispersion occurs. This could be due to lack-of-fit of the regression model, extra-Poisson variation, or both. A score test statistic and regression diagnostics are used to identify over-dispersion. A quasi-likelihood method of moments procedure is used to evaluate and adjust for extra-Poisson variation when necessary. Two examples are presented using respiratory disease absence rates at two DOE sites to illustrate the methods and interpretation of the results. In the first example the Poisson main effects model is adequate. In the second example the score test indicates considerable over-dispersion and a more detailed analysis attributes the over-dispersion to extra-Poisson variation. The R open source software environment for statistical computing and graphics is used for analysis. Additional details about R and the data that were used in this report are provided in an Appendix. Information on how to obtain R and utility functions that can be used to duplicate results in this report are provided.

Frome E.L., Watkins J.P., Ellis E.D.

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

179

Evaluation of Fish-Injury Mechanisms During Exposure to a High-Velocity Jet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the research supported by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Hydropower Turbine System (AHTS) Program, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a study where age-0 and age-1 chinook salmon, as well as several other types of fish, were released into a submerged water jet to quantify injuries caused by shear stresses and turbulence (Neitzel et al. 2000). The fish releases were videotaped. These videotape records were digitized and analyzed using new methods to identify the injury mechanisms and the stresses involved. Visible external injuries sustained by fish in this study generally occurred during the initial contact with the jet and not during the tumbling that occurred after the fish fully entered the turbulent flow. The inertial stresses of tumbling, however, may cause temporary or even permanent vestibular and neurological injuries. Such injuries can result in disorientation and loss of equilibrium, which are life threatening in the ''natural'' environment. Operculum injuries predominated at moderate water jet speeds (12 and 15 m {center_dot} s{sup -1}). At the highest speed, eye, operculum, isthmus, and gill injuries were equally common, and disorientation was most common. Bruising and descaling were relatively rare, especially for age-0 fish. Age-0 fish were less susceptible than the larger age-1 fish to all visible injury types, especially at lower speeds. This is presumably because age-0 fish have less mass and inertia, and therefore sustain smaller forces on exposed organs during acceleration. Alternatively, age-0 fish were substantially more susceptible to behavioral impairments such as disorientation. This may also relate to the smaller mass of the age-0 fish. The less massive age-0 fish sustain larger accelerations and jerks, which may be important sources of the internal injuries to the vestibular and neurological systems. All the dynamic parameters computed from the bulk motion of the fish (velocity, jerk, and force) were positively correlated with injury level, based on the results of this study. Multinomial response model results further suggested that force is most predictive of injury.

Guensch, Greg R.; Mueller, Robert P.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Dauble, Dennis D.

2003-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

180

2008 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

2007 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2009-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

182

2009 Y-12 National Security Complex Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

183

2008 Y-12 National Security Complex Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

184

2007 Los Alamos National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

185

2008 East Tennessee Technology Park Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

186

2008 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

187

2003 Pantex Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the Pantex Plant. DOE is commited to assuring the health and safety of its workers. This includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2007-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

188

2003 Kansas City Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007  

SciTech Connect

Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the Kansas City Plant. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

189

2003 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007  

SciTech Connect

Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Brookhaven National Lab. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

190

A history of optogenetics: the development of tools for controlling brain circuits with light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding how different kinds of neuron in the brain work together to implement sensations, feelings, thoughts, and movements, and how deficits in specific kinds of neuron result in brain diseases, has long been a ...

Boyden, Edward Stuart

191

A pseudo-equilibrium thermodynamic model of information processing in nonlinear brain dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Haven CT: Yale U. P. Thermodynamic model of brain dynamicsNeurophysiol. 117(3), Thermodynamic model of brain dynamicsA far-from-equilibrium thermodynamic model of the action-

Freeman, Walter J III

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Monitoraggio dell'attivitŕ cerebrale tramite brain-computer-interface(BCI).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Un’interfaccia cervello-computer (in inglese, Brain-Computer Interface, abbreviato in BCI, o anche Brain-Machine Interface, BMI) č un sistema di comunicazione in cui i messaggi o i… (more)

Gnamteu Sottang, Fabrice

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Neurological and behavioral abnormalities, ventricular dilatation, altered cellular functions, inflammation, and neuronal injury in brains of mice due to common, persistent, parasitic infection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mouse Thymic Virus (MTV) Bacterial pathogens Mycoplasma pulmonis; Salmonella spp.; Citrobacer rodentium; Clostridium piliforme; Cilia Associated Respiratory (CAR) Bacillus Parasitic pathogens Endoparasites; Pinworms (Syphaciasp, Aspiculuris tetraptera... and quantitated using a spectrophotometer (260 lamba). The extinction coefficient aliquots of 40 ?g (260/ 280 was less than 1.6) were utilized for hybridization For hybridization experiments 40 ?g total RNA was mixed with a 17 mer dT oligo (Sigma) and reverse...

Hermes, Gretchen; Ajioka, James W; Kelly, Krystyna A; Mui, Ernest; Roberts, Fiona; Kasza, Kristen; Mayr, Thomas; Kirisits, Michael J; Wollman, Robert; Ferguson, David J P; Roberts, Craig W; Hwang, Jong-Hee; Trendler, Toria; Kennan, Richard P; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Reardon, Catherine; Hickey, Adam William; Chen, Lieping; McLeod, Rima

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

194

Evaluation of brain edema using magnetic resonance proton relaxation times  

SciTech Connect

Experimental and clinical studies on the evaluation of water content in cases of brain edema were performed in vivo, using MR proton relaxation times (longitudinal relaxation time, T1; transverse relaxation time, T2). Brain edema was produced in the white matter of cats by the direct infusion method. The correlations between proton relaxation times obtained from MR images and the water content of white matter were studied both in autoserum-infused cats and in saline-infused cats. The correlations between T1 as well as T2 and the water content in human vasogenic brain edema were also examined and compared with the data obtained from the serum group. T1 and T2 showed good correlations with the water content of white matter not only in the experimental animals but also in the clinical cases. The quality of the edema fluid did not influence relaxation time and T1 seemed to represent almost solely the water content of the tissue. T2, however, was affected by the nature of existence of water and was more sensitive than T1 in detecting extravasated edema fluid. It seems feasible therefore to evaluate the water content of brain edema on the basis of T1 values.

Fu, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Nishimura, S. (Baba Memorial Hospital, Osaka (Japan))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Determination of Friction Coefficient in Unconfined Compression of Brain Tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unconfined compression tests are more convenient to perform on cylindrical samples of brain tissue than tensile tests in order to estimate mechanical properties of the brain tissue because they allow for homogeneous deformations. The reliability of these tests depends significantly on the amount of friction generated at the specimen/platen interface. Thus, there is a crucial need to find an approximate value of the friction coefficient in order to predict a possible overestimation of stresses during unconfined compression tests. In this study, a combined experimental-computational approach was adopted to estimate the dynamic friction coefficient mu of porcine brain matter against metal platens in compressive tests. Cylindrical samples of porcine brain tissue were tested up to 30% strain at variable strain rates, both under bonded and lubricated conditions in the same controlled environment. It was established that mu was equal to 0.09 +/- 0.03, 0.18 +/- 0.04, 0.18 +/- 0.04 and 0.20 +/- 0.02 at strain rates of...

Rashid, Badar; Gilchrist, Michael; 10.1016/j.jmbbm.2012.05.001

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2001: Injury and Illness Among the Electric Energy Workforce, 1995 - 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has established an ongoing health and safety database designed to provide more precise and detailed information about workplace injury and illness among the electric energy workforce than is available from other sources. This health and safety database provides the capability for epidemiologic monitoring, ongoing injury/illness reporting, occupational health and safety research, and program evaluation. This report summarizes injury/illness trends over the period 1995-2000 from eight participating co...

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

197

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2002: Injury and Illness Trends in the Electric Energy Workforce, 1995-2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although injury rates among sectors of the electric energy workforce are higher than in many industries, there are no comprehensive, nationwide surveillance systems for reporting and monitoring occupational injury/illness data for the electric energy industry. EPRI has established an ongoing Occupational Health and Safety Surveillance Database designed to provide more detailed, precise information about workplace injury and illness among the electric energy workforce than is available from other sources....

2002-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

198

EPRI Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2003: Injury and Illness Among the Electric Energy Workforce, 1995-2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although injury rates among some sectors of the electric energy workforce are higher than in many other industries, there is no comprehensive, nationwide surveillance system for reporting and monitoring occupational injury/illness data for the electric energy industry. EPRI has established an ongoing Occupational Health Surveillance Database to provide detailed information about workplace injury and illness among the electric energy workforce. The database facilitates epidemiological monitoring, ongoing ...

2004-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

199

The role of stress in recovery of function after spinal cord injury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research has shown that exposure to just 6 minutes of uncontrollable shock 24 hours following contusion injury impairs locomotor recovery and leads to greater tissue loss at the injury epicenter. Uncontrollable shock is known to elevate corticosterone levels in intact rats and corticosterone exacerbates cell death in the hippocampus following injury, suggesting the effects may be related to a stress-induced release of corticosterone. Uncontrollable shock also affects other indices of stress including, spleen weight and norepinephrine, and has been shown to elevate pro-inflammatory cytokines. The present experiments were designed to assess whether uncontrollable shock has similar effects after contusion injury. Experiment 1 examined whether injury itself produced a stress response. Subjects received anesthesia alone, a laminectomy, or a contusion injury. Twenty-four hours later, they were restrained for 6 minutes and blood was collected from the leg. They were sacrificed 24 hours later and spleens were weighed, and plasma corticosterone and norepinephrine were assessed using ELISAs. IL-1! and IL-6 levels at the injury site were also measured using an ELISA. Contusion injury had no impact on any of the biological outcomes. For Experiment 2, subjects received 6 minutes of uncontrollable tailshock or an equivalent amount of restraint. Subjects were sacrificed 6, 24, 72, or 168 hours later. Uncontrollable shock caused a decrease in spleen weight and increased plasma corticosterone within 24 hours. Increases in IL-1! and IL-6 were also seen. Morphine was used in Experiment 3 to block the “psychological” component of uncontrollable shock. Subjects received morphine (20 mg/kg; i.p.) or saline 30 minutes prior to uncontrollable shock and were sacrificed 24 hours later. Morphine did not prevent the consequences of uncontrollable shock and, in some cases, potentiated its effects. The effect of controllability was examined in Experiment 4. After receiving a contusion injury, subjects received either controllable (master) or uncontrollable (yoked) legshock over the course of 2 days. A third group served as unshocked controls. Master subjects did not differ from yoked subjects on any of the biological outcomes measured. Unshocked subjects, however, exhibited an increase in corticosterone, IL-6, and blood monocytes.

Washburn, Stephanie Nicole

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Weapons testing data determines brain makes new neurons into adulthood  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 For immediate release: 06/10/2013 | NR-13-06-04 Weapons testing data determines brain makes new neurons into adulthood Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Image courtesy of National Institutes of Health. LIVERMORE, Calif. -- Using data derived from nuclear weapons testing of the 1950s and '60s, Lawrence Livermore scientists have found that a small portion of the human brain involved in memory makes new neurons well into adulthood. The research may have profound impacts on human behavior and mental health. The study supports the importance of investigating the therapeutic potential of applying adult neurogenesis to the treatment of age-related cognitive disorders. Neurogenesis is the process by which neurons are generated from neural stem

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Simple Fully Automated Group Classification on Brain fMRI  

SciTech Connect

We propose a simple, well grounded classification technique which is suited for group classification on brain fMRI data sets that have high dimensionality, small number of subjects, high noise level, high subject variability, imperfect registration and capture subtle cognitive effects. We propose threshold-split region as a new feature selection method and majority voteas the classification technique. Our method does not require a predefined set of regions of interest. We use average acros ssessions, only one feature perexperimental condition, feature independence assumption, and simple classifiers. The seeming counter-intuitive approach of using a simple design is supported by signal processing and statistical theory. Experimental results in two block design data sets that capture brain function under distinct monetary rewards for cocaine addicted and control subjects, show that our method exhibits increased generalization accuracy compared to commonly used feature selection and classification techniques.

Honorio, J.; Goldstein, R.; Honorio, J.; Samaras, D.; Tomasi, D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

2010-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

202

Developments in deep brain stimulation using time dependent magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

The effect of head model complexity upon the strength of field in different brain regions for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been investigated. Experimental measurements were used to verify the validity of magnetic field calculations and induced electric field calculations for three 3D human head models of varying complexity. Results show the inability for simplified head models to accurately determine the site of high fields that lead to neuronal stimulation and highlight the necessity for realistic head modeling for TMS applications.

Crowther, L.J.; Nlebedim, I.C.; Jiles, D.C.

2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

203

Genotype and ancestry modulate brain's DAT availability in healthy humans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a principal regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission and its gene (the SLC6A3) is a strong biological candidate gene for various behavioral- and neurological disorders. Intense investigation of the link between the SLC6A3 polymorphisms and behavioral phenotypes yielded inconsistent and even contradictory results. Reliance on objective brain phenotype measures, for example, those afforded by brain imaging, might critically improve detection of DAT genotype-phenotype association. Here, we tested the relationship between the DAT brain availability and the SLC6A3 genotypes using an aggregate sample of 95 healthy participants of several imaging studies. These studies employed positron emission tomography (PET) with [{sup 11}C] cocaine wherein the DAT availability was estimated as Bmax/Kd; while the genotype values were obtained on two repeat polymorphisms - 3-UTR- and intron 8- VNTRs. The main findings are the following: (1) both polymorphisms analyzed as single genetic markers and in combination (haplotype) modulate DAT density in midbrain; (2) ethnic background and age influence the strength of these associations; and (3) age-related changes in DAT availability differ in the 3-UTR and intron8 - genotype groups.

Shumay, E.; Shumay, E.; Chen, J.; Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Pantex celebrates three million hours without a lost time injury | National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

three million hours without a lost time injury | National three million hours without a lost time injury | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex celebrates three million hours without a ... Pantex celebrates three million hours without a lost time injury Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA Blog NNSA Blog

205

'Safety Begins with Me' Works toward an Injury-Free Workplace at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'Safety Begins with Me' Works toward an Injury-Free Workplace 'Safety Begins with Me' Works toward an Injury-Free Workplace at Savannah River Site - Employees embrace high-quality safety awareness campaign 'Safety Begins with Me' Works toward an Injury-Free Workplace at Savannah River Site - Employees embrace high-quality safety awareness campaign February 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis A Savannah River Nuclear Solutions employee hangs one of several “Safety Begins with Me” banners near a Savannah River Site entrance. A Savannah River Nuclear Solutions employee hangs one of several "Safety Begins with Me" banners near a Savannah River Site entrance. A green cross was chosen as the primary symbol for the Savannah River Site’s “Safety Begins with Me” program. A green cross was chosen as the primary symbol for the Savannah River

206

Addiction: Decreased reward sensitivity and increased expectation sensitivity conspire to overwhelm the brain’s control circuit  

SciTech Connect

Based on brain imaging findings, we present a model according to which addiction emerges as an imbalance in the information processing and integration among various brain circuits and functions. The dysfunctions reflect (a) decreased sensitivity of reward circuits, (b) enhanced sensitivity of memory circuits to conditioned expectations to drugs and drug cues, stress reactivity, and (c) negative mood, and a weakened control circuit. Although initial experimentation with a drug of abuse is largely a voluntary behavior, continued drug use can eventually impair neuronal circuits in the brain that are involved in free will, turning drug use into an automatic compulsive behavior. The ability of addictive drugs to co-opt neurotransmitter signals between neurons (including dopamine, glutamate, and GABA) modifies the function of different neuronal circuits, which begin to falter at different stages of an addiction trajectory. Upon exposure to the drug, drug cues or stress this results in unrestrained hyperactivation of the motivation/drive circuit that results in the compulsive drug intake that characterizes addiction.

Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Tomasi, D.; Telang, F.; Baler, R.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Audit of Department of Energy Contractor Occupational Injury and Illness Reporting Practices, IG-0404  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 7, 1997 May 7, 1997 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: John C. Layton Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on "Audit of Department of Energy Contractor Occupational Injury and Illness Reporting Practices" BACKGROUND: The Department and its contractors are responsible for ensuring that a safe and healthy work environment is provided to Department and contractor employees at its operating facilities. Contractors are responsible for establishing a comprehensive occupational safety and health program, which includes reporting of significant work- related employee injuries. The Department is responsible

208

Motor Vehicle Crash Fatalities and Injuries: An Analysis of the Relationship of Roadway, Driver, Vehicle Characteristics in Oregon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motor Vehicle Crash Fatalities and Injuries: An Analysis of the Relationship of Roadway, Driver, Vehicle Characteristics in Oregon Motor Vehicle Crash Fatalities and Injuries: An Analysis,000 population among Oregon counties from 2000-2005 ranged from 6.64-211.17. In the event of a severe motor

Bertini, Robert L.

209

Factors Predictive of Symptomatic Radiation Injury After Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Intracerebral Arteriovenous Malformations  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate predictive factors in the development of symptomatic radiation injury after treatment with linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for intracerebral arteriovenous malformations and relate the findings to the conclusions drawn by Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC). Methods and Materials: Archived plans for 73 patients who were treated at the British Columbia Cancer Agency were studied. Actuarial estimates of freedom from radiation injury were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used for analysis of incidence of radiation injury. Log-rank test was used to search for dosimetric parameters associated with freedom from radiation injury. Results: Symptomatic radiation injury was exhibited by 14 of 73 patients (19.2%). Actuarial rate of symptomatic radiation injury was 23.0% at 4 years. Most patients (78.5%) had mild to moderate deficits according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. On univariate analysis, lesion volume and diameter, dose to isocenter, and a V{sub x} for doses {>=}8 Gy showed statistical significance. Only lesion diameter showed statistical significance (p < 0.05) in a multivariate model. According to the log-rank test, AVM volumes >5 cm{sup 3} and diameters >30 mm were significantly associated with the risk of radiation injury (p < 0.01). The V{sub 12} also showed strong association with the incidence of radiation injury. Actuarial incidence of radiation injury was 16.8% if V{sub 12} was <28 cm{sup 3} and 53.2% if >28 cm{sup 3} (log-rank test, p = 0.001). Conclusions: This study confirms that the risk of developing symptomatic radiation injury after radiosurgery is related to lesion diameter and volume and irradiated volume. Results suggest a higher tolerance than proposed by QUANTEC. The widely differing findings reported in the literature, however, raise considerable uncertainties.

Herbert, Christopher, E-mail: cherbert@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); McKenzie, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Redekop, Gary [Division of Neurosurgery, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Hsu, Fred [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Abbotsford, BC (Canada); Gete, Ermias; Gill, Brad; Lee, Richard; Luchka, Kurt [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Haw, Charles [Division of Neurosurgery, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Lee, Andrew [Department of Neurosurgery, Royal Columbian Hospital, New Westminster, BC (Canada); Toyota, Brian [Division of Neurosurgery, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Martin, Montgomery [Department of Medical Imaging, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Evaluation of injury/illness recordkeeping pilot course taught in Richland, Washington, June 18, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Injury/Illness Recordkeeping which was conducted June 18, at Hanford, in richland, Washington. This class was the second pilot course taught. This class was designed to aquaint attendees with DOE orders 5484.1, 5484.1A, draft 3 and OSHA regulations found in 29 CFR 1904.

Wright, T.S.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Bayesian Multivariate Poisson Regression for Models of Injury Count, by Severity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

' to 20') is predicted to result in 18% and 23% fewer fatal and disabling injury cases per 100 million VMT. (1986). On the estimation of the expected number of accidents. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 18, Federal Highway Administration. Zegeer, C.V., Stewart, J.R., Huang, H.H., and Lagerwey, P.A. (2002

Kockelman, Kara M.

212

Quantifying mortal injury of juvenile Chinook salmon exposed to simulated hydro-turbine passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A proportion of juvenile Chinook salmon and other salmonids travel through one or more turbines during seaward migration in the Columbia and Snake River every year. Despite this understanding, limited information exists on how these fish respond to hydraulic pressures found during turbine passage events. In this study we exposed juvenile Chinook salmon to varied acclimation pressures and subsequent exposure pressures (nadir) to mimic the hydraulic pressures of large Kaplan turbines (ratio of pressure change). Additionally, we varied abiotic (total dissolved gas, rate of pressure change) and biotic (condition factor, fish length, fish weight) factors that may contribute to the incidence of mortal injury associated with fish passing through hydro-turbines. We determined that the main factor associated with mortal injury of juvenile Chinook salmon during simulated turbine passage was the ratio between acclimation and nadir pressures. Condition factor, total dissolved gas, and the rate of pressure change were found to only slightly increase the predictive power of equations relating probability of mortal injury to conditions of exposure or characteristics of test fish during simulated turbine passage. This research will assist engineers and fisheries managers in operating and improving hydroelectric facility efficiency while minimizing mortality and injury of turbine-passed juvenile Chinook salmon. The results are discussed in the context of turbine development and the necessity of understanding how different species of fish will respond to the hydraulic pressures of turbine passage.

Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Gingerich, Andrew J.; Stephenson, John R.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Welch, Abigail E.; Langeslay, Mike; Ahmann, Martin L.; Johnson, Robert L.; Skalski, John R.; Seaburg, Adam; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

UC COMPENSATION FOR INJURY 1a. GENERAL PROVISION OF MEDICAL TREATMENT OR REIMBURSEMENT OF MEDICAL COST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UC COMPENSATION FOR INJURY GUIDELINES 1a. GENERAL PROVISION OF MEDICAL TREATMENT OR REIMBURSEMENT OF MEDICAL COST The University of California will provide to any injured subject any and all medical or illness is a consequence of a medical research procedure which is designed to benefit the subject directly

El Zarki, Magda

214

Response to Warnings during the 3 May 1999 Oklahoma City Tornado: Reasons and Relative Injury Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residents of homes that sustained F4 or F5 damage in the deadliest of the 3 May 1999 tornadoes were surveyed to determine their responses to the tornado warning, reasons for their responses, and relative injury rates. There were 190 people in 65 ...

Barbara Hammer; Thomas W. Schmidlin

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in cortical motor learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organization of adult motor cortex is dependent uponorganization of primary motor cortex output to targetreorganization following motor nerve lesions. Exp Brain Res,

Von dem Bussche, Mary

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Characterization and distribution of receptors for the atrial natriuretic peptides in mammalian brain  

SciTech Connect

Both rat SVI-labeled atrial natriuretic polypeptide ( SVI-ANP or atrial natriuretic factor fragment ANF-(99-126)) and human SVI- -ANP or human ANF-(99-126)) bind with high specificity and affinity to an apparent single class of sites in guinea pig brain. Similar results have been reported in peripheral tissues, which indicate that central and peripheral ANP binding sites have fairly similar structural requirements. In vitro receptor autoradiography shows that in the guinea pig brain, SVI-ANP binding sites are highly concentrated in the external plexiform layer of the olfactory bulb, subfornical organ, various thalamic nuclei, medial geniculate nucleus, and cerebellum. Lower densities are found in the central nucleus of the amygdala, dentate gyrus, hippocampus, and area postrema. Most remaining regions contain much lower densities of sites. In rat brain SVI-ANP binding sites are differentially distributed, with high densities in the subfornical organ, area postrema, and linings of ventricles but low densities in the thalamus and cerebellum. In monkey brain, SVI-ANP binding sites are concentrated in the cerebellum. The presence of high densities of SVI-ANP binding sites in various brain regions strongly suggests the existence of a family of brain-heart peptides, in analogy to the well-known brain-gut peptides. Moreover, the extensive distribution of SVI-ANP binding sites in mammalian brain suggests that the possible roles of ANP/ANF-like peptides in brain are not restricted to the central regulation of cardiovascular parameters.

Quirion, R.; Dalpe, M.; Dam, T.V.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Effect of Low Dose Radiation on Antioxidant Levels in Rat Brain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Radiation on Antioxidant Levels in Rat Brain Mohan Doss Fox Chase Cancer Center Abstract Background: Parkinsons disease (PD) is characterized by progressive...

218

Quantum Mind from a Classical Field Theory of the Brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest that, with regard to a theory of quantum mind, brain processes can be described by a classical, dissipative, non-abelian gauge theory. In fact, such a theory has a hidden quantum nature due to its non-abelian character, which is revealed through dissipation, when the theory reduces to a quantum vacuum, where temperatures are of the order of absolute zero, and coherence of quantum states is preserved. We consider in particular the case of pure SU(2) gauge theory with a special anzatz for the gauge field, which breaks Lorentz invariance. In the ansatz, a contraction mapping plays the role of dissipation. In the limit of maximal dissipation, which corresponds to the attractive fixed point of the contraction mapping, the gauge fields reduce, up to constant factors, to the Pauli quantum gates for one-qubit states. Then tubuline-qubits can be processed in the quantum vacuum of the classical field theory of the brain, where decoherence is avoided due to the extremely low temperature. Finally, we interpret the classical SU(2) dissipative gauge theory as the quantum metalanguage (relative to the quantum logic of qubits), which holds the non-algorithmic aspect of the mind.

Paola Zizzi

2011-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

219

Unitizing worker expertise and maximizing the brain reward centers  

SciTech Connect

People are experts when it comes to the work they do; unfortunately their expertise is not utilized as frequently as it could be. More opportunities need to be provided that allow people to participate in the design of their work including: accident investigations, job planning, and process improvements. Many employers use some form of job hazard analysis process to identify and document hazards and controls, but the front line worker is rarely involved. This presentation will show the core principles supporting employee involvement, provide examples where workers had brilliant ideas but no one listened, and provide examples where workers were given the opportunity to use their expertise to improve occupational safety. According to Abraham Maslow's Hierarch of Needs model, one essential human need is to be innovative and solve problems. Advances in brain science have proven, through functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, the brain reward pathway is activated when people are recognized for their intellectual contributions. As people contribute their expertise to improve occupational safety more frequently they will feel a sense of gratification. In addition, safety professionals will have more time to spend on strategic planning of emerging occupational safety issues. One effect of the current global recession is that SH&E professionals are asked to do more with less. Therefore, to be successful it is essential that SH&E professionals incorporate worker expertise in job planning. This will be illustrated in the presentation through an example where a worker had the answer to a difficult decision on appropriate personal protective equipment for a job but no one asked the worker for his idea during the job planning phase. Fortunately the worker was eventually consulted and his recommendation for the appropriate personal protective equipment for the job was implemented before work began. The goal of this presentation is to expand the awareness and knowledge of SH&E professionals on the benefits and opportunities for leveraging brain science. This will include an overview of the components of the brain reward pathway and the biological mechanisms that make workers feel a sense of gratification when they contribute their ideas toward improving occupational safety. On-the-job examples where it is hypothesized that the brain reward pathway was activated in workers will be provided. Finally, the presentation will include a model illustrating the importance of empowering workers to participate in occupational safety programs. SH&E professionals can use this model to maintain a robust safety and health program with limited resources. The model will also help SH&E professionals prepare for challenges in the SH&E fields by showing them how to allocate more time for strategic planning of emerging issues. Many recent best selling business books such as Wikinomics, Crowdsourcing, and Sway, illustrate how the benefit of harnessing the collective knowledge of employees is a key to company success. Companies like Google and Pixar have mastered the ability to capture empFoyee knowledge in terms of technology. Why should occupational safety be any different? Workers know how to improve safety in their workplace. SH&E professionals can harness this collective safety knowledge just as top companies do with technology, and workers will feel grateful for contributing.

Martinez, Anthony Bert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Zebrafish homologs of 16p11.2, a genomic region associated with brain disorders, are active during brain development, and include two deletion dosage sensor genes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deletion or duplication of one copy of the human 16p11.2 interval is tightly associated with impaired brain function, including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), intellectual disability disorder (IDD) and other phenotypes, ...

Blaker-Lee, Alicia

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Method and apparatus for extraction of low-frequency artifacts from brain waves for alertness detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus automatically detect alertness in humans by monitoring and analyzing brain wave signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave (EEG or MEG) data from the subject, digitizing the data, separating artifact data from raw data, and comparing trends in f-data to alertness indicators, providing notification of inadequate alertness.

Clapp, Ned E. (Knoxville, TN); Hively, Lee M. (Knoxville, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Phase lagging model of brain response to external stimuli-modeling of single action potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we detail a phase lagging model of brain response to external stimuli. The model is derived using the basic laws of physics like conservation of energy law. This model eliminates the paradox of instantaneous propagation of the action potential ... Keywords: Action potential, Brain response, External stimuli, Phase lagging model, Single neuron

Karthik Seetharaman; Hamidreza Namazi; Vladimir V. Kulsih

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Brain activity and presence: a preliminary study in different immersive conditions using transcranial Doppler monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transcranial Doppler (TCD) sonography is a brain activity measurement technique that monitors the hemodynamic characteristics of the major cerebral arteries in normal and pathological conditions. As it is not invasive, it can be easily used in combination ... Keywords: Brain activity, Immersion, Navigation, Transcranial Doppler, Virtual reality

Beatriz Rey; Mariano Alcańiz; José Tembl; Vera Parkhutik

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

2011 Special Issue: The pedunculopontine nucleus as an additional target for deep brain stimulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pedunculopontine nucleus has been suggested as a target for DBS. In this paper we propose a single compartment computational model for a PPN Type I cell and compare its dynamic behavior with experimental data. The model shows bursts after a period ... Keywords: Basal ganglia-brain stem circuit, Deep brain stimulation (DBS), Parkinson's disease (PD), Pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN)

M. A. J. Lourens; H. G. E. Meijer; T. Heida; E. Marani; S. A. van Gils

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Perfusion-Based High-Resolution Functional Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perfusion-Based High-Resolution Functional Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla Josef Pfeuffer smaller voxel size than previously reported in humans. High-resolution CBF maps were obtained with voxel sizes as small as 0.9 0.9 1.5 mm3 in the human brain. High sensitivity was made possible by signal

226

Automatic segmentation of non-enhancing brain tumors in magnetic resonance images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tumor segmentation from magnetic resonance (MR) images may aid in tumor treatment by tracking the progress of tumor growth and/or shrinkage. In this paper we present the first automatic segmentation method which separates non-enhancing brain tumors from ... Keywords: Automatic tissue classification, Fuzzy clustering, Image processing, MRI, Non-enhancing brain tumors

Lynn M Fletcher-Heath; Lawrence O Hall; Dmitry B Goldgof; F.Reed Murtagh

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Multi-modal affect induction for affective brain-computer interfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable applications of affective brain-computer interfaces (aBCI) in realistic, multi-modal environments require a detailed understanding of the processes involved in emotions. To explore the modalityspecific nature of affective responses, we studied ... Keywords: ECG, EEG, affective brain-computer interfaces, auditory, emotion, multi-modal, visual

Christian Mühl; Egon L. van den Broek; Anne-Marie Brouwer; Femke Nijboer; Nelleke van Wouwe; Dirk Heylen

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Method and apparatus for extraction of low-frequency artifacts from brain waves for alertness detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus automatically detect alertness in humans by monitoring and analyzing brain wave signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave (EEG or MEG) data from the subject, digitizing the data, separating artifact data from raw data, and comparing trends in f-data to alertness indicators, providing notification of inadequate alertness. 4 figs.

Clapp, N.E.; Hively, L.M.

1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

229

Brain and Heart 1. Reducing your risk of stroke and heart attack. . . . 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Contents Brain and Heart 1. Reducing your risk of stroke and heart attack. . . . 3 2. Exercising for a healthy heart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3. Choosing a home blood pressure unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 #12;BRAIN AND HEART Reducing your risk of stroke and heart attack One of the best ways to protect

Jagannatham, Aditya K.

230

Methamphetamine Delivers ‘One-TwoÂ’ Punch to the Brain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

89 89 Dec. 1, 2001 Methamphetamine Delivers ‘One-Two’ Punch to the Brain Mechanism may knock out brain’s ability to “just say no.” UPTON, NY — A new brain-imaging study at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory reveals that, compared with people who don’t use drugs, people who abuse methamphetamine have fewer receptors for dopamine, a brain chemical associated with feelings of reward and pleasure. Furthermore, in the drug abusers, low dopamine receptor levels were linked with reduced metabolic activity in a brain region that regulates motivation and “drive.” “These findings mirror those from a similar Brookhaven study on cocaine abusers, and may help explain why drugs addicts lose control and take drugs compulsively,” said Nora Volkow, the lead researcher. The new results appear in the December issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.

231

Minute Effects of Sex on the Aging Brain: A Multisample Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Healthy Aging and Alzheimer's Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Age is associated with substantial macrostructural brain changes. While some recent magnetic resonance imaging studies have reported larger age effects in men than women, others find no sex differences. As brain morphometry ...

Fjell, Anders M.

232

Fatality and Injury Severity of Older Adult Motor Vehicle Collisions in Orange County, California, 1998-2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report of Fatal and Injury Motor Vehicle Traffic Collisions.of state regulations on motor vehicle fatalities for youngerXIV, NO . 1 : February 2013 motor vehicle traffic crashes.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Epidemiology of fatal and nonfatal injuries in the Avianca plane crash: Avianca Flight 052, January 25, 1990. Final report  

SciTech Connect

On January 25, 1990 Avianca Flight 052 crashed without a conflagration after running out of fuel; 73 persons died, 85 survived. Epidemiological, biostatistical, and related analytical methods were used for the analysis of decedent and survivor injury patterns and for the purpose of examining selected EMS and hospital issues-relative to disaster planning and incident management and response. Medical examiner and hospital records for all decedents and survivors were identified, abstracted, and coded using the International Classification of Diseases with Clinical Modifications, 9th Edition (ICD 9-CM) to determine the nature of injuries and comorbid conditions. Injury severity values were determined using the 1985 Abbreviated Injury Scale with Epidemiologic Modifications (AIS 85-EM).

Barancik, J.I.; Kramer, C.F.; Thode, H.C. Jr.; Kahn, C.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Greensher, J.; Schechter, S. [Nassau County Dept. of Health, Mineola, NY (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A Bayesian Network Model for the Diagnosis of the Caring Procedure for Wheelchair Users with Spinal Injury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a probabilistic causal model for the caring procedure to be followed on wheelchair users with spinal injury. Uncertainty in the caring procedure arises mostly from incomplete information about patient findings (i.e. the signs and ...

Maria Athanasiou; Jonathan Y. Clark

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 4 Fatty Acids and Cardiac Ischemia-reperfusion Injury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 4 Fatty Acids and Cardiac Ischemia-reperfusion Injury Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

236

Scientists model brain structure to help computers recognize objects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Do you see what I see? Do you see what I see? Scientists model brain structure to help computers recognize objects The team tried developing a computer model based on human neural structure and function, to do what we do, and possibly do it better. December 20, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

237

DOE-Flex Bulletin-Worker Injury While on a DOE-Flex Arrangement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flex Bulletin Flex Bulletin The information contained in this Bulletin is intended for DOE-Flex Advisors and Coordinators in responding to questions. The information supplements the guidance in the Handbook on DOE- Flex and will be incorporated in the handbook in the near future, at which fime this Builetin wil! expire and be removed from the DOE-Flex web site No. 2 May 2000 Subject: Worker In~jury While on a DOE-Flex Arrangement This Bulletin responds to questions that have surfaced regarding DOE'S liability for an injury to an employee while working at an alternative workplace, particularly at home. 11 is the position of the DOE Office of General Counsel that the ease decision cited helow should be rdicd upon as the prevailing administrative law at this time.

238

A Phase I Study of Short-Course Accelerated Whole Brain Radiation Therapy for Multiple Brain Metastases  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of a SHort-course Accelerated whole brain RadiatiON therapy (SHARON) in the treatment of patients with multiple brain metastases. Methods and Materials: A phase 1 trial in 4 dose-escalation steps was designed: 12 Gy (3 Gy per fraction), 14 Gy (3.5 Gy per fraction), 16 Gy (4 Gy per fraction), and 18 Gy (4.5 Gy per fraction). Eligibility criteria included patients with unfavorable recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class > or =2 with at least 3 brain metastases or metastatic disease in more than 3 organ systems, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status {<=}3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the MTD. The dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any acute toxicity {>=}grade 3, according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Information on the status of the main neurologic symptoms and quality of life were recorded. Results: Characteristics of the 49 enrolled patients were as follows: male/female, 30/19; median age, 66 years (range, 23-83 years). ECOG performance status was <3 in 46 patients (94%). Fourteen patients (29%) were considered to be in recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class 3. Grade 1-2 acute neurologic (26.4%) and skin (18.3%) toxicities were recorded. Only 1 patient experienced DLT (neurologic grade 3 acute toxicity). With a median follow-up time of 5 months (range, 1-23 months), no late toxicities have been observed. Three weeks after treatment, 16 of 21 symptomatic patients showed an improvement or resolution of presenting symptoms (overall symptom response rate, 76.2%; confidence interval 0.95: 60.3-95.9%). Conclusions: Short-course accelerated radiation therapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days is tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase 2 study has been planned to evaluate the efficacy on overall survival, symptom control, and quality of life indices.

Caravatta, Luciana; Deodato, Francesco; Ferro, Marica [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Macchia, Gabriella, E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Massaccesi, Mariangela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Cilla, Savino [Medical Physics Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Medical Physics Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Padula, Gilbert D.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Lacks Cancer Center Saint Mary's Health Care, Grand Rapids, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Lacks Cancer Center Saint Mary's Health Care, Grand Rapids, Michigan (United States); Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa [Department of Palliative Therapies, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Palliative Therapies, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura 'Giovanni Paolo II', Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Carrozza, Francesco [Department of Oncology, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Campobasso (Italy)] [Department of Oncology, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Campobasso (Italy); Flocco, Mariano [Madre Teresa di Calcutta Hospice, Larino (Italy)] [Madre Teresa di Calcutta Hospice, Larino (Italy); Cantore, Giampaolo [Department of Neurological Sciences, Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo Neuromed, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Pozzilli (Italy)] [Department of Neurological Sciences, Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo Neuromed, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Pozzilli (Italy); Scapati, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'San Francesco' Hospital, Nuoro (Italy)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, 'San Francesco' Hospital, Nuoro (Italy); Buwenge, Milly [Department of Radiotherapy, Mulago Hospital, Kampala (Uganda)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Mulago Hospital, Kampala (Uganda); and others

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Robert Penn Warren's internal injuries: ''a picnic on the dark side of the moon''  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robert Penn Warren has a facility for transforming region and history into fiction and poetry. His novel Flood: A Romance of Our Time (1964) and his poem sequence “Internal Injuries” (1968) stand out insofar as they share a leitmotif; that is, he uses images of imprisonment to represent the loss of free and responsible selfhood under a technocratic dispensation. He is the quintessential loneliness artist, as can be heard through the voices of his characters. His literary criticism is a testament to his concerns about how one comes to reconcile oneself to place. His theory of literature provides us a unique window on what it means to discover oneself in the tumult of a rapidly changing landscape. The use and misuse of technology to augment one’s relationship to place and self is my overriding concern. In Fiddlersburg, the town in Flood, melodrama hangs in the air like rotting perfume. All that will remain once the town is flooded is the penitentiary. In “Internal Injuries,” Warren’s poem-within-a-poem sequence about the loss of self within the modern city, Warren invokes the penitentiary to represent and speak for the loss of self and the feeling of lonesomeness. Flood speaks to “Internal Injuries” in the sense that Warren oscillates between the discovery of self in Flood to the loss of self in “Internal Injuries.” I give my observation of how Warren’s critical work forms a dialogue with his creative work, offering insight as to how the oldest maximum-security penitentiary in Kentucky speaks to the lost and found selves of Warren’s world. Finally, I deal with the problem of modernity and Warren’s perennial concern about the alienation of the self and how he wrestles with it from a deeply personal and experiential perspective. The reader will find that Warren’s critical and creative works form a kind of inside passage.

Samaha, Marylouise

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Occupational Health and Safety Database, 1995-2011: Injury Surveillance Highlights 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Descriptive highlights are presented from the 2012 data reporting year of the Electric Power Research Institute’s Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program as a preliminary assessment of this long-term injury and illness surveillance program for the electric sector. OHSD provides the capability for monitoring trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and conducting research on occupational health and safety issues. OHSD currently integrates 17 years of personnel, ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal Year 2011 EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal Year 2011 February 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis This figure shows the downward trends of EM TRC and DART case rates for the last three fiscal years. These three years correspond to the time of substantial increase in work activities in support of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. This figure shows the downward trends of EM TRC and DART case rates for the last three fiscal years. These three years correspond to the time of substantial increase in work activities in support of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. EM’s TRC and DART case cumulative rate trend lines over the past 15 quarters remain well below comparable industries’ TRC and DART Case rates. For benchmark comparison, the Construction Industry and the Waste Management & Remediation Service Industry numbers are selected to best approximate the complex-wide decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remediation, waste management and facility construction activities contracted by EM

242

Non-traumatic Shoulder Dislocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Emergency Medicine, Detroit, MI Supervising SectionFord Hospital, 2799 W. Grand Blvd, Detroit, MI 48201. Email

Manteuffel, Jacob

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

What is a traumatic experience?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Excellence UU -- 777-5323 xcel.binghamton.edu Center for Learning and Teaching S3-261 -- 777-6379 www

Suzuki, Masatsugu

244

Gene Expression Analysis of Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress in Mouse Brain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress in Mouse Brain Analysis of Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress in Mouse Brain After Low-dose and Acute Radiation Exposure Daila Gridley Loma Linda University & Medical Center Abstract Purpose: 1) To examine the induction of oxidative stress and apoptosis-associated gene expression profiles in brain after whole-body irradiation with low-dose/low-dose-rate (LDR) photons and acute exposure to photons 2) to compare these radiation-induced effects with those produced by LDR and acute exposure to protons. Material and Methods: C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 2 Gy of photons or protons at 0.8 Gy/min and 0.9 Gy/min, respectively, both with and without pre-exposure to 0.01 Gy LDR Îł-rays (57Co) at 0.03 cGy/h. Brain tissues were harvested and quick-frozen for analyses by quantitative RTPCR at 56

245

Encoding of brain state changes in local field potentials modulated by motor behaviors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Local field potentials (LFPs) measure aggregate neural activity resulting from the coordinated firing of neurons within a local network. We hypothesized that state parameters associated with the underlying brain dynamics ...

Stamoulis, Catherine

246

No (Brain)power Outage at a Competition Like No Other  

Office of Science (SC) Website

No (Brain)power Outage at a Competition Like No Other News In the News In Focus 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Presentations & Testimony Recovery Act Contact...

247

Evolving Systems Beyond 3G — the IST BRAIN and MIND Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systems beyond 3G — using IP to combine 3G, wireless LANs and other access technologies — will offer users much greater flexibility and choice for mobile communications in the medium term. The IST projects BRAIN and MIND have developed outline ...

D. Wisely; E. Mitjana

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

A Brain-Machine Interface for Control of Medically-Induced Coma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medically-induced coma is a drug-induced state of profound brain inactivation and unconsciousness used to treat refractory intracranial hypertension and to manage treatment-resistant epilepsy. The state of coma is achieved ...

Shanechi, Maryam M.

249

LEFT VERSUS RIGHT HEMISPHERE DIFFERENCES IN BRAIN CONNECTIVITY: 4-TESLA HARDI TRACTOGRAPHY IN 569 TWINS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LEFT VERSUS RIGHT HEMISPHERE DIFFERENCES IN BRAIN CONNECTIVITY: 4-TESLA HARDI TRACTOGRAPHY IN 569) and 112 adolescents (age 12-16) with 4-Tesla 105-gradient high- angular resolution diffusion imaging. We

Thompson, Paul

250

"USING LASERS TO CONTROL AND PROBE THE BRAIN", Prof. Adam Cohen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12, 9:30am Science On Saturday "USING LASERS TO CONTROL AND PROBE THE BRAIN", Prof. Adam Cohen, Department of Physics, Harvard University http:mediacentral.princeton.eduid...

251

Sudden cardiac death: Directing the scope of resuscitation towards the heart and brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Resuscitation Toward the Heart and Brain First AuthorClinic and Kemp-Carraway Heart Institute, Birmingham,Utstein style reporting. Heart 1996; 76(1):18-23. (5) Doig

Athanasuleas, C L; Buckberg, G D; Allen, B S; Beyersdorf, F; Kirsh, M M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The new phrenology: the limits of localizing cognitive processes in the brain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New, noninvasive imaging technologies allow us to observe the brain while it is actively engaged in mental activities. Uttal cautions, however, that the excitement of these new research tools can lead to a neuroreductionist wild goose chase. With more ...

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

An ultra low power implantable neural recording system for brain-machine interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past few decades, direct recordings from different areas of the brain have enabled scientists to gradually understand and unlock the secrets of neural coding. This scientific advancement has shown great promise for ...

Wattanapanitch, Woradorn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Prosody-driven Sentence Processing: An Event-related Brain Potential Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four experiments systematically investigating the brain's response to the perception of sentences containing differing amounts of linguistic information are presented. Spoken language generally provides various levels of information for the interpretation ...

Ann Pannekamp; Ulrike Toepel; Kai Alter; Anja Hahne; Angela D. Friederici

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Filtering out deep brain stimulation artifacts using a nonlinear oscillatory model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This letter is devoted to the suppression of spurious signals (artifacts) in records of neural activity during deep brain stimulation. An approach based on nonlinear adaptive model with self-oscillations is proposed. We developed an algorithm of adaptive ...

Tatyana I. Aksenova; Dimitri V. Nowicki; Alim-Louis Benabid

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Regulation of survival and synaptic connectivity in the adult brain by cell-intrinsic excitability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the lifelong addition of new neurons to the olfactory bulb and dentate gyms of mammalian brains is by now an accepted fact, the function of adult-generated neurons still largely remains a mystery. The ability of ...

Sim, Shuyin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Applying brain emotional learning algorithm for multivariable control of HVAC systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we apply a modified version of Brain Emotional Learning (BEL) controller for Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) control system whose multivariable, nonlinear and non-minimum phase nature makes the task difficult. The proposed ...

N. Sheikholeslami; D. Shahmirzadi; E. Semsar; C. Lucas; M. J. Yazdanpanah

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Detection of Inter-hemispheric Asymmetries of Brain Perfusion in SPECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an unsupervised method to help detection of significant functional inter-hemispheric asymmetries in brain SPECT. A validation of this method was performed with realistic simulated SPECT data sets with known asymmetries (in size and ...

Bérengčre Aubert-Broche; Christophe Grova; Pierre Jannin; Irčne Buvat; Habib Benali; Bernard Gibaud

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Nutrition and Biochemistry of PhospholipidsChapter 1 Phospholipid Transporters in the Brain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutrition and Biochemistry of Phospholipids Chapter 1 Phospholipid Transporters in the Brain Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press 99B8868600C2AD1BCC41869F42420395 AOCS Press ...

260

A Parametric Approach to Orthographic Processing in the Brain: An fMRI Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brain activation studies of orthographic stimuli typically start with the premise that different types of orthographic strings (e.g., words, pseudowords) differ from each other in discrete ways, which should be reflected in separate and distinct areas ...

M.-A. Tagamets; Jared M. Novick; Maria L. Chalmers; Rhonda B. Friedman

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Brain oscillatory activity during spatial navigation: Theta and gamma activity link medial temporal and parietal regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brain oscillatory correlates of spatial navigation were investigated using blind source separation (BSS) and standardized low resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) analyses of 62-channel EEG recordings. Twenty-five participants were instructed ...

David J. White; Marco Congedo; Joseph Ciorciari; Richard B. Silberstein

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

doi:10.1093/alcalc/agm059 ETHANOL OXIDATION IN THE LIVING BRAIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — Aims: The examination of the possibility of ethanol oxidation in the brain in vivo and the evaluation of the enzyme catalase in this process. Methods: We anesthetized rats and perfused the brain with ethanol solutions through the lateral ventricle and collected the perfusate from the Cisterna magna. We determined ethanol and acetaldehyde in the perfusate by gas chromatography. Results: It was found that the passage of ethanol solution (85 and 90 mM) through the ventricular system of the rat brain (6–43 µl/min) results in the significant (up to 98%) elimination of ethanol from the perfusing fluid and in the appearance of acetaldehyde (up-to 60 µM) in the perfusate. The addition of the catalase inhibitor, aminotriazole, (10 mM) to the perfusing fluid decreased ethanol elimination significantly. Conclusions: The ethanol oxidation and AA accumulation take place in the living brain. The enzyme catalase is involved in this process.

Sergey M. Zimatkin; Alexander L. Buben

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

REVIEW ARTICLE Alcohol and injury in Poland: review and training recommendations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background Alcohol plays a significant role in accidents, injuries, and their outcomes. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), there are 76.3 million people with alcohol use disorders worldwide; in 2000, 1.8 million deaths and loss of 58.3 million disability-adjusted life years were attributed to alcohol. Methods Although the association between alcohol consumption and trauma-related morbidity and mortality is well-documented, particularly in the US, there is much less At the time this paper was written, Dr. Wozniak was a Fogarty

Piotr Wozniak; Rebecca Cunningham; Sonia Kamat; Kristen L. Barry; Frederic C. Blow; Andrzej S. Zawadzki; P. Wozniak; R. Cunningham; S. Kamat; A. S. Zawadzki; R. Cunningham

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Stereotactic radiosurgery as therapy for melanoma, renal carcinoma, and sarcoma brain metastases: Impact of added surgical resection and whole-brain radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Brain metastases of melanoma, renal carcinoma, and sarcoma have traditionally responded poorly to conventional treatments, including surgery and whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Several studies have suggested a beneficial effect of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). We evaluated our institutional experience with systematic SRS in patients harboring these 'radioresistant' metastases. Methods and Materials: A total of 68 patients with brain metastases from melanoma, renal carcinoma, and sarcoma underwent SRS with or without WBRT or surgical resection. All patients had Karnofsky performance scores >70, and SRS was performed before the initiation of systemic therapy. The survival time was calculated from the diagnosis of brain metastases using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method. Statistical significance was calculated using the log-rank test. Factors influencing survival, including surgical resection, WBRT, gender, number of SRS sessions, and histologic type, were evaluated retrospectively using Cox univariate models. Results: The overall median survival was 427 days (14.2 months), which appears superior to the results obtained with conventional WBRT. The addition of neither surgery nor WBRT to SRS provided a statistically significant increase in survival. Conclusion: Our results suggest that patients undergoing SRS for up to five cerebral metastases from 'radioresistant' tumors (melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and sarcoma) have survival rates comparable to those in other series of more selected patients. The addition of surgical resection or WBRT did not result in improved survival in our series.

Rao, Ganesh [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, UT (United States); Klimo, Paul [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, UT (United States); Thompson, Clinton J. [Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, UT (United States); Samlowski, Wolfram [Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, UT (United States); Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Wang, Michael [Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, UT (United States); Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Watson, Gordon [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, UT (United States); Shrieve, Dennis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, UT (United States); Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Jensen, Randy L. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, UT (United States) and Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)]. E-mail: randy.jensen@hsc.utah.edu

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

SOCIAL SUPPORT: MEDIATORS AND MODERATORS OF DEPRESSION IN A SPINAL CORD INJURY SAMPLE WITH CHRONIC PAIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chronic pain and depression are frequently co-reported secondary complications following spinal cord injury (SCI) that impact multiple psychosocial domains. This study investigated the contribution of pain intensity, perceived stress, pain coping strategies, pain interference, and social support in depression and sought to identify mediator and moderator effects in the pain-depression relationship among persons with chronic SCI pain. Perceived stress, pain coping strategies, and pain interference were proposed as likely mediators of pain intensity and depression. Different types of social support were proposed as likely moderators of pain intensity and depression. The SCI sample consisted of 60 people with chronic pain who completed measures of pain intensity, perceived stress, pain coping strategies, pain interference, social support, and depression. Demographic and injury-related factors were also examined as confounding variables. Occupational status, positive reframing, behavioral disengagement, self-blame, emotional support, perceived stress, and pain interference were associated with depression, with 7% of variance in depression accounted for by occupational status, 19 % of variance in

Michael W. Wilson; J. Scott Richards; Timothy R. Elliott; Warren T. Jackson; Adrian Hal Thurstin; Rudy Vuchinich; Michael W. Wilson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Optical Spectroscopy Approach for the Predictive Assessment of Kidney Functional Recovery Following Ischemic Injury  

SciTech Connect

Tissue that has undergone significant yet unknown amount of ischemic injury is frequently encountered in organ transplantation and trauma clinics. With no reliable real-time method of assessing the degree of injury incurred in tissue, surgeons generally rely on visual observation which is subjective. In this work, we investigate the use of optical spectroscopy methods as a potentially more reliable approach. Previous work by various groups was strongly suggestive that tissue autofluorescence from NADH obtained under UV excitation is sensitive to metabolic response changes. To test and expand upon this concept, we monitored autofluorescence and light scattering intensities of injured vs. uninjured rat kidneys via multimodal imaging under 355 nm, 325 nm, and 266 nm excitation as well as scattering under 500 nm illumination. 355 nm excitation was used to probe mainly NADH, a metabolite, while 266 nm excitation was used to probe mainly tryptophan to correct for non-metabolic signal artifacts. The ratio of autofluorescence intensities derived under these two excitation wavelengths was calculated and its temporal profile was fit to a relaxation model. Time constants were extracted, and longer time constants were associated with kidney dysfunction. Analysis of both the autofluorescence and light scattering images suggests that changes in microstructure tissue morphology, blood absorption spectral characteristics, and pH contribute to the behavior of the observed signal which may be used to obtain tissue functional information and offer predictive capability.

Raman, R N; Pivetti, C D; Rubenchik, A M; Matthews, D L; Troppmann, C; Demos, S G

2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

267

Radiation-induced lung injury using a pig model: Evaluation by high-resolution computed tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assess the early phase of radiation-induced lung injury using high-resolution computed tomography (CT) under experimental conditions and to perform precise CT-pathologic correlation. Five Yorkshire pigs received a single dose of 12.5 Gy to the right lower lung. Computed tomographic images were obtained at 2-week intervals. The animals were killed after follow-up periods of 4-16 weeks. The lungs were removed, inflated, fixed, dried, and sliced corresponding to the CT sections. Computed tomography, specimen radiography, and histologic findings were correlated. Various CT findings were observed during the first 16 weeks, including ground-glass opacity, discrete consolidation, patchy consolidation, thickened interlobular septum, and bronchovascular bundle. Ground-glass opacity was associated with thickened alveolar wall and scattered tiny fibrotic foci. Thickened interlobular septum and bronchovascular bundle were the results of fibrosis adjacent to these structures. Discrete consolidation correlated with intraalveolar edema with hemorrhage and infiltration of inflammatory cells. High-resolution CT correlated well with pathology of the lung due to radiation injury as verified by precise radiologic-pathologic correlation. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Takahashi, Masashi; Balazs, G.; Moskowitz, G.W.; Palestro, C.J.; Eacobacci, T.; Khan, A.; Herman, P.G. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New Hyde Park, NY (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

November 6, 2008; HSS/Union Working Group Meeting on Aging Workforce/Strategic Initiatives- Illness and Injury Surveillance Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Health, Safety and Security Illness and Injury Surveillance Program Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs Dr. Bonnie Richter, Office Director Dr. Cliff Strader, IISP Program Manager Further Information and Reports Available At: http://www.hss.energy.gov/HealthSafety/IIPP/hservices/epi_surv.html Program Overview: * Department's only multi-site program focused primarily on health of current workers * Monitors health of over 79,000 current contractor workers * Program evaluates and communicates potential impact of DOE operations on the health of workers * Maximizes use of existing data to reduce fiscal burden * Individual site analyses summarized annually * Reports of the entire DOE complex provide programmatic overview of workforce health

269

Detection of Nerve Injury with Diffusion Weighted Wide Band Steady State Free Precession (DW-WBSSFP) in the Lumbar Spine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detection of Nerve Injury with Diffusion Weighted Wide Band Steady State Free Precession (DW Precession (DW-WBSSFP) technique, which may allow both superior anatomical visualization as well as detection repetition time (TR), which is used for acquisition. In DW-WBSSFP, diffusion gradients were placed in TRs

Southern California, University of

270

Chemical Spills, Releases, Explosions, Exposures, or Injuries (includes corrosive, reactive, flammable, and toxic chemicals in solid, liquid or gas form)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Spills, Releases, Explosions, Exposures, or Injuries (includes corrosive, reactive, flammable, and toxic chemicals in solid, liquid or gas form) EHS Contact: Kate Lumley-Sapanski (kxl3@psu apply: When to Report: · All chemical exposures or explosions requiring medical attention must

Yener, Aylin

271

ADR Lunchtime Series Presentation: "Your Brain on Conflict" | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ADR Lunchtime Series Presentation: "Your Brain on Conflict" ADR Lunchtime Series Presentation: "Your Brain on Conflict" ADR Lunchtime Series Presentation: "Your Brain on Conflict" February 13, 2014 12:00PM to 1:30PM EST Registration link: To attend in person, please register by email to Cindy Mazur (below) and provide name, citizenship, and agency/employer by February 7th. If you are a federal employee and have an HSPD-12 government ID badge, you do not need to RSVP. Instead, show your HSPD-12 badge to the DOE guard. To listen only via teleconference, please call 202-287-5318. If you have any questions about this reservation number 453482, please contact the DOE Headquarters Operators by calling 301-903-3000. Materials for this presentation will be posted a few days in advance of the program at ADR

272

Low Dose Radiation Stimulates Antioxidant Capacity in the Brain and Lessens  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stimulates Antioxidant Capacity in the Brain and Lessens Stimulates Antioxidant Capacity in the Brain and Lessens Behavioral Symptoms in a 6-OHDA-Induced Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease Mohan Doss Fox Chase Cancer Center Abstract Background: Progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) pars compacta results in motor deficits in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients. Oxidative damage to the nigral dopaminergic neurons has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. Our hypothesis is that low dose radiation induces the production of antioxidants in the brain, which could provide protection to the dopaminergic neurons, potentially leading to prevention or stabilization of PD. The purpose of the study is (1) to determine the effect of low dose radiation on the total antioxidant capacity in SN in

273

In vivo measurement of human brain elasticity using a light aspiration device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The brain deformation that occurs during neurosurgery is a serious issue impacting the patient "safety" as well as the invasiveness of the brain surgery. Model-driven compensation is a realistic and efficient solution to solve this problem. However, a vital issue is the lack of reliable and easily obtainable patient-specific mechanical characteristics of the brain which, according to clinicians' experience, can vary considerably. We designed an aspiration device that is able to meet the very rigorous sterilization and handling process imposed during surgery, and especially neurosurgery. The device, which has no electronic component, is simple, light and can be considered as an ancillary instrument. The deformation of the aspirated tissue is imaged via a mirror using an external camera. This paper describes the experimental setup as well as its use during a specific neurosurgery. The experimental data was used to calibrate a continuous model. We show that we were able to extract an in vivo constitutive law of ...

Schiavone, Patrick; Boudou, Thomas; Promayon, Emmanuel; Valdivia, F; Payan, Yohan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

ORISE-09-OEWH-0176 POISSON REGRESSION ANALYSIS OF ILLNESS AND INJURY SURVEILLANCE DATA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORISE-09-OEWH-0176 ORISE-09-OEWH-0176 POISSON REGRESSION ANALYSIS OF ILLNESS AND INJURY SURVEILLANCE DATA E. L. Frome J. P. Watkins E. D. Ellis Center for Epidemiologic Research Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN, USA C. H. Strader U. S. Department of Energy Date Published: December 2012 Prepared by Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education P.O. Box 117 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117 managed by Oak Ridge Associated Universities for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-06OR23100 DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge

275

Myths and Misconceptions Revisited - What are the (Statistically Significant) methods to prevent employee injuries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A company's overall safety program becomes an important consideration to continue performing work and for procuring future contract awards. When injuries or accidents occur, the employer ultimately loses on two counts - increased medical costs and employee absences. This paper summarizes the human and organizational components that contributed to successful safety programs implemented by WESKEM, LLC's Environmental, Safety, and Health Departments located in Paducah, Kentucky, and Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The philosophy of 'safety, compliance, and then production' and programmatic components implemented at the start of the contracts were qualitatively identified as contributing factors resulting in a significant accumulation of safe work hours and an Experience Modification Rate (EMR) of safety needs be considered as the starting point when performing work. (authors)

Potts, T.T.; Hylko, J.M. [WESKEM, LLC, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Almond, D. [Melaleuca, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Report on electrocutions, electric shock, and electric burn injuries involving consumer products. final report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides direction to a project to reduce the number of electrocution, electric shock and electric burn injuries. The first section uses CPSC data to rank the consumer products involved in these accidents on the basis of frequency, severity, and number of products in use. It also analyzes demographic and accident characteristics. The second section contains a technical review of accidents occurring in eight product groups: Portable Power Tools; Welders, Battery Chargers and Inverters; Personal Hygiene Products; Entertainment Products; Lawn and Garden Tools; Installed Stoves, Ranges and Cook Tops; Refrigerators and Freezers; and Fans. This section also includes a review of the relevant Underwriters Laboratories (UL) standards and suggestions for potential action to reduce the accidents involving these eight product groups.

Not Available

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Greedy solutions for the construction of sparse spatial and spatio-spectral filters in brain computer interface applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the original formulation of common spatial pattern (CSP), all recording channels are combined when extracting the variance as input features for a brain computer interface (BCI). This results in overfitting and robustness problems of the constructed ... Keywords: Brain computer interface, Common spatial pattern, Greedy search, Sparse

Fikri Goksu; Nuri F. Ince; Ahmed H. Tewfik

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Brain atlases and associated databases have great potential as gateways for navigating, accessing, and visualizing a wide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Pechura CM, Martin JB: Mapping the Brain and Its Functions. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 1991 Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, St registered Windows on the brain: the emerging role of atlases and databases in neuroscience David C Van Essen

Van Essen, David

279

Spectroscopic imaging through magnetic resonance for brain tumour diagnostics: Recent achievements, dilemmas and potential solutions via advances in signal processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the very recent period Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) and Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI) have become key diagnostic modalities for neuro-oncology. MRS and MRSI are now applied extensively for initial detection of brain tumours, for histopathologic ... Keywords: biomedical imaging, brain tumours, magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, metastatic disease

Karen Belki?; Dževad Belki?

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

On-Line Evidence for Context Use by Right-Brain-Damaged Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of right-brain-damaged (RBD) patients to use on-line contextual information in a word-monitoring task was examined. Subjects were required to monitor for target words in the contexts of both normal and semantically anomalous sentences. Similar ...

Carol L. Leonard; Shari R. Baum

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Neuroinformatics for Genome-Wide 3-D Gene Expression Mapping in the Mouse Brain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large scale gene expression studies in the mammalian brain offer the promise of understanding the topology, networks and ultimately the function of its complex anatomy, opening previously unexplored avenues in neuroscience. High-throughput methods permit ... Keywords: Bioinformatics (genome or protein) databases, Data mining, Registration, Segmentation, Information Visualization

Lydia Ng; Sayan Pathak; Chihchau Kuan; Chris Lau; Hong-wei Dong; Andrew Sodt; Chinh Dang; Brian Avants; Paul Yushkevich; James Gee; David Haynor; Ed Lein; Allan Jones; Mike Hawrylycz

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Agentification of Markov model-based segmentation: Application to magnetic resonance brain scans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective: Markov random field (MRF) models have been traditionally applied to the task of robust-to-noise image segmentation. Most approaches estimate MRF parameters on the whole image via a global expectation-maximization (EM) procedure. The resulting ... Keywords: Distributed expectation maximization, Magnetic resonance brain scan segmentation, Markov random field, Medical imaging, Multiagents system

Benoit Scherrer; Michel Dojat; Florence Forbes; Catherine Garbay

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Electromagnetic interference of GSM mobile phones with the implantable deep brain stimulator, ITREL-III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

© 2003 Kainz et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article: verbatim copying and redistribution of this article are permitted in all media for any purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the article's original URL. Background: The purpose was to investigate mobile phone interference with implantable deep brain stimulators by means of 10 different 900 Mega Hertz (MHz) and 10 different 1800 MHz GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications) mobile phones. Methods: All tests were performed in vitro using a phantom especially developed for testing with deep brain stimulators. The phantom was filled with liquid phantom materials simulating brain and muscle tissue. All examinations were carried out inside an anechoic chamber on two implants of the same type of deep brain stimulator: ITREL-III from Medtronic Inc., USA. Results: Despite a maximum transmitted peak power of mobile phones of 1 Watt (W) at 1800 MHz and 2 W at 900 MHz respectively, no influence on the ITREL-III was found. Neither the shape of the pulse form changed nor did single pulses fail. Tests with increased transmitted power using CW signals and broadband dipoles have shown that inhibition of the ITREL-III occurs at frequency dependent power levels which are below the emissions of GSM mobile phones. The ITREL-III is

Wolfgang Kainz; François Alesch; Dulciana Dias; Chan Open Access

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

EFFECTS OF X-IRRADIATION OF SPONTANEOUS AND EVOKED BRAIN ELECTRICAL ACTIVITY IN CATS  

SciTech Connect

Specific alterations in spontaneous and evoked brain electrical activity were demonstrated in cats receiving 400 or 200 r of WBR or 400 r localized to the head or body. Results obtained in unrestrained cats with electrodes in the cortex and subcortex are reported. (C.H.)

Gangloff, H.; Haley, T.J.

1960-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Doses delivered to normal brain under different treatment protocols at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

As of October 31, 1996, 23 glioblastoma multiforme patients underwent BNCT under several treatment protocols at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor. For treatment planning and dosimetry purposes, these protocols may be divided into four groups. The first group comprises protocols that used an 8-cm collimator and allowed a peak normal brain dose of 10.5 Gy-Eq to avolume of 1 cm{sup 3} were the thermal neutron flux was maximal (even if it happened to be in the tumor volume). The second group differs from the first in that it allowed a peak normal brain dose of 12.6 Gy-Eq. The protocols of the third and fourth groups allowed the prescribed peak normal brain dose of 12.6 Gy-Eq to be outside of the tumor volume, used a 12-cm collimator and, respectively, uni- or bilateral irradiations. We describe the treatment planning procedures and report the doses delivered to various structures of the brain.

Capala, J.; Coderre, J.A.; Liu, H.B. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

286

Probing brain connectivity by combined analysis of diffusion MRI tractography and electrocorticography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrocorticography (ECoG) allows for measurement of task-related local field potentials directly from cortex in neurosurgical patients. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography is an MRI technique that allows for reconstruction of brain white matter ... Keywords: Delay activity, Diffusion-weighted MRI, Electrocorticography, Epilepsy, Inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, Tractography, Working memory

Kathrin Tertel; Nitin Tandon; Timothy M. Ellmore

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Imaging Nicotine in Rat Brain Tissue by Use of Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

Imaging mass spectrometry offers simultaneous detection of drugs, drug metabolites and endogenous substances in a single experiment. This is important when evaluating effects of a drug on a complex organ system such as the brain, where there is a need to understand how regional drug distribution impacts function. Nicotine is an addictive drug and its action in the brain is of high interest. Here we use nanospray desorption electrospray ionization, nano-DESI, imaging to discover the localization of nicotine in rat brain tissue after in vivo administration of nicotine. Nano-DESI is a new ambient technique that enables spatially-resolved analysis of tissue samples without special sample pretreatment. We demonstrate high sensitivity of nano-DESI imaging that enables detection of only 0.7 fmole nicotine per pixel in the complex brain matrix. Furthermore, by adding deuterated nicotine to the solvent, we examined how matrix effects, ion suppression, and normalization affect the observed nicotine distribution. Finally, we provide preliminary results suggesting that nicotine localizes to the hippocampal substructure called dentate gyrus.

Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Thomas, Mathew; Carson, James P.; Smith, Jordan N.; Timchalk, Charles; Laskin, Julia

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

A multivariate statistical analysis of the developing human brain in preterm infants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preterm delivery accounts for 5% of all deliveries and its consequences contribute to significant individual, medical, and social problems. The neuroanatomical substrates of these disorders are not known, but are essential for understanding mechanisms ... Keywords: Brain images, Multivariate statistics, Preterm infants, Small sample size

C. E. Thomaz; J. P. Boardman; S. Counsell; D. L. G. Hill; J. V. Hajnal; A. D. Edwards; M. A. Rutherford; D. F. Gillies; D. Rueckert

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Object extraction from T2 weighted brain MR image using histogram based gradient calculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several segmentation methods have been reported with their own pros and cons. Here we proposed a method for object extraction from T2 weighted (T2) brain magnetic resonance (MR) images. The proposed method is purely based on histogram processing for ... Keywords: Cerebrospinal fluid, Gray matter, Magnetic resonance imaging, Object extraction, White matter

Ghulam Gilanie, Muhammad Attique, Hafeez-Ullah, Shahid Naweed, Ejaz Ahmed, Masroor Ikram

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Heart rate fluctuations in post?operative and brain?death patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power spectra of heart rate in patients receiving intensive care were calculated and the relation between gain and frequency discussed. 1/f fluctuations in heart rate can be observed in both post?operative and brain?death patients in the intensive care unit. These results suggested that 1/f fluctuations are a fundamental human phenomenon.

Toshiyo Tamura; Kazuki Nakajima; Tuyoshi Maekawa; Yoshiyuki Soejima; Yasuhiro Kuroda; Akio Tateishi

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Characterization of angiotensin-binding sites in the bovine adrenal and the rat brain  

SciTech Connect

The first study was designed to determine whether systemically administered MSG affects neurons in the CVOs that are potentially important in mediating angiotensin-dependent responses. Rats were pretreated with MSG and the receptors for angiotensin II were assayed by radioligand binding in brain homogenates from the septum anteroventral third ventricular region (AV3V) and the thalamus/hypothalamus region using {sup 125}I-angiotensin II as the radioligand. The results of this experiment indicate that systematically administered MSG in the rat significantly reduced the number (Bmax) of Ang II receptors in a tissue sample which contained both extra blood-brain barrier organs as well as tissue within the blood-brain barrier with no change in the affinity (Kd) of the binding sites. The second chapter reports the successful solubilization of bovine adrenal {sup 125}I Ang II and {sup 125}I Sar{sup 1},Ile{sup 8}-Ang II binding sites with the detergent CHAPS. The results of our studies indicate the presence of two angiotensin binding sites. The one site is specific for naturally occurring angiotensins as well as sarcosine-1 substituted angiotensin analogues. The other site which can be optimally stabilized be re-addition of 0.3% CHAPS into the incubation assay binds sarcosine-1 substituted angiotensins exclusively. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography experiments suggest that these sites, possibly, represent distinct proteins. The third chapter discusses the successful solubilization and partial characterization of the rat brain angiotensin receptor.

Rogulja, I.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Distinct angiotensin II receptor in primary cultures of glial cells from rat brain  

SciTech Connect

Angiotensin II (Ang-II) has profound effects on the brain. Receptors for Ang-II have been demonstrated on neurons, but no relationship between glial cells and Agn-II has been established. Glial cells (from the hypothalamus and brain stem of 1-day-old rat brains) in primary culture have been used to demonstrate the presence of specific Ang-II receptors. Binding of /sup 125/I-Ang-II to glial cultures was rapid, reversible, saturable, and specific for Ang-II. The rank order of potency of /sup 125/I-Ang-II binding was determined. Scatchard analysis revealed a homogeneous population of high-affinity binding sites with a B/sub max/ of 110 fmol/mg of protein. Light-microscopic autoradiography of /sup 125/I-Ang-II binding supported the kinetic data, documenting specific Ang-II receptors on the glial cells. Ang-II stimulated a dose-dependent hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositols in glial cells, an effect mediated by Ang-II receptors. However, Ang-II failed to influence (/sup 3/H) norepinephrine uptake, and catecholamines failed to regulate Ang-II receptors, effects that occur in neurons. These observations demonstrate the presence of specific Ang-II receptors on the glial cells in primary cultures derived from normotensive rat brain. The receptors are kinetically similar to, but functionally distinct from, the neuronal Ang-II receptors.

Raizada, M.K.; Phillips, M.I.; Crews, F.T.; Sumners, C.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Fracture analysis of silicon microprobes designed for deep-brain stimulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent progress in microtechnology has made room for novel applications in neural stimulation as well as for extending our knowledge on several malfunction of the nerval system such as tremor, epilepsy or Parkinson's disease, which belong to the most ... Keywords: Buckling, Deep brain stimulation, Drug delivery, Fracture test, Microchannel, Neural microprobe

Z. Fekete; Z. Hajnal; G. MáRton; P. FüRjes; A. PongráCz

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Functional brain image classification using association rules defined over discriminant regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This letter shows a novel computer aided diagnosis (CAD) system for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). The proposed method evaluates the reliability of association rules (ARs) aiming to discover interesting associations between attributes ... Keywords: Alzheimer's Disease, Association rules, Fisher Discriminant Ratio, Functional brain imaging

R. Chaves; J. RamíRez; J. M. GóRriz; I. A. IlláN

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

On the empirical mode decomposition applied to the analysis of brain SPECT images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we propose a novel method for brain SPECT image feature extraction based on the empirical mode decomposition (EMD). The proposed method applied to assist the diagnosis of Alzheimer Disease (AD) selects the most discriminant voxels for support ... Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Empirical mode decomposition, SPECT, Support vector machines

A. Gallix; J. M. GóRriz; J. RamíRez; I. A. IlláN; E. W. Lang

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Physiological functions for brain NF-kB Mollie K. Meffert and David Baltimore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physiological functions for brain NF-kB Mollie K. Meffert and David Baltimore Division of BiologyB (NF-kB) family of transcription factors are activated within the CNS in pathological settings of the mechanisms of Ca2C -responsive activation and synaptic signaling to the nucleus by NF-kB transcription

Baltimore, David

297

Dietary resveratrol administration increases MnSOD expression and activity in mouse brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOD protein level (140%) and activity (75%). The increase in MnSOD was not due to a substantial proliferationDietary resveratrol administration increases MnSOD expression and activity in mouse brain Ellen L oxidative stress. In vitro studies have shown an increase in antioxidant enzyme activities following

Stuart, Jeffrey A.

298

Molecular Biology of the Brain, edited by S.J. Higgins. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1999. 196 pp. $32.50.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Biology of the Brain, edited by S.J. Higgins. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press level is one of the great- est and most important questions facing science. The Molecular Biology of the Brain reviews the state of current knowledge about the molecular foundations of brain function and gives

Schoenemann, P. Thomas

299

Reversal of docosahexaenoic acid deficiency in the rat brain, retina, liver, and serum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract The loss of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from the retina or brain has been associated with a loss in nervoussystem function in experimental animals, as well as in human infants fed vegetable oil-based formulas. The reversibility of the loss of DHA and the compensation by an increase in the n-6 docosapentaenoic acid (DPAn-6) was studied in young adult rats. Long-Evans rats were subjected to a very low level of n-3 fatty acids through two generations. The F2 generation, n-3-deficient animals at 7 weeks of age were provided a repletion diet containing both ?-linolenate and DHA. A separate group of F2 generation rats had been maintained on an n-3-adequate diet of the same composition. Tissues from the brain, retina, liver, and serum were collected on weeks 0, 1, 2, 4, and 8 from both groups of animals. The concentrations of DHA, DPAn-6, and other fatty acids were determined and the rate of recovery and length of time needed to complete DHA recovery were determined for each tissue. The DHA level in the brain at 1 and 2 weeks after diet reversal was only partially recovered, rising to approximately 20 % and 35%, respectively, of the n-3-adequate group level. Full recovery was not obtained until 8 weeks after initiation of the repletion diet. Although the initial rate of retinal DHA accretion was greater than that of brain DHA, the half-time for DHA recovery was only marginally greater. On the other hand, the levels of DHA in the serum and liver were approximately 90 % and 100 % replaced, respectively, within 2 weeks of diet reversal. A consideration of the total amounts and time courses of DHA repleted in the nervous system compared with the liver and circulation suggests that transport-related processes may limit the rate of DHA repletion in the retina and brain.—Moriguchi, T., J.

Toru Moriguchi; James Loewke; Megan Garrison; Janice Nicklay Catalan; Norman Salem

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Stereotactic Radiosurgery in the Management of Brain Metastases: An Institutional Retrospective Analysis of Survival  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The objective of this study was to report our experience with stereotactic radiosurgery performed with the Gamma Knife (GK) in the treatment of patients with brain metastases and to compare survival for those treated with radiosurgery alone with survival for those treated with radiosurgery and whole-brain radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Prospectively collected demographic and clinical characteristics and treatment and survival data on 237 patients with intracranial metastases who underwent radiosurgery with the GK between 2003 and 2007 were reviewed. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to compare survival by demographic and clinical characteristics and treatment. Results: The mean age of the patient population was 56 years. The most common tumor histologies were non-small-cell lung carcinoma (34.2%) and breast cancer (13.9%). The median overall survival time was 8.5 months from the time of treatment. The median survival times for patients with one, two/three, and four or more brain metastases were 8.5, 9.4, and 6.7 months, respectively. Patients aged 65 years or greater and those aged less than 65 years had median survival times of 7.8 and 9 months, respectively (p = 0.008). The Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) at the time of treatment was a significant predictor of survival: those patients with a KPS of 70 or less had a median survival of 2.9 months compared with 10.3 months (p = 0.034) for those with a KPS of 80 or greater. There was no statistically significant difference in survival between patients treated with radiosurgery alone and those treated with radiosurgery plus whole-brain radiotherapy. Conclusions: Radiosurgery with the GK is an efficacious treatment modality for brain metastases. A KPS greater than 70, histology of breast cancer, smaller tumor volume, and age less than 65 years were associated with a longer median survival in our study.

Frazier, James L.; Batra, Sachin; Kapor, Sumit; Vellimana, Ananth; Gandhi, Rahul [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Radiosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Carson, Kathryn A. [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Shokek, Ori [Department of Radiosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Lim, Michael [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Radiosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kleinberg, Lawrence [Department of Radiosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Rigamonti, Daniele, E-mail: dr@jhmi.ed [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Radiosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

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301

November 6, 2008; HSS/Union Working Group Meeting on Aging Workforce/Strategic Initiatives - DOE Illness and Injury Surveillance Program Worker Health Summary, 1995-2004  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

07-OEWH-1073 07-OEWH-1073 U.S. Department of Energy Illness and Injury Surveillance Program Worker Health Summary, 1995-2004 Questions or comments about this report or the Department of Energy's (DOE) Illness and Injury Surveillance Program (IISP) may be directed to: Dr. Cliff Strader at cliff.strader@hq.doe.gov or Dr. Bonnie Richter at bonnie.richter@hq.doe.gov United States Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs, HS-13 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585-0270 Additional information about the DOE's Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs, the IISP, and reports for DOE sites participating in this program can be found at: www.hss.energy.gov/HealthSafety/IIPP/hservices/epi_surv.html

302

A review of polymer-based water conditioners for reduction of handling-related injury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fish are coated with an external layer of protective mucus. This layer serves as the primary barrier against infection or injury, reduces friction, and plays a role in ionic and osmotic regulation. However, the mucus layer is easily disturbed when fish are netted, handled, transported, stressed, or subjected to adverse water conditions. Water additives containing polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) or proprietary polymers have been used to prevent the deleterious effects of mucus layer disturbances in the commercial tropical fish industry, aquaculture, and for other fisheries management purposes. This paper reviews research on the effectiveness of water conditioners, and examines the contents and uses of a wide variety of commercially available water conditioners. Water conditioners containing polymers may reduce external damage to fish held in containers during scientific experimentation, including surgical implantation of electronic tags. However, there is a need to empirically test the effectiveness of water conditioners at preventing damage to and promoting healing of the mucus layer. A research agenda is provided to advance the science related to the use of water conditions to improve the condition of fish during handling and tagging.

Harnish, Ryan A.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Brown, Richard S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

The Effect of an Externally Attached Neutrally Buoyant Transmitter on Mortal Injury during Simulated Hydroturbine Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On their seaward migration, juvenile salmonids commonly pass hydroelectric dams. Fish passing through hydroturbines experience a rapid decrease in pressure as they pass by the turbine blade and the severity of this decompression can be highly variable. This rapid decrease in pressure can result in injuries such as swim bladder rupture, exophthalmia, and emboli and hemorrhaging in the fins and tissues. However, recent research indicates that the presence of a telemetry tag (acoustic, radio, inductive) implanted inside the coelom of a juvenile salmon increases the likelihood that the fish will be injured or die during turbine passage. Thus, previous research conducted using telemetry tags implanted into the coelom of fish may have been inaccurate. Thus, a new technique is needed to provide unbiased estimates of survival through turbines. This research provides an evaluation of the effectiveness of a neutrally buoyant externally attached acoustic transmitter. Both nontagged fish and fish tagged with a neutrally buoyant external transmitter were exposed to a range of rapid decompressions simulating turbine passage. Juvenile Chinook salmon tagged with a neutrally buoyant externally attached acoustic transmitter did not receive a higher degree of barotrauma than their nontagged counterparts. We suggest that future research include field-based comparisons of survival and behavior among fish tagged with a neutrally buoyant external transmitter and those internally implanted with transmitters.

Brown, Richard S.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Deng, Zhiqun

2012-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

304

The Effect of Early Detection of Occult Brain Metastases in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Patients on Survival and Cause of Death  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The aim of the study is to evaluate disease-free survival, survival from the detection of brain metastases, overall survival, and cause of death in patients with occult brain metastases (Group I) vs. patients with symptomatic brain metastases (Group II). Methods and Materials: In 80 HER2-positive breast cancer patients, treated with trastuzumab and cytostatic agents for metastatic disease, magnetic resonance imaging screening of the brain was performed, and in 29 patients (36%) occult brain metastasis was detected (Group I). Whole-brain radiotherapy was delivered to Group I. This first group was compared with 52 patients who had symptomatic brain metastases (Group II) and was treated the same way, at the same clinic, during the same time period. Results: Median disease-free survival was 17 months in Group I and 19.9 months in Group II (p = 0.58). The median time interval between the dissemination of the disease and the detection of occult or symptomatic brain metastases was 9 and 15 months, respectively (p = 0.11). When the brain metastases were detected, the median survival was 9 and 8.78 months, respectively (p = 0.80). The median overall survival was 53 and 51 months, respectively (p = 0.94). In the group with occult brain metastases (Group I) 16% of patients died because of progression within the brain. In the group with symptomatic brain metastases (Group II) the rate of cerebral death was 48% (p = 0.009). Conclusions: Whole-brain radiotherapy of occult brain metastases in HER2-positive breast cancer patients with visceral dissemination produces a three-fold decrease in cerebral deaths but does not prolong survival.

Niwinska, Anna, E-mail: alphaonetau@poczta.onet.p [Department of Breast Cancer and Reconstructive Surgery, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Tacikowska, Malgorzata [Department of Radiology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Murawska, Magdalena [Department of Biostatistics, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

PRELIMINARY REPORT ON THE LOCALIZATION OF BRAIN LESIONS WITH I$sup 131$- LABELED POLYVINYLPHYRROLIDONE  

SciTech Connect

Because of its short physiologic half life ( approximates 1 day) and high molecular wt (40000), which approximates that of serum albumin, I/sup 131/- polyvinylpyrrolidone investigated for the detection of brain lesions by scirtillometry. Lesions were produced in cats by intracerebral injection of nitrogen mustard and the cats were injected intravenously with the tracer 2 to 7 days later. Localization of the lesions, which proved to be only a few mm in diameter, was excellent. Some radioactivity accumuiated in the nasal mucosa. The highest lesion/brain uptake ratio was noted 72 hr after injection of the tracer, but since its turnover time is shorter in man than in cats, a shorter time interval may be optimal in human studies. (H.H.D.)

Tauxe, W.N.; Sedlack, R.E.; Pitlyk, P.J.; Kerr, F.W.L.

1962-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

306

Transcription of Brain Natriuretic Peptide and Atria1 Natriuretic Peptide Genes in Human Tissues*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have compared the expression of atria1 natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) genes in various human tissues using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction technique. Tissues of three human subjects, obtained at autopsy, were analyzed. BNP transcripts could be detected in the central nervous system, lung, thyroid, adrenal, kidney, spleen, small intestine, ovary, uterus, and striated muscle. ANP transcripts could also be demonstrated in various human extracardiac tissues including several endocrine organs. In all periph-HE CARDIAC hormones atria1 natriuretic peptide (ANP) T and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) exhibit similar pharmacological profiles, such as natriuresis and smooth muscle relaxation (1). Along with these common properties there are striking dissimilarities: Whereas the structure of ANP is highly conserved among different species, there is considerable

Alexander L. Gerbest; Lina Dagninos; Than Nguyen; Mona Nemerll

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Can the Higgs Boson Save Us From the Menace of the Boltzmann Brains?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The standard $\\Lambda$CDM model provides an excellent fit to current cosmological observations but suffers from a potentially serious Boltzmann Brain problem. If the universe enters a de Sitter vacuum phase that is truly eternal, there will be a finite temperature in empty space and corresponding thermal fluctuations. Among these fluctuations will be intelligent observers, as well as configurations that reproduce any local region of the current universe to arbitrary precision. We discuss the possibility that the escape from this unacceptable situation may be found in known physics: vacuum instability induced by the Higgs field. Avoiding Boltzmann Brains in a measure-independent way requires a decay timescale of order the current age of the universe, which can be achieved if the top quark pole mass is approximately 178 GeV. Otherwise we must invoke new physics or a particular cosmological measure before we can consider $\\Lambda$CDM to be an empirical success.

Kimberly K. Boddy; Sean M. Carroll

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

308

Radiation therapy of pediatric brain tumors : comparison of long-term health effects and costs between proton therapy and IMRT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation therapy is an important component of pediatric brain tumor treatment. However, radiation-induced damage can lead to adverse long-term health effects. Proton therapy has the ability to reduce the dose delivered ...

Vu, An T. (An Thien)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Zoomed Functional Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla with Simultaneous High Spatial and High Temporal Resolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zoomed Functional Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla with Simultaneous High Spatial and High and is mainly limited by sensitivity. Here, signal-to-noise gains at high magnetic fields (7 Tesla

310

Nutrition and Biochemistry of PhospholipidsChapter 3 Is There Evidence That Phospholipid Administration Is Beneficial for Your Brain?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutrition and Biochemistry of Phospholipids Chapter 3 Is There Evidence That Phospholipid Administration Is Beneficial for Your Brain? Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press

311

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 8 a-Linolenic Acid in Brain Function and Infant Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 8 a-Linolenic Acid in Brain Function and Infant Development Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

312

A Genome-Wide Association Study Suggests Novel Loci Associated with a Schizophrenia-Related Brain-Based Phenotype  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Patients with schizophrenia and their siblings typically show subtle changes of brain structures, such as a reduction of hippocampal volume. Hippocampal volume is heritable, may explain a variety of cognitive symptoms of ...

Hass, Johanna

313

Monte Carlo based dosimetry and treatment planning for neutron capture therapy of brain tumors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monte Carlo based dosimetry and computer-aided treatment planning for neutron capture therapy have been developed to provide the necessary link between physical dosimetric measurements performed on the MITR-II epithermal-neutron beams and the need of the radiation oncologist to synthesize large amounts of dosimetric data into a clinically meaningful treatment plan for each individual patient. Monte Carlo simulation has been employed to characterize the spatial dose distributions within a skull/brain model irradiated by an epithermal-neutron beam designed for neutron capture therapy applications. The geometry and elemental composition employed for the mathematical skull/brain model and the neutron and photon fluence-to-dose conversion formalism are presented. A treatment planning program, NCTPLAN, developed specifically for neutron capture therapy, is described. Examples are presented illustrating both one and two-dimensional dose distributions obtainable within the brain with an experimental epithermal-neutron beam, together with beam quality and treatment plan efficacy criteria which have been formulated for neutron capture therapy. The incorporation of three-dimensional computed tomographic image data into the treatment planning procedure is illustrated. The experimental epithermal-neutron beam has a maximum usable circular diameter of 20 cm, and with 30 ppm of B-10 in tumor and 3 ppm of B-10 in blood, it produces a beam-axis advantage depth of 7.4 cm, a beam-axis advantage ratio of 1.83, a global advantage ratio of 1.70, and an advantage depth RBE-dose rate to tumor of 20.6 RBE-cGy/min (cJ/kg-min). These characteristics make this beam well suited for clinical applications, enabling an RBE-dose of 2,000 RBE-cGy/min (cJ/kg-min) to be delivered to tumor at brain midline in six fractions with a treatment time of approximately 16 minutes per fraction.

Zamenhof, R.G.; Clement, S.D.; Harling, O.K.; Brenner, J.F.; Wazer, D.E.; Madoc-Jones, H.; Yanch, J.C. (Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, MA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Methylphenidate attenuates limbic brain inhibition after cocaine-cues exposure in cocaine abusers.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dopamine (phasic release) is implicated in conditioned responses. Imaging studies in cocaine abusers show decreases in striatal dopamine levels, which we hypothesize may enhance conditioned responses since tonic dopamine levels modulate phasic dopamine release. To test this we assessed the effects of increasing tonic dopamine levels (using oral methylphenidate) on brain activation induced by cocaine-cues in cocaine abusers. Brain metabolism (marker of brain function) was measured with PET and {sup 18}FDG in 24 active cocaine abusers tested four times; twice watching a Neutral video (nature scenes) and twice watching a Cocaine-cues video; each video was preceded once by placebo and once by methylphenidate (20 mg). The Cocaine-cues video increased craving to the same extent with placebo (68%) and with methylphenidate (64%). In contrast, SPM analysis of metabolic images revealed that differences between Neutral versus Cocaine-cues conditions were greater with placebo than methylphenidate; whereas with placebo the Cocaine-cues decreased metabolism (p<0.005) in left limbic regions (insula, orbitofrontal, accumbens) and right parahippocampus, with methylphenidate it only decreased in auditory and visual regions, which also occurred with placebo. Decreases in metabolism in these regions were not associated with craving; in contrast the voxel-wise SPM analysis identified significant correlations with craving in anterior orbitofrontal cortex (p<0.005), amygdala, striatum and middle insula (p<0.05). This suggests that methylphenidate's attenuation of brain reactivity to Cocaine-cues is distinct from that involved in craving. Cocaine-cues decreased metabolism in limbic regions (reflects activity over 30 minutes), which contrasts with activations reported by fMRI studies (reflects activity over 2-5 minutes) that may reflect long-lasting limbic inhibition following activation. Studies to evaluate the clinical significance of methylphenidate's blunting of cue-induced limbic inhibition may help identify potential benefits of this medication in cocaine addiction.

Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.-J.; Tomasi, D.; Telang, F.; Fowler, J.S.; Pradhan, K.; Jayne, M.; Logan, J.; Goldstein, R.Z.; Alia-Klein, N.; Wong, C.T.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Quantum physics in neuroscience and psychology: A neurophysicalmodel of the mind/brain interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neuropsychological research on the neural basis of behavior generally posits that brain mechanisms will ultimately suffice to explain all psychologically described phenomena. This assumption stems from the idea that the brain is made up entirely of material particles and fields, and that all causal mechanisms relevant to neuroscience can therefore be formulated solely in terms of properties of these elements. Thus terms having intrinsic mentalistic and/or experiential content (e.g., ''feeling,'' ''knowing,'' and ''effort'') are not included as primary causal factors. This theoretical restriction is motivated primarily by ideas about the natural world that have been known to be fundamentally incorrect for more than three quarters of a century. Contemporary basic physical theory differs profoundly from classical physics on the important matter of how the consciousness of human agents enters into the structure of empirical phenomena. The new principles contradict the older idea that local mechanical processes alone can account for the structure of all observed empirical data. Contemporary physical theory brings directly and irreducibly into the overall causal structure certain psychologically described choices made by human agents about how they will act. This key development in basic physical theory is applicable to neuroscience, and it provides neuroscientists and psychologists with an alternative conceptual framework for describing neural processes. Indeed, due to certain structural features of ion channels critical to synaptic function, contemporary physical theory must in principle be used when analyzing human brain dynamics. The new framework, unlike its classical-physics-based predecessor is erected directly upon, and is compatible with, the prevailing principles of physics, and is able to represent more adequately than classical concepts the neuroplastic mechanisms relevant to the growing number of empirical studies of the capacity of directed attention and mental effort to systematically alter brain function.

Schwartz, Jeffrey M.; Stapp, Henry P.; Beauregard, Mario

2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

316

Reduced Metabolsim in Brain 'Control Networks' Following Cocaine-Cues Exposure in Female Cocaine Abusers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gender differences in vulnerability for cocaine addiction have been reported. Though the mechanisms are not understood, here we hypothesize that gender differences in reactivity to conditioned-cues, which contributes to relapse, are involved. To test this we compared brain metabolism (using PET and {sup 18}FDG) between female (n = 10) and male (n = 16) active cocaine abusers when they watched a neutral video (nature scenes) versus a cocaine-cues video. Self-reports of craving increased with the cocaine-cue video but responses did not differ between genders. In contrast, changes in whole brain metabolism with cocaine-cues differed by gender (p<0.05); females significantly decreased metabolism (-8.6% {+-} 10) whereas males tended to increase it (+5.5% {+-} 18). SPM analysis (Cocaine-cues vs Neutral) in females revealed decreases in frontal, cingulate and parietal cortices, thalamus and midbrain (p<0.001) whereas males showed increases in right inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44/45) (only at p<0.005). The gender-cue interaction showed greater decrements with Cocaine-cues in females than males (p<0.001) in frontal (BA 8, 9, 10), anterior cingulate (BA 24, 32), posterior cingulate (BA 23, 31), inferior parietal (BA 40) and thalamus (dorsomedial nucleus). Females showed greater brain reactivity to cocaine-cues than males but no differences in craving, suggesting that there may be gender differences in response to cues that are not linked with craving but could affect subsequent drug use. Specifically deactivation of brain regions from 'control networks' (prefrontal, cingulate, inferior parietal, thalamus) in females could increase their vulnerability to relapse since it would interfere with executive function (cognitive inhibition). This highlights the importance of gender tailored interventions for cocaine addiction.

Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Tomasi, D.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Telang, F.; Goldstein, R.Z.; Alia-Klein, N.; Wong, C.T.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Epigenetic remodelling of brain, body and behaviour during phase change in locusts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in behaviour and motor systems. They can change reversibly between two forms that differ so extensively in appearance (Figure 1A), behaviour, phy- siology, neurochemistry and morphology [13] that they were once thought to be different species. This transfor... -term solitarious locusts; optic lobes (blue), central brain (red), thoracic ganglia (green). Data for (B) and (C) are from [36]. (D) Serotonin is (i) necessary and (ii) sufficient to induce behavioural gregarization. Histograms showing proportions of locusts...

Burrows, Malcolm; Rogers, Stephen M; Ott, Swidbert R

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

318

Increased angiotensin II receptors in brain nuclei of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats  

SciTech Connect

We analyzed angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors by in vitro autoradiography in selective brain nuclei of control, salt-treated (1% NaCl in drinking water), deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-treated (DOCA pivalate, 25 mg/kg sc weekly), and DOCA-salt-treated (DOCA + salt treatments) uninephrectomized male Wistar-Kyoto rats. After 4 wk of treatment, only the DOCA-salt group developed hypertension. ANG II binding increased in median preoptic nucleus and subfornical organ of salt- and DOCA-treated rats. DOCA-treated rats also showed increased ANG II binding in paraventricular nucleus. DOCA-salt-treated rats showed higher ANG II binding in nucleus of the solitary tract and area postrema, as well as in the areas mentioned before. Although salt and/or DOCA treatments alone increased ANG II receptors in some brain nuclei, after combined DOCA-salt treatment there was significantly higher ANG II binding in all areas, except the median preoptic nucleus. These results suggest that increased ANG II receptors in selected brain areas may play a role in the pathophysiology of mineralocorticoid-salt experimental hypertension.

Gutkind, J.S.; Kurihara, M.; Saavedra, J.M.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Small Unilamellar Vesicles: A Platform Technology for Molecular Imaging of Brain Tumors  

SciTech Connect

Molecular imaging enables the non-invasive investigation of cellular and molecular processes. Although there are challenges to overcome, the development of targeted contrast agents to increase the sensitivity of molecular imaging techniques is essential for their clinical translation. In this study, spontaneously forming, small unilamellar vesicles (sULVs) (30 nm diameter) were used as a platform to build a bimodal (i.e., optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) targeted contrast agent for the molecular imaging of brain tumors. sULVs were loaded with a gadolinium (Gd) chelated lipid (Gd-DPTA-BOA), functionalized with targeting antibodies (anti-EGFR monoclonal and anti-IGFBP7 single domain), and incorporated a near infrared dye (Cy5.5). The resultant sULVs were characterized in vitro using small angle neutron scattering (SANS), phantom MRI and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Antibody targeted and nontargeted Gd loaded sULVs labeled with Cy5.5 were assessed in vivo in a brain tumor model in mice using time domain optical imaging and MRI. The results demonstrated that a spontaneously forming, nanosized ULVs loaded with a high payload of Gd can selectively target and image, using MR and optical imaging, brain tumor vessels when functionalized with anti-IGFBP7 single domain antibodies. The unique features of these targeted sULVs make them promising molecular MRI contrast agents.

Iqbal, U [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada; Albaghdadi, H [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada; Nieh, Mu-Ping [University of Connecticut, Storrs; Tuor, U.I [National Research Council of Canada, Calcary, AB, Canada; Mester, Z [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada; Stanimirovic, D [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada; Katsaras, John [ORNL; Abulrob, A [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

EPRI Comments on a Study of Power-Frequency Magnetic Fields and Childhood Brain Tumors in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A paper entitled, "Power-Frequency Magnetic Fields and Childhood Brain Tumors: A Case-Control Study in Japan," was recently published in Journal of Epidemiology (2010;20(1):54-61). The authors reported finding a positive association between magnetic field exposures above 0.4 T and risk of childhood brain tumors. These EPRI comments evaluate the strengths and limitations of the epidemiologic study.

2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Science & Technology Review March 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Countering the Growing Chem-Bio Threat -- Commentary by Penrose (Parney) C. Albright; (2) Responding to a Terrorist Attack Involving Chemical Warfare Agents -- Livermore scientists are helping the nation strengthen plans to swiftly respond to an incident involving chemical warfare agents; (3) Revealing the Secrets of a Deadly Disease -- A Livermore-developed system helps scientists better understand how plague bacteria infect healthy host cells; (4) A New Application for a Weapons Code -- Simulations reveal for the first time how blast waves cause traumatic brain injuries; (5) Testing Valuable National Assets for X-Ray Damage -- Experiments at the National Ignition Facility are measuring the effects of radiation on critical systems; and (6) An Efficient Way to Harness the Sun's Power -- New solar thermal technology is designed to supply residential electric power at nearly half of the current retail price.

Bearinger, J P

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

322

Underlying mitochondrial dysfunction triggers flutamide-induced oxidative liver injury in a mouse model of idiosyncratic drug toxicity  

SciTech Connect

Flutamide, a widely used nonsteroidal anti-androgen, but not its bioisostere bicalutamide, has been associated with idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury. Although the susceptibility factors are unknown, mitochondrial injury has emerged as a putative hazard of flutamide. To explore the role of mitochondrial sensitization in flutamide hepatotoxicity, we determined the effects of superimposed drug stress in a murine model of underlying mitochondrial abnormalities. Male wild-type or heterozygous Sod2{sup +/-} mice were injected intraperitoneously with flutamide (0, 30 or 100 mg/kg/day) for 28 days. A kinetic pilot study revealed that flutamide (100 mg/kg/day) caused approximately 10-fold greater exposure than the reported therapeutic mean plasma levels. Mutant (5/10), but not wild-type, mice in the high-dose group exhibited small foci of hepatocellular necrosis and an increased number of apoptotic hepatocytes. Hepatic GSSG/GSH, protein carbonyl levels, and serum lactate levels were significantly increased, suggesting oxidant stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Measurement of mitochondrial superoxide in cultured hepatocytes demonstrated that mitochondria were a significant source of flutamide-enhanced oxidant stress. Indeed, mitochondria isolated from flutamide-treated Sod2{sup +/-} mice exhibited decreased aconitase activity as compared to vehicle controls. A transcriptomics analysis using MitoChips revealed that flutamide-treated Sod2{sup +/-} mice exhibited a selective decrease in the expression of all complexes I and III subunits encoded by mitochondrial DNA. In contrast, Sod2{sup +/-} mice receiving bicalutamide (50 mg/kg/day) did not reveal any hepatic changes. These results are compatible with our concept that flutamide targets hepatic mitochondria and exerts oxidant stress that can lead to overt hepatic injury in the presence of an underlying mitochondrial abnormality.

Kashimshetty, Rohini [University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Storrs, CT, 06269 (United States); Desai, Varsha G. [Center for Functional Genomics, Division of Systems Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, US Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR, 72079 (United States); Kale, Vijay M. [University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Storrs, CT, 06269 (United States); Lee, Taewon [Korea University, Department of Information and Mathematics, Jochiwon, 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Moland, Carrie L.; Branham, William S. [Center for Functional Genomics, Division of Systems Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, US Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR, 72079 (United States); New, Lee S.; Chan, Eric C.Y. [National University of Singapore, Department of Pharmacy, 117543 Singapore (Singapore); Younis, Husam [Pfizer Global Research and Development, San Diego, CA, 92121 (United States); Boelsterli, Urs A. [University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Storrs, CT, 06269 (United States)], E-mail: urs.boelsterli@uconn.edu

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Guidelines for Contact with Employees Off Work Due to an Injury or Illness The University's Return-to-Work Program assists employees temporarily or permanently unable to perform the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of their regular work due to either a work related or non-work related injury or illness. This Program is designedGuidelines for Contact with Employees Off Work Due to an Injury or Illness The University's Return-to-Work Program assists employees temporarily or permanently unable to perform the essential functions

de Lijser, Peter

324

Coagulation Factors in Controlling Traumatic Bleeds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

patients with intracranial hemorrhage on preinjury warfarin. J Trauma 2006; 61(2):318-21. 21. Vang ML, Hvas

Pillow, Jonathan

325

Non-invasive, MRI-compatible fibreoptic device for functional near-IR reflectometry of human brain  

SciTech Connect

A non-invasive device for measuring blood oxygen variations in human brain is designed, implemented, and tested for MRI compatibility. The device is based on principles of near-IR reflectometry; power LEDs serve as sources of probing radiation delivered to patient skin surface through optical fibres. Numerical Monte Carlo simulations of probing radiation propagation in a multilayer brain model are performed to evaluate signal levels at different source - detector separations at three operation wavelengths and an additional wavelength of 915 nm. It is shown that the device can be applied for brain activity studies using power LEDs operating at 830 and 915 nm, while employment of wavelength of 660 nm requires an increased probing power. Employment of the wavelength of 592 nm in the current configuration is unreasonable. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

Sorvoja, H.S.S.; Myllylae, T S; Myllylae, Risto A [University of Oulu, Optoelectronics and Measurements Techniques Laboratory (Finland); Kirillin, M Yu; Sergeeva, Ekaterina A [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnii Novgorod (Russian Federation); Elseoud, A A; Nikkinen, J; Tervonen, O; Kiviniemi, V [MRI Research Unit, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu (Finland)

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

326

Characteristics of Lethal Electrical Injuries in Central and Northeastern Bulgaria for a 27-Year Period (1980–2006)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objective: Despite the advancement of forensic science, electro-traumas still pose serious challenges. Methods: We have studied the forensic medical documentation from 485 autopsies following electro-trauma over the period 1980–2006, performed at the forensic wards in 6 districts of the country The statistical analysis includes comparison of means and percentages. They are carried out using SPSS Version 11. We accepted statistical significant values of P =.05. Results: The incidence of lethal injuries caused by electricity is 1.29 cases per 100000 people per year. The average age of the deceased from electro-trauma is 37.3 years. Men (85%) prevails over women (14.84%). There are 24.32 % of the cases that are work-related accidents, and 60.61 % of them are domestic. Suicide through electrocution is relatively rare: 7.21%. Homicide has not been registered in our study. Low-voltage injuries (42.06%) are more common than high-voltage ones (30.72%). 62.68 % of the lethal cases occur in summer, between June and September. Conclusions: Among the studied cases, electro-trauma occurs at a young age. The victims are typically men. Work-related accidents are more common than domestic ones; injuries by low voltage are observed more frequently than those by high voltage. Suicides are very rare, and not a single case of homicide has been observed in the study. There exists a seasonal variation in incidence of lethal accidents caused by electric current, its peak being during the summer months. Despite the advancement of forensic science, electro-traumas (ET) still pose a serious challenge. The aim of the study is to examine the incidence and characterization of ET in some areas of Bulgaria as well as the victims ’ average age and their distribution by gender. METHODS The study has been conducted in 6 districts of the Republic of Bulgaria on a total area of 16 910.31 km 2 (15.23 % ± 0.54 % of the whole country’s territory) and a population of 1 388 277 (17.98 % ± 0.06 % of the whole population). 1 We have studied the forensic medical documentation from 485 autopsies caused by ET over the period 1980–2006, performed at

William Dokov Md

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

MEDICAL CONSENT AGREEMENT If I should require medical treatment because of injury or illness during the trip, I consent to such  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MEDICAL CONSENT AGREEMENT If I should require medical treatment because of injury or illness during/or accident insurance for trip participants and I agree to be financially responsible for any medical bills incurred as a result of an emergency or other medical treatment I may require while participating

Dyer, Bill

328

HUMAN BRAIN IMAGING AT 9.4 TESLA USING A COMBINATION OF TRAVELING WAVE EXCITATION WITH A 15-CHANNEL RECEIVE-ONLY ARRAY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HUMAN BRAIN IMAGING AT 9.4 TESLA USING A COMBINATION OF TRAVELING WAVE EXCITATION WITH A 15-CHANNEL is a successful setup for routine human brain imaging at 7 Tesla. For reception, the use of multiple surface coils multichannel transmit coils. At 9.4 Tesla, however, the even shorter RF wavelength in tissue causes the B1

329

Tumor Bed Dynamics After Surgical Resection of Brain Metastases: Implications for Postoperative Radiosurgery  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To analyze 2 factors that influence timing of radiosurgery after surgical resection of brain metastases: target volume dynamics and intracranial tumor progression in the interval between surgery and cavity stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Three diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were retrospectively analyzed for 41 patients with a total of 43 resected brain metastases: preoperative MRI scan (MRI-1), MRI scan within 24 hours after surgery (MRI-2), and MRI scan for radiosurgery planning, which is generally performed {<=}1 week before SRS (MRI-3). Tumors were contoured on MRI-1 scans, and resection cavities were contoured on MRI-2 and MRI-3 scans. Results: The mean tumor volume before surgery was 14.23 cm{sup 3}, and the mean cavity volume was 8.53 cm{sup 3} immediately after surgery and 8.77 cm{sup 3} before SRS. In the interval between surgery and SRS, 20 cavities (46.5%) were stable in size, defined as a change of {<=}2 cm{sup 3}; 10 cavities (23.3%) collapsed by >2 cm{sup 3}; and 13 cavities (30.2%) increased by >2 cm{sup 3}. The unexpected increase in cavity size was a result of local progression (2 cavities), accumulation of cyst-like fluid or blood (9 cavities), and nonspecific postsurgical changes (2 cavities). Finally, in the interval between surgery and SRS, 5 cavities showed definite local tumor progression, 4 patients had progression elsewhere in the brain, 1 patient had both local progression and progression elsewhere, and 33 patients had stable intracranial disease. Conclusions: In the interval between surgical resection and delivery of SRS, surgical cavities are dynamic in size; however, most cavities do not collapse, and nearly one-third are larger at the time of SRS. These observations support obtaining imaging for radiosurgery planning as close to SRS delivery as possible and suggest that delaying SRS after surgery does not offer the benefit of cavity collapse in most patients. A prospective, multi-institutional trial will provide more guidance to the optimal timing of cavity SRS.

Jarvis, Lesley A., E-mail: lesley.a.jarvis@hitchcock.org [Section of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Simmons, Nathan E. [Section of Neurosurgery, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States)] [Section of Neurosurgery, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Bellerive, Marc [Section of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States)] [Section of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Erkmen, Kadir [Section of Neurosurgery, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States)] [Section of Neurosurgery, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Eskey, Clifford J. [Department of Radiology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Gladstone, David J. [Section of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States)] [Section of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Hug, Eugen B. [Procure, New York, New York (United States)] [Procure, New York, New York (United States); Roberts, David W. [Section of Neurosurgery, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States)] [Section of Neurosurgery, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Hartford, Alan C. [Section of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States)] [Section of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Motexafin Gadolinium Combined With Prompt Whole Brain Radiotherapy Prolongs Time to Neurologic Progression in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Brain Metastases: Results of a Phase III Trial  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the efficacy of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) in combination with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for the treatment of brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: In an international, randomized, Phase III study, patients with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer were randomized to WBRT with or without MGd. The primary endpoint was the interval to neurologic progression, determined by a centralized Events Review Committee who was unaware of the treatment the patients had received. Results: Of 554 patients, 275 were randomized to WBRT and 279 to WBRT+MGd. Treatment with MGd was well tolerated, and 92% of the intended doses were administered. The most common MGd-related Grade 3+ adverse events included liver function abnormalities (5.5%), asthenia (4.0%), and hypertension (4%). MGd improved the interval to neurologic progression compared with WBRT alone (15 vs. 10 months; p = 0.12, hazard ratio [HR] = 0.78) and the interval to neurocognitive progression (p = 0.057, HR = 0.78). The WBRT patients required more salvage brain surgery or radiosurgery than did the WBRT+MGd patients (54 vs. 25 salvage procedures, p < 0.001). A statistically significant interaction between the geographic region and MGd treatment effect (which was in the prespecified analysis plan) and between treatment delay and MGd treatment effect was found. In North American patients, where treatment was more prompt, a statistically significant prolongation of the interval to neurologic progression, from 8.8 months for WBRT to 24.2 months for WBRT+MGd (p = 0.004, HR = 0.53), and the interval to neurocognitive progression (p = 0.06, HR = 0.73) were observed. Conclusion: In the intent-to-treat analysis, MGd exhibited a favorable trend in neurologic outcomes. MGd significantly prolonged the interval to neurologic progression in non-small-cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases receiving prompt WBRT. The toxicity was acceptable.

Mehta, Minesh P. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)], E-mail: mehta@mail.humonc.wisc.edu; Shapiro, William R. [Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Phan, See C. [Clinical Development, Pharmacyclics, Sunnyvale, CA (United States); Gervais, Radj [Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Carrie, Christian [Centre Leon-Berard, Lyon (France); Chabot, Pierre [Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QB (Canada); Patchell, Roy A. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Glantz, Michael J. [University of Massachusetts, Hinsdale, MA (United States); Recht, Lawrence [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Langer, Corey [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sur, Ranjan K. [Juravinski Cancer Centre at Hamilton Regional Cancer Centre, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Roa, Wilson H. [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Mahe, Marc A. [Centre Rene Gauducheau, Nantes-St. Herblain (France); Fortin, Andre [Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QB (Canada); Nieder, Carsten [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Munchen, Munich (Germany); Meyers, Christina A. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Smith, Jennifer A.; Miller, Richard A.; Renschler, Markus F. [Clinical Development, Pharmacyclics, Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Long-term activity-induced changes in the brain : a study of translational regulation and structural plasticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-lasting changes must take place in the brain to store the skills and memories that have been learned by the organism throughout its history. Long-term memory (LTM), and its cellular correlate, the late-phase of long-term ...

Govindarajan, Arvind

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

300 MHz RF coils for MR studies of Macaca mulatta brain at 7 Tesla Hellmut Merkle2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

300 MHz RF coils for MR studies of Macaca mulatta brain at 7 Tesla Hellmut Merkle2 , Josef Pfeuffer, customized for a vertical ultra high field 7 Tesla system develop for vision research in the alert, trained macaque. Methods A prototype primate chair was designed and built for the vertical 7-Tesla/60-cm BRUKER

333

MAPPING HUMAN BRAIN FUNCTION WITH MRI AT 7 TESLA Xiaoping HU, Essa YACOUB, Josef PFEUFFER, Amir SCHUMEL,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAPPING HUMAN BRAIN FUNCTION WITH MRI AT 7 TESLA Xiaoping HU, Essa YACOUB, Josef PFEUFFER, Amir of the BOLD response to neural activity increase with the field strength. With the establishment of a 7 Tesla at a magnetic field strength that significantly exceeds 4 Tesla. Functional mapping using echo-planar imaging

334

Mechanism of Regulating Thyroid Gland Functioning by Brain Cortex; O MEKHANIZME REGULYATSII FUNKTSII SHCHTOVIDNOI ZHELEZY KOROI GOLOVNOGO MOZGA  

SciTech Connect

Results are reported from tracer studies which show that the influence of the brain on activity of the thyroid gland is mediated through hormonal links involving either secretions from the hypophysis of the pituitary or the adrenal glands. (C.H.)

Amiragova, M.G.

1959-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Two approaches to selecting set of voxels for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease using brain SPECT images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a computer-aided diagnosis technique for improving the accuracy of the early diagnosis of the Alzheimer type dementia. The first proposed methodology is based on the selection of those voxels which present a greater difference between ... Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Computer aided diagnosis, SPECT brain images

D. Salas-Gonzalez; J. M. Górriz; J. Ramírez; I. Álvarez; M. López; F. Segovia; C. G. Puntonet

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

"Artificial" brains, electrical grids, and disease modeling: Los Alamos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science discoveries unveiled Science discoveries unveiled "Artificial" brains, electrical grids, and disease modeling: Los Alamos science discoveries unveiled September 15 The event is an opportunity for business leaders and community members to learn about where science is heading, as well as for students to discover potential new career directions. September 8, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

337

Chaotic physics in ferroelectrics hints at brain-like computing | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Morgan McCorkle Morgan McCorkle Oak Ridge National Laboratory 865-574-7308 Chaotic physics in ferroelectrics hints at brain-like computing Unexpected behavior in ferroelectric materials explored by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory supports a new approach to information storage and processing known as memcomputing. Unexpected behavior in ferroelectric materials explored by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory supports a new approach to information storage and processing known as memcomputing. (hi-res image) OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Nov. 18, 2013-Unexpected behavior in ferroelectric materials explored by researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory supports a new approach to information storage and processing. Ferroelectric materials are known for their ability to spontaneously switch

338

In-vivo measurement of lithium in the brain and other organs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The lithium used clinically and distributed in organs such as the brain or idney of humans and other exhaling animals is determined in-vivo by means of neutron radiation and measuring in the exhaled air elemental tritiated hydrogen released from the tritium reaction by the reaction .sup.6 Li(n,.alpha.)T. The tritium atoms so released are transformed in part in the surrounding aqueous solution to form gaseous tritiated hydrogen which has a small solubility in body tissues and liquids and thus appears quickly in the breath. After a recipient fasts and is irradiated with neutrons, the air exhaled in the breath for a given time after irradiation is captured and processed to remove water, isolate hydrogen and measure the tritiated hydrogen with a gaseous organ-methane counter.

Vartsky, David (Yavne, IL); Wielopolski, Lucian (Shirley, NY); LoMonte, Anthony F. (Wading River, NY); Ellis, Kenneth J. (Bayport, NY); Cohn, Stanton H. (Smithtown, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Infant Brain Tumors: Incidence, Survival, and the Role of Radiation Based on Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Data  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of infant brain tumors and survival outcomes by disease and treatment variables. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program November 2008 submission database provided age-adjusted incidence rates and individual case information for primary brain tumors diagnosed between 1973 and 2006 in infants less than 12 months of age. Results: Between 1973 and 1986, the incidence of infant brain tumors increased from 16 to 40 cases per million (CPM), and from 1986 to 2006, the annual incidence rate averaged 35 CPM. Leading histologies by annual incidence in CPM were gliomas (13.8), medulloblastoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumors (6.6), and ependymomas (3.6). The annual incidence was higher in whites than in blacks (35.0 vs. 21.3 CPM). Infants with low-grade gliomas had the highest observed survival, and those with atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRTs) or primary rhabdoid tumors of the brain had the lowest. Between 1979 and 1993, the annual rate of cases treated with radiation within the first 4 months from diagnosis declined from 20.5 CPM to <2 CPM. For infants with medulloblastoma, desmoplastic histology and treatment with both surgery and upfront radiation were associated with improved survival, but on multivariate regression, only combined surgery and radiation remained associated with improved survival, with a hazard ratio for death of 0.17 compared with surgery alone (p = 0.005). For ATRTs, those treated with surgery and upfront radiation had a 12-month survival of 100% compared with 24.4% for those treated with surgery alone (p = 0.016). For ependymomas survival was higher in patients treated in more recent decades (p = 0.001). Conclusion: The incidence of infant brain tumors has been stable since 1986. Survival outcomes varied markedly by histology. For infants with medulloblastoma and ATRTs, improved survival was observed in patients treated with both surgery and early radiation compared with those treated with surgery alone.

Bishop, Andrew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); McDonald, Mark W., E-mail: mwmcdona@iupui.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, IN (United States); Chang, Andrew L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, IN (United States); Esiashvili, Natia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Early Significant Tumor Volume Reduction After Radiosurgery in Brain Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma Results in Long-Term Survival  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate survival of patients with brain metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after radiosurgery. Patients and Methods: Between 1998 and 2010, 46 patients were treated with radiosurgery, and the total number of lesions was 99. The mean age was 58.9 years (range, 33-78 years). Twenty-six patients (56.5%) had a single brain metastasis. The mean tumor volume was 3.0 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.01-35.1 cm{sup 3}), and the mean marginal dose prescribed was 20.8 Gy (range, 12-25 Gy) at the 50% isodose line. A patient was classified into the good-response group when the sum of the volume of the brain metastases decreased to less than 75% of the original volume at a 1-month follow-up evaluation using MRI. Results: As of December 28, 2010, 39 patients (84.8%) had died, and 7 (15.2%) survived. The overall median survival time was 10.0 {+-} 0.4 months (95% confidence interval, 9.1-10.8). After treatment, local tumor control was achieved in 72 (84.7%) of the 85 tumors assessed using MRI after radiosurgery. The good-response group survived significantly longer than the poor-response group (median survival times of 18.0 and 9.0 months, respectively; p = 0.025). In a multivariate analysis, classification in the good-response group was the only independent prognostic factor for longer survival (p = 0.037; hazard ratio = 0.447; 95% confidence interval, 0.209-0.953). Conclusions: Radiosurgery seems to be an effective treatment modality for patients with brain metastases from RCC. The early significant tumor volume reduction observed after radiosurgery seems to result in long-term survival in RCC patients with brain metastases.

Kim, Wook Ha [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Gyu, E-mail: gknife@plaza.snu.ac.kr [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jung Ho [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Paek, Sun Ha; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Park, Chul-Kee [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chae-Yong [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Hwy; Kim, Jin Wook; Jung, Hee-Won [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy, environmental nuclear contamination, as well as earth orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of murine brain tissue after whole-body radiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high dose (2 Gy), and low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues, and pathways that were brain tissue specific. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (p < 10{sup -53}) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified 9 neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose radiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

Lowe, Xiu R; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

342

Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy, environmental nuclear contamination, as well as earth orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of murine brain tissue after whole-body radiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high dose (2 Gy), and low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues, and pathways that were brain tissue specific. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (p < 10{sup -53}) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified 9 neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose radiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

Lowe, Xiu R; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

343

CATIONIC SHELL CROSSLINKED NANOPARTICLES AS INTRACELLULAR DELIVERY VEHICLES FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF ACUTE LUNG INJURY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanomedicine is a growing field of medicine that seeks to take advantage of nanoscale materials in order to address current challenges such as the ability to cross the epithelial mucus of the lungs to deliver treatment. This thesis focuses on the development of polymer nanomaterials known as shell crosslinked knedel-like (SCK) nanoparticles to serve as intracellular carriers of genetic material and specifically target injured cells in the lung for the treatment of acute lung injury (ALI). SCK nanoparticles are spherical in their morphology and their synthesis allows for them to possess tunable functionalities, size, and physical properties. The research presented in this work includes the synthesis of amphiphilic block copolymers that exhibit cationic character in their hydrophilic segment, in order to facilitate cell transfection in the body. The block copolymer poly(acrylamidoethylamine)130-block-polysterene123 (PAEA-b-PS) underwent subsequent micellization in water and crosslinking across the hydrophilic chains. The resulting SCK nanoparticles were c.a 75 nm in diameter and possessed cationic character. Herein, we report the physical and chemical characteristics of the block copolymers, micelles, and crosslinked nanoparticles. Current efforts for refining the synthetic methods in the production of SCK nanoparticles for the treatment of ALI are described.

Florez, Stephanie

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 25 The Importance of the Omega-3 and Omega-6 Ratio: Brain Biochemistry, Cognition, and Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 25 The Importance of the Omega-3 and Omega-6 Ratio: Brain Biochemistry, Cognition, and Behavior Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Pres

345

On the relevance of automatically selected single-voxel MRS and multimodal MRI and MRSI features for brain tumour differentiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to evaluate the relevance of magnetic resonance (MR) features selected by automatic feature selection techniques to build classifiers for differential diagnosis and tissue segmentation two data sets containing MR spectroscopy data from patients ... Keywords: ANOVA, ARD, Ala, Automatic feature selection, Brain tumour, CSF, Cho, Cr, Differential diagnosis, Gd, Glc, Glx, Gly, HLSVD, LDA, LS-SVM, Lac, Lip, MR, MRI, MRS, MRSI, NAA, PD, PRESS, QDA, STEAM, SVM, TE, TM, TR, Tau, mI

Geert J. Postma; Jan Luts; Albert J. Idema; Margarida Julií-Sapé; Ángel Moreno-Torres; Witek Gajewicz; Johan A. K. Suykens; Arend Heerschap; Sabine Van Huffel; Lutgarde M. C. Buydens

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics: Human Brain Tissue Sample Analysis.  

SciTech Connect

To design a robust quantitative proteomics study, an understanding of both the inherent heterogeneity of the biological samples being studied as well as the technical variability of the proteomics methods and platform is needed. Additionally, accurately identifying the technical steps associated with the largest variability would provide valuable information for the improvement and design of future processing pipelines. We present an experimental strategy that allows for a detailed examination of the variability of the quantitative LC-MS proteomics measurements. By replicating analyses at different stages of processing, various technical components can be estimated and their individual contribution to technical variability can be dissected. This design can be easily adapted to other quantitative proteomics pipelines. Herein, we applied this methodology to our label-free workflow for the processing of human brain tissue. For this application, the pipeline was divided into four critical components: Tissue dissection and homogenization (extraction), protein denaturation followed by trypsin digestion and SPE clean-up (digestion), short-term run-to-run instrumental response fluctuation (instrumental variance), and long-term drift of the quantitative response of the LC-MS/MS platform over the 2 week period of continuous analysis (instrumental stability). From this analysis, we found the following contributions to variability: extraction (72%) >> instrumental variance (16%) > instrumental stability (8.4%) > digestion (3.1%). Furthermore, the stability of the platform and its’ suitability for discovery proteomics studies is demonstrated.

Piehowski, Paul D.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Xie, Fang; Moore, Ronald J.; Ramirez Restrepo, Manuel; Engel, Anzhelika; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Albin, Roger L.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Myers, Amanda J.

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

347

Automatic Seedpoint Selection and Tracing of Microstructures in the Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope Mouse Brain Data Set  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope (KESM) enables imaging of an entire mouse brain at sub-micrometer resolution. By using the data sets from the KESM, we can trace the neuronal and vascular structures of the whole mouse brain. I investigated effective methods for automatic seedpoint selection on 3D data sets from the KESM. Furthermore, based on the detected seedpoints, I counted the total number of somata and traced the neuronal structures in the KESM data sets. In the first step, the acquired images from KESM were preprocessed as follows: inverting, noise filtering and contrast enhancement, merging, and stacking to create 3D volumes. Second, I used a morphological object detection algorithm to select seedpoints in the complex neuronal structures. Third, I used an interactive 3D seedpoint validation and a multi-scale approach to identify incorrectly detected somata due to the dense overlapping structures. Fourth, I counted the number of somata to investigate regional differences and morphological features of the mouse brain. Finally, I traced the neuronal structures using a local maximum intensity projection method that employs moving windows. The contributions of this work include reducing time required for setting seedpoints, decreasing the number of falsely detected somata, and improving 3D neuronal reconstruction and analysis performance.

Kim, Dongkun

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Hippocampal Dosimetry Predicts Neurocognitive Function Impairment After Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Benign or Low-Grade Adult Brain Tumors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the association between hippocampal dose and long-term neurocognitive function (NCF) impairment for benign or low-grade adult brain tumors treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT). Methods and Materials: Adult patients with benign or low-grade adult brain tumors were treated with FSRT per institutional practice. No attempt was made to spare the hippocampus. NCF testing was conducted at baseline and 18 months follow-up, on a prospective clinical trial. Regression-based standardized z scores were calculated by using similar healthy control individuals evaluated at the same test-retest interval. NCF impairment was defined as a z score {7.3 Gy was associated with impairment in Wechsler Memory Scale-III Word List (WMS-WL) delayed recall (odds ratio [OR] 19.3; p = 0.043). The association between WMS-WL delayed recall and EQD{sub 2} to 100% of the bilateral hippocampi >0.0 Gy trended to significance (OR 14.8; p = 0.068). Conclusion: EQD{sub 2} to 40% of the bilateral hippocampi greater than 7.3 Gy is associated with long-term impairment in list-learning delayed recall after FSRT for benign or low-grade adult brain tumors. Given that modern intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques can reduce the dose to the bilateral hippocampi below this dosimetric threshold, patients should be enrolled in ongoing prospective trials of hippocampal sparing during cranial irradiation to confirm these preliminary results.

Gondi, Vinai [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Hermann, Bruce P. [Department of Neurology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Mehta, Minesh P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Tome, Wolfgang A., E-mail: tome@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Phase I, study of a miniature X-ray source for interstitial radiotherapy of brain metastases  

SciTech Connect

Despite a variety of stereotactic techniques used to increase intracranical local control, dose escalation strategies remain controversial, with respect to therapeutric gain, convenience, and cost effectiveness, in the setting of brain metastases. In this report, we summarize our experience with the safety and efficacy of a new miniature X-ray device for interstitial radiosurgical treatment of intracranial metastatic neoplasms. Although the role of surgical resection of solitary metastases is established, aggressive treatment with proton, gamma knife, and linac radiation therapy for these lesions is under investigation. The new miniature X-ray device offers a very localized, convenient, time and cost efficient means of delivering radiotherapy to these lesions, with lower normal tissue exposure than gamma knife or proton beam techniques. Retreatment of previously irradiated areas are also now under investigation as part of a Phase II trial. The photon radiosurgery system is a miniature battery operated 40 kV x-ray device designed by the Photoelectron Corporation for use in the interstitial treatment of small tumors ({ge}3 cm in diameter) in humans. This 10 cm long, low current, high voltage X-ray generator is easily mounted in a stereotactic frame and produces low energy (10-20 KeV) x-rays to be emitted from the 10 cm long, 3.2 mm diameter probe, after stereotactic insertion into the tumor. Two scintillation detectors positioned on the stereotactic frame near the patient`s scalp monitor radiation. The spherical X-ray beam behaves essentially as a point source, with dose rate nominally 150 cGy/min. at a distance of 10mm, for a beam current of 40 {mu}A and a voltage of 40 kv.

Douglas, R.M.; Beatty, J.; Biggs, P. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others] [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

350

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security Illness and Injury Surveillance Program Worker Health at a Glance, 2000-2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Worker Health at a Glance, 2000 – 2009 provides an overview of selected illness and injury patterns among the current DOE contractor workforce that have emerged over the 10-years covered by this report. This report is a roll-up of data from 16 individual DOE sites, assigned to one of three program offices (Office of Environmental Management, Office of Science and the National Nuclear Security Administration). In this report, an absences is defined as 40 or more consecutive work hours (5+ calendar days) off the job. Shorter absences were not included.

none,

2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

351

Dietary composition modulates brain mass and amyloid beta levels in a mouse model of aggressive Alzheimer's amyloid pathology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Western Diet (TWD). Neurobiol Dis 2007, 28:16-29. 9. Cao D, Lu H, Lewis TL, Li L: Intake of sucrose-sweetened water induces insulin resistance and exacerbates memory deficits and amyloidosis in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease. J Biol Chem... Diets, Inc, so as to avoid diets associated with predictable organ toxicity. Mice were supplied with food and water ad libi- tum and were weighed weekly. At the age of 18 weeks, mice were sacrificed via isoflurane inhalation, and the brains were removed...

Pedrini, Steve; Thomas, Carlos; Brautigam, Hannah; Schmeidler, James; Ho, Lap; Fraser, Paul; Westaway, David; St George Hyslop, Peter; Martins, Ralph N; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Pasinetti, Giulio M; Dickstein, Dara L; Hof, Patrick R; Ehrlich, Michelle E; Gandy, Sam

2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

352

NADPH oxidase and lipid raft-associated redox signaling are required for PCB153-induced upregulation of cell adhesion molecules in human brain endothelial cells  

SciTech Connect

Exposure to persistent organic pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), can lead to chronic inflammation and the development of vascular diseases. Because cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) of the cerebrovascular endothelium regulate infiltration of inflammatory cells into the brain, we have explored the molecular mechanisms by which ortho-substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), such as PCB153, can upregulate CAMs in brain endothelial cells. Exposure to PCB153 increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), as well as elevated adhesion of leukocytes to brain endothelial cells. These effects were impeded by inhibitors of EGFR, JAKs, or Src activity. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase or disruption of lipid rafts by cholesterol depleting agents blocked PCB153-induced phosphorylation of JAK and Src kinases and upregulation of CAMs. In contrast, silencing of caveolin-1 by siRNA interference did not affect upregulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in brain endothelial cells stimulated by PCB153. Results of the present study indicate that lipid raft-dependent NADPH oxidase/JAK/EGFR signaling mechanisms regulate the expression of CAMs in brain endothelial cells and adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial monolayers. Due to its role in leukocyte infiltration, induction of CAMs may contribute to PCB-induced cerebrovascular disorders and neurotoxic effects in the CNS.

Eum, Sung Yong [Molecular Neuroscience and Vascular Biology Laboratory, Department of Neurosurgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)], E-mail: sungyong.eum@uky.edu; Andras, Ibolya [Molecular Neuroscience and Vascular Biology Laboratory, Department of Neurosurgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Hennig, Bernhard [College of Agriculture, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Toborek, Michal [Molecular Neuroscience and Vascular Biology Laboratory, Department of Neurosurgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Nrf2 protects against 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced oxidative injury and steatohepatitis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies demonstrate that Nrf2, a master regulator of antioxidative responses, is essential in mediating induction of many antioxidative enzymes by acute activation of the AhR. However, the role of Nrf2 in protecting against oxidative stress and DNA damage induced by sustained activation of the AhR remains unknown and was investigated herein. Tissue and blood samples were collected from wild-type (WT) and Nrf2-null mice 21 days after administration of a low-toxic dose (10 {mu}g/kg ip) of TCDD. Only Nrf2-null mice lost body weight after TCDD treatment; however, blood levels of ALT were not markedly changed in either genotype, indicating a lack of extensive necrosis. Compared to livers of TCDD-treated WT mice, livers of TCDD-treated Nrf2-null mice had: 1) degenerated hepatocytes, lobular inflammation, marked fat accumulation, and higher mRNA expression of inflammatory and fibrotic genes; 2) depletion of glutathione, elevation in lipid peroxidation and marker of DNA damage; 3) attenuated induction of phase-II enzymes Nqo1, Gsta1/2, and Ugt2b35 mRNAs, but higher induction of cytoprotective Ho-1, Prdx1, Trxr1, Gclc, and Epxh1 mRNAs; 4) higher mRNA expression of Fgf21 and triglyceride-synthesis genes, but down-regulation of bile-acid-synthesis genes and cholesterol-efflux transporters; and 5) trend of induction/activation of c-jun and NF-kB. Additionally, TCDD-treated Nrf2-null mice had impaired adipogenesis in white adipose tissue. In conclusion, Nrf2 protects livers of mice against oxidative stress, DNA damage, and steatohepatitis induced by TCDD-mediated sustained activation of the AhR. The aggravated hepatosteatosis in TCDD-treated Nrf2-null mice is due to increased lipogenesis in liver and impaired lipogenesis in white adipose tissue. - Highlights: > TCDD causes hepatosteatosis and induction of Nrf2-target genes in wild-type mice. > TCDD causes weight loss, oxidative injury, and steatohepatitis in Nrf2-null mice. > Livers of TCDD-treated Nrf2-null mice have lower Nqo1, Gsta1/2, and Ugt2b35 mRNAs. > Livers of TCDD-treated Nrf2-null mice have lipogenic gene expression profiles. > White adipose tissues of TCDD-treated Nrf2-null mice have impaired adipogenesis.

Lu Hong, E-mail: hlu@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas 66160 (United States); Cui Wei [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas 66160 (United States); Klaassen, Curtis D. [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas 66160 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

A Multi-Route Model of Nicotine-Cotinine Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Brain Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding in Humans  

SciTech Connect

The pharmacokinetics of nicotine, the pharmacologically active alkaloid in tobacco responsible for addiction, are well characterized in humans. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of nicotine pharmacokinetics, brain dosimetry and brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) occupancy. A Bayesian framework was applied to optimize model parameters against multiple human data sets. The resulting model was consistent with both calibration and test data sets, but in general underestimated variability. A pharmacodynamic model relating nicotine levels to increases in heart rate as a proxy for the pharmacological effects of nicotine accurately described the nicotine related changes in heart rate and the development and decay of tolerance to nicotine. The PBPK model was utilized to quantitatively capture the combined impact of variation in physiological and metabolic parameters, nicotine availability and smoking compensation on the change in number of cigarettes smoked and toxicant exposure in a population of 10,000 people presented with a reduced toxicant (50%), reduced nicotine (50%) cigarette Across the population, toxicant exposure is reduced in some but not all smokers. Reductions are not in proportion to reductions in toxicant yields, largely due to partial compensation in response to reduced nicotine yields. This framework can be used as a key element of a dosimetry-driven risk assessment strategy for cigarette smoke constituents.

Teeguarden, Justin G.; Housand, Conrad; Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Gunawan, Rudy; Timchalk, Charles

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Printed in U.S.A. Copyright © 2001 by The Endocrine Society Soy Isoflavone Supplements Antagonize Reproductive Behavior and Estrogen Receptor ?- and ?-Dependent Gene Expression in the Brain*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Epidemiological evidence suggests that isoflavone phytoestrogens may reduce the risk of cancer, osteoporosis, and heart disease, effects at least partially mediated by estrogen receptors ? and ? (ER ? and ER?). Because isoflavone dietary supplements are becoming increasingly popular and are frequently advertised as natural alternatives to estrogen replacement therapy, we have examined the effects of one of these supplements on estrogen-dependent behavior and ER?- and ER?-dependent gene expression in the brain. In the adult female rat brain, 17?-estradiol treatment decreased ER ? messenger RNA signal in the paraventricular nucleus by 41%, but supplement treatment resulted in a 27 % increase. The regulation of ER ? in the paraventricular nucleus is probably via an ER?-dependent mechanism. Similarly, in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus, supplement treatment diminished the estrogen-dependent up-regulation of oxytocin receptor by 10.5%. The regulation of oxytocin receptor expression in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus is via an ER?dependent mechanism. Supplement treatment also resulted in a significant decrease in receptive behavior in estrogen- and progesterone-primed females. The observed disruption of sexual receptivity by the isoflavone supplement is probably due to antiestrogenic effects observed in the brain. These results suggest that isoflavone phytoestrogens are antiestrogenic on both ER?- and ?R?-dependent gene expression in the brain and estrogen-dependent behavior. (Endocrinology

Heather B. Patisaul; Marietta Dindo; Patricia L. Whitten; Larry J. Young

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Zinc and Health: Current Status and Future Directions Zinc Transport in the Brain: Routes of Zinc Influx and Efflux in Neurons1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zinc and Health: Current Status and Future Directions Zinc Transport in the Brain: Routes of Zinc and that mediate extracellular zinc toxicity and (3) a plasma membrane transporter potentially present in all of mechanism, is the transporter pathway. The kinetics of zinc uptake in cultured neurons under resting

357

Temporal Order is Coded Temporally in the Brain: Early Event-related Potential Latency Shifts Underlying Prior Entry in a Cross-modal Temporal Order Judgment Task  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The speeding-up of neural processing associated with attended events (i.e., the prior-entry effect) has long been proposed as a viable mechanism by which attention can prioritize our perception and action. In the brain, this has been thought to be regulated ...

J. Vibell; C. Klinge; M. Zampini; C. Spence; A. C. Nobre

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Angiotensin II induces secretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and a tissue metalloprotease inhibitor-related protein from rat brain astrocytes  

SciTech Connect

The present study investigates angiotensin (Ang) II effects on secretory protein synthesis in brain astrocytes cultured from neonatal and 21-day-old rats. Ang II-induced changes in the de novo synthesis of (35S)methionine-labeled secretory proteins were visualized using two-dimensional NaDodSO4/PAGE. Astrocytes from 21-day-old rat brain possess specific high-affinity receptors for Ang II. These cells express two Ang II-induced secretory proteins with Mr 55,000 (AISP-55K) and Mr 30,000 (AISP-30K), which were time- and dose-dependent (EC50, 1 nM). (Sar1, Ile8)Ang II (where Sar is sarcosine) inhibited Ang II-induced secretion of AISP-55K but not AISP-30K. N-terminal amino acid sequencing indicates that AISP-55K is identical to rat plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, whereas AISP-30K exhibits 72-81% identity to three closely related proteins: human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases, a rat phorbol ester-induced protein, and the murine growth-responsive protein 16C8. Immunofluorescent staining with rat plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 antibody was induced in the majority of cells in culture after Ang II treatment of astrocytes from 21-day-old rat brains. Absence of this response to Ang II in astrocytes from neonatal rat brain provides evidence that this action of Ang II on astrocytes is developmentally regulated.

Olson, J.A. Jr.; Shiverick, K.T.; Ogilvie, S.; Buhi, W.C.; Raizada, M.K. (Univ. of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville (USA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Changes in brain glucose use and extracellular ions associated with kainic acid-induced seizures: (/sup 14/C)-2-deoxyglucose and intracranial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of kainic acid (KA) on brain glucose use with coadministration of diazepam, and the effect of KA on brain extracellular (K/sup +/), Ca/sup 2 +/), and (Na/sup +/) was investigated in rats by means of (/sup 14/C)-2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) and intracranial microdialysis, respectively. Also, the impact of intracranial microdialysis on brain regional metabolic function was studied. Co-treatment with KA and diazepam attenuated KA-induced 3 hr increases and prevented 48 hr decreases in glucose use within all structures measured, particularly the piriform cortex and amygdala. Hippocampal CA/sub 3/, CA/sub 4/, and CA/sub 1/-ventral were least affected by diazepam. The results suggest that diazepam suppresses KA seizure spread from its focus, proposed to be CA/sub 3/. KA-induced ions changes were studied by intracranial microdialysis. Dialysis fibers were implanted within the hippocampus or piriform cortex and perfused 24 hr later. Samples, collected before and after KA, were analyzed for (K/sup +/), (Ca/sup 2 +/), and (Na/sup +/). KA caused an early and prolonged increase in extracellular (K/sup +/) and a negligible decrease in (Ca/sup 2 +/) within the hippocampus. In the piriform cortex, both (K/sup +/) and (Na/sup +/) increase during a period of early seizure signs. The results indicate that ion homostatic control of ion levels is better maintained during parenteral KA-induced seizures than when the brain is activated locally or during ischemia/hypoxia. The effect of intracranial microdialysis was studied by means of 2-DG in control state and KA-induced seizure state. The results indicate that intracranial microdialysis alters brain metabolic function during KA-induced seizures, but not in the control state. At 3 hr post KA, seizure metabolic activity was enhanced within the piriform cortex, and attenuated within the hippocampus.

Chastain, J.E Jr.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Northern pike bycatch in an inland commercial hoop net fishery: effects of water temperature and net tending frequency on injury, physiology, and survival  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In lakes and rivers of eastern Ontario (Canada) commercial fishers use hoop nets to target a variety of fishes, but incidentally capture non-target (i.e., bycatch) gamefish species such as northern pike (Esox lucius). Little is known about the consequences of bycatch in inland commercial fisheries, making it difficult to identify regulatory options. Regulations that limit fishing during warmer periods and that require frequent net tending have been proposed as possible strategies to reduce bycatch mortality. Using northern pike as a model, we conducted experiments during two thermal periods (mid-April: 14.45 ± 0.32 °C, and late May: 17.17 ± 0.08 °C) where fish were retained in nets for 2 d and 6 d. A ‘0 d’ control group consisted of northern pike that were angled, immediately sampled and released. We evaluated injury, physiological status and mortality after the prescribed net retention period and for the surviving fish used radio telemetry with manual tracking to monitor delayed post-release mortality. Our experiments revealed that injury levels, in-net mortality, and post-release mortality tended to increase with net set duration and at higher temperatures. Pike exhibited signs of chronic stress and starvation following retention, particularly at higher temperatures. Total mortality rates were negligible for the 2 d holding period at 14 °C, 14% for 6 d holding at 14 °C, 21% for 2 d holding at 17 °C, and 58% for 6 d holding at 17 °C. No mortality was observed in control fish. Collectively, these data reveal that frequent net tending, particularly at warmer temperatures, may be useful for conserving gamefish populations captured as bycatch in inland hoop net fisheries.

Colotelo, Alison HA; Raby, Graham D.; Hasler, Caleb T.; Haxton, Tim; Smokorowski, Karen; Blouin-Demers, Gabriel; Cooke, Steven J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

Influence of a Weak Field of Pulsed DC Electricity on the Behavior and Incidence of Injury in Adult Steelhead and Pacific Lamprey, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Predation by pinnipeds, such as California sea lions Zalophus californianus, Pacific harbor seals Phoca vitulina, and Stellar sea lions Eumetopias jubatus on adult Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp in the lower Columbia River has become a serious concern for fishery managers trying to conserve and restore runs of threatened and endangered fish. As a result, Smith-Root, Incorporated (SRI; Vancouver, Washington), manufacturers of electrofishing and closely-related equipment, proposed a project to evaluate the potential of an electrical barrier to deter marine mammals and reduce the amount of predation on adult salmonids (SRI 2007). The objectives of their work were to develop, deploy, and evaluate a passive, integrated sonar and electric barrier that would selectively inhibit the upstream movements of marine mammals and reduce predation, but would not injure pinnipeds or impact anadromous fish migrations. However, before such a device could be deployed in the field, concerns by regional fishery managers about the potential effects of such a device on the migratory behavior of Pacific salmon, steelhead O. mykiss, Pacific lampreys Entoshpenus tridentata, and white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus, needed to be addressed. In this report, we describe the results of laboratory research designed to evaluate the effects of prototype electric barriers on adult steelhead and Pacific lampreys. The effects of electricity on fish have been widely studied and include injury or death (e.g., Sharber and Carothers 1988; Dwyer et al. 2001; Snyder 2003), physiological dysfunction (e.g., Schreck et al. 1976; Mesa and Schreck 1989), and altered behavior (Mesa and Schreck 1989). Much of this work was done to investigate the effects of electrofishing on fish in the wild. Because electrofishing operations would always use more severe electrical settings than those proposed for the pinniped barrier, results from these studies are probably not relevant to the work proposed by SRI. Field electrofishing operations typically use high voltage and amperage settings and a variety of waveforms, pulse widths (PW), and pulse frequencies (PF), depending on conditions and target species. For example, when backpack electrofishing for trout in a small stream, one might use settings such as 500 V pulsed DC, a PW of 1 ms, and a PF of 60 Hz. In contrast, the electrical barrier proposed by SRI will produce electrical conditions significantly lower than those used in electrofishing, particularly for PW and PF (e.g., PW ranging from 300-1,000 {micro}s and PF from 2-3 Hz). Further, voltage gradients (in V/cm) are predicted to be lower in the electric barrier than those produced during typical electrofishing. Although the relatively weak, pulsed DC electric fields to be produced by the barrier may be effective at deterring pinnipeds, little, if anything, is known about the effects of such low intensity electrical fields on fish behavior. For this research, we evaluated the effects of weak, pulsed DC electric currents on the behavior of adult steelhead and Pacific lamprey and the incidence of injury in steelhead only. In a series of laboratory experiments, we: (1) documented the rate of passage of fish over miniature, prototype electric barriers when they were on and off; (2) determined some electric thresholds beyond which fish would not pass over the barrier; and (3) assessed the incidence and severity of injury in steelhead exposed to relatively severe electrical conditions. The results of this study should be useful for making decisions about whether to install electrical barriers in the lower Columbia River, or elsewhere, to reduce predation on upstream migrating salmonids and other fishes by marine pinnipeds.

Mesa, Matthew

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

362

High-resolution single photon planar and spect imaging of brain and neck employing a system of two co-registered opposed gamma imaging heads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact, mobile, dedicated SPECT brain imager that can be easily moved to the patient to provide in-situ imaging, especially when the patient cannot be moved to the Nuclear Medicine imaging center. As a result of the widespread availability of single photon labeled biomarkers, the SPECT brain imager can be used in many locations, including remote locations away from medical centers. The SPECT imager improves the detection of gamma emission from the patient's head and neck area with a large field of view. Two identical lightweight gamma imaging detector heads are mounted to a rotating gantry and precisely mechanically co-registered to each other at 180 degrees. A unique imaging algorithm combines the co-registered images from the detector heads and provides several SPECT tomographic reconstructions of the imaged object thereby improving the diagnostic quality especially in the case of imaging requiring higher spatial resolution and sensitivity at the same time.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

363

High-resolution single photon planar and spect imaging of brain and neck employing a system of two co-registered opposed gamma imaging heads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compact, mobile, dedicated SPECT brain imager that can be easily moved to the patient to provide in-situ imaging, especially when the patient cannot be moved to the Nuclear Medicine imaging center. As a result of the widespread availability of single photon labeled biomarkers, the SPECT brain imager can be used in many locations, including remote locations away from medical centers. The SPECT imager improves the detection of gamma emission from the patient's head and neck area with a large field of view. Two identical lightweight gamma imaging detector heads are mounted to a rotating gantry and precisely mechanically co-registered to each other at 180 degrees. A unique imaging algorithm combines the co-registered images from the detector heads and provides several SPECT tomographic reconstructions of the imaged object thereby improving the diagnostic quality especially in the case of imaging requiring higher spatial resolution and sensitivity at the same time.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

364

Occult Mediastinal Great Vessel Trauma: The Value of Aortography Performed During Angiographic Screening for Blunt Cervical Vascular Trauma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose. To determine the value of aortography in the assessment of occult aortic and great vessel injuries when routinely performed during screening angiography for blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI). Methods. One hundred and one consecutive patients who received both aortography and screening four-vessel angiography over 4 years were identified retrospectively. Angiograms for these patients were evaluated, and the incidence of occult mediastinal vascular injury was determined. Results. Of the 101 patients, 6 (6%) had angiographically documented traumatic aortic injuries. Of these 6 patients, one injury (17%) was unsuspected prior to angiography. Four of the 6 (67%) also had BCVI. One additional patient also had an injury to a branch of the subclavian artery. Conclusion. Routine aortography during screening angiography for BCVI is not warranted due to the low incidence (1%) of occult mediastinal arterial injury. However, in the setting of a BCVI screening study and no CT scan of the chest, aortography may be advantageous.

Ray, Charles E. [Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States)], E-mail: cray@dhha.org; Bauer, Jason R. [University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (United States); Cothren, C. Clay [Denver Health Medical Center, Department of Surgery (United States); Turner, James H. [Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States); Moore, Ernest E. [Denver Health Medical Center, Department of Surgery (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Hippocampal-Sparing Whole-Brain Radiotherapy: A 'How-To' Technique Using Helical Tomotherapy and Linear Accelerator-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Sparing the hippocampus during cranial irradiation poses important technical challenges with respect to contouring and treatment planning. Herein we report our preliminary experience with whole-brain radiotherapy using hippocampal sparing for patients with brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Five anonymous patients previously treated with whole-brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing were reviewed. The hippocampus was contoured, and hippocampal avoidance regions were created using a 5-mm volumetric expansion around the hippocampus. Helical tomotherapy and linear accelerator (LINAC)-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plans were generated for a prescription dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Results: On average, the hippocampal avoidance volume was 3.3 cm{sup 3}, occupying 2.1% of the whole-brain planned target volume. Helical tomotherapy spared the hippocampus, with a median dose of 5.5 Gy and maximum dose of 12.8 Gy. LINAC-based IMRT spared the hippocampus, with a median dose of 7.8 Gy and maximum dose of 15.3 Gy. On a per-fraction basis, mean dose to the hippocampus (normalized to 2-Gy fractions) was reduced by 87% to 0.49 Gy{sub 2} using helical tomotherapy and by 81% to 0.73 Gy{sub 2} using LINAC-based IMRT. Target coverage and homogeneity was acceptable with both IMRT modalities, with differences largely attributed to more rapid dose fall-off with helical tomotherapy. Conclusion: Modern IMRT techniques allow for sparing of the hippocampus with acceptable target coverage and homogeneity. Based on compelling preclinical evidence, a Phase II cooperative group trial has been developed to test the postulated neurocognitive benefit.

Gondi, Vinai [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); Tolakanahalli, Ranjini [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); Mehta, Minesh P. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); Tewatia, Dinesh [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); Rowley, Howard [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); Kuo, John S. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); Khuntia, Deepak [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); Tome, Wolfgang A., E-mail: tome@humonc.wisc.ed [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

7-Tesla Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging to Assess the Effects of Radiotherapy on Normal-Appearing Brain in Patients With Glioma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the intermediate- and long-term imaging manifestations of radiotherapy on normal-appearing brain tissue in patients with treated gliomas using 7T susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Methods and Materials: SWI was performed on 25 patients with stable gliomas on a 7 Tesla magnet. Microbleeds were identified as discrete foci of susceptibility that did not correspond to vessels. The number of microbleeds was counted within and outside of the T2-hyperintense lesion. For 3 patients, radiation dosimetry maps were reconstructed and fused with the 7T SWI data. Results: Multiple foci of susceptibility consistent with microhemorrhages were observed in patients 2 years after chemoradiation. These lesions were not present in patients who were not irradiated. The prevalence of microhemorrhages increased with the time since completion of radiotherapy, and these lesions often extended outside the boundaries of the initial high-dose volume and into the contralateral hemisphere. Conclusions: High-field SWI has potential for visualizing the appearance of microbleeds associated with long-term effects of radiotherapy on brain tissue. The ability to visualize these lesions in normal-appearing brain tissue may be important in further understanding the utility of this treatment in patients with longer survival.

Lupo, Janine M., E-mail: janine.lupo@ucsf.edu [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Chuang, Cynthia F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Chang, Susan M. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Barani, Igor J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Jimenez, Bert; Hess, Christopher P. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nelson, Sarah J. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Motor representations and practice affect brain systems underlying imagery: an fMRI study of internal imagery in novices and active high jumpers. Open Neuroimaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate differences in brain activity between one group of active high jumpers and one group of high jumping novices (controls) when performing motor imagery of a high jump. It was also investigated how internal imagery training affects neural activity. The results showed that active high jumpers primarily activated motor areas, e.g. pre-motor cortex and cerebellum. Novices activated visual areas, e.g. superior occipital cortex. Imagery training resulted in a reduction of activity in parietal cortex. These results indicate that in order to use an internal perspective during motor imagery of a complex skill, one must have well established motor representations of the skill which then translates into a motor/internal pattern of brain activity. If not, an external perspective will be used and the corresponding brain activation will be a visual/external pattern. Moreover, the findings imply that imagery training reduces the activity in parietal cortex suggesting that imagery is performed more automatic and results in a more efficient motor representation more easily accessed during motor performance.

C. -j. Olsson; Bert Jonsson; Anne Larsson; Lars Nyberg

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Research Article Curcumin Decreased Oxidative Stress, Inhibited NF-?B Activation, and Improved Liver Pathology in Ethanol-Induced Liver Injury in Rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To study the mechanism of curcumin-attenuated inflammation and liver pathology in early stage of alcoholic liver disease, female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups and treated with ethanol or curcumin via an intragastric tube for 4 weeks. A control group treated with distilled water, and an ethanol group was treated with ethanol (7.5 g/kg bw). Treatment groups were fed with ethanol supplemented with curcumin (400 or 1 200 mg/kg bw). The liver histopathology in ethanol group revealed mild-tomoderate steatosis and mild necroinflammation. Hepatic MDA, hepatocyte apoptosis, and NF-?B activation increased significantly in ethanol-treated group when compared with control. Curcumin treatments resulted in improving of liver pathology, decreasing the elevation of hepatic MDA, and inhibition of NF-?B activation. The 400 mg/kg bw of curcumin treatment revealed only a trend of decreased hepatocyte apoptosis. However, the results of SOD activity, PPAR? protein expression showed no difference among the groups. In conclusion, curcumin improved liver histopathology in early stage of ethanol-induced liver injury by reduction of oxidative stress and inhibition of NF-?B activation. Copyright © 2009 Suchittra Samuhasaneeto et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. 1.

Suchittra Samuhasaneeto; Duangporn Thong-ngam; Onanong Kulaputana; Doungsamon Suyasunanont; Naruemon Klaikeaw

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

AI Gets a Brain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the 50 years since John McCarthy coined the term artificial intelligence, much progress has been made toward identifying, understanding, and automating many classes of symbolic and computational problems that were once the exclusive domain of human ...

Jeff Barr; Luis Felipe Cabrera

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Movement and Injury Rates for Three Life Stages of Spring Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha : A Comparison of Submerged Orifices and an Overflow Weir for Fish Bypass in a Modular Rotary Drum Fish Screen : Annual Report 1995.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated the effectiveness of 6-in. and 2-in. submerged orifices, and an overflow weir for fish bypass at a rotary drum fish screening facility. A modular drum screen built by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) was installed at PNNL`s Aquatic Ecology research laboratory in Richland, Washington. Fry, subyearlings, and smolts of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawyacha) were introduced into the test system, and their movement and injury rates were monitored. A total of 33 tests (100 fish per test) that lasted from 24 to 48 hr were completed from 1994 through 1995. Passage rate depended on both fish size and bypass configuration. For fry/fingerling spring chinook salmon, there was no difference in passage rate through the three bypass configurations (2-in. orifice, 6-in. orifice, or overflow weir). Subyearlings moved sooner when the 6-in. orifice was used, with more than 50% exiting through the fish bypass in the first 8 hr. Smolts exited quickly and preferred the 6-in. orifice, with over 90% of the smolts exiting through the bypass in less than 2 hr. Passage was slightly slower when a weir was used, with 90% of the smolts exiting in about 4 hr. When the 2-in. orifice was used in the bypass, 90% of the smolts did not exit until after 8 hr. In addition, about 7% of the smolts failed to migrate from the forebay within 24 hr, indicating that smolts were significantly delayed when the 2-in. orifice was used. Few significant injuries were detected for any of the life stages. However, light descaling occurred on about 15% of chinook salmon smolts passing through the 2-in. orifice. Although a single passage through the orifice did not appear to cause significant scale loss or other damage, passing through several screening facilities with 2-in. orifices could cause cumulative injuries.

Abernethy, C. Scott; Neitzel, Duane A.; Mavros, William V.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Catechol estrogen formation and metabolism in brain tissue: comparison of tritium release from different positions in ring A of the steroid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catechol estrogens labeled with /sup 3/H at different positions in rings A and B of the steroid were synthesized by chemical or enzymatic methods, and their oxidative transformation by male rat brain microsomes was followed by the transfer of /sup 3/H into /sup 3/H/sub 2/O. This reaction was shown to occur more readily with the catechol estrogens than with the parent steroid and was also influenced by the position of the radiolabel. Tritium was displaced less readily from C-1 than from C-2 or C-4 of the aromatic ring. Spermine, which is known to increase cytochrome P-450-mediated hydroxylation reactions, had no effect on the release of /sup 3/H from ring A of either estradiol or 2-hydroxyestradiol with rat brain microsomes in contrast to liver. Glutathione and other thiols were able to cause a rapid loss of /sup 3/H from labeled catechol estrogens, even in the absence of tissue, but in double label experiments with (4-/sup 3/H)- and (4-/sup 14/C)2-hydroxyestradiol, the isotope ratio in the recovered catechol estrogen was unchanged. The results illustrate some of the problems in determining accurately the metabolism of estrogens by measuring /sup 3/H/sub 2/O formation when aromatic hydroxylation is involved and also highlight the possible interaction of the catechol estrogens with cellular nucleophiles such as glutathione.

Jellinck, P.H.; Hahn, E.F.; Norton, B.I.; Fishman, J.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Combat-related blast injuries : injury types and outcomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was categorized as return to duty (RTD), light duty/sick inMTF (31.1%) followed by RTD (27.2%) and LD/SIQ (25.2%) (to the MTF was higher than RTD and LD/SIQ which were not

Eskridge, Susan Lindsay

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Quality of Life in Patients With Brain Metastases Using the EORTC QLQ-BN20+2 and QLQ-C15-PAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The 20-item European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Brain Neoplasm (QLQ-BN20) is a validated quality-of-life (QOL) questionnaire for patients with primary brain tumors. The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15 Palliative (QLQ-C15-PAL) core palliative questionnaire is a 15-item version of the core 30-item QLQ-C30 and was developed to decrease the burden on patients with advanced cancer. The combination of the QLQ-BN20 and QLQ-C30 to assess QOL may be too burdensome for patients. The primary aim of this study was to assess QOL in patients before and after treatment for brain metastases using the QLQ-BN20+2 and QLQ-C15-PAL, a version of the QLQ-BN20 questionnaire with 2 additional questions assessing cognitive functioning that were not addressed in the QLQ-C15-PAL. Methods and Materials: Patients with brain metastases completed the QLQ-C15-PAL and QLQ-BN20+2 questionnaires to assess QOL before and 1 month after radiation. Linear regression analysis was used to assess changes in QOL scores over time, as well as to explore associations between the QLQ-BN20+2 and QLQ-C15-PAL scales, patient demographics, and clinical variables. Spearman correlation assessed associations between the QLQ-BN20+2 and QLQ-C15-PAL scales. Results: Among 108 patients, the majority (55%) received whole-brain radiotherapy only, with 65% of patients completing follow-up at 1 month after treatment. The most prominent symptoms at baseline were future uncertainty (QLQ-BN20+2) and fatigue (QLQ-C15-PAL). After treatment, significant improvement was seen for the QLQ-C15-PAL insomnia scale, as well as the QLQ-BN20+2 scales of future uncertainty, visual disorder, and concentration difficulty. Baseline Karnofsky Performance Status was negatively correlated to QLQ-BN20+2 motor dysfunction but positively related to QLQ-C15-PAL physical functioning and QLQ-BN20+2 cognitive functioning at baseline and follow-up. QLQ-BN20+2 scales of future uncertainty and motor dysfunction correlated with the most QLQ-C15-PAL scales, including overall QOL (negative association) at baseline and follow-up. Conclusion: After radiation, the questionnaires showed maintenance of QOL and improvement of QOL scores such as future uncertainty, which featured prominently in this patient population. It is proposed that the 37-item QLQ-BN20+2 and QLQ-C15-PAL, as opposed to the 50-item QLQ-BN20 and QLQ-C30, may be used together as a universal QOL assessment tool in this setting.

Caissie, Amanda; Nguyen, Janet; Chen, Emily; Zhang Liying [Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun [Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Clemons, Mark [Department of Medical Oncology, Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Kerba, Marc [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Arnalot, Palmira Foro [Parc de Salut Mar Hospital de l'Esperanca, Barcelona (Spain); Danjoux, Cyril; Tsao, May; Barnes, Elizabeth; Holden, Lori [Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Danielson, Brita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Chow, Edward, E-mail: edward.chow@sunnybrook.ca [Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Ionizing Radiation Injury (South Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation applies to employers that have more than one employee who engages in activities which involve the presence of ionizing radiation. Employers with less than three employees can...

375

Perfusion-based High-Resolution Functional Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla J. Pfeuffer, G. Adriany, A. Shmuel, E. Yacoub, P.-F. van de Moortele, X. Hu, K. Ugurbil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perfusion-based High-Resolution Functional Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla J. Pfeuffer, G was made possible by signal-to-noise gains at the high magnetic field of 7 Tesla and by using a novel RF

376

Functional expression of the heteromeric “olfactory” cyclic nucleotide-gated channel in the hippocampus: a potential effector of synaptic plasticity in brain neurons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cyclic nucleotide-gated (cng) channels are important components of signaling systems mediating sensory transduction. In vertebrate photoreceptors, light activates a signaling cascade that causes a decrease in intracellular cGMP concentrations, closing retinal cng channels. Signal transduction in olfactory receptor neurons is believed to proceed via G-proteinmediated elevation of intracellular cAMP in response to odorant binding by 7-helix receptors. cAMP opens the olfactory cng channel, which is highly permeable to Ca 2 ?. Here we demonstrate by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry with subunit-specific antibodies that both subunits of the heteromeric rat olfactory cng channel are also widely expressed in the brain. Expression of the retinal rod cng channel, however, can be detected only in the eye. In the adult hippocampus, the olfactory cng channel is expressed on cell bodies and processes

Jonathan Bradley; A Yinong Zhang; A Robert Bakin; Henry A. Lester; Gabriele V. Ronnett; Kai Zinn

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Does brain activity stem from high-dimensional chaotic dynamics? Evidence from the human electroencephalogram, cat cerebral cortex and artificial neuronal networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonlinear time series analyses have suggested that the human electroencephalogram (EEG) may share statistical and dynamical properties with chaotic systems. During slow-wave sleep or pathological states like epilepsy, correlation dimension measurements display low values, while in awake and attentive subjects, there is not such low dimensionality, and the EEG is more similar to a stochastic variable. We briefly review these results and contrast them with recordings in cat cerebral cortex, as well as with theoretical models. In awake or sleeping cats, recordings with microelectrodes inserted in cortex show that global variables such as local field potentials (local EEG) are similar to the human EEG. However, in both cases, neuronal discharges are highly irregular and exponentially distributed, similar to Poisson stochastic processes. To attempt reconcile these results, we investigate models of randomly-connected networks of integrate-and-fire neurons, and also contrast global (averaged) variables, with neuronal activity. The network displays different states, such as "synchronous regular" (SR) or "asynchronous irregular" (AI) states. In SR states, the global variables display coherent behavior with low dimensionality, while in AI states, the global activity is high-dimensionally chaotic with exponentially distributed neuronal discharges, similar to awake cats. Scale-dependent Lyapunov exponents and epsilon-entropies show that the seemingly stochastic nature at small scales (neurons) can coexist with more coherent behavior at larger scales (averages). Thus, we suggest that brain activity obeys similar scheme, with seemingly stochastic dynamics at small scales (neurons), while large scales (EEG) display more coherent behavior or high-dimensional chaos.

Sami El Boustani; Alain Destexhe

2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

378

Type A Accident Investigation Board report on the January 17, 1996, electrical accident with injury in Technical Area 21 Tritium Science and Fabrication Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An electrical accident was investigated in which a crafts person received serious injuries as a result of coming into contact with a 13.2 kilovolt (kV) electrical cable in the basement of Building 209 in Technical Area 21 (TA-21-209) in the Tritium Science and Fabrication Facility (TSFF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In conducting its investigation, the Accident Investigation Board used various analytical techniques, including events and causal factor analysis, barrier analysis, change analysis, fault tree analysis, materials analysis, and root cause analysis. The board inspected the accident site, reviewed events surrounding the accident, conducted extensive interviews and document reviews, and performed causation analyses to determine the factors that contributed to the accident, including any management system deficiencies. Relevant management systems and factors that could have contributed to the accident were evaluated in accordance with the guiding principles of safety management identified by the Secretary of Energy in an October 1994 letter to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board and subsequently to Congress.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Category Learning in the Brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to group items and events into functional categories is a fundamental characteristic of sophisticated thought. It is subserved by plasticity in many neural systems, including neocortical regions (sensory, ...

Miller, Earl K.

380

Catestatin in heart and brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

secretory granules of rat heart.  J Histochem Cytochem 38:of  chromogranin A in human heart: a new regulatory peptide cardiac  function.  Eur Heart J 28:1117?1127.   Kim, T. , 

Curello, Erica L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

How does the brain work?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conceptually though it's a widget to get folks from where they live to where they work, and it works by figuring out the paths they take, assigning trains to those routes,...

382

Positron Scanner for Brain Tumors  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

It was thought that if a multi-detector device could be developed, the scanning time would be greatly shortened, with such consequent advantages as being able to work with lower dose of radiation, to obtain serial determinations, and to work with shorter-lived isotopes.

Robertson, J. S.; Bozzo, S. R.

1964-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

383

CT appearance of radiation injury of the lung and clinical symptoms after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancers: Are patients with pulmonary emphysema also candidates for SBRT for lung cancers?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze the computed tomographic (CT) appearance of radiation injury to the lung and clinical symptoms after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and evaluate the difference by the presence of pulmonary emphysema (PE) for small lung cancers. Methods and Materials: In this analysis, 45 patients with 52 primary or metastatic lung cancers were enrolled. We evaluated the CT appearance of acute radiation pneumonitis (within 6 months) and radiation fibrosis (after 6 months) after SBRT. Clinical symptoms were evaluated by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. We also evaluated the relationship between CT appearance, clinical symptoms, and PE. Results: CT appearance of acute radiation pneumonitis was classified as follows: (1) diffuse consolidation, 38.5%; (2) patchy consolidation and ground-glass opacities (GGO), 15.4%; (3) diffuse GGO, 11.5%; (4) patchy GGO, 2.0%; (5) no evidence of increasing density, 32.6%. CT appearance of radiation fibrosis was classified as follows: (1) modified conventional pattern, 61.5%; (2) mass-like pattern, 17.3%; (3) scar-like pattern, 21.2%. Patients who were diagnosed with more than Grade 2 pneumonitis showed significantly less no evidence of increased density pattern and scar-like pattern than any other pattern (p = 0.0314, 0.0297, respectively). Significantly, most of these patients with no evidence of increased density pattern and scar-like pattern had PE (p = 0.00038, 0.00044, respectively). Conclusion: Computed tomographic appearance after SBRT was classified into five patterns of acute radiation pneumonitis and three patterns of radiation fibrosis. Our results suggest that SBRT can be also safely performed even in patients with PE.

Kimura, Tomoki [Department of Radiology, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima (Japan) and Department of Radiology, Kagawa University, School of Medicine, Kagawa (Japan)]. E-mail: tkkimura@med.kawawa-u.ac.jp; Matsuura, Kanji [Department of Radiology, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima (Japan); Murakami, Yuji [Department of Radiology, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima (Japan); Hashimoto, Yasutoshi [Department of Radiology, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima (Japan); Kenjo, Masahiro [Department of Radiology, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima (Japan); Kaneyasu, Yuko [Department of Radiology, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima (Japan); Wadasaki, Koichi [Department of Radiology, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima (Japan); Hirokawa, Yutaka [Hiroshima Heiwa Clinic, Hiroshima (Japan); Ito, Katsuhide [Department of Radiology, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima (Japan); Okawa, Motoomi [Department of Radiology, Kagawa University, School of Medicine, Kagawa (Japan)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

workers at participating sites across the DOE complex. Manages and conducts epidemiologic investigations to assess the health implications of exposures to hazardous materials for...

385

CAIRS Injury and Illness Reporting Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

provides centralized collection of these individual accident reports, allows users to query the individual accident report fields directly to create custom reports, generate...

386

Injury / Incident Report INSTRUCTIONS ON REVERSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRAINING 4 UNSAFE EQUIPMENT / POOR DESIGN 5 INSUFFICIENT CARE 6 IMPROPER POSITION OR POSTURE 7 FAILURE ORDER JOB SAFETY ANALYSIS DONE 4 IMPROVED PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT 5 EQUIPMENT REPAIR TO BE USED FOR COMPLETION OF WSIB CLAIM FORM #7 WHITE COPY - Department Chair, Manager or Director YELLOW

Hitchcock, Adam P.

387

Traumatic Stress, Systemic Oppression, and Resilience in Post-Katrina New Orleans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Culturally competent disaster response outcomes. Journal offor effective disaster response interventions withpress). A model for disaster response is needed that ensures

Goodman, Rachael D.; West-Olatunji, Cirecie A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

POST-TRAUMATIC DEGENERATION AND REGENERATION OF SYNAPSES IN THE ACTION OF IONIZING RADIATION  

SciTech Connect

A study was made of degeneration and regeneration of synapses in the upper cervical ganglion and section of the sympathetic trunk on the neck of cats after total single x ray irradiation in a dose of 30, 100, or 500 r. There was an acceleration of these processes after the action of low doses, and delay after the action of high doses. The synapses first restored undergo considerable structural changes with the lapse of time and become small and delicate. The scar at the site of nerve section considerably diminishes in size after the high doses of x-ray irradiation. (auth)

Babmindra, V.P.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Traumatic Inferior Gluteal Artery Aneurysm Managed with Emergency Transcatheter Thrombin Injection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pseudoaneurysms of the inferior gluteal artery (IGA) are rare and are often caused by trauma. Treatment options vary and include surgery, ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection, and endovascular procedures such as stent-graft placement, coil embolization, and glue injection. We report a 70-year-old male who presented to the hospital after a road accident with a posttraumatic pseudoaneurysm that was treated by endovascular thrombin embolization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of inferior gluteal artery false aneurysm treated by this method.

Juszkat, Robert, E-mail: radiologiamim@wp.p [Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology (Poland); Zielinski, Maciej [Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Department of General and Vascular Surgery (Poland); Wykretowicz, Mateusz; Piekarek, Alina [Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology (Poland); Majewski, Waclaw [Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Department of General and Vascular Surgery (Poland)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Neurobiologically-motivated treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder in an animal model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis demonstrates that chronic immobilization stress administered to rats enhances fear learning and increases plasma acylated ghrelin. This effect is independent of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis ...

Meyer, Retsina Michele

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Brain Energy Metabolism During Experimental Neonatal Seizures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

results from the release of catechol- amines by seizures [8]serum levels of dopa, catechols, and monoamine metabolites

Wasterlain, Claude G.; Thompson, Kerry W.; Suchomelova, Lucie; Niquet, Jerome

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Words and rules in the brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Words-and-Rules theory (WR) posits that different mental processes underlie regular and irregular past tense formation: regular forms are rule-generated ('add -ed'), whereas irregular forms are retrieved from memory. ...

Rhee, Jaemin, 1972-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Cliff Joslyn on the Global Brain  

SciTech Connect

This is an interview I did with Ben Goertzel, an old friend and editor of the H+ electronic journal on technological, scientific, and cultural trends that are changing human beings. It's published by Humanity+, the world’s leading nonprofit for the ethical use of technology to extend human capabilities. It concerns some of my work in cybernetic technology and knowledge systems from the early 1990's, with some implications for my current work.

Joslyn, Cliff A.; Goertzel, Ben

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

394

Cliff Joslyn on the Global Brain  

SciTech Connect

This is an interview I did with Ben Goertzel, an old friend and editor of the H+ electronic journal on technological, scientific, and cultural trends that are changing human beings. It's published by Humanity+, the world’s leading nonprofit for the ethical use of technology to extend human capabilities. It concerns some of my work in cybernetic technology and knowledge systems from the early 1990's, with some implications for my current work.

Joslyn, Cliff A.

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

395

6.20 Mapping Human Brain Function  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M. Reivich, Kuhl, D., Wolf, A.P., Greenberg, J., Phelps, M., Ido, T., Casella, V., Fowler, J., Hoffman, E., Alavi, A., Som, P., and L. Sokoloff, "The (18F) Fluorodeoxyglucose...

396

Structural brain variation, age, and response time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

faster RTs in the senior group (BAs 19, 37, 46, 9, 8, 6, 13,Brodmann areas, especially in BAs 46, 9, and other parts ofparahippocampus, and BAs 46/9 have all been reported to be

Haier, Richard J; Jung, Rex E; Yeo, Ronald A; Head, Kevin; Alkire, Michael T

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Guest Editorial Brain inspired cognitive systems (BICS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

644O2(,mm *Aooony.a.U-. XG>*a*_ 'ur ,an* m' FOR FREE-PISTON STIRLING ENGINE DRIVEN HEAT PUMPS* . pb, as shown in Fig. 1. Stirling engine (FPSE) driven heat pump will tend either to stall or to overstroke (ORNL) has sponsored research to develop Stirling engine driven heat pumps for residential applications

Chrisley, Ron

398

Building the Valency Lexicon of Arabic Verbs Viktor Bielicky Otakar Smrz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a high incidence of road traffic accidents, which result in a large number of brain injuries." She points Damascus to Mecca. "Hester was a remarkable woman, ahead of her time," says Seidler. "She ran Pitt (WCMC-Q) examined the impact of speed cameras on motor vehicle accidents and found a dramatic decrease

Cerveny, Vlastislav

399

The Brazen NoseVolume 45 The Brazen Nose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a high incidence of road traffic accidents, which result in a large number of brain injuries." She points Damascus to Mecca. "Hester was a remarkable woman, ahead of her time," says Seidler. "She ran Pitt (WCMC-Q) examined the impact of speed cameras on motor vehicle accidents and found a dramatic decrease

Oxford, University of

400

A Note on Brain Actuated Spelling with the Berlin Brain-Computer Interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blankertz,B. Krauledat,M. Dornhege,G. Williamson,J. Murray-Smith,R. MĂĽller,K-R. Universal Access in Human-Computer Interaction. Ambient Interaction, Volume 4555/2007, DOI: 10.1007/978-3-540-73281-5_83 pp 759-768 Springer Verlag

Blankertz, B.; Krauledat, M.; Dornhege, G.; Williamson, J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Molecular Brain BioMed Central Editorial Welcome to Molecular Brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

© 2008 Mei et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

Lin Mei; Kei Cho; C Justin Lee; Xiao-jiang Li; Min Zhuo; Kiun Kaang; Min Zhuo; Bong-kiun Kaang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

ORISE: Illness and Injury Surveillance, Radiation Exposure, and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surveillance Data, December 2012 (PDF) Technical Report: Health Surveillance of Rocky Flats Radiation Workers, April 2006 (PDF) Technical Basis Document for the Neutron Dose...

403

Safety Bulletin 2006-06: Preventing Eye Injuries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

If you are working with chemicals, you should wear goggles. If you are working near welding, lasers, ultraviolet light, or fiber optics, you must use special-purpose safety...

404

Normal Tissue Injury Responses in Mammary Glands After Low Doses...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

we take advantage of the variation in sensitivity to radiation induced mammary gland cancer in three genetically defined inbred strains of mice (BALBc: sensitive; C57BL6...

405

Occupational Injury and Illness Recordkeeping Questions and Answers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Logo Department of Energy Seal Left Tab SEARCH Right Tab TOOLS Right Tab Left Tab HOME Right Tab Left Tab ABOUT US Right Tab Left Tab...

406

Oxidative Stress Mediates Radiation Lung Injury by Inducing Apoptosis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Apoptosis in irradiated normal lung tissue has been observed several weeks after radiation. However, the signaling pathway propagating cell death after radiation remains unknown. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6J mice were irradiated with 15 Gy to the whole thorax. Pro-apoptotic signaling was evaluated 6 weeks after radiation with or without administration of AEOL10150, a potent catalytic scavenger of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Results: Apoptosis was observed primarily in type I and type II pneumocytes and endothelium. Apoptosis correlated with increased PTEN expression, inhibition of downstream PI3K/AKT signaling, and increased p53 and Bax protein levels. Transforming growth factor-{beta}1, Nox4, and oxidative stress were also increased 6 weeks after radiation. Therapeutic administration of AEOL10150 suppressed pro-apoptotic signaling and dramatically reduced the number of apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Increased PTEN signaling after radiation results in apoptosis of lung parenchymal cells. We hypothesize that upregulation of PTEN is influenced by Nox4-derived oxidative stress. To our knowledge, this is the first study to highlight the role of PTEN in radiation-induced pulmonary toxicity.

Zhang Yu; Zhang Xiuwu; Rabbani, Zahid N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Jackson, Isabel L. [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Vujaskovic, Zeljko, E-mail: vujas@radonc.duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

NIF Warehouse Group celebrates 15 injury-free years | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

every component that has gone into the construction of NIF, installation of the laser systems and the conduct of the National Ignition Campaign. A celebration was held on...

408

Need for Injury Prevention Education In Medical School Curriculum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

control and prevention curriculums in undergraduate medicalin Medical School Curriculum Isaac Yoshii, MD* Rockaneducation into existing curriculum. Key resources are

Yoshii, Isaac; Sayegh, Rockan; Lotfipour, Shahram; Vaca, Federico E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Pantex celebrates three million hours without a lost time injury...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

all of our activities at Pantex," he said. The hard work of the members of the division led to Pantex being named the High Explosives Center of Excellence for High Explosives...

410

Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs - Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

School of Public Health, and received a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Hygiene and Public Health. Dr. Richter has vast experience in conducting...

411

Future directions in therapy of whole body radiation injury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clinicians have long known that marked granulocytopenia predisposed patients to bacterial infections either from pathogens or commensal organisms with which an individual usually lives in harmony. Evidence that infection was of major importance derives from several observations: (a) clinical observations of bacterial infection in human beings exposed to atomic bomb radiation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, in reactor accidents, and in large animals dying from radiation exposure, (b) correlative studies on mortality rate, time of death, and incidence of positive culture in animals, (c) challenge of irradiated animals with normally non-virulent organisms, (d) studies of germ free mice and rats, and (e) studies of the effectiveness of antibiotics in reducing mortality rate. General knowledge and sound experimental data on animals and man clearly demonstrated that the sequelae of pancytopenia (bacterial infection, thrombopenic hemorrhage, and anemia) are the lethal factors. A lot of research was required to demonstrate that there were no mysterious radiations toxins, that hyperheparinemia was not a cause of radiation hemorrhage and that radiation hemorrhage could be prevented by fresh platelet transfusions.

Cronkite, E.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Traffic Injury Research FoundationTable of Contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The editors wish to acknowledge the contributions of all speakers and participants at the Annecy workshop, and particularly those who moderated sessions: Charles Mercier-Guyon, Hans Laurell, and Rob Foss.- i-

Annecy France; Robyn D. Robertson; Ward G. M. Vanlaar; Douglas J. Beirness; Sponsors Acknowledgements; Tom Bjerver; Robert Voas; Richard Roth; Paul Marques

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Cooperative brains: psychological constraints on the evolution of altruism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

self-defense, illuminating or luring prey, camouflage, and attracting mates. For example, the vampire called oxyluciferin, and energy. The energy takes the form of photons, units of light. Some. Understanding Light is a kind of energy (electromagnetic radiation) that travels in waves. These waves range

Stevens, Jeffrey

414

Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Brain Activation during Human Male Ejaculation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structures, including shale. Recent improvements with hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," a controversial

Cooper, Robin L.

415

Dynamics of volume transmission in the brain. Focus on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

rior commissure, medial part; LSS lateral stripe of the striatum; VEn ventral endopiriform nucleus; VP ventral pallidum. Scale bar 200 ?m. Dynamics of volume ...

416

9.14 Brain Structure and its Origins, Spring 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This course covers major CNS structures with emphasis on systems being used as models for experimental studies of development and plasticity. Topics include basic patterns of connections in CNS, embryogenesis, PNS anatomy ...

Schneider, Gerald

417

Mechanical Response of Brain Tissue Surrogate Material under ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study is to investigate the dynamic response of ... of Ti-6Al-4V for Medical Applications after Surface Modification by Anodization.

418

Selective Color Constancy Deficits after Circumscribed Unilateral Brain Lesions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Doris I. Braun,2 Karl R. Gegenfurtner,3 Dirk Petersen,4 Paul Scho¨ nle,5 and Lindsay T. Sharpe1 1. Spatial attention As a test of neglect, patients were tested in a visual search task using the shape but was recorded. The occurrence of errors (wrong symbol markings) and misses as well as the search strategy were

419

A Glucose Fuel Cell for Implantable Brain–Machine Interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed an implantable fuel cell that generates power through glucose oxidation, producing 3:4 mW cm{2steady-state power and up to 180 mW cm{2 peak power. The fuel cell is manufactured using a novel approach, ...

Rapoport, Benjamin I.

420

Use of fish brain acetylcholinesterase to monitor pollution by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

of exposed fish. He suggested that this technique be used to monitor pollution in natural waters (4,5). Recovery to normal ipresent address: U. S. Army Corp of ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

(A clinical trial of neutron capture therapy for brain tumors)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes progress made in refining of neutron-induced alpha tract autoradiography, in designing epithermal neutron bean at MITR-II and in planning treatment dosimetry using Monte Carlo techniques.

Zamenhof, R.G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Acetylcholine, brain activation, and processing of temporal stimuli  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

one thalamic cell, a rate increase from this cell could makeinputs is big enough a rate increase will not have much ofobserved that as the rate increases the Spike Count Series

Minces, Victor

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

ROBERT A. JACOBS Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bulletin and Review, Science, Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Vision Research JOURNAL ARTICLES Jacobs, R. A connectionist architecture: The what and where vision tasks. Cognitive Science, 15, 219- 250. Jacobs, R. A. Cognitive Science, 18, 361-386. Jordan, M. I. & Jacobs, R. A. (1994). Hierarchical mixtures of experts

Jacobs, Robert A.

424

Physostigmine results in an increased decrement in brain glucose ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

and quantitated using the transmission scan (acquired before FDG injection using three rotating ... thomeatal line. The placebo and physostigmine PET scans

425

NDN, volume transmission, and self-organization in brain dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NDN, VOLUME TRANSMISSION, AND SELF- ORGANIZATION IN BRAINThese systems instantiate volume transmission bynonsynaptic diffusion transmission, in concert with the

Freeman, Walter J III

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Low Dose Radiation Stimulates Antioxidant Capacity in the Brain...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mu , C-M Charlie Ma , Lili Chen , Darrell Q. Brown , Sam Litwin , and Alfred G. Knudson Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA Brian J. Augelli , S. Ausim Azizi , and Barbara...

427

Distinct processing of objects and faces in the infant brain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous work has shown that gamma-band electroencephalogram oscillations recorded over the posterior cortex of infants play a role in maintaining object representations during occlusion. Although it is not yet known what kind of representations are ...

Victoria Southgate; Gergely Csibra; Jordy Kaufman; Mark H. Johnson

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Neuronal Synchronization and Selective Color Processing in the Human Brain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present study, subjects selectively attended to the color of checkerboards in a feature-based attention paradigm. Induced gamma band responses (GBRs), the induced alpha band, and the event-related potential (ERP) were analyzed to uncover neuronal ...

Matthias M. Müller; Andreas Keil

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Technical Note Real-time functional brain mapping using electrocorticography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al., 1994; Keles et al., 2004). In contrast, methods that read endogenous signals, such as somato) 504­507 #12;the 80­200 Hz band (Grenier et al., 2001). This real-time mapping technique should. J. Neurophysiol. 94, 4269­4280. Grenier, F., Timofeev, I., Steriade, M., 2001. Focal synchronization

Rao, Rajesh

430

Blood vessel simulation probes secrets of brain | Argonne National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

can be treated. Argonne's Blue GeneP supercomputer, housed at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), allows scientists to tackle these immense problems with the power...

431

Genetic strategies for elucidating neural circuit function in the brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

led to a reduction in cell number in the olfactory epithelium as well as a disorganization of olfactory bulb

Tan, Elaine May

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Suppression of MMP-9 by doxycycline in brain arteriovenous malformations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reduction of total MMP-9 by doxycycline at 10 and 100 !g/ml (con- trol vs doxycycline 10 ! g/ml: 100 ±control, P doxycycline 100 ! g/ml: 100 ± 6

Hashimoto, Tomoki; Matsumoto, Melissa M; Li, Jenny F; Lawton, Michael T; Young, William L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Suppression of MMP-9 by doxycycline in brain arteriovenous malformations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reduction of total MMP-9 by doxycycline at 10 and 100 !g/ml (con- trol vs doxycycline 10 ! g/ml: 100 ±control, P doxycycline 100 ! g/ml: 100 ± 6

Hashimoto, Tomoki; Matsumoto, Melissa M; Li, Jenny F; Lawton, Michael T; Young, William L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Dimensional analysis of nonlinear oscillations in brain, heart and muscle  

SciTech Connect

We present some numerical studies on the dimensional analysis of temporal oscillations measured in the human electroencephalogram (EEG), heart rates (HR), and muscle tremor. We show that it is sufficient to characterize the individual system by a single dimension value alone. We give some detailed numerical analysis of the scaling structure of the attractors reconstructed from the time signal. Our methods are based on the concept of local gauge functions that we derive from the raw signals as well as from the transformed signal obtained from singular value decomposition. We were able to confirm and improve earlier results on the change of dimensionality of EEG signals. For heart rates and muscle tremor we observe significant changes in the dimensionality depending on the state of the system. We indicate which factors enter dimension estimates and where specific problems lie in each of the examples. 51 refs., 27 figs.

Mayer-Kress, G.; Yates, F.E.; Benton, L.; Keidel, M.; Tirsch, W.; Poeppl, S.J.; Geist, K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

ROBERT A. JACOBS Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Science, Trends in Cogni- tive Sciences, Vision Research ARTICLES Jacobs, R. A. (1988). Increased rates: The what and where vision tasks. Cognitive Science, 15, 219­250. Jacobs, R. A., Jordan, M. I., Nowlan, S. J version of the article with the same title published in Cognitive Science, 15, 219­250 (1991).] Jacobs, R

DeAngelis, Gregory

436

A Quasi-linear Viscoelastic Constitutive Equation for the Brain ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 25, 2006 ... Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006. Abstract ...... more, by imposing continuity of the elastic response and the relaxation function at.

437

NREL: News Feature - NREL Adds Eyes, Brains to Occupancy Detection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

level (sedentary or active), and it communicates this information with building automation systems via standard protocols. Credit: Dennis Schroeder It's a gnawing frustration...

438

Peculiarities of Brain's Blood Flow : Role of Carbon Dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among the major factors controlling the cerebral blood flow (CBF), the effect of PaCO2 is peculiar in that it violates autoregulatory CBF mechanisms and allows to explore the full range of the CBF. This research resulted in a simple physical model, with a four parameter formula, relating the CBF to PaCO2. The parameters can be extracted in an easy manner, directly from the experimental data. With this model earlier experimental data sets of Rhesus monkeys and rats were well fitted. Human data were also fitted with this model. Exact formulae were found, which can be used to transform the fits of one animal to the fits of another one. The merit of this transformation is that it enable us the use of rats data as monkeys data simply by rescaling the PaCO2 values and the CBF data. This transformation makes possible the use of experimental animal data instead of human ones.

Gersten, Alexander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Osmotic Blood-Brain Barrier Modification: Clinical Documentation by Enhanced CT Scanning and/or Radionuclide Brain Scanning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article appears in the July/August 1983 Issue of the AJNR and the October 1983 issue of the AJR. Received September 8, 1 982; accepted after revision January 1 9, 1983. This work was supported by the veterans Administration,

Edward A; H. David Specht; John Howieson; James E. Haines; Michael J. Bennett; Suellen A. Hill; Eugene P. Frenkel; Medical Foundation-kinslen; Williamson Brown

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

An Isolated Winter Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Flash Causing Damage and Injury in Connecticut  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An isolated lightning flash at 1436:52 UTC 11 February 1996 struck and destroyed a house in Burlington, Connecticut, injuring an occupant of the house. A flash detected simultaneously by the National Lightning Detection Network was within 1.1 km ...

Ronald L. Holle; Raúl E. López; Kenneth W. Howard; Kenneth L. Cummins; Mark D. Malone; E. Philip Krider

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

How ORISE is Making a Difference: DOE Illness and Injury Surveillance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sites' workforce health. Reports enable trends assessment by worker group, age group, gender and health event. ORISE conducts follow-ups with SOMDs regarding health events...

442

Internet Self-Injury Forums as Communities of Social-Cognitive Literacy Practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

search engines (google.com, yahoo.com, and bing.com), usingthe button (or accept google.com as the default); when the

Brett, Jeremy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Mitigation of Late Renal and Pulmonary Injury After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To update the results of a clinical trial that assessed whether the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril was effective in mitigating chronic renal failure and pulmonary-related mortality in subjects undergoing total body irradiation (TBI) in preparation for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Methods and Materials: Updated records of the 55 subjects who were enrolled in this randomized controlled trial were analyzed. Twenty-eight patients received captopril, and 27 patients received placebo. Definitions of TBI-HSCT-related chronic renal failure (and relapse) were the same as those in the 2007 analysis. Pulmonary-related mortality was based on clinical or autopsy findings of pulmonary failure or infection as the primary cause of death. Follow-up data for overall and pulmonary-related mortality were supplemented by use of the National Death Index. Results: The risk of TBI-HSCT-related chronic renal failure was lower in the captopril group (11% at 4 years) than in the placebo group (17% at 4 years), but this was not statistically significant (p > 0.2). Analysis of mortality was greatly extended by use of the National Death Index, and no patients were lost to follow-up for reasons other than death prior to 67 months. Patient survival was higher in the captopril group than in the placebo group, but this was not statistically significant (p > 0.2). The improvement in survival was influenced more by a decrease in pulmonary mortality (11% risk at 4 years in the captopril group vs. 26% in the placebo group, p = 0.15) than by a decrease in chronic renal failure. There was no adverse effect on relapse risk (p = 0.4). Conclusions: Captopril therapy produces no detectable adverse effects when given after TBI. Captopril therapy reduces overall and pulmonary-related mortality after radiation-based HSCT, and there is a trend toward mitigation of chronic renal failure.

Cohen, Eric P., E-mail: Eric.Cohen2@va.gov [Department of Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Bedi, Manpreet; Irving, Amy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Jacobs, Elizabeth; Tomic, Rade [Department of Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Klein, John [Department of Biostatistics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Lawton, Colleen A.; Moulder, John E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Internet Self-Injury Forums as Communities of Social-Cognitive Literacy Practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K. Y. A. (2004). The Internet and social life. Annual ReviewThe Oxford handbook of Internet psychology (pp. 223-236).Sage. Ess, C. (2007). Internet research ethics. In A. N.

Brett, Jeremy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Xenotransplantation of mitochondrial electron transfer enzyme, Ndi1, treats myocardial reperfusion injury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of cytosolic NADH. J Bio Chem. 273(38):24529-34. 69. Bai Y,1-mediated response. J Bio Chem. 265: 13809- 18. He H, LiMitochondrial Complex I. J Bio Chem. 51. Gavrikova EV,

Perry, Cynthia Nicole

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

DIRECT INJURY, MYIASIS, FORENSICS Influence of Resources on Hermetia illucens (Diptera: Stratiomyidae)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and vegetables, and Ă?sh rendering. Larvae fed manure were shorter, weighed less, and took longer to develop of the feeding is done in the larval stage, with larvae acquiring a large fat body to use as energy for pupation

Tomberlin, Jeff

447

Mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective effects of tetracyclines in myocardial ischemic injury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Periodontol 67:506-514. Grenier, D. , Plamondon, P. , Sorsa,inhibitor ? 1 -antitrypsin. Grenier et al. (64) showed DOX

Griffin, Michael O.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

The effects of vasopressin on acute kidney injury in septic shock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2009 ... For the Vasopressin and Septic Shock Trial. (VASST) Investigators. .... several small studies of vasodilatory shock, vasopressin increased ...

449

Internet Self-Injury Forums as Communities of Social-Cognitive Literacy Practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In: G. Lindzey (Ed. ), Handbook of social psychology (Vol.Reips (Eds. ), The Oxford handbook of Internet psychology (C. Andreoletti (Eds. ), Handbook of adult development (pp.

Brett, Jeremy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

'Safety Begins with Me' Works toward an Injury-Free Workplace...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

safety awareness campaign February 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis A Savannah River Nuclear Solutions employee hangs one of several Safety Begins with Me banners...

451

Astronaut Extravehicular Activity : safety, injury & countermeasures; &, Orbital collisions & space debris : incidence, impact & international policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) spacesuits are a key enabling technology which allow astronauts to survive and work in the harsh environment of space. Of the entire spacesuit, the gloves may perhaps be considered the most ...

Opperman, Roedolph A. (Roedolph Adriaan)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Collagen scaffolds in full- and hemi- resection spinal cord injury models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basic scientific research over the past few decades has shown some light on the complex pathophysiology of SCI and has enhanced our understanding of some of the important factors that contribute to the lack of regeneration ...

Cholas, Rahmatullah H. (Rahmatullah Hujjat)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective effects of tetracyclines in myocardial ischemic injury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hall, J. , et al. 1993. Doxycycline in the protection ofHall, J. , et al. 1993. Doxycycline protects serum alpha-1-via MMP Inhibition by Doxycycline, and Evaluation of New

Griffin, Michael O.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Transient growth factor delivery sustains regenerated axons after spinal cord injury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Duration of treatment with doxycycline in the drinking waterand survival without doxycycline treatment is indicated bywere first treated with doxycycline followed by doxycycline

Blesch, Armin; Tuszynski, Mark H

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

PROLONGED STORAGE OF MARROW AND ITS USE IN THE TREATMENT OF RADIATION INJURY  

SciTech Connect

Marrow was removed from the femurs. f dogs and frozen in 15% glycerol at 1 deg C per minute. Marrow from one dog was stored at -80 deg C and from the other at -180 deg C for a period of 14 months. Each dog was then given 1200 r of wholebody irradiation followed by infusion of his own thawed marrow. Recovery was rapid, and the dogs were living and well two months later. (auth)

Thomas, E.D.; Ferrebee, J.W.

1962-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Regulation of lubricin gene expression and synthesis in cartilage by mechanical injury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Articular cartilage is the connective tissue which lines the bony ends of diathrodial joints to provide load distribution and frictionless motion. Lubricin, a glycoprotein which concentrates at the superficial layer of the ...

Chen, Shuodan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

The fabrication and characterization of linearly oriented nerve guidance scaffolds for spinal cord injury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of glass tubes containing polymerized agarose to a block ofglass tube in Styrofoam was then placed onto the surface of a 15 Â 15 Â 3 cm 3 block

Stokols, S; Tuszynski, M H

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Brain Research 925 (2002) 2841 www.elsevier.com/locate/bres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blue (FB) or Diamidino Yellow (DiY), were injected into the SOC and the pattern of labeled cells that received injections of FB in the GCD and DiY in the SOC, cells labeled by each injection had a different. The neurons in the SOC form circuits that compute tracer Fast Blue (FB) or Diamidino Yellow (DiY) into the SOC

Ryugo, David K.

459

MRIVIEW: an interactive computational tool for investigation of brain structure and function  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MRIVIEW is a software system that uses image processing and visualization to provide neuroscience researchers with an integrated environment for combining functional and anatomical information. Key features of the software include semi-automated ...

Doug Ranken; John George

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Six3 demarcates the anterior-most developing brain region in bilaterian animals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fission, both genes are expressed in stripes at the putative anterior part of the newly forming head in the middle of a segment (Figure 2g, h). At this stage, we were technically not able to resolve whether Plo-six3 lies anterior of Plo-otx. However...

Steinmetz, Patrick R H; Urbach, Rolf; Posnien, Nico; Eriksson, Joakim; Kostyuchenko, Roman P; Brena, Carlo; Guy, Keren; Akam, Michael; Bucher, Gregor; Arendt, Detlev

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Assessment of the impact of the scanner-related factors on brain morphometry analysis with Brainvisa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

performed using the same scanner. Only one volume was acquired at each scanning session. Data pre-processing Pre-processing of the 3D T1 images was carried out using the segmentation pipeline of Brainvisa (version 4.0) and included the following steps (also... recognition algorithms are shown for the 1.5 T group (left) and the 3 T group (right). Mean geodesic depth refers to the average geodesic depth across a given sulcal label (note that the depth a sulcus is usually non-uniform throughout its length and hence...

Shokouhi, Mahsa; Barnes, Anna; Suckling, John; Moorhead, Thomas WJ; Brennan, David; Job, Dominic; Lymer, Katherine; Dazzan, Paola; Reis Marques, Tiago; MacKay, Clare; McKie, Shane; Williams, Steven CR; Lawrie, Stephen M; Deakin, Bill; Williams, Steve R; Condon, Barrie

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

462

Phylogeny and adaptive evolution of the brain-development gene microcephalin (MCPH1) in cetaceans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Wilgenbusch JC, Warren DL, Swofford DL: AWTY (are we there yet?): a system for graphical exploration of MCMC convergence in Bayesian phylogenetics. Bioinformatics 2008, 24:581-583. 69 Jeffers LJ, Coull BJ, Stack SJ, Morrison CG: Distinct BRCT domains in Mcph1... to their intricate behavioral repertoire and to their use of echolocation [11], which requires production and processing of high frequency sounds to perceive spatial relationships in the surrounding liquid environment [2]. Odontocete cetaceans also are distinguished...

McGowen, Michael R; Montgomery, Stephen H; Clark, Clay; Gatesy, John

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

463

Microarray analysis of microRNA expression in the developing mammalian brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: MicroRNAs are a large new class of tiny regulatory RNAs found in nematodes, plants, insects and mammals. MicroRNAs are thought to act as post-transcriptional modulators of gene expression. In invertebrates ...

Miska, Eric A

464

Dynamic mechanical response of brain tissue in indentation in vivo, in situ and in vitro  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

region. 1. Westinghouse modified DOE Procedure 8. Estimated via market study (based on Ref. 6) 9. Energy State Performance - Preprototype Number One Several test runs were completed at each of the DOE test in Appendix B. Test procedure is in accordance with Reference 6. ** The system performance model used

Suresh, Subra

465

Control of Cyst Burden in the Brain During Chronic Toxoplasma Gondii Infection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infect Immun 76, 4883-4894. Mendis, D.B. , and Brown, I.R. (absent from the cortex (Mendis and Brown, 1994). To confirm

Nance, John Philip

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

[A clinical trial of neutron capture therapy for brain tumors]. Technical progress report 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes progress made in refining of neutron-induced alpha tract autoradiography, in designing epithermal neutron bean at MITR-II and in planning treatment dosimetry using Monte Carlo techniques.

Zamenhof, R.G.

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

467

Assessing gene effects on the brain and risk for disease using machine learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Harrison PJ, Weinberger DR. Catechol-o-methyltransferase,R, Delespaul P, van Os J. The catechol-O-methyl transferasein press), neuregulin, catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT),

Kohannim, Omid

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Adolescent Brain Development and the Risk for Alcohol and Other Drug Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. S. , et al. (2007). Catechol-o- methyltransferase enzymethe dopamine degrading enzyme catechol-O-methyltransferase (

Bava, Sunita; Tapert, Susan F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in cortical motor learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Error Bars: ± 1 Standard Error(s) Row exclusion: 04-83/05-Error Bars: ± 1 Standard Error(s) Row exclusion: 05-120/06-± 1 Standard Error( s) Percent CFA Devoted to Wrist Row

Von dem Bussche, Mary

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

In-vivo measurement of lithium in the brain and other organs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in-vivo method of measurement of the amount of lithium present in tissue and organs of breathing animals is described. The basis for the technique is the lithium-1 neutron interaction - /sup 6/Li(n,..cap alpha..)T. The lithium is irradiated with thermal neutrons to produce tritium atoms. The tritium diffuses into the tissues and is exhaled. By measuring the amount of tritium exhaled, the lithium concentration in the irradiated zone is determined.

Vartsky, D.; Wielopolski, L.; LoMonte, A.F.; Ellis, K.J.; Cohn, S.H.

1983-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

471

Evidence That Sleep Deprivation Downregulates Dopamine D2R in Ventral Striatum in the Human Brain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dopamine D2 receptors are involved with wakefulness, but their role in the decreased alertness associated with sleep deprivation is unclear. We had shown that sleep deprivation reduced dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability (measured with PET and [{sup 11}C]raclopride in controls) in striatum, but could not determine whether this reflected dopamine increases ([{sup 11}C]raclopride competes with dopamine for D2/D3 receptor binding) or receptor downregulation. To clarify this, we compared the dopamine increases induced by methylphenidate (a drug that increases dopamine by blocking dopamine transporters) during sleep deprivation versus rested sleep, with the assumption that methylphenidate's effects would be greater if, indeed, dopamine release was increased during sleep deprivation. We scanned 20 controls with [{sup 11}C]raclopride after rested sleep and after 1 night of sleep deprivation; both after placebo and after methylphenidate. We corroborated a decrease in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum with sleep deprivation (compared with rested sleep) that was associated with reduced alertness and increased sleepiness. However, the dopamine increases induced by methylphenidate (measured as decreases in D2/D3 receptor availability compared with placebo) did not differ between rested sleep and sleep deprivation, and were associated with the increased alertness and reduced sleepiness when methylphenidate was administered after sleep deprivation. Similar findings were obtained by microdialysis in rodents subjected to 1 night of paradoxical sleep deprivation. These findings are consistent with a downregulation of D2/D3 receptors in ventral striatum with sleep deprivation that may contribute to the associated decreased wakefulness and also corroborate an enhancement of D2 receptor signaling in the arousing effects of methylphenidate in humans.

Volkow N. D.; Fowler J.; Volkow, N.D.; Tomasi, D.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J.; Benveniste, H.; Kin, R.; Thanos, P.K.; Sergi F.

2012-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

472

Recognition of splice junctions on DNA sequences by BRAIN learning algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivation: The problem addressed in this paper is the prediction of splice site locations in human DNA. The aims of the proposed approach are explicit splicing rule description, high recognition quality, and robust and stable `one shot' data processing.

Salvatore Rampone

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Cell proliferation in the Drosophila adult brain revealed by clonal analysis and bromodeoxyuridine labelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

feeding on soaked filter paper (Whatman, Springfield Mill, Kent, United Kingdom) and yeast containing 5% sucrose (Sigma-Aldrich, Dorset, United Kingdom), 1 mg/ ml BrdU (Sigma-Aldrich, Dorset, United Kingdom) and 1% red food colour (SuperCook, Leeds, United...

von Trotha, Jakob W; Egger, Boris; Brand, Andrea H

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

474

Age-related changes in receptor-mediated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in various regions of rat brain  

SciTech Connect

The effects of age on cholinergic markers and receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis was examined in the frontal cortex and striatum of male Fischer-344 rats. Choline acetyltransferase activity was decreased 27% in the striatum of aged rats compared to young controls. Muscarinic receptor density as measured by ({sup 3}H)-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding showed a similar 26% decrease in the striatum of aged rats. Phosphoinositide hydrolysis was measured by the release of inositol phosphate (IP) from tissue slices prelabeled with ({sup 3}H)myoinositol in response to carbachol, norepinephrine, and quisqualate. In the cortex, stimulated IP release was significantly greater in slices from aged rats compared to young rats for all three agonists. In contrast, stimulated IP release was significantly decreased in striatal slices from aged rats compared to young for all three agonists. These data indicate a differential effect of age on agonist-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in the cortex and striatum. The decreased responsiveness in the latter area may result from the age-related loss of postsynaptic receptors.

Mundy, W.; Tandon, P.; Tilson, H. (Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)); Ali, S. (National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Indirect biological measures of consciousness from field studies of brains as dynamical systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carried by beta-gamma activity fields may approach thecortical fields of the relevant macroscopic beta events aredelays giving beta. Neural field dynamics and consciousness

Freeman, Walter J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Aging effects on DNA methylation modules in human brain and blood tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

changes in chromosomes cause aging? Cell 1996, 86:9-12. 2.M: Cross-Talk between Aging and Cancer. Annals of the NewMF, Esteller M: Epigenetics and aging: the targets and the

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

STRATEGIES FOR QUANTIFYING PET IMAGING DATA FROM TRACER STUDIES OF BRAIN RECEPTORS AND ENZYMES.  

SciTech Connect

A description of some of the methods used in neuroreceptor imaging to distinguish changes in receptor availability has been presented in this chapter. It is necessary to look beyond regional uptake of the tracer since uptake generally is affected by factors other than the number of receptors for which the tracer has affinity. An exception is the infusion method producing an equilibrium state. The techniques vary in complexity some requiring arterial blood measurements of unmetabolized tracer and multiple time uptake data. Others require only a few plasma and uptake measurements and those based on a reference region require no plasma measurements. We have outlined some of the limitations of the different methods. Laruelle (1999) has pointed out that test/retest studies to which various methods can be applied are crucial in determining the optimal method for a particular study. The choice of method will also depend upon the application. In a clinical setting, methods not involving arterial blood sampling are generally preferred. In the future techniques for externally measuring arterial plasma radioactivity with only a few blood samples for metabolite correction will extend the modeling options of clinical PET. Also since parametric images can provide information beyond that of ROI analysis, improved techniques for generating such images will be important, particularly for ligands requiring more than a one-compartment model. Techniques such as the wavelet transform proposed by Turkheimer et al. (2000) may prove to be important in reducing noise and improving quantitation.

Logan, J.

2001-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

478

Quantitative diffusion magnetic resonance imaging of the brain : validation, acquisition, and analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Breton E, Lallemand D, Grenier P, Cabanis E, Laval-JeantetBreton E, Lallemand D, Grenier P, Cabanis E, Laval-JeantetBreton E, Lallemand D, Grenier P, Cabanis E, Laval-Jeantet

White, Nathan S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Second Language Interferes with Word Production in Fluent Bilinguals: Brain Potential and Functional  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Friston, Fletcher, et al., 1998; Friston, Frith, Turner, & Frack- owiak, 1995). First, for each volunteer

Coulson, Seana

480

Common multifractality in the heart rate variability and brain activity of healthy humans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence from the central nervous system on the human multifractal heart rate variability (HRV) is examined under the autonomic nervous system perturbation induced by the head-up-tilt body maneuver. We conducted the multifractal factorization analysis to factor out the common multifractal factor in the joint fluctuation of the beat-to-beat heart rate and electroencephalography data. Evidence of a central link in the multifractal HRV was found

D. C. Lin; A. Sharif

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "traumatic brain injury" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Systematic analysis of gene expression in human brains before and after death  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

represent expected regression lines with the slope = 1. 4 2 0 2 4 4 2 0 2 4 Resection Au to ps y 4 2 0 2 4 4 2 0 2 4 Resection Au to ps yn Genome Biology 2005, 6:R112 regression lines (?) fitted through the distributions of the expression differences...

Franz, Henriette; Ullmann, Claudia; Becker, Albert; Ryan, Margaret; Bahn, Sabine; Arendt, Thomas; Simon, Matthias; Paabo, Svante; Khaitovich, Philipp

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z