National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for traumatic brain injury

  1. Traumatic brain injury with particular reference to diffuse traumatic axonal injury subpopulations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Hasani, Omer Hussain

    2011-07-05

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality within society. TBI may result in both focal and diffuse brain injury. Diffuse traumatic axonal injury (TAI) is an important pathological substrate of TBI, and can...

  2. The role of Lysophosphatidic Acid in Traumatic Brain Injury outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Whitney S.

    2015-01-01

    germinal niches in the adult brain. Neuron, 41(5), 683–6.damage after mild traumatic brain injury: a pilot study.for Fatigue After Traumatic Brain Injury. Journal of Head

  3. Traumatic Brain Injury and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in OEF/OIF Veterans : : A Combined Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Cortical Thickness Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorg, Scott Francis

    2013-01-01

    injury in mild traumatic brain injury: A diffusion tensoralteration after traumatic brain injury experienced duringE. (1999). Mild traumatic brain injury. Neuropsychological

  4. Understanding Why Patients Return to the Emergency Department after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury within 72 Hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    patients with minimal brain injury and small intracranialelements for traumatic brain injury: a population study. Intcenter for mild traumatic brain injury. Neurosurgical Focus.

  5. Quantitative Brain Electrical Activity in the Initial Screening of Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neil, Brian; Prichep, Leslie S.; Naunheim, Roseanne; Chabot, Robert

    2012-01-01

    investigation into mild brain injury and discriminantfrequency bands (32-64 Hz). Brain Inj. 24. Thakor NV, Tongfor accuracy traumatic brain injury. J Neuropsychiatry Clin

  6. Trajectories of Life Satisfaction During the First 10 Years Following Traumatic Brain Injury 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, Meredith

    2014-05-23

    To examine the predictive relationships of functional ability, gender, and age on the longitudinal trajectories of life satisfaction across 10 years following onset of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants were part of the Traumatic Brain...

  7. Design of a composite combat helmet liner for prevention of blast-induced traumatic brain injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vechart, Andrew (Andrew Peter)

    2011-01-01

    Air blast-induced traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) represent a significant percentage of military personnel injuries observed in Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). Prevalence of blast-induced ...

  8. Fluid-filled helmet liner concept for protection against blast-induced traumatic brain injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yost, Allison L. (Allison Lynne)

    2012-01-01

    Due to changes in modem warfare threats, as well as advances in body armor, soldier survivability in combat has increased, but blast-induced Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) has become a prevalent injury in the battlefield. ...

  9. Traumatic Brain Injury: The “Signature Injury” of the Iraq War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aftandilians, Tania

    2009-01-01

    news/nationworld/iraq/bal- factorvii,0,2855253.storygallery?The “Signature Injury” of the Iraq War by Tania Aftandiliansremains undi- lives in Iraq; however, funding is severely

  10. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Symptoms as Predictors of Suicide Behavior Among Veterans with and without a History of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villarreal, Edgar Javier

    2012-10-19

    Prior research has established that a history of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and/or traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases the risk of suicide behavior. Few studies have examined the role of specific PTSD symptom clusters and suicide...

  11. Improved Cognitive Function After Transcranial, Light-Emitting Diode Treatments in Chronic, Traumatic Brain Injury: Two Case Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naeser, Margaret A.

    Objective: Two chronic, traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases, where cognition improved following treatment with red and near-infrared light-emitting diodes (LEDs), applied transcranially to forehead and scalp areas, are ...

  12. Computational modeling of blast-induced traumatic brain injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyein, Michelle K. (Michelle Kyaw)

    2010-01-01

    Blast-induced TBI has gained prominence in recent years due to the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, yet little is known about the mechanical effects of blasts on the human head; no injury thresholds have been established ...

  13. Use of diffusion tensor imaging to assess the impact of normobaric hyperoxia within at-risk pericontusional tissue after traumatic brain injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veenith, Tonny V.; Carter, Eleanor L.; Grossac, Julia; Newcombe, Virginia F.; Outtrim, Joanne G.; Nallapareddy, Sridhar; Lupson, Victoria; Correia, Marta M.; Mada, Marius M.; Williams, Guy B.; Menon, David K.; Coles, Jonathan P.

    2014-07-09

    death following traumatic brain injury in adult and immature animals. J Bioenerg Biomembr 2004; 36: 363–368. 31 Verweij BH, Muizelaar JP, Vinas FC, Peterson PL, Xiong Y, Lee CP et al. Impaired cerebral mitochondrial function after traumatic brain injury...

  14. Use of diffusion tensor imaging to assess the impact of normobaric hyperoxia within at-risk pericontusional tissue following traumatic brain injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veenith, T. V.; Carter, E. L.; Grossac, J.; Newcombe, V. F.; Outtrim, J. G.; Nallapareddy, Sridhar; Lupson, Victoria; Correia, M. M.; Mada, Marius M.; Williams, Guy B.; Menon, David K.; Coles, J. P.

    2014-07-08

    death following traumatic brain injury in adult and immature animals. J Bioenerg Biomembr 2004; 36: 363–368. 31 Verweij BH, Muizelaar JP, Vinas FC, Peterson PL, Xiong Y, Lee CP et al. Impaired cerebral mitochondrial function after traumatic brain injury...

  15. The football helmet is a device used to help mitigate the occurrence of impact-related traumatic (TBI) and minor traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) in the game of American football. The current design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The football helmet is a device used to help mitigate the occurrence of impact-related traumatic (TBI) and minor traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) in the game of American football. The current design as a contributor of brain injury. To help better understand how the football helmet design features effect

  16. An animal-to-human scaling law for blast-induced traumatic brain injury risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean, Aurelie H.

    Despite recent efforts to understand blast effects on the human brain, there are still no widely accepted injury criteria for humans. Recent animal studies have resulted in important advances in the understanding of brain ...

  17. Quantitative Brain Electrical Activity in the Initial Screening of Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neil, Brian; Prichep, Leslie S.; Naunheim, Roseanne; Chabot, Robert

    2012-01-01

    J, et al. Use of Brain Electrical 32. Slobounov S, Cao C,device measuring brain electrical activity can be used inet al Quantitative Brain Electrical Activity in Screening of

  18. Comparison of frequency and time domain methods of assessment of cerebral autoregulation in traumatic brain injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiuyun; Czosnyka, Marek; Donnelly, Joseph; Budohoski, Karol P.; Varsos, Georgios V.; Nasr, Nathalie; Brady, Ken M.; Reinhard, Matthias; Hutchinson, Peter J.; Smielewski, Peter

    2014-11-19

    . Czosnyka M, Smielewski P, Kirkpatrick P, Menon DK, Pickard JD. Monitoring of cerebral autoregulation in head-injured patients. Stroke 1996; 27: 1829-1834. 4. Fujii M, Yan J, Rolland WB, Soejima Y, Caner B, Zhang JH. Early brain injury, an evolving...

  19. N-3 FATTY ACIDS AND JUVENILE TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY: EFFECTS OF DIETARY N-3 FATTY ACID CONTENT, N-3 FATTY ACID STATUS, AND ORALLY DOSED FISH OIL ON SENSORIMOTOR AND BIOCHEMICAL OUTCOMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Kristin L.

    2013-08-31

    Children under five years of age are at high risk for sustaining traumatic brain injury (TBI) and tend to have poorer outcomes despite greater neuroplasticity in children. Hence, there is a great need to study TBI specifically ...

  20. White matter disruption in moderate/severe pediatric traumatic brain injury: Advanced tract-based analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    severity, and extent of the brain damage patients sustain.whereby disruption of one injured brain area spreadsto other connected brain areas. This is an on- going,

  1. Baroreflex Sensitivity during Positional Changes in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNair, Norma Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) of patients with traumaticheart rate variability (HRV) and BRS in neurological injury.

  2. Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression in Contusional Traumatic Brain Injury: A Paired Microdialysis Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guilfoyle, Matthew R.; Carpenter, Keri L. H.; Helmy, Adel; Pickard, John D.; Menon, David K.; Hutchinson, Peter J. A.

    2015-05-14

    multiple sclerosis subtypes. J. Neu- roimmunol. 136, 46–53. 5. Shigemori, Y., Katayama, Y., Mori, T., Maeda, T., and Kawamata, T. (2006). Matrix metalloproteinase-9 is associated with blood-brain barrier opening and brain edema formation after cortical... expansion.15 Multiple up- stream signaling molecules have been shown to have a role in reg- ulating expression and activation of MMP-9, including cytokines (e.g., interleukin-1b), growth factors (e.g., transforming growth factor TGF-b and vascular...

  3. Traumatic brain injury and recovery mechanisms: peptide modulation of periventricular neurogenic regions by the choroid plexus–CSF nexus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Baird, Andrew; Sharma, Hari

    2011-01-01

    re?ects trauma sequelae in brain. S100B has also been testedhyperthermia challenges to brain when delivered to CNS viaeffectively protects the brain against edema (Naka- machi et

  4. Decellularized biomaterials for cell culture and repair after ischemic injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeQuach, Jessica Ann

    2012-01-01

    surface modification. Biomaterials. Volume 25; 2004. p 1331-in a hindlimb ischemia model. Biomaterials 2010;31(16):4573-traumatic brain injury. Biomaterials; 2001. Tate M, Shear D,

  5. Measurement of brain temperature using magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parikh, Jehill

    2013-07-06

    The study of brain temperature is important for a number of clinical conditions such as stroke, traumatic brain injury, schizophrenia and birth asphyxia (for neonates). A direct method to estimate brain temperature ...

  6. Extracellular N-acetylaspartate in human traumatic brain injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shannon, Richard J.; van der Heide, Susan; Carter, Eleanor L.; Jalloh, Ibrahim; Menon, David K.; Hutchinson, Peter J.; Carpenter, Keri L. H.

    2015-07-10

    from each patient were pooled into either 8 h periods (normal CNS perfusion fluid) or 24 h periods (CNS perfusion fluid supplemented with glucose) for HPLC analysis. The six benign tumour resection patients were monitored using microdialysis, which... (Sigma Aldrich, UK), 1.25 % v/v methanol, pH 7.0. The run time was 15 mins, and after every four samples, the column was washed with a mobile phase consisting of 100 mM potassium phosphate in water, 2.8 mM tetrabutylammonium hydroxide, 30 % v...

  7. Using biomarkers to identify traumatic brain injury for soldiers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The LANL and SMT collaborators (left to right): Donald Shields, Aaron Anderson, Paul Smith, Nicholas Hengartner, Dr. Donald Becker, Harshini Mukundan (co-PI), Laurie Samitaur...

  8. The role of Lysophosphatidic Acid in Traumatic Brain Injury outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Whitney S.

    2015-01-01

    R. , Chun, J. , & Fukushima, N. (2008). LysophosphatidicWeiner, J. A. , Fukushima, N. , Contos, J. J. A. , Scherer,J. J. a, Ishii, I. , Fukushima, N. , Kingsbury, M. a, Ye,

  9. Using biomarkers to identify traumatic brain injury for soldiers, sports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0 - 19PortalStatusUserUserHomeUsingUsingbbcp

  10. Traumatic Brain Injury Protection: Blast Pressure Sensors in Helmets -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >TransportationEHSS A-Z Site MapEffectsEnergy

  11. Toward reducing impact induced brain injury: Lessons from a computational study of army and football helmet pads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moss, W C; Blackman, E G

    2012-01-01

    We use computational simulations to compare the impact response of different football and U.S. Army helmet pad materials. We conduct experiments to characterize the material response of different helmet pads. We simulate experimental helmet impact tests performed by the U.S. Army to validate our methods. We then simulate a cylindrical impactor striking different pads. The acceleration history of the impactor is used to calculate the Head Injury Criterion for each pad. We conduct sensitivity studies exploring the effects of pad composition, geometry, and material stiffness. We find that: (1) The football pad materials do not outperform the currently used military pad material in militarily-relevant impact scenarios; (2) Optimal material properties for a pad depend on impact energy; and (3) Thicker pads perform better at all velocities. Our analysis suggests that by using larger helmet shells with correspondingly thicker pads, impact-induced traumatic brain injury may be significantly reduced. Keywords: helmet,...

  12. SPHINGOSINE-1-PHOSPHATE RECEPTOR MODULATION IN NEONATAL HYPOXIC-ISCHEMIC BRAIN INJURY 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santiago, Javier Enrique

    2013-02-12

    -PHOSPHATE RECEPTOR MODULATION IN NEONATAL HYPOXIC-ISCHEMIC BRAIN INJURY An Undergraduate Research Scholars Thesis By JAVIER ENRIQUE SANTIAGO Submitted to Honors and Undergraduate Research Texas A&M University in partial... REFERENCES ………………………………………………………………………………...28 2 ABSTRACT Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor Modulation in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury. (May 2013) Javier Enrique Santiago Department of Biology Texas A...

  13. Devastating Brain Injuries: Assessment and Management, Part I: Overview of Brain Death

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Tara D; Malinoski, Darren

    2009-01-01

    349:667-674. 11. Capron AM. Brain death – well settled yetWijdicks EFM. The diagnosis of brain death. NEJM. 2001; 344:AA. Organ preservation in a brain dead patient: information

  14. Assessing Visuospatial Neglect in Children with Brain Injury 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahlberg, Andrea Christine

    2014-05-28

    lead to overgeneralization of the neural basis of VSN (Ting et al., 2011). Brain imaging studies utilizing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET), perfusion weighted imaging (PWI), and diffusion 15...

  15. Molecular mechanisms of traumatic brain injury; the missing link in management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veenith, Tonny; Goon, Serena H.; Burnstein, Rowan M.

    2009-02-02

    the catecholamines There are three isoforms of the enzyme catechol-o-meth- yltransferase (COMT) encoded by 3 genetic polymor- phisms (COMT Val/Val, COMT Val/Met, and COMT Met/ Met). This enzyme is associated with inactivation of dopamine and norepinephrine...

  16. Adherence to Head Computed Tomography Guidelines in the Setting of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Landon A; Morley, Eric J; Grant, William D; Wojcik, Susan M; Paolo, William F

    2014-01-01

    with the most recent ACEP guidelines in only 62.8% (76/121)of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) clinical recommendationsImproved dissemination of the ACEP clinical policy and

  17. Baroreflex Sensitivity during Positional Changes in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNair, Norma Dianne

    2012-01-01

    is also influenced by the hypothalamus, the amygdala and the1-2 and 1-3). The hypothalamus responds to input from theInsular Cortex Locus Ceruleus Hypothalamus Nucleus Tractus

  18. Computational Modeling and Optimization of a Novel Shock Tube to Study Blast Induced Traumatic Brain Injury 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anumolu, Pratima

    2014-08-06

    Over the last decade, soldiers fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan are being exposed to blasts from powerful explosives with improvised detonation techniques. These blasts put them at high risk of closed head non-impact ...

  19. Glucose metabolism following human traumatic brain injury: methods of assessment and pathophysiological findings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalloh, Ibrahim; Carpenter, Keri L. H.; Helmy, Adel; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Menon, David K.; Hutchinson, Peter J.

    2014-11-21

    with im- proved behavioural outcomes for N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA), apparently due to maintenance of mitochondrial glutathione and mitochondrial bioenergetics, and to reduction in oxidative damage (Pandya et al. 2014). These or other mitochondrial...

  20. Transplantation of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in an animal model of diffuse traumatic axonal injury: Survival and differentiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    experimental history and location, that is injury does nothistory and location shows no significant effect, i.e. lesion does

  1. Predicting Quality of Life Five Years Following Medical Discharge for a Traumatically-Acquired Spinal Cord Injury 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erosa, Norma

    2012-10-19

    This dissertation presents the prediction of quality of life (QoL), composed of by life satisfaction and self-perceived health status, across 5 years post a spinal cord injury (SCI) hospital discharge. Predictor variables of functional independence...

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in OEF/OIF Veterans : : A Combined Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Cortical Thickness Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorg, Scott Francis

    2013-01-01

    R. L. (2004). Combat duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, mentalU.S. soldiers returning from iraq. N.Engl.J.Med. , 358, 453-white matter integrity in Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans.

  3. Glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway after human traumatic brain injury: microdialysis studies using 1,2-13C2 glucose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalloh, Ibrahim; Carpenter, Keri L. H.; Grice, Peter; Howe, Duncan J.; Mason, Andrew; Gallagher, Clare N.; Helmy, Adel; Murphy, Michael P.; Menon, David K.; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Pickard, John D.; Hutchinson, Peter J.

    2014-10-22

    a microdialysis catheter with 1,2-13C2 glucose and measure the ensuing labelling patterns in lactate collected in the emerging microdialysates by analysing them using high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. For comparison... 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 Confidential: For Review Only clearly visible doublet (red stars in expansion of 13C spectra) for the lactate C3 methyl group, and likewise a doublet...

  4. Combat-related blast injuries : injury types and outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eskridge, Susan Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    U.S. Soldiers returning from Iraq. N Engl J Med. Jan Helmickmilitary convoys in Iraq: an examination of battle injuriesdistinguishing injury of the Iraq war. Brain Injury Resource

  5. European Society of Intensive Care Medicine study of therapeutic hypothermia (32-35degreesC) for intracranial pressure reduction after traumatic brain injury (the Eurotherm3235Trial)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Peter J. D.; Sinclair, Helen Louise K.; Battison, Claire G.; Polderman, Kees K.; Citerio, Giuseppe K.; Mascia, Luciana K.; Harris, Bridget A.; Murray, Gordon D.; Stocchetti, Nino K.; Menon, David K.; Shakur, Haleema K.; De Backer, Daniel K.; Eurotherm3235 Trial Collaborators

    2011-01-12

    patient outcome but key issues are length of hypothermia treatment and speed of re-warming. A recent meta-analysis showed improved outcome when hypothermia was continued for between 48 hours and 5 days and patients were re-warmed slowly (1°C/4 hours...

  6. Social Work Delivered Intervention for Persons with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Implementation and Evaluation in an Urban, Public, Trauma Center Emergency Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Megan

    2012-01-01

    the typical month) G6 G7 G8 G9 G10 Who usually looked1 If yes, tell me about it. G8 Did you see the flyer for the= 4 Not applicable = 5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Who usually looked after

  7. In vitro models of cartilage degradation following joint injury : mechanical overload, inflammatory cytokines and therapeutic approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Yihong C. S

    2010-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of joint disorder. Individuals who have sustained an acute traumatic joint injury are at greater risk for the development of OA. The mechanisms by which injury causes cartilage ...

  8. Systemic, local, and imaging biomarkers of brain injury: more needed, and better use of those already established?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Keri L. H.; Czosnyka, Marek; Jalloh, Ibrahim; Newcombe, Virginia F. J.; Helmy, Adel; Shannon, Richard J.; Budohoski, Karol P.; Kolias, Angelos G.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.; Carpenter, Thomas Adrian; Menon, David K.; Hutchinson, Peter J.

    2015-02-18

    , cerebral metabolic rate of glucose; CMRO2, cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen; CPP, cerebral perfusion pressure; GABA, gamma-aminobutyric acid; ICP, intracranial pressure; i.v., intravenous; MRS, magnetic resonance spectroscopy; NAA, N-acetylaspartate; PbtO2... to surface coils, because of the radio-frequency power absorption by the brain as a consequence of decoupling 1H from the 13C to achieve an interpretable 13C spectrum. The specific absorption rate (SAR) limit to minimize heating of tissue is especially...

  9. Cartilage response to in vitro models of injury in combination with growth factor and antioxidant treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheeler, Cameron, 1978-

    2008-01-01

    Approximately one in five Americans is affected by arthritis, making it one of the most prevalent diseases and the leading cause of disability in the United States. Post-traumatic arthritis occurs after joint injury (e.g., ...

  10. In vitro models for injurious compression of bovine and human articular cartilage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patwari, Parth, 1972-

    2003-01-01

    Patients who have sustained a traumatic joint injury, such as a ligament rupture or cartilage fracture, are known to have an increased risk for the development of osteoarthritis (OA) in that joint. This has motivated the ...

  11. Shock induces a deficit in the recovery of function after a contusion injury: identifying the relative contributions of the brain and spinal cord 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bopp, Anne Caroline

    2006-10-30

    and the recovery of locomotor function following spinal cord injury (SCI). Whereas evidence suggests that the disruption of instrumental learning depends on maladaptive plasticity within spinal cord neurons, it is still unknown whether the disruptive effects...

  12. HEAD INJURY ASSESSMENT IN JUVENILE CHINOOK USING THE ALPHA II-SPECTRIN BIOMARKER: EFFECTS OF PRESSURE CHANGES AND PASSAGE THROUGH A REMOVABLE SPILLWAY WEIR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonason, C.; Miracle, A.

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeletal protein alpha II-spectrin has specifi c neurodegenerative mechanisms that allow the necrotic (injury-induced) and apoptotic (non-injury-induced) pathways of proteolysis to be differentiated in an immunoblot. Consequently, ?II-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs) are potential biomarkers for diagnosing traumatic brain injury (TBI). The purpose of the following investigation, consisting of two studies, was to evaluate the utility of the spectrin biomarker in diagnosing TBI in fi sh that travel through hydroelectric dams in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. The fi rst study used hyperbaric pressure chambers to simulate the pressure changes that affect fi sh during passage through a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Kaplan turbine. The second study tested the effect of a removable spillway weir (RSW) on the passage of juvenile chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). This study was conducted in tandem with a balloon-tag study by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Brain samples from fi sh were collected and analyzed using an immunoblot for SBDPs, and imaging software was used to quantify the protein band density and determine the ratio of cleaved protein to total protein. The biomarker analyses found higher SBDP expression levels in fi sh that were exposed to lower pressure nadirs and fi sh that passed through the RSW at a deep orientation. In general, the incidence of injuries observed after treatment positively correlated with expression levels, suggesting that the biomarker method of analysis is comparable to traditional methods of injury assessment. It was also found that, for some treatments, the 110 kDa spectrin fragment (SBDP 110) correlated more strongly with necrotic head injury incidence and mortality rates than did the total cleaved protein or the 120 kDa fragment. These studies will be informative in future decisions regarding the design of turbines and fi sh passage structures in hydroelectric dams and will hopefully contribute to the development of faster and more accurate techniques for diagnosing TBI in fi sh.

  13. Helmets Designed by Supercomputers Help Warfighters at Home

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These supercomputing applications are helping protect warfighters from the blast waves produced by explosions that cause traumatic brain injury (TBI).

  14. Art appreciation for veterans with severe mental illness in a VA Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Recovery Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ketch, RA; Rubin, RT; Baker, MR; Sones, AC; Ames, D

    2015-01-01

    Wissing, K. (2009). Expressive arts and traumaticbrain injury: Therapeutic arts for head trauma survivors.suite101.com/a/expressive-arts-and-traumatic-brain-injury-

  15. Brain Imaging Findings in Neuropathic Pain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apkarian, A. Vania

    Brain Imaging Findings in Neuropathic Pain Paul Y. Geha, MD and A. Vania Apkarian, PhD* Address (posther- petic neuralgia), then the spinal cord (postspinal cord injury pain), to the brain itself mechanisms; hence, they assume implicitly or explicitly that the rest of the brain passively responds

  16. Optical spectroscopy for the detection of ischemic tissue injury

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Demos, Stavros (Livermore, CA); Fitzgerald, Jason (Sacramento, CA); Troppmann, Christoph (Sacramento, CA); Michalopoulou, Andromachi (Athens, GR)

    2009-09-08

    An optical method and apparatus is utilized to quantify ischemic tissue and/or organ injury. Such a method and apparatus is non-invasive, non-traumatic, portable, and can make measurements in a matter of seconds. Moreover, such a method and apparatus can be realized through optical fiber probes, making it possible to take measurements of target organs deep within a patient's body. Such a technology provides a means of detecting and quantifying tissue injury in its early stages, before it is clinically apparent and before irreversible damage has occurred.

  17. Combat-related blast injuries : injury types and outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eskridge, Susan Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    =Spinal Cord Injury, VCI=Vertebral Column Injury, UE=Upper=Spinal Cord Injury, VCI=Vertebral Column Injury, UE=Upper

  18. Accidental Death & Dismemberment Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forms & Required Notices Other News from LANL Using biomarkers to identify traumatic brain injury for soldiers, sports figures A new detection approach originally developed for...

  19. donations

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Sheely Foundation. On Aug. 22, 2011, Derek suffered a traumatic brain injury during football practice at Frostburg State University and died one week...

  20. Community Commitment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probes of the Strong Interaction."May 6, 2015 Using biomarkers to identify traumatic brain injury for soldiers, sports figures A new detection approach originally developed for...

  1. PROFILE 2009 NIH CLINICAL CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Governance 46 #12;MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTOR EXPANDING OPPORTUNITIES In 2009, the NIH Clinical Center research studies on traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder, investigations

  2. San Francisco folio, Tamalpais, San Francisco, Concord, San Mateo, and Haywards quadrangles, California 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawson, Andrew C. (Andrew Cowper), 1861-1952.

    1914-01-01

    POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER (PTSD) SYMPTOMS AS PREDICTORS OF SUICIDE BEHAVIOR AMONG VETERANS WITH AND WITHOUT A HISTORY OF TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY (TBI) A Dissertation by EDGAR JAVIER VILLARREAL Submitted to the Office of Graduate... Disorder (PTSD) Symptoms as Predictors of Suicide Behavior among Veterans with and without a History of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Copyright 2012 Edgar Javier Villarreal POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER (PTSD) SYMPTOMS AS PREDICTORS OF SUICIDE...

  3. Endovascular Management of Extra-cranial Supra-aortic Vascular Injuries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almazedi, Bahir Lyall, Harpreet; Bhatnagar, Priya; Kessel, David; McPherson, Simon; Patel, Jai V.; Puppala, Sapna

    2013-02-08

    Supra-aortic vessel injuries are uncommon but can be life-threatening and surgically challenging. Trauma to these vessels may be blunt or penetrating, including iatrogenic trauma following the insertion of central venous lines, which may be preventable. Recent advances in technology have resulted in endovascular therapy becoming a common first-line treatment, and interventional radiologists now play a major role in the management of these vascular injuries. We review the literature on the endovascular management of these types of injuries and describe a spectrum of case-based extra-cranial supra-aortic vascular injuries managed at our institution and the range of imaging appearances, including active contrast extravasation, traumatic vessel occlusion, true aneurysms, pseudoaneurysms, and arteriovenous fistulae.

  4. Neuroscience/Brain & Mind For the past 40 years, some of Western University's most internationally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    Neuroscience/Brain & Mind For the past 40 years, some of Western University's most internationally of the brain that bring together some of the most accomplished minds at the forefront of neuroscience research to degenerative and neuromuscular disorders, spinal injury, stroke, aneurysms and brain tumours · Uses highly

  5. Development of a helmet liner for protection against blast induced trauma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christou, George Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries caused by shock waves have attracted increased medical and scientific attention due to the large percentage of combat troops that have sustained such injuries in recent conflict theatres. To this ...

  6. Pedestrian Injuries: Emergency Care Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakravarthy, Bharath; Lotfipour, Shahram; Vaca, Federico E

    2007-01-01

    minimize the effects of pedestrian motor vehicle injuries.Vehicle Technology Reducing Pedestrian Injuries Upper FrameTraffic Safety Facts 2004:Pedestrians. National Highway and

  7. Association of Insurance Status with Health Outcomes Following Traumatic Injury: Statewide Multicenter Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    150 N. 18th Avenue, Suite 540, Phoenix, AZ 85007. Email:Services and Trauma System, Phoenix, Arizona West ValleyGood Samaritan Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona Supervising

  8. Injectable chemokine-releasing gelatin matrices for enhancing endogenous regenerative responses in the injured rat brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Teck Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Brain injuries acquired from hemorrhage, ischemic strokes and trauma affect millions worldwide each year and often cause irreversible loss of neural tissue that disrupts vital neurological functions. Cell transplantation ...

  9. Gene-supplemented collagen scaffolds for non-viral gene delivery for brain tissue engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolliet, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in tissue engineering, combining an extracellular matrix (ECM)-like vehicle with therapeutic molecules, cells and/or genes has yielded promising results for brain injury repair. The purpose of this thesis ...

  10. Brain-Computer Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, Khushbu

    2009-01-01

    I \\ November 16, 2008). CNN. ’Brain’ in a dish ?ies ?ightREFERENCES Adams, Ray. Brain Computer Interfaces: Psychologyaccessed Biever, Celeste. Brain cells in a dish ?y ?ghter

  11. The Global Brain is Neither Global nor a Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocha, Luis

    The Global Brain is Neither Global nor a Brain Adaptive Webs for Heterarchies Luis Mateus Rocha-organism or a global brain? The Global Brain Is Neither Global nor a Brain #12;!Disembodied Brain Disembodied brains on symbol-matter requirements for open-ended evolution) The Global Brain Is Neither Global Nor a Brain #12

  12. Singing the Brain Electric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chua, Grace (Grace W. J.)

    2008-01-01

    Singing the Brain Electric Brain pacemakers, scientists have found, can treat depression by correcting neural circuitry gone haywire. This thesis examines how such technology - a technique known as deep-brain stimulation, ...

  13. Vortices in Brain waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Walter J III; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Burke and M. D. Holmes, Human Brain Mapping 19(4), 248 7. W.20. W. J. Freeman, How Brains Make Up Their Minds (Columbiaand K. Yasue, Quantum Brain Dynamics and Consciousness (John

  14. Core modular blood and brain biomarkers in social defeat mouse model for post traumatic stress disorder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    1998, 21(1):127–148. 45. Sriram K, Rodriguez-Fernandez M,301–320. 47. Yang R, Sriram K, Doyle FJ: Control circuitry

  15. Gene expression abnormalities in the autistic brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Maggie Lok Mun

    2011-01-01

    13 Early Brain Overgrowth13 Discontinuous brainpostmortem brain ______________________________________ 33

  16. Traumatized subjects : horror film and the legacy of mass extermination in post-dictatorship Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boehm, Scott Walter

    2012-01-01

    David Stanley. Lacan and the Subject of Law: Toward a1999. Print. ---. The Lacanian Subject: Between Language andconclude Traumatized Subjects by stating that my ultimate

  17. Human Functional Brain Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review Summary Brain Imaging #12 Dale ­ one of our first Trustees. Understanding the brain remains one of our key strategic aims today three-fold: · to identify the key landmarks and influences on the human functional brain imaging

  18. Pediatric pedestrian injuries: Emergency care considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakravarthy, B; Vaca, FE; Lotfipour, S; Bradley, D

    2007-01-01

    minimize the effects of pedestrian motor vehicle injuries.Vehicle Technology Reducing Pedestrian Injuries Upper FrameTraffic Safety Facts 2004:Pedestrians. National Highway and

  19. Learning ability in post-stroke aphasia : success, strategy use and implications for therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohter, Sofia Vallila

    2014-01-01

    Aphasia is an impairment in the expression or comprehension of language that results from stroke, traumatic brain injury or progressive neurological disease. Approximately one million people in the United States suffer ...

  20. Expert Secondary Inclusive Classroom Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montague, Marcia

    2011-02-22

    disabilities, including autism, intellectual disability, and traumatic brain injury were of interest in this study. Further, this study was designed to determine how the teachers learned to expertly manage their inclusive classrooms. Eight teachers met criteria...

  1. Porcine head response to blast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyein, Michelle K.

    Recent studies have shown an increase in the frequency of traumatic brain injuries related to blast exposure. However, the mechanisms that cause blast neurotrauma are unknown. Blast neurotrauma research using computational ...

  2. Cell biomechanics of the central nervous system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernick, Kristin Briana

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant cause of death and morbidity in both the civilian and military populations. The major causes of TBI, such as motor vehicle accidents, falls, sports concussions, and ballistic ...

  3. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biomarkers to identify traumatic brain injury for soldiers, sports figures April 28, 2015 Los Alamos and partners identify clues through body chemistry LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 28,...

  4. Study of an advanced helmet liner concept to reduce TBI : experiments & simulation using sandwich structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goel, Rahul, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    A large percentage of combat troops suffered Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI) due to Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) in recent wars in the Middle East. The majority of TBIs were caused by exposure to blast waves. Use of ...

  5. NEW GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN INJURY BIOMECHANICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    NEW GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN INJURY BIOMECHANICS Injury biomechanics is a well-known field made over the last half century use research data generated by workers in injury biomechanics. Wayne State University has an almost 70-year history in injury biomechanics research ­ including development

  6. Mechanisms of brain ventricle development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowery, Laura Anne

    2008-01-01

    The brain ventricles are a conserved system of fluid-filled cavities within the brain that form during the earliest stages of brain development. Abnormal brain ventricle development has been correlated with neurodevelopmental ...

  7. Optogenetic Brain Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pashaie, Ramin

    The brain is a large network of interconnected neurons where each cell functions as a nonlinear processing element. Unraveling the mysteries of information processing in the complex networks of the brain requires versatile ...

  8. Human Functional Brain Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review #12;2 | Portfolio Review: Human Functional Brain ImagingThe Wellcome Trust is a charity registered in England and Wales, no's role in supporting human functional brain imaging and have informed `our' speculations for the future

  9. AT NORTHWESTERN NORTHWESTERN BRAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    THE CANCER INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE NORTHWESTERN BRAIN TUMOR INSTITUTE THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE #12;THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE Established in 2008, the Northwestern Brain Tumor Institute (NBTI) is a nationally recognized leader in the fight against brain and spinal cord

  10. Transplantation of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in an animal model of diffuse traumatic axonal injury: Survival and differentiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    were stained en block in uranyl acetate prior to embedment.that were not stained with uranyl acetate were used for

  11. Transplantation of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in an animal model of diffuse traumatic axonal injury: Survival and differentiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    in a viral model of multiple sclerosis. J Neuroimmunol 23.in a chronic model of multiple sclerosis. Nature 422: 60.embryonic fibroblasts; MS, multiple sclerosis; NDM, neural

  12. Brain Awareness Season OHSU Brain Awareness Lecture Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Brain Awareness Season OHSU Brain Awareness Lecture Series Fascinating lectures by nationally is an opportunity for educators to learn about brain-related issues. Expert speakers familiar with current for the workshop is available on-line in January at http://seo.ohsu.edu. OHSU Brain Fair The Brain Fair features

  13. Life Satisfaction Over the First Five Years Following Burn Injury 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoskins, Jessica Lynne

    2012-10-19

    Individuals with burn injuries increasingly survive their injury, but we know little about their psychological outcomes following the injury. This study examines life satisfaction outcomes for 260 individuals who sustained burn injuries and were...

  14. Insects Injurious to Stored Grain. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, R. H.

    1894-01-01

    . ............................... J. W. PHILLIPS,. Wichita Falls. \\Vichita Co. do. :in. an. .or. ist. an. . . rot parag c i' blc raph, for for graph, P 1 of fig. 4 R"1 ?'A. Tnsch Life, read Insect I 1894, read 1890. upinting. I, for Alnl , read pu ;umois, r... pating. bead Angl Life. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. INSECT'S INJURIOUS TO STORED GRAIN R. H. PRICE, B. S. L L I only a , scarce! ons to nl~t~t~i up th seed the st " a clu resto Th Febr~ . . The injury done to stored grain...

  15. Original Contrbution Induction of oxidative and nitrosative damage leads to cerebrovascular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Original Contrbution Induction of oxidative and nitrosative damage leads to cerebrovascular 2013 Available online 4 March 2013 Keywords: Mild traumatic brain injury Blood­brain barrier Oxidative the hypothesis that oxidative damage of the cerebral vascular barrier interface (the blood­brain barrier, BBB

  16. Refinery, petrochemical plant injuries decline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-25

    The National Petroleum Refiners Association (NPRA) reports a 7% reduction in workplace injury and illness incidence rates for refineries in 1993, and a 21% decrease for petrochemical plants. The report summarizes data from 135 of the 162 US member refineries, and 117 of the 172 US member petrochemical plants. This paper summarizes the report findings.

  17. Ergonomics research: Impact on injuries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heller, A.

    1997-03-01

    No tool has characterized the modern workplace like the personal computer. An estimated 60 million PCs adorn desks in virtually every work environment today, achieving remarkable increases in productivity while virtually transforming entire industries. At the same time, however, an increasing number of employees are heavy computer users who suffer painful and sometimes debilitating (and occasionally career-ending) injuries called work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSDs) involving their hands and arms. Within computer-intensive occupations the incidence of injury has doubled every year for the past four years. These disorders cost the nation over $40 billion per year in medical costs alone. When productivity losses and disability and retraining costs are included, the total bill may top $80 billion per year. A common injury is tendonitis--inflammation of tendons, which connect muscle to bone. Another well-publicized injury, carpal tunnel syndrome, involves damage to the median nerve that travels through a tight space in the wrist called the carpal tunnel. In the past, safety at most work sites, including Lawrence Livermore, traditionally focused on avoiding accidental injuries caused by hazardous materials or industrial equipment. As a result, procedures and instruments were developed that can detect, for example, toxic solvents at extremely low levels. Little is known about the range of WRMSDs which can lend itself to avoiding these problems. In response to the lack of scientific data, Lawrence Livermore`s Interdisciplinary Ergonomics Research Program is addressing comprehensively the problem of WRMSDs plaguing US industry. The program uses a multidisciplinary research team that taps LLNL`s strengths in human factors design and engineering, computational modeling, biomechanical engineering, sensors, industrial hygiene, and occupational medicine.

  18. Spatiotemporal brain imaging and modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan, 1972-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis integrates hardware development, data analysis, and mathematical modeling to facilitate our understanding of brain cognition. Exploration of these brain mechanisms requires both structural and functional knowledge ...

  19. Portable MRI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  20. The Brain, the Broken Brain & the Neural Biology of Language

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collar, Juan I.

    The Brain, the Broken Brain & the Neural Biology of Language Presenter: Steven Small Time & Date.maproom.com )1949 N. Hoyne Café Email list https://cfcpwork.uchicago.edu/mailman/listinfo/cafe #12;The Brain, the Broken Brain & the Neural Biology of Language Presenter: Steven Small Time & Date: 7-9 PM Monday

  1. 414th Brookhaven Lecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anat Biegon

    2006-04-19

    "Of Boys and Girls and Bumps on the Head." Although it has been well documented that gender affects the prevalence of disorders such as depression and Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, recent head injury trials suggest that both age and sex affect the likelihood and degree of recovery from injuries to the brain. While girls are more likely to die following a traumatic brain injury than boys, that result is reversed after the age of 50, when men die twice as often.

  2. EDUCATION 01 THE LEARNING BRAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 EDUCATION 01 THE LEARNING BRAIN: INTRODUCTION TO CHILD DEVELOPEMENT AND EDUCATION FALL of the typically developing learning brain. Course Goals · Introduce the developing field of Mind, Brain is to explore the connections between brain research and education. The assignment has 3 parts. 1) Find

  3. Irradiation Alters MMP-2/TIMP-2 System and Collagen Type IV Degradation in Brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Won Hee; Warrington, Junie P.; Sonntag, William E.; Lee, Yong Woo

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is one of the major consequences of radiation-induced normal tissue injury in the central nervous system. We examined the effects of whole-brain irradiation on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)/tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation in the brain. Methods and Materials: Animals received either whole-brain irradiation (a single dose of 10 Gy {gamma}-rays or a fractionated dose of 40 Gy {gamma}-rays, total) or sham-irradiation and were maintained for 4, 8, and 24 h following irradiation. mRNA expression levels of MMPs and TIMPs in the brain were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The functional activity of MMPs was measured by in situ zymography, and degradation of ECM was visualized by collagen type IV immunofluorescent staining. Results: A significant increase in mRNA expression levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 was observed in irradiated brains compared to that in sham-irradiated controls. In situ zymography revealed a strong gelatinolytic activity in the brain 24 h postirradiation, and the enhanced gelatinolytic activity mediated by irradiation was significantly attenuated in the presence of anti-MMP-2 antibody. A significant reduction in collagen type IV immunoreactivity was also detected in the brain at 24 h after irradiation. In contrast, the levels of collagen type IV were not significantly changed at 4 and 8 h after irradiation compared with the sham-irradiated controls. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates for the first time that radiation induces an imbalance between MMP-2 and TIMP-2 levels and suggests that degradation of collagen type IV, a major ECM component of BBB basement membrane, may have a role in the pathogenesis of brain injury.

  4. MR imaging of the fetal brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glenn, Orit A.

    2010-01-01

    development of the fetal brain by MRI. Semin Perinatol 33:determination in normal fetal brain: a prenatal MR imagingin intrauterine fetal brain development. In: Abstracts of

  5. Genomic mosaicism in the human brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westra, Jurjen Willem

    2008-01-01

    Zlokovic BV (2008) The blood-brain barrier in health andmosaicism in the human brain ………………………………………. Chapter Threethe Alzheimer’s disease brain ………………………………. Chapter Five DNA

  6. Children's Brain Development Benefits from Longer Gestation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Mapping of the Human Brain. NeuroImage, Sendai, Japan.2005). Regional deficits in brain volume in schizophrenia: areso- nance imaging of brain development in premature and

  7. Brain Energy Metabolism During Experimental Neonatal Seizures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wasterlain, Claude G.; Thompson, Kerry W.; Suchomelova, Lucie; Niquet, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    premature or term neonate, brain ATP concentrations measuredreversible energy loss in the hypoxic immature rat brain.Brain Res Dev Brain Res 73(1):99–105 20. King LJ, Lowry OH,

  8. Wireless Magnetothermal Deep Brain Stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ritchie

    Wireless deep brain stimulation of well-defined neuronal populations could facilitate the study of intact brain circuits and the treatment of neurological disorders. Here we demonstrate minimally-invasive and remote neural ...

  9. Methods for assisting recovery of damaged brain and spinal cord using arrays of X-Ray microplanar beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham (Yaphank, NY); McDonald, III, John W. (Baltimore, MD)

    2007-12-04

    A method of assisting recovery of an injury site of brain or spinal cord injury includes providing a therapeutic dose of X-ray radiation to the injury site through an array of parallel microplanar beams. The dose at least temporarily removes regeneration inhibitors from the irradiated regions. Substantially unirradiated cells surviving between the microplanar beams migrate to the in-beam irradiated portion and assist in recovery. The dose may be administered in dose fractions over several sessions, separated in time, using angle-variable intersecting microbeam arrays (AVIMA). Additional doses may be administered by varying the orientation of the microplanar beams. The method may be enhanced by injecting stem cells into the injury site.

  10. Methods for assisting recovery of damaged brain and spinal cord using arrays of X-ray microplanar beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham; McDonald, III, John W.

    2007-01-02

    A method of assisting recovery of an injury site of brain or spinal cord injury includes providing a therapeutic dose of X-ray radiation to the injury site through an array of parallel microplanar beams. The dose at least temporarily removes regeneration inhibitors from the irradiated regions. Substantially unirradiated cells surviving between the microplanar beams migrate to the in-beam irradiated portion and assist in recovery. The dose may be administered in dose fractions over several sessions, separated in time, using angle-variable intersecting microbeam arrays (AVIMA). Additional doses may be administered by varying the orientation of the microplanar beams. The method may be enhanced by injecting stem cells into the injury site.

  11. SUB-POPULATION BRAIN ATLASES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    SUB-POPULATION BRAIN ATLASES Paul Thompson PhD, Michael S. Mega MD PhD, and Arthur W. Toga PhD Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, Brain Mapping Division and Alzheimer's Disease Center Dept. of Neurology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1769 A Chapter in: Brain Mapping: The Methods (2nd Edition

  12. How Minds Work Brains, Ontologies &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Memphis, University of

    or software agent is a virtual machine implemented on another virtual machine · The minds of humans or animals are virtual machines implemented on brains #12;Brains, Ontologies & Virtual Machines 13 Virtual1 How Minds Work Brains, Ontologies & Virtual Machines Stan Franklin Computer Science Division

  13. Consensus statement from the 2014 International Microdialysis Forum 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, Peter; Jalloh, Ibrahim; Helmy, Adel; Carpenter, Keri L.; Rostami, Elham; Bellander, Bo-Michael; Boutelle, Martyn G.; Chen, Jeff W.; Claassen, Jan; Dahyot-Fizelier, Claire; Enblad, Per; Gallagher, Clare N.; Helbok, Raimund; Hillered, Lars; Le Roux, Peter D.; Magnoni, Sandra; Mangat, Halinder S.; Menon, David K.; Nordström, Carl-Henrik; O'Phelan, Kristine H.; Oddo, Mauro; Barcena, Jon Perez; Robertson, Claudia; Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth; Sahuquillo, Juan; Smith, Martin; Stocchetti, Nino; Belli, Antonio; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Coles, Jonathan P.; Czosnyka, Marek; Dizdar, Nil; Goodman, J. Clay; Gupta, Arun K.; Nielsen, Troels H.; Marklund, Niklas; Montcriol, Ambroise; O'Connell, Mark T.; Poca, Maria A.; Sarrafzadeh, Asita; Shannon, Richard J.; Skjøth-Rasmussen, Jane; Smielewski, Peter; Stover, John F.; Timofeev, Ivan; Vespa, Paul; Zavala, Elizabeth; Ungerstedt, Urban

    2015-06-03

    search using the term microdialysis plus one of the following terms: ‘traumatic brain injury’, ‘brain injury’, ‘trauma’, ‘subarachnoid hemorrhage’, ‘stroke’, ‘epilepsy’, ‘intracerebral hematoma’ and ‘cost effectiveness’. We restricted our review... to suggest a trial of increasing serum glucose by intravenous or enteral administration and/or loosening glycemic control. 6. With regards to the safety profile, only the risk associated with the catheter placement is mentioned. I think there is an additional...

  14. Information Processing in Brain Microtubules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean Faber; Renato Portugal; Luiz Pinguelli Rosa

    2005-01-18

    Models of the mind are based on the possibility of computing in brain microtubules. From this point of view, information processing is the fundamental issue for understanding the brain mechanisms that produce consciousness. The cytoskeleton polymers could store and process information through their dynamic coupling mediated by mechanical energy. We analyze the problem of information transfer and storage in brain microtubules, considering them as a communication channel. We discuss the implications of assuming that consciousness is generated by the subneuronal process.

  15. Interference Effects in the Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerzy Szwed

    2008-03-14

    Interference effects are the most spectacular manifestation of the wave nature of phenomena. This note proposes a systematic search for such effects in the brain.

  16. Melatonin and the aging brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BONDY, S; SHARMAN, E

    2007-01-01

    mitochondrial decay of aging. Mol. Aspects Med. 26, Ames,the degenerative diseases of aging. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.2004. Retardation of brain aging by chronic treatment with

  17. Metastasis Infiltration: An Investigation of the Postoperative Brain-Tumor Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raore, Bethwel; Schniederjan, Matthew; Prabhu, Roshan; Brat, Daniel J.; Shu, Hui-Kuo; Olson, Jeffrey J.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: This study aims to evaluate brain infiltration of metastatic tumor cells past the main tumor resection margin to assess the biological basis for the use of stereotactic radiosurgery treatment of the tumor resection cavity and visualized resection edge or clinical target volume. Methods and Materials: Resection margin tissue was obtained after gross total resection of a small group of metastatic lesions from a variety of primary sources. The tissue at the border of the tumor and brain tissue was carefully oriented and processed to evaluate the presence of tumor cells within brain tissue and their distance from the resection margin. Results: Microscopic assessment of the radially oriented tissue samples showed no tumor cells infiltrating the surrounding brain tissue. Among the positive findings were reactive astrocytosis observed on the brain tissue immediately adjacent to the tumor resection bed margin. Conclusions: The lack of evidence of metastatic tumor cell infiltration into surrounding brain suggests the need to target only a narrow depth of the resection cavity margin to minimize normal tissue injury and prevent treatment size-dependent stereotactic radiosurgery complications.

  18. Vascular pathology in the aged human brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grinberg, Lea Tenenholz; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    vascular pathology, and the AD brain. Neurology 65: 259–265brospinal ?uid from the rat brain. Acta Neuropathol (Berl)and Alzheimer’s disease in the brains of elderly individuals

  19. Injury experience in coal mining, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-01-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for 1990. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and anthracite or bituminous coal. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison between coal mining and the metal and nonmetal mineral mining industries, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  20. Injury experience in metallic mineral mining, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of metallic mineral mining in the United States for 1992. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  1. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print Wednesday, 28 January 2015 00:00 With an aging population in...

  2. Predicting injury among nursing personnel using personal risk factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gjolberg, Ivar Henry

    2004-09-30

    The purpose of this thesis was to develop a means of predicting future injury among nursing personnel working in a hospital system. Nursing has one of the highest incidence rates of musculoskeletal injuries among U.S. occupations. Endemic...

  3. Rapid brain scanning radiopharmaceutical

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sargent, T.W. III; Shulgin, A.T.; Mathis, C.A.

    1987-03-03

    A method for detecting the blood flow in animals, particularly in the brain, is provided wherein a detectable amount of a novel radioactive compound of the formula 1 is administered to one animal: as given in figure in patent wherein R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] are independently alkyl of 1 to 6 carbon atoms or benzyl; R[sub 3] is alkyl of 1 to 6 carbon atoms, benzyl, cyclopropylalkyl of 4 to 6 carbon atoms, or cyanoalkyl of 2 to 6 carbon atoms; R[sub 4] is hydrogen, benzyl or alkyl of 1 to 6 carbon atoms; with the provisos that R[sub 4] is not isopropyl and when R[sub 4] is methyl, R[sub 3] is not benzyl; and X is a radioactive halogen. 2 figs.

  4. Rapid brain scanning radiopharmaceutical

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sargent, III, Thornton W. (Berkeley, CA); Shulgin, Alexander T. (Lafayette, CA); Mathis, Chester A. (Oakland, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A method for detecting the blood flow in animals, particularly in the brain, is provided wherein a detectable amount of a novel radioactive compound of the formula I is administered to one animal: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are independently alkyl of 1 to 6 carbon atoms or benzyl; R.sub.3 is alkyl of 1 to 6 carbon atoms, benzyl, cyclopropylalkyl of 4 to 6 carbon atoms, or cyanoalkyl of 2 to 6 carbon atoms; R.sub.4 is hydrogen, benzyl or alkyl of 1 to 6 carbon atoms; with the provisos that R.sub.4 is not isopropyl and when R.sub.4 is methyl, R.sub.3 is not benzyl; and X is a radioactive halogen.

  5. To: Supervisors and Managers Subject: Computer-Related Ergonomic Injuries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    To: Supervisors and Managers Subject: Computer-Related Ergonomic Injuries Date: March 14, 2007 The statistics we have collected at the Lab this year are disturbing to me in the area of ergonomic injuries from-blown injuries. Over the next seven days, all supervisors must meet with their employees, discuss good ergonomic

  6. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 2. 9. Blast injuries in foxholes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talbot, J.M.; Maupin, C.S.

    1985-04-01

    This experiment was conducted to gain information about the amount of protection from direct blast effects that may be provided by foxholes of uniform dimensions located within distances of a nuclear explosion that are recognized as lethal for combinations of thermal and ionzing radiations and indirect blast injuries. Sixteen dogs protected in foxholes were exposed in pairs to the nuclear detonation. Autopsies performed between 10 and 15 hours after the blast demonstrated mild to moderately severe lung hemorrhages and three instances of mild to moderately severe brain hemorrhage. Ruptured ear drums and blast damage to abdominal viscera were infrequent. Evidences of acute ionizing radiation injury consisted in decreases in absolute lymphocyte counts and changes in lymph nodes and spleens. Photographs and diagrams of foxholes, animals, and tissue speciments; graphs of blast pressures, gamma doses, and neutron fluxes are included.

  7. WORKERS' COMPENSATION GUIDE INJURY / INCIDENT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    employees with appropriate medical care and a portion of lost wages following a work-related injury, illness with the CSU Office of Risk Management phone number (970) 491-6745. The employee is required to supply that these be provided to us within 24 hours of a visit or prior to next work shift, whichever is first. TIME RECORD

  8. Injury vs Disease Lifestyles of pathogens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    of plant disease Nematodes alone cost ~$100 billions worldwide In the US, yearly cost ~ $15 billions #12 of temperature 3 Days After #12;#12;Effects of wind Mostly dispersal of pathogens In some cases, wind can prevent the development of new infections because it dries the surface of plants Wind can cause injury

  9. Injury vs Disease Lifestyles of pathogens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    In the US, yearly cost ~ $15 billions #12;4/29/2015 15 Impacts of plant disease In a worldwide scale 27 of wind Mostly dispersal of pathogens In some cases, wind can prevent the development of new infections because it dries the surface of plants Wind can cause injury (mechanical abrasion) Effects of temperature

  10. Lung injury in dimethyl sulfate poisoning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ip, M.; Wong, K.L.; Wong, K.F.; So, S.Y.

    1989-02-01

    Two manual laborers were exposed to dimethyl sulfate during work and sustained mucosal injury to the eyes and respiratory tract. In one of them, noncardiogenic pulmonary edema occurred and improved with high-dose methylprednisolone. On follow-up for 10 months, this patient developed persistent productive cough with no evidence of bronchiectasis or bronchial hyperreactivity.

  11. Modeling of Human Brain Tissues and Head Injuries Induced by Blast and Ballistic Impact 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Sahil G

    2013-11-07

    .............................................................................. 162 56 Absence of the fluid cavitation on the coup side in the CSF for a helmet protected head ........................................................................ 163 57 Fluid cavitation damage observed on the coup side in the CSF... to the impact site. Irreversible cavitation damage was also observed. However...

  12. Classification of brain compartments and head injury lesions by neural networks applied to magnetic resonance images 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kischell, Eric Robert

    1993-01-01

    were obtained on a 0. 6 Tesla Technicare MRT50A machine. A double echo sequence with a repetition time (TR) of 3000 ms and echo times (TE) of 30 and 120 ms was used. An average of 20 coronal sec- tions, slice thickness of 7. 5 mm and separation of 1...

  13. Diffuse optical monitoring of hemodynamic changes in piglet brain with closed head injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yodh, Arjun G.

    physiological events, such as apnea, cardiac arrest, and hypertonic saline infusion. In total, the investigation

  14. THERMOACOUSTIC TOMOGRAPHY ARISING IN BRAIN IMAGING ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-02-21

    THERMOACOUSTIC TOMOGRAPHY ARISING IN BRAIN IMAGING. PLAMEN STEFANOV AND GUNTHER UHLMANN. ABSTRACT. We study the mathematical ...

  15. Whole-Brain Thinking in Systems Architecting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udwadia, Firdaus E.

    Whole-Brain Thinking in Systems Architecting Tony Di Carlo,1, * Behrokh Khoshnevis,2 and Firdaus, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 WHOLE-BRAIN THINKING IN SYSTEMS ARCHITECTING paper explores the role of whole-brain thinking in the context of systems architecting. Brain research

  16. Brain Surface Conformal Mapping and Brain VolumetricBrain Surface Conformal Mapping and Brain Volumetric Harmonic Map withHarmonic Map with VariationalVariational MethodsMethods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brain Surface Conformal Mapping and Brain VolumetricBrain Surface Conformal Mapping and Brain Volumetric Harmonic Map withHarmonic Map with VariationalVariational MethodsMethods YalinYalin WangWang11 to the cortical surface matching problem. We further extended the algorithm to find a 3D volumetric harmonic map

  17. A Brain-to-Brain Interface for Real-Time Sharing of Sensorimotor Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    A Brain-to-Brain Interface for Real-Time Sharing of Sensorimotor Information Miguel Pais-Vieira1 Safra International Institute for Neuroscience of Natal (ELS-IINN), RN 59066-060, Natal, Brazil. A brain-to-brain the brains of two rats. In this BTBI, an ``encoder'' rat performed sensorimotor tasks that required

  18. Behavioral and Brain Sciences (forthcoming) Prcis of The Cognitive-Emotional Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pessoa, Luiz

    Behavioral and Brain Sciences (forthcoming) Précis of The Cognitive-Emotional Brain Luiz Pessoa that a specific brain circuit constitutes the emotional brain and its corollary, that cognition resides elsewhere, has shaped thinking about emotion and the brain for many years. Recent behavioral, neuropsychological

  19. Methods for functional brain imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witzel, Thomas, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has demonstrated the potential for non-invasive mapping of structure and function (fMRI) in the human brain. In this thesis, we propose a series of methodological developments towards ...

  20. Uptake of radiolabeled ions in normal and ischemia-damaged brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dienel, G.A.; Pulsinelli, W.A.

    1986-05-01

    The regional concentrations of nine radiochemicals were measured in rat brain after induction of cerebral ischemia to identify tracers concentrated by brain undergoing selective neuronal necrosis. Transient (30 minute) forebrain ischemia was produced in the rat; 24 hours after cerebral recirculation the radiochemicals were injected intravenously and allowed to circulate for 5 hours. The brain concentrations of the radiochemicals in dissected regions were determined by scintillation counting. Forebrain ischemia of this nature will produce extensive injury to striatal neurons but will spare the great majority of neocortical neurons at 24 hours. The regional concentrations of these radiochemicals varied considerably in both control and ischemic animals. In postischemic animals, 4 radionuclides (/sup 63/Ni, /sup 99/TcO/sub 4/, /sup 22/Na, and (/sup 3/H)tetracycline) were concentrated in the irreversibly damaged striatum in amounts ranging from 1.4 to 2.4 times greater than in normal tissue. The concentrations of /sup 65/Zn, /sup 59/Fe, /sup 32/PO/sub 4/, and /sup 147/Pm in postischemic brain were similar to or less than those in normal brain. The concentration of (14C)EDTA was increased in injured and uninjured brain of postischemic rats. Autoradiographic analysis of the distribution patterns of some of these ions in normal animals showed that /sup 99/TcO/sub 4/, /sup 22/Na, /sup 65/Zn, and /sup 59/Fe were distributed more uniformly throughout the brain than were /sup 32/PO/sub 4/, /sup 63/Ni, and /sup 147/Pm. At 24 or 48 hours after ischemia, /sup 63/Ni, /sup 99/TcO/sub 4/, and /sup 22/Na were preferentially concentrated in the damaged striatum and hippocampus, whereas /sup 65/Zn, /sup 59/Fe, /sup 32/PO/sub 4/, and /sup 147/Pm did not accumulate in irreversibly injured tissue. Of the radiochemicals tested to date, Ni, TcO/sub 4/, and tetracycline may be useful for diagnosing ischemic brain injury in humans, using positron emission tomography.

  1. This paper presents ethnographic research on the relationship between gender differences in the expression of traumatic stress and emic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Quintana Roo, Mexico had the greatest impact on gender differences in the expression in the expression of traumatic stress and emic constructions of social power relating to the humoral categories hot (q'ix) and cold (ke) in a Q'eqchi' refugee community in Campeche, Mexico. Women disproportionately

  2. Brain Imaging with Positron Emission Tomography: Quantification and Biomedical Applications in Alzheimer's Disease and Brain Tumors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wardak, Mirwais

    2013-01-01

    AB, Elson LM. The human brain coloring book. 1st ed. New21. Toga AW, Mazziotta JC. Brain mapping : the systems. SanSR, Phelps ME. Imaging Brain Function with Positron Emission

  3. How brain images reveal cognition : an ethnographic study of meaning-making in brain mapping practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ala?, Morana

    2006-01-01

    cortical surface’, Human Brain Mapping, Volume 8, pp. 272-attention affects brain activity in Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci, USA,Atlas of the Human Brain, Stuttgart: Thieme. TOOTELL,

  4. The genetics and epigenetics of sex differences in the brain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghahramani, Negar

    2012-01-01

    modifications during brain sexual differentiation. (Arnold, and E. Vilain. (2012). Brain and behavior phenotypesThe genetics of sex differences in brain and behavior. Front

  5. Microglial and neuronal abnormalities in the autistic brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, John T.

    2009-01-01

    G. , Dager, S. R. , 2002. Brain sructural abnormalities inwith autistic behavior. Brain Behav Immun 7, 97- Sparks, B.G. , Dager, S. R. , 2002. Brain sructural abnormalities in

  6. Late Pseudocoarctation Syndrome After Stent-Graft Implantation For Traumatic Aortic Rupture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letocart, Vincent Fau, Georges Tirouvanziam, Ashok; Toquet, Claire; Al Habash, Oussama Guerin, Patrice; Rousseau, Herve; Crochet, Dominique

    2013-06-15

    The present observation illustrates an unusual complication occurring after stent-grafting (S-graft) for aortic isthmus rupture. A 22-year-old patient, treated by S-graft in the emergency department for traumatic aortic rupture, was readmitted 10 months later with pseudocoarctation syndrome. A membrane was found inside the stent-graft that had induced a pseudo-dissection, which caused the pseudocoarctation syndrome. Surgical treatment consisted of removing the stent-graft and membrane and replacing it with a vascular implant. The patient's clinical course was fair. The suggested mechanism was circumferential neoendothelialization of the stent-graft. Dehiscence caused the superior part of the membrane to drop into the lumen of the stent-graft creating a 'false channel' that compressed the 'true lumen' and induced 'pseudocoarctation' syndrome. The cause of the extensive neointimalization remains unexplained. Thoracic aortic stent-grafts require regular follow-up monitoring by angioscan or angio-magnetic resonance imaging.

  7. BrainMap `95 workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    The fourth annual BrainMap workshop was held at La Mansion del Rio Hotel in San Antonio December 3--4, 1995. The conference title was ``Human Brain Mapping and Modeling.`` The meeting was attended by 137 registered participants and 30 observers from 82 institutions representing 12 countries. The meeting focused on the technical issues associated with brain mapping and modeling. A total of 23 papers were presented covering the following topics: spatial normalization and registration; functional image analysis; metanalysis and modeling; and new horizons in biological databases. The full program with abstracts was available on the Research Imaging Center`s web site. A book will be published by John Wiley and Sons prior to the end of 1998.

  8. Constructing loss : exploring the traumatic effects of bereavement due to HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis on aid workers in South Africa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranjbar, Vania

    2013-07-02

    This thesis aimed to investigate, first, the potentially traumatic effects of AIDS-related bereavement on HIV/AIDS aid workers in South Africa; second, the resources that aid workers utilise in order to cope with their ...

  9. 2010 Idaho National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-09-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  10. 2010 Argonne National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-06-20

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  11. 2010 Hanford Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-10-05

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  12. 2010 Savannah River Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-09-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  13. 2010 Pantex Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-06-29

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  14. 2010 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-08-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  15. 2010 Kansas City Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-06-20

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  16. 2010 Sandia National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-10-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  17. Brain&oscillations&mediate&memory&suppression&1! Running&Title:&BRAIN&OSCILLATIONS&MEDIATE&MEMORY&SUPPRESSION&

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubart, Christoph

    Brain&oscillations&mediate&memory&suppression&1! & ! Running&Title:&BRAIN&OSCILLATIONS&MEDIATE&MEMORY&SUPPRESSION& & & Brain&oscillations&mediate&successful&suppression&of&unwanted&memories& Gerd&T.&Waldhauser1,&Karl1Heinz.de& Phone:&+49(0)753118815707& Fax:&+49(0)753118814829& #12;Brain&oscillations&mediate&memory&suppression&2

  18. Words in the brain: lexical determinants of word-induced brain activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coulson, Seana

    Words in the brain: lexical determinants of word-induced brain activity Lee Osterhout*, Mark Allen Abstract Many studies have shown that open- and closed-class words elicit different patterns of brain. Introduction Is the brain response to words determined primarily by their linguistic functions

  19. Perspective Great Expectations: Using Whole-Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deco, Gustavo

    Neuron Perspective Great Expectations: Using Whole-Brain Computational Connectomics for Understanding Neuropsychiatric Disorders Gustavo Deco1,2,* and Morten L. Kringelbach3,4 1Center for Brain://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2014.08.034 The study of human brain networks with in vivo neuroimaging has given

  20. Brain Evolution Relevant to P. Thomas Schoenemann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenemann, P. Thomas

    Brain Evolution Relevant to Language P. Thomas Schoenemann James Madison University 1. Introduction The evolution of language obviously presupposes a brain that made language possible. At the same time, given of the human brain must have been language. Given that language is at least as much a cultural

  1. Brain dynamics promotes function Carlos Lourenco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisboa, Universidade Técnica de

    Brain dynamics promotes function Carlos Louren¸co 1 Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon, 1049-001 Lisboa - Portugal Abstract. Dynamical structure in the brain promotes biological func- tion. Computational scientists have new opportunities to receive 'algorithmic' inspiration from brain processes

  2. Brain Surface Conformal Parameterization with Algebraic Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yalin

    Brain Surface Conformal Parameterization with Algebraic Functions Yalin Wang1,2 , Xianfeng Gu3 a brain surface to a multi-hole disk. The re- sulting parameterizations do not have any singularities of anatomical surfaces in MRI scans of the brain, in- cluding the hippocampi and the cerebral cortices

  3. Understanding complexity in the human brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gazzaniga, Michael

    Understanding complexity in the human brain Danielle S. Bassett1 and Michael S. Gazzaniga2 1 the ultimate aim of neuroscientific enquiry is to gain an understanding of the brain and how its work- ings of mind­brain mechanisms if the cumulative findings from these neu- roscientific studies are coupled

  4. Brain Organization and Computation Andreas Schierwagen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schierwagen, Andreas

    Brain Organization and Computation Andreas Schierwagen Institute for Computer Science, Intelligent://www.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/~schierwa Abstract. Theories of how the brain computes can be differentiated in three general conceptions systems approach. The discussion of key features of brain organization (i.e. structure with function

  5. 1. Brain vs Computer Brian Whitworth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitworth, Brian

    7/12/2011 1 1. Brain vs Computer © Brian Whitworth An Overview http://brianwhitworth.com 2 Aim Compare how computers process information vs how the brain process the senses? Define the main differences://brianwhitworth.com 3 Human vs computer centered · The brain has changed little in last 3 million years ­ Under

  6. PUZZLING SYMPTOMS: EATING DISORDERS AND THE BRAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Squire, Larry R.

    PUZZLING SYMPTOMS: EATING DISORDERS AND THE BRAIN A FAMILY GUIDE TO THE NEUROBIOLOGY OF EATING TO DO WITH THE BRAIN? Although people with eating disorders struggle to eat normally, this is only now believe that part of the problem has to do with how our brains process information about

  7. VOLUMETRIC HARMONIC BRAIN MAPPING Yalin Wang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    VOLUMETRIC HARMONIC BRAIN MAPPING Yalin Wang1 , Xianfeng Gu2 , Tony F. Chan1 , Paul M. Thompson3 general investigation of 3D volumetric brain har- monic mapping. The motivations for 3D volumetric brain volumetric harmonic map- ping algorithm. The algorithm can work with manifolds with genus zero and non genus

  8. CAMPAIGN FOR SALK DYNAMIC BRAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellugi, Ursula

    ,000 epigenetic switches control daily liver cycles 26 Aggressive brain tumors can originate from a range Parting shots 21 Two more Salk faculty elected as AAAS Fellows 22 Creative projects receive Innovation Grant Awards Tom Albright named president of Academy of Neuroscience for Architecture 23 Salk

  9. Children's Conceptions of the Brain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McColl, Judith

    2012-03-14

    The present study explored children’s developing conceptions of the brain in order to enhance previous research and to contribute to debates regarding the nature of children’s naïve biological theories. 56 participants aged 5, 7 and 9-years-old were...

  10. Brain science, addiction and drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiesner, Karoline

    Designing your future Page 7 Theme: Nanoscience and Quantum Information Exchanging keys in the Canaries Page:searchUniversity of Bristol · Research Review · Issue 10 · October 2005 research themes issue #12;Research themes 2005 Establishedresearchthemes Theme: Neuroscience Brain science, addiction and drugs Other established research themes

  11. Accelerating axonal growth promotes motor recovery after peripheral nerve injury in mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gertler, Frank

    Although peripheral nerves can regenerate after injury, proximal nerve injury in humans results in minimal restoration of motor function. One possible explanation for this is that injury-induced axonal growth is too slow. ...

  12. Brain Research and DLM: An overview 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irby, Beverly J.; Lara-Alecio, Rafael

    2010-10-22

    stream_source_info Brain Research and DLM(2005).pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 16021 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Brain Research and DLM(2005).pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859...-1 Brain Research and DLM: An Overview Beverly J. Irby, Ed.D. Professor and Chair Sam Houston State University Rafael Lara-Alecio, Ph.D. Professor and Director Texas A&M University November 4, 2005 Basic Brain Information ? The brain research...

  13. Injury and Repair: Retinal Remodeling Robert E. Marc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc, Robert E.

    Injury and Repair: Retinal Remodeling Robert E. Marc Department of Ophthalmology John A. Moran Eye Center 65 Mario Capecchi Dr University of Utah Salt Lake City, UT 84132 robert.marc@hsc.utah.edu Keywords photoreceptors In press Elsevier Encyclopedia of the Eye Robert E. Marc :: Chapter 220 :: Injury and Repair

  14. Type A Investigation of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Complex on October 11, 2004 Type A Investigation of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator...

  15. Brain Prostheses as a Dynamic System (Immortalizing the Human Brain?)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vadim Astakhov; Tamara Astakhova

    2007-05-17

    Interest in development of brain prostheses, which might be proposed to recover mental functions lost due to neuron-degenerative disease or trauma, requires new methods in molecular engineering and nanotechnology to build artificial brain tissues. We develop a Dynamic Core model to analyze complexity of damaged biological neural network as well as transition and recovery of the system functionality due to changes in the system environment. We provide a method to model complexity of physical systems which might be proposed as an artificial tissue or prosthesis. Delocalization of Dynamic Core model is developed to analyze migration of mental functions in dynamic bio-systems which undergo architecture transition induced by trauma. Term Dynamic Core is used to define a set of causally related functions and Delocalization is used to describe the process of migration. Information geometry and topological formalisms are proposed to analyze information processes. A holographic model is proposed to construct dynamic environment with self-poetic Dynamic Core which preserve functional properties under transition from one host to another. We found statistical constraints for complex systems which conserve a Dynamic Core under environment transition. Also we suggest those constraints might provide recommendations for nanotechnologies and tissue engineering used in development of an artificial brain tissue.

  16. Of Boys and girls and Bumps on the Head (414th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biegon, Anat

    2006-04-19

    If you are a young man driving your wife and her parents, be very careful. If you are involved in a serious car accident, you and your mother-in-law are most likely to survive. This 'warning' is one conclusion of Anat Biegon's upcoming 414th Brookhaven Lecture, entitled 'Of Boys and Girls and Bumps on the Head.' Joanna Fowler of the Chemistry Department, Director of BNL's Translational Neuroimaging Center, will introduce the lecturer. Biegon, a senior medical scientist in the Medical Department, will detail how research has refined scientists view of gender differences in the prevalence and outcome of diseases affecting the brain. Although it has been well documented that gender affects the prevalence of disorders such as depression and Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, recent head injury trials suggest that both age and sex affect the likelihood and degree of recovery from injuries to the brain. While girls are more likely to die following a traumatic brain injury than boys, that result is reversed after the age of 50, when men die twice as often. Although it has been well documented that gender affects the prevalence of disorders such as depression and Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, recent head injury trials suggest that both age and sex affect the likelihood and degree of recovery from injuries to the brain. While girls are more likely to die following a traumatic brain injury than boys, that result is reversed after the age of 50, when men die twice as often.

  17. Investigation of injury data at a detonator facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Apodaca, Marylou; Bustamante, Robert A.; Armijo, Mark A.; Lawton, Cindy M.

    2015-08-28

    This paper focuses on the collection of injury data; incorporation of this information into a visual format that DET management uses to make decisions to improving operations. Results from this 1 study include of the following: chemical exposure cases have declined because the Hazard Assessment of each DET operation has been formally reviewed; Slip/Trip/Fall factors have decreased due to Slip Simulator training; and work station evaluations have led to fewer injuries with Lift/Push/Pull factors. Rotation of employees, ergonomically friendly balances, automatic powder dispensers, and other equipment procurements will lower ergonomic injuries.

  18. Mechanisms of olfactory ensheathing cell-enhanced neurite outgrowth and axon regeneration after spinal cord injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khankan, Rana R.

    2015-01-01

    milieu which prevents CNS axon regeneration following injury. Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a promising therapy

  19. Brain Mapping Using Topology Graphs Obtained by Surface Segmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linsen, Lars

    Brain Mapping Using Topology Graphs Obtained by Surface Segmentation Fabien Vivodtzev1 , Lars@ucdavis.edu Summary. Brain mapping is a technique used to alleviate the tedious and time- consuming process of annotating brains by mapping existing annotations from brain atlases to individual brains. We introduce

  20. Vulnerability of ex vivo ?-motor nerve terminals to hypoxia-reperfusion injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baxter, Rebecca L.

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence shows that presynaptic nerve terminals throughout the nervous system are vulnerable to a range of traumatic, toxic and disease-related neurodegenerative stimuli. The aim of this study was to ...

  1. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print With an aging population in America, it is more important than ever to discover ways to treat or prevent diseases...

  2. "Artificial" brains, electrical grids, and disease modeling:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science discoveries unveiled "Artificial" brains, electrical grids, and disease modeling: Los Alamos science discoveries unveiled September 15 The event is an opportunity for...

  3. Novel Fluorine-Containing NMDA Antagonists for Brain Imaging: In Vitro Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarado, M.; Biegon, A.

    2001-01-01

    The NMDA receptor has been implicated in neuronal death following stroke, brain injury and neurodegenerative disorders (e.g. Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's disease) and in physiological functions (e.g. memory and cognition). Non-competitive antagonists, such as MK- 801 and CNS-1102, that block the action of glutamate at the NMDA receptor have been shown to be neuroprotective by blocking the influx of calcium into the cells. As a result, they are being considered as therapeutic agents for the above mentioned diseases. Several Fluorine-containing novel analogs of NMDA channel blockers have been synthesized and evaluated in search of a compound suitable for 18F labeling and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Based on in vitro binding assay studies on rat brain membranes, the novel compounds examined displayed a range of affinities. Preliminary analyses indicated that chlorine is the best halogen on the ring, and that ethyl fluoro derivatives are more potent than methyl-fluoro compounds. Further analysis based on autoradiography will be needed to examine the regional binding characteristics of the novel compounds examined in this study. Labeling with 18F will allow the use of these compounds in humans, generating new insights into mechanisms and treatment of diseases involving malfunction of the glutamatergic system in the brain.

  4. Exploring the motivational brain: effects of implicit power motivation on brain activation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultheiss, Oliver C.

    Exploring the motivational brain: effects of implicit power motivation on brain activation the hypothesis that implicit power motivation (nPower), in interaction with power incentives, influences activation of brain systems mediating motivation. Twelve individuals low (lowest quartile) and 12 individuals

  5. Thesis Oscillations in the Brain -1-Marieke van Vugt Oscillations in the Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vugt, Marieke

    Thesis Oscillations in the Brain -1- Marieke van Vugt Oscillations in the Brain: A Dynamic Memory Model Marieke van Vugt Honors thesis sciences University College Utrecht Spring semester 2002 #12;Thesis #12;Thesis Oscillations in the Brain -3- Marieke van Vugt Introduction In the field of neuroscience

  6. Focal Brain Lesions to Critical Locations Cause Widespread Disruption of the Modular Organization of the Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Focal Brain Lesions to Critical Locations Cause Widespread Disruption of the Modular Organization of the Brain Caterina Gratton*, Emi M. Nomura*, Fernando Pérez, and Mark DEsposito Abstract Although it is generally assumed that brain damage pre- dominantly affects only the function of the damaged region, here we

  7. Exploring candidate genes for human brain diseases from a brain-specific gene network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang,Tianzi

    identifying multiple candidate genes for genetic human brain diseases from a brain-specific gene network; Candidate genes Many common human brain diseases, such as schizo- phrenia, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, depres- sion, etc., have prominent genetic components [1,2]. Most researchers think that large

  8. Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Switches How GABA Affects Nociceptive Plasticity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yung-Jen

    2015-05-11

    Research has shown that spinal cord injury (SCI) can induce neural hyperexcitability within the spinal cord that facilitates nociceptive reflexes. Nociceptive inputs have been shown to sensitize spinal nociceptive systems, ...

  9. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the Head Injury...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2004 October 15, 2004 On August 25, 2004, an employee of Washington TRU Solution, LLC (WTS) sustained a head injury when he was struck by a C-clamp and rope attachment that broke...

  10. Characterization of Morphine Self-Administration Following Spinal Cord Injury 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woller, Sarah Ann

    2013-07-16

    Approximately two-thirds of patients will experience pain following spinal cord injury (SCI). This pain can arise as an immediate consequence of SCI, or can develop over time into chronic, neuropathic pain. Individuals ...

  11. 2009 Pantex Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2010-12-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  12. 2009 Hanford Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2010-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  13. 2009 Argonne National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2010-08-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  14. 2009 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2010-11-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  15. 2008 Idaho National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2010-11-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  16. Intraoperative Brain Tumor Resection Cavity Characterization with Conoscopic Holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intraoperative Brain Tumor Resection Cavity Characterization with Conoscopic Holography Amber L ABSTRACT Brain shift compromises the accuracy of neurosurgical image-guided interventions if not corrected approach to correcting for brain shift. Laser range scan, instrument swabbing, and conoscopic holography

  17. Genetic associations with brain cortical thickness in multiple sclerosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    onset of multiple sclerosis. Brain 131, 808–817. Georgala,in multiple sclerosis. Brain 126, Shannon, P. , Markiel,Genes, Brain and Behavior (2015) 14: 217–227 doi:

  18. Ultrasound-Enhanced Drug Transport and Distribution in the Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    enhanced taxol delivery in brain tumor patients usingopening of the blood–brain barrier in rabbits. Radiology.and Distribution in the Brain Ying Liu, 1 Sumit Paliwal, 2

  19. Brain Derived Vision Algorithm on High Performance Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    Granger, R. : Novel brain-derived algorithms scale linearly37:345–369 17. Brain derived vision on IBM CELL: http://10.1007/s10766-009-0106-9 Brain Derived Vision Algorithm on

  20. VOLUMETRIC HARMONIC BRAIN MAPPING Yalin Wang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VOLUMETRIC HARMONIC BRAIN MAPPING Yalin Wang1 , Xianfeng Gu2 , Tony F. Chan1 , Paul M. Thompson3. The first one is to find a harmonic map from a 3 manifold to a 3D solid sphere and the second is a sphere- gest that 3D harmonic mapping of brain volumes to a solid sphere can provide a canonical coordinate

  1. McCausland Center For Brain Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    .mricro.com). he Siemens 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imag- ing system at the McCausland Center for Brain Imaging the Palmetto Richland Memorial Hospi- tal. The Siemens 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imag- ing system is fitted brain remains one of the great scientific challenges of our generation. With approximately 100 billion

  2. Sparse Brain Network Recovery under Compressed Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Moo K.

    a small set of noisy measurements. We briefly show that the penalized linear regression for partial for a sparse brain network recovery. As an illustration, we construct sparse brain networks of 97 regions the government of Korea to M.K.C., by grant No. R31-2008-000-10103-0 from the WCU project of the MEST and the NRF

  3. Drug transport in brain via the cerebrospinal fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardridge, William M

    2011-01-01

    diffusion. Drug transport into cerebrospinal fluid vs. brainDrug transport from blood to interstitial fluid (ISF) isDrug transport in brain via the cerebrospinal fluid William

  4. The PPARalpha Agonist Fenofibrate Preserves Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Inhibits Microglial Activation After Whole-Brain Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanan, Sriram [Department of Cancer Biology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Brain Tumor Center of Excellence, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Kooshki, Mitra; Zhao Weiling [Brain Tumor Center of Excellence, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Hsu, F.-C. [Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Riddle, David R. [Brain Tumor Center of Excellence, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Robbins, Mike E., E-mail: mrobbins@wfubmc.ed [Brain Tumor Center of Excellence, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: Whole-brain irradiation (WBI) leads to cognitive impairment months to years after radiation. Numerous studies suggest that decreased hippocampal neurogenesis and microglial activation are involved in the pathogenesis of WBI-induced brain injury. The goal of this study was to investigate whether administration of the peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha agonist fenofibrate would prevent the detrimental effect of WBI on hippocampal neurogenesis. Methods and Materials: For this study, 129S1/SvImJ wild-type and PPARalpha knockout mice that were fed either regular or 0.2% wt/wt fenofibrate-containing chow received either sham irradiation or WBI (10-Gy single dose of {sup 137}Cs gamma-rays). Mice were injected intraperitoneally with bromodeoxyuridine to label the surviving cells at 1 month after WBI, and the newborn neurons were counted at 2 months after WBI by use of bromodeoxyuridine/neuronal nuclei double immunofluorescence. Proliferation in the subgranular zone and microglial activation were measured at 1 week and 2 months after WBI by use of Ki-67 and CD68 immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results: Whole-brain irradiation led to a significant decrease in the number of newborn hippocampal neurons 2 months after it was performed. Fenofibrate prevented this decrease by promoting the survival of newborn cells in the dentate gyrus. In addition, fenofibrate treatment was associated with decreased microglial activation in the dentate gyrus after WBI. The neuroprotective effects of fenofibrate were abolished in the knockout mice, indicating a PPARalpha-dependent mechanism or mechanisms. Conclusions: These data highlight a novel role for PPARalpha ligands in improving neurogenesis after WBI and offer the promise of improving the quality of life for brain cancer patients receiving radiotherapy.

  5. The role of whole brain radiation therapy in the management of newly diagnosed brain metastases: a systematic review and evidence-based clinical practice guideline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    MANUSCRIPT The role of whole brain radiation therapy in themanagement of newly diagnosed brain metastases: a systematicNeurosurgery, Iowa Spine and Brain Institute, Iowa City, IA,

  6. The Noisy Brain: Stochastic Dynamics as a Principle of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rolls, Edmund T.

    The Noisy Brain: Stochastic Dynamics as a Principle of Brain Function Edmund T. Rolls Oxford Centre random spiking times of individual neurons produce a source of noise in the brain. The aim of this book is to consider the effects of this and other noise on brain pro- cessing. We show that in cortical networks

  7. Learning Brain Connectivity of Alzheimer's Disease from Neuroimaging Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    Learning Brain Connectivity of Alzheimer's Disease from Neuroimaging Data Shui Huang2 , Jing Li2 to alternation in the functional brain network, i.e., the functional connectivity among different brain regions. In this paper, we consider the problem of learning functional brain connectivity from neuroimaging, which holds

  8. Wavelets and functional magnetic resonance imaging of the human brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breakspear, Michael

    Wavelets and functional magnetic resonance imaging of the human brain Ed Bullmore,a,* Jalal Fadili Breakspeare a Brain Mapping Unit and Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke of Psychiatry (King's College), London, UK e Brain Dynamics Centre (Westmead Hospital) and School of Physics

  9. Zo Rebecca Hunter Plasticity of the adult human brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallenrode, May-Britt

    Zoë Rebecca Hunter Plasticity of the adult human brain and motor recovery after stroke PICS © Institute of Cognitive Science #12;1 Bachelor's Thesis Plasticity of the adult human brain and motor brain and motor recovery after stroke 2 Abstract Stroke may cause a major destruction of brain tissue

  10. NEAR INFRARED IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY FOR BRAIN ACTIVITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazici, Birsen

    emphasis on the techology's potential in security and defense applications. Keywords: functional brain

  11. Stochastic generation of biologically accurate brain networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluri, Aravind

    2006-04-12

    Gen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 2. Synapses in NeuroConstruct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 D. Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 V LATTICE/GROUP : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 35 A. Introduction... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 B. Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 1. Lattice geometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 2. Examples of lattice geometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 C. Lattice structures in the brain...

  12. Where Brain, Body and World Collide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Andy

    1998-01-01

    The brain fascinates because it is the biological organ of mindfulness itself. It is the inner engine that drives intelligent behavior. Such a depiction provides a worthy antidote to the once-popular vision of the mind as ...

  13. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tim Berners-Lee The man credited with inventing the World Wide Web surely understood the power of connectivity. A human brain incorporates a massive web of interconnected neurons...

  14. Scaling in topological properties of brain networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Soibam Shyamchand; Ishrat, Romana; Sharma, B Indrajit; Singh, R K Brojen

    2015-01-01

    The organization in brain networks shows highly modular features with weak inter-modular interaction. The topology of the networks involves emergence of modules and sub-modules at different levels of constitution governed by fractal laws. The modular organization, in terms of modular mass, inter-modular, and intra-modular interaction, also obeys fractal nature. The parameters which characterize topological properties of brain networks follow one parameter scaling theory in all levels of network structure which reveals the self-similar rules governing the network structure. The calculated fractal dimensions of brain networks of different species are found to decrease when one goes from lower to higher level species which implicates the more ordered and self-organized topography at higher level species. The sparsely distributed hubs in brain networks may be most influencing nodes but their absence may not cause network breakdown, and centrality parameters characterizing them also follow one parameter scaling la...

  15. Brain perfusion imaging : performance and accuracy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Fan

    2013-07-02

    Brain perfusion weighted images acquired using dynamic contrast studies have an important clinical role in acute stroke diagnosis and treatment decisions. The purpose of my PhD research is to develop novel methodologies ...

  16. Network induces burst synchronisation in cat brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ewandson L. Lameu; Fernando S. Borges; Rafael R. Borges; Antonio M. Batista; Murilo S. Baptista; Ricardo L. Viana

    2015-03-07

    The brain of mammals are divided into different cortical areas that are anatomically connected forming larger networks which perform cognitive tasks. The cat cerebral cortex is composed of 65 areas organised into the visual, auditory, somatosensory-motor and frontolimbic cognitive regions. We have built a network of networks, in which networks are connected among themselves according to the connections observed in the cat cortical areas aiming to study how inputs drive the synchronous behaviour in this cat brain-like network. We show that without external perturbations it is possible to observe high level of bursting synchronisation between neurons within almost all areas, except for the auditory area. Bursting synchronisation appears between neurons in the auditory region when an external perturbation is applied in another cognitive area. This is a clear evidence that pattern formation and collective behaviour in the brain might be a process mediated by other brain areas under stimulation.

  17. Melatonin, oxidative stress and the aging brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bondy, SC; Sharman, EH

    2010-01-01

    markers in healthy aging and Alzheimer’s disease.Neurobiol Aging. 8. Kim R, Emi M, Tanabe K. Role ofFree radicals and brain aging. Clin Geriatr Med. 2004;20:

  18. Moab Project Logs 2 Million Work Hours Without Lost-Time Injury...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Logs 2 Million Work Hours Without Lost-Time Injury or Illness Moab Project Logs 2 Million Work Hours Without Lost-Time Injury or Illness March 31, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Empty...

  19. The role of stress in recovery of function after spinal cord injury 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washburn, Stephanie Nicole

    2009-05-15

    Research has shown that exposure to just 6 minutes of uncontrollable shock 24 hours following contusion injury impairs locomotor recovery and leads to greater tissue loss at the injury epicenter. Uncontrollable shock is ...

  20. Understanding human-space suit interaction to prevent injury during extravehicular activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Allison P. (Allison Paige)

    2014-01-01

    Extravehicular Activity (EVA) is a critical component of human spaceflight. Working in gas-pressurized space suits, however, causes fatigue, unnecessary energy expenditure, and injury. The problem of injury is particularly ...

  1. Analgesia or Addiction: Implications for Morphine Use After Spinal Cord Injury 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woller, Sarah Ann

    2012-07-16

    Up to 65% of individuals with a spinal cord injury (SCI) experience neuropathic pain, and cite this as one of the most significant consequences of injury. Opiate analgesics are one of the most effective, but also most ...

  2. Near to the Brain: Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy as a Lightweight Brain Imaging Technique for Visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    Near to the Brain: Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy as a Lightweight Brain Imaging Technique conditions. The brain activity plot is the mean change in deoxygenated hemoglobin over 130 trials of each and position judgment tasks in pie charts and bar graphs. The brain activity plot is the mean chance

  3. UCSC Injury and Illness Prevention Program Revised 10/01 University of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    ) Shops (5) Mechanical/Boiler Rooms (6) Kitchens #12;UCSC Injury and Illness Prevention Program (rev 04

  4. Central Nervous System Injury, Neurocognitive and Quality of Life Outcomes in Children with Brain Tumors Treated with Chemotherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baron Nelson, Mary Christine

    2012-01-01

    National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners (Certification as a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (CPNP) byCertification Board of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners xi

  5. Hypoglycemia is associated with increased risk for brain injury and adverse neurodevelopmental outcome in neonates at risk for encephalopathy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    J Child Neurol. 2011. [23] Spar JA, Lewine JD, Orrison WW,after neonatal hypoglycemia was by Spar et al. in 1994, who

  6. Central Nervous System Injury, Neurocognitive and Quality of Life Outcomes in Children with Brain Tumors Treated with Chemotherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baron Nelson, Mary Christine

    2012-01-01

    adult survivors of childhood cancer. Journal of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Nursing,adult survivors of childhood cancer: unique needs of an emerging population. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing,

  7. Date of Injury Date Time In Time Out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : NORMAL Work Schedule (ie: MF, 8am5pm)First Name Last Name # of hours missed from work #12;RISK MGTDate of Injury Date Time In Time Out Total time worked medical appt no work within restrictions Next Medical Appointment(s): Tuesday of each week. Risk Mgt email: workcomp@colostate.edu; fax

  8. Accident/Injury Reporting, Investigation, & Basic First Aid Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Nicholas

    . It is designed to help reduce injuries by reducing unsafe or hazardous conditions and discouraging accident causing unsafe acts or practices. It applies to all SFASU employees and campus locations conditions to your supervisor and the Safety Department by filling out a Report of Safety or Health Hazard

  9. Foliar ozone injury and gas exchange among black cherry genotypes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouterick, K.B.; Skelly, J.M.; Fredericksen, T.S.; Kolb, T.E.; Savage, J.E.; Snyder, K.R. (Penn State Univ., University Park, PA (United States))

    1994-06-01

    The effect of differing ozone exposures on seedlings of black cherry genotypes was investigated in northcentral Pennsylvania. Ozone exclusion treatments were administrated to half-sib families R12 and MO-7, and wild-type (WT) grown in open-top chambers. Over the 1993 growing season, left gas exchange and stem volume were related to percentage of foliar ozone injury observed as adaxial stipple. Ozone symptoms decreased significantly with increasing ozone filtration. R12 exhibited the most severe foliar injury, while WT seedlings showed slightly less symptoms. MO-7 had the least amount of foliar injury. No clear trends in stomatal conductance or net photosynthesis were observed until August. During August, foliar injury was positively related to stomatal conductance. Stomatal conductance values were greatest in R12, followed by WT and MO-7. Photosynthesis followed the same pattern at stomatal conductance. Dark respiration rates were variable across treatments for the entire growing season. Differing ozone exposures did not affect stem volume, but stem volume of seedlings of all families in the open plot were significantly lower than seedlings within chambers. Overall, R12 had higher stem volume than MO-7 and WT seedlings.

  10. Brain Sci. 2012, 2, 147-175; doi:10.3390/brainsci2020147 brain sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    activities are unconscious, perhaps along with secondary-process learning and memory mechanisms, the primal to classical psychoanalytical models. OPEN ACCESS #12;Brain Sci. 2012, 2 148 Keywords: affective consciousness of conscious and unconscious brain processes, using a neuropsychoanalytic framework. Our starting point

  11. Development of the Brain Tissue Scanner Brain Networks Laboratory Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adult mouse data source Adult rat data source Shrinkage upon embedding 2.2 Mounts for whole rodent brain Design problem Proposed solution Rodent brain blocking tools Recommended mold sizes 2.3 Mounts for human piece and its physical sectioning 3.4 Stage 3D coordinate system: home positions and directions

  12. Toward real-time communication using brain-computer interface systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speier, William Farran

    2015-01-01

    Unsupervised training of brain-computer interface systemsSingle Trial EEG: Towards Brain Computer Interfacing. AdvK. (2006) The Berlin brain-computer interface presents the

  13. Structural and Functional Brain Alterations in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Jui-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease. Behav Brain Res. Zou QH, Zhu CZ, YangMP (2010) The oscillating brain: complex and reliable.of the Resting Brain………………………………………………………………8

  14. The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in cortical motor learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Von dem Bussche, Mary

    2007-01-01

    T. , and Nakamura, S. , Brain-derived neurotrophic factor-dependent transfer of brain-derived neurotrophic factor toneurotrophic factors brain-derived neurotrophic factor and

  15. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor rescues synaptic plasticity in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    in mice lacking brain- derived neurotrophic factor. Procterm potentiation by brain- derived neurotrophic factor. JCM, Simmons DA (2007b) Brain-derived neurotrophic factor

  16. AMPA receptor-induced local brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling mediates motor recovery after stroke.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarkson, Andrew N; Overman, Justine J; Zhong, Sheng; Mueller, Rudolf; Lynch, Gary; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2011-01-01

    polymorphism in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (Chronic elevation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor bysustained increases in brain-derived neurotrophic fac- tor

  17. Approaching Injury and Violence Prevention through Public Health Policy: A Window of Opportunity to Renew Our Focus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degutis, Linda C

    2011-01-01

    our largest external research grantees, the Injury Controland state health department grantees are actively engaged in

  18. miRNAs in brain development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petri, Rebecca; Malmevik, Josephine; Fasching, Liana; Åkerblom, Malin; Jakobsson, Johan

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In the brain, a large number of miRNAs are expressed and there is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. Conditional knockout studies of the core components in the miRNA biogenesis pathway, such as Dicer and DGCR8, have demonstrated a crucial role for miRNAs during the development of the central nervous system. Furthermore, mice deleted for specific miRNAs and miRNA-clusters demonstrate diverse functional roles for different miRNAs during the development of different brain structures. miRNAs have been proposed to regulate cellular functions such as differentiation, proliferation and fate-determination of neural progenitors. In this review we summarise the findings from recent studies that highlight the importance of miRNAs in brain development with a focus on the mouse model. We also discuss the technical limitations of current miRNA studies that still limit our understanding of this family of non-coding RNAs and propose the use of novel and refined technologies that are needed in order to fully determine the impact of specific miRNAs in brain development. - Highlights: • miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. • KO of Dicer is embryonically lethal. • Conditional Dicer KO results in defective proliferation or increased apoptosis. • KO of individual miRNAs or miRNA families is necessary to determine function.

  19. Electromagnetic imaging of dynamic brain activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosher, J.; Leahy, R.; Lewis, P.; Lewine, J.; George, J.; Singh, M.

    1991-12-31

    Neural activity in the brain produces weak dynamic electromagnetic fields that can be measured by an array of sensors. Using a spatio-temporal modeling framework, we have developed a new approach to localization of multiple neural sources. This approach is based on the MUSIC algorithm originally developed for estimating the direction of arrival of signals impinging on a sensor array. We present applications of this technique to magnetic field measurements of a phantom and of a human evoked somatosensory response. The results of the somatosensory localization are mapped onto the brain anatomy obtained from magnetic resonance images.

  20. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura|BilayerBiomimeticBooksFormerTaubmanBrain ReceptorBrain

  1. The formation and function of the brain ventricular system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Jessica T. (Jessica Tzung-Min)

    2012-01-01

    The brain ventricular system is composed of a highly conserved set of cavities that contain cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a protein-rich fluid essential for brain function. However, little is known about the function of ...

  2. An improved dosimetric model of the head and brain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouchet, Lionel Gerard

    1995-01-01

    During the last decade, various brain imaging methods using radionuclides have become available. Due to the introduction of new techniques, a small-scale dosimetry study of the brain, and more specifically the organs of ...

  3. 9.14 Brain Structure and Its Origins, Spring 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Gerald E.

    Outline of mammalian functional neuroanatomy, aided by studies of comparative neuroanatomy and evolution, and of brain development. Topics include early steps to a central nervous system, basic patterns of brain and spinal ...

  4. BigNeuron: Unlocking the Secrets of the Human Brain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BigNeuron: Unlocking the Secrets of the Human Brain BigNeuron: Unlocking the Secrets of the Human Brain Berkeley Researchers and Supercomputers to Help Create a Standard 3D Neuron...

  5. High-Throughput Single-Cell Manipulation in Brain Tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinmeyer, Joseph Daly

    The complexity of neurons and neuronal circuits in brain tissue requires the genetic manipulation, labeling, and tracking of single cells. However, current methods for manipulating cells in brain tissue are limited to ...

  6. Compartmentalization and axon guidance in the Drosophila brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tayler, Timothy D., 1972-

    2005-01-01

    The Drosophila brain is composed of many morphologically and functionally distinct processing centers and brain morphogenesis depends on the creation and maintenance of distinct boundaries between adjacent regions to prevent ...

  7. Spinal Injury: Regeneration, Recovery, and a Possible New Approach

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cohen, Avis [University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, United States

    2010-01-08

    Spinal injury is most frequent in young healthy men, desperate to walk. Most treatments have focused on regeneration of the injured axons, but no one has as yet achieved success with this approach. However, in the lamprey, a primitive fish with a spinal cord having all the critical features of the human spinal cored, spinal injury is followed by complete regeneration of injured axons. Additionally, the animal recovers the ability to swim, and in many, the swimming is normal. Unfortunately, in most others, it is highly abnormal. This talk will review evidence from the abnormal regeneration, why it bespeaks difficulties heretofore not considered, and suggest an alternate approach for the near future. In so doing, the speaker will introduce the normal function of the spinal cord, what happens in normal and abnormal regeneration, and the new techniques that employ methods from neuromorphic engineering, a synthesis of neuroscience and engineering to engineer smart devices.

  8. Principles and Applications of Brain-Computer Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Thomas T.

    -Signals for BCIs · Microarrays, ECoG, Neurochips, etc. Utah Electrode #12;Non-Brain Signals for BCIs

  9. PIA - Richland Occupational Injury and Illness | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyAprilEnergy EEREPlateau Training System PIA -Injury and Illness

  10. Deep brain stimulation for chronic pain investigated with magnetoencephalography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornelissen, Piers

    Deep brain stimulation for chronic pain investigated with magnetoencephalography Morten L CharitableTrust. Received11September 2006; accepted14 September 2006 Deep brain stimulation has shown by magne- toencephalography to map changes in neural activity induced by deep brain stimulation

  11. Chemically-selective imaging of brain structures with CARS microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    Chemically-selective imaging of brain structures with CARS microscopy Conor L. Evans1§ , Xiaoyin Xu anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy to image brain structure and pathology ex vivo. Although. Definitive diagnosis still requires brain biopsy in a significant number of cases. CARS microscopy

  12. animals --produce characteristic, heritable incubation times and patterns of brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Graeme

    animals -- produce characteristic, heritable incubation times and patterns of brain damage, the animalslivedalong,TSE-freelife,andmostly did not accumulate PrPSc in their brains (B. Chesebro, Rocky Mountain Labs, Hamilton, Montana). The injection of PrPSc -negative brain extracts from these mice into further

  13. Development of an Interhemispheric Symmetry Measurement in the Neonatal Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development of an Interhemispheric Symmetry Measurement in the Neonatal Brain Ninah Koolen1.dereymaeker, katrien.jansen, jan.vervisch, gunnar.naulaers}@uzleuven.be Keywords: Preterm Brain, Symmetry, Channel of different brain regions will allow detecting physiologic asymmetry versus pathologic asymmetry. This can

  14. ELSEVIER Brain Research 712 (1996) 293-298 Research report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tepper, James M.

    1996-01-01

    BRAIN RESEARCH ELSEVIER Brain Research 712 (1996) 293-298 Research report Local infusion of brain examined the effects of local infusion of BDNF on the electrophysioiogical activity of serotonergic neurons in the rat dorsal raph6 nucleus with extracellular single unit recording in vivo. Compared with vehicle-infused

  15. and the Brain Sound may seem a straightforward physical phenom-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    Hearing and the Brain Sound may seem a straightforward physical phenom- enon, whose waves can be recorded, charted and parsed. But no machines can do what the human brain does--understand a wide variety of electrical and computer engineering and member of the Institute for Systems Research, studies how the brain

  16. Brain Specialization for Music New Evidence from Congenital Amusia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    153 Brain Specialization for Music New Evidence from Congenital Amusia ISABELLE PERETZ Department of Psychology, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3J7, Canada ABSTRACT: Brain specialization for music refers to the possibility that the hu- man brain is equipped with neural networks

  17. The Brain Opera Technology: New Instruments and Gestural Sensors for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Brain Opera Technology: New Instruments and Gestural Sensors for Musical Interaction-617-253-8988 Fax: +1-617-258-7168 Keywords: Brain Opera, human-computer interface, multimodal input devices and interactive installations developed for the Brain Opera, a large, touring multimedia production, where

  18. Child & Brain Development A group of individuals in the Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 CASE STUDY Child & Brain Development A group of individuals in the Community Services Program for Society and Child Development and CIFAR's pro- gram in Experience-based Brain and Biolog- ical Development (EBBD, now called Child & Brain Development). Dan Keating, then director of the Atkinson Centre

  19. APPEL PROJETS PROGRAMME DE FINANCEMENT COLLABORATIF CQDM / BRAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charette, André

    / BRAIN CANADA 2014 FOCUS SUR LES NEUROSCIENCES LETTRE D'INTENTION DATE LIMITE: 20 AOÛT 2014 À 17H HAE Le programme collaboratif « Focus sur les neurosciences » du CQDM et de Brain Canada est une cadre de cet appel à projets. #12; Programme « Focus sur les neurosciences » du CQDM / Brain

  20. BRAIN AND SURFACE WARPING VIA MINIMIZING LIPSCHITZ EXTENSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BRAIN AND SURFACE WARPING VIA MINIMIZING LIPSCHITZ EXTENSIONS By Facundo M´emoli Guillermo Sapiro­0436 Phone: 612/624-6066 Fax: 612/626-7370 URL: http://www.ima.umn.edu #12;Brain and Surface Warping via connection with the infinity Laplacian, a computational framework for surface warping and in particular brain

  1. The Brain's "New" Science: Psychology, Neurophysiology, and Constraint*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatfield, Gary

    The Brain's "New" Science: Psychology, Neurophysiology, and Constraint* Gary Hatfield University that brain science will or should provide for any future possible psychological theories. Hempel (1949 behavior and brain states. Quine (1974) maintained that mentalistic talk could be tolerated in psychology

  2. BRAIN ATLASES AND REGISTRATION Arthur W. Toga and Paul Thompson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    1 BRAIN ATLASES AND REGISTRATION Arthur W. Toga and Paul Thompson Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, Dept. of Neurology, Division of Brain Mapping, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA A Book Chapter for: Handbook and Stroke and the National Institute of Mental Health (NINDS/NIMH NS38753), and by a Human Brain Project

  3. DISCOVERING BRAIN MECHANISMS AND THE RULES OF MOLECULAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stengel, Robert F.

    DISCOVERING BRAIN MECHANISMS AND THE RULES OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Paul Shapshak, PhD*1 and Robert-324-2723 ABSTRACT The human genome has approximately 30,000 genes. Brain cells express at least 15,000. The human brain is subject to many acute and chronic diseases including viral encephalitis, AIDS/HIV Associated

  4. BDP: BrainSuite Diffusion Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leahy, Richard M.

    BDP: BrainSuite Diffusion Pipeline Chitresh Bhushan #12; Quantify microstructural tissue ROI Connectivity ROI Statistics MPRAGE Diffusion #12;Diffusion Pipeline Dicom to NIfTI Co ROIs Custom ROIs #12;Diffusion Pipeline Dicom to NIfTI Co-registration Diffusion Modeling Tractography

  5. Research Article Human Brain Activity Time-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    Research Article Human Brain Activity Time- Locked to Narrative Event Boundaries Nicole K. Speer to or reading descriptions of everyday activities (e.g., reading about a person making cookies; Speer & Zacks, 2005; Speer, Zacks, & Reynolds, 2006). These findings are not altogether surprising given theories

  6. Possible new wave phenomena in the brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerzy Szwed

    2009-08-10

    We propose to search for new wave phenomena in the brain by using interference effects in analogy to the well-known double slit (Young) experiment. This method is able to extend the range of oscillation frequencies to much higher values than currently accessible. It is argued that such experiments may test the hypothesis of the wave nature of information coding.

  7. How brain images reveal cognition : an ethnographic study of meaning-making in brain mapping practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ala?, Morana

    2006-01-01

    drawn chart representing human cortical organization, cf.organization and its form are laid out in the chart (Figurethe organization of the brain image in respect to the chart.

  8. Cultured Brain Microvessel Endothelial Cells as In Vitro Models of the Blood-Brain Barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takakura, Yoshinobu; Audus, Kenneth L.; Borchardt, Ronald T.

    1992-01-01

    .g., sucrose, fluorescein, inulin, and dextran) when drug transport studies are conducted (Shah et al. 1989). IN VITRO STUDIES ON BBB METABOLISM Several different enzyme systems have been established in primary cultures of bovine brain microvessel endothelial....g., sucrose, fluorescein, inulin, and dextran) when drug transport studies are conducted (Shah et al. 1989). IN VITRO STUDIES ON BBB METABOLISM Several different enzyme systems have been established in primary cultures of bovine brain microvessel endothelial...

  9. Rearing Environment Affects the Brain Size of Guppies: Lab-Reared Guppies have Smaller Brains than Wild-Caught

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodd, Helen

    . dom.), sheep (Ovis aries), and cats (Felis catus) typically have brains 8­33% smaller than their wild

  10. Brain 1 Walter J Freeman Introductory article on 'Brain' Encyclopedia of Science & Technology, Vol. 3, pp.30-32,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Walter J.

    Brain 1 Walter J Freeman Introductory article on 'Brain' Encyclopedia of Science & Technology, Vol Biology University of California, Berkeley CA 94720 TEL (510) 642-4220; FAX (510) 643-6791 Brain, biology) that moves through its environment to eat and avoid being eaten, in competition to reproduce

  11. Entry on "Philosophical Issues in Brain Theory" for the HANDBOOK OF BRAIN THEORY AND NEURAL NETWORKS (ed, M. Arbib)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Andy

    Entry on "Philosophical Issues in Brain Theory" for the HANDBOOK OF BRAIN THEORY AND NEURAL for understanding the mind and the brain? The first question concerns a fundamental assumption of most researchers sciences can help to constrain cognitive scientific models. Finally, the third question focuses attention

  12. Fear extinction in rats: Implications for human brain imaging and anxiety disorders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirk, Gregory J.

    ). For example, a soldier in combat may associate the sound of a helicopter with a severe traumatic event. Years after the war, the sound of the helicopter will continue to induce conditioned fear responses in those

  13. In: Proceedings of SPIE Conference on Medical Imaging (4684), pp. 201-205, Feb. 2002. Robustness of the Brain Parenchymal Fraction for Measuring Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orchard, Jeffery J.

    of the Brain Parenchymal Fraction for Measuring Brain Atrophy M. Stella Atkins, Jeff J. Orchard, Ben Law ABSTRACT Other researchers have proposed that the brain parenchymal fraction (or brain atrophy) may considers various factors influencing the measure of the brain parenchymal fraction obtained from dual spin

  14. 2010 East Tennessee Technology Park Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-08-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  15. 2010 Y-12 National Security Complex Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-08-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  16. 2010 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-07-28

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  17. 2010 Nevada National Security Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-07-28

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  18. 2010 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-08-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  19. Strategies for Reducing Pedestrian and Bicyclist Injury at the Corridor Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grembek, Offer; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yavari, Afsaneh; Yang, Zhao; Ragland, David

    2013-01-01

    Strategies for Reducing Pedestrian and Bicyclist Injury atand William W. Hunter. 2006. Pedestrian and bicycle crashof collision consistency pedestrian Appendix 2-1 San Pablo

  20. Air-pollution injury on Pinus strobus in Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore - 1985 survey results. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchini, P.J.

    1986-10-01

    Visible symptoms of ozone injury were observed on 100% of the Eastern white pine trees (Pinus strobus) sampled in 1985 from permanent pine plots at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. Average injury was low and affected about 5% of the needle surface. Only 6% of the trees sampled had more than 10% injury. Fleck injury was the most common ozone symptom encountered, followed by tipburn and chlorotic mottle. Significant variation among plots existed in total ozone injury, chlorotic mottle, tipburn, and needle length. Symptoms of other injury types were observed on 9% of the needle surfaces of sampled trees.

  1. Epileptic Seizures: Quakes of the brain?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osorio, Ivan; Sornette, Didier; Milton, John; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2007-01-01

    The concept of universality proposes that dynamical systems with the same power law behaviors are equivalent at large scales. We test this hypothesis on the Earth's crust and the epileptic brain, and discover that power laws also govern the distributions of seizure energies and recurrence times. This robust correspondence is extended over seven statistics, including the direct and inverse Omori laws. We also verify in an animal seizure model the earthquake-driven hypothesis that power law statistics co-exist with characteristic scales, as coupling between constitutive elements increases towards the synchronization regime. These observations point to the universality of the dynamics of coupled threshold oscillators for systems even as diverse as Earth and brain and suggest a general strategy for forecasting seizures, one of neurosciences' grails.

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor genotype is associated with brain gray and white matter tissue volumes recovery in abstinent alcohol-dependent individuals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    PA Author Manuscript Genes Brain Behav. Author manuscript;in major depression. Genes Brain Behav. 2011; 10:756–764. [G, Craighead WE. Variation in brain-derived neurotrophic

  3. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor genotype is associated with brain gray and white matter tissue volumes recovery in abstinent alcohol-dependent individuals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    WE. Variation in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)183X.2012.00854.x. Brain-derived neurotrophic factorAuthor Manuscript Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)

  4. Thermoacoustic tomography arising in brain imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plamen Stefanov; Gunther Uhlmann

    2010-09-09

    We study the mathematical model of thermoacoustic and photoacoustic tomography when the sound speed has a jump across a smooth surface. This models the change of the sound speed in the skull when trying to image the human brain. We derive an explicit inversion formula in the form of a convergent Neumann series under the assumptions that all singularities from the support of the source reach the boundary.

  5. Thermoacoustic tomography arising in brain imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanov, Plamen

    2010-01-01

    We study the mathematical model of thermoacoustic and photoacoustic tomography when the sound speed has a jump across a smooth surface. This models the change of the sound speed in the skull when trying to image the human brain. We derive an explicit inversion formula in the form of a convergent Neumann series under the assumptions that all singularities from the support of the source reach the boundary.

  6. Computational role of disinhibition in brain function 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Yingwei

    2009-06-02

    of Committee, Yoonsuck Choe Committee Members, Ricardo Gutierrez-Osuna Thomas Ioerger Takashi Yamauchi Head of Department, Valerie E. Taylor August 2006 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Computational Role of Disinhibition in Brain Function. (August... I could not have finished my Ph.D. research. I would also like to thank my committee members, Dr. Ricardo Gutierrez- Osuna, Dr. Takashi Yamauchi, and Dr. Thomas Ioerger, for their guidance, and Dr. Van Rullen for his valuable comments on my research...

  7. Brain-Computer Interfaces and Quantum Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eliano Pessa; Paola zizzi

    2009-09-08

    The actual (classical) Brain-Computer Interface attempts to use brain signals to drive suitable actuators performing the actions corresponding to subject's intention. However this goal is not fully reached, and when BCI works, it does only in particular situations. The reason of this unsatisfactory result is that intention cannot be conceived simply as a set of classical input-output relationships. It is therefore necessary to resort to quantum theory, allowing the occurrence of stable coherence phenomena, in turn underlying high-level mental processes such as intentions and strategies. More precisely, within the context of a dissipative Quantum Field Theory of brain operation it is possible to introduce generalized coherent states associated, within the framework of logic, to the assertions of a quantum metalanguage. The latter controls the quantum-mechanical computing corresponding to standard mental operation. It thus become possible to conceive a Quantum Cyborg in which a human mind controls, through a quantum metalanguage, the operation of an artificial quantum computer.

  8. Shorter-Course Whole-Brain Radiotherapy for Brain Metastases in Elderly Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rades, Dirk; Evers, Jasmin N.; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Lohynska, Radka; Schild, Steven E.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Many patients with brain metastases receive whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone. Using 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy in 2 weeks is the standard regimen in most centers. Regarding the extraordinarily poor survival prognosis of elderly patients with multiple brain metastases, a shorter WBRT regimen would be preferable. This study compared 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy with 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy in elderly patients ({>=}65 years). Methods and Materials: Data from 455 elderly patients who received WBRT alone for brain metastases were retrospectively analyzed. Survival and local (= intracerebral) control of 293 patients receiving 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy were compared with 162 patients receiving 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy. Eight additional potential prognostic factors were investigated including age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), primary tumor, number of brain metastases, interval from tumor diagnosis to WBRT, extracerebral metastases, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class. Results: The 6-month overall survival rates were 29% after 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy and 21% after 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy (p = 0.020). The 6-month local control rates were 12% and 10%, respectively (p = 0.32). On multivariate analysis, improved overall survival was associated with KPS {>=} 70 (p < 0.001), only one to three brain metastases (p = 0.029), no extracerebral metastasis (p = 0.012), and lower RPA class (p < 0.001). Improved local control was associated with KPS {>=} 70 (p < 0.001), breast cancer (p = 0.029), and lower RPA class (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Shorter-course WBRT with 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy was not inferior to 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy with respect to overall survival or local control in elderly patients. 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy appears preferable for the majority of these patients.

  9. Most Workers Who Suffer Head Injuries- Were Not Wearing Head Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A survey by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) of accidents and injuries noted that most workers who suffered impact injuries to the head were not wearing head protection. In addition, the same survey showed that the majority of workers were injured while performing their normal jobs at their regular worksites.

  10. Skin Thermal Injury Prediction with Strain Energy Wensheng Shen y and Jun Zhang z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jun

    Skin Thermal Injury Prediction with Strain Energy #3; Wensheng Shen y and Jun Zhang z Laboratory, in which the activation energy includes chemical reaction only, strain energy of tissue due to thermal-dimensional model is presented for the quantitative prediction of skin injury re- sulting from certain thermal

  11. Chapter 13 Employee Health and Safety 13.03 Hazardous Employment Injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Chapter 13 Employee Health and Safety 13.03 Hazardous Employment Injury · Policy Wisconsin Statutes of hazardous employment are entitled to continued payment of full base pay without deduction of sick leave. The employee is treated as if she/he is still in pay status. Employees eligible for hazardous employment injury

  12. Off-the-Job Injuries are on the Rise- and Costly

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Do you have an off-the-job safety program? Should you? The findings from a National Safety Council survey suggest that off-the-job injuries cost companies and society in general as much, if not more than on-the-job injuries!

  13. Ergonomics and Musculoskeletal Injuries in Agriculture: Recognizing and Preventing the Industry's Most Widespread Health and Safety Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Ergonomics and Musculoskeletal Injuries in Agriculture: Recognizing and Preventing the Industry demonstrated that these potentially permanently disabling injuries are readily prevented using ergonomics that agricultural work is diverse and so agricultural ergonomics must bridge many specific problems with a flexible

  14. Hot Topics Livescience RSS Feeds Newsletters A new brain electrode array wraps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    :06 pm ET Comments (0) | Recommend (1) Page 1 of 3New Implants Mold to Brain Like Shrink-Wrap | Live shrink-wrap around a model of the brain. The wrapping process occurs spontaneously, driven by capillary designed brain exercises. Proven Brain Exercises New silken brain implants that mold to the organ's grooves

  15. Microfluidic Brain Slice Chambers and Flexible Microelectrode Arrays for in vitro Localized Stimulation and Spatial Mapping of Neural Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Yujie

    2012-01-01

    in elasmobranch cerebellum. Brain Research. 199:113– Zadorin extracellular space deep in brain. The FASEB journal?:perfusion system for thick brain slice cultures. Biomedical

  16. Resting and Task-Modulated High-Frequency Brain Rhythms Measured by Scalp Encephalography in Infants with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    in tuberous sclerosis complex. Brain, 125(Pt6), 1247–1255.A. (2011). Mapping infant brain myelination with magneticduring face processing. Brain, 131, 1000–1012. Major, P. ,

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor restores synaptic plasticity in a knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    term potentiation by brain-derived neurotrophic factor. JNeurobiology of Disease Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factorbe rescued with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

  18. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor promotes long-term potentiation-related cytoskeletal changes in adult hippocampus.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rex, Christopher S; Lin, Ching-Yi; Kramár, Eniko A; Chen, Lulu Y; Gall, Christine M; Lynch, Gary

    2007-01-01

    RC, Nicoll RA (1998) Brain-derived neurotrophic fac- tor (term potentiation by brain-derived neurotrophic factor. JSystems/Cognitive Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Promotes

  19. Chaotic physics in ferroelectrics hints at brain-like computing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Morgan McCorkle Oak Ridge National Laboratory 865-574-7308 Chaotic physics in ferroelectrics hints at brain-like computing Unexpected behavior in ferroelectric materials explored...

  20. Genetic associations with brain cortical thickness in multiple sclerosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Weinshenker, B.G. (2000) Multiple sclerosis. N Engl J Medcorrelations in multiple sclerosis: HLA genes in?uencecerebral cortex in multiple sclerosis. Brain 126, Shannon,

  1. Algorithms for enhanced spatiotemporal imaging of human brain function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnaswamy, Pavitra

    2014-01-01

    Studies of human brain function require technologies to non-invasively image neuronal dynamics with high spatiotemporal resolution. The electroencephalogram (EEG) and magnetoencephalogram (MEG) measure neuronal activity ...

  2. Complex Networks - A Key to Understanding Brain Function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olaf Sporns

    2008-01-23

    The brain is a complex network of neurons, engaging in spontaneous and evoked activity that is thought to be the main substrate of mental life.  How this complex system works together to process information and generate coherent cognitive states, even consciousness, is not yet well understood.  In my talk I will review recent studies that have revealed characteristic structural and functional attributes of brain networks, and discuss efforts to build computational models of the brain that are informed by our growing knowledge of brain anatomy and physiology.

  3. Complex Networks - A Key to Understanding Brain Function

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Olaf Sporns

    2010-01-08

    The brain is a complex network of neurons, engaging in spontaneous and evoked activity that is thought to be the main substrate of mental life.  How this complex system works together to process information and generate coherent cognitive states, even consciousness, is not yet well understood.  In my talk I will review recent studies that have revealed characteristic structural and functional attributes of brain networks, and discuss efforts to build computational models of the brain that are informed by our growing knowledge of brain anatomy and physiology.

  4. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY BRAIN AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES DEPARTMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratté, Sylvie

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY BRAIN AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES DEPARTMENT BCS Memo June 1994) , and Pustejovsky (1991b) among others) without having to incorporate these situational categories in our

  5. Silibinin, dexamethasone, and doxycycline as potential therapeutic agents for treating vesicant-inflicted ocular injuries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari-Singh, Neera; Jain, Anil K.; Inturi, Swetha; Ammar, David A.; Agarwal, Chapla; Tyagi, Puneet; Kompella, Uday B.; Enzenauer, Robert W.; Petrash, J. Mark; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2012-10-01

    There are no effective and approved therapies against devastating ocular injuries caused by vesicating chemical agents sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM). Herein, studies were carried out in rabbit corneal cultures to establish relevant ocular injury biomarkers with NM for screening potential efficacious agents in laboratory settings. NM (100 nmol) exposure of the corneas for 2 h (cultured for 24 h), showed increases in epithelial thickness, ulceration, apoptotic cell death, epithelial detachment microbullae formation, and the levels of VEGF, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Employing these biomarkers, efficacy studies were performed with agent treatments 2 h and every 4 h thereafter, for 24 h following NM exposure. Three agents were evaluated, including prescription drugs dexamethasone (0.1%; anti-inflammatory steroid) and doxycycline (100 nmol; antibiotic and MMP inhibitor) that have been studied earlier for treating vesicant-induced eye injuries. We also examined silibinin (100 ?g), a non-toxic natural flavanone found to be effective in treating SM analog-induced skin injuries in our earlier studies. Treatments of doxycycline + dexamethasone, and silibinin were more effective than doxycycline or dexamethasone alone in reversing NM-induced epithelial thickening, microbullae formation, apoptotic cell death, and MMP-9 elevation. However, dexamethasone and silibinin alone were more effective in reversing NM-induced VEGF levels. Doxycycline, dexamethasone and silibinin were all effective in reversing NM-induced COX-2 levels. Apart from therapeutic efficacy of doxycycline and dexamethasone, these results show strong multifunctional efficacy of silibinin in reversing NM-induced ocular injuries, which could help develop effective and safe therapeutics against ocular injuries by vesicants. -- Highlights: ? Established injury biomarkers in rabbit corneal culture with nitrogen mustard (NM) ? This NM model is a cost effective system to evaluate and optimize therapeutics. ? Show that doxycycline and dexamethasone reduce NM-caused ocular injuries ? Demonstrate that silibinin effectively reverses NM-caused ocular injury endpoints ? Suggest optimization of identified agents against ocular injuries by vesicants.

  6. Seasonal development of ozone-induced foliar injury on tall milkweed (Asclepias exaltata) in Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, Howard S.

    Seasonal development of ozone-induced foliar injury on tall milkweed (Asclepias exaltata) in Great by symptoms of foliar ozone injury. Abstract The goals of this study were to document the development of ozone-induced foliar injury, on a leaf-by-leaf basis, and to develop ozone exposure relationships for leaf cohorts

  7. Early Detection of Oleic Acid-Induced Lung Injury in Rats Using 111In-Labeled Anti-Rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terasaki, Mark

    Early Detection of Oleic Acid-Induced Lung Injury in Rats Using 111In-Labeled Anti of Radiology, VA Medical Center, Newington, Connecticut Previous study of the bleomycin-induced lung injury of 111In-aICAM-1 to detect inflammation in another ARDS lung injury model. Methods: 111In-labeled rat

  8. Quantum features of consciousness, computers and brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael B. Mensky

    2009-10-22

    Many people believe that mysterious phenomenon of consciousness may be connected with quantum features of our world. The present author proposed so-called Extended Everett's Concept (EEC) that allowed to explain consciousness and super-consciousness (intuitive knowledge). Brain, according to EEC, is an interface between consciousness and super-consciousness on the one part and body on the other part. Relations between all these components of the human cognitive system are analyzed in the framework of EEC. It is concluded that technical devices improving usage of super-consciousness (intuition) may exist.

  9. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura|BilayerBiomimeticBooksFormerTaubmanBrain Receptor

  10. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &Bradbury Science Museum - Science on Wheels26BradleyBrain

  11. Visualizing Brain Metals in Health and Disease

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN A CountyFeet) CooleyVisitorVisualizing Brain

  12. Whole Brain Irradiation With Hippocampal Sparing and Dose Escalation on Multiple Brain Metastases: A Planning Study on Treatment Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prokic, Vesna; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Fels, Franziska; Schmucker, Marianne; Nieder, Carsten; Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromso, Tromso ; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a new treatment planning strategy in patients with multiple brain metastases. The goal was to perform whole brain irradiation (WBI) with hippocampal sparing and dose escalation on multiple brain metastases. Two treatment concepts were investigated: simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) and WBI followed by stereotactic fractionated radiation therapy sequential concept (SC). Methods and Materials: Treatment plans for both concepts were calculated for 10 patients with 2-8 brain metastases using volumetric modulated arc therapy. In the SIB concept, the prescribed dose was 30 Gy in 12 fractions to the whole brain and 51 Gy in 12 fractions to individual brain metastases. In the SC concept, the prescription was 30 Gy in 12 fractions to the whole brain followed by 18 Gy in 2 fractions to brain metastases. All plans were optimized for dose coverage of whole brain and lesions, simultaneously minimizing dose to the hippocampus. The treatment plans were evaluated on target coverage, homogeneity, and minimal dose to the hippocampus and organs at risk. Results: The SIB concept enabled more successful sparing of the hippocampus; the mean dose to the hippocampus was 7.55 {+-} 0.62 Gy and 6.29 {+-} 0.62 Gy, respectively, when 5-mm and 10-mm avoidance regions around the hippocampus were used, normalized to 2-Gy fractions. In the SC concept, the mean dose to hippocampus was 9.8 {+-} 1.75 Gy. The mean dose to the whole brain (excluding metastases) was 33.2 {+-} 0.7 Gy and 32.7 {+-} 0.96 Gy, respectively, in the SIB concept, for 5-mm and 10-mm hippocampus avoidance regions, and 37.23 {+-} 1.42 Gy in SC. Conclusions: Both concepts, SIB and SC, were able to achieve adequate whole brain coverage and radiosurgery-equivalent dose distributions to individual brain metastases. The SIB technique achieved better sparing of the hippocampus, especially when a10-mm hippocampal avoidance region was used.

  13. Regulation of brain copper homeostasis by the brain barrier systems: Effects of Fe-overload and Fe-deficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monnot, Andrew D.; Behl, Mamta; Ho, Sanna; Zheng, Wei

    2011-11-15

    Maintaining brain Cu homeostasis is vital for normal brain function. The role of systemic Fe deficiency (FeD) or overload (FeO) due to metabolic diseases or environmental insults in Cu homeostasis in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain tissues remains unknown. This study was designed to investigate how blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-SCF barrier (BCB) regulated Cu transport and how FeO or FeD altered brain Cu homeostasis. Rats received an Fe-enriched or Fe-depleted diet for 4 weeks. FeD and FeO treatment resulted in a significant increase (+ 55%) and decrease (- 56%) in CSF Cu levels (p < 0.05), respectively; however, neither treatment had any effect on CSF Fe levels. The FeD, but not FeO, led to significant increases in Cu levels in brain parenchyma and the choroid plexus. In situ brain perfusion studies demonstrated that the rate of Cu transport into the brain parenchyma was significantly faster in FeD rats (+ 92%) and significantly slower (- 53%) in FeO rats than in controls. In vitro two chamber Transwell transepithelial transport studies using primary choroidal epithelial cells revealed a predominant efflux of Cu from the CSF to blood compartment by the BCB. Further ventriculo-cisternal perfusion studies showed that Cu clearance by the choroid plexus in FeD animals was significantly greater than control (p < 0.05). Taken together, our results demonstrate that both the BBB and BCB contribute to maintain a stable Cu homeostasis in the brain and CSF. Cu appears to enter the brain primarily via the BBB and is subsequently removed from the CSF by the BCB. FeD has a more profound effect on brain Cu levels than FeO. FeD increases Cu transport at the brain barriers and prompts Cu overload in the CNS. The BCB plays a key role in removing the excess Cu from the CSF.

  14. Incidence of Leukoencephalopathy After Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebi, Junko; Sato, Hisashi; Nakajima, Masaru; Shishido, Fumio

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of leukoencephalopathy after whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in patients with brain metastases. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 111 patients who underwent WBRT for brain metastases from April 2001 through March 2008 and had evaluable computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at least 1 month after completion of WBRT. We evaluated the leukoencephalopathy according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. The patients who had brain tumor recurrence after WBRT were censored at the last follow-up CT or MRI without recurrence. To evaluate the risk factors for leukoencephalopathy, bivariate analysis was performed using a logistic regression analysis adjusted for follow-up time. Factors included in the analysis were age, gender, dose fractionation, 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, cisplatin, and other chemotherapeutic agents. Results: The median age of the 111 patients was 60.0 years (range, 23-89 years). The median follow-up was 3.8 months (range, 1.0-38.1 months). Leukoencephalopathy developed in 23 of the 111 patients. Grades 1, 2, and 3 were observed in 8, 7, and 8 patients, respectively. The incidence was 34.4% (11 of 32), 42.9% (6 of 14), 66.7% (2 of 3), and 100% (2 of 2) of the patients who were followed up for ?6, ?12, ?24, and ?36 months, respectively. In the bivariate analysis, older age (?65 years) was significantly correlated with higher risk of leukoencephalopathy (odds ratio 3.31; 95% confidence interval 1.15-9.50; P=.03). Conclusions: The incidence of leukoencephalopathy after WBRT was 34.4% with ?6 months follow-up, and increased with longer follow-up. Older age was a significant risk factor. The schedule of WBRT for patients with brain metastases should be carefully determined, especially for favorable patients.

  15. Train Your Brain Math Club Train Your Brain Math Club meets on Fridays at 4:20-5:20pm. The aim is to teach high

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blokh, Alexander

    Train Your Brain Math Club Train Your Brain Math Club meets on Fridays at 4:20-5:20pm. The aim in joining Train Your Brain Math Club should call UAB Special Studies at (205)934-8263 and mention Train Your Brain Math Club. Contact information: Dr A. Blokh, Coordinator of Outreach Program Department

  16. Growth hormone responsive neural precursor cells reside within the adult mammalian brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    within the adult mammalian brain. Sci. Rep. 2, 250; DOI:of neurons from adult brain stem cells during recovery afterin the adult mammalian brain. J Neurosci 17, 5046–5061 (

  17. Nonlinear brain dynamics as macroscopic manifestation of underlying many-body field dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Walter J III; Vitiello, G

    2006-01-01

    and should be done next. Brain dynamics and many-body fielddissipative quantum model of brain. Int J Mod Phys B14: 853-Neurotransmission and Late Brain Reorganization. New York:

  18. Brain development in Chinese children and adolescents: a structural MRI study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, X; Chen, C; Chen, K; Jin, Z; Peng, D; Yao, L

    2007-01-01

    J, Filipek PA. The human brain age 7–11 years: a volumetricHS, Ross JL, Denckla MB. Brain development, gender and IQ ina volumetric imaging study. Brain 1996; 119:1763–1774. 3.

  19. Memory, brain and aging: The good, the bad and the promising

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ober, Beth A.

    2010-01-01

    in the healthy aging brain. Neu- ropsychology 23(5):541–50.Development in the Adult Brain. New York, NY: Oxford Univinfluences on cognitive and brain plasticity during aging. J

  20. Global Brain Gene Expression Analysis Links Glutamatergic and GABAergic Alterations to Suicide and Major Depression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    SJ, Horton RW (1988) Brain GABAA/benzodiazepine bindingin depressed suicide victims. Brain Res 460: 114–123. 18.labelled with [3H]MK-801, in brain samples from drug-free

  1. Brain-computer interface controlled functional electrical stimulation system for ankle movement.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, An H; Wang, Po T; King, Christine E; Abiri, Ahmad; Nenadic, Zoran

    2011-01-01

    N: Breaking the silence: Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) forsignal by a noninvasive brain-computer interface in humans.E: A novel P300-based brain- computer interface stimulus

  2. Is Serum Brain-Derived NeurotrophicFactor a Biomarker for Cognitive Enhancementin Schizophrenia?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinogradov, Sophia

    2009-01-01

    S, Jones KR (2003): Brain-derived neuro- trophic factor ischemical study of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and itsP, et al. (2001): Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and

  3. Towards Neurofeedback Training of Associative Brain Areas for Stroke Rehabilitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    Towards Neurofeedback Training of Associative Brain Areas for Stroke Rehabilitation Ozan ¨Ozdenizci rehabilitation beyond sensorimotor-rhythms to also include associative brain areas. In particular, we argue to enhance post-stroke motor rehabilitation. We propose an adaptive neu- rofeedback paradigm for this purpose

  4. Towards Brain-Robot Interfaces in Stroke Rehabilitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Towards Brain-Robot Interfaces in Stroke Rehabilitation M. Gomez-Rodriguez, M. Grosse-Wentrup, J rehabilitation methods for patients with severe motor impairment due to cerebrovascular brain damage (e of a robot-based rehabilitation framework that enables artificial support of the sensorimotor feedback loop

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of quantum Zeno effect in the brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danko Georgiev

    2014-12-11

    Environmental decoherence appears to be the biggest obstacle for successful construction of quantum mind theories. Nevertheless, the quantum physicist Henry Stapp promoted the view that the mind could utilize quantum Zeno effect to influence brain dynamics and that the efficacy of such mental efforts would not be undermined by environmental decoherence of the brain. To address the physical plausibility of Stapp's claim, we modeled the brain using quantum tunneling of an electron in a multiple-well structure such as the voltage sensor in neuronal ion channels and performed Monte Carlo simulations of quantum Zeno effect exerted by the mind upon the brain in the presence or absence of environmental decoherence. The simulations unambiguously showed that the quantum Zeno effect breaks down for timescales greater than the brain decoherence time. To generalize the Monte Carlo simulation results for any n-level quantum system, we further analyzed the change of brain entropy due to the mind probing actions and proved a theorem according to which local projections cannot decrease the von Neumann entropy of the unconditional brain density matrix. The latter theorem establishes that Stapp's model is physically implausible but leaves a door open for future development of quantum mind theories provided the brain has a decoherence-free subspace.

  6. Tissue Classification of Noisy MR Brain Images Using Constrained GMM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberger, Jacob

    Tissue Classification of Noisy MR Brain Images Using Constrained GMM Amit Ruf1 , Hayit Greenspan1. The presented algorithm is used to segment 3D, T1­weighted, simulated and real MR images of the brain into three , and Jacob Goldberger2 1 Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, ISRAEL, 2 School

  7. Discriminative, Semantic Segmentation of Brain Tissue in MR Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    Discriminative, Semantic Segmentation of Brain Tissue in MR Images Zhao Yi1 , Antonio Criminisi2 , Jamie Shotton2 , and Andrew Blake2 1 University of California, Los Angeles, USA. zyi@ucla.edu. 2 is presented for the automatic segmentation and classification of brain tissue from 3D MR scans. It uses

  8. Event-Related Brain Potentials (ERPs) Elicited by Novel Stimuli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kutas, Marta

    Event-Related Brain Potentials (ERPs) Elicited by Novel Stimuli during SentenceProcessing" MARTA at San Diego La Jolla, California 92093 Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) have proven reviews see Donchin et al., 1978; Picton et al., 1979). One of the more prominent of these ERPs following

  9. THE FUTURE IN BRAIN/NEURAL-COMPUTER INTERACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theune, Mariët

    THE FUTURE IN BRAIN/NEURAL-COMPUTER INTERACTION: HORIZON 2020 Roadmap #12;ISBN 978-3-85125-379-5 DOI 10.3217/978-3-85125-379-5 © 2015 Graz University of Technology This roadmap and its appendix can #12;THE FUTURE IN BRAIN/NEURAL-COMPUTER INTERACTION: HORIZON 2020 Roadmap #12;© Kurhan - Fotolia.com 4

  10. LUABAB: Leeds University Angry Birds Artificial Brain Brandon Bennett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Brandon

    LUABAB: Leeds University Angry Birds Artificial Brain Brandon Bennett University of Leeds United Kingdom B.Bennett@leeds.ac.uk Abstract This document gives an overview of the develop- ment and design principles behind LUABAB, the Leeds University Angry Birds Artificial Brain. 1 Background There is a long

  11. Communication Technologies Based on Brain Avid Roman Gonzalez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Communication Technologies Based on Brain Activity Avid Roman Gonzalez TELECOM ParisTech 75013 to acquire electroencephalogram signals of brain activity, to process and interpret them to take appropriate tomography (PET), magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional MRI (fMRI), but these signals are not practical

  12. Mental Vitality 1 Walter J Freeman Brain Training.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Walter J.

    Mental Vitality 1 Walter J Freeman Brain Training. Lifelong schooling and education for mental vitality and physical health: Four major transitions. Walter J Freeman Division of Neurobiology, LSA 129 understanding of the social origins and destinies of brains, by #12;Mental Vitality 2 Walter J Freeman which

  13. We used spared nerve injury (SNI) model to assess effects of sarcosine in adult, male, Sprague Dawley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apkarian, A. Vania

    or Saline; 50g, 10l/site) · Acute brain infusions in mPFC (Sarcosine or Saline; 50g, 0.5l/site) · Chronic of treatment. For brain infusions rats were anesthetized and implanted with one guide cannula (26 gauge healthy controls. 44 D Acute brain infusions (inAcute brain infusions (in mPFCmPFC))33 The results

  14. Multifocal brain radionecrosis masquerading as tumor dissemination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safdari, H.; Boluix, B.; Gros, C.

    1984-01-01

    The authors report on an autopsy-proven case of multifocal widespread radionecrosis involving both cerebral hemispheres and masquerading as tumor dissemination on a CT scan done 13 months after complete resection of an oligodendroglioma followed by radiation therapy. This case demonstrates that radiation damage may be present in a CT scan as a multifocal, disseminated lesion. Since the survival of brain-tumor patients who have undergone radiation therapy is prolonged by aggressive therapy, the incidence and variability of radiation-induced complications in such cases is likely to increase. For similar reasons, the radionecrosis in such cases should be taken into consideration. A short review of the CT scan findings and diagnostic and therapeutic considerations in a case of widespread radionecrosis is presented. The need for appropriate diagnosis and subsequent life-saving management is emphasized.

  15. Injectable hydrogels for the improved delivery of treatments in spinal cord injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'shea, Timothy Mark

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in sudden life-altering paralysis with chronic medical consequences. Although no clinical therapy is currently available to reverse paralysis, a number of biomacromolecule drug candidates ...

  16. Recipient clinical risk factors predominate in possible transfusion-related acute lung injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    patients at risk of acute lung injury: evaluation of lungevaluation of a transfusion reaction case for TRALI, transfusion medicine physicians may find it diffi- cult to identify recipient ARDS risk

  17. Importance of satellite cells in recovery from eccentric contraction-induced muscle injury 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbone, Christopher Ronald

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the elimination of satellite cell proliferation with []-irradiation would inhibit normal force recovery following eccentric contraction-induced injury. Adult female ICR mice were implanted with a...

  18. To Create a Recording and Classification System for First-aid Injuries in the Construction Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudhakaran, Bhavana

    2011-08-08

    The construction industry is known for its high accident rate which leads to numerous fatalities every year. Currently, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires injury/illness recording forms to be completed only...

  19. Moderators of the Safety Climate-Injury Relationship: A Meta-Analytic Examination 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beus, Jeremy M.

    2010-07-14

    and group levels of analysis. Hypotheses were posited regarding the effects of six moderators: study design (i.e., retrospective or prospective), the time frame for gathering injury data, the degree of content contamination and deficiency in safety climate...

  20. Effects of density on displacement, falls, injuries, and orientation during horse transportation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Maranda Nicole

    2000-01-01

    Three groups of horses (totaling 30 mares and 29 geldings) purchased from local auctions, were used to determine density effects on displacement (distance moved during a stop), falls, injuries, and orientation using a ...

  1. Identification and molecular characterization of novel genomic targets in oxidant-induced vascular injury 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partridge, Charles Randal

    2007-04-25

    Gene expression was examined in vascular smooth muscle cells to study the complex interaction between oxidative injury and the pathogenesis of vascular disease. Extensive vascular remodeling coupled to increased production of 8-epi-PGF2�± nuclear...

  2. Transportation Time In A Rural State Following Splenic Injury: Does Time Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Jeanette G.

    2014-05-31

    Background: Failure rates remain high following attempted non-operative treatment of spleen injuries despite progress made in identifying risk factors. Over the past thirty years, transportation times were excluded from predictive models although...

  3. The association between vital signs and major hemorrhagic injury is significantly improved after controlling for sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The association between vital signs and major hemorrhagic injury is significantly improved after: Vital signs; Decision support systems; Clinical; Hemorrhage; Data interpretation; Statistical; Emergency care; Prehospital; Trauma Abstract Purpose: Measurement error and transient variability affect vital

  4. Investigation of plasticity in somatosensory processing following early life adverse events or nerve injury 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Liting

    2012-06-22

    Chronic hypersensitive pain states can become established following sustained, repeated or earlier noxious stimuli and are notably difficult to treat, especially in cases where nerve injury contributes to the trauma. A ...

  5. Dose impact in radiographic lung injury following lung SBRT: Statistical analysis and geometric interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Victoria; Kishan, Amar U.; Cao, Minsong; Low, Daniel; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate a new method of evaluating dose response of treatment-induced lung radiographic injury post-SBRT (stereotactic body radiotherapy) treatment and the discovery of bimodal dose behavior within clinically identified injury volumes. Methods: Follow-up CT scans at 3, 6, and 12 months were acquired from 24 patients treated with SBRT for stage-1 primary lung cancers or oligometastic lesions. Injury regions in these scans were propagated to the planning CT coordinates by performing deformable registration of the follow-ups to the planning CTs. A bimodal behavior was repeatedly observed from the probability distribution for dose values within the deformed injury regions. Based on a mixture-Gaussian assumption, an Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm was used to obtain characteristic parameters for such distribution. Geometric analysis was performed to interpret such parameters and infer the critical dose level that is potentially inductive of post-SBRT lung injury. Results: The Gaussian mixture obtained from the EM algorithm closely approximates the empirical dose histogram within the injury volume with good consistency. The average Kullback-Leibler divergence values between the empirical differential dose volume histogram and the EM-obtained Gaussian mixture distribution were calculated to be 0.069, 0.063, and 0.092 for the 3, 6, and 12 month follow-up groups, respectively. The lower Gaussian component was located at approximately 70% prescription dose (35 Gy) for all three follow-up time points. The higher Gaussian component, contributed by the dose received by planning target volume, was located at around 107% of the prescription dose. Geometrical analysis suggests the mean of the lower Gaussian component, located at 35 Gy, as a possible indicator for a critical dose that induces lung injury after SBRT. Conclusions: An innovative and improved method for analyzing the correspondence between lung radiographic injury and SBRT treatment dose has been demonstrated. Bimodal behavior was observed in the dose distribution of lung injury after SBRT. Novel statistical and geometrical analysis has shown that the systematically quantified low-dose peak at approximately 35 Gy, or 70% prescription dose, is a good indication of a critical dose for injury. The determined critical dose of 35 Gy resembles the critical dose volume limit of 30 Gy for ipsilateral bronchus in RTOG 0618 and results from previous studies. The authors seek to further extend this improved analysis method to a larger cohort to better understand the interpatient variation in radiographic lung injury dose response post-SBRT.

  6. Poisson Regression Analysis of Illness and Injury Surveillance Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frome E.L., Watkins J.P., Ellis E.D.

    2012-12-12

    The Department of Energy (DOE) uses illness and injury surveillance to monitor morbidity and assess the overall health of the work force. Data collected from each participating site include health events and a roster file with demographic information. The source data files are maintained in a relational data base, and are used to obtain stratified tables of health event counts and person time at risk that serve as the starting point for Poisson regression analysis. The explanatory variables that define these tables are age, gender, occupational group, and time. Typical response variables of interest are the number of absences due to illness or injury, i.e., the response variable is a count. Poisson regression methods are used to describe the effect of the explanatory variables on the health event rates using a log-linear main effects model. Results of fitting the main effects model are summarized in a tabular and graphical form and interpretation of model parameters is provided. An analysis of deviance table is used to evaluate the importance of each of the explanatory variables on the event rate of interest and to determine if interaction terms should be considered in the analysis. Although Poisson regression methods are widely used in the analysis of count data, there are situations in which over-dispersion occurs. This could be due to lack-of-fit of the regression model, extra-Poisson variation, or both. A score test statistic and regression diagnostics are used to identify over-dispersion. A quasi-likelihood method of moments procedure is used to evaluate and adjust for extra-Poisson variation when necessary. Two examples are presented using respiratory disease absence rates at two DOE sites to illustrate the methods and interpretation of the results. In the first example the Poisson main effects model is adequate. In the second example the score test indicates considerable over-dispersion and a more detailed analysis attributes the over-dispersion to extra-Poisson variation. The R open source software environment for statistical computing and graphics is used for analysis. Additional details about R and the data that were used in this report are provided in an Appendix. Information on how to obtain R and utility functions that can be used to duplicate results in this report are provided.

  7. Accident/Incident Statistics 2010 Number of Work/Study-Related Injuries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by Department LWD = Lost Workday(s) Cause of Work/Study-Related Injuries Figure 1 summarizes the causes for all injury cases, 4 of them were due to inadequate protection of eyes. Department No. of Accidents Total LWD=0 0LWD3 LWD>3 ACPF 1 1 BCB 3 3 CBME 1 1 CHEM 2 2 CLS 1 1 CSO 1 1 DMSF 1 1 FMO 11 1 2 8 LANG 1 1 LIB

  8. 2007 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2009-03-04

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  9. Comparisons of topological properties in autism for the brain network construction methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Moo K.

    be analyzed from its networks. Recently, attempts to model the human brain as a network of brain regions Engineering, Yonsei University, Wonju, Korea; b Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and Behavior, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA ABSTRACT Structural brain networks can be constructed from the white matter

  10. Wavelets and statistical analysis of functional magnetic resonance images of the human brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breakspear, Michael

    Wavelets and statistical analysis of functional magnetic resonance images of the human brain Ed Bullmore Brain Mapping Unit and Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke CNRS UMR 6072, Caen, France, Michael Breakspear Brain Dynamics Centre (Westmead Hospital) and School

  11. Small-sample brain mapping: sparse recovery on spatially correlated designs with randomization and clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    Small-sample brain mapping: sparse recovery on spatially correlated designs with randomization Abstract Functional neuroimaging can measure the brain's response to an external stimulus. It is used to perform brain mapping: identi- fying from these observations the brain re- gions involved. This problem

  12. Shoreline prediction: the nightmare of sparse noisy data, non-stationary nonlinear processes and brain-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and brain- dead models Neil Frazer, Tiffany Anderson, Ayesha Genz*, Brad Romine & Charles Fletcher SOEST

  13. Exp Brain Res DOI 10.1007/s00221-012-3390-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    -Faraco (*) Departament de tecnologies de la Informació i les comunicacions, center of Brain and cognition (c

  14. Brain and Language 96 (2006) 90105 www.elsevier.com/locate/b&l

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coulson, Seana

    2006-01-01

    Brain and Language 96 (2006) 90­105 www.elsevier.com/locate/b&l 0093-934X/$ - see front matterVect was absent following semantic violations. These results provide a characterization of the oscillatory brain be observed in the electro- physiological activity of the brain. Unlike Event-Related brain Potentials

  15. Relating spontaneous BOLD oscillatory power scale to whole-brain functional and structural organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apkarian, A. Vania

    . Neurosci. 2011). Brain oscillations have been a prominent theme in electroencephalography (EEG and function Comparing BAs to ventral stream and whole-brain connectivity: (A) Standard brain highlighting, and subcortical parcels: (A) Standard brain highlighting the anatomical parcellations. (B) one-way ANOVA shows

  16. INDEPENDENT COMPONENT ANALYSIS AND BEYOND IN BRAIN IMAGING: EEG, MEG, FMRI, AND PET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vialatte, François

    Technological University, Singapore ¾ Laboratory of Advanced Brain Signal Processing, Brain Science Institute applications of ICA in processing brain imaging signals: EEG, MEG, fMRI or PET. We highlight the current issuesINDEPENDENT COMPONENT ANALYSIS AND BEYOND IN BRAIN IMAGING: EEG, MEG, FMRI, AND PET Jagath C

  17. Volumetric Harmonic Brain Mapping using a Variational Method Yalin Wang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    Volumetric Harmonic Brain Mapping using a Variational Method Yalin Wang1 , Xianfeng Gu2 , Tony F investigation of 3D volumetric brain harmonic mapping. By transforming the full 3D brain volume to a solid harmonic map from a volumetric brain image to a 3D solid sphere and the second uses a sphere carving

  18. BrainDump #1 The Need for Best Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    BrainDump #1 The Need for Best Practices in Creating Digital Library Objects DRAFT -- 3 IN CREATING THESE STANDARDS? ...................4 THE DIGITAL LIBRARY SERVICE MODEL............................................................................................5 A MODEL FOR DIGITAL LIBRARY OBJECTS

  19. Deciphering brain oxygenation and its change with age using phosphorescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meunier, Michel

    for energy metabolism in every cell in the body. · The functioning of the brain is critically dependent #12;Oxygenation biomarkers · Average tissue pO2 · Spatial heterogeneity in tissue pO2 · pO2 gradient

  20. Genetic associations with brain cortical thickness in multiple sclerosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    relapse onset of multiple sclerosis. Brain 131, 808–817.Weinshenker, B.G. (2000) Multiple sclerosis. N Engl J Medcorrelations in multiple sclerosis: HLA genes in?uence

  1. NDN, VOLUME TRANSMISSION, AND SELF-ORGANIZATION IN BRAIN DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Walter J.

    NDN, VOLUME TRANSMISSION, AND SELF- ORGANIZATION IN BRAIN DYNAMICS WALTER J FREEMAN Department for the field synchrony: electric fields; magnetic fields; electromagnetic fields (radio waves); diffusion transmission by nonsynaptic diffusion transmission, in concert with the self- organization of the textured

  2. Structure-function relationships in human brain development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saygin, Zeynep Mevhibe

    2012-01-01

    The integration of anatomical, functional, and developmental approaches in cognitive neuroscience is essential for generating mechanistic explanations of brain function. In this thesis, I first establish a proof-of-principle ...

  3. Proteins, anatomy and networks of the fruit fly brain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles-Barley, Seymour Francis

    2012-06-25

    Our understanding of the complexity of the brain is limited by the data we can collect and analyze. Because of experimental limitations and a desire for greater detail, most investigations focus on just one aspect of the ...

  4. Generative models of brain connectivity for population studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkataraman, Archana, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    Connectivity analysis focuses on the interaction between brain regions. Such relationships inform us about patterns of neural communication and may enhance our understanding of neurological disorders. This thesis proposes ...

  5. Hunting a robot controlled by an artificial brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Arnoud

    In this demonstration an Raspberry Pi robot, controlled by an artificial brain which simulates the 302 neurons on the GoPiGo robot board1 . The demonstration is based on the later robot, which consists of a Raspberry Pi

  6. MRI of the human brain at 130 microtesla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inglis, Ben

    We present in vivo images of the human brain acquired with an ultralow field MRI (ULFMRI) system operating at a magnetic field B[subscript 0] ? 130 ?T. The system features prepolarization of the proton spins at B[subscript ...

  7. Recognizing deviations from normalcy for brain tumor segmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, David T. (David Thomas), 1971-

    2003-01-01

    A framework is proposed for the segmentation of brain tumors from MRI. Instead of training on pathology, the proposed method trains exclusively on healthy tissue. The algorithm attempts to recognize deviations from normalcy ...

  8. Wiring cost and topological participation of the mouse brain connectome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinov, Mikail; Ypma, Rolf J. F.; Watson, Charles; Bullmore, Edward T.

    2015-07-27

    Brain connectomes are topologically complex systems, anatomically embedded in 3D space. Anatomical conservation of “wiring cost” explains many but not all aspects of these networks. Here, we examined the relationship between topology and wiring cost...

  9. System Provides Clear Brain Scans of Awake, Unrestrained Mice...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    System Provides Clear Brain Scans of Awake, Unrestrained Mice dynamic imaging of mice Three markers attached to the head of a mouse enable the AwakeSPECT system to obtain detailed,...

  10. Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

    2011-02-08

    A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

  11. Number of Work/Study-Related Injuries A total of 31 work/study related injury cases were recorded in 2008. Among the cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accidents in 2008 by Department LWD = Lost Workday(s) Causes of Work/Study-Related Injuries Figure 1.1 16.2 2.5 7.5 16.6 4.1 7.9 17.2 4.8 6.4 Department No. of Accidents Total LWD=0 0LWD£3 LWD>3 BIOL 2 1

  12. The effects of alcohol and aspirin on neonatal brain development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beshear, Myra Dawn

    2013-02-22

    -1 THE EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL AND ASPIRIN ON NEONATAL BRAIN DEVELOPMENT A Senior Honors Thesis By MYRA DAWN BESHEAR Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs & Academic Scholarships Texas A&M University In partial fulfillment of the requirements... of the UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS April 2000 Group: Cell Biology 2 THE EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL AND ASPIRIN ON NEONATAL BRAIN DEVELOPMENT A Senior Honors Thesis By ~ DAWN BESHEAR Submitted to the Ofhce of Honors Programs 4 Academic Scholarships...

  13. Intentionality, Artificial Intelligence and the Causal Powers of the Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitmer, Jeffrey M.

    Intentionality, Artificial Intelligence and the Causal Powers of the Brain Jeffrey M. Whitmer Northern Illinois University It seems to be a common belief that in the future, if not in the present, digital computers are going to be capable... of cognitive states, experiences, and con­ sciousness equal in every respect to that which exists in human beings. 1 Not everyone, however, is so optimistic. One such skeptic is John Searle and his "Minds, Brains, and Programs" 2 represents a direct con...

  14. Membrane associated phospholipase C from bovine brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K.; Ryu, S.H.; Suh, P.; Choi, W.C.; Rhee, S.G.

    1987-05-01

    Cytosolic fractions of bovine brain contain 2 immunologically distinct phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase (PLC), PLC-I and PLC-II, whose MW are 150,000 and 145,000 respectively, under a denaturing condition. Monoclonal antibodies were derived against each form and specific radioimmunoassays were developed. Distribution of PLC-I and PLC-II in cytosolic and particulate fractions was measured using the radioimmunoassay. More than 90% of PLC-II was found in the cytosolic fraction, while the anti-PLC-I antibody cross-reacting protein was distributed nearly equally between the soluble fraction and the 2 M KCl extract of particulate fraction. The PLC enzyme in the particulate fraction was purified to homogeneity, yielding 2 proteins of 140 KDa and 150 KDa when analyzed on SDS-PAGE. Neither of the 2 enzymes cross-reacted with anti-PLC-II antibodies, but both could be immunoblotted by all 4 different anti-PLC-I antibodies. This suggests that the 140 KDa PLC was derived from the 150 KDa form. The 150 Kda form from particulate fraction was indistinguishable from the cytosolic PLC-I when their mixture was analyzed on SDS-PAGE. In addition, the elution profile of tryptic peptides derived from the 150 KDa particulate form was identical to that of cytosolic PLC-I. This result indicates that PLC-I is reversibly associated to membranes.

  15. Brain projects think big When you read these words, hundreds of million of nerve cells are electrically and chemically active in your brain. This

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brain projects think big When you read these words, hundreds of million of nerve cells are electrically and chemically active in your brain. This activity enables you to recognize words, sense the world, learn, enjoy and create new things, and be curious about the world around you. Indeed, our brain

  16. Lung injury, inflammation and Akt signaling following inhalation of particulate hexavalent chromium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaver, Laura M. [Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, George Washington University Medical Center, 2300 I Street NW, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, George Washington University Medical Center, 2300 I Street NW, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Stemmy, Erik J.; Constant, Stephanie L. [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, George Washington University Medical Center, 2300 I Street NW, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Tropical Medicine, George Washington University Medical Center, 2300 I Street NW, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Schwartz, Arnold [Department of Pathology, George Washington University Medical Center, 2300 I Street NW, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Little, Laura G. [University of Montana, Department of Chemistry, 32 Campus Drive, Missoula, MT 59812 (United States); Gigley, Jason P. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Tropical Medicine, George Washington University Medical Center, 2300 I Street NW, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Chun, Gina [Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, George Washington University Medical Center, 2300 I Street NW, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, George Washington University Medical Center, 2300 I Street NW, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Sugden, Kent D. [University of Montana, Department of Chemistry, 32 Campus Drive, Missoula, MT 59812 (United States)] (and others)

    2009-02-15

    Certain particulate hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are human respiratory carcinogens that release genotoxic soluble chromate, and are associated with fibrosis, fibrosarcomas, adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas of the lung. We postulate that inflammatory processes and mediators may contribute to the etiology of Cr(VI) carcinogenesis, however the immediate (0-24 h) pathologic injury and immune responses after exposure to particulate chromates have not been adequately investigated. Our aim was to determine the nature of the lung injury, inflammatory response, and survival signaling responses following intranasal exposure of BALB/c mice to particulate basic zinc chromate. Factors associated with lung injury, inflammation and survival signaling were measured in airway lavage fluid and in lung tissue. A single chromate exposure induced an acute immune response in the lung, characterized by a rapid and significant increase in IL-6 and GRO-{alpha} levels, an influx of neutrophils, and a decline in macrophages in lung airways. Histological examination of lung tissue in animals challenged with a single chromate exposure revealed an increase in bronchiolar cell apoptosis and mucosal injury. Furthermore, chromate exposure induced injury and inflammation that progressed to alveolar and interstitial pneumonitis. Finally, a single Cr(VI) challenge resulted in a rapid and persistent increase in the number of airways immunoreactive for phosphorylation of the survival signaling protein Akt, on serine 473. These data illustrate that chromate induces both survival signaling and an inflammatory response in the lung, which we postulate may contribute to early oncogenesis.

  17. RBC-coupled tPA prevents cerebrovasodilatory impairment and tissue injury in pediatric cerebral hypoxia/ischemia through inhibition of ERK MAPK unregulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganguly, Kumkum [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Armstead, William M [U PENNSYLVANIA; Kiessling, J W [U PENNSYLVANIA; Chen, Xiao - Han [U PENNSYLVANIA; Smith, Douglas H [U PENNSYLVANA; Higazi, Abd Ar [U PENNSYLVANIA; Cines, Douglas B [U PENNSYLVANIA; Bdeir, Khalil [U PENNSYLVANIA; Zaitsev, Sergei [U PENNSYLVANIA; Muzykantov, Vladimir R [U PENNSYLVANIA

    2008-01-01

    Babies experience hypoxia (H) and ischemia (I) from stroke. The only approved treatment for stroke is fibrinolytic therapy with tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA). However, tPA potentiates H/I-induced impairment of responses to cerebrovasodilators such as hypercapnia and hypotension, and blockade of tPA-mediated vasoactivity prevents this deleterious effect. Coupling tPA to RBCs reduces its CNS toxicity through spatially confining the drug to the vasculature. Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), a family of at least 3 kinases, is upregulated after H/I. In this study we determined if RBC-tPA given before or after cerebral H/I would preserve responses to cerebrovasodilators and prevent neuronal injury mediated through the ERK MAPK pathway. Animals given RBC-tPA maintained responses to cerebrovasodilators at levels equivalent to pre-H/I values. CSF and brain parenchymal ERK MAPK was elevated by H/I and this upregulation was potentiated by tPA, but blunted by RBC-tPA. U 0126, an ERK MAPK antagonist, also maintained cerebrovasodilation post H/I. Neuronal degeneration in CA1 hippocampus and parietal cortex after H/I was exacerbated by tPA, but ameliorated by RBC-tPA and U 0126. These data suggest that coupling tPA to RBCs may offer a novel approach towards increasing the benefit/risk ratio of thrombolytic therapy for CNS disorders associated with H/I.

  18. Genetic Knockdown of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in 3xTg-AD Mice Does Not Alter ABeta or Tau Pathology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castello, Nicholas A; Green, Kim N; LaFerla, Frank M; Ginsberg, Stephen D

    2012-01-01

    Essential role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in adult2005) Precursor form of brain- derived neurotrophic factorand mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor are decreased

  19. Perlecan Domain V Induces VEGF Secretion in Brain Endothelial Cells Through ?5?1 Integrin Dependent Mechanism a Novel Insight in Brain Tissue Recovery Following Ischemia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Douglas Nelson

    2012-02-14

    ) in the post-ischemic brain. As post-stroke angiogenesis is an important step in post-stroke brain repair, I focused on the mechanism of DV?s role in brain angiogenesis in vitro. I first demonstrated that DV significantly increased brain endothelial (BE...?, is the leading cause of long term disability and the third leading cause of death in the United States. Two types of stroke exist. Ischemic stroke is where there is loss of blood flow to a brain region due to a blood clot occluding a cerebral artery...

  20. Inhibition of chlorine-induced lung injury by the type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Weiyuan; Chen, Jing; Schlueter, Connie F.; Rando, Roy J.; Pathak, Yashwant V.; Hoyle, Gary W.

    2012-09-01

    Chlorine is a highly toxic respiratory irritant that when inhaled causes epithelial cell injury, alveolar-capillary barrier disruption, airway hyperreactivity, inflammation, and pulmonary edema. Chlorine is considered a chemical threat agent, and its release through accidental or intentional means has the potential to result in mass casualties from acute lung injury. The type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram was investigated as a rescue treatment for chlorine-induced lung injury. Rolipram inhibits degradation of the intracellular signaling molecule cyclic AMP. Potential beneficial effects of increased cyclic AMP levels include inhibition of pulmonary edema, inflammation, and airway hyperreactivity. Mice were exposed to chlorine (whole body exposure, 228–270 ppm for 1 h) and were treated with rolipram by intraperitoneal, intranasal, or intramuscular (either aqueous or nanoemulsion formulation) delivery starting 1 h after exposure. Rolipram administered intraperitoneally or intranasally inhibited chlorine-induced pulmonary edema. Minor or no effects were observed on lavage fluid IgM (indicative of plasma protein leakage), KC (Cxcl1, neutrophil chemoattractant), and neutrophils. All routes of administration inhibited chlorine-induced airway hyperreactivity assessed 1 day after exposure. The results of the study suggest that rolipram may be an effective rescue treatment for chlorine-induced lung injury and that both systemic and targeted administration to the respiratory tract were effective routes of delivery. -- Highlights: ? Chlorine causes lung injury when inhaled and is considered a chemical threat agent. ? Rolipram inhibited chlorine-induced pulmonary edema and airway hyperreactivity. ? Post-exposure rolipram treatments by both systemic and local delivery were effective. ? Rolipram shows promise as a rescue treatment for chlorine-induced lung injury.

  1. Ozone injury on cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata) and crown-beard (Verbesina occidentalis) in Great Smoky Mountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, Howard S.

    Ozone injury on cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata) and crown-beard (Verbesina occidentalis ``Capsule'': Ground-level ozone causes deleterious effects to cutleaf coneflower and crown-beard in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Abstract Incidence and severity of visible foliar ozone injury on cutleaf

  2. An Algebraic Topological Method for Multimodal Brain Networks Comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simas, Tiago; Rodriguez, Pablo; Diaz-Guilera, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Understanding brain connectivity has become one of the most important issues in neuroscience. But connectivity data can reflect either the functional relationships of the brain activities or the anatomical properties between brain areas. Although one should expect a clear relationship between both representations it is not straightforward. Here we present a formalism that allows for the comparison of structural (DTI) and functional (fMRI) networks by embedding both in a common metric space. In this metric space one can then find for which regions the two networks are significantly different. Our methodology can be used not only to compare multimodal networks but also to extract statistically significant aggregated networks of a set of subjects. Actually, we use this procedure to aggregate a set of functional (fMRI) networks from different subjects in an aggregated network that is compared with the anatomical (DTI) connectivity. The comparison of the aggregated network reveals some features that are not observ...

  3. A history of optogenetics: the development of tools for controlling brain circuits with light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyden, Edward Stuart

    Understanding how different kinds of neuron in the brain work together to implement sensations, feelings, thoughts, and movements, and how deficits in specific kinds of neuron result in brain diseases, has long been a ...

  4. Establishing a positional information assay for brain ventricle mutants and investigating the choroid plexuses in zebrafish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Catherine D., 1980-

    2004-01-01

    The process by which the neural tube expands into three brain ventricles can be understood through genetic mutant analysis. Within the framework of a characterization of zebrafish mutants with brain ventricle phenotypes, ...

  5. Robotic actions in the human brain Robotic movement preferentially engages the action observation network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Antonia

    Robotic actions in the human brain 1 Robotic movement., Stadler, W. & Prinz, W. (in press / 2011). Robotic movement preferentially engages the action observation network. Human Brain Mapping. #12;Robotic

  6. Functional specificity for high-level linguistic processing in the human brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedorenko, Evelina G.

    Neuroscientists have debated for centuries whether some regions of the human brain are selectively engaged in specific high-level mental functions or whether, instead, cognition is implemented in multifunctional brain ...

  7. "USING LASERS TO CONTROL AND PROBE THE BRAIN", Prof. Adam Cohen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9:30am Science On Saturday "USING LASERS TO CONTROL AND PROBE THE BRAIN", Prof. Adam Cohen, Department of Physics, Harvard University USING LASERS TO CONTROL AND PROBE THE BRAIN...

  8. Methods to assess changes in human brain structure across the lifecourse 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickie, David Alexander

    2014-11-28

    Human brain structure can be measured across the lifecourse (“in vivo”) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI data are often used to create “atlases” and statistical models of brain structure across the lifecourse. ...

  9. Finite element decomposition and grid generation for brain modeling and visualization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batte, David Allan

    1997-01-01

    Numerical grid generation is used to provide a framework for brain and neuron visualization. Smoothing spline surfaces are fit to contour data to generate 3D solid model reconstruction of brain tissues. Finite element methods are then used...

  10. How Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites bind to human brain endothelial cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claessens, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is characterised by an accumulation of infected erythrocytes in the microvasculature of the brain. Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes have been shown to bind to a Human Brain Endothelial Cell line (HBEC-5i) in vitro...

  11. Direct Painting Software for Tracing on 3D Brain Surfaces with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct Painting Software for Tracing on 3D Brain Surfaces with Global Conformal Parameterization 1 4 Illustrates tracing on the brain surface with the direct painting software. (a) shows the global

  12. Preliminary Results of Whole Brain Radiotherapy With Concurrent Trastuzumab for Treatment of Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chargari, Cyrus; Idrissi, Hind Riahi; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Bollet, Marc A.; Dieras, Veronique; Campana, Francois; Cottu, Paul; Fourquet, Alain; Kirova, Youlia M.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the use of trastuzumab concurrently with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for patients with brain metastases from human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2001 and April 2007, 31 patients with brain metastases from human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive breast cancer were referred for WBRT with concurrent trastuzumab. At brain progression, the median age was 55 years (range, 38-73), and all patients had a performance status of 0-2. The patients received trastuzumab 2 mg/kg weekly (n = 17) or 6 mg/kg repeated every 21 days (n = 14). In 26 patients, concurrent WBRT delivered 30 Gy in 10 daily fractions. In 6 patients, other fractionations were chosen because of either poor performance status or patient convenience. Results: After WBRT, radiologic responses were observed in 23 patients (74.2%), including 6 (19.4%) with a complete radiologic response and 17 (54.8%) with a partial radiologic response. Clinical responses were observed in 27 patients (87.1%). The median survival time from the start of WBRT was 18 months (range, 2-65). The median interval to brain progression was 10.5 months (range, 2-27). No Grade 2 or greater acute toxicity was observed. Conclusion: The low toxicity of trastuzumab concurrently with WBRT should probably not justify delays. Although promising, these preliminary data warrant additional validation of trastuzumab as a potential radiosensitizer for WBRT in brain metastases from breast cancer in the setting of a clinical trial.

  13. Investigation of injury/illness data at a nuclear facility: Part II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Garcia, Vincent E.; Sandoval, Arnold N.; George, Gerald L.; Gubernatis, David C.; Schreiber, Stephen B.

    2014-11-21

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), there are several nuclear facilities, accelerator facilities, radiological facilities, explosives sites, moderate- and high-hazard non-nuclear facilities, biosciences laboratory, etc. The Plutonium Science and Manufacturing Directorate (ADPSM) provides special nuclear material research, process development, technology demonstration, and manufacturing capabilities. ADPSM manages the LANL Plutonium Facility. Within the Radiological Control Area at TA-55 (PF-4), chemical and metallurgical operations with plutonium and other hazardous materials are performed. LANL Health and Safety Programs investigate injury and illness data. In this study, statistically significant trends have been identified and compared for LANL, ADPSM, and PF-4 injury/illness cases. A previously described output metric is used to measures LANL management progress towards meeting its operational safety objectives and goals. Timelines are used to determine trends in Injury/Illness types. Pareto Charts are used to prioritize causal factors. The data generated from analysis of Injury/Illness data have helped identify and reduce the number of corresponding causal factors.

  14. Theoretical evaluation on burn injury of human respiratory tract due to inhalation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jun

    at tissue temperature (kPa) mQ Metabolic rate of tissue (W/m3 ) R Ideal gas constant (J/molK) Re Reynolds1 Theoretical evaluation on burn injury of human respiratory tract due to inhalation of hot gas to predict the thermal impact of inhaled hot air during the early stage of fires. Influences of individual

  15. P l e a s e P o s t Instant Adhesive Eye Injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P l e a s e P o s t Instant Adhesive Eye Injury Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lessons Learned LL-2006-01 Concern Statement: While attempting to apply instant adhesive to a piece with cyanoacrylate instant adhesives. Trade names include 495 Super Bonder® Instant Adhesive, Superglue® , and Krazy

  16. Detection of reactive oxygen species by flow cytometry after spinal cord injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Riyi

    introduced a fixation step (with formaldehyde) between the dye loading and dissociation. As a result; Lipid peroxidation; Spinal cord injury; Formaldehyde 1. Introduction Increasing evidence suggests level of ROS or causing ROS production. The purpose of this study is to introduce a new procedure

  17. The Effect of Planting Strategies, Imazethapyr Rates, and Application Timings on CLEARFIELD® Hybrid Rice Injury 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Aaron Lyles

    2012-02-14

    recommendations. Research was performed to test the hybrids on the effect of planting date, planting density, and imazethapyr application rate on visual plant injury at Beaumont and Eagle Lake, TX in 2008 and 2009. A secondary experiment was designed to test...

  18. Quantifying mortal injury of juvenile Chinook salmon exposed to simulated hydro-turbine passage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Gingerich, Andrew J.; Stephenson, John R.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Welch, Abigail E.; Langeslay, Mike; Ahmann, Martin L.; Johnson, Robert L.; Skalski, John R.; Seaburg, Adam; Townsend, Richard L.

    2012-02-01

    A proportion of juvenile Chinook salmon and other salmonids travel through one or more turbines during seaward migration in the Columbia and Snake River every year. Despite this understanding, limited information exists on how these fish respond to hydraulic pressures found during turbine passage events. In this study we exposed juvenile Chinook salmon to varied acclimation pressures and subsequent exposure pressures (nadir) to mimic the hydraulic pressures of large Kaplan turbines (ratio of pressure change). Additionally, we varied abiotic (total dissolved gas, rate of pressure change) and biotic (condition factor, fish length, fish weight) factors that may contribute to the incidence of mortal injury associated with fish passing through hydro-turbines. We determined that the main factor associated with mortal injury of juvenile Chinook salmon during simulated turbine passage was the ratio between acclimation and nadir pressures. Condition factor, total dissolved gas, and the rate of pressure change were found to only slightly increase the predictive power of equations relating probability of mortal injury to conditions of exposure or characteristics of test fish during simulated turbine passage. This research will assist engineers and fisheries managers in operating and improving hydroelectric facility efficiency while minimizing mortality and injury of turbine-passed juvenile Chinook salmon. The results are discussed in the context of turbine development and the necessity of understanding how different species of fish will respond to the hydraulic pressures of turbine passage.

  19. Investigation of injury/illness data at a nuclear facility. Part II

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Garcia, Vincent E.; Sandoval, Arnold N.; George, Gerald L.; Gubernatis, David C.; Schreiber, Stephen B.

    2015-07-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), there are several nuclear facilities, accelerator facilities, radiological facilities, explosives sites, moderate- and high-hazard non-nuclear facilities, biosciences laboratory, etc. The Plutonium Science and Manufacturing Directorate (ADPSM) provides special nuclear material research, process development, technology demonstration, and manufacturing capabilities. ADPSM manages the LANL Plutonium Facility. Within the Radiological Control Area at TA-55 (PF-4), chemical and metallurgical operations with plutonium and other hazardous materials are performed. LANL Health and Safety Programs investigate injury and illness data. In this study, statistically significant trends have been identified and compared for LANL, ADPSM, and PF-4 injury/illness cases. A previouslymore »described output metric is used to measures LANL management progress towards meeting its operational safety objectives and goals. Timelines are used to determine trends in Injury/Illness types. Pareto Charts are used to prioritize causal factors. The data generated from analysis of Injury/Illness data have helped identify and reduce the number of corresponding causal factors.« less

  20. Established within the Wayne State University (WSU) Bioengineering Center, the Sports Injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Established within the Wayne State University (WSU) Bioengineering Center, the Sports Injury the WSU Bioengineering Center. The Center is staffed by over 50 full-time and part-time personnel from both the College of Engineering and the School of Medicine. The Bioengineering Center has been

  1. Semi-Autonomous Car Control Using Brain Computer Daniel Gohring, David Latotzky, Miao Wang, Raul Rojas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Göhring, Daniel

    Semi-Autonomous Car Control Using Brain Computer Interfaces Daniel G¨ohring, David Latotzky, Miao, Germany Abstract--In this paper we present an approach to control a real car with brain signals. To achieve this, we use a brain computer interface (BCI) which is connected to our autonomous car. The car

  2. High-resolution imaging of vessels in the isolated rat brain M. F. Valverde Salzmann1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-resolution imaging of vessels in the isolated rat brain M. F. Valverde Salzmann1 , N for the distribution of vessels in the rat brain. Angiography is able to use the blood flow in the brain of the living of this study was to obtain a full picture of vessels even down to relatively small size in the isolated rat

  3. ARTICLE IN PRESS 3 Mapping cortical change in Alzheimer's disease, brain development,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    's disease, schizo- 19 phrenia, normal aging, and abnormal brain development based on 20 imaging data, not seen in individual brain scans, often emerge when 45population-based brain data are averaged School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1769, United States 9 b Child Psychiatry Branch, NIMH, Bethesda

  4. New Approaches for Exploring Anatomical and Functional Connectivity in the Human Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penny, Will

    REVIEWS New Approaches for Exploring Anatomical and Functional Connectivity in the Human Brain in the primate brain is based on the complementary principles of modular and distributed information processing. The former emphasizes the specialization of functions within different brain areas. The latter emphasizes

  5. Intraoperative Brain Shift and Deformation: A Quantitative Analysis of Cortical Displacement in 28 Cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    Intraoperative Brain Shift and Deformation: A Quantitative Analysis of Cortical Displacement in 28 of surgery, the nature of the cranial opening, the region of the brain involved, the duration of surgery resulting from misregistration during the course of surgery is warranted. Key words: brain shift, computer

  6. Patterns of Brain Activity Associated With Variation in Voluntary Wheel-Running Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saltzman, Wendy

    Patterns of Brain Activity Associated With Variation in Voluntary Wheel- Running Behavior Justin S variation within and between species is unknown. This study used Fos immunoreactivity to compare brain, and striatum. Results implicate specific brain regions in motivation to run and others in control

  7. Corpora and Cognition: The Semantic Composition of Adjectives and Nouns in the Human Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corpora and Cognition: The Semantic Composition of Adjectives and Nouns in the Human Brain Alona number FA865013C7360. #12;Keywords: language, brain imaging, machine learning, distributional semantics. In memory of my father, Jonathan Fyshe who had a lifelong interest in the brain. #12;4 #12;Abstract

  8. Distributed Brain Modelling by means of Hierarchical Collaborative CoEvolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trahanias, Panos

    Distributed Brain Modelling by means of Hierarchical Collaborative CoEvolution Michail Maniadakis-based agent structures are employed to represent distinct brain areas. We in- troduce a Hierarchical Collaborative CoEvolutionary (HCCE) approach to design autonomous, yet cooper- ating agents. Thus, partial brain

  9. Corpora and Cognition: The Semantic Composition of Adjectives and Nouns in the Human Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corpora and Cognition: The Semantic Composition of Adjectives and Nouns in the Human Brain Alona and Nouns in the Human Brain Alona Fyshe February 2015 CMU-ML-15-100 Machine Learning Department School; Air Force Research Laboratory: contract number FA865013C7360. #12;Keywords: language, brain imaging

  10. Integrating Brain Data Spatially: Spatial Data Infrastructure and Atlas Environment for Online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Amarnath

    Integrating Brain Data Spatially: Spatial Data Infrastructure and Atlas Environment for Online Federation and Analysis of Brain Images Ilya Zaslavsky1 , Haiyun He2 , Joshua Tran1 , Maryann E. Martone2 Numerous digital atlases of the brain have been developed for different species through the efforts

  11. Behavioural Brain Research 198 (2009) 267272 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    2009-01-01

    Behavioural Brain Research 198 (2009) 267­272 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Behavioural Brain Research journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/bbr Review The emergence of consciousness s t r a c t The brains of animals show chemical, anatomical, and functional differences

  12. Aminonaphthalene 2Cyanoacrylate (ANCA) Probes Fluorescently Discriminate between Amyloid and Prion Plaques in Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodorakis, Emmanuel

    and Prion Plaques in Brain Kevin Cao, Mona Farahi, Marianna Dakanali, Willy M. Chang, Christina J. Sigurdson discriminate be- tween different types of amyloid deposits in brain. The discriminating capability that is not readily accessible from currently available technology. Amyloid plaque accumulation in the brain

  13. Behavioural Brain Research 233 (2012) 7989 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolowski, Marla

    2012-01-01

    Behavioural Brain Research 233 (2012) 79­89 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect Behavioural Brain Research journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/bbr Research report Dendritic morphology in the brain have been studied in both human and animal populations, and may result in novel circuitry

  14. A Generic Machine-Learning Tool for Online Whole Brain Classification from fMRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koppel, Moshe

    A Generic Machine-Learning Tool for Online Whole Brain Classification from fMRI Ori Cohen1 generic machine learning (ML) tool for real- time fMRI whole brain classification, which can be used informa- tion gain for isolating the most relevant voxels in the brain and a support vector machine

  15. Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Visual Processing in the Central Bee Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fellous, Jean-Marc

    Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Visual Processing in the Central Bee Brain Angelique C. Paulk,1 Andrew M. Dacks,2 James Phillips-Portillo,2 Jean-Marc Fellous,3 and Wulfila Gronenberg2 1Queensland Brain intracellularly in vivo from 30 neurons in the central bumblebee brain (the lateral protocerebrum) and compared

  16. Exploring brain activity in neuroeconomics Sylvain Charron1,2,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuchs, Armin

    Exploring brain activity in neuroeconomics Sylvain Charron1,2,3 Armin Fuchs4,5 Olivier Oullier6 Épistémologie Appli- quée, Paris, France 4. Human Brain and Behaviour Laboratory, Center for Complex Systems and Brain Scien- ces, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 33431, USA 5. Department of Physics

  17. Brain and Language xxx (2006) xxxxxx www.elsevier.com/locate/b&l

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coulson, Seana

    2006-01-01

    Brain and Language xxx (2006) xxx­xxx www.elsevier.com/locate/b&l 0093-934X/$ - see front matter, USA Accepted 3 November 2005 Abstract Measures of electrical brain activity (event-related potentials, and the retrieval cues provided by the preceding context. Recordings from patients with brain damage, intracranial

  18. For Immediate Release --Friday, March 9, 2012 Help your Hippocampus* at Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Joy

    For Immediate Release -- Friday, March 9, 2012 Help your Hippocampus* at Brain Awareness Week Neuroscience (CCBN) is inviting the community to Brain Awareness Week, which takes place March 12 - 18. This popular, free event helps the public learn more about the brain and the various ways in which researchers

  19. Brain and Mind 2: 161194, 2001. 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryder, Dan

    Brain and Mind 2: 161­194, 2001. © 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. 161; in final form: 23 May 2001) Abstract. The ability to predict is the most important ability of the brain that are orders of complexity removed from raw sensory inputs. We propose that the brain's basic mechanism

  20. NeuroPhone: Brain-Mobile Phone Interface using a Wireless EEG Headset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Andrew T.

    NeuroPhone: Brain-Mobile Phone Interface using a Wireless EEG Headset Andrew T. Campbell, Tanzeem electroencephalo- graphy (EEG) headsets. We demonstrate a brain-controlled address book dialing app, which works on similar princi- ples to P300-speller brain-computer interfaces: the phone flashes a sequence of photos

  1. Psychological & Brain Sciences 10/2012 HOW TO PLACE AN ORDER IN GATEWAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Psychological & Brain Sciences 10/2012 1 HOW TO PLACE AN ORDER IN GATEWAY 1) Go to the Gateway above). All items need to be from the same vendor. #12;Psychological & Brain Sciences 10/2012 2 c on the Cart in the upper right hand corner to view your items. #12;Psychological & Brain Sciences 10/2012 3

  2. Automated Brain Shift Correction Using A Pre-computed Deformation Atlas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    Automated Brain Shift Correction Using A Pre-computed Deformation Atlas Prashanth Dumpuria Dr. Reid, USA ABSTRACT Compensating for intraoperative brain shift using computational models has shown preoperatively and are combined with the help of a statistical model to predict the intraoperative brain shift

  3. fMRI Brain Image Retrieval Based on ICA Components bbai@cs.rutgers.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fMRI Brain Image Retrieval Based on ICA Components Bing Bai bbai@cs.rutgers.edu Department This manuscript proposes a retrieval system for fMRI brain images. Our goal is to find a similarity- metric to enable us to support queries for "similar tasks" for retrieval on a large collection of brain ex

  4. Mapping brain maturation Arthur W. Toga, Paul M. Thompson and Elizabeth R. Sowell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    Mapping brain maturation Arthur W. Toga, Paul M. Thompson and Elizabeth R. Sowell Laboratory 225, Los Angeles, CA 90095-7332, USA Human brain maturation is a complex, lifelong process that can. Introduction The dynamic course of brain maturation is one of the most fascinating aspects of the human

  5. Brain Behav Evol 2004;63:197210 DOI: 10.1159/000076781

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dukas, Reuven

    Brain Behav Evol 2004;63:197­210 DOI: 10.1159/000076781 Causes and Consequences of Limited of information processing by the brain. The avail- able data suggest, first, that limited attention is a major. Karger AG, Basel Introduction Many animals, from tiny insects to large-brained mammals, are capable

  6. Brain Shift Correction Based on a Boundary Element Biomechanical Model with Different

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    Brain Shift Correction Based on a Boundary Element Biomechanical Model with Different Material to inaccuracy due to intraoperative changes like brain shift or tumor resection. In order to correct for these deformations a biomechanical model of the brain is proposed. Not only elastic tissues, but also fluids

  7. RICE UNIVERSITY Building a 3D Atlas of the Mouse Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ju, Tao

    RICE UNIVERSITY Building a 3D Atlas of the Mouse Brain by Tao Ju A Thesis Submitted in Partial, Texas April, 2005 #12;Building a 3D Atlas of the Mouse Brain Tao Ju Abstract Building and studying 3D representations of anatomical structures, such as the brain, plays an important role in modern biology and medical

  8. Data and text mining Large-scale extraction of brain connectivity from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thévenaz, Jacques

    Project, Brain Mind Institute and 2 School of Computer and Communication Sciences, Ecole Polytechnique Fe: the Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) and the atlas from the Brain Architecture Management System (BAMS). We then use are also evaluated against in vivo connectivity data from ABA with an estimated precision of 78

  9. TOOLS AND BRAINS IN BIRDS LOUIS LEFEBVRE1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fussman, Gregor

    TOOLS AND BRAINS IN BIRDS by LOUIS LEFEBVRE1) , NEKTARIA NICOLAKAKIS and DENIS BOIRE2,3,4) (1, Montréal, Québec, Canada) (Acc. 14-V-2002) Summary Tools are traditionally de ned as objects that are used by hitting it with a stone uses a tool, but a gull dropping an egg on a rock does not. This distinction

  10. Dispatch R427 Time perception: Brain time or event time?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Alan

    Dispatch R427 Time perception: Brain time or event time? Alan Johnston* and Shin'ya Nishida Recent experiments show that synchronous events can appear to an observer to occur at different times. Neural processing time delays are offered as an explanation of these temporal illusions, but equating perceived time

  11. Brain Mechanisms in Early Language Acquisition Patricia K. Kuhl1,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    attest, infants' neural commitment to the elementary units of language begins early, and the review showNeuron Review Brain Mechanisms in Early Language Acquisition Patricia K. Kuhl1,* 1Institute of the phonetic units of language requires learning in a social context. Neuroscience on early language learning

  12. Experimental Models of Anxiety for Drug Discovery and Brain Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    Chapter 18 Experimental Models of Anxiety for Drug Discovery and Brain Research Peter C. Hart and anxiogenic drugs. Detailed protocols will be provided for these paradigms, and possible confounds+Business Media, LLC 2010 299 #12;300 Hart et al. It is important to understand, however, that any animal exper

  13. The Future of Memory: Remembering, Imagining, and the Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szpunar, Karl K.

    Neuron Review The Future of Memory: Remembering, Imagining, and the Brain Daniel L. Schacter,1 increase in research examining the role of memory in imagination and future thinking. This work has revealed striking similarities between remembering the past and imagining or simulating the future

  14. Multivariate Tensor-based Brain Anatomical Surface Morphometry via Holomorphic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    Multivariate Tensor-based Brain Anatomical Surface Morphometry via Holomorphic One-Forms Yalin Wang}@loni.ucla.edu Abstract. Here we introduce multivariate tensor-based surface mor- phometry using holomorphic one abnormalities. Multivariate statistics on the local tensors outperformed other TBM methods including analysis

  15. Fast Filament Tracking Using Graphics Hardware Brain Networks Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keyser, John

    Fast Filament Tracking Using Graphics Hardware Brain Networks Lab Texas A&M University TAMU, that are difficult to visualize. In this paper, we de- scribe a method for tracking filaments and show how data set, a large volume is processed allowing the filaments to be traced in a local frame positioned

  16. Acquisition and Mining of the Whole Mouse Brain Microstructure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Jae-Rock

    2010-10-12

    data acquisition and analysis framework to overcome these challenges with a focus on data from the C57BL/6 mouse brain. Since there has been no such complete microstructure data from any mammalian species, the sheer amount of data can overwhelm...

  17. Automatic Landmark Tracking and the Optimization of Brain Conformal Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    Automatic Landmark Tracking and the Optimization of Brain Conformal Mapping 1Lok Ming Lui , 1 manually, especially when large dataset must be analyzed. We present algorithms to automatically detect. Methods: We propose an automatic landmark curve tracing method based on the principal directions

  18. Behavioural Brain Research 95 (1998) 219226 Research report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    1998-01-01

    Behavioural Brain Research 95 (1998) 219­226 Research report Intra-amygdala infusions received bilateral intra-amygdala infusions of the muscarinic receptor antagonist, scopolamine (SCOP; 5 vg/0.5 vl) or vehicle. On a retention test 24 h later, unoperated and vehicle-infused rats

  19. HIERARCHICAL TOPOLOGICAL NETWORK ANALYSIS OF ANATOMICAL HUMAN BRAIN CONNECTIVITY AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RELATED TO SEX AND KINSHIP By Julio M. Duarte-Carvajalino, Neda Jahanshad, Christophe Lenglet, Katie L. Mc Human Brain Connectivity and Differences Related to Sex and Kinship Julio M. Duarte-Carvajalinoa , Neda- Corresponding author Email addresses: duart022@umn.edu (Julio M. Duarte-Carvajalino), neda

  20. ORIGINAL PAPER Encoding properties of auditory neurons in the brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tricas, Timothy C.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Encoding properties of auditory neurons in the brain of a soniferous damselfish in social communication, but few studies have examined response properties of central auditory neurons neurons to tone bursts and playbacks of con- specific sounds in the soniferous damselfish, Abudefduf

  1. FE SPOTLIGHT Breathing, bugs, and brains: conceptual unification?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). At some point, the level of oxygen declines, or car- bon dioxide rises, enough to cause the spiracles a recent mechanistic model for the control of spiracles, from Fo¨ rster & Hetz (2010), and a new hypothesis energy. Although the actual metabolic costs of running an insect brain are poorly known, they could

  2. Computational Modeling of High-Level Cognition and Brain Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :128­136, 1999. 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Key words: brain function; fMRI; PET; 4CAPS INTRODUCTION Functional technologies (functional magnetic resonance imaging--fMRI), new analytic methods, and a boldness to examine disparate findings, but also generate new predictions in the process of testing and refining particular

  3. Number of Work/Study-Related Injuries A total of 38 work/study-related injury cases were recorded in 2009. Among the cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by Department LWD = Lost Workday(s) Cause of Work/Study-Related Injuries Figure 1 summarizes the causes for all Per Accident 16.2 2.5 7.5 16.6 4.1 7.9 17.2 4.8 6.4 17.5 Department No. of Accidents Total LWD=0 0LWD£3 LWD>3 ACCT 1 1 BIOL 3 2 1 CSO 1 1 DBM 1 1 FMO 16 1 8 7 LANG 1 1 SAO 4 4 Total 27 4 9 14 #12

  4. Brain-Computer Interfaces for HCI and In this workshop we study the research themes and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nijholt, Anton

    Brain-Computer Interfaces for HCI and Games Abstract In this workshop we study the research themes and the state-of-the-art of brain-computer interaction. Brain- computer interface research has seen much for the treatment of neurological disorders. Here, however, we look at brain-computer interaction especially

  5. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 48, NO. 5, MAY 2001 501 Noise Reduction in Brain Evoked Potentials Based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cichocki, Andrzej

    techniques have been extensively used for the enhancement and recovering of various biomedical signals. Gharieb is with the Laboratory for Advanced Brain Signal Processing, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako. Cichocki is with the Laboratory for Advanced Brain Signal Processing, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako

  6. CATIONIC SHELL CROSSLINKED NANOPARTICLES AS INTRACELLULAR DELIVERY VEHICLES FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF ACUTE LUNG INJURY 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florez, Stephanie

    2011-08-08

    on the development of polymer nanomaterials known as shell crosslinked knedel-like (SCK) nanoparticles to serve as intracellular carriers of genetic material and specifically target injured cells in the lung for the treatment of acute lung injury (ALI). SCK...

  7. A quantitative proteomics study of the additive effect of inflammatory cytokines and injurious compression on cartilage damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaminathan, Krishnakumar

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: 1) To perform a quantitative comparison of proteins released to media on combination with cytokine (IL-1[beta[ or TNF-[alpha]) and Injury as compared to either treatment alone, and to thus identify proteins ...

  8. Epidemiology of fatal and nonfatal injuries in the Avianca plane crash: Avianca Flight 052, January 25, 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barancik, J.I.; Kramer, C.F.; Thode, H.C. Jr.; Kahn, C.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Greensher, J.; Schechter, S. [Nassau County Dept. of Health, Mineola, NY (United States)

    1992-11-01

    On January 25, 1990 Avianca Flight 052 crashed without a conflagration after running out of fuel; 73 persons died, 85 survived. Epidemiological, biostatistical, and related analytical methods were used for the analysis of decedent and survivor injury patterns and for the purpose of examining selected EMS and hospital issues-relative to disaster planning and incident management and response. Medical examiner and hospital records for all decedents and survivors were identified, abstracted, and coded using the International Classification of Diseases with Clinical Modifications, 9th Edition (ICD 9-CM) to determine the nature of injuries and comorbid conditions. Injury severity values were determined using the 1985 Abbreviated Injury Scale with Epidemiologic Modifications (AIS 85-EM).

  9. Bleecker: WC Reporting Check List Risk Management 12/10/2012 Initial Injury/Illness Reporting Check List

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    Bleecker: WC Reporting Check List Risk Management 12/10/2012 Initial Injury/Illness Reporting Check List Questions contact Department's HR or Risk Management 650-723-7400 Any Death or Serious Injury://www.stanford.edu/dept/EHS/prod/general/su17.pdf Within 24 HRS Worker & Supervisor Fax to 650-723-9456 Original to Mail Code 6207 DWC 1 http://www.stanford.edu/dept/Risk-Management

  10. Sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury in mice: Implications for acute and chronic lung disease in humans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lingappan, Krithika, E-mail: lingappa@bcm.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology, Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, 1102 Bates Avenue, MC: FC530.01, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I. [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology, Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, 1102 Bates Avenue, MC: FC530.01, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Barrios, Roberto [Department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine, The Methodist Hospital Physician Organization, 6565 Fannin Street, Suite M227, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Moorthy, Bhagavatula [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology, Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, 1102 Bates Avenue, MC: FC530.01, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Sex-specific differences in pulmonary morbidity in humans are well documented. Hyperoxia contributes to lung injury in experimental animals and humans. The mechanisms responsible for sex differences in the susceptibility towards hyperoxic lung injury remain largely unknown. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that mice will display sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury. Eight week-old male and female mice (C57BL/6J) were exposed to 72 h of hyperoxia (FiO{sub 2} > 0.95). After exposure to hyperoxia, lung injury, levels of 8-iso-prostaglandin F{sub 2} alpha (8-iso-PGF 2?) (LC–MS/MS), apoptosis (TUNEL) and inflammatory markers (suspension bead array) were determined. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A expression in the lung was assessed using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. After exposure to hyperoxia, males showed greater lung injury, neutrophil infiltration and apoptosis, compared to air-breathing controls than females. Pulmonary 8-iso-PGF 2? levels were higher in males than females after hyperoxia exposure. Sexually dimorphic increases in levels of IL-6 (F > M) and VEGF (M > F) in the lungs were also observed. CYP1A1 expression in the lung was higher in female mice compared to males under hyperoxic conditions. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that male mice are more susceptible than females to hyperoxic lung injury and that differences in inflammatory and oxidative stress markers contribute to these sex-specific dimorphic effects. In conclusion, this paper describes the establishment of an animal model that shows sex differences in hyperoxic lung injury in a temporal manner and thus has important implications for lung diseases mediated by hyperoxia in humans. - Highlights: • Male mice were more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury than females. • Sex differences in inflammatory markers were observed. • CYP1A expression was higher in females after hyperoxia exposure.

  11. An evaluation of a weight-lifting belt and back injury prevention training class for fleet service clerks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddell, Cheryl Renee?

    1991-01-01

    AN EVALUATION OF A WEIGHT-LIFTING BELT AND BACK INJURY PREVENTION TRAINING CLASS FOR FLEET SERVICE CLERKS A Thesis by CHERYL RENEE REDDELL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering AN EVALUATION OF A WEIGHT-LIFTING BELT AND BACK INJURY PREVENTION TRAINING CLASS FOR FLEET SERVICE CLERKS A Thesis by Cheryl Rene' Reddell Approved...

  12. Quantum Interference in Cognition: Structural Aspects of the Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diederik Aerts; Sandro Sozzo

    2012-04-22

    We identify the presence of typically quantum effects, namely 'superposition' and 'interference', in what happens when human concepts are combined, and provide a quantum model in complex Hilbert space that represents faithfully experimental data measuring the situation of combining concepts. Our model shows how 'interference of concepts' explains the effects of underextension and overextension when two concepts combine to the disjunction of these two concepts. This result supports our earlier hypothesis that human thought has a superposed two-layered structure, one layer consisting of 'classical logical thought' and a superposed layer consisting of 'quantum conceptual thought'. Possible connections with recent findings of a 'grid-structure' for the brain are analyzed, and influences on the mind/brain relation, and consequences on applied disciplines, such as artificial intelligence and quantum computation, are considered.

  13. Source localization of brain activity using helium-free interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dammers, Jürgen Chocholacs, Harald; Eich, Eberhard; Boers, Frank; Faley, Michael; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Jon Shah, N.

    2014-05-26

    To detect extremely small magnetic fields generated by the human brain, currently all commercial magnetoencephalography (MEG) systems are equipped with low-temperature (low-T{sub c}) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors that use liquid helium for cooling. The limited and increasingly expensive supply of helium, which has seen dramatic price increases recently, has become a real problem for such systems and the situation shows no signs of abating. MEG research in the long run is now endangered. In this study, we report a MEG source localization utilizing a single, highly sensitive SQUID cooled with liquid nitrogen only. Our findings confirm that localization of neuromagnetic activity is indeed possible using high-T{sub c} SQUIDs. We believe that our findings secure the future of this exquisitely sensitive technique and have major implications for brain research and the developments of cost-effective multi-channel, high-T{sub c} SQUID-based MEG systems.

  14. A Novel Flexible Sinusoidal Probe for Chronic Extracellular Brain Recording

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohal, Harbaljit S; Jackson, Andrew; Baker, Stuart N; O'Neill, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Current microelectrodes designed to record chronic neural activity suffer from recording instabilities due to the modulus mismatch between the electrode materials and the brain. We sought to address this by microfabricating a novel flexible neural probe. Our probe was fabricated from parylene-C with a WTi metal, using contact photolithography and reactive ion etching, with three design features to address this modulus mismatch: a sinusoidal shaft, a rounded tip and a polyimide anchoring ball. The anchor restricts movement of the electrode recording sites and the shaft accommodates the brain motion. We successfully patterned thick metal and parylene-C layers, with a reliable device release process leading to high functional yield and were able to sample stable neural activity for over 2 years with this probe. We have successfully optimized the fabrication process to produce a reliable probe with high functional yield. This novel reliably microfabricated probe can record stable neural activity for up to two yea...

  15. A versatile clearing agent for multi-modal brain imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costantini, Irene; Di Giovanna, Antonino Paolo; Mascaro, Anna Letizia Allegra; Silvestri, Ludovico; Müllenbroich, Marie Caroline; Onofri, Leonardo; Conti, Valerio; Vanzi, Francesco; Sacconi, Leonardo; Guerrini, Renzo; Markram, Henry; Iannello, Giulio; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2015-01-01

    Extensive mapping of neuronal connections in the central nervous system requires high-throughput um-scale imaging of large volumes. In recent years, different approaches have been developed to overcome the limitations due to tissue light scattering. These methods are generally developed to improve the performance of a specific imaging modality, thus limiting comprehensive neuroanatomical exploration by multimodal optical techniques. Here, we introduce a versatile brain clearing agent (2,2'-thiodiethanol; TDE) suitable for various applications and imaging techniques. TDE is cost-efficient, water-soluble and low-viscous and, more importantly, it preserves fluorescence, is compatible with immunostaining and does not cause deformations at sub-cellular level. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method in different applications: in fixed samples by imaging a whole mouse hippocampus with serial two-photon tomography; in combination with CLARITY by reconstructing an entire mouse brain with light sheet microscopy...

  16. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the Head Injury to a Miner at

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsStateof Energy Two CompaniesRappelInjury at the Saltthe

  17. Type B Accident Investigation Of The February 25, 2009 Injury To A

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsStateof Energy Two CompaniesRappelInjury atPassenger In An

  18. Type B Accident Investigation Report of the October 28, 2004, Burn Injuries

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsStateof Energy Two CompaniesRappelInjury atPassenger In

  19. Developments in deep brain stimulation using time dependent magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowther, L.J.; Nlebedim, I.C.; Jiles, D.C.

    2012-03-07

    The effect of head model complexity upon the strength of field in different brain regions for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been investigated. Experimental measurements were used to verify the validity of magnetic field calculations and induced electric field calculations for three 3D human head models of varying complexity. Results show the inability for simplified head models to accurately determine the site of high fields that lead to neuronal stimulation and highlight the necessity for realistic head modeling for TMS applications.

  20. Mitofusin-2 protects against cold stress-induced cell injury in HEK293 cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wenbin; Chen, Yaomin; Yang, Qun; Che, Honglei; Chen, Xiangjun; Yao, Ting; Zhao, Fang; Liu, Mingchao; Ke, Tao; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2010-06-25

    Mitochondrial impairment is hypothesized to contribute to cell injury during cold stress. Mitochondria fission and fusion are closely related in the function of the mitochondria, but the precise mechanisms whereby these processes regulate cell injury during cold stress remain to be determined. HEK293 cells were cultured in a cold environment (4.0 {+-} 0.1 {sup o}C) for 2, 4, 8, or 12 h. Western blot analyses showed that these cells expressed decreased fission-related protein Drp1 and increased fusion-related protein Mfn2 at 4 h; meanwhile, electron microscopy analysis revealed large and long mitochondrial morphology within these cells, indicating increased mitochondrial fusion. With silencing of Mfn2 but not of Mfn1 by siRNA promoted cold-stress-induced cell death with decreased ATP production in HEK293 cells. Our results show that increased expression of Mfn2 and mitochondrial fusion are important for mitochondrial function as well as cell survival during cold stress. These findings have important implications for understanding the mechanisms of mitochondrial fusion and fission in cold-stress-induced cell injury.

  1. Avoiding Boltzmann Brain domination in holographic dark energy models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Horvat

    2015-09-14

    In a spatially infinite and eternal universe approaching ultimately a de Sitter (or quasi-de Sitter) regime, structure can form by thermal fluctuations as such a space is thermal. The models of Dark Energy invoking holographic principle fit naturally into such a category, and spontaneous formation of isolated brains in otherwise empty space seems the most perplexing, creating the paradox of Boltzmann Brains (BB). It is thus appropriate to ask if such models can be made free from domination by Boltzmann Brains. Here we consider only the simplest model, but adopt both the local and the global viewpoint in the description of the Universe. In the former case, we find that if a parameter $c$, which modulates the Dark Energy density, lies outside the exponentially narrow strip around the most natural $c = 1$ line, the theory is rendered BB-safe. In the later case, the bound on $c$ is exponentially stronger, and seemingly at odds with those bounds on $c$ obtained from various observational tests.

  2. Avoiding Boltzmann Brain domination in holographic dark energy models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvat, R

    2015-01-01

    In a spatially infinite and eternal universe approaching ultimately a de Sitter (or quasi-de Sitter) regime, structure can form by thermal fluctuations as such a space is thermal. The models of Dark Energy invoking holographic principle fit naturally into such a category, and spontaneous formation of isolated brains in otherwise empty space seems the most perplexing, creating the paradox of Boltzmann Brains (BB). It is thus appropriate to ask if such models can be made free from domination by Boltzmann Brains. Here we consider only the simplest model, but adopt both the local and the global viewpoint in the description of the Universe. In the former case, we find that if a parameter $c$, which modulates the Dark Energy density, lies outside the exponentially narrow strip around the most natural $c = 1$ line, the theory is rendered BB-safe. In the later case, the bound on $c$ is exponentially stronger, and seemingly at odds with those bounds on $c$ obtained from various observational tests.

  3. Avoiding Boltzmann Brain domination in holographic dark energy models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Horvat

    2015-02-23

    In a spatially infinite and eternal universe approaching ultimately a de Sitter (or quasi-de Sitter) regime, structure can form by thermal fluctuations as such a space is thermal. The models of Dark Energy invoking holographic principle fit naturally into such a category, and spontaneous formation of isolated brains in otherwise empty space seems the most perplexing, creating the paradox of Boltzmann Brains (BB). It is thus appropriate to ask if such models can be made free from domination by Boltzmann Brains. Here we consider only the simplest model, but adopt both the local and the global viewpoint in the description of the Universe. In the former case, we find that if a parameter $c$, which modulates the Dark Energy density, lies outside the exponentially narrow strip around the most natural $c = 1$ line, the theory is rendered BB-safe. In the later case, the bound on $c$ is exponentially stronger, and seemingly at odds with those bounds on $c$ obtained from various observational tests.

  4. "Where Brain, Body and World Collide"" DAEDALUS : JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES (Special Issue on The Brain) Vol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Andy

    "Where Brain, Body and World Collide"" DAEDALUS : JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ARTS@twinearth.wustl.edu "Where Brain, Body, and World Collide" reprinted by permission of Daedalus, Journal of the American to the project of understanding the mind. But how should such an understanding proceed? An early sentiment

  5. Brief Introduction to BrainSpace V2.1 BrainSpace V2.1: Geometric mapping and diffusion-based software for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jing

    State University With ever-improving imaging technologies and ever-increasing high integrated cross-subject analysis of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) (molecular-level brain activity. #12;2 Processing pipeline for geometry-based integrative analysis of brain imaging data

  6. Treatment of Five or More Brain Metastases With Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, Grant K.; Suh, John H.; Reuther, Alwyn M.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Barnett, Gene H.; Angelov, Lilyana; Weil, Robert J.; Neyman, Gennady; Chao, Samuel T.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To examine the outcomes of patients with five or more brain metastases treated in a single session with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients with brain metastases treated with SRS to five or more lesions in a single session were reviewed. Primary disease type, number of lesions, Karnofsky performance score (KPS) at SRS, and status of primary and systemic disease at SRS were included. Patients were treated using dosing as defined by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 90-05, with adjustments for critical structures. We defined prior whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) as WBRT completed >1 month before SRS and concurrent WBRT as WBRT completed within 1 month before or after SRS. Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazard regression were used to determine which patient and treatment factors predicted overall survival (OS). Results: The median OS after SRS was 7.5 months. The median KPS was 80 (range, 60-100). A KPS of {>=}80 significantly influenced OS (median OS, 4.8 months for KPS {<=}70 vs. 8.8 months for KPS {>=}80, p = 0.0097). The number of lesions treated did not significantly influence OS (median OS, 6.6 months for eight or fewer lesions vs. 9.9 months for more than eight, p = nonsignificant). Primary site histology did not significantly influence median OS. On multivariate Cox modeling, KPS and prior WBRT significantly predicted for OS. Whole-brain radiotherapy before SRS compared with concurrent WBRT significantly influenced survival, with a risk ratio of 0.423 (95% confidence interval 0.191-0.936, p = 0.0338). No significant differences were observed when no WBRT was compared with concurrent WBRT or when the no WBRT group was compared with prior WBRT. A KPS of {<=}70 predicted for poorer outcomes, with a risk ratio of 2.164 (95% confidence interval 1.157-4.049, p = 0.0157). Conclusions: Stereotactic radiosurgery to five or more brain lesions is an effective treatment option for patients with metastatic cancer, especially for patients previously treated with WBRT. A KPS of {>=}80 predicts for an improved outcome.

  7. Postoperative Stereotactic Radiosurgery Without Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases: Potential Role of Preoperative Tumor Size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartford, Alan C.; Paravati, Anthony J.; Spire, William J.; Li, Zhongze; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Fadul, Camilo E.; Erkmen, Kadir; Friedman, Jonathan; Gladstone, David J.; Hug, Eugen B.; Roberts, David W.; Simmons, Nathan E.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy following resection of a brain metastasis increases the probability of disease control at the surgical site. We analyzed our experience with postoperative stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) as an alternative to whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), with an emphasis on identifying factors that might predict intracranial disease control and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed all patients through December 2008, who, after surgical resection, underwent SRS to the tumor bed, deferring WBRT. Multiple factors were analyzed for time to intracranial recurrence (ICR), whether local recurrence (LR) at the surgical bed or “distant” recurrence (DR) in the brain, for time to WBRT, and for OS. Results: A total of 49 lesions in 47 patients were treated with postoperative SRS. With median follow-up of 9.3 months (range, 1.1-61.4 months), local control rates at the resection cavity were 85.5% at 1 year and 66.9% at 2 years. OS rates at 1 and 2 years were 52.5% and 31.7%, respectively. On univariate analysis (preoperative) tumors larger than 3.0 cm exhibited a significantly shorter time to LR. At a cutoff of 2.0 cm, larger tumors resulted in significantly shorter times not only for LR but also for DR, ICR, and salvage WBRT. While multivariate Cox regressions showed preoperative size to be significant for times to DR, ICR, and WBRT, in similar multivariate analysis for OS, only the graded prognostic assessment proved to be significant. However, the number of intracranial metastases at presentation was not significantly associated with OS nor with other outcome variables. Conclusions: Larger tumor size was associated with shorter time to recurrence and with shorter time to salvage WBRT; however, larger tumors were not associated with decrements in OS, suggesting successful salvage. SRS to the tumor bed without WBRT is an effective treatment for resected brain metastases, achieving local control particularly for tumors up to 3.0 cm diameter.

  8. SU-E-T-568: Improving Normal Brain Sparing with Increasing Number of Arc Beams for Volume Modulated Arc Beam Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossain, S; Hildebrand, K; Ahmad, S; Larson, D; Ma, L; Sahgal, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated arc beams have been newly reported for treating multiple brain metastases. The purpose of this study was to determine the variations in the normal brain doses with increasing number of arc beams for multiple brain metastases treatments via the TrueBeam Rapidarc system (Varian Oncology, Palo Alto, CA). Methods: A patient case with 12 metastatic brain lesions previously treated on the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (GK) was used for the study. All lesions and organs at risk were contoured by a senior radiation oncologist and treatment plans for a subset of 3, 6, 9 and all 12 targets were developed for the TrueBeam Rapidarc system via 3 to 7 intensity modulated arc-beams with each target covered by at least 99% of the prescribed dose of 20 Gy. The peripheral normal brain isodose volumes as well as the total beam-on time were analyzed with increasing number of arc beams for these targets. Results: All intensisty modulated arc-beam plans produced efficient treatment delivery with the beam-on time averaging 0.6–1.5 min per lesion at an output of 1200 MU/min. With increasing number of arc beams, the peripheral normal brain isodose volumes such as the 12-Gy isodose line enclosed normal brain tissue volumes were on average decreased by 6%, 11%, 18%, and 28% for the 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-target treatment plans respectively. The lowest normal brain isodose volumes were consistently found for the 7-arc treatment plans for all the cases. Conclusion: With nearly identical beam-on times, the peripheral normal brain dose was notably decreased when the total number of intensity modulated arc beams was increased when treating multiple brain metastases. Dr Sahgal and Dr Ma are currently serving on the board of international society of stereotactic radiosurgery.

  9. Response [to Whitmer's "Intentionality, Artificial Intelligence and the Causal Powers of the Brain"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eudaly, Thomas

    is that if something artificial functions in the electro-chemical way that brains do, then it has intentional states. Now, Whitmer does state the conclusion aright where he says that "it seems conceivable that an entity could exist whose component mental parts..., 1977). 2J. Whitmer, "Intentionality, Artificial Intelli­ gence and the Causal Powers of the Brain," p. 204 above. 'Ibid. *The Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 3 (1980), p. 419. 213 ...

  10. Brain Behav Evol 82(3) 147210 (2013) 82 | 3 | 13 print

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Brain Behav Evol 82(3) 147­210 (2013) 82 | 3 | 13 print ISSN 0006­8977 online e-ISSN 1421­9743 www: WashingtonUniversity 128.252.128.7-12/30/201310:19:31PM #12;E-Mail karger@karger.com Original Paper Brain.karger.com/bbe Downloadedby: WashingtonUniversity 128.252.128.7-10/30/20132:58:04PM #12;Stevens/Sukhum/CarlsonBrain Behav Evol

  11. Skull-stripping magnetic resonance brain images using a model-based level set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, A H; Valentino, Daniel J; Toga, A W

    2006-01-01

    in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Neurologicalbrain atrophy in multiple sclerosis. Neurological SciencesWhole-brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis measured by two

  12. Differeneces in Brain Responses Between Lean and Obese Women to a Sweetened Drink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connolly, Lynn Shapiro

    2012-01-01

    GI) tract to the hypothalamus and posterior insula (pINS),amygdala, hippocampus, hypothalamus, anterior and posteriorthe pancreas and the brain (hypothalamus, NTS). 25, 26 In a

  13. Secondary fibrosarcoma of the brain stem treated with cyclophosphamide and Imatinib

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandru, Daniela; Horn, Denise K.; Bota, Daniela Annenelie

    2010-01-01

    RW, Limentani SA, Dollar JD, Asher A (2003) Recurrent primary ?brosarcoma of the brain treated with the GliaSite brachytherapy system: case report.

  14. Conformable actively multiplexed high-density surface electrode array for brain interfacing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, John; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Litt, Brian; Viventi, Jonathan

    2015-01-13

    Provided are methods and devices for interfacing with brain tissue, specifically for monitoring and/or actuation of spatio-temporal electrical waveforms. The device is conformable having a high electrode density and high spatial and temporal resolution. A conformable substrate supports a conformable electronic circuit and a barrier layer. Electrodes are positioned to provide electrical contact with a brain tissue. A controller monitors or actuates the electrodes, thereby interfacing with the brain tissue. In an aspect, methods are provided to monitor or actuate spatio-temporal electrical waveform over large brain surface areas by any of the devices disclosed herein.

  15. Computational study of shock waves propagating through air-plastic-water interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Razo, Mauricio J

    2015-01-01

    The following study is motivated by experimental studies in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Recent research has demonstrated that low intensity non-impact blast wave exposure frequently leads to mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI); however, the mechanisms connecting the blast waves and the mTBI remain unclear. Collaborators at the Seattle VA Hospital are doing experiments to understand how blast waves can produce mTBI. In order to gain insight that is hard to obtain by experimental means, we have developed conservative finite volume methods for interface-shock wave interaction to simulate these experiments. A 1D model of their experimental setup has been implemented using Euler equations for compressible fluids. These equations are coupled with a Tammann equation of state (EOS) that allows us to model compressible gas along with almost incompressible fluids or elastic solids. A hybrid HLLC-exact Eulerian-Lagrangian Riemann solver for Tammann EOS with a jump in the parameters has been developed. The model has sho...

  16. Sandia Energy - The Brain: Key To a Better Computer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput AnalysisSinkholeCapabilities General overview of theBrain: Key To a

  17. Cell density signal protein suitable for treatment of connective tissue injuries and defects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwarz, Richard I. (Oakland, CA)

    2002-08-13

    Identification, isolation and partial sequencing of a cell density protein produced by fibroblastic cells. The cell density signal protein comprising a 14 amino acid peptide or a fragment, variant, mutant or analog thereof, the deduced cDNA sequence from the 14 amino acid peptide, a recombinant protein, protein and peptide-specific antibodies, and the use of the peptide and peptide-specific antibodies as therapeutic agents for regulation of cell differentiation and proliferation. A method for treatment and repair of connective tissue and tendon injuries, collagen deficiency, and connective tissue defects.

  18. Foot Drop after Ethanol Embolization of Calf Vascular Malformation: A Lesson on Nerve Injury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tay, Vincent Khwee-Soon; Mohan, P. Chandra; Liew, Wendy Kein Meng; Mahadev, Arjandas; Tay, Kiang Hiong

    2013-08-01

    Ethanol is often used in sclerotherapy to treat vascular malformations. Nerve injury is a known complication of this procedure. However, the management of this complication is not well described in literature. This case describes a 10-year-old boy with a slow flow vascular malformation in the right calf who underwent transarterial ethanol embolization following prior unsuccessful direct percutaneous sclerotherapy. The development of a dense foot drop that subsequently recovered is described, and the management of this uncommon but distressful complication is discussed.

  19. On the Theoretical Possibility of Quantum Visual Information Transfer to the Human Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Salari; M. Rahnama; J. A. Tuszynski

    2010-12-13

    The feasibility of wave function collapse in the human brain has been the subject of vigorous scientific debates since the advent of quantum theory. Scientists like Von Neumann, London, Bauer and Wigner (initially) believed that wave function collapse occurs in the brain or is caused by the mind of the observer. It is a legitimate question to ask how human brain can receive subtle external visual quantum information intact when it must pass through very noisy and complex pathways from the eye to the brain? There are several approaches to investigate information processing in the brain, each of which presents a different set of conclusions. Penrose and Hameroff have hypothesized that there is quantum information processing inside the human brain whose material substrate involves microtubules and consciousness is the result of a collective wavefunction collapse occurring in these structures. Conversely, Tegmark stated that owing to thermal decoherence there cannot be any quantum processing in neurons of the brain and processing in the brain must be classical for cognitive processes. However, Rosa and Faber presented an argument for a middle way which shows that none of the previous authors are completely right and despite the presence of decoherence, it is still possible to consider the brain to be a quantum system. Additionally, Thaheld, has concluded that quantum states of photons do collapse in the human eye and there is no possibility for collapse of visual quantum states in the brain and thus there is no possibility for the quantum state reduction in the brain. In this paper we conclude that if we accept the main essence of the above approaches taken together, each of them can provide a different part of a teleportation mechanism.

  20. Quantum Mind from a Classical Field Theory of the Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paola Zizzi

    2011-04-13

    We suggest that, with regard to a theory of quantum mind, brain processes can be described by a classical, dissipative, non-abelian gauge theory. In fact, such a theory has a hidden quantum nature due to its non-abelian character, which is revealed through dissipation, when the theory reduces to a quantum vacuum, where temperatures are of the order of absolute zero, and coherence of quantum states is preserved. We consider in particular the case of pure SU(2) gauge theory with a special anzatz for the gauge field, which breaks Lorentz invariance. In the ansatz, a contraction mapping plays the role of dissipation. In the limit of maximal dissipation, which corresponds to the attractive fixed point of the contraction mapping, the gauge fields reduce, up to constant factors, to the Pauli quantum gates for one-qubit states. Then tubuline-qubits can be processed in the quantum vacuum of the classical field theory of the brain, where decoherence is avoided due to the extremely low temperature. Finally, we interpret the classical SU(2) dissipative gauge theory as the quantum metalanguage (relative to the quantum logic of qubits), which holds the non-algorithmic aspect of the mind.

  1. Improving the Delivery of Camptothecin through the Blood-Brain Barrier via Modulation of Paracellular Pathway using E-Cadherin Peptide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabanor, Kayann

    2014-12-31

    The successful treatments of brain tumors and many other brain disorders have been limited due to the presence of barricade from microvascular endothelium called the blood-brain barrier (BBB). It was estimated that over 98% of newly developed...

  2. 1/12/11 1:51 PMComputer-Aided Brains: Scientific American Page 1 of 3http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=computer-aided-brains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvucci, Dario D.

    » SEARCH Log In or Register Log In to SA DigitalLog In to SA Digital Blog & ColumnsEnergy & Sustainability as a Gift. Risk-free Guarantee, Free Shipping. magazine-subscription.com-sub.info Increase Your Brain Power

  3. Estrogen: A master regulator of bioenergetic systems in the brain and Jamaica R. Rettberg a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    Review Estrogen: A master regulator of bioenergetic systems in the brain and body Jamaica R is coincident with decline in brain bioenergetics and shift towards a metabolically compromised phenotype. Compensatory bioenergetic adaptations, or lack thereof, to estrogen loss could determine risk of late

  4. Equilibrium Water Exchange Between the Intra-and Extracellular Spaces of Mammalian Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duong, Timothy Q.

    Equilibrium Water Exchange Between the Intra- and Extracellular Spaces of Mammalian Brain James D.H. Ackerman,1,2,5 and Jeffrey J. Neil2,6* This report describes the measurement of water preexchange lifetimes and intra/extracellular content in intact, functioning mammalian brain. Intra- and extracellular water

  5. Brain Tissue Volume Changes Following Weight Gain in Adults with Anorexia Nervosa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brain Tissue Volume Changes Following Weight Gain in Adults with Anorexia Nervosa Christina A Disord 2011; 44:406­411) Introduction Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious psychiatric ill- ness, MD3 ABSTRACT Objective: To measure brain volume deficits among underweight patients with anorexia

  6. Composition and On Demand Deployment of Distributed Brain Activity Analysis Application on Global Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    the magnetic fields generated by the electrical activity in the brain. This method is more accurate than others can detect a disorder by observing the complex brain wave form and analysing the frequency content University, Japan. 3 Department of Information Systems Engineering, Graduate School of Osaka University

  7. Size-optimized 32-Channel Brain Arrays for 3 T Pediatric Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanwisher, Nancy

    old, 1 year old, 4 years old, and 7 years old, and evaluated for pediatric brain imaging. The array and compared to two coils routinely used for pediatric brain imaging; a commercially available 32-channel adult head coil and a pediatric-sized birdcage coil. Phantom measurements using the neonate, 6-month-old, 1

  8. Method and apparatus for extraction of low-frequency artifacts from brain waves for alertness detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clapp, N.E.; Hively, L.M.

    1997-05-06

    Methods and apparatus automatically detect alertness in humans by monitoring and analyzing brain wave signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave (EEG or MEG) data from the subject, digitizing the data, separating artifact data from raw data, and comparing trends in f-data to alertness indicators, providing notification of inadequate alertness. 4 figs.

  9. Semi-Automated Reconstruction of Vascular Networks in Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope Mouse Brain Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dileepkumar, Ananth

    2014-08-14

    , vascular reconstruction techniques focus either on tracing vessels at the macro-level in a whole brain or tracing micro vessels in a small section of the brain. In this thesis, I attempt to develop a new, more targeted approach to semi-automatically trace a...

  10. Characterizing and Detecting Cohesive Subgroups with Applications to Social and Brain Networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ertem Oktay, Makbule Zeynep

    2015-08-06

    and robust clustering analysis of animal brain networks utilizing a unique and novel experimental data. In collaboration with TIPS, we have analyzed multiple pairs of fMRI data about animal brains that are measured before and after a concussion. We utilize...

  11. Binary and nonbinary description of hypointensity for search and retrieval of brain MR images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Çetin, Müjdat

    of some diseases or the inter/intra-observer variability of the diagnoses. We believe that mining of large. In a previous study based on binary description of hypointensity in the brain, it was shown that brain iron iron load, that are commonly used in clinics. This paper proposes a novel, nonbinary description

  12. Method and apparatus for extraction of low-frequency artifacts from brain waves for alertness detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clapp, Ned E. (Knoxville, TN); Hively, Lee M. (Knoxville, TN)

    1997-01-01

    Methods and apparatus automatically detect alertness in humans by monitoring and analyzing brain wave signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave (EEG or MEG) data from the subject, digitizing the data, separating artifact data from raw data, and comparing trends in f-data to alertness indicators, providing notification of inadequate alertness.

  13. A SAMPLER OF EVENT-RELATED BRAIN POTENTIAL (ERP) ANALYSES OF LANGUAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kutas, Marta

    6 A SAMPLER OF EVENT-RELATED BRAIN POTENTIAL (ERP) ANALYSES OF LANGUAGE PROCESSING Marta Kutas1 and unavailable to conscious reflection. Electrophysiological methods ­ event- related brain potentials (ERPs these language processes as they unfold in real time. Moreover, ERPs can be utilized even when a comprehender

  14. 2001 Progress on a Direct Brain Interface Based on Detection of ERPs in ECoG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    2001 Progress on a Direct Brain Interface Based on Detection of ERPs in ECoG The University of event- related potentials (ERPs) in ECoG. First, averaged ECoG templates are developed using triggered. The brain activity that forms an ERP in the time domain also appears as frequency- specific changes

  15. My body in the brain: a neurocognitive model of body-ownership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    in the brain: a neurocognitive model of body- ownership. Neuropsychologia, 48(3):703-12. #12;Abstract EmpiricalMy body in the brain: a neurocognitive model of body-ownership Manos Tsakiris Department the experience of body-ownership. This review puts forward a neurocognitive model according to which body

  16. Reconstructing the ups and downs of primate brain evolution: implications for adaptive hypotheses and Homo floresiensis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, Stephen H.; Capellini, Isabella; Barton, Robert A.; Mundy, Nicholas I.

    2010-01-27

    the ups and downs of primate brain evolution: implications for adaptive hypotheses and Homo floresiensis Stephen H Montgomery1, Isabella Capellini2, Robert A Barton2, Nicholas I Mundy1* Abstract Background: Brain size is a key adaptive trait. It is often...

  17. Big-brained birds survive better in nature Daniel Sol1,*, Tamas Szekely2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fussman, Gregor

    here that species with larger brains, relative to their body size, experience lower mortality than biologists with an unresolved problem: if growing an enlarged brain has a high cost of development size? A classic answer to this question is that the costs are compensated for later in life

  18. AN APPROACH FOR INTERSUBJECT ANALYSIS OF 3D BRAIN IMAGES BASED ON CONFORMAL GEOMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jing

    ABSTRACT Recent advances in imaging technologies, such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) have accelerated brain research in many aspects. In order to better understand the synergy of the many processes involved in normal brain function

  19. Real-Time Biomechanical Simulation of Volumetric Brain Deformation for Image Guided Neurosurgery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    Real-Time Biomechanical Simulation of Volumetric Brain Deformation for Image Guided Neurosurgery during a neurosurgery procedure. It allowed a three-dimensional volumetric deformation to be simulated to volumetric scans of the brain acquired intraoperatively. Image guided surgery techniques are used

  20. Dietary resveratrol administration increases MnSOD expression and activity in mouse brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Jeffrey A.

    Dietary resveratrol administration increases MnSOD expression and activity in mouse brain Ellen L May 2008 Available online xxxx Keywords: MnSOD Superoxide dismutase Resveratrol Antioxidant enzyme Brain Heart Liver Mitochondria Reactive oxygen species a b s t r a c t trans-Resveratrol (3,40 ,5