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1

Atom Trap Trace Analysis at ANL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Atom Trap Trace Analysis at ANL Atom Trap Trace Analysis at ANL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Atom Trap Trace Analysis at ANL Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) to determine isotopic abundances. Developed at: Argonne National Laboratory Developed in: 1999-current

2

Energy Efficient Steam Trapping of Trace Heating Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since as many as 40-60% of a plant's steam traps may be used on steam tracer lines, it is essential to select the correct, properly sized 'traps'; to optimize the efficient removal of condensate while providing maximum heat transfer to maintain desired product temperatures and greatly reduce steam losses. Factors related to achieving uniform product temperatures and maximum heat transfer rates and energy efficiency are: 1.Types and Methods used for Steam Tracing; 2. Systematic heat balance required to achieve economic tracer lengths; 3. Maximum allowable trapping distance for specific applications 4.Data important to determine condensate loads; 5. Trap selection, sizing, good installation practices, and proper maintenance. Using an engineered approach to steam trapping of trace heating systems have resulted in stable tracer line temperatures while reducing steam consumption 10-50% with minimum maintenance.

Krueger, R. G.; Wilt, G. W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Isotopic Abundance in Atom Trap Trace Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-mail:maynard@anl.gov Website:http://www.anl.gov/ techtransfer/ ABOUT ARGONNE TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER Argonne

Kemner, Ken

4

Isotopic Abundance in Atom Trap Trace Analysis  

isotopes for climate change and nuclear proliferation interests. The Invention Argonne scientists have created a novel method and system for

5

ADVANCED GASIFICATION MERCURY/TRACE METAL CONTROL WITH MONOLITH TRAPS  

SciTech Connect

Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400°F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-?g/m3 (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-?g/m3 (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400°F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most effective arsine and hydrogen selenide sorbents. The noncarbon sorbent was able to reduce the concentration to 0 ppb from a starting concentration of 120 ppb. This compares to the target value of 5 ppb (~17?g/m3). The EERC-prepared metal-based pellet and coprecipitate sorbents exhibited arsine reductions of 90% or greater, being below 10 ppb. Corning SR Liquid monoliths exhibited brief periods (<1 hour) of attaining 90% arsine reduction but were able to achieve greater than 80% reduction for several hours. With respect to hydrogen selenide, all Group IB and IIB metal-based sorbents tested exhibited 100% reduction from an inlet concentration of approximately 400 ppb. Corning SR Liquid monoliths exhibited an 82% reduction when two monoliths were tested simultaneously in series.

Mark A. Musich; Michael L. Swanson; Grant E. Dunham; Joshua J. Stanislowski

2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

6

Trace Element Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace Element Analysis Trace Element Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Trace Element Analysis Details Activities (8) Areas (8) Regions (4) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Fluid Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Fluid Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Reconstructing the fluid circulation of a hydrothermal system Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 15.001,500 centUSD 0.015 kUSD 1.5e-5 MUSD 1.5e-8 TUSD / element Median Estimate (USD): 18.001,800 centUSD 0.018 kUSD 1.8e-5 MUSD 1.8e-8 TUSD / element High-End Estimate (USD): 106.0010,600 centUSD 0.106 kUSD 1.06e-4 MUSD 1.06e-7 TUSD / element

7

Apparatus and Method for Ultra-Sensitive trace Analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for conducting ultra-sensitive trace element and isotope analysis. The apparatus injects a sample through a fine nozzle to form an atomic beam. A DC discharge is used to elevate select atoms to a metastable energy level. These atoms are then acted on by a laser oriented orthogonally to the beam path to reduce the traverse velocity and to decrease the divergence angle of the beam. The beam then enters a Zeeman slower where a counter-propagating laser beam acts to slow the atoms down. Then select atoms are captured in a magneto-optical trap where they undergo fluorescence. A portion of the scattered photons are imaged onto a photo-detector, and the results analyzed to detect the presence of single atoms of the specific trace elements.

Lu, Zhengtian; Bailey, Kevin G.; Chen, Chun Yen; Li, Yimin; O' Connor, Thomas P.; Young, Linda

2000-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

8

Trace Assessment for BWR ATWS Analysis  

SciTech Connect

A TRACE/PARCS input model has been developed in order to be able to analyze anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) in a boiling water reactor. The model is based on one developed previously for the Browns Ferry reactor for doing loss-of-coolant accident analysis. This model was updated by adding the control systems needed for ATWS and a core model using PARCS. The control systems were based on models previously developed for the TRAC-B code. The PARCS model is based on information (e.g., exposure and moderator density (void) history distributions) obtained from General Electric Hitachi and cross sections for GE14 fuel obtained from an independent source. The model is able to calculate an ATWS, initiated by the closure of main steam isolation valves, with recirculation pump trip, water level control, injection of borated water from the standby liquid control system and actuation of the automatic depres-surization system. The model is not considered complete and recommendations are made on how it should be improved.

Cheng, L.Y.; Diamond, D.; Arantxa Cuadra, Gilad Raitses, Arnold Aronson

2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

9

Spent fuel pool analysis using TRACE code  

SciTech Connect

The storage requirements of Spent Fuel Pools have been analyzed with the purpose to increase their rack capacities. In the past, the thermal limits have been mainly evaluated with conservative codes developed for this purpose, although some works can be found in which a best estimate code is used. The use of best estimate codes is interesting as they provide more realistic calculations and they have the capability of analyzing a wide range of transients that could affect the Spent Fuel Pool. Two of the most representative thermal-hydraulic codes are RELAP-5 and TRAC. Nowadays, TRACE code is being developed to make use of the more favorable characteristics of RELAP-5 and TRAC codes. Among the components coded in TRACE that can be used to construct the model, it is interesting to use the VESSEL component, which has the capacity of reproducing three dimensional phenomena. In this work, a thermal-hydraulic model of the Maine Yankee spent fuel pool using the TRACE code is developed. Such model has been used to perform a licensing calculation and the results obtained have been compared with experimental measurements made at the pool, showing a good agreement between the calculations predicted by TRACE and the experimental data. (authors)

Sanchez-Saez, F.; Carlos, S.; Villanueva, J. F.; Martorell, S. [Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Universitat Politenica de Valencia, Cami de Vera s/n, 46021, Valencia (Spain)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Trace Element Analysis Core Lab methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), Hg and Pb (no gas mode). Selenium and Fe are analysed in collision mode with H2. The sample strem a weighed sample is placed in either a 15 ml or 50 ml centrifuge tube and an appropriate volume of optima analysis is performed in the 15 ml centrifuge tubes with addition of 0.5 mls HNO3. For sediment/soils 0

Lotko, William

11

Analysis of electron dynamics in non-ideal Penning traps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Penning traps that are used for particular applications, such as in ion pump technology, Larmor, bouncing, and diocotron frequencies, can be of the same order of magnitude. The paper deals with the dynamics of electrons confined in such devices starting from the study of the properties of the trajectories. In cases of interest, in which electron-neutral collision frequency is much smaller with respect to the characteristic frequencies of the motion, suitable time averages of the trajectories are introduced in order to simplify the analysis of the problem. In the work, time averages have been calculated in a simple way by using an approximate r-z decoupling of the effective potential. Results obtained with the method are presented and discussed in both linear and nonlinear regimes.

Coppa, G.; Mulas, R. [Dipartimento Energia, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Torino (Italy); D'Angola, A. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Fisica dell'Ambiente, Universita della Basilicata, 85100 Potenza (Italy)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Sampling and analysis of natural gas trace constituents  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Major and minor components of natural gas are routinely analyzed by gas chromatography (GC), using a thermal conductivity (TC). The best results obtained by these methods can report no better than 0.01 mole percent of each measured component. Even the extended method of analysis by flame ionization detector (FID) can only improve on the detection limit of hydrocarbons. The gas industry needs better information on all trace constituents of natural gas, whether native or inadvertently added during gas processing that may adversely influence the operation of equipment or the safety of the consumer. The presence of arsenic and mercury in some gas deposits have now been documented in international literature as causing not only human toxicity but also damaging to the field equipment. Yet, no standard methods of sampling and analysis exist to provide this much needed information. In this paper the authors report the results of a three-year program to develop an extensive array of sampling and analysis methods for speciation and measurement of trace constituents of natural gas. A cryogenic sampler operating at near 200 K ({minus}99 F) and at pipeline pressures up to 12.4 {times} 10{sup 6}Pa (1800 psig) has been developed to preconcentrate and recover all trace constituents with boiling points above butanes. Specific analytical methods have been developed for speciating and measurement of many trace components (corresponding to US EPA air toxics) by GC-AED and GC-MS, and for determining various target compounds by other techniques. Moisture, oxygen and sulfur contents are measured on site using dedicated field instruments. Arsenic, mercury and radon are sampled by specific solid sorbents for subsequent laboratory analysis.

Attari, A.; Chao, S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Vascular flora and gradient analysis of the Natchez Trace Parkway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vascular plant collections were made on the Natchez Trace Parkway over a 15 month period beginning in August 2004. These collections along with previous work done by the National Park Service (NPS) produced a flora of 750 genera and 2196 species in 167 families. Five collection trips were made so as to include as much of the growing season as possible (August 2004, March, May, July and October 2005). Specimens were collected from 500 sites along the Parkway as well as at 50 quadrat locations. The largest families, by species numbers, are Asteraceae (298 species), Poaceae (236 species), Cyperaceae (148 species), Fabaceae (133 species) and Rosaceae (73 species), which accounted for 40.4% of the flora. A Detrended Correspondence Analysis (DCA) and TWINSPAN analysis were performed on data collected from 49 sites along the length of the Natchez Trace Parkway (NATR). It was found that the major environmental gradient (Axis 1) affecting the species composition of the site was to be the level of disturbance. The sites with high levels of disturbance were characterized as grassland field sites, while those areas with low levels of disturbance were characterized as forested sites. The TWINSPAN analysis produced 29 groupings, of which eight were found to be valid groupings. Through the course of the study, almost 450 new species were added to the current knowledge of the Natchez Trace Parkway by the NPS. In addition, one prospective endangered species was located, which will aid the NPS in future management practices within the park.

Phillips, Nena Mae Monique

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

A Reference Based Analysis Framework for Analyzing System Call Traces  

SciTech Connect

Reference based analysis (RBA) is a novel data mining tool for exploring a test data set with respect to a reference data set. The power of RBA lies in it ability to transform any complex data type, such as symbolic sequences and multi-variate categorical data instances, into a multivariate continuous representation. The transformed representation not only allows visualization of the complex data, which cannot be otherwise visualized in its original form, but also allows enhanced anomaly detection in the transformed feature space. We demonstrate the application of the RBA framework in analyzing system call traces and show how the transformation results in improved intrusion detection performance over state of art data mining based intrusion detection methods developed for system call traces.

Chandola, Varun [ORNL; Kumar, Vipin [University of Minnesota; Boriah, Shyam [University of Minnesota

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

ScalaTrace: Tracing, Analysis and Modeling of HPC Codes at Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterizing the communication behavior of large-scale applications is a difficult and costly task due to code/system complexity and their long execution times. An alternative to running actual codes is to gather their communication traces and then replay them, which facilitates application tuning and future procurements. While past approaches lacked lossless scalable trace collection, we contribute an approach that provides orders of magnitude smaller, if not near constant-size, communication traces regardless of the number of nodes while preserving structural information. We introduce intra- and inter-node compression techniques of MPI events, we develop a scheme to preserve time and causality of communication events, and we present results of our implementation for BlueGene/L. Given this novel capability, we discuss its impact on communication tuning and on trace extrapolation. To the best of our knowledge, such a concise representation of MPI traces in a scalable manner combined with time-preserving deterministic MPI call replay are without any precedence.

Mueller, F; Wu, X; Schulz, M; de Supinski, B; Gamblin, T

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

Algorithms and analysis for underwater vehicle plume tracing.  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this research was to develop and demonstrate cooperative 3-D plume tracing algorithms for miniature autonomous underwater vehicles. Applications for this technology include Lost Asset and Survivor Location Systems (L-SALS) and Ship-in-Port Patrol and Protection (SP3). This research was a joint effort that included Nekton Research, LLC, Sandia National Laboratories, and Texas A&M University. Nekton Research developed the miniature autonomous underwater vehicles while Sandia and Texas A&M developed the 3-D plume tracing algorithms. This report describes the plume tracing algorithm and presents test results from successful underwater testing with pseudo-plume sources.

Byrne, Raymond Harry; Savage, Elizabeth L. (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Hurtado, John Edward (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Eskridge, Steven E.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for

18

Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for

19

Heterogeneity and dynamicity of clouds at scale: Google trace analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To better understand the challenges in developing effective cloud-based resource schedulers, we analyze the first publicly available trace data from a sizable multi-purpose cluster. The most notable workload characteristic is heterogeneity: in resource ...

Charles Reiss; Alexey Tumanov; Gregory R. Ganger; Randy H. Katz; Michael A. Kozuch

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Y8, Stress Mapping Analysis by Ray Tracing (SMART): A New ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fine grid made out of X-ray absorbing material is placed in the path of ... Stress Mapping Analysis by Ray Tracing (SMART), to fully determine the state of stress ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trap trace analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Trace Element Analysis At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace Element Analysis At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Trace Element Analysis At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes In order to determine which of the faults in these regions were active and open to hydrothermal fluid circulation, we have employed selective ion geochemistry that is a new geochemical method capable of detecting anomalous concentrations for up to 47 elements transported to soils by geochemical cells or low pressure vapors. Enzyme leach and Terrasol leach are two such techniques. This method has to datae been mostly applied to

22

Trace Evidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Work with national and international ... 00 Optional Open House and Trace Analysis Lab Tours of ... Ethanol in Water Standard Reference Materials to ...

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

23

Atom Trap Trace Analysis at ANL | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

by: DOE-NP, NSF-Earth Science Impactbenefit to spin-off field: Used to date old ground water, non-proliferation monitoring, Radio-Krypton Dating A new technique for counting very...

24

Atom Trap Trace Analysis at ANL | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

atoms of the more common isotope found in nature. The device has uses for dating ice and water for geological studies, or monitoring nuclear waste in the environment. 81Kr...

25

ESI/Ion Trap/Ion Mobility/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for Rapid and Sensitive Analysis of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

discuss a new separation strategy for biomolecules that is based on differences in ion mobilitiesESI/Ion Trap/Ion Mobility/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for Rapid and Sensitive Analysis* Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 An ion trap/ion mobility

Clemmer, David E.

26

Trace Element Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coolbaugh, Et Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa

27

Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring lithium deposits." References Mark Coolbaugh, Paul Lechler, Chris...

28

Trace Element Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring lithium deposits." References Mark Coolbaugh, Paul Lechler, Chris...

29

Trace Element Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring lithium deposits." References Mark Coolbaugh, Paul Lechler, Chris...

30

Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring lithium deposits." References Mark Coolbaugh, Paul Lechler, Chris...

31

Trace Element Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for

32

Trace Element Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area (Christensen, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Christensen, Et Al., Christensen, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area (Christensen, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Roosevelt Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Three of the recognized trace-element suites are characteristic of the surface and near-surface environment. These are: (1) concentrations of As, Sb, Be and Hg associated with siliceous material at the location of liquid discharge, fluid mixing, or at boiling interfaces; (2) deposits of Mn and Fe oxides containing concentrations of Ba, W, Be, Co, Cu, As, Sb and Hg formed by the oxidation of cooled brines; and (3) high concentrations of Hg

33

Tracing the Birth of an OSN: Social Graph and Profile Analysis in Google+  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tracing the Birth of an OSN: Social Graph and Profile Analysis in Google+ Doris Schi¨oberg Fabian of Google launch- ing the Google+ OSN. Through multiple crawls of the Google+ OSN, before and after of the birth of an OSN. Our findings underline the impact of peculiar aspects of Google+ such as (a) Google

Schmid, Stefan

34

TRACE/PARCS Core Modeling of a BWR/5 for Accident Analysis of ATWS Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TRACE/PARCS computational package [1, 2] isdesigned to be applicable to the analysis of light water reactor operational transients and accidents where the coupling between the neutron kinetics (PARCS) and the thermal-hydraulics and thermal-mechanics (TRACE) is important. TRACE/PARCS has been assessed for itsapplicability to anticipated transients without scram(ATWS) [3]. The challenge, addressed in this study, is to develop a sufficiently rigorous input model that would be acceptable for use in ATWS analysis. Two types of ATWS events were of interest, a turbine trip and a closure of main steam isolation valves (MSIVs). In the first type, initiated by turbine trip, the concern is that the core will become unstable and large power oscillations will occur. In the second type,initiated by MSIV closure,, the concern is the amount of energy being placed into containment and the resulting emergency depressurization. Two separate TRACE/PARCS models of a BWR/5 were developed to analyze these ATWS events at MELLLA+ (maximum extended load line limit plus)operating conditions. One model [4] was used for analysis of ATWS events leading to instability (ATWS-I);the other [5] for ATWS events leading to emergency depressurization (ATWS-ED). Both models included a large portion of the nuclear steam supply system and controls, and a detailed core model, presented henceforth.

Cuadra A.; Baek J.; Cheng, L.; Aronson, A.; Diamond, D.; Yarsky, P.

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

35

Trace Element Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Area (Klusman & Landress,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Klusman & Landress, Klusman & Landress, 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Area (Klusman & Landress, 1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes This study involved the field collection and laboratory analysis of Al-horizon soil samples in the vicinity of a known geothermal source at Long Valley, California. The samples were analyzed for several constituents known to have influence on Hg retention by soils, including pH, hydrous Fe and Mn, and organic carbon, as well as Hg. The data compiled for these secondary parameters and the field-determined parameters of geology, soil

36

Tracing Noble Gas Radionuclides in the Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trace analysis of radionuclides is an essential and versatile tool in modern science and technology. Due to their ideal geophysical and geochemical properties, long-lived noble gas radionuclides, in particular, 39Ar (t1/2 = 269 yr), 81Kr (t1/2 = 2.3x10^5 yr) and 85Kr (t1/2 = 10.8 yr), have long been recognized to have a wide range of important applications in Earth sciences. In recent years, significant progress has been made in the development of practical analytical methods, and has led to applications of these isotopes in the hydrosphere (tracing the flow of groundwater and ocean water). In this article, we introduce the applications of these isotopes and review three leading analytical methods: Low-Level Counting (LLC), Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA).

P. Collon; W. Kutschera; Z. -T. Lu

2004-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

37

Matrix Optimization for the MALDI-TOF-MS Analysis of Trace Biodiesel Components (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

Trace biodiesel components that could reduce the fuel's operability in cold weather are analyzed using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

McAlpin, C. R.; Voorhees, K. J.; Alleman, T. L.; McCormick, R. L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

TRACE/PARCS analysis of the OECD/NEA Oskarshamn-2 BWR stability benchmark  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On February 25, 1999, the Oskarshamn-2 NPP experienced a stability event which culminated in diverging power oscillations with a decay ratio of about 1.4. The event was successfully modeled by the TRACE/PARCS coupled code system, and further analysis of the event is described in this paper. The results show very good agreement with the plant data, capturing the entire behavior of the transient including the onset of instability, growth of the oscillations (decay ratio) and oscillation frequency. This provides confidence in the prediction of other parameters which are not available from the plant records. The event provides coupled code validation for a challenging BWR stability event, which involves the accurate simulation of neutron kinetics (NK), thermal-hydraulics (TH), and TH/NK. coupling. The success of this work has demonstrated the ability of the 3-D coupled systems code TRACE/PARCS to capture the complex behavior of BWR stability events. The problem was released as an international OECD/NEA benchmark, and it is the first benchmark based on measured plant data for a stability event with a DR greater than one. Interested participants are invited to contact authors for more information. (authors)

Kozlowski, T. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Downar, T.; Xu, Y.; Wysocki, A. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ivanov, K.; Magedanz, J.; Hardgrove, M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., Univ. Park, PA (United States); March-Leuba, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hudson, N.; Woodyatt, D. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

The application of a synchrotron radiation microprobe to trace element analysis  

SciTech Connect

Synchrotron radiation is light emitted by electrons when accelerated in a circular orbit. Properties of synchrotron radiation important to trace element analysis by x-ray fluorescence analysis include a broad, continuous and tunable energy spectrum for K- and L-shell excitation of all elements; a linearly polarized source reducing the scattered radiation backgrounds; low energy deposition in the target; and an appreciable flux in narrow energy bandwidths for chemical speciation. Experiments to date have generally used ''white'' continuous spectra with a low energy absorber and no focussing, but future runs will use focussing mirrors which increase intensities by a factor of more than 1000. Monochromators will be used to select the energy and bandwidths appropriate to the experiment. Detection limits for thin biomedical samples using a solid-state detector, a 0.5 mm beam and a 5 min counting interval were in the range of 30 ppB for calcium to 50 ppB for zinc. A prototype wet cell was designed, constructed and tested using cat cardiac myocytes with the result that major trace elements such as iron could be quantitated in single myocytes. The x-ray microprobe was used to localize gallium in fetal rat bone explants after being cultured in BGJ media containing 25 ..mu..M Ga(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/. The high brightness of x rays from a synchrotron source makes possible the development of computerized tomography on a micrometer scale. A tomogram of a freeze-dried caterpillar head was produced in a 50 min scan. The pixel size was 30 ..mu..m using a 20-..mu..m beam. 2 refs., 1 fig.

Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Kwiatek, W.M.; Long, G.J.; Pounds, J.G.; Schidlovsky, G.; Spanne, P.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

COLD TRAPS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

Thompson, W.I.

1958-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trap trace analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Pore-scale analysis of solubilization and mobilization of trapped NAPL blobs in porous media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NAPL (non-aqueous phase liquid) blob mobilization and solubilization models were developed to predict residual NAPL fate and describe flow dynamics of various displacing phases (water and surfactant foam). The models were achieved by pore-scale mass and force balances and were focused on the understanding of the physico-chemical interactions between NAPL blobs and the displacing phases. The pore-level mass balance indicated changes in NAPL saturation instead of mass reduction occurring with blob solubilization. The force balance was used to explain the complex flow configurations among NAPL blobs and the displacing phases. Some factors such as the wettability and the spreading/entering coefficients were useful in determining flow configurations. From the models developed in this study, dimensional analysis was performed to identify NAPL blob motion during water or surfactant foam flooding. In non-dimensionalized forms, a Trapping number employed as an indicator of blob displacement performance was modified to quantify the onset of blob mobilization. Its value for water flooding was nearly 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than that of surfactant foam flooding. Next, to investigate the blob flow regime in porous media, a blob velocity was computed. Regardless of the displacing phases, a blob’s velocity increased with increasing blob sizes after commencement of blob motion, and the velocity of DNAPL (dense non-aqueous phase liquid) blobs was greater than that of LNAPL (light non-aqueous phase liquid) blobs. From this investigation, it is expected that the pore-scale solubilization and mobilization models would provide better understanding leading to a predictive capability for the flow behavior of NAPL blobs removed by various displacing phases in a porous medium. Additionally, the models based on newly approached concepts and modified governing equations would be useful in conceptualization, as well as the model prediction of other immiscible or miscible fluids flowing through a porous medium. Further, the models developed in our study would be a useful contribution to the study of small-scale contaminants or substances such as particle and bacterial transport in porous media.

Yoon, Sun Hee

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Carbon dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center: A for Atmospheric trace gases. Annual progress report, FY 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments made by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases during the fiscal year 1994. Topics discussed in this report include; organization and staff, user services, systems, communications, Collaborative efforts with China, networking, ocean data and activities of the World Data Center-A.

Burtis, M.D. [comp.] [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B.; Nelson, T.R.; Stoss, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Analysis of Mineral Trapping for CO2 Disposal in Deep Aquifers  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reactive Geochemical Transport Simulation to Study Mineral Trapping Reactive Geochemical Transport Simulation to Study Mineral Trapping for CO 2 Disposal in Deep Saline Arenaceous Aquifers Tianfu Xu, John A. Apps, and Karsten Pruess Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract. A reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport numerical model for evaluating long-term CO 2 disposal in deep aquifers has been developed. Using this model, we performed a number of sensitivity simulations under CO 2 injection conditions for a commonly encountered Gulf Coast sediment to analyze the impact of CO 2 immobilization through carbonate precipitation. Geochemical models are needed because alteration of the predominant host rock aluminosilicate minerals is very slow and is not

44

Trace component analysis of process hydrogen streams at the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes subcontracted work done by the Radian Corporation to analyze trace components in process hydrogen streams at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The data will be used to help define whether the gas streams to be treated in the hydrogen processing unit in the SRC-I Demonstration Plant will require further treatment to remove trace contaminants that could be explosive under certain conditions. 2 references.

Bronfenbrenner, J.C.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Ray tracing visualization toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ray Tracing Visualization Toolkit (rtVTK) is a collection of programming and visualization tools supporting visual analysis of ray-based rendering algorithms. rtVTK leverages layered visualization within the spatial domain of computation, enabling ... Keywords: ray tracing, ray-based rendering, visualization

Christiaan Gribble; Jeremy Fisher; Daniel Eby; Ed Quigley; Gideon Ludwig

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Mode trap  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report discusses a mode trap to trap and absorb transverse modes formed by a beam in a linear accelerator includes a waveguide having a multiplicity of electrically conductive (preferably copper) irises and rings, each iris and ring including an aperture, and the irises and rings being stacked in a side-by-side, alternating fashion such that the apertures of the irises and rings are concentrically aligned. An absorbing material layer such as a dielectric is embedded in each iris and ring, and this absorbing material layer encircles, but is circumferentially spaced from its respective aperture. Each iris and ring includes a plurality of circumferentially spaced slots around it`s aperture and extending radially out toward it`s absorbing material layer.

Chojnacki, E.P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for atmospheric trace gases: FY 1993 activities  

SciTech Connect

During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC`s staff also provide technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC (including World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases) during the period October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of NDPS, CMPS, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints are provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also presented.

Cushman, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Stoss, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment, and Resources Center

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 2000 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels.

Cushman, R.M.

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Proceedings of the workshop on applications of synchrotron radiation to trace impurity analysis for advanced silicon processing  

SciTech Connect

Wafer surface trace impurity analysis is essential for development of competitive Si circuit technologies. Today's grazing incidence x-ray fluorescence techniques with rotating anodes fall short of requirements for the future. Hewlett Packard/Toshiba experiments indicate that with second generation synchrotron sources such as SSRL, the techniques can be extended sufficiently to meet important needs of the leading edge Si circuit industry through nearly all of the 1990's. This workshop was held to identify people interested in use of synchrotron radiation-based methods and to document needs and concerns for further development. Viewgraphs are included for the following presentations: microcontamination needs in silicon technology (M. Liehr), analytical methods for wafer surface contamination (A. Schimazaki), trace impurity analysis of liquid drops using synchrotron radiation (D. Wherry), TRXRF using synchrotron sources (S. Laderman), potential role of synchrotron radiation TRXRF in Si process R D (M. Scott), potenital development of synchrotron radiation facilities (S. Brennan), and identification of goals, needs and concerns (M. Garner).

Laderman, S. (Integrated Circuits Business Div., Hewlett Packard Co., Palo Alto, CA (United States)); Pianetta, P. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Interaction of trapped ions with trapped atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I present results from two Paul-trap based ion traps carried out in the Vuleti? laboratory: the Atom-Ion trap for collision studies between cold atoms and cold ions, and the Cavity-Array trap for studying ...

Grier, Andrew T. (Andrew Todd)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

COLD TRAP  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

Milleron, N.

1963-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

52

High precision trace element and organic constituent analysis of oil shale and solvent-refined coal materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Broad spectrum inorganic and organic analytical techniques provide the best approach for the initial characterization of the complex samples encountered in working with new energy technologies such as oil shale retorting and solvent refining of coal. In complex samples, analyses are facilitated by techniques, such as neutron activation and x-ray fluorescence, that are relatively insensitive to matrix effects. A comparative organic constituent analysis of the crude shale oil and coal liquid samples analyzed in this study showed that the coal liquids contained higher concentrations of aromatic compounds including polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. The coal liquids were considerably richer in phenols than was the shale oil. N-heterocyclics were present in higher concentration in shale oil due to the high nitrogen content of the raw shale. Hydroaromatics were found to be common in coal liquids but negligible in this shale oil. Measurable amounts of the heavy elements Hg, As, Zn, and Se were found in effluent streams from oil shale retorting. The process water also contained significant Co, Br, Sb, and U. The raw oil shale was enriched in Se, As and Sb and somewhat enriched in U, Pb, Cs, Hg, and Zn. Solvent-refined coal liquids were found to be relatively low in most trace elements. Most were concentrated in the mineral residue. Only Br was not depleted in solvent-refined coal. Other trace elements remaining in significant amounts were U, Ta, Cr and Zn. We have not yet measured the trace elements and gaseous and particulate samples from the solvent-refined coal plant. 10 tables.

Fruchter, J.S.; Laul, J.C.; Petersen, M.R.; Ryan, P.W.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases, Fiscal Year 2002 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including atmospheric concentrations and atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels.

Cushman, R.M.

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

54

Oceanic Trace Gases Numeric Data Packages from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

CDIAC products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Most data sets or packages, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. CDIAC lists the following numeric data packages under the broad heading of Oceanic Trace Gases: Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16S_2005 ( 01/11/05 - 022405) • Determination of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Parameters during the R/V Nathaniel B. Palmer Cruise in the Southern Indian Ocean (WOCE Section S04I, 050396 - 070496) • Inorganic Carbon, Nutrient, and Oxygen Data from the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16N_2003a (060403 – 081103) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Maurice Ewing Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A17, 010494 - 032194) • Global Ocean Data Analysis Project GLODAP: Results and Data • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruises in the North Atlantic Ocean on WOCE Sections AR24 (1102 – 120596) and A24, A20, and A22 (053097 – 090397) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic and Chemical Data Obtained During the Nine R/V Knorr Cruises Comprising the Indian Ocean CO2 Survey (WOCE Sections I8SI9S, I9N, I8NI5E, I3, I5WI4, I7N, I1, I10, and I2; 120 194 – 012296) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 28/1 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A8, 032994 - 051294) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruise 138-3, -4, and -5 in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P6E, P6C, and P6W, 050292 - 073092) • Global Distribution of Total Inorganic Carbon and Total Alkalinity below the deepest winter mixed layer depths • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V John V. Vickers Cruise in the Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P13, NOAA CGC92 Cruise, 080492 – 102192) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Hesperides Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A5, 071492 - 081592) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas G. Thompson Cruise in the Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P10, 100593 – 111093) • The International Intercomparison Exercise of Underway fCO2 Systems during the R/V Meteor Cruise 36/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A10, Dec. 1992-Jan, 1993) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C, R/V Knorr , Oct. 1992-April 1993) • Surface Water and Atmospheric Underway Carbon Data Obtained During the World Ocean Circulation Experiment Indian Ocean Survey Cruises (R/V Knorr, Dec. 1994 – Jan, 1996) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Akademik Ioffe Cruise in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section S4P, Feb.-April 1992) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-1 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE section P17C) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-3 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE section P16C) • Carbon-14 Measurements in Surface Water CO2 from the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans, 1965-1994 • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During R/V Meteor Cruise 18/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A1E) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the Central South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P17S and P16S) during the TUNES-2 Expedition of the R

55

Low cost manufacturing of light trapping features on multi-crystalline silicon solar cells : jet etching method and cost analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted in order to determine low cost methods to improve the light trapping ability of multi-crystalline solar cells. We focused our work on improving current wet etching methods to achieve the ...

Berrada Sounni, Amine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Provenance Traces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Provenance is information about the origin, derivation, ownership, or history of an object. It has recently been studied extensively in scientific databases and other settings due to its importance in helping scientists judge data validity, quality and integrity. However, most models of provenance have been stated as ad hoc definitions motivated by informal concepts such as "comes from", "influences", "produces", or "depends on". These models lack clear formalizations describing in what sense the definitions capture these intuitive concepts. This makes it difficult to compare approaches, evaluate their effectiveness, or argue about their validity. We introduce provenance traces, a general form of provenance for the nested relational calculus (NRC), a core database query language. Provenance traces can be thought of as concrete data structures representing the operational semantics derivation of a computation; they are related to the traces that have been used in self-adjusting computation, but differ in impor...

Cheney, James; Ahmed, Amal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

[13] Analysis of Trace Hydrogen Metabolism By FRANK E. LO FFLER and ROBERT A. SANFORD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

community (Fauque et al., 1988). In natural ecosystems, the flux of reduced organic compounds, H2forming influence H2 concentrations through regulating hydrogenase activity also makes H2 an attractive METHODS (headspace) H2. Hence, H2 analysis assumes equilibrium between aqueous phase concentrations (molar) and gas

Löffler, Frank E.

58

Microfabricated Ion Traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion traps offer the opportunity to study fundamental quantum systems with high level of accuracy highly decoupled from the environment. Individual atomic ions can be controlled and manipulated with electric fields, cooled to the ground state of motion with laser cooling and coherently manipulated using optical and microwave radiation. Microfabricated ion traps hold the advantage of allowing for smaller trap dimensions and better scalability towards large ion trap arrays also making them a vital ingredient for next generation quantum technologies. Here we provide an introduction into the principles and operation of microfabricated ion traps. We show an overview of material and electrical considerations which are vital for the design of such trap structures. We provide guidance in how to choose the appropriate fabrication design, consider different methods for the fabrication of microfabricated ion traps and discuss previously realized structures. We also discuss the phenomenon of anomalous heating of ions within ion traps, which becomes an important factor in the miniaturization of ion traps.

Marcus D. Hughes; Bjoern Lekitsch; Jiddu A. Broersma; Winfried K. Hensinger

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

59

Multi-physics coupled code reactor analysis with the U.S. NRC code system TRACE/PARCS  

SciTech Connect

This paper will focus on the PARCS code and some of the recent applications of the coupled TRACE/PARCS codes to OECD LWR benchmarks and to the Advanced CANDU Reactor, the ACR-700. (authors)

Xu, Y.; Downar, T.; Ward, A. [Purdue Univ. (United States); Kozlowski, T. [KTH, Nuclear Power Safety (Sweden); Ivanov, K. [Penn State Univ. (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Telling friends from foes : strontium isotope and trace element analysis of companion burials from Pusilhá, Toledo District, Belize  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Powell 1972 Strontium Isotope Geology. Minerals, Rocks, andisotope ratios in an ecosystem are a factor of the local geology andisotope and trace element values in human bone vary depending on the geology

Somerville, Andrew D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trap trace analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 2001 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels. CDIAC is located within the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. CDIAC is co-located with ESD researchers investigating global-change topics, such as the global carbon cycle and the effects of carbon dioxide on climate and vegetation. CDIAC staff are also connected with current ORNL research on related topics, such as renewable energy and supercomputing technologies. CDIAC is supported by the Environmental Sciences Division (Jerry Elwood, Director) of DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. CDIAC represents DOE in the multi-agency Global Change Data and Information System (GCDIS). Wanda Ferrell is DOE's Program Manager with overall responsibility for CDIAC. Roger Dahlman is responsible for CDIAC's AmeriFlux tasks, and Anna Palmisano for CDIAC's Ocean Data tasks. CDIAC is made up of three groups: Data Systems, Information Services, and Computer Systems, with nineteen full-time or part-time staff. The following section provides details on CDIAC's staff and organization. The Data Systems Group identifies and obtains databases important to global-change research; analyzes data; compiles needed databases; provides data management and support to specific programs [e.g., NARSTO, Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE), AmeriFlux, Oceans]; and prepares documentation to ensure the long-term utility of CDIAC's data holdings. The Information Services Group responds to data and information requests; maintains records of all request activities; analyzes user statistics; assists in Web development and maintenance; and produces CDIAC's newsletter (CDIAC Communications), the fiscal year annual reports, and various information materials. The Computer Systems Group provides computer system support for all CDIAC and WDC activities; designs and maintains CDIAC's computing system network; ensures compliance with ORNL/DOE computing security regulations; ensures long-term preservation of CDIAC data holdings through systematic backups; evaluates, develops, and implements software; ensures standards compliance; generates user statistics; provides Web design, development, and oversight; and provides systems analysis and programming assistance for scientific data projects.

Cushman, R.M.

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 1999 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global-change data and information analysis center of the Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has--since its inception in 1982--enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea level. CDIAC is located within the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. CDIAC is co-located with ESD researchers investigating global-change topics, such as the global carbon cycle and the effects of carbon dioxide on vegetation. CDIAC staff are also connected with current ORNL research on related topics, such as renewable energy and supercomputing technologies. CDIAC is supported by the Environmental Sciences Division (Jerry Elwood, Acting Director) of DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. CDIAC's FY 1999 budget was 2.2M dollars. CDIAC represents the DOE in the multi-agency Global Change Data and Information System. Bobbi Parra, and Wanda Ferrell on an interim basis, is DOE's Program Manager with responsibility for CDIAC. CDIAC comprises three groups, Global Change Data, Computer Systems, and Information Services, with seventeen full-time and part-time staff. The Global Change Data group is responsible for identifying and obtaining databases important to global-change research, analyzing data, compiling needed databases, providing data management support to specific programs (e.g., NARSTO), and preparing documentation to ensure the long-term utility of CDIAC's data holdings. The Computer Systems group provides computer system support for all CDIAC and WDC activities, including designing and maintaining CDIAC's computing system network; ensuring compliance with ORNL/DOE computing security regulations; ensuring long-term preservation of CDIAC data holdings through systematic backups; evaluating, developing, and implementing software; ensuring standards compliance; generating user statistics; providing Web design, development, and oversight; and providing systems analysis and programming assistance for scientific data projects. The Information Services group responds to data and information requests; maintains records of all request activities; assists in Web development and maintenance; and produces CDIAC's newsletter, CDIAC Communications, catalog, glossary, and educational materials. The following section provides further details on CDIAC's organization.

Cushman, R.M.

2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

Trapped Inflation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze a distinctive mechanism for inflation in which particle production slows down a scalar field on a steep potential, and show how it descends from angular moduli in string compactifications. The analysis of density perturbations - taking into account the integrated effect of the produced particles and their quantum fluctuations - requires somewhat new techniques that we develop. We then determine the conditions for this effect to produce sixty e-foldings of inflation with the correct amplitude of density perturbations at the Gaussian level, and show that these requirements can be straightforwardly satisfied. Finally, we estimate the amplitude of the non-Gaussianity in the power spectrum and find a significant equilateral contribution.

Green, Daniel; Horn, Bart; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Senatore, Leonardo; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /Harvard U., Phys. Dept. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Silverstein, Eva; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

64

The trace partitioning abstract domain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to achieve better precision of abstract interpretation-based static analysis, we introduce a new generic abstract domain, the trace partitioning abstract domain. We develop a theoretical framework allowing a wide range of instantiations of the ...

Xavier Rival; Laurent Mauborgne

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Trapping Rydberg Atoms in an Optical Lattice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rubidium Rydberg atoms are laser excited and subsequently trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice (wavelength 1064 nm). Efficient trapping is achieved by a lattice inversion immediately after laser excitation using an electro-optic technique. The trapping efficiency is probed via analysis of the trap-induced shift of the two-photon microwave transition 50S{yields}51S. The inversion technique allows us to reach a trapping efficiency of 90%. The dependence of the efficiency on the timing of the lattice inversion and on the trap laser power is studied. The dwell time of 50D{sub 5/2} Rydberg atoms in the lattice is analyzed using lattice-induced photoionization.

Anderson, S. E.; Younge, K. C.; Raithel, G. [FOCUS Center, Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

66

Superconducting microfabricated ion traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single [superscript 88]Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the ...

Wang, Shannon Xuanyue

67

Steam Trap Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effective application of steam traps encompasses three primary areas which are the selection and sizing, the installation, and the monitoring of the steam trapping system. Proper application of steam traps will improve production rates, product quality, and reduce energy and maintenance costs.

Murphy, J. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Ion trap simulation tools.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion traps present a potential architecture for future quantum computers. These computers are of interest due to their increased power over classical computers stemming from the superposition of states and the resulting capability to simultaneously perform many computations. This paper describes a software application used to prepare and visualize simulations of trapping and maneuvering ions in ion traps.

Hamlet, Benjamin Roger

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Superconducting microfabricated ion traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

Shannon X. Wang; Yufei Ge; Jaroslaw Labaziewicz; Eric Dauler; Karl Berggren; Isaac L. Chuang

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

70

Microfabricated Ion Traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion traps offer the opportunity to study fundamental quantum systems with high level of accuracy highly decoupled from the environment. Individual atomic ions can be controlled and manipulated with electric fields, cooled to the ground state of motion with laser cooling and coherently manipulated using optical and microwave radiation. Microfabricated ion traps hold the advantage of allowing for smaller trap dimensions and better scalability towards large ion trap arrays also making them a vital ingredient for next generation quantum technologies. Here we provide an introduction into the principles and operation of microfabricated ion traps. We show an overview of material and electrical considerations which are vital for the design of such trap structures. We provide guidance in how to choose the appropriate fabrication design, consider different methods for the fabrication of microfabricated ion traps and discuss previously realized structures. We also discuss the phenomenon of anomalous heating of ions with...

Hughes, Marcus D; Broersma, Jiddu A; Hensinger, Winfried K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

www.elsevier.com/locate/fuel Trace elements in coal derived liquids: analysis by ICP-MS and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concentrations of trace elements in coal derived liquids have been investigated by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Liquefaction extracts prepared from the Argonne Premium Coals and a coal tar pitch have been examined. Microwave digestion in concentrated nitric acid has been shown as a suitable method for determining trace element concentrations in coal derived liquids by ICP-MS—for sample sizes as small as 3–20 mg. High concentrations of Fe were found for all extract samples (?265–1474 ppm). Ti, Cr, Mn, Co, Ga, Sb, Cs and Ba were measurable. Concentration distributions of trace elements found in the extracts bore little relation to the corresponding distributions in the original coals. The proportions of individual trace elements present in the original coals and found in the extracts, varied widely. Mössbauer spectroscopy of the extracts indicated that the high Fe-concentrations corresponded to the presence of organometallic-Fe compounds—and not to pyritic iron. There is evidence suggesting the presence of material derived from iron-storage proteins such as ferritin, but final proof is lacking. Our data suggest that other metallic ions detected in these coal derived liquids may be present in association with the organic material. Concentrations of paramagnetic metal species were found to be of the same order of magnitude as ESR spin-densities already found in coal liquids. Both types of paramagnetic species are suspected of causing loss of signal in

Mössbauer Spectroscopy; R. Richaud A; H. Lachas A; M. -j. Lazaro A; L. J. Clarke B; K. E. Jarvis B; A. A. Herod A; T. C. Gibb C; R. Kandiyoti A

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

High precision trace element and organic constituent analysis of oil shale and solvent-refined coal materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of a number of sensitive and precise methods for the determination of trace elements, heavy element species and organic compounds in materials from an oil shale research retort process and from a solvent-refined coal pilot plant operation are discussed. The methods were chosen both for their sensitivity, and also for their relative freedom from interference effects. Coal liquids contain much higher concentrations of aromatic compounds, including polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNA's). A larger relative fraction of the pna's in shale oil are alkyl substituted. Coal liquids are also considerably higher in phenols (28 percent) than is shale oil (2 percent). N-heterocyclics are present in higher concentration (greater than 8 percent) in shale oil due to the high nitrogen content of the raw shale. Hydroaromatics are common in coal liquids but negligible in shale oil. Inorganic elements and speciation measurements indicate significant amounts of the toxic heavy elements Hg, As, Zn, and Se in effluent oil water and gas streams. In addition, the process water contains significant Co, Br, Sb, and U. Raw oil shale is highly enriched in Se, As and Sb and somewhat enriched in U, Pb, Cs, Hg and Zn. Solvent-refined coal liquids were found to be relatively low in most trace elements. The majority of trace elements are concentrated by the process into the mineral residue. Only Br and Hg are not depleted in solvent-refined coal. Other trace elements still remaining in significant amounts are U, Ta, Cr, and Zn.

Fruchter, J.S.; Petersen, M.R.; Laul, J.C.; Ryan, P.W.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Thermodynamic analysis of interactions between Ni-based solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) anodes and trace species in a survey of coal syngas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thermodynamic analysis was conducted to characterize the effects of trace contaminants in syngas derived from coal gasification on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material. The effluents from 15 different gasification facilities were considered to assess the impact of fuel composition on anode susceptibility to contamination. For each syngas case, the study considers the magnitude of contaminant exposure resulting from operation of a warm gas cleanup unit at two different temperatures and operation of a nickel-based SOFC at three different temperatures. Contaminant elements arsenic (As), phosphorous (P), and antimony (Sb) are predicted to be present in warm gas cleanup effluent and will interact with the nickel (Ni) components of a SOFC anode. Phosphorous is the trace element found in the largest concentration of the three contaminants and is potentially the most detrimental. Poisoning was found to depend on the composition of the syngas as well as system operating conditions. Results for all trace elements tended to show invariance with cleanup operating temperature, but results were sensitive to syngas bulk composition. Synthesis gas with high steam content tended to resist poisoning.

Andrew Martinez; Kirk Gerdes; Randall Gemmen; James Postona

2010-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

74

CGC Trace Species Partitioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trace Species Partitioning as Affected Trace Species Partitioning as Affected by Cold Gas Cleanup Conditions: A Thermodynamic Analysis February 10, 2011 DOE/NETL-2011/1503 T r ace Species P ar titioning at C old G as C leanup C onditions Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

75

Formulated 2-Traces - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 19, 1997 ... next · up · previous. Next: Characteristics of truth tables Up: Introduction to Traces Previous: Definition of the n-Trace ...

76

Prius: generic hybrid trace compression for wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several diagnostic tracing techniques (e.g., event, power, and control-flow tracing) have been proposed for run-time debugging and postmortem analysis of wireless sensor networks (WSNs). Traces generated by such techniques can become large, defying the ... Keywords: compression, sensor networks, tracing

Vinaitheerthan Sundaram; Patrick Eugster; Xiangyu Zhang

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Evaluating Steam Trap Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory tests were conducted on several types of steam traps at Holston Defense Corporation in Kingsport, Tennessee. Data from these tests, which determined their relative efficiencies, were used in performing economic analyses to determine their equivalent uniform annual cost (EUAC). The comparison was made using a computer program written for the Apple II computer to evaluate overall steam trap economics. This program calculates the EUAC for any steam trap based on 12 input variables including capital, maintenance and steam costs, interest rate and trap life. After determinIng the EUAC, the program will perform sensitivity analyses on any of the twelve variables. (This computer program is available from the author.) This study shows that inverted bucket traps have lower EUAC's under more conditions than other types of traps. Also, this study shows that live steam loss is the heaviest contributor to the annual operating cost of any steam trap and that maintenance frequency and repair cost are also more important than a trap's first cost.

Fuller, N. Y.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Nonlinear integrable ion traps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quadrupole ion traps can be transformed into nonlinear traps with integrable motion by adding special electrostatic potentials. This can be done with both stationary potentials (electrostatic plus a uniform magnetic field) and with time-dependent electric potentials. These potentials are chosen such that the single particle Hamilton-Jacobi equations of motion are separable in some coordinate systems. The electrostatic potentials have several free adjustable parameters allowing for a quadrupole trap to be transformed into, for example, a double-well or a toroidal-well system. The particle motion remains regular, non-chaotic, integrable in quadratures, and stable for a wide range of parameters. We present two examples of how to realize such a system in case of a time-independent (the Penning trap) as well as a time-dependent (the Paul trap) configuration.

Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab; Danilov, V.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Data Preparation and Analysis for Annex III, USA/PRC Cooperation in the Field of Atmospheric Trace Gases  

SciTech Connect

The National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) has been a long-time and very active participant in the joint research program on the Greenhouse Effect created by the bilateral agreement Annex III to the Protocol on Fossil Energy Research and Development on Cooperation in the Field of Atmospheric Trace Gases. This agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the People's Republic of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has fostered a large amount of data set development and research (Riches et al., 1992) as well as science exchange between the two countries. Within the agreement there have been four basic tasks: (1) to analyze general circulation models, (2) to prepare, validate, and analyze data, (3) analyze the relationship between large scale and local climate, and (4) atmospheric trace gas measurements, particularly methane (Riches et al. 1992). Within this framework the NCDC has had two basic tasks in this program: to develop, validate, analyze and exchange long-term climate data sets suitable for analyzing past climate change, and to perform research into past climate change and linking large-scale and regional climates. Following is a brief review of NCDC's accomplishments in the project.

Easterling, D.R.; Karl, T.R.

1999-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

80

Trace metal characterization and speciation in geothermal effluent by multiple scanning anodic stripping voltammetry and atomic absorption analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent studies have shown geothermal power plants to have a significant environmental impact on the ground water of the area. The heavy metals arsenic and mercury are special problems, as both are concentrated by flora and fauna exposed to the effluent waters. Because the toxicity of these and other metallic pollutants present in geothermal effluent depends on the chemical form, or speciation, of the particular metal, any serious study of the environmental impact of a geothermal development should include studies of trace metal speciation, in addition to trace metal concentration. This proposal details a method for determining metal speciation in dilute waters. The method is based on ion-exchange and backed by atomic absorption spectrometry and multiple scanning anodic stripping voltammetry. Special laboratory studies will be performed on mercury, arsenic and selenium speciation in synthetic geothermal water. The method will be applied to three known geothermal areas in Washington and Oregon, with emphasis on the speciation of mercury, arsenic and selenium in these waters. The computer controlled electrochemical instrumentation was built and tested. Using this instrumentation, a new experimental procedure was developed to determine the chemical form (speciation) of metal ions in very dilute solutions (ng/ml). This method was tested on model systems including Pb, Cd, and As with C1/sup -/, CO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ and glycine ligands. Finally, the speciation of lead in a geothermal water was examined and the PbC1/sup +/ complex was observed and quantified.

Kowalski, B.R.

1979-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trap trace analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control With Monolith Traps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Technologies Gasification Technologies CONTACTS Jenny Tennant Technology/Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4830 jenny.tennant@netl.doe.gov Michael Swanson Principal Investigator University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center 15 North 23rd Street Grand Forks, ND 58202 701-777-5239 MSwanson@undeerc.org PARTNERS Corning, Inc. PROJECT DURATION

82

Workshop on Ion Trap Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... optical components, conventional and microfabricated ion traps, and classical control ... will bring together experts on trapped-ion physics, laser optics ...

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Steam trap monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (a hot finger) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellow in providing an indication of total energy (steam + condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the hot and cold fingers subtracts the former from the latter to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning. 2 figs.

Ryan, M.J.

1987-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

84

As-Run Thermal Analysis of the GTL-1 Experiment Irradiated in the ATR South Flux Trap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GTL-1 experiment was conducted to assess corrosion the performance of the proposed Boosted Fast Flux Loop booster fuel at heat flux levels {approx}30% above the design operating condition. Sixteen miniplates fabricated from 25% enriched, high-density U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel with 6061 aluminum cladding were subjected to peak beginning of cycle (BOC) heat fluxes ranging from 411 W/cm2 to 593 W/cm2. Miniplates fabricated with three different fuel variations (without fines, annealed, and with standard powder) performed equally well, with negligible irradiation-induced swelling and a normal fission density gradient. Both the standard and the modified prefilm procedures produced hydroxide films that adequately protected the miniplates from failure. A detailed finite element model was constructed to calculate temperatures and heat flux for an as-run cycle average effective south lobe power of 25.4 MW(t). Results of the thermal analysis are given at four times during the cycle: BOC at 0 effective full power days (EFPD), middle of cycle (MOC) at 18 EFPD, MOC at 36 EFPD, and end of cycle at 48.9 EFPD. The highest temperatures and heat fluxes occur at the BOC and decrease in a linear manner throughout the cycle. Miniplate heat flux levels and fuel, cladding, hydroxide, and coolant-hydroxide interface temperatures were calculated using the average measured hydroxide thickness on each miniplate. The hydroxide layers are the largest on miniplates nearest to the core midplane, where heat flux and temperature are highest. The hydroxide layer thickness averages 20.4 {mu}m on the six hottest miniplates (B3, B4, C1, C2, C3, and C4). This tends to exacerbate the heating of these miniplates, since a thicker hydroxide layer reduces the heat transfer from the fuel to the coolant. These six hottest miniplates have the following thermal characteristics at BOC: (1) Peak fuel centerline temperature >300 C; (2) Peak cladding temperature >200 C; (3) Peak hydroxide temperature >190 C; (4) Peak hydroxide-water interface temperature >140 C; and (5) Peak heat flux >565 W/cm2.

Donna P. Guillen

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Asymmetric ion trap  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity.

Barlow, Stephan E. (Richland, WA); Alexander, Michael L. (Richland, WA); Follansbee, James C. (Pasco, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Steam trap monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (the combination of a hot finger and thermocouple well) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellows in providing an indication of total energy (steam+condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the thermocouple well hot and cold fingers subtracts the condensate energy as measured by the hot finger and thermocouple well from the total energy as measured by the cold finger to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning.

Ryan, Michael J. (Plainfield, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Venus Fly Trap Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Venus Fly Trap Experiment Venus Fly Trap Experiment Name: Jeremy Bailey Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: My name is Jeremy Bailey, and I am a student of Dorseyville Middle School. I have been working on a science project about Venus' Fly Traps. A recent addition to the project involved designing an experiment about something I found interesting about them. However, I don't know where to get them or how to grow them in the moderate climate of Pittsburgh. Also, I don't know how a successful experiment could be designed. Replies: Jeremy, I believe Venus Fly traps can be found 'in the wild' in the coastal floodplain of the Carolinas. As far as where to buy them, look in the phonebook yellow pages under plants or houseplants and do some calling. I live in eastern Pennsylvania, and over here they even sell them in hardware stores like Hechinger's and Home Depot (in their garden departments). I don't think you will have luck trying to grow them outside, our winters here are a bit too harsh for them. From what I recall they require substantial moisture and more moderate climes. You might try looking for houseplant books at your local library for more detailed information.

88

WATER-TRAPPED WORLDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO{sub 2} as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe.

Menou, Kristen [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Nuclear Physics with trapped  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Physics with trapped atoms and ions #12;2/2/2013Dan Melconian #12;2/2/2013Dan Melconian Outline · Scope and applications of nuclear physics precision frontier compliments LHC properties and aquifers in the Sahara #12;2/2/2013Dan Melconian What is Nuclear Physics? · Began with the study

Boas, Harold P.

90

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for atmospheric trace gases: Fiscal year 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect

Fiscal year 1995 was both a very productive year for the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and a year of significant change. This document presents information about the most notable accomplishments made during the year. Topics include: high-lights; statistics; future plans; publications, presentations, and awards; and change in organization and staff.

Burtis, M.D. [comp.; Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B.; Nelson, T.; Stoss, F.W.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Introduction to Traces - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 19, 1997 ... Section 2 describes patterns that arise in the construction of truth tables for traces and their theoretical interest for the completeness problem.

92

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases catalog of databases and reports  

SciTech Connect

Data products and reports made available by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Sciences Division, Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), and the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) provide coverage in a number of areas relevant to the greenhouse effect and global climate change. Such areas include records of the concentration of carbon dioxide and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated carbon dioxide on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea level. Currently, in its eighth revision, this catalog provides information about the data products and reports available through CDIAC.

Burtis, M.D. [comp.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

GPU ray tracing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NVIDIA® OptiX™ ray tracing engine is a programmable system designed for NVIDIA GPUs and other highly parallel architectures. The OptiX engine builds on the key observation that most ray tracing algorithms can be implemented using a small ...

Steven G. Parker; Heiko Friedrich; David Luebke; Keith Morley; James Bigler; Jared Hoberock; David McAllister; Austin Robison; Andreas Dietrich; Greg Humphreys; Morgan McGuire; Martin Stich

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Trace element emissions  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to (1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, (2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and (3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

Benson, S.A.; Erickson, T.A.; Steadman, E.N.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; Hauserman, W.B.; Hassett, D.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Uncertainty Measurement for Trace Element Analysis of Uranium and Plutonium Samples by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The measurement uncertainty estimatino associated with trace element analysis of impurities in U and Pu was evaluated using the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty Measurement (GUM). I this evalution the uncertainty sources were identified and standard uncertainties for the components were categorized as either Type A or B. The combined standard uncertainty was calculated and a coverage factor k = 2 was applied to obtain the expanded uncertainty, U. The ICP-AES and ICP-MS methods used were deveoped for the multi-element analysis of U and Pu samples. A typical analytical run consists of standards, process blanks, samples, matrix spiked samples, post digestion spiked samples and independent calibration verification standards. The uncertainty estimation was performed on U and Pu samples that have been analyzed previously as part of the U and Pu Sample Exchange Programs. Control chart results and data from the U and Pu metal exchange programs were combined with the GUM into a concentration dependent estimate of the expanded uncertainty. Comparison of trace element uncertainties obtained using this model was compared to those obtained for trace element results as part of the Exchange programs. This process was completed for all trace elements that were determined to be above the detection limit for the U and Pu samples.

Gallimore, David L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

96

TRACE ELEMENT ANALYSES OF URANIUM MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed an analytical method to measure many trace elements in a variety of uranium materials at the high part-per-billion (ppb) to low part-per-million (ppm) levels using matrix removal and analysis by quadrapole ICP-MS. Over 35 elements were measured in uranium oxides, acetate, ore and metal. Replicate analyses of samples did provide precise results however none of the materials was certified for trace element content thus no measure of the accuracy could be made. The DOE New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) does provide a Certified Reference Material (CRM) that has provisional values for a series of trace elements. The NBL CRM were purchased and analyzed to determine the accuracy of the method for the analysis of trace elements in uranium oxide. These results are presented and discussed in the following paper.

Beals, D; Charles Shick, C

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

97

Sensor – Data Trace Communication  

This is a method and process for detecting, locating and quantifying physical phenomena using a “data” trace that may be incorporated and/or installed on structures including oil and gas pipes and bridges, buildings, etc.

98

DNA Separation Using Photoelectrophoretic Traps  

SciTech Connect

In our recent publications we presented a design that allows formation of highly localized and optically controlled electrophoretic traps. 1,2 We demonstrated that electrophoretic traps can be utilized for biomolecule photoconcentration, optically directed transport, and separation by size. 1,2 In the current publication we suggest a hybrid design for biomolecule separation which implements electrophoretic traps in tandem with well-established electrophoretic techniques. We perform Monte Carlo simulations that demonstrate that the resolution of well-established electrophoretic techniques can be greatly enhanced by introducing photoelectrophoretic traps.

Braiman, Avital [ORNL; Thundat, Thomas George [ORNL; Rudakov, Fedor M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally...

100

Laser Cooling of Trapped Ions.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... period, so it can be assumed to give an in- stantaneous impulse to the ... In sympathetic laser cooling, two different ion species are loaded into a trap. ...

2002-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trap trace analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Trace-chemical characterization of pollutants occurring in the production of landfill gas from the shoreline regional park sanitary landfill, Mountain View, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary is presented of the results of sampling and analysis of ambient and process gas streams, and liquid and solid samples taken at different locations from the Pacific Gas and Electric Company Landfill Gas Recovery Plant in Mountain View, California. The purpose of this study is to identify environmental pollutants and characterize the trace chemistry of landfill gas recovered from the Mountain View Sanitary (Class II) Landfill. Gaseous samples, liquid condensate, and other plant products were analyzed for their trace chemical constituents, and the results indicate that certain organic and inorganic pollutants inherent to the landfill are emitted into the ambient environment and also become involved in the methane recovery process. Incorporation of condensate traps, molecular seive and charcoal filtration was found to significantly reduce both the organic and inorganic component burdens in the product gas. The environmental significances of the landfill gas recovery to the surrounding area and to worker safety are presented.

Flynn, N.W.; Guttman, M.; Hahn, J.; Payne, J.R.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Trace chemical characterization of pollutants occurring in the production of landfill gas from the shoreline regional park sanitary landfill, Mountain View, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of sampling and analysis of ambient and process gas streams, and liquid and solid samples taken at different locations from the Pacific Gas and Electric Company Landfill Gas Recovery Plant in Mountain View, California. The purpose of this study is to identify environmental pollutants and characterize the trace chemistry of landfill gas recovered from the Mountain View Sanitary (Class II) Landfill. Gaseous samples, liquid condensate and other plant products were analyzed for their trace chemical constituents, and the results indicate that certain organic and inorganic pollutants inherent to the landfill are emitted into the ambient environment and also become involved in the methane recovery process. Incorporation of condensate traps, molecular seive and charcoal filtration was found to significantly reduce both the organic and inorganic component burdens in the product gas. The environmental significances of the landfill gas recovery to the surrounding area and to worker safety are presented.

Flynn, N.W.; Guttman, M.; Hahn, J.; Payne, J.R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Theory and application of planar ion traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we investigate a new geometry of Paul trap with electrodes in a plane. These planar ion traps are compatible with modern silicon microfabrication, and can be scaled up to large arrays with multiple trapping ...

Pearson, Christopher Elliott

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

First Attempts at Antihydrogen Trapping in ALPHA  

SciTech Connect

The ALPHA apparatus is designed to produce and trap antihydrogen atoms. The device comprises a multifunction Penning trap and a superconducting, neutral atom trap having a minimum-B configuration. The atom trap features an octupole magnet for transverse confinement and solenoidal mirror coils for longitudinal confinement. The magnetic trap employs a fast shutdown system to maximize the probability of detecting the annihilation of released antihydrogen. In this article we describe the first attempts to observe antihydrogen trapping.

Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der [Department of Physics, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M. [Instituto de Fisica Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Fujiwara, M. C. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada)] (and others)

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

105

Tracing Geothermal Fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical compounds have been designed under this contract that can be used to trace water that has been injected into vapor-dominated and two-phase geothermal fields. Increased knowledge of the injection flow is provided by the tracers, and this augments the power that can be produced. Details on the stability and use of these tracers are included in this report.

Michael C. Adams Greg Nash

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

Trapped Quintessential Inflation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quintessential inflation is studied using a string modulus as the inflaton - quintessence field. The modulus begins its evolution at the steep part of its scalar potential, which is due to non-perturbative effects (e.g. gaugino condensation). It is assumed that the modulus crosses an enhanced symmetry point (ESP) in field space. Particle production at the ESP temporarily traps the modulus resulting in a brief period of inflation. More inflation follows, due to the flatness of the potential, since the ESP generates either an extremum (maximum or minimum) or a flat inflection point in the scalar potential. Eventually, the potential becomes steep again and inflation is terminated. After reheating the modulus freezes due to cosmological friction at a large value, such that its scalar potential is dominated by contributions due to fluxes in the extra dimensions or other effects. The modulus remains frozen until the present, when it can become quintessence and account for the dark energy necessary to explain the observed accelerated expansion.

J. C. Bueno Sanchez; K. Dimopoulos

2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

107

Compile-Time Compaction Of Traces For Memory Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines compile-time compaction of program execution traces. It presents a new method for compacting traces for memory simulation. Further, it describes a tool prototype that implements the method. Experiments with the tool prototype show that the new method reduces the time needed in simulating the operation of memories. Memory simulation is needed in the performance analysis and in the design of programs. In high performance applications, the data transfer between different layers of memory is one of the main bottlenecks. A program execution trace is a list of memory references. Using traces as simulation inputs is a flexible way of analyzing the memory perfor...

Vesa Hirvisalo; Vesa Hirvisalo; Dr. Tech Esko Nuutila

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Steam Tracing...New Technologies for the 21st Century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For decades, steam tracing has been an accepted practice in the heating of piping, vessels, and equipment. This paper presents recent product innovations such as "burn-safe" and "energy efficient" steam tracing products. For the many applications where steam tracing is applied for simple freeze protection, recently developed products which reduce the heat transfer rate and thus the energy consumption of steam tracers will be discussed. This paper will provide several steam tracing examples that will exhibit the use of experimental data, mathematical analysis, and FEA/CFD numerical simulation techniques.

Pitzer, R. K.; Barth, R. E.; Bonorden, C.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

BorderPatrol: isolating events for black-box tracing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Causal request traces are valuable to developers of large concurrent and distributed applications, yet difficult to obtain. Traces show how a request is processed, and can be analyzed by tools to detect performance or correctness errors and anomalous ... Keywords: black box systems, causal paths, distributed systems, performance analysis, performance debugging

Eric Koskinen; John Jannotti

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Inspect and Repair Steam Traps  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on inspecting and repairing steam traps provide how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Electronic Trap States in Methanofullerenes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The trap states in three fullerene derivatives, namely PC61BM ([6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester), bisPC61BM (bis[6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester) and PC71BM ([6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester), are investigated by thermally stimulated current measurements (TSC). Thereby, the lower limit of the trap densities for all studied methanofullerenes exhibits values in the order of 10^22 m^-3 with the highest trap density in bisPC61BM and the lowest in PC61BM. Fractional TSC measurements on PC61BM reveal a broad trap distribution instead of discrete trap levels with activation energies ranging from 15 meV to 270 meV and the maximum at about 75 meV. The activation energies of the most prominent traps in the other two fullerene derivatives are significantly higher, being at 96 meV and 223 meV for PC71BM and 184 meV for bisPC61BM, respectively. The influence of these findings on the performance of organic solar cells is discussed.

Julia Schafferhans; Carsten Deibel; Vladimir Dyakonov

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

112

Trapped Ion Imaging with a High Numerical Aperture Spherical Mirror  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient collection and analysis of trapped ion qubit fluorescence is essential for robust qubit state detection in trapped ion quantum computing schemes. We discuss simple techniques of improving photon collection efficiency using high numerical aperture (N.A.) reflective optics. To test these techniques we placed a spherical mirror with an effective N.A. of about 0.9 inside a vacuum chamber in the vicinity of a linear Paul trap. We demonstrate stable and reliable trapping of single barium ions, in excellent agreement with our simulations of the electric field in this setup. While a large N.A. spherical mirror introduces significant spherical aberration, the ion image quality can be greatly improved by a specially designed aspheric corrector lens located outside the vacuum system. Our simulations show that the spherical mirror/corrector design is an easy and cost-effective way to achieve high photon collection rates when compared to a more sophisticated parabolic mirror setup.

G Shu; M R Dietrich; N Kurz; B B Blinov

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

113

Trapped Ion Imaging with a High Numerical Aperture Spherical Mirror  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient collection and analysis of trapped ion qubit fluorescence is essential for robust qubit state detection in trapped ion quantum computing schemes. We discuss simple techniques of improving photon collection efficiency using high numerical aperture (N.A.) reflective optics. To test these techniques we placed a spherical mirror with an effective N.A. of about 0.9 inside a vacuum chamber in the vicinity of a linear Paul trap. We demonstrate stable and reliable trapping of single barium ions, in excellent agreement with our simulations of the electric field in this setup. While a large N.A. spherical mirror introduces significant spherical aberration, the ion image quality can be greatly improved by a specially designed aspheric corrector lens located outside the vacuum system. Our simulations show that the spherical mirror/corrector design is an easy and cost-effective way to achieve high photon collection rates when compared to a more sophisticated parabolic mirror setup.

Shu, G; Kurz, N; Blinov, B B

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Gravity-induced resonances in a rotating trap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that in an anisotropic harmonic trap that rotates with the properly chosen rotation rate, the force of gravity leads to a resonant behavior. Full analysis of the dynamics in an anisotropic, rotating trap in 3D is presented and several regions of stability are identified. On resonance, the oscillation amplitude of a single particle, or of the center of mass of a many-particle system (for example, BEC), grows linearly with time and all particles are expelled from the trap. The resonances can only occur when the rotation axis is tilted away from the vertical position. The positions of the resonances (there are always two of them) do not depend on the mass but only on the characteristic frequencies of the trap and on the direction of the angular velocity of rotation.

Iwo Bialynicki-Birula; Tomasz Sowinski

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Multimedia Trace Elements Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current and future trace element regulations on flue gas emissions, water discharges, and solid waste disposal will result in increasingly stringent limits and substantially increased costs for energy companies. As a result, there is a critical need to address environmental pollutant releases in a holistic, multimedia manner so that a pollutant removed by a control technology in one medium (for example, flue gas) is properly managed in regard to discharges in the other media (water and solid waste). This...

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

116

Flexible reference trace reduction for VM simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The unmanageably large size of reference traces has spurred the development of sophisticated trace reduction techniques. In this article we present two new algorithms for trace reduction: Safely Allowed Drop (SAD) and Optimal LRU Reduction ... Keywords: cache hierarchies, locality, reference traces, trace compression, trace reduction

Scott F. Kaplan; Yannis Smaragdakis; Paul R. Wilson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can become temporarily trapped by the molecule before ultimately escaping, giving rise to a broad feature in the photoelectron spectrum known as a shape resonance. This process represents a novel type of symmetry-breaking phenomenon that has not been observed previously but appears to be widespread. Such coupling between electronic motion and nuclear motion becomes increasingly important as scientists learn more about the geometry and dynamics of novel chemical structures such as those found in nanodevices and transient chemical species, and the results have implications for studies that use photoelectron spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool.

118

Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can become temporarily trapped by the molecule before ultimately escaping, giving rise to a broad feature in the photoelectron spectrum known as a shape resonance. This process represents a novel type of symmetry-breaking phenomenon that has not been observed previously but appears to be widespread. Such coupling between electronic motion and nuclear motion becomes increasingly important as scientists learn more about the geometry and dynamics of novel chemical structures such as those found in nanodevices and transient chemical species, and the results have implications for studies that use photoelectron spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool.

119

TRACE METAL CONTENT OF COAL AND ASH AS DETERMINED USING SCANNINGELECTRON MICROSCOPYWITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRACE METAL CONTENT OF COAL AND ASH AS DETERMINED USING SCANNINGELECTRON MICROSCOPYWITE WAVELENGTH Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 Keywords: scanning electron microscopy, trace metals, coal analysis ABSTRACT Scanningelectron microscopy with wavelength-dispersive spectrometry has been used to measure trace metals in coal

Laughlin, Robert B.

120

The Allegheny Power Service Constructed Wetland at Springdale: The Role of Plants in the Removal of Trace Elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constructed wetlands are proving an effective technology for the removal of many aqueous contaminants. The ability of wetlands to remove contaminants such as trace elements appears to be a function of both the physical trapping of suspended materials and the biological and chemical processes occurring within the wetlands. Thus, wetlands are commonly described as "biogeochemical reactors." This report details a study of trace element removal and sequestration within a highly engineered wetland designed to...

2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trap trace analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Trapping by Molecular Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print Wednesday, 27 April 2005 00:00 In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can become temporarily trapped by the molecule before ultimately escaping, giving rise to a broad feature in the photoelectron spectrum known as a shape resonance. This process represents a novel type of symmetry-breaking phenomenon that has not been observed previously but appears to be widespread. Such coupling between electronic motion and nuclear motion becomes increasingly important as scientists learn more about the geometry and dynamics of novel chemical structures such as those found in nanodevices and transient chemical species, and the results have implications for studies that use photoelectron spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool.

122

Trapped-flux superconducting memory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A memory cell based on trapped flux in superconductors has been built and tested. The cell is constructed entirely by vacuum evaporation of thin films and can be selected by coincident current or by other techniques, with drive-current requirements less ...

J. W. Crowe

1957-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Characterization of a Dominant Electron Trap in GaNAs Using Deep-Level Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dilute-nitrogen GaNAs epitaxial layers grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition were characterized by deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). For all samples, the dominant DLTS signal corresponds to an electron trap having an activation energy of about 0.25 to 0.35 eV. The minority-carrier trap density in the p-type material is quantified based on computer simulation of the devices. The simulations show that only about 2% of the traps in the depleted layer are filled during the transient. The fraction of the traps that are filled depends strongly on the depth of the trap, but only weakly on the doping of the layers and on the conduction-band offset. The simulations provide a pathway to obtain semi-quantitative data for analysis of minority-carrier traps by DLTS.

Johnston, S. W.; Kurtz, S. R.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Long-Wave Trapping by Oceanic Ridges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long waves are affected by bottom topography and under certain conditions may be trapped along topographical contours which then act as wave guides transmitting wave energy for great distances with little loss. This study examines waves trapped ...

Richard Paul Shaw; Wayne Neu

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

A Neutrally Buoyant, Upper Ocean Sediment Trap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have designed and deployed a neutrally buoyant sediment trap (NBST) intended for use in the upper ocean. The aim was to minimize hydrodynamic flow interference by making a sediment trap that drifted freely with the ambient current. ...

James R. Valdes; James F. Price

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Inertial measurement via dynamics of trapped particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe theoretical and practical aspects of the particle trap as an inertial sensor. The insight motivating this approach is that a trapped particle acts like a mass on a spring, but the restoring forces are provided ...

Post, E. Rehmi, 1966-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Determination of Hydrogen Peak Temperatures and Trapping ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Determination of Hydrogen Peak Temperatures and Trapping Energies of Various Lattice Defects In Iron Using Thermal Desorption ...

128

Trace metal transformation in gasification  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to 1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, 2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and 3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

Benson, S.A.; Erickson, T.A.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; O`Keefe, C.A.; Katrinak, K.A.; Allen, S.E.; Hassett, D.J.; Hauserman, W.B. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center; Holcombe, N.T. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Trace metal transformations in gasification  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to (1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, (2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and (3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

Benson, S.; Erickson, T.A.; Zygarlicke, C.J. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Optimally profiling and tracing programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes algorithms for inserting monitoring code to profile and trace programs. These algorithms greatly reduce the cost of measuring programs with respect to the commonly used technique of placing code in each basic block. Program profiling ... Keywords: control-flow graph, instruction tracing, instrumentation, profiling

Thomas Ball; James R. Larus

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Trace Anomaly in Geometric Discretization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I develop the simplest geometric-discretized analogue of two dimensional scalar field theory, which qualitatively reproduces the trace anomaly of the continuous theory. The discrete analogue provides an interpretation of the trace anomaly in terms of a non-trivial transformation of electric-magnetic duality-invariant modes of resistor networks that accommodate both electric and magnetic charge currents.

Czech, B

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Capturing Energy Savings with Steam Traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper will discuss the energy savings potential of steam traps and present the energy, economic, and environmental reason why an active steam trap maintenance program is good for the company's bottom line. Several case studies will be discussed to demonstrate the merits of steam trap technology.

Bockwinkel, R. G.; French, S. A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Factors influencing trace element composition in human teeth  

SciTech Connect

The authors recently compiled and reviewed the literature published in or after 1978 for 45 major, minor, and trace elements in human teeth as a part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) study. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the various factors that influence the concentration levels of certain trace elements in human teeth. The sampling practices and analytical techniques that are applicable for trace element analysis are also discussed. It is also our intention to identify reference range of values, where data permit such conclusions. The scrutiny was designed to identify only the healthy permanent teeth, and values from teeth with fillings, caries, or periodontal diseases were eliminated.

Tandon, L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Iyengar, G.V. [Biomineral Sciences International, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Atmospheric Trace Gases, Carbon Isotopes, Radionuclides, and Aerosols: Isotopes in Greenhouse Gases Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

(Scroll down to find Isotopes in Greenhouse Gases, a subheading under the broader heading of Atmospheric Trace Gases, etc.) CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Information related to isotopes in greenhouse gases includes: • Monthly atmospheric 13C/12C isotopic ratios for 10 SIO stations, (2005) (Trends Online) • Mixing ratios of CO, CO2, CH4, and isotope ratios of associated 13C, 18O, and 2H in air samples from Niwot Ridge, Colorado, and Monta±a de Oro, California, USA (2004) • Estimates of Monthly CO2 Emissions and Associated 13C/12C Values from Fossil-Fuel Consumption in the U.S.A., (2004) (Trends Online) ?13C in CO2 from the CSIRO GASLAB Flask Sampling Network (Trends Online) • In Situ 13CO2 from Cape Grim, Tasmania, Australia: 1982-1993 (2001) (Trends Online) • In situ Carbon 13 and Oxygen 18 Ratios of Atmospheric CO2 from Cape Grim, Tasmania, Australia: 1982-1993 (1995) • Carbon-13 Isotopic Abundance and concentration of Atmospheric Methane for Background Air in the Southern and Northern Hemispheres from 1978 to 1989 (1995) • Measurements of Atmospheric Methane and 13C/12C of Atmospheric Methane from Flask Air Samples (1999) • 14CO 2 Observations from Schauinsland, Germany (1997) (Trends Online) • Carbon-14 Measurements in Atmospheric CO 2 from Northern and Southern Hemisphere Sites, 1962-1992 (1996) • Carbon-14 Measurements in Surface Water CO2 from the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans, 1965-1994 (1998) (Specialized Interface)

135

The Elimination of Steam Traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How would you like to have a share of $154,000,000,000 a year? According to the Department of Energy that is roughly what was spent for creating steam in 1978. Steam generation accounts for fully one half of the industrial and commercial energy dollar. That figure could be reduced by 10-20% or more by the simple elimination of steam traps. Recent engineering developments show that steam traps can be eliminated. Documented results demonstrate that the retrofitting of existing facilities to alternative methods of condensate removal is simple and economically feasible, with paybacks of less than 12 months. Advantages obtained in the first year remain consistent for several years after conversion with virtual elimination of maintenance.

Dickman, F.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Volatiles trapped in coals: Second quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

We have been able to collect and characterize volatiles that are evolved in the grinding of coal. We have developed a very sensitive method for collecting volatiles evolved in grinding. A sealed, gas tight, grinding apparatus has been built. With this system we can collect volatiles freed from the coal matrix during grinding. To do this a 125 cm/sup 3/ sample of coal is placed in to a 1 liter sealable ball mill jar. The jar is evacuated and the coal ground for 1 hr. The jar is then removed from the ball mill and evacuated into our sample collection system. Gas from the jar is pumped through two stages of dust filtering into a liquid nitrogen cold trap charged with 5 ml of methylene chloride. After warming the trap is shaken so that any gas from the sample mixes with and dissolves in the methylene chloride. One microliter samples of the methylene chloride are injected into a Finnegan GCMS. Preliminary analysis of mass spectra from peaks in the RIC show the presence of hydrocarbons. It was possible to definitively identify cyclohexene. The total amount of hydrocarbons seen is low. The attached figure is the mass spectra of the cyclohexene that was collected from the ground coal. 1 fig.

Sutter, J.R.; Halpern, J.B.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Techniques for debugging parallel programs with flowback analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: debugging, flowback analysis, incremental tracing, parallel program, program dependence graph, semantic analysis

Jong-Deok Choi; Barton P. Miller; Robert H. B. Netzer

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Transparent ion trap with integrated photodetector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorescence collection sets the efficiency of state detection and the rate of entanglement generation between remote trapped ion qubits. Despite efforts to improve light collection using various optical elements, solid angle capture is limited to ~10% for implementations that are scalable to many ions. We present an approach based on fluorescence detection through a transparent trap using an integrated photodetector, combining collection efficiency approaching 50% with scalability. We microfabricate transparent surface traps with indium tin oxide and verify stable trapping of single ions. The fluorescence from a cloud of ions is detected using a photodiode sandwiched with a transparent trap.

Amira M. Eltony; Shannon X. Wang; Gleb M. Akselrod; Peter F. Herskind; Isaac L. Chuang

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

139

Transparent ion trap with integrated photodetector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorescence collection sets the efficiency of state detection and the rate of entanglement generation between remote trapped ion qubits. Despite efforts to improve light collection using various optical elements, solid angle capture is limited to ~10% for implementations that are scalable to many ions. We present an approach based on fluorescence detection through a transparent trap using an integrated photodetector, combining collection efficiency approaching 50% with scalability. We microfabricate transparent surface traps with indium tin oxide and verify stable trapping of single ions. The fluorescence from a cloud of ions is detected using a photodiode sandwiched with a transparent trap.

Eltony, Amira M; Akselrod, Gleb M; Herskind, Peter F; Chuang, Isaac L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Tracing Geothermal Fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal water must be injected back into the reservoir after it has been used for power production. Injection is critical in maximizing the power production and lifetime of the reservoir. To use injectate effectively the direction and velocity of the injected water must be known or inferred. This information can be obtained by using chemical tracers to track the subsurface flow paths of the injected fluid. Tracers are chemical compounds that are added to the water as it is injected back into the reservoir. The hot production water is monitored for the presence of this tracer using the most sensitive analytic methods that are economically feasible. The amount and concentration pattern of the tracer revealed by this monitoring can be used to evaluate how effective the injection strategy is. However, the tracers must have properties that suite the environment that they will be used in. This requires careful consideration and testing of the tracer properties. In previous and parallel investigations we have developed tracers that are suitable from tracing liquid water. In this investigation, we developed tracers that can be used for steam and mixed water/steam environments. This work will improve the efficiency of injection management in geothermal fields, lowering the cost of energy production and increasing the power output of these systems.

Michael C. Adams; Greg Nash

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trap trace analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A General, Cryogenically-Based Analytical Technique for the Determination of Trace Quantities of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical technique for the determination of trace (sub-ppbv) quantities of volatile organic compounds in air was developed. A liquid nitrogen-cooled trap operated at reduced pressures in series with a Dupont Nafion-based drying tube and a ...

Randolph A. Coleman; Wesley R. Cofer III; Robert A. Edahl Jr.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

ARM - Measurement - Trace gas concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsTrace gas concentration govMeasurementsTrace gas concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Trace gas concentration The amount per unit volume of trace gases other than carbon dioxide, ozone and water vapor, typically measured in conjunction with in situ aerosol measurements, e.g. carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO : Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System

143

Trace 700 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace 700 Trace 700 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Trace 700 Agency/Company /Organization: Trane Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Topics: Technology characterizations Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.trane.com/Commercial/Dna/View.aspx?i=1136 References: http://www.trane.com/Commercial/Dna/View.aspx?i=1136 Detailed HVAC design tool. Can provide heating and cooling load calculation, system sizing, and energy use. A fairly thorough understanding of HVAC is necessary to use this tool. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Trace 700 Agency/Company /Organization: Trane Phase: Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, "Evaluate Options and Determine Feasibility" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property.

144

Texas A&M Penning Trap Facility - Design of the Measurement Trap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A tandem Penning trap facility has been designed and is under construction at the Texas A&M University Cyclotron Institute (TAMU-TRAP). The initial experimental program will be the study of correlation parameters for T=2 superallowed beta-delayed proton emitters. The measurement trap is a unique large-bore optimized 5-electrode cylindrical Penning trap, which features a 90 mm free radius, larger than in any existing Penning trap. This novel geometry allows for full radial containment of decay products of interest. The trap has also been designed to exhibit a "tunable" and "orthogonalized" geometry, which is useful for alternate experiments.

Mehlman, M; Shidling, P D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Texas A&M Penning Trap Facility - Design of the Measurement Trap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A tandem Penning trap facility has been designed and is under construction at the Texas A&M University Cyclotron Institute (TAMU-TRAP). The initial experimental program will be the study of correlation parameters for T=2 superallowed beta-delayed proton emitters. The measurement trap is a unique large-bore optimized 5-electrode cylindrical Penning trap, which features a 90 mm free radius, larger than in any existing Penning trap. This novel geometry allows for full radial containment of decay products of interest. The trap has also been designed to exhibit a "tunable" and "orthogonalized" geometry, which is useful for alternate experiments.

M. Mehlman; D. Melconian; P. D. Shidling

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

146

Trapping and Measuring Charged Particles in Liquids  

Genome sequencing especially benefits from the nanoscale approach. The trap is a three-layer, three-dimensional crossing metal/insulator structure.

147

Trapping and Measuring Charged Particles in Liquids  

Using molecular dynamics simulations, the researchers found that particles are trapped in liquid environments when appropriate AC/DC electric fields ...

148

Hydrogen trapping, diffusion, and recombination in austenitic stainless steels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Trapping, diffusion, and recombination of hydrogen in austenitic stainless steels are reviewed. It is suggested that since all of these processes are strongly interdependent and since the measured recombination rates are found to vary four orders of magnitude at any temperature, the data analysis techniques used to date are insufficient. A two-region diffusion model with surface recombination is proposed in which the surface layer is characterized by a smaller diffusion coefficient than the bulk.

Langley, R.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

A ray tracing investigation of light trapping due to grooves in solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The biggest problem the world faces today is finding a renewable energy source as fossil fuel reserves being depleted, and the ongoing burning of fossil fuels is destroying environments all over the world. Solar energy is ...

Ruggiero, Christopher W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Ion Trap in a Semiconductor Chip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electromagnetic manipulation of isolated atoms has led to many advances in physics, from laser cooling and Bose-Einstein condensation of cold gases to the precise quantum control of individual atomic ion. Work on miniaturizing electromagnetic traps to the micrometer scale promises even higher levels of control and reliability. Compared with 'chip traps' for confining neutral atoms, ion traps with similar dimensions and power dissipation offer much higher confinement forces and allow unparalleled control at the single-atom level. Moreover, ion microtraps are of great interest in the development of miniature mass spectrometer arrays, compact atomic clocks, and most notably, large scale quantum information processors. Here we report the operation of a micrometer-scale ion trap, fabricated on a monolithic chip using semiconductor micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. We confine, laser cool, and measure heating of a single 111Cd+ ion in an integrated radiofrequency trap etched from a doped gallium arsenide (GaAs) heterostructure.

D. Stick; W. K. Hensinger; S. Olmschenk; M. J. Madsen; K. Schwab; C. Monroe

2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

151

Trace species emissions for IGFC  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this investigation are to study both the fate and distribution of at least five significant, coal-derived trace elements commonly present in coal-gas, in terms of their vaporization during gasification, their condensation and sorption during hot-gas cleanup, as well as their effects on fuel cells, gas turbines, and ultimately the environment. The definition here of trace does not include the major contaminants of sulfur and chlorine, etc., although the simultaneous presence of such major species is always considered in our thermochemical calculations. Of course, many other elements can vaporize in trace quantities from raw coal as either volatile, molecular compounds or as metallic vapors which, besides their deleterious action on the energy conversion systems, can also be detrimental to plant and animal life when emitted into the atmosphere. Hence, an understanding is sought of how the type and quantity of significant trace species in coal-gas changes from the coal pile through cleanup subsystems and the electric generators to the exhaust stack of an integrated system.

Pigeaud, A.E.; Helble, J.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Parameter exploration of optically trapped liquid aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When studying the motion of optically trapped particles on the $\\mu s$ time scale, in low viscous media such as air, inertia cannot be neglected. Resolution of unusual and interesting behaviour not seen in colloidal trapping experiments is possible. In attempt to explain the phenomena we use power spectral methods to perform a parameter study of the Brownian motion of optically trapped liquid aerosol droplets concentrated around the critically damped regime. We present evidence that the system is suitably described by a simple harmonic oscillator model which must include a description of Fax\\'{e}n's correction, but not necessarily frequency dependent hydrodynamic corrections to Stokes' law. We also provide results describing how the system behaves under several variables and discuss the difficulty in decoupling the parameters responsible for the observed behaviour. We show that due to the relatively low dynamic viscosity and high trap stiffness it is easy to transfer between over- and under-damped motion by experimentally altering either trap stiffness or damping. Our results suggest stable aerosol trapping may be achieved in under-damped conditions, but the onset of deleterious optical forces at high trapping powers prevents the probing of the upper stability limits due to Brownian motion.

D. R. Burnham; P. J. Reece; D. McGloin

2009-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

153

Tracing the behavior of parallel applications on extreme-scale systems |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracing the behavior of parallel applications on extreme-scale systems Tracing the behavior of parallel applications on extreme-scale systems January 3, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint Event-tracing tools have proved vital for understanding how parallel applications behave. But new challenges make the use of event tracing on extreme-scale machines problematic. Tracing tools generate large amounts of data, which can overload the parallel file system and skew the application being studied. To remedy this problem, researchers from Argonne National Laboratory, the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have devised a new technique that enables event tracing on exascale systems. Scientists who have been using existing performance analysis tools find that these frequently do not scale to large systems. And even if they do

154

Controlling trapping and ejection of ions from multipole ...  

Controlling trapping and ejection of ions from multipole guides and traps ... The concept can be used to control the kinetic energy of the

155

Trace Metals in Oil Laboratory Proficiency Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for Trace Metals in Oil. Soybean oil sample to test for Iron, Copper, and Nickel using AOCS Official method Ca 18-79. Trace Metals in Oil Laboratory Proficiency Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs applicants

156

Distributed trace using central performance counter memory  

SciTech Connect

A plurality of processing cores, are central storage unit having at least memory connected in a daisy chain manner, forming a daisy chain ring layout on an integrated chip. At least one of the plurality of processing cores places trace data on the daisy chain connection for transmitting the trace data to the central storage unit, and the central storage unit detects the trace data and stores the trace data in the memory co-located in with the central storage unit.

Satterfield, David L.; Sexton, James C.

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

157

Distributed trace using central performance counter memory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A plurality of processing cores, are central storage unit having at least memory connected in a daisy chain manner, forming a daisy chain ring layout on an integrated chip. At least one of the plurality of processing cores places trace data on the daisy chain connection for transmitting the trace data to the central storage unit, and the central storage unit detects the trace data and stores the trace data in the memory co-located in with the central storage unit.

Satterfield, David L; Sexton, James C

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

158

Phytoremediation of Trace Elements by Wetland Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some plants naturally absorb and hyperaccumulate trace elements in their tissues. In a process known as phytoremediation, scientists are harnessing this ability to remove toxic heavy metals and trace elements from contaminated soils and waters. This screening program quantified the capacity of various wetland plant species for removing trace elements from polluted water.

2001-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

159

FEMP-FTA--Steam Trap Performance Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steam Trap Function Steam Trap Function Steam traps are automatic valves used in every steam system to remove conden- sate, air, and other non-condensable gases while preventing or minimizing the passing of steam. If condensate is allowed to collect, it reduces the flow capacity of steam lines and the thermal capacity of heat transfer equipment. In addition, excess condensate can lead to "water hammer," with potentially destructive and dangerous results. Air that remains after system startup reduces steam pressure and temperature and may also reduce the thermal capacity of heat transfer equipment. Non-condensable gases, such as oxygen and carbon dioxide, cause corrosion. Steam that passes through the trap provides no heating ser- vice. This effectively reduces the heating capacity

160

Laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1 m/s, any gas in equilibrium (other than spin-polarized atomic hydro- ... lattice-trapped atoms, a physical picture with the simplicity and power of the ...

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trap trace analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Trapped Ions and Laser Cooling 11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2 GHz I ... monic well, eg, the absorption spectrum for the secular motion in an rf trap ... a sin- gle atom [mass of 100 u (atomic mass units)] starts from rest ...

2002-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

162

Microfabrication techniques for trapped ion quantum ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... used for micro-traps, starting with stacking multiple wafers to form a ... dc rf dc rf dc ... This section starts with a description of the tried and true gold-on ...

2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

163

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

164

Trapping of strangelets in the geomagnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strangelets coming from the interstellar medium (ISM) are an interesting target to experiments searching for evidence of this hypothetic state of hadronic matter. We entertain the possibility of a {\\it trapped} strangelet population, quite analogous to ordinary nuclei and electron belts. For a population of strangelets to be trapped by the geomagnetic field, these incoming particles would have to fulfill certain conditions, namely having magnetic rigidities above the geomagnetic cutoff and below a certain threshold for adiabatic motion to hold. We show in this work that, for fully ionized strangelets, there is a narrow window for stable trapping. An estimate of the stationary population is presented and the dominant loss mechanisms discussed. It is shown that the population would be substantially enhanced with respect to the ISM flux (up to two orders of magnitude) due to quasi-stable trapping.

L. Paulucci; J. E. Horvath; G. A. Medina-Tanco

2007-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

165

Trapping of strangelets in the geomagnetic field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strangelets arriving from the interstellar medium are an interesting target for experiments searching for evidence of this hypothetical state of hadronic matter. We entertain the possibility of a trapped strangelet population, quite analogous to ordinary nuclei and electron belts. For a population of strangelets to be trapped by the geomagnetic field, these incoming particles would have to fulfill certain conditions, namely, having magnetic rigidities above the geomagnetic cutoff and below a certain threshold for adiabatic motion to hold. We show in this work that, for fully ionized strangelets, there is a narrow window for stable trapping. An estimate of the stationary population is presented and the dominant loss mechanisms discussed. It is shown that the population would be substantially enhanced with respect to the interstellar medium flux (up to 2 orders of magnitude) due to quasistable trapping.

Paulucci, L.; Horvath, J. E.; Medina-Tanco, G. A. [Instituto de Fisica-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187, 05508-090, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo SP (Brazil); Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, 1226, 05508-900, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo SP (Brazil); Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico A.P. 70-543, C.U. Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Trapping of strangelets in the geomagnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strangelets coming from the interstellar medium (ISM) are an interesting target to experiments searching for evidence of this hypothetic state of hadronic matter. We entertain the possibility of a {\\it trapped} strangelet population, quite analogous to ordinary nuclei and electron belts. For a population of strangelets to be trapped by the geomagnetic field, these incoming particles would have to fulfill certain conditions, namely having magnetic rigidities above the geomagnetic cutoff and below a certain threshold for adiabatic motion to hold. We show in this work that, for fully ionized strangelets, there is a narrow window for stable trapping. An estimate of the stationary population is presented and the dominant loss mechanisms discussed. It is shown that the population would be substantially enhanced with respect to the ISM flux (up to two orders of magnitude) due to quasi-stable trapping.

Paulucci, L; Medina-Tanco, G A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

On the application of radio frequency voltages to ion traps via helical resonators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ions confined using a Paul trap require a stable, high voltage and low noise radio frequency (RF) potential. We present a guide for the design and construction of a helical coil resonator for a desired frequency that maximises the quality factor for a set of experimental constraints. We provide an in-depth analysis of the system formed from a shielded helical coil and an ion trap by treating the system as a lumped element model. This allows us to predict the resonant frequency and quality factor in terms of the physical parameters of the resonator and the properties of the ion trap. We also compare theoretical predictions with experimental data for different resonators, and predict the voltage applied to the ion trap as a function of the Q-factor, input power and the properties of the resonant circuit.

Siverns, J D; Weidt, S; Hensinger, W K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

On the application of radio frequency voltages to ion traps via helical resonators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ions confined using a Paul trap require a stable, high voltage and low noise radio frequency (RF) potential. We present a guide for the design and construction of a helical coil resonator for a desired frequency that maximises the quality factor for a set of experimental constraints. We provide an in-depth analysis of the system formed from a shielded helical coil and an ion trap by treating the system as a lumped element model. This allows us to predict the resonant frequency and quality factor in terms of the physical parameters of the resonator and the properties of the ion trap. We also compare theoretical predictions with experimental data for different resonators, and predict the voltage applied to the ion trap as a function of the Q-factor, input power and the properties of the resonant circuit.

J. D. Siverns; L. R. Simkins; S. Weidt; W. K. Hensinger

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

169

Autonomous microexplosives subsurface tracing system final report.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the autonomous micro-explosive subsurface tracing system is to image the location and geometry of hydraulically induced fractures in subsurface petroleum reservoirs. This system is based on the insertion of a swarm of autonomous micro-explosive packages during the fracturing process, with subsequent triggering of the energetic material to create an array of micro-seismic sources that can be detected and analyzed using existing seismic receiver arrays and analysis software. The project included investigations of energetic mixtures, triggering systems, package size and shape, and seismic output. Given the current absence of any technology capable of such high resolution mapping of subsurface structures, this technology has the potential for major impact on petroleum industry, which spends approximately $1 billion dollar per year on hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States alone.

Engler, Bruce Phillip; Nogan, John; Melof, Brian Matthew; Uhl, James Eugene; Dulleck, George R., Jr.; Ingram, Brian V.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Rivas, Raul R.; Cooper, Paul W.; Warpinski, Norman Raymond; Kravitz, Stanley H.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Trapping and dark current in plasma-based accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The trapping of thermal electrons in a nonlinear plasma wave of arbitrary phase velocity is investigated. The threshold plasma wave amplitude for trapping plasma electrons is calculated, thereby determining the fraction trapped and the expected dark current in a plasma-based accelerator. It is shown that the presence of a laser field (e.g., trapping in the self-modulated regime of the laser wakefield accelerator) increases the trapping threshold. Implications for experimental and numerical laser-plasma studies are discussed.

Schroder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Shadwick, B.A.; Leemans, W.P.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Controlling trapping potentials and stray electric fields in a microfabricated ion trap through design and compensation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent advances in quantum information processing with trapped ions have demonstrated the need for new ion trap architectures capable of holding and manipulating chains of many (>10) ions. Here we present the design and detailed characterization of a new linear trap, microfabricated with scalable complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) techniques, that is well-suited to this challenge. Forty-four individually controlled DC electrodes provide the many degrees of freedom required to construct anharmonic potential wells, shuttle ions, merge and split ion chains, precisely tune secular mode frequencies, and adjust the orientation of trap axes. Microfabricated capacitors on DC electrodes suppress radio-frequency pickup and excess micromotion, while a top-level ground layer simplifies modeling of electric fields and protects trap structures underneath. A localized aperture in the substrate provides access to the trapping region from an oven below, permitting deterministic loading of particular isotopic/elemental sequences via species-selective photoionization. The shapes of the aperture and radio-frequency electrodes are optimized to minimize perturbation of the trapping pseudopotential. Laboratory experiments verify simulated potentials and characterize trapping lifetimes, stray electric fields, and ion heating rates, while measurement and cancellation of spatially-varying stray electric fields permits the formation of nearly-equally spaced ion chains.

S. Charles Doret; Jason M. Amini; Kenneth Wright; Curtis Volin; Tyler Killian; Arkadas Ozakin; Douglas Denison; Harley Hayden; C. -S. Pai; Richart E. Slusher; Alexa W. Harter

2012-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

172

Modular cryostat for ion trapping with surface-electrode ion traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a simple cryostat purpose built for use with surface-electrode ion traps, designed around an affordable, large cooling power commercial pulse tube refrigerator. A modular vacuum enclosure with a single vacuum space facilitates interior access, and enables rapid turnaround and flexiblity for future modifications. Long rectangular windows provide nearly 360 degrees of optical access in the plane of the ion trap, while a circular bottom window near the trap enables NA 0.4 light collection without the need for in-vacuum optics. We evaluate the system's mechanical and thermal characteristics, and we quantify ion trapping performance by trapping 40Ca+, finding small stray electric fields, long ion lifetimes, and low ion heating rates.

Grahame Vittorini; Kenneth Wright; Kenneth R. Brown; Alexa W. Harter; S. Charles Doret

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

173

Trapping of quantum particles and light beams by switchable potential wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider basic dynamical effects in settings based on a pair of local potential traps that may be effectively switched on and off, or suddenly displaced, by means of appropriate control mechanisms, such as the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) or photo-switchable quantum dots. The same models, based on the linear Schrodinger equation with time-dependent trapping potentials, apply to the description of optical planar systems designed for the switching of trapped light beams. The analysis is carried out in the analytical form, using exact solutions of the Schrodinger equation. The first dynamical problem considered in this work is the retention of a particle released from a trap which was suddenly turned off, while another local trap was switched on at a distance - immediately or with a delay. In this case, we demonstrate that the maximum of the retention rate is achieved at a specific finite value of the strength of the new trap, and at a finite value of the temporal delay, depending on the distance between the two traps. Another ptoblem is retrapping of the bound particle when the addition of the second trap transforms the single-well setting into a double-well potential (DWP). In that case, we find probabilities for the retrapping into the ground or first excited state of the DWP. We also analyze effects entailed by the application of a kick to a bound particle, the most interesting one being a kick-induced transition between the DWP's ground and excited states. In the latter case, the largest transition probability is achieved at particular strength of the kick.

Eduard Sonkin; Boris A. Malomed; Er'el Granot; Avi Marchewka

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

174

Charge trapping in imidazolium ionic liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

trapping in imidazolium ionic liquids trapping in imidazolium ionic liquids I. A. Shkrob and J. F. Wishart J. Phys. Chem. B 113, 5582-5592 (2009). [Find paper at ACS Publications] or use ACS Articles on Request Abstract: Room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs) are a promising class of solvents for applications ranging from photovoltaics to solvent extractions. Some of these applications involve the exposure of the ILs to ionizing radiation, which stimulates interest in their radiation and photo- chemistry. In the case of ILs consisting of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium cations and hydrophobic anions, ionization, charge transfer and redox reactions yield charge-trapped species thought to be radicals resulting from neutralization of the constituent ions. Using computational chemistry methods and the recent results on electron spin resonance (ESR) and transient absorption

175

Energy Savings Through Steam Trap Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainability and energy management are broad topics which have become a common focus in industry. Recognizing the need for greater cost reduction and competitive advantage through sustainability, industry is putting forth resources to improve energy management controls. When the topic of energy management relates to steam trap management however, the focus becomes less clear and action less notable. The seemingly “low hanging” fruit of steam traps are not often tied to significant and sustainable energy management projects. Typically this holds true because of the failure of industry to put a value on the cost of steam and because of the lack of energy tracking from failed steam traps as part of best practice. The use of technology can help industry transform how steam systems are managed and sustainability in steam systems is achieved.

Gibbs, C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Trace gases could double climate warming  

SciTech Connect

The atmospheric concentrations of several trace gases capable of changing the climate are increasing. Researchers are concerned about the trace gases despite their miniscule concentrations because they are such efficient absorbers of far-infrared radiation. The trace gases that concern climatologists are methane, nitrous oxide, and the chlorofluorocarbons or CFC's. The increase in atmospheric concentrations of these gases are discussed and atmospheric models predicting their greenhouse effect are described.

Kerr, R.A.

1983-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

177

Tool for Rapid Assessment of City Energy (TRACE) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tool for Rapid Assessment of City Energy (TRACE) Tool for Rapid Assessment of City Energy (TRACE) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Tool for Rapid Assessment of City Energy (TRACE) Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Sector: Climate Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Buildings, Energy Efficiency Topics: Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Training materials, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: esmap.org/esmap/TRACE Cost: Free Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/tool-rapid-assessment-city-energy-tra Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance References: TRACE[1] This tool offers cities a quick and easy way to assess their energy

178

Visualization and observations on traces - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 19, 1997 ... A similar quality appears in resulting columns of a 2-trace operation with the difference that the pattern now merges aspects of the truth table ...

179

Thermal electric vapor trap arrangement and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique for trapping vapor within a section of a tube is disclosed herein. This technique utilizes a conventional, readily providable thermal electric device having a hot side and a cold side and means for powering the device to accomplish this. The cold side of this device is positioned sufficiently close to a predetermined section of the tube and is made sufficiently cold so that any condensable vapor passing through the predetermined tube section is condensed and trapped, preferably within the predetermined tube section itself.

Alger, Terry (Tracy, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Marginally outer trapped surfaces in higher dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the basic setup of Kaluza-Klein theory, namely a 5-dimensional vacuum with a cyclic isometry, which corresponds to Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory in 4-dimensional spacetime. We first recall the behaviour of Killing horizons and its generators under bundle lift and projection. We then show that the property of compact surfaces of being (stably) marginally trapped is preserved under lift and projection provided the appropriate ("Pauli-") conformal scaling is used for the spacetime metric. We also discuss and compare recently proven area inequalities for stable axially symmetric 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional marginally outer trapped surfaces.

Tim-Torben Paetz; Walter Simon

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trap trace analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Parametric Resonance of Optically Trapped Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Brownian dynamics of an optically trapped water droplet are investigated across the transition from over to under-damped oscillations. The spectrum of position fluctuations evolves from a Lorentzian shape typical of over-damped systems (beads in liquid solvents), to a damped harmonic oscillator spectrum showing a resonance peak. In this later under-damped regime, we excite parametric resonance by periodically modulating the trapping power at twice the resonant frequency. The power spectra of position fluctuations are in excellent agreement with the obtained analytical solutions of a parametrically modulated Langevin equation.

R. Di Leonardo; G. Ruocco; J. Leach; M. J. Padgett; A. J. Wright; J. M. Girkin; D. R. Burnham; D. McGloin

2007-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

182

The Engineered Approach to Energy and Maintenance Effective Steam Trapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The engineered approach to steam trap sizing, selection and application has proven effective in significantly reducing a plant's fuel consumption, maintenance and trap replacement costs while improving thermal efficiency and overall steam system performance. New field test procedures for measuring condensate load and steam loss have proven valuable in sizing traps and to determine which trap is the most energy efficient. The combination of using the engineered approach to steam trapping, field tests to verify trap performance and good maintenance practices has contributed to a major reduction in energy consumption of 10-50% in many industrial plants.

Krueger, R. G.; Wilt, G. W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Marginally trapped surfaces in spaces of oriented geodesics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the geometric properties of marginally trapped surfaces (surfaces which have null mean curvature vector) in the spaces of oriented geodesics of Euclidean 3-space and hyperbolic 3-space, endowed with their canonical neutral Kaehler structures. We prove that every rank one surface in these four manifolds is marginally trapped. In the Euclidean case we show that Lagrangian rotationally symmetric sections are marginally trapped and construct an explicit family of marginally trapped Lagrangian tori. In the hyperbolic case we explore the relationship between marginally trapped and Weingarten surfaces, and construct examples of marginally trapped surfaces with various properties.

Brendan Guilfoyle; Nikos Georgiou

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

184

Measurement of Trace Uranium Isotopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extent to which thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) can measure trace quantities of 233U and 236U in the presence of a huge excess of natural uranium is evaluated. This is an important nuclear non-proliferation measurement. Four ion production methods were evaluated with three mass spectrometer combinations. The most favorable combinations are not limited by abundance sensitivity; rather, the limitations are the ability to generate a uranium ion beam of sufficient intensity to obtain the required number of counts on the minor isotopes in relationship to detector background. The most favorable situations can measure isotope ratios in the range of E10 if sufficient sample intensity is available. These are the triple sector mass spectrometer with porous ion emitters (PIE) and the single sector mass spectrometer with energy filtering.

Matthew G. Watrous; James E. Delmore

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The Spindown of Bottom-Trapped Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note considers the decay of a bottom-trapped freshwater plume after the causative freshwater inflow has ceased. It is shown that shortly after the low-density inflow stops, the barotropic pressure field that it created radiates away and the ...

Ricardo P. Matano; Elbio D. Palma

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Mercury and Other Trace Metals in Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes the trace metal analyses of more than 150 as-received bituminous, sub-bituminous, and lignite coal samples from full-scale power plants. Analyses for mercury, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, and lead offer a benchmark for utilities to compare and contrast their own estimates and measurements of trace element content in coal.

1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

187

Diagnostic tracing for wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless sensor networks are typically deployed in harsh environments, thus post-deployment failures are not infrequent. An execution trace containing events in their order of execution could play a crucial role in postmortem diagnosis of these failures. ... Keywords: Embedded debugging, diagnosis, tracing, wireless sensor networks

Vinaitheerthan Sundaram; Patrick Eugster; Xiangyu Zhang; Vamsidhar Addanki

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Two-dimensional ion trap lattice on a microchip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microfabricated ion traps are a major advancement towards scalable quantum computing with trapped ions. The development of more flexible ion trap designs, in which tailored arrays of ions are positioned in two dimensions above a microfabricated surface, would lead to applications in fields as varied as quantum simulation, metrology and atom-ion interactions. Current surface ion traps often have low trap depths and high heating rates, due to the size of the voltages that can be applied to them, limiting the fidelity of quantum gates. In this article we report on a fabrication process that allows for the application of very high voltages to microfabricated devices in general and we apply this advance to fabricate a 2D ion trap lattice on a microchip. Our scalable microfabricated architecture allows for reliable trapping of 2D ion lattices, long ion lifetimes due to the deep trapping potential, rudimentary shuttling between lattice sites and the ability to deterministically introduce defects into the ion lattice.

R. C. Sterling; H. Rattanasonti; S. Weidt; K. Lake; P. Srinivasan; S. C. Webster; M. Kraft; W. K. Hensinger

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Towards a cryogenic planar ion trap for Sr-88  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes experiments with ion traps constructed with electrodes in a single two-dimensional plane, and ion traps operated in a cryogenic environment at 77K and 4K temperatures. These two technologies address ...

Bakr, Waseem (Waseem S.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Ideal Multipole Ion Traps from Planar Ring Electrodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present designs for multipole ion traps based on a set of planar, annular, concentric electrodes which require only rf potentials to confine ions. We illustrate the desirable properties of the traps by considering a few simple cases of confined ions. We predict that mm-scale surface traps may have trap depths as high as tens of electron volts, or micromotion amplitudes in a 2-D ion crystal as low as tens of nanometers, when parameters of a magnitude common in the field are chosen. Several example traps are studied, and the scaling of those properties with voltage, frequency, and trap scale, for small numbers of ions, is derived. In addition, ions with very high charge-to-mass ratios may be confined in the trap, and species of very different charge-to-mass ratios may be simultaneously confined. Applications of these traps include quantum information science, frequency metrology, and cold ion-atom collisions.

Robert J. Clark

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

191

Transport of Trapped-Ion Qubits within a Scalable Quantum ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 158 6.13 Glass vacuum envelope. . . . . ... 159 6.14 Picture of the trap inside of the glass envelope. . . . . ...

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

192

High voltage gas insulated transmission line with continuous particle trapping  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a novel high voltage gas insulated transmission line utilizing insulating supports spaced at intervals with snap-in means for supporting a continuous trapping apparatus and said trapping apparatus having perforations and cutouts to facilitate trapping of contaminating particles and system flexibility.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Dale, Steinar J. (Monroeville, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

TBBT: scalable and accurate trace replay for file server evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the design, implementation, and evaluation of TBBT, the first comprehensive NFS trace replay tool. Given an NFS trace, TBBT automatically detects and repairs missing operations in the trace, derives a file system image required to ...

Ningning Zhu; Jiawu Chen; Tzi-Cker Chiueh

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Easy system call tracing for Plan 9.  

SciTech Connect

Tracing system calls makes debugging easy and fast. On Plan 9, traditionally, system call tracing has been implemented with acid. New systems do not always implement all the capabilities needed for Acid, particularly the ability to rewrite the process code space to insert breakpoints. Architecture support libraries are not always available for Acid, or may not work even on a supported architecture. The requirement that Acid's libraries be available can be a problem on systems with a very small memory footprint, such as High Performance Computing systems where every Kbyte counts. Finally, Acid tracing is inconvenient in the presence of forks, which means tracing shell pipelines is particularly troublesome. The strace program available on most Unix systems is far more convenient to use and more capable than Acid for system call tracing. A similar system on Plan 9 can simplify troubleshooting. We have built a system calling tracing capability into the Plan 9 kernel. It has proven to be more convenient than strace in programming effort. One can write a shell script to implement tracing, and the C code to implement an strace equivalent is several orders of magnitude smaller.

Minnich, Ronald G.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Demonstration of a scalable, multiplexed ion trap for quantum information processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scalable, multiplexed ion trap for quantum information processing is fabricated and tested. The trap design and fabrication process are optimized for scalability to small trap size and large numbers of interconnected traps, and for integration of control ...

D. R. Leibrandt; J. Labaziewicz; R. J. Clark; I. L. Chuang; R. J. Epstein; C. Ospelkaus; J. H. Wesenberg; J. J. Bollinger; D. Leibfried; D. J. Wineland; D. Stick; J. Sterk; C. Monroe; C.-S. Pai; Y. Low; R. Frahm; R. E. Slusher

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Use of Bullet Traps and Steel Targets  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

USE OF BULLET TRAPS AND USE OF BULLET TRAPS AND STEEL TARGETS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Health, Safety and Security AVAILABLE ONLINE AT: INITIATED BY: http://www.hss.energy.gov Office of Health, Safety and Security Notices This document is intended for the exclusive use of elements of the Department of Energy (DOE), to include the National Nuclear Security Administration, their contractors, and other government agencies/individuals authorized to use DOE facilities. DOE disclaims any and all liability for personal injury or property damage due to use of this document in any context by any organization, group, or individual, other than during official government activities. Local DOE management is responsible for the proper execution of firearms-related programs for

197

Noise-enhanced trapping in chaotic scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that noise enhances the trapping of trajectories in scattering systems. In fully chaotic systems, the decay rate can decrease with increasing noise due to a generic mismatch between the noiseless escape rate and the value predicted by the Liouville measure of the exit set. In Hamiltonian systems with mixed phase space we show that noise leads to a slower algebraic decay due to trajectories performing a random walk inside Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser islands. We argue that these noise-enhanced trapping mechanisms exist in most scattering systems and are likely to be dominant for small noise intensities, which is confirmed through a detailed investigation in the Henon map. Our results can be tested in fluid experiments, affect the fractal Weyl's law of quantum systems, and modify the estimations of chemical reaction rates based on phase-space transition state theory.

Altmann, Eduardo G; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.244102

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

A quantum information processor with trapped ions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum computers hold the promise to solve certain problems exponentially faster than their classical counterparts. Trapped atomic ions are among the physical systems in which building such a computing device seems viable. In this work we present a small-scale quantum information processor based on a string of $^{40}$Ca${^+}$ ions confined in a macroscopic linear Paul trap. We review our set of operations which includes non-coherent operations allowing us to realize arbitrary Markovian processes. In order to build a larger quantum information processor it is mandatory to reduce the error rate of the available operations which is only possible if the physics of the noise processes is well understood. We identify the dominant noise sources in our system and discuss their effects on different algorithms. Finally we demonstrate how our entire set of operations can be used to facilitate the implementation of algorithms by examples of the quantum Fourier transform and the quantum order finding algorithm.

Philipp Schindler; Daniel Nigg; Thomas Monz; Julio T. Barreiro; Esteban Martinez; Shannon X. Wang; Stephan Quint; Matthias F. Brandl; Volckmar Nebendahl; Christian F. Roos; Michael Chwalla; Markus Hennrich; Rainer Blatt

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

199

TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION GAS CHEMISTRY Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: TRACING...

200

Iterated dynamical maps in an ion trap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iterated dynamical maps offer an ideal setting to investigate quantum dynamical bifurcations and are well adapted to few-qubit quantum computer realisations. We show that a single trapped ion, subject to periodic impulsive forces, exhibits a rich structure of dynamical bifurcations derived from the Jahn-Teller Hamiltonian flow model. We show that the entanglement between the oscillator and electronic degrees of freedom reflects the underlying dynamical bifurcation in a Floquet eigenstate.

M. Duncan; J. Links; G. J. Milburn

2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trap trace analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Effect of trapping in degenerate quantum plasmas  

SciTech Connect

In the present work we consider the effect of trapping as a microscopic process in a plasma consisting of quantum electrons and nondegenerate ions. The formation of solitary structures is investigated in two cases: first when the electrons are fully degenerate and second when small temperature effects are taken into account. It is seen that not only rarefactive but coupled rarefactive and compressive solitons are obtained under different temperature conditions.

Shah, H. A.; Qureshi, M. N. S. [Department of Physics, GC University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Tsintsadze, N. [Department of Physics, GC University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salam Chair, GC University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

What To Do With Cold Traps and Why  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increased emphasis on energy management has helped sites reduce system cost through the diagnosis and repair of “Leaking” or “Blowing” steam traps (“Leakage Failures”). Timely maintenance response is a significant action to lower energy use and GHG emissions generated by steam production. But, what action should be taken with Cold Traps? In every steam trap survey to determine the steam trap population’s current state of health, there are usually a significant amount of steam traps determined to be “Cold” or “Low Temp” (“Drainage Failures” or “Cold Traps”). It seems that site personnel commonly assign a lower response priority to these Drainage Failures traps, and sometimes actually implement a practice to intentionally convert Leaking traps into Cold Traps by closing the inlet stop valve to immediately stop energy leakage. Subsequently, they may label those traps as “Valved- Out” or “Out of Service,” but those trap stations were originally designed as needed to drain retained condensate from the system. So, the correct designation for such a trap station is “Cold,” regardless of the current intention. If the trap station does not drain condensate and is not hot, it is “Cold.” It can be astounding that many sites are not convinced of what actions or priority to take to repair Cold Traps, even while intrinsically understanding that there is something wrong with having Cold Traps that cannot drain condensate from a steam system. It often is simply because sites may not be fully aware of the potential dangers of uncorrected Cold Traps or the significant safety, reliability, and energy benefits of addressing them. Although safety is always the main priority, it cannot be overstated that there are huge reliability and energy benefits to prioritized repair of Cold Traps. Unfortunately, proactive response to repair Cold Traps in a steam system is not always achieved, often because the real benefits of such a response are not understood. Therefore, further review of “WHAT TO DO ABOUT COLD TRAPS…AND WHY?” is warranted for safe, reliable, and energy-efficient management of the condensate discharge locations (CDLs). Several tables are provided to help sites valuate the cost impact of Cold Traps in their steam systems by using readily available historical data.

Risko, J. R.; Walter, J. P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Comparative assessment of the trace-element composition of coals, crude oils, and oil shales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparative analysis of the amounts of 42 trace elements in coals, crude oils, and oil and black shales was performed. The degree of concentration of trace elements by caustobioliths and their ashes relative to their abundance in argillaceous rocks and the Earth's crust was calculated. Typomorphic trace elements were distinguished, of which many turned out to be common for the different kinds of caustobioliths in question. The trace elements were classified according to their concentration factors in different caustobioliths. The ash of crude oils is enriched in trace elements (Cs, V, Mo, Cu, Ag, Au, Zn, Hg, Se, Cr, Co, Ni, U) to the greatest extent (concentration factor above 3.5) and that of oil shales is enriched to the least extent (Re, Cs, Hg, Se). The ratios between typomorphic trace elements in general strongly differ from those in the Earth's crust and argillaceous rocks and are not identical in different caustobioliths. Quantitative parameters that make it possible to calculate a change in these ratios on passing from one caustobiolith type to another were proposed and the relative trace-element affinity of different caustobioliths was estimated.

M.Y. Shpirt; S.A. Punanova [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiproton discrimination: Discriminating between antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiprotons in a minimum-B trap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, antihydrogen atoms were trapped at CERN in a magnetic minimum (minimum-B) trap formed by superconducting octupole and mirror magnet coils. The trapped antiatoms were detected by rapidly turning off these magnets, thereby eliminating the magnetic minimum and releasing any antiatoms contained in the trap. Once released, these antiatoms quickly hit the trap wall, whereupon the positrons and antiprotons in the antiatoms annihilated. The antiproton annihilations produce easily detected signals; we used these signals to prove that we trapped antihydrogen. However, our technique could be confounded by mirror-trapped antiprotons, which would produce seemingly-identical annihilation signals upon hitting the trap wall. In this paper, we discuss possible sources of mirror-trapped antiprotons and show that antihydrogen and antiprotons can be readily distinguished, often with the aid of applied electric fields, by analyzing the annihilation locations and times. We further discuss the general properties of antiproton and antihydrogen trajectories in this magnetic geometry, and reconstruct the antihydrogen energy distribution from the measured annihilation time history.

C. Amole; G. B. Andresen; M. D. Ashkezari; M. Baquero-Ruiz; W. Bertsche; E. Butler; C. L. Cesar; S. Chapman; M. Charlton; A. Deller; S. Eriksson; J. Fajans; T. Friesen; M. C. Fujiwara; D. R. Gill; A. Gutierrez; J. S. Hangst; W. N. Hardy; M. E. Hayden; A. J. Humphries; R. Hydomako; L. Kurchaninov; S. Jonsell; N. Madsen; S. Menary; P. Nolan; K. Olchanski; A. Olin; A. Povilus; P. Pusa; F. Robicheaux; E. Sarid; D. M. Silveira; C. So; J. W. Storey; R. I. Thompson; D. P. van der Werf; J. S. Wurtele

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

205

Steam Traps-The Oft Forgotten Energy Conservation Treasure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In these days of high technology, the steam trap is often treated as a commodity item, forgotten by many and respected by a relative few. Yet, in many facilities, widespread undetected failure of steam traps has wasted 5-15% of a plant's total steam generation. Stopping this waste represents a major energy conservation treasure characterized by low investment and a fast payback. The proper application of steam trap technology requires the experience and judgment of a dedicated champion at each location. This paper will present an overview of a working steam trap program starting with the initial survey and loss estimates. Trap characteristics and performance by generic type will be discussed with practical examples utilized to illustrate the myths in steam trap sizing and the consequences of over-sizing. Standardization of trap inventory, training and follow-up are the other key program elements addressed.

Pychewicz, F. S.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Accelerating ray tracing using constrained tetrahedralizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce the constrained tetrahedralization as a new acceleration structure for ray tracing. A constrained tetrahedralization of a scene is a tetrahedralization that respects the faces of the scene geometry. The closest intersection ...

Ares Lagae; Philip Dutré

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Definition of the n-Trace - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 19, 1997 ... Definition of the n-Trace. Suppose $\\Sigma$ is a set of inputs $\\Sigma = \\{\\ alpha_1,\\alpha_2,\\alpha_3.. . Then the set $\\wp(\\Sigma)$ ...

208

Extraction of trace metals from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

Blander, Milton (Palos Park, IL); Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Nagy, Zoltan (Woodridge, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Extraction of trace metals from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Abstract Chemical interaction of thermal brines with reservoir rock in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area has resulted in the development of distinctive trace element signatures. Geochemical analysis of soil sample, shallow temperature gradient drill hole cuttings and deep drill hole cutting provides a three dimensional perspective of trace element distributions within the system. Distributions of As, Hg and Li provide the clearest expression of hydrothermal activity. Comparison of these distribution

211

Void trapping of hydrogen in sintered iron  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of void trapping of hydrogen in iron was studied using the gas-phase permeation technique. Iron membranes of controlled void density, varying from 92% to 98% were prepared by press and sintering of electrolytic iron powder. The presence of internal voids showed no effect on the steady state flux of hydrogen through the membrane. The effective diffusivity, obtained by the time lag method, increased with the increase of input hydrogen partial pressure. This disagreement with the prediction of the theory in literature was explained by the existence of hydrogen in both the diatomic gaseous form and as adsorbed hydrogen. This explanation was further confirmed by examining the dependence of trapped hydrogen concentration with pressure. The linear dependence of trapped hydrogen concentration in voids with external hydrogen partial pressure for samples of 96%, 94% and 92% dense were given respectively by C/sub g/ = (1.5 +- 0.2) x 10/sup 15/ P + (3.2 +- 0.5) x 10/sup 14/ atoms of H/c.c. C/sub g/ = (2.1 +- 0.6) x 10/sup 15/ P + (1.7 +- 0.5) x 10/sup 15/ atoms of H/c.c. C/sub g/ = (4.5 +- 0.3) x 10/sup 15/ P + (6.5 +- 0.2) x 10/sup 15/ atoms of H/c.c. The discrepancy between the reported values and the values predicted by theory was explained by the poisoning of some of the voids by surface oxides.

Wong, K.C.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Gas turbine engines with particle traps  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas turbine engine (10) incorporates a particle trap (46) that forms an entrapment region (73) in a plenum (24) which extends from within the combustor (18) to the inlet (32) of a radial-inflow turbine (52, 54). The engine (10) is thereby adapted to entrap particles that originate downstream from the compressor (14) and are otherwise propelled by combustion gas (22) into the turbine (52, 54). Carbonaceous particles that are dislodged from the inner wall (50) of the combustor (18) are incinerated within the entrapment region (73) during operation of the engine (10).

Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ); Sumner, D. Warren (Phoenix, AZ); Sheoran, Yogendra (Scottsdale, AZ); Judd, Z. Daniel (Phoenix, AZ)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Trapped Quintessential Inflation from Flux Compactifications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quintessential inflation is studied using a string modulus as the inflaton - quintessence field. It is assumed that the modulus crosses an enhanced symmetry point (ESP) in field space. Particle production at the ESP temporarily traps the modulus resulting in a period of inflation. After reheating, the modulus freezes due to cosmological friction at a large value, such that its scalar potential is dominated by contributions due to fluxes in the extra dimensions. The modulus remains frozen until the present, when it can become quintessence.

Konstantinos Dimopoulos

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Universal digital quantum simulation with trapped ions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A digital quantum simulator is an envisioned quantum device that can be pro- grammed to efficiently simulate any other local system. We demonstrate and investigate the digital approach to quantum simulation in a system of trapped ions. Using sequences of up to 100 gates and 6 qubits, the full time dynamics of a range of spin systems are digitally simulated. Interactions beyond those naturally present in our simulator are accurately reproduced and quantitative bounds are provided for the overall simulation quality. Our results demon- strate the key principles of digital quantum simulation and provide evidence that the level of control required for a full-scale device is within reach.

B. P. Lanyon; C. Hempel; D. Nigg; M. Müller; R. Gerritsma; F. Zähringer; P. Schindler; J. T. Barreiro; M. Rambach; G. Kirchmair; M. Hennrich; P. Zoller; R. Blatt; C. F. Roos

2011-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

215

Impurity beam-trapping instability in tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

The sensitivity of neutron energy production to the impurity trapping of injected neutral beams is considered. This process is affected by inherent low-Z contamination of the tritium pre-heat plasma, by the species composition of the neutral beam, and by the entrance angle of the beam. The sensitivities of the process to these variables, and to the variation of wall material are compared. One finds that successful use of a low-Z, low-sputtering material can appreciably lengthen the useful pulse length. (auth)

Hogan, J.T.; Howe, H.C.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Reforming of methane with carbon dioxide to synthesize gas over supported rhodium catalysts: II. A steady-state tracing analysis: Mechanistic aspects of the carbon and oxygen reaction pathways to form CO  

SciTech Connect

Steady-state tracing techniques have been applied to investigate mechanistic aspects of the CH{sub 4} reforming reaction over CO{sub 2} over Rh supported on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as catalysts. It was found that the surface coverage of active carbon-containing species, which are found in the reaction pathway to CO formation, is of the order of 0.2 over the Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst, while it is very small ({theta}{sub c}, < 0.02) over Rh/YSZ. The surface coverage of active oxygen-containing species which lead to the formation of CO is found to be very small over both Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Rh/YSZ catalysts. However, over the Rh/YSZ catalyst it was found that there exists a large reservoir of lattice oxygen species of the carrier which interact reversibly with gaseous CO{sub 2} under reforming reaction conditions. A spillover of these lattice oxygen species onto the Rh surface seems to occur, contributing to the formation of CO and H{sub 2}O. This reaction route proceeds in parallel with the reforming reaction on the Rh surface. 27 refs., 12 figs.

Efstathiou, A.M.; Kladi, A.; Tsipouriari, V.A. [Univ. of Patras (Greece)] [and others

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

New nano trap protects environment | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New nano trap protects environment New nano trap protects environment By Tona Kunz * October 31, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint This story was originally published in volume 10, number 5 of Innovation magazine. A new type of nanoscale molecular trap makes it possible for industry to store large amounts of hydrogen in small fuel cells or capture, compact and remove volatile radioactive gas from spent nuclear fuel in an affordable, easily commercialized way. The ability to adjust the size of the trap openings to select for specific molecules or to alter how molecules are released at industrially accessible pressures makes the trap uniquely versatile. The trap is constructed of commercially available material and made possible through collaborative work at Argonne and Sandia national laboratories. "This introduces a new class of materials to nuclear waste remediation,"

218

Gas insulated transmission line having tapered particle trapping ring  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor, insulating supports and an insulating gas. A particle-trapping ring is secured to each insulating support, and it is comprised of a central portion and two tapered end portions. The ends of the particle trapping ring have a smaller diameter than the central portion of the ring, so as to enable the use of the particle trapping ring in a curved transmission line.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Energy trapping from Hagedorn densities of states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this note, we construct simple stochastic toy models for holographic gauge theories in which distributions of energy on a collection of sites evolve by a master equation with some specified transition rates. We build in only energy conservation, locality, and the standard thermodynamic requirement that all states with a given energy are equally likely in equilibrium. In these models, we investigate the qualitative behavior of the dynamics of the energy distributions for different choices of the density of states for the individual sites. For typical field theory densities of states (\\log(\\rho(E)) ~ E^{\\alphaenergy spread out relatively quickly. For large N gauge theories with gravitational duals, the density of states for a finite volume of field theory degrees of freedom typically includes a Hagedorn regime (\\log(\\rho(E)) ~ E). We find that this gives rise to a trapping of energy in subsets of degrees of freedom for parametrically long time scales before the energy leaks away. We speculate that this Hagedorn trapping may be part of a holographic explanation for long-lived gravitational bound states (black holes) in gravitational theories.

Connor Behan; Klaus Larjo; Nima Lashkari; Brian Swingle; Mark Van Raamsdonk

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

220

Trap-depth determination from residual gas collisions  

SciTech Connect

We present a method for determining the depth of an atomic or molecular trap of any type. This method relies on a measurement of the trap loss rate induced by collisions with background gas particles. Given a fixed gas composition, the loss rate uniquely determines the trap depth. Because of the ''soft'' long-range nature of the van der Waals interaction, these collisions transfer kinetic energy to trapped particles across a broad range of energy scales, from room temperature to the microkelvin energy scale. The resulting loss rate therefore exhibits a significant variation over an enormous range of trap depths, making this technique a powerful diagnostic with a large dynamic range. We present trap depth measurements of a Rb magneto-optical trap using this method and a different technique that relies on measurements of loss rates during optical excitation of colliding atoms to a repulsive molecular state. The main advantage of the method presented here is its large dynamic range and applicability to traps of any type requiring only knowledge of the background gas density and the interaction potential between the trapped and background gas particles.

Van Dongen, J.; Zhu, C.; Clement, D.; Dufour, G.; Madison, K. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Booth, J. L. [Physics Department, British Columbia Institute of Technology, 3700 Willingdon Avenue, Burnaby, British Columbia, V5G 3H2 (Canada)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trap trace analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

How Algae Use a "Sulfate Trap" to Selectively Biomineralize Strontium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed How Algae Use a "Sulfate Trap" to Selectively Biomineralize Strontium OCTOBER 20, 2011 Bookmark...

222

Bait formulations and longevity of navel orangeworm egg traps tested  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

there were 1% or 3% crude almond oil received more eggshaving no letters crude almond oil or traps baited with inone standard error. crude almond oil received significantly

Kuenen, L.P.S. Bas; Bentley, Walt; Rowe, Heather; Ribeiro, Brian

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

`Trapped' Ions Provide First View of Light Property  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... PHYSICS `Trapped' Ions Provide First View of Light Property. ... Quantum theory states that light can act either as a wave or as a particle. ...

224

November 18, 2010: Antimatter Trapped and Stored | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Stored November 18, 2010 The Department's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) announces that atoms of antimatter have been trapped and stored for the first time in...

225

Onset of Fermi Degeneracy in a Trapped Atomic Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in the total energy of the ultra- cold, trapped ... of charge e onto a cryogenic capacitor C, and ... standards are known as “calculable capacitors” and rely ...

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

226

Bon MOT: Innovative Atom Trap Catches Highly Magnetic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of a cloud of erbium atoms trapped and cooled and a ... all the while extracting energy and cooling them ... only a single laser and can cool erbium atoms ...

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

227

Possible mechanism for enhancing the trapping and cooling of antihydrogen  

SciTech Connect

We propose a usage of microwave radiation in a magnetic trap for improving the cooling and trapping of cold antihydrogen atoms which are initially produced in high magnetic moment states. Inducing transitions toward lower magnetic moments near the turning points of the atom in the trap, followed by spontaneous emission, should enhance the number of trappable atoms. We present results of simulations based on a typical experimental condition of the antihydrogen experiments at CERN. This technique should also be applicable to other trapped high magnetic moment Rydberg atoms.

Cesar, C. L.; Zagury, N. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Robicheaux, F. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Controlled Kinetic Energy Ion Source for Miniature Ion Trap ...  

with electronic signal sources coupled to the electrodes. The ion trap can be machined with conventional materials and methods and has demonstrated

229

Electron traps in organic light-emitting diodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents the effects of electron traps in organic light-emitting diodes using a model which includes charge injection

Min-Jan Tsai; Hsin-Fei Meng

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

NIST Racetrack Ion Trap is a Contender in Quantum ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ion trap under development as possible hardware for a future quantum computer. ... loading of 10 magnesium ions at once and transport of an ion ...

2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

231

Trapping and Measuring Charged Particles in Liquids - Energy ...  

Genome sequencing especially benefits from the nanoscale approach. Description. The trap is a three-layer, three-dimensional crossing metal/insulator ...

232

Josephson oscillations between exciton condensates in electrostatic traps  

SciTech Connect

Technological advances allow for tunable lateral confinement of cold dipolar excitons in coupled quantum wells. We consider theoretically the Josephson effect between exciton condensates in two traps separated by a weak link. The flow of the exciton supercurrent is driven by the dipole-energy difference between the traps. The Josephson oscillations may be observed after ensemble average of the time correlation of photons separately emitted from the two traps. The fringe visibility is controlled by the trap coupling and is robust against quantum and thermal fluctuations.

Rontani, Massimo [CNR-INFM Research Center on nanoStructures and bioSystems at Surfaces (S3), Via Campi 213/A, 41125 Modena (Italy); Sham, L. J. [Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0319 (United States)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Bait formulations and longevity of navel orangeworm egg traps tested  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

traps tested by L.P.S. (Bas) Kuenen, Walt Bentley, Heatherfor at least 10 weeks. L.P.S. (Bas) Kuenen is Research

Kuenen, L.P.S. Bas; Bentley, Walt; Rowe, Heather; Ribeiro, Brian

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Tellurium Inclusions and Carrier Trapping Times in Detector Grade ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial mapping of carrier trapping times and defect densities in CZT was performed to determine the relationship between defect density and electronic decay.

235

The angular momentum of a magnetically trapped atomic condensate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For an atomic condensate in an axially symmetric magnetic trap, the sum of the axial components of the orbital angular momentum and the hyperfine spin is conserved. Inside an Ioffe-Pritchard trap (IPT) whose magnetic field (B-field) is not axially symmetric, the difference of the two becomes surprisingly conserved. In this paper we investigate the relationship between the values of the sum/difference angular momentums for an atomic condensate inside a magnetic trap and the associated gauge potential induced by the adiabatic approximation. Our result provides significant new insight into the vorticity of magnetically trapped atomic quantum gases.

P. Zhang; H. H. Jen; C. P. Sun; L. You

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

236

Correlation between some selected trace metal concentrations in six species of fish from the Arabian Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of trace metals in marine ecosystems has been keenly investigated during recent years. It is known that abundance of essential trace metals regulates the metal content in the organisms by homeostatic control mechanisms, which when cease to function cause essential trace metals to act in an either acutely or chronically toxic manner. Therefore, a correlation study based on essential and non-essential trace metal concentrations is imperative for extending the existing knowledge of bioaccumulation of trace metals in marine organisms. An attempt has been made in the present investigation to bring out quantitative correlations between the concentrations of iron, copper, lead and zinc in the edible muscle tissue of six species of marine fish: Salmon (salmon sole); tuna (thunnus thynnus); pomfret silver (pampus argenteus); Pomfret black (formioniger); long tail tuna (thynnus tonggel) and Indian oil sardine (sardinella longiceps). These fish are abundantly available in Pakistan along the coastal line of the Arabian Sea and have great commercial value. The computational analysis on the trace metal correlation was conducted using an MSTAT statistical package.

Ashraf, M.; Jaffar, M.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: TRACE 700  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

700 700 TRACE 700 logo. Trane's TRACE 700 software - the latest version of Trane Air Conditioning Economics - brings the algorithms recommended by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) to the familiar Windows operating environment. Use it to assess the energy and economic impacts of building-related selections such as architectural features, comfort-system design, HVAC equipment selections, operating schedules, and financial options. Flexible data entry, coupled with multiple views and "drag-and-drop" load assignments, simplify the modeling process and help you identify optimal zoning and plant configurations. Compare up to four alternatives for a single project by modeling various air distribution and mechanical

238

Final Report - Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program - Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Sandia National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the three main projects that collectively comprised the Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program. Chapter 1 describes the direct interrogation of individual particles by laser desorption within the ion trap mass spectrometer analyzer. The goals were (1) to develop an ''intelligent trigger'' capable of distinguishing particles of biological origin from those of nonbiological origin in the background and interferent particles and (2) to explore the capability for individual particle identification. Direct interrogation of particles by laser ablation and ion trap mass spectrometry was shown to have good promise for discriminating between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin, although detailed protocols and operating conditions were not worked out. A library of more than 20,000 spectra of various types of biological particles has been assembled. Methods based on multivariate analysis and on neural networks were used to discriminate between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin. It was possible to discriminate between at least some species of bacteria if mass spectra of several hundred similar particles were obtained. Chapter 2 addresses the development of a new ion trap mass analyzer geometry that offers the potential for a significant increase in ion storage capacity for a given set of analyzer operating conditions. This geometry may lead to the development of smaller, lower-power field-portable ion trap mass spectrometers while retaining laboratory-scale analytical performance. A novel ion trap mass spectrometer based on toroidal ion storage geometry has been developed. The analyzer geometry is based on the edge rotation of a quadrupolar ion trap cross section into the shape of a torus. Initial performance of this device was poor, however, due to the significant contribution of nonlinear fields introduced by the rotation of the symmetric ion-trapping geometry. These nonlinear resonances contributed to poor mass resolution and sensitivity and to erratic ion ejection behavior. To correct for these nonlinear effects, the geometry of the toroid ion trap analyzer has been modified to create an asymmetric torus, as first suggested by computer simulations that predicted significantly improved performance and unit mass resolution for this geometry. A reduced-sized version (one-fifth scale) has been fabricated but was not tested within the scope of this project. Chapter 3 describes groundbreaking progress toward the use of ion-ion chemistry to control the charge state of ions formed by the electrospray ionization process, which in turn enables precision analysis of whole proteins. In addition, this technique may offer the unique possibility of a priori identification of unknown biological material when employed with existing proteomics and genomic databases. Ion-ion chemistry within the ion trap was used to reduce the ions in highly charged states to states of +1 and +2 charges. Reduction in charge greatly simplifies identification of molecular weights of fragments from large biological molecules. This technique enables the analysis of whole proteins as biomarkers for the detection and identification of all three classes of biological weapons (bacteria, toxins, and viruses). In addition to methods development, tests were carried out with samples of tap water, local creek water, and soil (local red clay) spiked with melittin (bee venom), cholera toxin, and virus MS2. All three analytes were identified in tap water and soil; however, all three were problematic for detection in creek water at concentrations of 1 nM. More development of methods is needed.

Whitten, W.B.

2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

239

Title Offline Trace Synchronization for Smartphone Energy Profiling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy profiling is a means to effectively understand the power behavior of smartphone applications. However, no tool that effectively combines portability, accuracy and automation has been proposed yet. In this thesis a new approach is proposed, which sets the basis for such a tool by solving a trace synchronization problem. TRAM (TRAce Merger) uses the event trace from a mobile device and the power trace from a measurement device. It synchronizes them offline, maps the mobile device events trace on the corresponding trace from the power measurement tool, and attributes energy consumption to smartphone functionalities. The event and power traces traces from these two systems contain timestamps based on the corresponding local clocks. Taking the aforementioned clocks inaccuracy and deviation into account, we synchronize these traces to extract useful information from their contents. We achieved energy consumption attribution to smartphone functionalities by solving this synchronization problem with milliseconds accuracy.

Ioannis Oikonomidis; Offline Trace; Synchronization Smartphone; Ioannis Oikonomidis; Msc Presentation

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Selection, Sizing, and Testing of Stream Traps in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For maximum effectiveness in steam systems, steam traps should have operating characteristics which closely match the requirements of the applications for which they are used. A trap which holds back condensate until it is subcooled and some of the sensible heat has been utilized is unsuitable where the need is to get maximum output from an exchanger by discharging condensate as soon as it forms. Equally, a trap discharging condensate at steam temperature can exacerbate flash steam problems in cases where surplus heat exchange area exists and a subcooling trap might be more suitable. In all cases, undersized traps simply cannot drain condensate from the steam equipment at the required rate, while oversized traps which cost more will usually wear faster and begin leaking expensive steam. This emphasizes the need for carefully selecting trap sizes that are properly engineered for maximum system efficiency. And, of course, the ability of a trap to cope with varying loads and to discharge noncondensible gases is often important. The recommended procedure is to first select the trap type which has performance capabilities that satisfy specific application needs, and then to choose a size which handles the condensate load without any unnecessary excess capacity. The Selection Guide, Table 1, is not comprehensive but helps in many applications where no unusual operating conditions or severe corrosion problems exist. Choosing the correct trap size then implies estimating the steam consumption rate, which of course equals the condensate load. Sometimes the load has already been measured, or the rated output of the steam equipment is known or can be obtained from the original manufacturer. In other cases, an estimate must be made and a Table o f Load Formulas will help although it, too, cannot be comprehensive. After making the best possible estimate of the load, a safety factor is applied. This allows for any inaccuracies in the estimating, for increased condensation rates at start-up, and for lower than anticipated pressure differentials across the trap.

Armer, A.; Risko, J. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trap trace analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Debris trap in a turbine cooling system  

SciTech Connect

In a turbine having a rotor and a plurality of stages, each stage comprising a row of buckets mounted on the rotor for rotation therewith; and wherein the buckets of at least one of the stages are cooled by steam, the improvement comprising at least one axially extending cooling steam supply conduit communicating with an at least partially annular steam supply manifold; one or more axially extending cooling steam feed tubes connected to the manifold at a location radially outwardly of the cooling steam supply conduit, the feed tubes arranged to supply cooling steam to the buckets of at least one of the plurality of stages; the manifold extending radially beyond the feed tubes to thereby create a debris trap region for collecting debris under centrifugal loading caused by rotation of the rotor.

Wilson, Ian David (Clifton Park, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Can aerosols be trapped in open flows?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fate of aerosols in open flows is relevant in a variety of physical contexts. Previous results are consistent with the assumption that such finite-size particles always escape in open chaotic advection. Here we show that a different behavior is possible. We analyze the dynamics of aerosols both in the absence and presence of gravitational effects, and both when the dynamics of the fluid particles is hyperbolic and nonhyperbolic. Permanent trapping of aerosols much heavier than the advecting fluid is shown to occur in all these cases. This phenomenon is determined by the occurrence of multiple vortices in the flow and is predicted to happen for realistic particle-fluid density ratios.

Rafael D. Vilela; Adilson E. Motter

2007-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

243

Hydrobiologia vol. 65, I, pag. 65-68, 1979 A SIZE SELECTIVE UNDERWATER LIGHT TRAP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrobiologia vol. 65, I, pag. 65-68, 1979 A SIZE SELECTIVE UNDERWATER LIGHT TRAP R. B. AIKEN underwater light trap isdescribed. Trap records indicate that the trap iseffective in taking a wide variety. (1955) described the construction and operation of an underwater light trap. Their records indi- cate

Aiken, Ron

244

Biological trace element measurements using synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of performing x-ray fluorescence trace element determinations at concentrations substantially below the ppM level for biological materials is demonstrated. Conditions for achieving optimum sensitivity were ascertained. Results achieved for five standard reference materials were, in most cases, in excellent agreement with listed values. Minimum detectable limits of 20 ppM were measured for most elements.

Giauque, R.D.; Jaklevic, J.M.; Thompson, A.C.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Stochastic path tracing on consumer graphics cards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a path tracer using the GPU of a consumers graphics card to render images. It is implemented in Java and GLSL using GroIMP as modelling platform and runtime environment. The path tracer is capable of rendering primitives like sphere, cone, ... Keywords: GPU, HDR, global illumination, path tracing, procedural texturing, raytracing, texture mapping

Thomas Huwe; Reinhard Hemmerling

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Effective Steam Trap Selection/Maintenance - Its Payback  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In oil refineries and petrochemical plants large number of steam traps are used to discharge condensate from steam mains, tracers and process equipment. Early efforts on steam traps focused almost exclusively on their selection and sizing, and it was not until the 1973 oil embargo that a need for regular maintenance became recognized. Although relatively small pieces of equipment, traps are responsible for large quantities of steam losses, decreased equipment efficiency and high maintenance costs; e.g., a steam trap leaking 100 psig steam through a 1/8 inch orifice costs at least $2k/yr if steam is valued at $5/k lb. Typically, a steam trap survey identifies 20-60% of traps malfunctioning. Therefore, establishing an effective steam trap selection/maintenance program is not simple but can be extremely profitable. This paper will show how a successful checking/maintenance program can result in high returns by using a case study at an Exxon plant. The example also shows how a central engineering organization can interact with plant technicians/ maintenance personnel to help implement an effective steam trap maintenance program at competitive costs and high returns.

Garcia, E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Tracefs: a file system to trace them all  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

File system traces have been used for years to analyze user behavior and system software behavior, leading to advances in file system and storage technologies. Existing traces, however, are difficult to use because they were captured for a specific use ...

Akshat Aranya; Charles P. Wright; Erez Zadok

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Bunker: a privacy-oriented platform for network tracing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ISPs are increasingly reluctant to collect and store raw network traces because they can be used to compromise their customers' privacy. Anonymization techniques mitigate this concern by protecting sensitive information. Trace anonymization can be performed ...

Andrew G. Miklas; Stefan Saroiu; Alec Wolman; Angela Demke Brown

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

12.479 Trace-Element Geochemistry, Fall 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Focuses on element distribution in rocks and minerals using data obtained from natural and experimental systems. Emphasizes models describing trace-element partitioning and applications of trace-element geochemistry to ...

Frey, Frederick August

250

On the privacy risks of publishing anonymized IP network traces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Networking researchers and engineers rely on network packet traces for understanding network behavior, developing models, and evaluating network performance. Although the bulk of published packet traces implement a form of address anonymization to hide ...

D. Koukis; S. Antonatos; K. G. Anagnostakis

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Measurements of electric field noise and light-induced charging in cryogenic surface electrode ion traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion traps provide an excellent tool for controlling and observing the state of a single trapped ion. For this reason, ion traps have been proposed as a possible system for large-scale quantum computation. However, many ...

Lachenmyer, Nathan S. (Nathan Scott)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Understanding Ajax applications by connecting client and server-side execution traces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ajax-enabled Web applications are a new breed of highly interactive, highly dynamic Web applications. Although Ajax allows developers to create rich Web applications, Ajax applications can be difficult to comprehend and thus to maintain. For this reason, ... Keywords: Ajax, Dynamic analysis, Program comprehension, Reverse engineering, Web applications, execution traces

Andy Zaidman; Nick Matthijssen; Margaret-Anne Storey; Arie Deursen

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Nuclear and Trace Ideals in Tensored \\LambdaCategories Samson Abramsky \\Lambda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear and Trace Ideals in Tensored \\Lambda­Categories Samson Abramsky \\Lambda Department of his 60th birthday. Abstract We generalize the notion of nuclear maps from functional analysis by defining nuclear ideals in tensored \\Lambda­categories. The motivation for this study came from attempts

Blute, Richard

254

Nuclear and Trace Ideals in Tensored \\LambdaCategories Samson Abramsky \\Lambda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear and Trace Ideals in Tensored \\Lambda­Categories Samson Abramsky \\Lambda Department 60th birthday. Abstract We generalize the notion of nuclear maps from functional analysis by defining nuclear ideals in tensored \\Lambda­categories. The motivation for this study came from attempts

Abramsky, Samson

255

Properties of Trapped Electron Bunches in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plasma-based accelerators use the propagation of a drive bunch through plasma to create large electric fields. Recent plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) experiments, carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), successfully doubled the energy for some of the 42 GeV drive bunch electrons in less than a meter; this feat would have required 3 km in the SLAC linac. This dissertation covers one phenomenon associated with the PWFA, electron trapping. Recently it was shown that PWFAs, operated in the nonlinear bubble regime, can trap electrons that are released by ionization inside the plasma wake and accelerate them to high energies. These trapped electrons occupy and can degrade the accelerating portion of the plasma wake, so it is important to understand their origins and how to remove them. Here, the onset of electron trapping is connected to the drive bunch properties. Additionally, the trapped electron bunches are observed with normalized transverse emittance divided by peak current, {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t}, below the level of 0.2 {micro}m/kA. A theoretical model of the trapped electron emittance, developed here, indicates that the emittance scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density in the non-linear 'bubble' regime of the PWFA. This model and simulations indicate that the observed values of {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t} result from multi-GeV trapped electron bunches with emittances of a few {micro}m and multi-kA peak currents. These properties make the trapped electrons a possible particle source for next generation light sources. This dissertation is organized as follows. The first chapter is an overview of the PWFA, which includes a review of the accelerating and focusing fields and a survey of the remaining issues for a plasma-based particle collider. Then, the second chapter examines the physics of electron trapping in the PWFA. The third chapter uses theory and simulations to analyze the properties of the trapped electron bunches. Chapters four and five present the experimental diagnostics and measurements for the trapped electrons. Next, the sixth chapter introduces suggestions for future trapped electron experiments. Then, Chapter seven contains the conclusions. In addition, there is an appendix chapter that covers a topic which is extraneous to electron trapping, but relevant to the PWFA. This chapter explores the feasibility of one idea for the production of a hollow channel plasma, which if produced could solve some of the remaining issues for a plasma-based collider.

Kirby, Neil; /SLAC

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

256

Development of NIST Standard Reference Materials for Trace ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... analytical measurements, consideration of suitable packaging, and investigation of ... provides trace levels of the plastic explosive Composition C4 ...

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

257

Two-dimensional Vlasov simulation of electron plasma wave trapping, wavefront bowing, self-focusing, and sideloss  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two-dimensional Vlasov simulations of nonlinear electron plasma waves are presented, in which the interplay of linear and nonlinear kinetic effects is evident. The plasma wave is created with an external traveling wave potential with a transverse envelope of width {Delta}y such that thermal electrons transit the wave in a ''sideloss'' time, t{sub sl{approx}{Delta}}y/v{sub e}. Here, v{sub e} is the electron thermal velocity. The quasisteady distribution of trapped electrons and its self-consistent plasma wave are studied after the external field is turned off. In cases of particular interest, the bounce frequency, {omega}{sub be}=k{radical}(e{phi}/m{sub e}), satisfies the trapping condition {omega}{sub be}t{sub sl}>2{pi} such that the wave frequency is nonlinearly downshifted by an amount proportional to the number of trapped electrons. Here, k is the wavenumber of the plasma wave and {phi} is its electric potential. For sufficiently short times, the magnitude of the negative frequency shift is a local function of {phi}. Because the trapping frequency shift is negative, the phase of the wave on axis lags the off-axis phase if the trapping nonlinearity dominates linear wave diffraction. In this case, the phasefronts are curved in a focusing sense. In the opposite limit, the phasefronts are curved in a defocusing sense. Analysis and simulations in which the wave amplitude and transverse width are varied establish criteria for the development of each type of wavefront. The damping and trapped-electron-induced focusing of the finite-amplitude electron plasma wave are also simulated. The damping rate of the field energy of the wave is found to be about the sideloss rate, {nu}{sub e{approx}}t{sub sl}{sup -1}. For large wave amplitudes or widths {Delta}y, a trapping-induced self-focusing of the wave is demonstrated.

Banks, J. W.; Berger, R. L.; Cohen, B. I.; Hittinger, J. A. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Brunner, S. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Runtime Tracing of The Community Earth System Model: Feasibility and Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Community Earth System Models (CESM) is one of US's leading earth system modeling systems, which has over decades of development history and embraced by large, active user communities. In this paper, we first review the history of CESM software development and layout the general objectives of performance analysis. Then we present an offline global community land model simulation within the CESM framework to demonstrate the procedure of runtime tracing of CESM using the Vampir toolset. Finally, we explain the benefits of runtime tracing to the general earth system modeling community. We hope those considerations can also be beneficial to many other modeling research programs involving legacy high-performance computing applications.

Wang, Dali [ORNL; Domke, Jens [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Equations for static vacuum solutions arising from trace dynamics modifications to gravitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive the equations governing static, spherically symmetric vacuum solutions to the Einstein equations as modified by the frame-dependent effective action arising from trace dynamics. We give several equivalent forms of the master second order, nonlinear differential equation implied by the trace dynamics effective action, and calculate the leading perturbative correction to the Schwarzschild metric. We then analyze the master equation in the regimes $r \\to 0$, $r \\to \\infty$, and $0symmetric case, we calculate the leading effective action corrections to the spatial components of the Einstein equations, which furnish the starting point for a similar analysis (yet to be done) of the static, axially symmetric case.

Stephen L. Adler

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

260

Trace element speciation under coal fired power station conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal combustion from power stations is one of the largest contributors of potentially toxic trace elements to the environment. Some trace elements may be released in range of valencies, often with varying toxicity and bioavailability. Hence, determination ... Keywords: arsenic, chromium, coal combustion, mercury, selenium, speciation, trace elements

Pushan Shah; Vladimir Strezov; Peter F. Nelson

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trap trace analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Inhibition of the current-driven ion wave instability by electron trapping in the FM-1 spherator  

SciTech Connect

An experimental analysis is made of the scattering of microwaves by the density fluctuations due to the current-driven ion wave instability in a toroidal plasma confinement device, the FM-1 spherator. It is found that the instability exists in the collisional regime and it is inhibited (i.e., quenched by two orders in magnitude) in the trapped-electron (i.e., banana) regime. The inhibition occurs when the electron collision frequency is about equal to the electron bounce frequency between mirror trapping. (auth)

Arunasalam, V.; Okabayaski, M.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Suckewer, S.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Progress towards high precision measurements on ultracold metastable hydrogen and trapping deuterium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) not achieve deuterium trapping through helium-surface cooling. It is proposed that buffer gas loading can be used to cryogenically cool and trap deuterium.

Steinberger, Julia K., 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Using malaise traps to sample ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae).  

SciTech Connect

Pitfall traps provide an easy and inexpensive way to sample ground-dwelling arthropods (Spence and Niemela 1994; Spence et al. 1997; Abildsnes and Tommeras 2000) and have been used exclusively in many studies of the abundance and diversity of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Despite the popularity of this trapping technique, pitfall traps have many disadvantages. For example, they often fail to collect both small (Spence and Niemela 1994) and �¢����trap-shy�¢��� species (Benest 1989), eventually deplete the local carabid population (Digweed et al. 1995), require a species to be ground-dwelling in order to be captured (Liebherr and Mahar 1979), and produce different results depending on trap diameter and material, type of preservative used, and trap placement (Greenslade 1964; Luff 1975; Work et al. 2002). Further complications arise from seasonal patterns of movement among the beetles themselves (Maelfait and Desender 1990), as well as numerous climatic factors, differences in plant cover, and variable surface conditions (Adis 1979). Because of these limitations, pitfall trap data give an incomplete picture of the carabid community and should be interpreted carefully. Additional methods, such as use of Berlese funnels and litter washing (Spence and Niemela 1994), collection from lights (Usis and MacLean 1998), and deployment of flight intercept devices (Liebherr and Mahar 1979; Paarmann and Stork 1987), should be incorporated in surveys to better ascertain the species composition and relative numbers of ground beetles. Flight intercept devices, like pitfall traps, have the advantage of being easy to use and replicate, but their value to carabid surveys is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of Malaise traps for sampling ground beetles in a bottomland hardwood forest.

Ulyshen, Michael D., James L. Hanula, and Scott Horn

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Ray-tracing Procedural Displacement Shaders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Displacement maps and procedural displacement shaders are a widely used approach of specifying geometric detail and increasing the visual complexity of a scene. While it is relatively straightforward to handle displacement shaders in pipeline based rendering systems such as the Reyes-architecture, it is much harder to efficiently integrate displacement-mapped surfaces in ray-tracers. Many commercial ray-tracers tessellate the surface into a multitude of small triangles. This introduces a series of problems such as excessive memory consumption and possibly undetected surface detail. In this paper we describe a novel way of ray-tracing procedural displacement shaders directly, that is, without introducing intermediate geometry. Affine arithmetic is used to compute bounding boxes for the shader over any range in the parameter domain. The method is comparable to the direct ray-tracing of B'ezier surfaces and implicit surfaces using B'ezier clipping and interval methods, respectively. Keyw...

Wolfgang Heidrich; Hans-peter Seidel

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Double-well magnetic trap for Bose-Einstein condensates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a magnetic trapping scheme for neutral atoms based on a hybrid of Ioffe-Pritchard and Time-averaged Orbiting Potential traps. The resulting double-well magnetic potential has readily controllable barrier height and well separation. This offers a new tool for studying the behavior of Bose condensates in double-well potentials, including atom interferometry and Josephson tunneling. We formulate a description for the potential of this magnetic trap and discuss practical issues such as loading with atoms, evaporative cooling and manipulating the potential.

N. R. Thomas; C. J. Foot; A. C. Wilson

2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

266

Steam Trap Testing and Evaluation: An Actual Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With rising steam costs and a high failure rate on the Joliet Plants standard steam trap, a testing and evaluation program was begun to find a steam trap that would work at Olin-Joliet. The basis was to conduct the test on the actual process equipment and that a minimum life be achieved. This paper deals with the history of the steam system/condensate systems, the setting up of the testing procedure, which traps were and were not tested and the results of the testing program to date.

Feldman, A. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Searching fast for a target on a DNA without falling to traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genomic expression depends critically both on the ability of regulatory proteins to locate specific target sites on a DNA within seconds and on the formation of long lived (many minutes) complexes between these proteins and the DNA. Equilibrium experiments show that indeed regulatory proteins bind tightly to their target site. However, they also find strong binding to other non-specific sites which act as traps that can dramatically increase the time needed to locate the target. This gives rise to a conflict between the speed and stability requirements. Here we suggest a simple mechanism which can resolve this long-standing paradox by allowing the target sites to be located by proteins within short time scales even in the presence of traps. Our theoretical analysis shows that the mechanism is robust in the presence of generic disorder in the DNA sequence and does not require a specially designed target site.

O. Bénichou; Y. Kafri; M. Sheinman; R. Voituriez

2009-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

268

Polish permian basin: Lithofacies traps for gas within the Rotliegende deposits as a new exploration potential  

SciTech Connect

Rotliegende deposits are the most prospective reservoir gas rocks in the Polish Permian basin. Thirty years of their exploration have led to location of numerous gas fields in the upper-most part of these series, particularly in the area of the Fore-Sudetic monocline. Up to this time, exploration studies concentrated mainly on structural objects, and most of the structures were positive gas traps. Well and seismic data also indicate an occurrence of lithofacies gas traps; they occur mainly in the sandstone zones within the fanglomerates surrounding the Wolsztyn Ridge. When comparing the facies regularities in the known gas fields in the German Permian basin (interfingering sandstones and claystones) to the facies patterns of the Polish Permian basin, one may suspect similar exploration possibilities. These are the first promising results. Advances in analysis of the Rotliegende depositional systems will enable us to create a new exploration potential.

Karnkowski, P.H. (Warsaw Univ., Warsaw (Poland))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Charge Trapping in Bright and Dark States of Coupled PbS Quantum Dot Films  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of photoluminescence (PL) from chemically treated lead sulfide (PbS) quantum dot (QD) films versus temperature reveals the effects of QD size and ligand binding on the motion of carriers between bright and dark trap states. For strongly coupled QDs, the PL exhibits temperature-dependent quenching and shifting consistent with charges residing in a shallow exponential tail of quasi-localized states below the band gap. The depth of the tail varies from 15 to 40 meV, similar to or smaller than exponential band tail widths measured for polycrystalline Si. The trap state distribution can be manipulated with QD size and surface treatment, and its characterization should provide a clearer picture of charge separation and percolation in disordered QD films than what currently exists.

Gao, J.; Johnson, J. C.

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

270

An Energy Signature Scheme for Steam Trap Assessment and Flow Rate Estimation Using Pipe-Induced Acoustic Measurements  

SciTech Connect

The US Congress has passed legislation dictating that all government agencies establish a plan and process for improving energy efficiencies at their sites. In response to this legislation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently conducted a pilot study to explore the deployment of a wireless sensor system for a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization framework within the steam distribution system within the ORNL campus. We make assessments on the real-time status of the distribution system by observing the state measurements of acoustic sensors mounted on the steam pipes/traps/valves. In this paper, we describe a spectral-based energy signature scheme that interprets acoustic vibration sensor data to estimate steam flow rates and assess steam traps health status. Experimental results show that the energy signature scheme has the potential to identify different steam trap health status and it has sufficient sensitivity to estimate steam flow rate. Moreover, results indicate a nearly quadratic relationship over the test region between the overall energy signature factor and flow rate in the pipe. The analysis based on estimated steam flow and steam trap status helps generate alerts that enable operators and maintenance personnel to take remedial action. The goal is to achieve significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam pipes/traps/valves.

Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Allgood, Glenn O [ORNL; Kuruganti, Phani Teja [ORNL; Lake, Joe E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Study of Ion Cooling and Ejection from Two Stage Linear Quadrupole Ion Trap consisted of RFQ ion guides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ion Cooling and Ejection from Two Stage Linear Quadrupole Ion Trap consisted of RFQ ion guides Ion Cooling and Ejection from Two Stage Linear Quadrupole Ion Trap consisted of RFQ ion guides Kozlovskiy V.I., Filatov V. V., Shchepunov (UNIRIB, O.R.A.U. Oak Ridge, TN, USA) V. A., Brusov V. S., Pikhtelev A. R., Zelenov V. V. Introduction The primary objective of this work concerns linear quadrupole ion traps, which are commonly used to interface a continuous ion beam from an external source with a mass analyzer, requiring bunched or pulsed beams. We assume that the ions prepared for mass analysis, are well spatially shaped, and normalized by ion kinetic energy. (Slava, I don't understand the meaning of the previous sentence - I wrote it as I interpreted what you are saying - I may be all wrong) In our work, such a device was developed and built to interface a source of continuous ion beams and a

272

Operation of the Lower Granite Dam Adult Trap, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 2008 we operated the adult salmonid trap at Lower Granite Dam from 7 March through 25 November, except during a short summer period when water temperatures were too high to safely handle fish. We collected and handled a total of 20,463 steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss and radio-tagged 34 of the hatchery steelhead. We took scale samples from 3,724 spring/summer Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha for age and genetic analysis. We collected and handled a total of 8,254 fall Chinook salmon. Of those fish, 2,520 adults and 942 jacks were transported to Lyons Ferry Hatchery on the Snake River in Washington. In addition, 961 adults and 107 jacks were transported to the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery on the Clearwater River in Idaho. The remaining 3,724 fall Chinook salmon were passed upstream. Scales samples were taken from 780 fall Chinook salmon tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and collected by the sort-by-code system.

Harmon, Jerrel R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Purple traps yield Reservation's first detection of Emerald Ash Borer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

traps yield Reservation's first detection of Emerald Ash Borer traps yield Reservation's first detection of Emerald Ash Borer The question of whether or not DOE's forests are infested with Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has been answered. On May 10, a trap on Highway 95 at the Highway 58 interchange produced the first instance of the destructive non-native insect in Roane County. Five days later, a second trap on Bethel Valley Road near the East Portal turned up the first capture in Anderson County. "Unfortunately, these finds signal the beginning of a decline of ash species throughout the reservation" according to Greg Byrd, forester with the ORNL Natural Resources Program. "Dieback will become more prominent as the insect populations expand. Native ash trees have little defense against this pest, which was

274

Novel trapping techniques for shaping Bose-Einstein condensates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combination of radio frequency radiation and magnetic field gradients was used to trap atoms in dressed states. In a magnetic field with a quadrupole minimum. RF fields resonant with the (I F. m)) 11. -1) -- 1, 0) ...

Boyd, Micah (Micah Scott)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

A Model for Vortex-Trapped Internal Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regions of negative vorticity are observed to trap and amplify near-inertial internal waves, which are sources of turbulent mixing 10–100 times higher than typically found in the stratified ocean interior. Because these regions are of finite ...

Eric Kunze; Emmanuel Boss

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

On the Damping of Free Coastal-Trapped Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A perturbative method is presented for estimating the decay time of subinertial coastal-trapped waves under a wide range of conditions where damping is relatively weak. Bottom friction is sometimes much more important than “long-wave” results ...

K. H. Brink

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

278

Energy Trapping near the Equator in a Numerical Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The trapped equatorial standing modes described theoretically by Gent (1979) are reproduced in a single vertical-mode numerical ocean model. integrations are carried out in domains whose longitudinal extents are characteristic of the widths of ...

Peter R. Gent; Albert J. Semtner Jr.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Trapped Lee Wave Interference in the Presence of Surface Friction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trapped lee wave interference over double bell-shaped obstacles in the presence of surface friction is examined. Idealized high-resolution numerical experiments with the nonhydrostatic Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) ...

Ivana Stiperski; Vanda Grubiši?

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

From transistor to trapped-ion computers for quantum chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last few decades, quantum chemistry has progressed through the development of computational methods based on modern digital computers. However, these methods can hardly fulfill the exponentially-growing resource requirements when applied to large quantum systems. As pointed out by Feynman, this restriction is intrinsic to all computational models based on classical physics. Recently, the rapid advancement of trapped-ion technologies has opened new possibilities for quantum control and quantum simulations. Here, we present an efficient toolkit that exploits both the internal and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions for solving problems in quantum chemistry, including molecular electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and vibronic coupling. We focus on applications that go beyond the capacity of classical computers, but may be realizable on state-of-the-art trapped-ion systems. These results allow us to envision a new paradigm of quantum chemistry that shifts from the current transistor to a near-future trapped-ion-based technology.

M. -H. Yung; J. Casanova; A. Mezzacapo; J. McClean; L. Lamata; A. Aspuru-Guzik; E. Solano

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trap trace analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Life Cycle of a Linear Coastal-Trapped Disturbance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent climatology of observed coastal-trapped disturbances in the marine atmospheric boundary layer along the United States west coast motivates the detailed examination, for a specific form of imposed forcing, of a linear shallow-water ...

R. M. Samelson; A. M. Rogerson

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Light trapping limits in plasmonic solar cells: an analytical investigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analytically investigate the light trapping performance in plasmonic solar cells with Si/metallic structures. We consider absorption enhancements for surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at planar Si/metal interfaces and ...

Sheng, Xing

283

Heating of trapped ions from the quantum ground state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have investigated motional heating of laser-cooled 9Be+ ions held in radio-frequency (Paul) traps. We have measured heating rates in a variety of traps with different geometries, electrode materials, and characteristic sizes. The results show that heating is due to electric-field noise from the trap electrodes which exerts a stochastic fluctuating force on the ion. The scaling of the heating rate with trap size is much stronger than that expected from a spatially uniform noise source on the electrodes (such as Johnson noise from external circuits), indicating that a microscopic uncorrelated noise source on the electrodes (such as fluctuating patch-potential fields) is a more likely candidate for the source of heating.

Q. A. Turchette; D. Kielpinski; B. E. King; D. Leibfried; D. M. Meekhof; C. J. Myatt; M. A. Rowe; C. A. Sackett; C. S. Wood; W. M. Itano; C. Monroe; D. J. Wineland

2000-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

284

Dissipative trapped electron modes in ell = 2 torsatrons  

SciTech Connect

Trapped electron modes in stellarators can be more unstable than those in tokamaks. They could be easier to detect in a stellarator and may be responsible for anomalous losses in the low collisionality regime. 5 refs., 1 fig.

Carreras, B.A.; Dominguez, N.; Lynch, V.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Diamond, P.H. (California Univ., San Diego, CA (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Quantum gates, sensors, and systems with trapped ions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum information science promises a host of new and useful applications in communication, simulation, and computational algorithms. Trapped atomic ions are one of the leading physical systems with potential to implement ...

Wang, Shannon Xuanyue

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Laser-driven Sisyphus cooling in an optical dipole trap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a laser-driven Sisyphus-cooling scheme for atoms confined in a far-off resonance optical dipole trap. Utilizing the differential trap-induced ac Stark shift, two electronic levels of the atom are resonantly coupled by a cooling laser preferentially near the trap bottom. After absorption of a cooling photon, the atom loses energy by climbing the steeper potential, and then spontaneously decays preferentially away from the trap bottom. The proposed method is particularly suited to cooling alkaline-earth-metal-like atoms where two-level systems with narrow electronic transitions are present. Numerical simulations for the cases of {sup 88}Sr and {sup 174}Yb demonstrate the expected recoil and Doppler temperature limits. The method requires a relatively small number of scattered photons and can potentially lead to phase-space densities approaching quantum degeneracy in subsecond time scales.

Ivanov, Vladyslav V.; Gupta, Subhadeep [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Physics Department, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Neutron lifetime measurements using gravitationally trapped ultracold neutrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our experiment using gravitationally trapped ultracold neutrons (UCN) to measure the neutron lifetime is reviewed. Ultracold neutrons were trapped in a material bottle covered with perfluoropolyether. The neutron lifetime was deduced from comparison of UCN losses in the traps with different surface-to-volume ratios. The precise value of the neutron lifetime is of fundamental importance to particle physics and cosmology. In this experiment, the UCN storage time is brought closer to the neutron lifetime than in any experiments before:the probability of UCN losses from the trap was only 1% of that for neutron beta decay. The neutron lifetime obtained,878.5+/-0.7stat+/-0.3sys s, is the most accurate experimental measurement to date.

A. P. Serebrov; V. E. Varlamov; A. G. Kharitonov; A. K. Fomin; Yu. N. Pokotilovski; P. Geltenbort; I. A. Krasnoschekova; M. S. Lasakov; R. R. Taldaev; A. V. Vassiljev; O. M. Zherebtsov

2007-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

288

Energy Conservation in Coastal-Trapped Wave Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A consideration of energy conservation for coastal-trapped waves shows that, for a slowly varying medium, the normalization of the wave modes is not arbitrary. Errors related to incorrect normalization are demonstrated for a simple analytic ...

K. H. Brink

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Fuel traps: mapping stability via water association.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen storage is a key enabling technology required for attaining a hydrogen-based economy. Fundamental research can reveal the underlying principles controlling hydrogen uptake and release by storage materials, and also aid in characterizing and designing novel storage materials. New ideas for hydrogen storage materials come from exploiting the properties of hydrophobic hydration, which refers to water s ability to stabilize, by its mode of association, specific structures under specific conditions. Although hydrogen was always considered too small to support the formation of solid clathrate hydrate structures, exciting new experiments show that water traps hydrogen molecules at conditions of low temperatures and moderate pressures. Hydrogen release is accomplished by simple warming. While these experiments lend credibility to the idea that water could form an environmentally attractive alternative storage compound for hydrogen fuel, which would advance our nation s goals of attaining a hydrogen-based economy, much work is yet required to understand and realize the full potential of clathrate hydrates for hydrogen storage. Here we undertake theoretical studies of hydrogen in water to establish a firm foundation for predictive work on clathrate hydrate H{sub 2} storage capabilities. Using molecular simulation and statistical mechanical theories based in part on quantum mechanical descriptions of molecular interactions, we characterize the interactions between hydrogen and liquid water in terms of structural and thermodynamic properties. In the process we validate classical force field models of hydrogen in water and discover new features of hydrophobic hydration that impact problems in both energy technology and biology. Finally, we predict hydrogen occupancy in the small and large cages of hydrogen clathrate hydrates, a property unresolved by previous experimental and theoretical work.

Rempe, Susan L.; Clawson, Jacalyn S.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Alam, Todd M; Leung, Kevin; Varma, Sameer; Sabo, Dubravko; Martin, Marcus Gary; Cygan, Randall Timothy

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Plant View On Reducing Steam Trap Energy Loss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy will continue to be an ever increasingly important factor in the cost of doing business in the decade of the 80' s. In many petrochemical industries, energy is the second most costly item in producing a product. About 36% of our nation's total energy consumption is used by industry in producing the goods which are consumed around the world. Steam is the most commonly used energy source for the petrochemical industry. Most of this steam is used for heating and evaporating the many petrochemical liquids. This steam is then condensed and is removed from the system at the same rate as it is being formed or the loss of heat transfer will result. From a cost standpoint only condensate should be allowed through the trap. But at many plants half of the steam traps are passing excess steam. This is caused by neglect of aged steam traps which have worn out and misapplication of steam traps by oversizing or using the 'wrong' type trap. Elimination of steam wastes by an effective well engineered steam trap program is what is covered by this article.

Vallery, S. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Signal Enhancement Magnetic Trap - Microchip Appratus and ...  

Sample volumes required for molecular diagnostic analysis such as PCR are up to one million times smaller than current commercial instruments;

292

Structural evolution of the Permian-Triassic Cooper basin, Australia: Relation to hydrocarbon trap styles  

SciTech Connect

The structural and depositional history of the Cooper basin in eastern central Australia has revealed that the basin is a mildly compressional structural depression controlled by northwestrending and northeast-trending pre-Permian basement features. Pronounced pre-Permian compressions are indicated by northeast-trending major structures, the Gidgealpa-Merrimelia-Innamincka and Murteree-Nappacoongee trends. Detailed chronostratigraphic facies analysis, with closely spaced palynological control, of the Patchawarra Formation revealed that two pronounced phases of uplift occurred during the Sakmarian. The major intrabasin highs were rejuvenated during these tectonic events, as documented by crestal unconformities (middle and upper Patchawarra unconformities). Evidence of each event is dominantly tectonic in character, with similar depositional patterns over these highs related to each event. These events are also recognizable in midflank areas and basin margins with contemporaneous deposition in deeper parts of the basin. Results from this research show potential for future hydrocarbon discoveries within structural, stratigraphic, and structural/stratigraphic traps in the Cooper basin. Various trap styles are closely associated with faults, unconformities, and lateral facies changes. Lowside fault closures, onlap plays, and unconformity traps are expected to be well developed along intrabasinal highs, basin margins, and preexisting structures. The primary reservoir targets would be deltaic sequences comprising shoreline sandstones, distributary and delta-mouth bar deposits that may be well developed in synclinal areas, and flanks of intrabasin highs in the Copper basin.

Apak, S.N. [Geological Survey of Western Australia, East Perth (Australia); Stuart, W.J.; Lemon, N.M. [Univ. of Adelaide (Australia); Wood, G. [Santos Ltd., Adelaide (Australia)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Trapping of antiprotons -- a first step on the way to antihydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A first step towards producing and effectively utilizing antihydrogen atoms consists of trapping antiprotons. The immediate next step must then be to control, i.e. trap the produced antihydrogen. The current state of the art in trapping antiprotons and positrons is reviewed, and the challenges in trapping the resulting neutral particles are discussed.

Holzscheiter, M.H.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Electron cyclotron resonance near the axis of the gas-dynamic trap  

SciTech Connect

Propagation of an extraordinary electromagnetic wave in the vicinity of electron cyclotron resonance surface in an open linear trap is studied analytically, taking into account inhomogeneity of the magnetic field in paraxial approximation. Ray trajectories are derived from a reduced dispersion equation that makes it possible to avoid the difficulty associated with a transition from large propagation angles to the case of strictly longitudinal propagation. Our approach is based on the theory, originally developed by Zvonkov and Timofeev [Sov. J. Plasma Phys. 14, 743 (1988)], who used the paraxial approximation for the magnetic field strength, but did not consider the slope of the magnetic field lines, which led to considerable error, as has been recently noted by Gospodchikov and Smolyakova [Plasma Phys. Rep. 37, 768-774 (2011)]. We have found ray trajectories in analytic form and demonstrated that the inhomogeneity of both the magnetic field strength and the field direction can qualitatively change the picture of wave propagation and significantly affect the efficiency of electron cyclotron heating of a plasma in a linear magnetic trap. Analysis of the ray trajectories has revealed a criterion for the resonance point on the axis of the trap to be an attractor for the ray trajectories. It is also shown that a family of ray trajectories can still reach the resonance point on the axis if the latter generally repels the ray trajectories. As an example, results of general theory are applied to the electron cyclotron resonance heating experiment which is under preparation on the gas dynamic trap in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics [Shalashov et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 052503 (2012)].

Bagulov, D. S. [Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova Street 2, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kotelnikov, I. A. [Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova Street 2, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akademika Lavrentyeva Prospect 11, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

ScalaTrace: Scalable Compression and Replay of Communication Traces for High Performance Computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterizing the communication behavior of large-scale applications is a difficult and costly task due to code/system complexity and long execution times. While many tools to study this behavior have been developed, these approaches either aggregate information in a lossy way through high-level statistics or produce huge trace files that are hard to handle. We contribute an approach that provides orders of magnitude smaller, if not near-constant size, communication traces regardless of the number of nodes while preserving structural information. We introduce intra- and inter-node compression techniques of MPI events that are capable of extracting an application's communication structure. We further present a replay mechanism for the traces generated by our approach and discuss results of our implementation for BlueGene/L. Given this novel capability, we discuss its impact on communication tuning and beyond. To the best of our knowledge, such a concise representation of MPI traces in a scalable manner combined with deterministic MPI call replay are without any precedent.

Noeth, M; Ratn, P; Mueller, F; Schulz, M; de Supinski, B R

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

296

System and method for trapping and measuring a charged particle in a liquid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for trapping a charged particle is disclosed. A time-varying periodic multipole electric potential is generated in a trapping volume. A charged particle under the influence of the multipole electric field is confined to the trapping volume. A three electrode configuration giving rise to a 3D Paul trap and a four planar electrode configuration giving rise to a 2D Paul trap are disclosed.

Reed, Mark A; Krstic, Predrag S; Guan, Weihua; Zhao, Xiongce

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

297

Trace metals in sediments of coastal Siberia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the work described in this thesis, a total of 218 samples from 104 cores from the East Siberian, Laptev, Kara, and Pechora Seas and the Ob and Yenisei Rivers were analyzed for the trace metals Ag, As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, and Zn. To make comparisons between locations easier, the concentration of all elements was normalized to Fe to account for variability in grain size and mineralogy. For the metals Ag, Cd, and Hg there was poor correlation with Fe, likely partially due to analytical variations caused by the low concentrations of these elements. Copper, Ni and Zn showed good correlation with Fe, suggesting these elements are from natural inputs to the sediments. Arsenic, Ba, Cr, Pb, and Sb showed variable correlations, suggesting a more mafic (basaltic) mineral phase at some locations and/or diagenetic redistribution of these metals. No statistically significant differences were found between metal to Fe ratios at the surface (0-2.5 cm) of the sediment cores and the bottoms (5- 1 00 cm), with a few exceptions. There was also no statistically significant difference in the average metal to Fe ratios of the East Siberian and Laptev Seas. There was, however, a significant difference when these two seas were compared to the Kara and Pechora Seas, suggesting different mineralogy in the drainage basins of eastern and western Siberia. Sediment from the Kara Sea was similar in trace metal concentration to sediment from its likely source, the Ob and Yenisei rivers.

Esnough, Teresa Elizabeth

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Particle Accelerator & X-Ray Optics | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hard X-Ray Quad Collimator Facilitates Microcrystallography Experiments Isotopic Abundance in Atom Trap Trace Analysis Nanomaterials Analysis using a Scanning Electron Microscope...

299

Cosmological perturbations from inhomogeneous preheating and multi-field trapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider inhomogeneous preheating in a multi-field trapping model. The curvature perturbation is generated by inhomogeneous preheating which induces multi-field trapping at the enhanced symmetric point (ESP), and results in fluctuation in the number of e-foldings. Instead of considering simple reheating after preheating, we consider a scenario of shoulder inflation induced by the trapping. The fluctuation in the number of e-foldings is generated during this weak inflationary period, when the additional light scalar field is trapped at the local maximum of its potential. The situation may look similar to locked or thermal inflation or even to hybrid inflation, but we will show that the present mechanism of generating the curvature perturbation is very different from these others. Unlike the conventional trapped inflationary scenario, we do not make the assumption that an ESP appears at some unstable point on the inflaton potential. This assumption is crucial in the original scenario, but it is not important in the multi-field model. We also discuss inhomogeneous preheating at late-time oscillation, in which the magnitude of the curvature fluctuation can be enhanced to accommodate low inflationary scale.

Tomohiro Matsuda

2007-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

300

Trapped electron losses by interactions with coherent VLF waves  

SciTech Connect

VLF whistler waves from lightning enter the magnetosphere and cause the precipitation of energetic trapped electrons by pitch angle scattering. These events, known as Lightning-induced Electron Precipitation (LEP) have been detected by satellite and rocket instruments and by perturbations of VLF waves traveling in the earth-ionosphere waveguide. Detailed comparison of precipitating electron energy spectra and time dependence are in general agreement with calculations of trapped electron interactions with ducted whistler waves. In particular the temporal structure of the precipitation and the dynamic energy spectra of the electrons confirm this interpretation of the phenomena. There are discrepancies between observed and measured electron flux intensities and pitch angle distributions, but these quantities are sensitive to unknown wave intensities and trapped particle fluxes near the loss cone angle. The overall effect of lightning generated VLF waves on the lifetime of trapped electrons is still uncertain. The flux of electrons deflected into the bounce loss cone by a discrete whistler wave has been measured in a few cases. However, the area of the precipitation region is not known, and thus the total number of electrons lost in an LEP event can only be estimated. While the LEP events are dramatic, more important effects on trapped electrons may arise from the small but numerous deflections which increase the pitch angle diffusion rate of the electron population. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Walt, M.; Inan, U.S. [Space, Telecommunications and Radioscience Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Voss, H.D. [Lockheed Missiles and Space Co. (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trap trace analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Leaching of Trace Elements From Highway Materials Stabilized ...  

Leaching of Trace Elements From Highway Materials Stabilized with Coal Fly Ash Craig H. Benson, PhD, PE Professor, Geo Engineering Program Dept. of ...

302

Graphics: Atmospheric Trace Gases in Whole-Air Samples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphics graphics Graphics: Atmospheric Trace Gases in Whole-Air Samples The following links are for methane, nonmethane hydrocarbons, alkyl nitrates, and chlorinated carbon...

303

Trace Element Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area (Christensen...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fluid conduits; and (5) deposits of calcium carbonate where flashing of brine to steam due to pressure release has occurred. References Odin D. Christensen, Regina A....

304

Precise trace rare earth analysis by radiochemical neutron activation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rare earth group separation scheme followed by normal Ge(Li), low energy photon detector (LEPD), and Ge(Li)-NaI(Tl) coincidence-noncoincidence spectrometry significantly enhances the detection sensitivity of individual rare earth elements (REE) at or below the ppB level. Based on the selected ..gamma..-ray energies, normal Ge(Li) counting is favored for /sup 140/La, /sup 170/Tb, and /sup 169/Yb; LEPD is favored for low ..gamma..-ray energies of /sup 147/Nd, /sup 153/Sm, /sup 166/Ho, and /sup 169/Yb; and noncoincidence counting is favored for /sup 141/Ce, /sup 143/Ce, /sup 142/Pr, /sup 153/Sm, /sup 171/Er, and /sup 175/Yb. The detection of radionuclides /sup 152m/Eu, /sup 159/Gd, and /sup 177/Lu is equally sensitive by normal Ge(Li) and noncoincidence counting; /sup 152/Eu is equally sensitive by LEPD and normal Ge(Li); and /sup 153/Gd and /sup 170/Tm is equally favored by all the counting modes. Overall, noncoincidence counting is favored for most of the REE. Precise measurements of the REE were made in geological and biological standards.

Laul, J.C.; Lepel, E.A.; Weimer, W.C.; Wogman, N.A.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Trace-based performance analysis for the petascale simulation code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with similarly sized mice (Riskin and Hermanson, 2005) suggests that vampire bats might even consume less energy (Chiroptera) are generally awkward crawlers, but the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) and the New a single kinematic gait shift with increasing speed from a kinetic walk (where kinetic and potential energy

Dongarra, Jack

306

Large Event Traces in Parallel Performance Analysis Felix Wolf1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- loaded once a month. Using software specifically designed for viewing the data, we can separate out as humans. Vampire Bats? The legend of Dracula, the human vampire, arose long before real blood-drinking bats were even discovered in South America. Vampire bats (of which there are 3 species) were actually

Freitag, Felix

307

Recent progress in tailoring trap-based positron beams  

SciTech Connect

Recent progress is described to implement two approaches to specially tailor trap-based positron beams. Experiments and simulations are presented to understand the limits on the energy spread and pulse duration of positron beams extracted from a Penning-Malmberg (PM) trap after the particles have been buffer-gas cooled (or heated) in the range of temperatures 1000 {>=} T {>=} 300 K. These simulations are also used to predict beam performance for cryogenically cooled positrons. Experiments and simulations are also presented to understand the properties of beams formed when plasmas are tailored in a PM trap in a 5 tesla magnetic field, then non-adiabatically extracted from the field using a specially designed high-permeability grid to create a new class of electrostatically guided beams.

Natisin, M. R.; Hurst, N. C.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M. [Physics Department, University of California, San Diego La Jolla CA 92093-0319 (United States)

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

308

Storing Electrons Instead of Positrons Without Trapping of Positive Ions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrons Instead of Positrons Without Electrons Instead of Positrons Without Trapping of Positive Ions LS-75 T. K. Khoe October, 1986 In this note, a procedure to inject and store electrons in the ring without trapping ions will be described. The minimum injection current per bunch below which ion trapping occur will be determined. Since the vertical beam size is smaller than the horizontal beam size, we will consider the vertical motion only. The following assumptions are made: 1. The bunch period is much longer than the bunch length. This assumption allow us to use the thin lens approximation for the focusing effect of the electron bunch. 2. The bunch length is much larger than the transverse dimensions of the beam. A two-dimensional calculation can then be used to obtain the

309

Formation of Antihydrogen Rydberg atoms in strong magnetic field traps  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that several features of antihydrogen production in nested Penning traps can be described with accurate and efficient Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that cold deeply-bound Rydberg states of antihydrogen (H-bar) are produced in three-body capture in the ATRAP experiments and an additional formation mechanism -Rydberg charge transfer-, particular to the nested Penning trap geometry, is responsible for the observed fast (hot) H-bar atoms. Detailed description of the numerical propagation technique for following extreme close encounters is given. An analytic derivation of the power law behavior of the field ionization spectrum is provided.

Pohl, T.; Sadeghpour, H. R. [ITAMP, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge MA 02138 (United States)

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

310

Electron Trapping in Shear Alfven Waves that Power the Aurora  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from 1D Vlasov drift-kinetic plasma simulations reveal how and where auroral electrons are accelerated along Earth's geomagnetic field. In the warm plasma sheet, electrons become trapped in shear Alfven waves, preventing immediate wave damping. As waves move to regions with larger v{sub Te}/v{sub A}, their parallel electric field decreases, and the trapped electrons escape their influence. The resulting electron distribution functions compare favorably with in situ observations, demonstrating for the first time a self-consistent link between Alfven waves and electrons that form aurora.

Watt, Clare E. J.; Rankin, Robert [University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

Heating of trapped ions from the quantum ground state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have investigated motional heating of laser-cooled 9Be+ ions held inradio-frequency (Paul) traps. We have measured heating rates in a variety oftraps with different geometries, electrode materials, and characteristic sizes.The results show that heating is due to electric-field noise from the trapelectrodes which exerts a stochastic fluctuating force on the ion. The scalingof the heating rate with trap size is much stronger than that expected from aspatially uniform noise source on the electrodes (such as Johnson noise fromexternal circuits), indicating that a microscopic uncorrelated noise source onthe electrodes (such as fluctuating patch-potential fields) is a more likelycandidate for the source of heating.

Turchette, Q A; King, B E; Leibfried, D; Meekhof, D M; Myatt, C J; Rowe, M A; Sackett, C A; Wood, C S; Itano, W M; Monroe, C; Wineland, D J

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Casing design for trapped annular pressure buildup  

SciTech Connect

Conventional single-string analysis for casing design with annular-fluid expansion can underpredict or overpredict pressures between strings because multistring effects are neglected. Multiple-string systems with multiple sealed annuli behave as composite interactive systems. This paper presents a constitutive-based multistring analysis method for composite string effects and complex fluid behavior. The composite stiffness of cemented casings is determined from elastic stress/strain relationships, and the nonlinear fluid behavior is modeled by direct use of fluid PVT relations in the formulation and solution. The method is incorporated in a computer model linking comprehensive stress calculations to accurate temperature and pressure predictions. Sensitivity studies of the system response to various key parameters and operating conditions are presented, and comparisons are made with single-string analyses to demonstrate the strong interaction between casing strings.

Halal, A.S.; Mitchell, R.F. (Enertech Engineering Research Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Compact, fast and robust grids for ray tracing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of research in acceleration structures for ray tracing recently shifted from render time to time to image, the sum of build time and render time, and also the memory footprint of acceleration structures now receives more attention. In this ... Keywords: acceleration structure, grid, perfect hashing, ray tracing, row displacement compression

Ares Lagae; Philip Dutré

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Effect of Trace Elements on Anaerobic Digestion of Coking Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pretreatment of coking wastewater using ASBR was conducted at 35? in this paper. The addition of trace elements to the anaerobic reactor has positive effect on the anaerobic treatment of coking wastewater, but too much or too little of it will ... Keywords: trace elements, anaerobic digestion, coking wastewater

Yu-ying Li; Bing Li

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

A Beginner's Guide to the Use of the TRACE Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With deregulation increasing the number of bulk power transfers, more utility planners will be evaluating multi-area power transfer capability with programs such as EPRI's Transfer Capability Evaluation (TRACE). This manual will help TRACE users, particularly first-time users, develop their expertise with this sophisticated application.

1997-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

316

RPU: a programmable ray processing unit for realtime ray tracing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recursive ray tracing is a simple yet powerful and general approach for accurately computing global light transport and rendering high quality images. While recent algorithmic improvements and optimized parallel software implementations have increased ... Keywords: hardware architecture, programmable shading, ray processing unit, ray tracing

Sven Woop; Jörg Schmittler; Philipp Slusallek

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Naive ray-tracing: A divide-and-conquer approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an efficient ray-tracing algorithm which, for the first time, does not store any data structures when performing spatial subdivisions, and directly computes intersections inside the scene. This new algorithm is often faster than comparable ... Keywords: Ray tracing, divide-and-conquer, global illumination, rendering

Benjamin Mora

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Synthesis of Cold Antihydrogen in a Cusp Trap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report here the first successful synthesis of cold antihydrogen atoms employing a cusp trap, which consists of a superconducting anti-Helmholtz coil and a stack of multiple ring electrodes. This success opens a new path to make a stringent test of the CPT symmetry via high precision microwave spectroscopy of ground-state hyperfine transitions of antihydrogen atoms.

Enomoto, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Kanai, Y.; Mohri, A. [RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kuroda, N.; Kim, C. H.; Torii, H. A.; Fujii, K.; Ohtsuka, M.; Tanaka, K.; Matsuda, Y. [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Michishio, K.; Nagashima, Y. [Department of Physics, Tokyo University of Science, Kagurazaka, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan); Higaki, H. [Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Corradini, M.; Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V.; Venturelli, L.; Zurlo, N. [Dipartimento di Chimica e Fisica per l'Ingegneria e per i Materiali, Universita di Brescia and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Brescia, 25133 Brescia (Italy)

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

319

Detection of Magnetically Trapped Neutrons: Liquid Helium as a Scintillator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Daniel Nicholas McKinsey to The Department of Physics in partial fulfillment of the requirements February 2002 #12;c 2002 - Daniel Nicholas McKinsey All rights reserved. #12;To my parents #12;Thesis advisor Author John Morrissey Doyle Daniel Nicholas McKinsey Detection of Magnetically Trapped Neutrons

McKinsey, Daniel

320

Manipulation and assembly of nanowires with holographic optical traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate that semiconductor nanowires measuring just a few nanometers in diameter can be translated, rotated, cut, fused and organized into nontrivial structures using holographic optical traps. The holographic approach to nano-assembly allows for simultaneous independent manipulation of multiple nanowires, including relative translation and relative rotation.

Ritesh Agarwal; Kosta Ladavac; Yael Roichman; Guiha Yu; Charles M. Lieber; David G. Grier

2005-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trap trace analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

An investigation of the sub-grid variability of trace gases and aerosols for global climate modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One fundamental property and limitation of grid based models is their inability to identify spatial details smaller than the grid cell size. While decades of work have gone into developing sub-grid treatments for clouds and land surface processes in climate models, the quantitative understanding of sub-grid processes and variability for aerosols and their precursors is much poorer. In this study, WRF-Chem is used to simulate the trace gases and aerosols over central Mexico during the 2006 MILAGRO field campaign, with multiple spatial resolutions and emission/terrain scenarios. Our analysis focuses on quantifying the sub-grid variability (SGV) of trace gases and aerosols within a typical global climate model grid cell, i.e. 75x75 km2. Our results suggest that a simulation with 3-km horizontal grid spacing adequately reproduces the overall transport and mixing of trace gases and aerosols downwind of Mexico City, while 75-km horizontal grid spacing is insufficient to represent local emission and terrain-induced flows along the mountain ridge, subsequently affecting the transport and mixing of plumes from nearby sources. Therefore, the coarse model grid cell average may not correctly represent aerosol properties measured over polluted areas. Probability density functions (PDFs) for trace gases and aerosols show that secondary trace gases and aerosols, such as O3, sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate, are more likely to have a relatively uniform probability distribution (i.e. smaller SGV) over a narrow range of concentration values. Mostly inert and long-lived trace gases and aerosols, such as CO and BC, are more likely to have broad and skewed distributions (i.e. larger SGV) over polluted regions. Over remote areas, all trace gases and aerosols are more uniformly distributed compared to polluted areas. Both CO and O3 SGV vertical profiles are nearly constant within the PBL during daytime, indicating that trace gases are very efficiently transported and mixed vertically by turbulence. But, simulated horizontal variability indicates that trace gases and aerosols are not well mixed horizontally in the PBL. During nighttime the SGV for trace gases is maximum at the surface, and quickly decreases with height. Unlike the trace gases, the SGV of BC and secondary aerosols reaches a maximum at the PBL top during the day. The SGV decreases with distance away from the polluted urban area, has a more rapid decrease for long-lived trace gases and aerosols than for secondary ones, and is greater during daytime than nighttime. The SGV of trace gases and aerosols is generally larger than for meteorological quantities. Emissions can account for up to 50% of the SGV over urban areas such as Mexico City during daytime for less-reactive trace gases and aerosols, such as CO and BC. The impact of emission spatial variability on SGV decays with altitude in the PBL and is insignificant in the free troposphere. The emission variability affects SGV more significantly during daytime (rather than nighttime) and over urban (rather than rural or remote) areas. The terrain, through its impact on meteorological fields such as wind and the PBL structure, affects dispersion and transport of trace gases and aerosols and their SGV.

Qian, Yun; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

322

Fungal, bacterial, and archaeal communities mediating C cycling and trace gas flux in peatland ecosystems subject to climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fungal, bacterial, and archaeal communities mediating C cycling and trace gas flux in peatland microbial community profiling in a network of natural peatland ecosystems spanning large-scale climate the drivers of microbial community composition via metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analysis of samples from

323

Using RFID for tracing cumulated resources and emissions in supply chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The tracing of resources and emissions has been recognised increasingly important in supply chains. The developed traceability graph enables tracing of information associated with products and their parts. Tracing in a supply chain requires the three ...

Marko Junkkari; Antti Sirkka

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Z5, Effect of Traps Spatial Localization on GaN HEMT Static ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference Tools for 2010 Electronic Materials Conference ... In this work we discuss how trap state formation during reverse gate-source and ... by means of the commercial DESSIS-ISE (Synopsis Inc.) simulator showed that acceptor traps

325

Observations of Seasonal Variations in Atmospheric Greenhouse Trapping and Its Enhancement at High Sea Surface Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The correlation between observed values of atmospheric greenhouse trapping and sea surface temperature is found to vary seasonally. Atmospheric greenhouse trapping is defined here as the difference between infrared emissions from the earth's ...

Robert Hallberg; Anand K. Inamdar

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Finite-geometry models of electric field noise from patch potentials in ion traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We model electric field noise from fluctuating patch potentials on conducting surfaces by taking into account the finite geometry of the ion trap electrodes to gain insight into the origin of anomalous heating in ion traps. ...

Low, Guang Hao

327

Loading a planar RF Paul Trap from a cold Yb? source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we demonstrate a functioning planar radio frequency, three-rod Paul Trap, loaded with Yb+ ions that have been photoionized from a source of neutral atoms, which were cooled in a magneto-optical trap. Planar ...

Shields, Brendan John

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Use of Bullet Traps and Steel Targets - June 4, 2012 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Use of Bullet Traps and Steel Targets - June 4, 2012 Use of Bullet Traps and Steel Targets - June 4, 2012 June 4, 2012 This supplement contains the currently approved document, Use...

329

Microfabricated surface ion trap on a high-finesse optical mirror  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel approach to optics integration in ion traps is demonstrated based on a surface electrode ion trap that is microfabricated on top of a dielectric mirror. Additional optical losses due to fabrication are found to be ...

Herskind, Peter F.

330

Design of superconducting transmission line integrated surface-electrode ion-traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We fabricated superconducting surface electrode ion traps with integrated microwave coplanar waveguides using direct-write optical lithography and a niobium on sapphire process. We then tested these traps in a closed cycle ...

Meyer, David Thomas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

The Extension of Baroclinic Coastal-Trapped Wave Theory to Superinertial Frequencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of finding baroclinic coastal-trapped wave modes is generalized from subinertial to superinertial frequencies at which complete trapping can only occur in special cases. Modes are found by a numerical resonance searching method in ...

Andrew C. Dale; Toby J. Sherwin

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Mechanisms for Fluorescence Blinking and Charge Carrier Trapping in Single Semiconductor Nanocrystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trapping Mechanisms in Single CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots fromTrapping Mechanisms in Single CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots fromintermittency of single CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dot

Cordones, Amy Ashbrook

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Tracing the Impact of Bank Liquidity Shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While bank lending may fall in response to shocks to their liquidity, to what extent are such shocks transmitted to borrowing …rms? Tracing such transmission mechanisms has proven di ¢ cult in the past due to a lack of micro data linking banks to borrowing …rms and identi…cation concerns. This paper uses di¤erential liquidity shocks arising from unanticipated nuclear tests in Pakistan in 1998, and a dataset linking over 18; 000 …rms to all 145 banks to understand the full transmission mechanism. We isolate the causal impact of the bank lending channel by showing that for the same …rm borrowing from two di¤erent banks, its loan from the bank experiencing a 1 % larger decline in liquidity drops by an additional 0.6%. The liquidity shock also leads to large declines in the probability of continued lending to old clients, and extending credit to new ones. However, we …nd that …rms di¤er in their ability to compensate the bank lending channel shock. Larger …rms, while also facing a bank lending channel, are able to o¤set the adverse e¤ect by borrowing more from more liquid banks. Smaller …rms on the other hand are entiely unable to hedge out the bank lending channels. Consequently, a negative bank liquidity shock increases the

Asim Ijaz Khwaja; Atif Mian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Conversion of the trace elements Zn, Cd, and Pb in the combustion of near-Moscow coals  

SciTech Connect

A model for the conversion of trace elements in the combustion of near-Moscow coals based on a complex approach combining the capabilities of geochemistry, chemical thermodynamics, phase analysis, and chemical kinetics is proposed. The conversion of the trace elements Zn, Cd, and Pb as the constituents of near-Moscow coal in the flow of coal combustion products along the line of the P-59 boiler at the Ryazanskaya Thermal Power Plant was calculated. Experimental data were used in the development of the model and in calculations.

E.V. Samuilov; L.N. Lebedeva; L.S. Pokrovskaya; M.V. Faminskaya [OAO Power Engineering Institute, Moscow (Russia)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

Evaluation of Sorbent Trap Materials and Methods for Flue Gas Mercury Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sorbent traps are used as an alternative to continuous mercury monitors (CMM) for measuring vapor phase mercury concentrations in stacks of coal-fired power plants and for relative accuracy test audits (RATAs) of CMMs. EPRI has an ongoing program of research on sorbent trap methods, evaluating the performance of sorbent materials and the methods used to measure mercury on the sorbent traps. This report presents results of two investigations targeted at evaluating the performance of sorbent trap methods f...

2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

336

Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions  

SciTech Connect

Laser induced fluoresence (LIF) spectra (laser excitation spectra) are conceptually among the most simple spectra to obtain. One need only confine a gaseous sample in a suitable container, direct a laser along one axis of the container, and monitor the sample's fluorescence at a right angle to the laser beam. As the laser wavelength is changed, the changes in fluorescence intensity map the absorption spectrum of the sample. (More precisely, only absorption to states which have a significant radiative decay component are monitored.) For ion spectroscopy, one could benefit in many ways by such an experiment. Most optical ion spectra have been observed by emission techniques, and, aside from the problems of spectral analysis, discharge emission methods often produce the spectra of many species, some of which may be unknown or uncertain. Implicit in the description of LIF given above is certainty as to the chemical identity of the carrier of the spectrum. This article describes a method by which the simplifying aspects of LIF can be extended to molecular ions (albeit with a considerable increase in experimental complexity over that necessary for stable neutral molecules).

Winn, J.S.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The Algorithmic Beauty of Traces Using L-systems to Hilight Patterns ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 19, 1997 ... Characteristics of truth tables · Visualization of truth tables · L-systems · Visualization and observations on traces · A strategy for the 3-trace case.

338

Atom trapping in a bottle beam created by a diffractive optical element  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A diffractive optical element (DOE) has been fabricated for creating blue detuned atomic bottle beam traps. The DOE integrates several diffractive lenses for trap creation and imaging of atomic fluorescence. We characterize the performance of the DOE and demonstrate trapping of cold Cesium atoms inside a bottle beam.

V. V. Ivanov; J. A. Isaacs; M. Saffman; S. A. Kemme; A. R. Ellis; G. R. Brady; J. R. Wendt; G. W. Biedermann; S. Samora

2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

339

Atom trapping in a bottle beam created by a diffractive optical element  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A diffractive optical element (DOE) has been fabricated for creating blue detuned atomic bottle beam traps. The DOE integrates several diffractive lenses for trap creation and imaging of atomic fluorescence. We characterize the performance of the DOE and demonstrate trapping of cold Cesium atoms inside a bottle beam.

Ivanov, V V; Saffman, M; Kemme, S A; Ellis, A R; Brady, G R; Wendt, J R; Biedermann, G W; Samora, S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

J. Plasma Fusion Res. SERIES, Vol. 10 (2013) Simulating Tritium Retention in Tungsten with a Multiple Trap Model in the TMAP Code a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurately predicting the quantity of tritium retained in plasma facing components is a key safety issue for licensing future fusion power reactors. Retention of tritium in the lattice damage caused when high energy neutrons collide with atoms in the structural material of the reactor’s plasma facing components (PFCs) is an area of ongoing experimental research at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) under the US/Japan TITAN collaboration. Recent experiments with the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE), located in the INL’s Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility, demonstrate that this damage can only be simulated by computer codes like the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) if one assumes that the lattice damage produced by these neutrons results in multiple types of hydrogen traps (energy wells) within the material, each possessing a different trap energy and density. Previous attempts to simulate the quantity of deuterium released from neutron irradiated TPE tungsten targets indicated that at least six different traps are required by TMAP to model this release. In this paper we describe a recent extension of the TMAP trap site model to include as many traps as required by the user to simulate retention of tritium in neutron damaged tungsten. This model has been applied to data obtained for tungsten irradiated to a damage level of 0.025 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) after exposure to a plasma in TPE.

Brad J. Merrill; Masashi Shimada; Paul W. Humrickhouse

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trap trace analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Observation of cold Rb{sub 2} molecules trapped in an optical dipole trap using a laser-pulse-train technique  

SciTech Connect

In this work, we have developed and characterized a laser-pulse-train technique to observe cold Rb{sub 2} molecules trapped in an optical dipole trap. The molecules are produced in a magneto-optical trap, and then loaded into a crossed optical dipole trap. The time evolution of the molecular population is obtained by applying a laser pulse train, which photoionizes the ground-state molecules through intermediate molecular bands. Our results show that this technique allows us to obtain a faster data acquisition rate of the time evolution of the molecule population than other techniques.

Menegatti, Carlos R.; Marangoni, Bruno S.; Marcassa, Luis G. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 369, 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Dataset Summary Description The general mission of the Halocarbons and other Atmospheric Trace Species group is to quantify the distributions and magnitudes of sources and sinks for atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) and halogen containing compounds. HATS utilizes numerous types of platforms, including ground-based stations, towers, ocean vessels, aircraft, and balloons, to accomplish its mission. For a detailed mission statement, consult our FAQ. Tags {"nitrous oxide","sulfur hexaflouride",CFC-11,CFC-12,CFC-113,CCl4,CH3CCl3,CH3Cl,halon-1211,HCFC-22,HCFC-142b,halocarbons,chromatograph,aircraft,balloons,vessels,ships,towers,"natural resources",environment,air,"GHG "}

343

Interannual Variability of Trace Gases in the Subtropical Winter Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of water vapor and methane from the Halogen Occultation Experiment instrument on board the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite are used to study the interannual variability of trace gas distributions in the atmosphere. Particular ...

L. J. Gray; J. M. Russell Jr.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Traces generation to simulate large-scale distributed applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to study the performance of scheduling algorithms, simulators of parallel and distributed applications need accurate models of the application's behavior during execution. For this purpose, traces of low-level events collected during the actual ...

Olivier Dalle; Emilio P. Mancini

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Trace metal particulates in coal-fired power plant emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Since coal-fired power plants produce approximately 50% of U.S. energy, the toxic and environmental damaging effects of this energy source are important. Trace metals are… (more)

Marett, Lanette Simone

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Laboratory measurements and modeling of trace atmospheric species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trace species play a major role in many physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere. Improving our understanding of the impact of each species requires a combination of laboratory exper- imentation, field measurements, ...

Sheehy, Philip M. (Philip Michael)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

High quality rendering using ray tracing and photon mapping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ray tracing and photon mapping provide a practical way of efficiently simulating global illumination including interreflections, caustics, color bleeding, participating media and subsurface scattering in scenes with complicated geometry and advanced ...

Henrik Wann Jensen; Per Christensen

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

A strategy for the 3-trace case - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 19, 1997 ... Figure 10 shows a 3-trace on 4-atom truth table and its correspondence as an L- system. Again transitions form 1's to 0's are highlighted. Similar ...

349

Agent-based chemical plume tracing using fluid dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a rigorous evaluation of a novel, distributed chemical plume tracing algorithm. The algorithm is a combination of the best aspects of the two most popular predecessors for this task. Furthermore, it is based on solid, formal principles ...

Dimitri Zarzhitsky; Diana Spears; David Thayer; William Spears

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Photoionizing Trapped Highly Charged Ions with Synchrotron Radiation  

SciTech Connect

Photoabsorption by highly charged ions plays an essential role in astrophysical plasmas. Diagnostics of photoionized plasmas surrounding binary systems rely heavily on precise identification of absorption lines and on the knowledge of their cross sections and widths. Novel experiments using an electron beam ion trap, FLASH EBIT, in combination with monochromatic synchrotron radiation allow us to investigate ions in charge states hitherto out of reach. Trapped ions can be prepared in any charge state at target densities sufficient to measure absorption cross sections below 0.1 Mb. The results benchmark state-of-the-art predictions of the transitions wavelengths, widths, and absolute cross sections. Recent high resolution results on Fe{sup 14+}, Fe{sup 15+}, and Ar{sup 12+} at photon energies up to 1 keV are presented.

Crespo, J R; Simon, M; Beilmann, C; Rudolph, J; Steinbruegge, R; Eberle, S; Schwarz, M; Baumann, T; Schmitt, B; Brunner, F; Ginzel, R; Klawitter, R; Kubicek, K; Epp, S; Mokler, P; Maeckel, V; Ullrich, J; Brown, G V; Graf, A; Leutenegger, M; Beiersdorfer, P; Behar, E; Follath, R; Reichardt, G; Schwarzkopf, O

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

351

Wolf Trap, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trap, Virginia: Energy Resources Trap, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.9398329°, -77.286094° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.9398329,"lon":-77.286094,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

352

A Toy Model Study of Decay Trapping | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Toy Model Study of Decay Trapping, reported by Brett Parker A Toy Model Study of Decay Trapping, reported by Brett Parker Introduction A group from the BNL Superconducting Magnet Division is looking at various options for dipole magnets which would be suitable for use in a muon storage ring that is used as a neutrino factory. Since the useful neutrino beams from a neutrino factory come from straight sections it is desirable to minimize the rings arc circumference, in relation to straight section length, in order to ensure that the fraction of muons which decay in the straight section is as large as possible. Therefore superconducting magnets, with higher B-fields and smaller bend radii, are reasonable to consider for this application. Unfortunately the decay electrons generated along with the neutrinos carry on average about a third of the original

353

Trapped Quintessential Inflation in the context of Flux Compactifications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a model for quintessential inflation using a string modulus for the inflaton - quintessence field. The scalar potential of our model is based on generic non-perturbative potentials arising in flux compactifications. We assume an enhanced symmetry point (ESP), which fixes the initial conditions for slow-roll inflation. When crossing the ESP the modulus becomes temporarily trapped, which leads to a brief stage of trapped inflation. This is followed by enough slow roll inflation to solve the flatness and horizon problems. After inflation, the field rolls down the potential and eventually freezes to a certain value because of cosmological friction. The latter is due to the thermal bath of the hot big bang, which is produced by the decay of a curvaton field. The modulus remains frozen until the present, when it becomes quintessence.

J. C. Bueno Sanchez; K. Dimopoulos

2006-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

354

Umatilla River Basin Trap and Haul Program : Annual Report 1993.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Threemile Falls Dam is the major counting and collection point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were collected at Threemile Dam from October 23, 1992 to July 14, 1993. A total of 1,913 summer steelhead; 239 adult and 64 jack fall chinook; 355 adult and 174 jack coho; and 1,205 adult and 16 jack spring chinook were collected. Fish collected were hauled upstream from Threemile Dam using either a 370 or 3,000 gallon liberation unit. The Westland Canal facility, the major collection point for outmigrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts was in operation from February 15 to July 29, 1993. During that period, fish were trapped 46 days. An estimated 3,228 pounds of fish were transported from the Westland Canal trap to the Umatilla River boat ramp at rivermile 0.5.

Zimmerman, Brian C.; Duke, Bill B.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Trace Impurities and Activation Products in Base Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of research related to the concentrations of trace impurities and activation products in stainless steel alloys used for reactor vessels and internals. While present in extremely low concentrations, these trace elements and radionuclides can impact radioactive waste disposal of the components upon decommissioning.BackgroundThe primary basis of activity in a decommissioning source term is activated metals from the reactor and ...

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

Technique for identifying, tracing, or tracking objects in image data  

SciTech Connect

A technique for computer vision uses a polygon contour to trace an object. The technique includes rendering a polygon contour superimposed over a first frame of image data. The polygon contour is iteratively refined to more accurately trace the object within the first frame after each iteration. The refinement includes computing image energies along lengths of contour lines of the polygon contour and adjusting positions of the contour lines based at least in part on the image energies.

Anderson, Robert J. (Albuquerque, NM); Rothganger, Fredrick (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

357

Adiabatic trapping in coupled kinetic Alfven-acoustic waves  

SciTech Connect

In the present work, we have discussed the effects of adiabatic trapping of electrons on obliquely propagating Alfven waves in a low {beta} plasma. Using the two potential theory and employing the Sagdeev potential approach, we have investigated the existence of arbitrary amplitude coupled kinetic Alfven-acoustic solitary waves in both the sub and super Alfvenic cases. The results obtained have been analyzed and presented graphically and can be applied to regions of space where the low {beta} assumption holds true.

Shah, H. A.; Ali, Z. [Department of Physics, G.C. University, 54000 Lahore (Pakistan); Masood, W. [COMSATS, Institute of Information Technology, Park Road, Chak Shahzad, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdara Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Observation of Spin Flips with a Single Trapped Proton  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radio-frequency induced spin transitions of one individual proton are observed. The spin quantum jumps are detected via the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect, which is used in an experiment with a single proton stored in a cryogenic Penning trap. This is an important milestone towards a direct high-precision measurement of the magnetic moment of the proton and a new test of the matter-antimatter symmetry in the baryon sector.

Ulmer, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Ruprecht Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69047 Heidelberg (Germany); Rodegheri, C. C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ruprecht Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69047 Heidelberg (Germany); Kracke, H.; Mooser, A.; Walz, J. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Helmholtz Institut Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Quint, W. [Ruprecht Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69047 Heidelberg (Germany); GSI--Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

359

Persistent currents in Bose gases confined in annular traps  

SciTech Connect

We examine the problem of stability of persistent currents in a mixture of two Bose gases trapped in an annular potential. We evaluate the critical coupling for metastability in the transition from quasi-one- to two-dimensional motion. We also evaluate the critical coupling for metastability in a mixture of two species as a function of the population imbalance. The stability of the currents is shown to be sensitive to the deviation from one-dimensional motion.

Bargi, S.; Malet, F.; Reimann, S. M. [Mathematical Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Kavoulakis, G. M. [Technological Educational Institute of Crete, P.O. Box 1939, GR-71004, Heraklion (Greece)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

Mixtures of Bose gases confined in concentrically coupled annular traps  

SciTech Connect

A two-component Bose-Einstein condensate confined in an axially symmetric potential with two local minima, resembling two concentric annular traps, is investigated. The system shows a number of phase transitions that result from the competition between phase coexistence and radial-azimuthal phase separation. The ground-state phase diagram, as well as the rotational properties, including the (meta)stability of currents in this system, is analyzed.

Malet, F.; Reimann, S. M. [Mathematical Physics, LTH, Lund University, Post Office Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Kavoulakis, G. M. [Technological Education Institute of Crete, Post Office Box 1939, GR-71004, Heraklion (Greece)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trap trace analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Simulation of a main steam line break with steam generator tube rupture using trace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simulation of the OECD/NEA ROSA-2 Project Test 5 was made with the thermal-hydraulic code TRACE5. Test 5 performed in the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) reproduced a Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) with a Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The result of these simultaneous breaks is a depressurization in the secondary and primary system in loop B because both systems are connected through the SGTR. Good approximation was obtained between TRACE5 results and experimental data. TRACE5 reproduces qualitatively the phenomena that occur in this transient: primary pressure falls after the break, stagnation of the pressure after the opening of the relief valve of the intact steam generator, the pressure falls after the two openings of the PORV and the recovery of the liquid level in the pressurizer after each closure of the PORV. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis has been performed to know the effect of varying the High Pressure Injection (HPI) flow rate in both loops on the system pressures evolution. (authors)

Gallardo, S.; Querol, A.; Verdu, G. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica Y Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022, Valencia (Spain)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Revolutionary systems for catalytic combustion and diesel catalytic particulate traps.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of an LDRD project completed for the development of materials and structures conducive to advancing the state of the art for catalyst supports and diesel particulate traps. An ancillary development for bio-medical bone scaffolding was also realized. Traditionally, a low-pressure drop catalyst support, such as a ceramic honeycomb monolith, is used for catalytic reactions that require high flow rates of gases at high-temperatures. A drawback to the traditional honeycomb monoliths under these operating conditions is poor mass transfer to the catalyst surface in the straight-through channels. ''Robocasting'' is a unique process developed at Sandia National Laboratories that can be used to manufacture ceramic monoliths with alternative 3-dimensional geometries, providing tortuous pathways to increase mass transfer while maintaining low-pressure drops. These alternative 3-dimensional geometries may also provide a foundation for the development of self-regenerating supports capable of trapping and combusting soot particles from a diesel engine exhaust stream. This report describes the structures developed and characterizes the improved catalytic performance that can result. The results show that, relative to honeycomb monolith supports, considerable improvement in mass transfer efficiency is observed for robocast samples synthesized using an FCC-like geometry of alternating rods. Also, there is clearly a trade-off between enhanced mass transfer and increased pressure drop, which can be optimized depending on the particular demands of a given application. Practical applications include the combustion of natural gas for power generation, production of syngas, and hydrogen reforming reactions. The robocast lattice structures also show practicality for diesel particulate trapping. Preliminary results for trapping efficiency are reported as well as the development of electrically resistive lattices that can regenerate the structure by combusting the trapped soot. During this project an ancillary bio-medical application was discovered for lattices of hydroxyapatite. These structures show promise as bone scaffolds for the reparation of damaged bone. A case study depicting the manufacture of a customized device that fits into a damaged mandible is described.

Stuecker, John Nicholas; Witze, Peter O.; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Miller, James Edward

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Trace Gas Measurements from Tethered Balloon Platforms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instrumentation and chemical sampling and analysis procedures are described for making measurements of atmospheric carbon disulfide in the concentration range 1–1000 pptv from tethered balloon platforms. Results of a study on the CS2 composition ...

Alan R. Bandy; Terese L. Bandy; Otto Youngbluth; Thomas L. Owens

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

NREL: Energy Analysis - Andrew Martinez  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

et. al., Thermodynamic analysis of interactions between Ni-based solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes and trace species in a survey of coal syngas, Journal of Power Sources...

365

Diatom Genome Helps Explain Their Great Diversity and Success in Trapping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2008 5, 2008 Diatom Genome Helps Explain Their Great Diversity and Success in Trapping Excess Carbon in Oceans WALNUT CREEK, CA-Diatoms, mighty microscopic algae, have profound influence on climate, producing 20 percent of the oxygen we breathe by capturing atmospheric carbon and in so doing, countering the greenhouse effect. Since their evolutionary origins these photosynthetic wonders have come to acquire advantageous genes from bacterial, animal and plant ancestors enabling them to thrive in today's oceans. These findings, based on the analysis of the latest sequenced diatom genome, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, are published in 15 October edition of the journal Nature by an international team of researchers led by the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) and the Ecole Normale Supérieure of

366

Destabilization of the trapped electron mode by magnetic curvature drift resonances  

SciTech Connect

Electron curvature drift resonances, ignored in earlier work on the trapped-electron modes, are found to exert a strong destabilizing influence in the lower collision frequency range of these instabilities. Effects arising from ion temperature gradients, shear, and finite ion gyroradius are included with these vector nebla-drifts in the analysis, and the resultant eigenvalue equation is solved by numerical procedures rather than the commonly used perturbation techniques. For typical tokamak parameters the maximum growth rates are found to be increased over earlier estimates by roughly a factor of 4, and requirements on magnetic shear strength for stabilization are likewise more severe and very difficult to satisfy. For inverted density profiles, this new destabilizing effect is rendered ineffective, with the result that the modes can be stabilized for achievable values of shear provided the temperature gradients are not too severe. Estimates of the particle and thermal energy transport are given for both normal and inverted profiles. (auth)

Adam, J.C.; Tang, W.M.; Rutherford, P.H.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

All optical sensor for automated magnetometry based on Coherent Population Trapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An automated magnetometer suitable for long lasting measurement under stable and controllable experimental conditions has been implemented. The device is based on Coherent Population Trapping (CPT) produced by a multi-frequency excitation. CPT resonance is observed when a frequency comb, generated by diode laser current modulation, excites Cs atoms confined in a $\\pi/4\\times(2.5)^2\\times1 \\textrm{cm}^3$, 2 Torr $N_2$ buffered cell. A fully optical sensor is connected through an optical fiber to the laser head allowing for truly remote sensing and minimization of the field perturbation. A detailed analysis of the CPT resonance parameters as a function of the optical detuning has been made in order to get high sensitivity measurements. The magnetic field monitoring performances and the best sensitivity obtained in a balanced differential configuration of the sensor are presented.

Belfi, J; Biancalana, V; Dancheva, Y; Moi, L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Trapping of charge carriers into InAs/AlAs quantum dots at liquid-helium temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of how the probability of trapping of charge carriers into quantum dots via the wetting layer influences the steady-state and time-dependent luminescence of the wetting layer and quantum dots excited via the matrix is analyzed in the context of some simple models. It is shown that the increase in the integrated steady-state luminescence intensity of quantum dots with increasing area fraction occupied by the quantum dots in the structure is indicative of the suppression of trapping of charge carriers from the wetting layer into the quantum dots. The same conclusion follows from the independent decays of the time-dependent luminescence signals from the wetting layer and quantum dots. The processes of trapping of charge carriers into the InAs quantum dots in the AlAs matrix at 5 K are studied experimentally by exploring the steady-state and time-dependent photoluminescence. A series of structures with different densities of quantum dots has been grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on a semi-insulating GaAs (001) substrate. It is found that the integrated photoluminescence intensity of quantum dots almost linearly increases with increasing area occupied with the quantum dots in the structure. It is also found that, after pulsed excitation, the photoluminescence intensity of the wetting layer decays more slowly than the photoluminescence intensity of the quantum dots. According to the analysis, these experimental observations suggest that trapping of excitons from the wetting layer into the InAs/AlAs quantum dots at 5 K is suppressed.

Abramkin, D. S., E-mail: demid@thermo.isp.nsc.ru; Zhuravlev, K. S.; Shamirzaev, T. S.; Nenashev, A. V.; Kalagin, A. K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Trace element fingerprinting of ancient Chinese gold with femtosecond laser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trace element fingerprinting of ancient Chinese gold with femtosecond laser Trace element fingerprinting of ancient Chinese gold with femtosecond laser ablation-inductivity coupled mass spectrometry Title Trace element fingerprinting of ancient Chinese gold with femtosecond laser ablation-inductivity coupled mass spectrometry Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Brostoff, Lynn B., Jhanis J. Gonzalez, Paul Jett, and Richard E. Russo Journal Journal of Archeological Science Volume 36 Start Page 461 Issue 2 Pagination 461-466 Date Published 02/2009 Keywords Ancient gold, femtosecond, la-icp-ms, Trace element Abstract In this collaborative investigation, femtosecond laser ablation-inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was applied to the study of a remarkable group of ancient Chinese gold objects in the Smithsonian's Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery. Taking advantage of the superior ablation characteristics and high precision of a femtosecond 266 nm Ti:sapphire laser at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, major, minor and trace element concentrations in the gold fragments were quantified. Results validate use of femtosecond LA-ICP-MS for revealing ''fingerprints'' in minute gold samples. These fingerprints allow us to establish patterns based on the association of silver, palladium and platinum that support historical, technical and stylistic relationships, and shed new light on these ancient objects.

370

Nuclear spin qubits in a trapped-ion quantum computer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physical systems must fulfill a number of conditions to qualify as useful quantum bits (qubits) for quantum information processing, including ease of manipulation, long decoherence times, and high fidelity readout operations. Since these conditions are hard to satisfy with a single system, it may be necessary to combine different degrees of freedom. Here we discuss a possible system, based on electronic and nuclear spin degrees of freedom in trapped ions. The nuclear spin yields long decoherence times, while the electronic spin, in a magnetic field gradient, provides efficient manipulation, and the optical transitions of the ions assure a selective and efficient initialization and readout.

M. Feng; Y. Y. Xu; F. Zhou; D. Suter

2009-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

371

Hawking-like radiation does not require a trapped region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the issue of quasi-particle production by ``analogue black holes'' with particular attention to the possibility of reproducing Hawking radiation in a laboratory. By constructing simple geometric acoustic models, we obtain a somewhat unexpected result: We show that in order to obtain a stationary and Planckian emission of quasi-particles, it is not necessary to create a trapped region in the acoustic spacetime (corresponding to a supersonic regime in the fluid flow). It is sufficient to set up a dynamically changing flow asymptotically approaching a sonic regime with sufficient rapidity in laboratory time.

Carlos Barcelo; Stefano Liberati; Sebastiano Sonego; Matt Visser

2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

372

Anti-hydrogen production with positron beam ion trap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In low-energy antiproton physics, it is advantageous to be able to manipulate anti-particles as freely as normal particles. A robust production and storage system for high-quality positrons and antiprotons would be a substantial advance for the development of anti-matter science. The idea of electron beam ion trap could be applied for storage of anti-particle when the electron beam could be replaced by the positron beam. The bright positron beam would be brought about using synchrotron radiation source with a superconducting wiggler. The new scheme for production of anti-particles is proposed by using new accelerator technologies.

Itahashi, Takahisa [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

373

Selective control of the symmetric Dicke subspace in trapped ions  

SciTech Connect

We propose a method of manipulating selectively the symmetric Dicke subspace in the internal degrees of freedom of N trapped ions. We show that the direct access to ionic-motional subspaces, based on a suitable tuning of motion-dependent ac Stark shifts, induces a two-level dynamics involving previously selected ionic Dicke states. In this manner, it is possible to produce, sequentially and unitarily, ionic Dicke states with increasing excitation number. Moreover, we propose a probabilistic technique to produce directly any ionic Dicke state assuming suitable initial conditions.

Lopez, C. E.; Retamal, J. C. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 307 Correo 2, Santiago (Chile); Solano, E. [Physics Department, ASC, and CeNS, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Theresienstrasse 37, 80333 Munich (Germany); Seccion Fisica, Departamento de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Apartado 1761, Lima (Peru)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Selective interactions in trapped ions: State reconstruction and quantum logic  

SciTech Connect

We propose the implementation of selective interactions of atom-motion subspaces in trapped ions. These interactions yield resonant exchange of population inside a selected subspace, leaving the others in a highly dispersive regime. Selectivity allows us to generate motional Fock (and other nonclassical) states with high purity out of a wide class of initial states, and becomes an unconventional cooling mechanism when the ground state is chosen. Individual population of number states can be distinctively measured, as well as the motional Wigner function. Furthermore, a protocol for implementing quantum logic through a suitable control of selective subspaces is presented.

Solano, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany and Seccion Fisica, Departamento de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Apartado 1761, Lima (Peru)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Laser cooling of a trapped particle with increased Rabi frequencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the cooling of a single particle in a harmonic trap with red-detuned laser light with fewer approximations than previously done in the literature. We avoid the adiabatic elimination of the excited atomic state but are still interested in Lamb-Dicke parameters {eta}cooling laser can be chosen higher than previously assumed, thereby increasing the effective cooling rate but not affecting the final outcome of the cooling process. Since laser cooling is already a well-established experimental technique, the main aim of this paper is to present a model which can be extended to more complex scenarios, like cavity-mediated laser cooling.

Blake, Tony; Kurcz, Andreas; Saleem, Norah S.; Beige, Almut [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Plasma outflow from a corrugated trap in the kinetic regime  

SciTech Connect

The problem of stationary plasma outflow from an open corrugated trap in the kinetic regime is considered with allowance for pair collisions in the framework of a kinetic equation with the Landau collision integral. The distribution function is studied in the limit of small-scale corrugation and a large mirror ratio. In considering a single corrugation cell, a correction for the distribution function is calculated analytically. An equation describing variations of the distribution function along the system is derived and used to study the problem of plasma outflow into vacuum.

Skovorodin, D. I.; Beklemishev, A. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Energy trapping and shock disintegration in a composite granular medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Granular materials demonstrate a strongly nonlinear behavior influencing the wave propagation in the medium. We report the first experimental observation of impulse energy confinement and the resultant disintegration of shock and solitary waves. The medium consists of alternating ensambles of high-modulus vs orders of magnitude lower modulus chains of different masses. The trapped energy is contained within the "softer" portions of the composite chain and is slowly released in the form of weak, separated pulses over an extended period of time. This effect is enhanced by using a specific group assembly and superimposed force.

C. Daraio; V. F. Nesterenko; E. B. Herbold; S. Jin

2005-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

378

Ionization Induced Trapping in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental studies of electrons produced in a laser wakefield accelerator indicate trapping initiated by ionization of target gas atoms. Targets composed of helium and controlled amounts of various gases were found to increase the beam charge by as much as an order of magnitude compared to pure helium at the same electron density and decrease the beam divergence from 5.1+-1.0 to 2.9+-0.8 mrad. The measurements are supported by particle-in-cell modeling including ionization. This mechanism should allow generation of electron beams with lower emittance and higher charge than in preionized gas.

McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Schumaker, W.; Matsuoka, T.; Chvykov, V.; Dollar, F. J.; Kalintchenko, G.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Krushelnick, K.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Glazyrin, I. V.; Karpeev, A. V. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); P. N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Science, Leninskii Prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); RFNC-VNIITF, Snezhinsk 456770, Chelyabinsk region (Russian Federation)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Quantum mechanics of one-dimensional trapped Tonks gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several experimental groups are currently working towards realizing quasi-one-dimensional (1D) atom waveguides and loading them with ultracold atoms. The dynamics becomes truly 1D in a regime (Tonks gas) of low temperatures and densities and large positive scattering lengths for which the transverse mode becomes frozen, in which case the many-body Schrodinger dynamics becomes exactly soluble via a Fermi-Bose mapping theorem. In this paper we review our recent work on the exact ground state and quantum dynamics of 1D Tonks gases and assess the possibility of approaching the Tonks regime using Bessel beam optical dipole traps.

M. D. Girardeau; E. M. Wright

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

Natchez Trace Elec Power Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natchez Trace Elec Power Assn Natchez Trace Elec Power Assn Jump to: navigation, search Name Natchez Trace Elec Power Assn Place Mississippi Utility Id 13227 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service (1001 kW-5000kW) Industrial General Service (50 kW and Under) Commercial General Service (51 kW-1000 kW) Commercial Outdoor Lighting HPS 100 W Lighting Outdoor Lighting HPS 100 W Dedicated Pole Lighting Outdoor Lighting HPS 100 W Dedicated Pole & Transformer Lighting Outdoor Lighting HPS 100 W Dedicated Transformer Lighting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trap trace analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: TRACE Load 700  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Load 700 Load 700 TRACE Load 700 logo. Use TRACE Load 700 software - the building and load design modules of TRACE 700, Trane Air Conditioning Economics - to evaluate the effect of building orientation, size, shape, and mass based on hourly weather data and the resulting heat-transfer characteristics of air and moisture. To assure calculation integrity, the program uses algorithms recommended by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). Choose from eight different ASHRAE cooling and heating methodologies, including the Exact Transfer Function. The program encourages "what if" analyses, allowing the user to enter construction details in any order and then easily change the resulting building model as the design progresses. Multiple project views and "drag-and-drop"

382

CSIRO GASLAB Network: Individual Flask Measurements of Atmospheric Trace  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GASLAB Network GASLAB Network CSIRO GASLAB Network: Individual Flask Measurements of Atmospheric Trace Gases (April 2003) data Data Investigators L.P. Steele, P.R. Krummel, and R.L. Langenfelds Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) DOI 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.db1021 Data are available for four atmospheric trace gases at nine stationary sites and one moving platform (aircraft over Cape Grim, Tasmania, and Bass Strait, between the Australian continent and Tasmania). The trace gases are carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrogen (H2). Measurements of δ13C from CO2 are also included in this database. The nine stationary sites are, from north to south: Alert, Canada; Shetland Islands, Scotland; Estevan Point, Canada; Mauna Loa, Hawaii; Cape Ferguson,

383

AN OVERVIEW OF TOOL FOR RESPONSE ACTION COST ESTIMATING (TRACE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tools and techniques that provide improved performance and reduced costs are important to government programs, particularly in current times. An opportunity for improvement was identified for preparation of cost estimates used to support the evaluation of response action alternatives. As a result, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company has developed Tool for Response Action Cost Estimating (TRACE). TRACE is a multi-page Microsoft Excel{reg_sign} workbook developed to introduce efficiencies into the timely and consistent production of cost estimates for response action alternatives. This tool combines costs derived from extensive site-specific runs of commercially available remediation cost models with site-specific and estimator-researched and derived costs, providing the best estimating sources available. TRACE also provides for common quantity and key parameter links across multiple alternatives, maximizing ease of updating estimates and performing sensitivity analyses, and ensuring consistency.

FERRIES SR; KLINK KL; OSTAPKOWICZ B

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

384

Understanding reservoir mechanisms using phase and component streamline tracing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventionally streamlines are traced using total flux across the grid cell faces. The visualization of total flux streamlines shows the movement of flood, injector-producer relationship, swept area and movement of tracer. But they fail to capture some important signatures of reservoir dynamics, such as dominant phase in flow, appearance and disappearance of phases (e.g. gas), and flow of components like CO2. In the work being presented, we demonstrate the benefits of visualizing phase and component streamlines which are traced using phase and component fluxes respectively. Although the phase and component streamlines are not appropriate for simulation, as they might be discontinuous, they definitely have a lot of useful information about the reservoir processes and recovery mechanisms. In this research, phase and component streamline tracing has been successfully implemented in three-phase and compositional simulation and the additional information obtained using these streamlines have been explored. The power and utility of the phase and component streamlines have been demonstrated using synthetic examples and two field cases. The new formulation of streamline tracing provides additional information about the reservoir drive mechanisms. The phase streamlines capture the dominant phase in flow in different parts of the reservoir and the area swept corresponding to different phases can be identified. Based on these streamlines the appearance and disappearance of phases can be identified. Also these streamlines can be used for optimizing the field recovery processes like water injection and location of infill wells. Using component streamlines the movement of components like CO2 can be traced, so they can be used for optimizing tertiary recovery mechanisms and tracking of tracers. They can also be used to trace CO2 in CO2 sequestration project where the CO2 injection is for long term storage in aquifers or reservoirs. They have also other potential uses towards study of reservoir processes and behavior such as drainage area mapping for different phases, phase rate allocations to reservoir layers, etc.

Kumar, Sarwesh

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Reliable transport through a microfabricated X-junction surface-electrode ion trap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a microfabricated surface-electrode ion trap that supports controlled transport through the two-dimensional intersection of linear trapping zones arranged in a ninety-degree cross. The trap is fabricated with very-large-scalable-integration (VLSI) techniques which are compatible with scaling to a larger quantum information processor. The shape of the radio-frequency (RF) electrodes is optimized with a genetic algorithm to minimize axial pseudopotential barriers and to minimize ion heating during transport. Seventy-eight independent DC control electrodes enable fine control of the trapping potentials. We demonstrate reliable ion transport between junction legs, trapping of ion chains with nearly-equal spacing in one of the trap's linear sections, and merging and splitting ions from these chains. Doppler-cooled ions survive more than 10^5 round-trip transits between junction legs without loss and more than sixty-five consecutive round trips without laser cooling.

Kenneth Wright; Jason M. Amini; Daniel L. Faircloth; Curtis Volin; S. Charles Doret; Harley Hayden; C. -S. Pai; David W. Landgren; Douglas Denison; Tyler Killian; Richart E. Slusher; Alexa W. Harter

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

386

Dynamic ray tracing and traveltime corrections for global seismic tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a dynamic ray tracing program for a spherically symmetric Earth that may be used to compute Frechet kernels for traveltime and amplitude anomalies at finite frequency. The program works for arbitrarily defined phases and background models. The numerical precisions of kinematic and dynamic ray tracing are optimized to produce traveltime errors under 0.1 s, which is well below the data uncertainty in global seismology. This tolerance level is obtained for an integration step size of about 20 km for the most common seismic phases. We also give software to compute ellipticity, crustal and topographic corrections and attenuation.

Tian Yue [Department of Geosciences, Guyot Hall, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States)], E-mail: ytian@princeton.edu; Hung, S.-H. [Department of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Nolet, Guust [Department of Geosciences, Guyot Hall, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States); Montelli, Raffaella [ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, P.O. Box 22189, GW03-940A, Houston, TX 77252-2189 (United States); Dahlen, F.A. [Department of Geosciences, Guyot Hall, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States)

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

387

How Do We Trace Requirements? An Initial Study of Analyst Behavior in Trace Validation Tasks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

above suggest that looking at the logs side-by-side may reveal some common trends. Log analysis revealed

Dekhtyar, Alexander

388

To:... Subject: Electromagnetic Impact of CEBAF Beam on Hydrogen Trap EXPECTED IMPACT OF CEBAF BEAM ON HYDROGEN TRAP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A magnetic ultra-cold trap of fully polarized atomic hydrogen is being considered for using as a target for Møller polarimetry at CEBAF, at beam currents up to 100 µA. This note addresses possible problems caused by the CEBAF beam impact on such a target. The beam current generates an electromagnetic RF radiation which may cause a target depolarization inducing spin flips. Also, a part of the radiation may be absorbed in the cell pipe, heating it. The beam also heats up the gas by ionization. 1

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Angular constraint on light-trapping absorption enhancement in solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light trapping for solar cells can reduce production cost and improve energy conversion efficiency. Understanding some of the basic theoretical constraints on light trapping is therefore of fundamental importance. Here, we develop a general angular constraint on the absorption enhancement in light trapping. We show that there is an upper limit for the angular integration of absorption enhancement factors. This limit is determined by the number of accessible resonances supported by an absorber.

Yu, Zongfu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Self-trapping dynamics in a 2D optical lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe theoretical models for the recent experimental observation of Macroscopic Quantum Self-Trapping (MQST) in the transverse dynamics of an ultracold bosonic gas in a 2D lattice. The pure mean-field model based on the solution of coupled nonlinear equations fails to reproduce the experimental observations. It greatly overestimates the initial expansion rates at short times and predicts a slower expansion rate of the cloud at longer times. It also predicts the formation of a hole surrounded by a steep square fort-like barrier which was not observed in the experiment. An improved theoretical description based on a simplified Truncated Wigner Approximation (TWA), which adds phase and number fluctuations in the initial conditions, pushes the theoretical results closer to the experimental observations but fails to quantitatively reproduce them. An explanation of the delayed expansion as a consequence of a new type of self-trapping mechanism, where quantum correlations suppress tunneling even when there are no density gradients, is discussed and supported by numerical time-dependent Density Matrix Renormalization Group (t-DMRG) calculations performed in a simplified two coupled tubes set-up.

Shuming Li; Salvatore R. Manmana; Ana Maria Rey; Rafael Hipolito; Aaron Reinhard; Jean-Félix Riou; Laura A. Zundel; David S. Weiss

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

391

THE DISCOVERY OF GEOMAGNETICALLY TRAPPED COSMIC-RAY ANTIPROTONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existence of a significant flux of antiprotons confined to Earth's magnetosphere has been considered in several theoretical works. These antiparticles are produced in nuclear interactions of energetic cosmic rays with the terrestrial atmosphere and accumulate in the geomagnetic field at altitudes of several hundred kilometers. A contribution from the decay of albedo antineutrons has been hypothesized in analogy to proton production by neutron decay, which constitutes the main source of trapped protons at energies above some tens of MeV. This Letter reports the discovery of an antiproton radiation belt around the Earth. The trapped antiproton energy spectrum in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region has been measured by the PAMELA experiment for the kinetic energy range 60-750 MeV. A measurement of the atmospheric sub-cutoff antiproton spectrum outside the radiation belts is also reported. PAMELA data show that the magnetospheric antiproton flux in the SAA exceeds the cosmic-ray antiproton flux by three orders of magnitude at the present solar minimum, and exceeds the sub-cutoff antiproton flux outside radiation belts by four orders of magnitude, constituting the most abundant source of antiprotons near the Earth.

Adriani, O. [Department of Physics, University of Florence, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Barbarino, G. C. [Department of Physics, University of Naples 'Federico II', I-80126 Naples (Italy); Bazilevskaya, G. A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, RU-119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bellotti, R.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F. [Department of Physics, University of Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Bogomolov, E. A. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RU-194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bongi, M.; Bottai, S. [INFN, Sezione di Florence, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Borisov, S.; Casolino, M.; De Pascale, M. P.; De Santis, C. [INFN, Sezione di Rome 'Tor Vergata', I-00133 Rome (Italy); Campana, D.; Carbone, R.; Consiglio, L. [INFN, Sezione di Naples, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Carlson, P. [KTH, Department of Physics, and the Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Castellini, G., E-mail: alessandro.bruno@ba.infn.it [IFAC, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy)

2011-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

392

The discovery of geomagnetically trapped cosmic ray antiprotons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existence of a significant flux of antiprotons confined to Earth's magnetosphere has been considered in several theoretical works. These antiparticles are produced in nuclear interactions of energetic cosmic rays with the terrestrial atmosphere and accumulate in the geomagnetic field at altitudes of several hundred kilometers. A contribution from the decay of albedo antineutrons has been hypothesized in analogy to proton production by neutron decay, which constitutes the main source of trapped protons at energies above some tens of MeV. This Letter reports the discovery of an antiproton radiation belt around the Earth. The trapped antiproton energy spectrum in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region has been measured by the PAMELA experiment for the kinetic energy range 60--750 MeV. A measurement of the atmospheric sub-cutoff antiproton spectrum outside the radiation belts is also reported. PAMELA data show that the magnetospheric antiproton flux in the SAA exceeds the cosmic-ray antiproton flux by three orders of magnitude at the present solar minimum, and exceeds the sub-cutoff antiproton flux outside radiation belts by four orders of magnitude, constituting the most abundant source of antiprotons near the Earth.

O. Adriani; G. C. Barbarino; G. A. Bazilevskaya; R. Bellotti; M. Boezio; E. A. Bogomolov; M. Bongi; V. Bonvicini; S. Borisov; S. Bottai; A. Bruno; F. Cafagna; D. Campana; R. Carbone; P. Carlson; M. Casolino; G. Castellini; L. Consiglio; M. P. De Pascale; C. De Santis; N. De Simone; V. Di Felice; A. M. Galper; W. Gillard; L. Grishantseva; G. Jerse; A. V. Karelin; M. D. Kheymits; S. V. Koldashov; S. Y. Krutkov; A. N. Kvashnin; A. Leonov; V. Malakhov; L. Marcelli; A. G. Mayorov; W. Menn; V. V. Mikhailov; E. Mocchiutti; A. Monaco; N. Mori; N. Nikonov; G. Osteria; F. Palma; P. Papini; M. Pearce; P. Picozza; C. Pizzolotto; M. Ricci; S. B. Ricciarini; L. Rossetto; R. Sarkar; M. Simon; R. Sparvoli; P. Spillantini; Y. I. Stozhkov; A. Vacchi; E. Vannuccini; G. Vasilyev; S. A. Voronov; Y. T. Yurkin; J. Wu; G. Zampa; N. Zampa; V. G. Zverev

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

393

Trapping ultracold gases near cryogenic materials with rapid reconfigurability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate a novel atom chip trapping system that allows the placement and high-resolution imaging of ultracold atoms within microns from any exchange with minimal experimental downtime. The sample is not connected to the atom chip, allowing rapid exchange without perturbing the atom chip or laser cooling apparatus. Exchange of the sample and retrapping of atoms has been performed within a week turnaround, limited only by chamber baking. Moreover, the decoupling of sample and atom chip provides the ability to independently tune the sample temperature and its position with respect to the trapped ultracold gas, which itself may remain in the focus of a high-resolution imaging system. As a first demonstration of this new system, we have confined a 700-nK cloud of 8x10^4 87Rb atoms within 100 um of a gold-mirrored 100-um-thick silicon substrate. The substrate was cooled to 35 K without use of a heat shield, while the atom chip, 120 um away, remained at room temperature. Atoms may be imaged and retrapped every 16 s, allowing rapid data collection.

Matthew A. Naides; Richard W. Turner; Ruby A. Lai; Jack M. DiSciacca; Benjamin L. Lev

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

394

Nano-texturization for Light Trapping in Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, To address the question whether random or periodic nanostructures lead to better light trapping in solar cells, we design and fabricate three ...

395

HappyJIT: a tracing JIT compiler for PHP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current websites are a combination of server-generated dynamic content with client-side interactive programs. Dynamically - typed languages have gained a lot of ground in both of these domains. The growth of Web 2.0 has introduced a myriad of websites ... Keywords: dynamically typed languages, interpreter, just-in-time compilation, php, pypy, rpython, tracing

Andrei Homescu; Alex ?uhan

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Exploring the use of ray tracing for future games  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rasterization hardware and computer games have always been tightly connected: The hardware implementation of rasterization has made complex interactive 3D games possible while requirements for future games drive the development of increasingly parallel ... Keywords: dynamic scenes, games development, global illumination, graphics hardware, realtime ray tracing, simulation

Heiko Friedrich; Johannes Günther; Andreas Dietrich; Michael Scherbaum; Hans-Peter Seidel; Philipp Slusallek

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Steal Tree: low-overhead tracing of work stealing schedulers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Work stealing is a popular approach to scheduling task-parallel programs. The flexibility inherent in work stealing when dealing with load imbalance results in seemingly irregular computation structures, complicating the study of its runtime behavior. ... Keywords: async-finish parallelism, tracing, work-stealing schedulers

Jonathan Lifflander; Sriram Krishnamoorthy; Laxmikant V. Kale

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Network traces of virtual worlds: measurements and applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although network traces of virtual worlds are valuable to ISPs (Internet service providers), virtual world software developers, and research communities, they do not exist in the public domain. In this work, we implement a complete testbed to efficiently ... Keywords: traffic measurement, traffic modeling, virtual world

Yichuan Wang; Cheng-Hsin Hsu; Jatinder Pal Singh; Xin Liu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Trace Metal Source Terms in Carbon Sequestration Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline and depleted oil geologic formations is feasible and promising; however, possible CO2 or CO2-saturated brine leakage to overlying aquifers may pose environmental and health impacts. The purpose of this study was to experimentally define to provide a range of concentrations that can be used as the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations. Storage source terms for trace metals are needed to evaluate the impact of brines leaking into overlying drinking water aquifers. The trace metal release was measured from cements and sandstones, shales, carbonates, evaporites, and basalts from the Frio, In Salah, Illinois Basin, Decatur, Lower Tuscaloosa, Weyburn-Midale, Bass Islands, and Grand Ronde carbon sequestration geologic formations. Trace metal dissolution was tracked by measuring solution concentrations over time under conditions (e.g., pressures, temperatures, and initial brine compositions) specific to the sequestration projects. Existing metrics for maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for drinking water as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) were used to categorize the relative significance of metal concentration changes in storage environments because of the presence of CO2. Results indicate that Cr and Pb released from sandstone reservoir and shale cap rocks exceed the MCLs byan order of magnitude, while Cd and Cu were at or below drinking water thresholds. In carbonate reservoirs As exceeds the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd, Cu, and Pb were at or below drinking water standards. Results from this study can be used as a reasonable estimate of the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations to further evaluate the impact of leakage on groundwater quality.

Karamalidis, Athanasios; Torres, Sharon G.; Hakala, Jacqueline A.; Shao, Hongbo; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Trace elements in oil shale. Progress report, 1976--1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the program is to evaluate the environmental and health consequences of the release of toxic trace elements (As, B, F, Mo, Se) by shale oil production and use. Some of the particularly significant results are: The baseline geochemical survey shows that stable trace elements maps can be constructed for numerous elements and that the trends observed are related to geologic and climatic factors. Shale retorted by above-ground processes tends to be very homogeneous (both in space and in time) in trace element content. This implies that the number of analytical determinations required of processed shales is not large. Leachate studies show that significant amounts of B, F, And Mo are released from retorted shales and while B and Mo are rapidly flushed out, F is not. On the other hand, As, Se, and most other trace elements ae not present in significant quantities. Significant amounts of F and B are also found in leachates of raw shales. Very large concentrations of reduced sulfur species are found in leachates of processed shale. Upon oxidation a drastic lowering in pH is observed. Preliminary data indicates that this oxidation is catalyzed by bacteria. Very high levels of B and Mo are taken up in some plants growing on processed shale with and without soil cover. These amounts depend upon the process and various site specific characteristics. In general, the amounts taken up decrease with increasing soil cover. On the other hand, we have not observed significant uptake of As, Se, and F into plants. There is a tendency for some trace elements to associate with specific organic fractions, indicating that organic chelation or complexation may play an important role. In particular, most of the Cd, Se, and Cr in shale oil is associated with the organic fraction containing most of the nitrogen-containing compounds.

Chappell, W.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Steven Chu: Laser Cooling and Trapping of Atoms  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Steven Chu Steven Chu Laser Cooling and Trapping of Atoms Resources with Additional Information · Interviews, Speeches, and Presentations · Patents Steven Chu Photo Credit: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Roy Kaltschmidt, Photographer Steven Chu was appointed by President Barack Obama to be the 12th Secretary of Energy and served in this capacity until April 22, 2013. He was previously Director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Professor in the Physics Department at the University of California, Berkeley, and 'the Theodore and Frances Geballe Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at Stanford University. Professor Chu's research is in atomic physics, polymer and biophysics. His thesis and postdoctoral work at Berkeley ... was the observation of parity non-conservation in atomic transitions in 1978. This experiment was one of the earliest atomic physics confirmations of the Weinberg-Salam-Glashow theory that unifies the weak and electromagnetic forces.

402

Steven Chu: Laser Cooling and Trapping of Atoms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steven Chu Steven Chu Laser Cooling and Trapping of Atoms Resources with Additional Information · Interviews, Speeches, and Presentations · Patents Steven Chu Photo Credit: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Roy Kaltschmidt, Photographer Steven Chu was appointed by President Barack Obama to be the 12th Secretary of Energy and served in this capacity until April 22, 2013. He was previously Director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Professor in the Physics Department at the University of California, Berkeley, and 'the Theodore and Frances Geballe Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at Stanford University. Professor Chu's research is in atomic physics, polymer and biophysics. His thesis and postdoctoral work at Berkeley ... was the observation of parity non-conservation in atomic transitions in 1978. This experiment was one of the earliest atomic physics confirmations of the Weinberg-Salam-Glashow theory that unifies the weak and electromagnetic forces.

403

Lean NOx Trap Catalysis for Lean Natural Gas Engine Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed energy is an approach for meeting energy needs that has several advantages. Distributed energy improves energy security during natural disasters or terrorist actions, improves transmission grid reliability by reducing grid load, and enhances power quality through voltage support and reactive power. In addition, distributed energy can be efficient since transmission losses are minimized. One prime mover for distributed energy is the natural gas reciprocating engine generator set. Natural gas reciprocating engines are flexible and scalable solutions for many distributed energy needs. The engines can be run continuously or occasionally as peak demand requires, and their operation and maintenance is straightforward. Furthermore, system efficiencies can be maximized when natural gas reciprocating engines are combined with thermal energy recovery for cooling, heating, and power applications. Expansion of natural gas reciprocating engines for distributed energy is dependent on several factors, but two prominent factors are efficiency and emissions. Efficiencies must be high enough to enable low operating costs, and emissions must be low enough to permit significant operation hours, especially in non-attainment areas where emissions are stringently regulated. To address these issues the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission launched research and development programs called Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) and Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (ARICE), respectively. Fuel efficiency and low emissions are two primary goals of these programs. The work presented here was funded by the ARES program and, thus, addresses the ARES 2010 goals of 50% thermal efficiency (fuel efficiency) and engines are being pursued. Approaches include: stoichiometric engine operation with exhaust gas recirculation and three-way catalysis, advanced combustion modes such as homogeneous charge compression ignition, and extension of the lean combustion limit with advanced ignition concepts and/or hydrogen mixing. The research presented here addresses the technical approach of combining efficient lean spark-ignited natural gas combustion with low emissions obtained from a lean NOx trap catalyst aftertreatment system. This approach can be applied to current lean engine technology or advanced lean engines that may result from related efforts in lean limit extension. Furthermore, the lean NOx trap technology has synergy with hydrogen-assisted lean limit extension since hydrogen is produced from natural gas during the lean NOx trap catalyst system process. The approach is also applicable to other lean engines such as diesel engines, natural gas turbines, and lean gasoline engines; other research activities have focused on those applications. Some commercialization of the technology has occurred for automotive applications (both diesel and lean gasoline engine vehicles) and natural gas turbines for stationary power. The research here specifically addresses barriers to commercialization of the technology for large lean natural gas reciprocating engines for stationary power. The report presented here is a comprehensive collection of research conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on lean NOx trap catalysis for lean natural gas reciprocating engines. The research was performed in the Department of Energy's ARES program from 2003 to 2007 and covers several aspects of the technology. All studies were conducted at ORNL on a Cummins C8.3G+ natural gas engine chosen based on industry input to simulate large lean natural gas engines. Specific technical areas addressed by the research include: NOx reduction efficiency, partial oxidation and reforming chemistry, and the effects of sulfur poisons on the partial oxidation

Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Ponnusamy, Senthil [ORNL; Ferguson, Harley Douglas [ORNL; Williams, Aaron M [ORNL; Tassitano, James B [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Lean NOx Trap Catalysis for Lean Natural Gas Engine Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Distributed energy is an approach for meeting energy needs that has several advantages. Distributed energy improves energy security during natural disasters or terrorist actions, improves transmission grid reliability by reducing grid load, and enhances power quality through voltage support and reactive power. In addition, distributed energy can be efficient since transmission losses are minimized. One prime mover for distributed energy is the natural gas reciprocating engine generator set. Natural gas reciprocating engines are flexible and scalable solutions for many distributed energy needs. The engines can be run continuously or occasionally as peak demand requires, and their operation and maintenance is straightforward. Furthermore, system efficiencies can be maximized when natural gas reciprocating engines are combined with thermal energy recovery for cooling, heating, and power applications. Expansion of natural gas reciprocating engines for distributed energy is dependent on several factors, but two prominent factors are efficiency and emissions. Efficiencies must be high enough to enable low operating costs, and emissions must be low enough to permit significant operation hours, especially in non-attainment areas where emissions are stringently regulated. To address these issues the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission launched research and development programs called Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) and Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (ARICE), respectively. Fuel efficiency and low emissions are two primary goals of these programs. The work presented here was funded by the ARES program and, thus, addresses the ARES 2010 goals of 50% thermal efficiency (fuel efficiency) and <0.1 g/bhp-hr emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx). A summary of the goals for the ARES program is given in Table 1-1. ARICE 2007 goals are 45% thermal efficiency and <0.015 g/bhp-hr NOx. Several approaches for improving the efficiency and emissions of natural gas reciprocating engines are being pursued. Approaches include: stoichiometric engine operation with exhaust gas recirculation and three-way catalysis, advanced combustion modes such as homogeneous charge compression ignition, and extension of the lean combustion limit with advanced ignition concepts and/or hydrogen mixing. The research presented here addresses the technical approach of combining efficient lean spark-ignited natural gas combustion with low emissions obtained from a lean NOx trap catalyst aftertreatment system. This approach can be applied to current lean engine technology or advanced lean engines that may result from related efforts in lean limit extension. Furthermore, the lean NOx trap technology has synergy with hydrogen-assisted lean limit extension since hydrogen is produced from natural gas during the lean NOx trap catalyst system process. The approach is also applicable to other lean engines such as diesel engines, natural gas turbines, and lean gasoline engines; other research activities have focused on those applications. Some commercialization of the technology has occurred for automotive applications (both diesel and lean gasoline engine vehicles) and natural gas turbines for stationary power. The research here specifically addresses barriers to commercialization of the technology for large lean natural gas reciprocating engines for stationary power. The report presented here is a comprehensive collection of research conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on lean NOx trap catalysis for lean natural gas reciprocating engines. The research was performed in the Department of Energy's ARES program from 2003 to 2007 and covers several aspects of the technology. All studies were conducted at ORNL on a Cummins C8.3G+ natural gas engine chosen based on industry input to simulate large lean natural gas engines. Specific technical areas addressed by the research include: NOx reduction efficiency, partial oxidation and reforming chemistry, and the effects of sulfur poisons on the partial oxidation

Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Ponnusamy, Senthil [ORNL; Ferguson, Harley Douglas [ORNL; Williams, Aaron M [ORNL; Tassitano, James B [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Lean Gasoline Engine Reductant Chemistry During Lean NOx Trap Regeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lean NOx Trap (LNT) catalysts can effectively reduce NOx from lean engine exhaust. Significant research for LNTs in diesel engine applications has been performed and has led to commercialization of the technology. For lean gasoline engine applications, advanced direct injection engines have led to a renewed interest in the potential for lean gasoline vehicles and, thereby, a renewed demand for lean NOx control. To understand the gasoline-based reductant chemistry during regeneration, a BMW lean gasoline vehicle has been studied on a chassis dynamometer. Exhaust samples were collected and analyzed for key reductant species such as H2, CO, NH3, and hydrocarbons during transient drive cycles. The relation of the reductant species to LNT performance will be discussed. Furthermore, the challenges of NOx storage in the lean gasoline application are reviewed.

Choi, Jae-Soon [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Partridge Jr, William P [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Norman, Kevin M [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL; Chambon, Paul H [ORNL; Thomas, John F [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Direct-energy-regenerated particulate trap technology. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this CRADA between Lockheed Martin and Cummins Engine Company was to develop fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC) composite materials for use as diesel engine particulate traps. Chemical vapor deposition techniques were used to partially densify and rigidize a thin fibrous substrate and produce the porous SiC- based filter. Microwave energy was used to directly couple to the deposited SiC to uniformly heat the filter and oxidize the collected carbon particulates. For commercial usage particulate traps must: (1) filter carbon particulates from a high temperature diesel exhaust at an acceptably low backpressure, (2) survive thousands of thermal transients due to regeneration or cleaning of the filter by oxidizing the collected carbon, (3) be durable and reliable over the expected life of the filter (300,000 miles or 10,000 hours), and (4) provide a low overall operating cost which is competitive with other filtering techniques. The development efforts performed as part of this CRADA have resulted in a very promising new technology for Cummins Engine Company. Ceramic fiber based filter papers were developed at Fleetguard, Inc., (a Cummins Subsidiary) and used to produce the spiral wound, corrugated filter cartridges. Optimized SiC coatings were developed at Lockheed Martin which couple with 2.45 GHz microwaves. Prototype particulate filter cartridges fabricated at Fleetguard and rigidized at Lockheed Martin performed well in single cylinder engine tests at Cummins. These prototype filters obtained filtering efficiencies greater than 80% at acceptably low backpressures and could be successfully headed and regenerated using a conventional in-home microwave oven.

Stinton, D.P.; Janney, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yonushonis, T.M.; McDonald, A.C.; Wiczynski, P.D. [Cummins Engine Co., Inc., Columbus, IN (United States); Haberkamp, W.C. [Fleetguard, Inc. (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Spin tracking simulations in AGS based on ray-tracing methods - bare lattice, no snakes -  

SciTech Connect

This Note reports on the first simulations of and spin dynamics in the AGS using the ray-tracing code Zgoubi. It includes lattice analysis, comparisons with MAD, DA tracking, numerical calculation of depolarizing resonance strengths and comparisons with analytical models, etc. It also includes details on the setting-up of Zgoubi input data files and on the various numerical methods of concern in and available from Zgoubi. Simulations of crossing and neighboring of spin resonances in AGS ring, bare lattice, without snake, have been performed, in order to assess the capabilities of Zgoubi in that matter, and are reported here. This yields a rather long document. The two main reasons for that are, on the one hand the desire of an extended investigation of the energy span, and on the other hand a thorough comparison of Zgoubi results with analytical models as the 'thin lens' approximation, the weak resonance approximation, and the static case. Section 2 details the working hypothesis : AGS lattice data, formulae used for deriving various resonance related quantities from the ray-tracing based 'numerical experiments', etc. Section 3 gives inventories of the intrinsic and imperfection resonances together with, in a number of cases, the strengths derived from the ray-tracing. Section 4 gives the details of the numerical simulations of resonance crossing, including behavior of various quantities (closed orbit, synchrotron motion, etc.) aimed at controlling that the conditions of particle and spin motions are correct. In a similar manner Section 5 gives the details of the numerical simulations of spin motion in the static case: fixed energy in the neighboring of the resonance. In Section 6, weak resonances are explored, Zgoubi results are compared with the Fresnel integrals model. Section 7 shows the computation of the {rvec n} vector in the AGS lattice and tuning considered. Many details on the numerical conditions as data files etc. are given in the Appendix Section, pages A and sqs.

Meot F.; Ahrens& #44; L.; Glenn& #44; J.; Huang& #44; H.; Luccio& #44; A.; MacKay& #44; W.W.; Roser& #44; T.; Tsoupas& #44; N.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Ion Trapping for Ion Mobility Spectrometry Measurements in a Cyclical Drift Tube  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

us to consider new types of mobility measurements. In traditional IMS instruments, R scales as (ELIon Trapping for Ion Mobility Spectrometry Measurements in a Cyclical Drift Tube Rebecca S. Glaskin 47405, United States ABSTRACT: A new ion trapping technique, involving the accumulation of ions

Clemmer, David E.

409

Synoptic-Scale Structure and the Character of Coastally Trapped Wind Reversals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coastally trapped wind reversals that occur along the U.S. West Coast have been described in numerous other studies. The synoptic-scale environment and the forcing of a coastally trapped Kelvin wave are highly linked in the development of these ...

Wendell A. Nuss

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Physica Scripta. Vol. T22, 228-237, 1988. Summary of the Physics in Traps Panel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

astrophysics, potential condensed matter experiments, and new ideas for optical and magnetic traps for neutral measured [7] their mass difference in a commercial spec- trometer (with cubic trap) to % 1 part in IO4dependence of the correction terms, one can clearly see the advantage of performing the experi- ment

California at San Diego, University of

411

Charge trapping in ultrathin Gd2O3 high-k dielectric  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Charge trapping in ultrathin high-k Gd"2O"3 dielectric leading to appearance of hysteresis in C-V curves is studied by capacitance-voltage and current-voltage techniques. It was shown that the large leakage current at a negative gate voltage causes the ... Keywords: Charge trapping, Gd2O3, High-k dielectric, Rare earth oxide

A. N. Nazarov; Y. V. Gomeniuk; Y. Y. Gomeniuk; H. D. B. Gottlob; M. Schmidt; M. C. Lemme; M. Czernohorsky; H. J. Osten

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Generation of continuous variable squeezing and entanglement of trapped ions in time-varying potentials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the generation of squeezing and entanglement for the motional degrees of freedom of ions in linear traps, confined by time-varying and oscillating potentials, comprised of a DC and an AC component. We show that high degrees of squeezing ... Keywords: 03.67.Bg, 05.45.Xt, 37.10.Vz, 42.50.Dv, Control, Entanglement, Ion traps

Alessio Serafini; Alex Retzker; Martin B. Plenio

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Loading of a surface-electrode ion trap from a remote, precooled source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate loading of ions into a surface-electrode trap (SET) from a remote, laser-cooled source of neutral atoms. We first cool and load ?10[superscript 6] neutral [superscript 88]Sr atoms into a magneto-optical trap ...

Sage, Jeremy M.

414

In Situ Measurements of Long-Lived Trace Gases in the Lower Stratosphere by Gas Chromatography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed information on the four-channel Airborne Chromatograph for Atmospheric Trace Species (ACATS-IV), used to measure long-lived atmospheric trace gases, is presented. Since ACATS-IV was last described in the literature, the temporal ...

P. A. Romashkin; D. F. Hurst; J. W. Elkins; G. S. Dutton; D. W. Fahey; R. E. Dunn; F. L. Moore; R. C. Myers; B. D. Hall

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

A validation of a ray-tracing tool used to generate bi-directional...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A validation of a ray-tracing tool used to generate bi-directional scattering distribution functions for complex fenestration systems Title A validation of a ray-tracing tool used...

416

Hybrid particle traps and conditioning procedure for gas insulated transmission lines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner condor within the outer sheath, insulating supports supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath, and an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath. An apertured particle trapping ring is disposed within the outer sheath, and the trapping ring has a pair of dielectric members secured at each longitudinal end thereof, with the dielectric members extending outwardly from the trapping ring along an arc. A support sheet having an adhesive coating thereon is secured to the trapping ring and disposed on the outer sheath within the low field region formed between the trapping ring and the outer sheath. A conditioning method used to condition the transmission line prior to activation in service comprises applying an AC voltage to the inner conductor in a plurality of voltage-time steps, with the voltage-time steps increasing in voltage magnitude while decreasing in time duration.

Dale, Steinar J. (Monroeville, PA); Cookson, Alan H. (Churchill, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

A Novel Method for Fundamental Interaction Studies with Electrostatic Ion Beam Trap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trapped radioactive atoms present exciting opportunities for the study of fundamental interactions and symmetries. For example, detecting beta decay in a trap can probe the minute experimental signal that originates from possible tensor or scalar terms in the weak interaction. Such scalar or tensor terms affect, e.g., the angular correlation between a neutrino and an electron in the beta-decay process, thus probing new physics of "beyond-the-standard-model" nature. In particular, this article focuses on a novel use of an innovative ion trapping device, the Electrostatic Ion Beam Trap (EIBT). Such a trap has not been previously considered for Fundamental Interaction studies and exhibits potentially very significant advantages over other schemes. These advantages include improved injection efficiency of the radionuclide under study, an extended field-free region, ion-beam kinematics for better efficiency and ease-of-operation and the potential for a much larger solid angle for the electron and recoiling atom counters.

S. Vaintraub; M. Hass; O. Aviv; O. Heber; I. Mardor

2010-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

418

The role of trace gas flux networks in biogeosciences  

SciTech Connect

Vast networks of meteorological sensors ring the globe, providing continuous measurements of an array of atmospheric state variables such as temperature, humidity, rainfall, and the concentration of carbon dioxide [New etal., 1999; Tans etal., 1996]. These measurements provide input to weather and climate models and are key to detecting trends in climate, greenhouse gases, and air pollution. Yet to understand how and why these atmospheric state variables vary in time and space, biogeoscientists need to know where, when, and at what rates important gases are flowing between the land and the atmosphere. Tracking trace gas fluxes provides information on plant or microbial metabolism and climate-ecosystem interactions. The existence of trace gas flux networks is a relatively new phenomenon, dating back to research in 1984. The first gas flux measurement networks were regional in scope and were designed to track pollutant gases such as sulfur dioxide, ozone, nitric acid, and nitrogen dioxide. Atmospheric observations and model simulations were used to infer the depositional rates of these hazardous chemicals [Fowler etal., 2009; Meyers etal., 1991]. In the late 1990s, two additional trace gas flux measurement networks emerged. One, the United States Trace Gas Network (TRAGNET), was a short-lived effort that measured trace gas emissions from the soil and plants with chambers distributed throughout the country [Ojima etal., 2000]. The other, FLUXNET, was an international endeavor that brought many regional networks together to measure the fluxes of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and sensible heat exchange with the eddy covariance technique [Baldocchi etal., 2001]. FLUXNET, which remains active today, currently includes more than 400 tower sites, dispersed across most of the world's climatic zones and biomes, with sites in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia. More recently, several specialized networks have emerged, including networks dedicated to urban areas (Urban Fluxnet), nitrogen compounds in Europe (NitroEurope), and methane (MethaneNet). Technical Aspects of Flux Networks Eddy covariance flux measurements are the preferred method by which biogeoscientists measure trace gas exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere [Baldocchi, 2003].

Baldocch, Dennis [Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley,; Reichstein, Markus [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Papale, D. [University of Tuscia; KOTEEN, LAURIE [University of California, Berkeley; VARGAS, RODRIGO [Ensenada Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education (CICESE); Agarwal, D.A [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Cook, Robert B [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Feasibility of the detection of trace elements in particulate matter using online High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of using an online thermal-desorption electron-ionization high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) for the detection of particulate trace elements was investigated analyzing data from Mexico City obtained during the MILAGRO 2006 field campaign, where relatively high concentrations of trace elements have been reported. This potential application is of interest due to the real-time data provided by the AMS, its high sensitivity and time resolution, and the widespread availability and use of this instrument. High resolution mass spectral analysis, isotopic ratios, and ratios of different ions containing the same elements are used to constrain the chemical identity of the measured ions. The detection of Cu, Zn, As, Se, Sn, and Sb is reported. There was no convincing evidence for the detection of other trace elements commonly reported in PM. The elements detected tend to be those with lower melting and boiling points, as expected given the use of a vaporizer at 600oC in this instrument. Operation of the AMS vaporizer at higher temperatures is likely to improve trace element detection. The detection limit is estimated at approximately 0.3 ng m-3 for 5-min of data averaging. Concentration time series obtained from the AMS data were compared to concentration records determined from offline analysis of particle samples from the same times and locations by ICP (PM2.5) and PIXE (PM1.1 and PM0.3). The degree of correlation and agreement between the three instruments (AMS, ICP, and PIXE) varied depending on the element. The AMS shows promise for real-time detection of some trace elements, although additional work including laboratory calibrations with different chemical forms of these elements are needed to further develop this technique and to understand the differences with the ambient data from the other techniques. The trace elements peaked in the morning as expected for primary sources, and the many detected plumes suggest the presence of multiple point sources, probably industrial, in Mexico City which are variable in time and space, in agreement with previous studies.

Salcedo, D.; Laskin, Alexander; Shutthanandan, V.; Jimenez, Jose L.

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

420

Assessing Transformation of Trace Metals and Crude Oil in Mississippi and Louisiana Coastal Wetlands in Response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resulting in the release of about 5 million barrels of crude oil into the environment. Coastal wetlands are particularly susceptible to oil contamination because they are composed largely of fine-grained sediments, which have a high capacity to adsorb oil and associated metals. Microbial activities may be enhanced by an increase in amounts of organic matter and subsequently influence the biogeochemical cycling of trace metals. This research assesses the levels of oil and trace metals, along with associated biogeochemical changes, in six coastal marshes in Mississippi and Louisiana. Total digestion analysis of wetland sediments shows higher concentrations of certain

Jeffrey Paul Keevan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Jyotish: Constructive approach for context predictions of people movement from joint Wifi/Bluetooth trace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well known that people movement exhibits a high degree of repetition since people visit regular places and make regular contacts for their daily activities. This paper presents a novel framework named Jyotish, which constructs a predictive model ... Keywords: Bluetooth trace, People movement prediction, People movement trace, Wifi trace

Long Vu; Quang Do; Klara Nahrstedt

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

A New Paradigm for Intelligent Tutoring Systems: Example-Tracing Tutors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cognitive Tutor Authoring Tools (CTAT) support creation of a novel type of tutors called example-tracing tutors. Unlike other types of ITSs (e.g., model-tracing tutors, constraint-based tutors), exampletracing tutors evaluate student behavior by ... Keywords: ITS architectures, authoring tools, behavior of tutoring systems, cognitive tutors, example-tracing tutors, programming by demonstration

Vincent Aleven; Bruce M. Mclaren; Jonathan Sewall; Kenneth R. Koedinger

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters- Lessons Learned From Mammoth Mountain, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters- Lessons Learned From Mammoth Mountain, Usa Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A major campaign to quantify the magmatic carbon discharge in cold groundwaters around Mammoth Mountain volcano in eastern California was carried out from 1996 to 1999. The total water flow from all sampled cold springs was >=1.8_107 m3/yr draining an area that receives an estimated

424

Ray tracing a three dimensional scene using a grid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ray tracing a three-dimensional scene using a grid. One example embodiment is a method for ray tracing a three-dimensional scene using a grid. In this example method, the three-dimensional scene is made up of objects that are spatially partitioned into a plurality of cells that make up the grid. The method includes a first act of computing a bounding frustum of a packet of rays, and a second act of traversing the grid slice by slice along a major traversal axis. Each slice traversal includes a first act of determining one or more cells in the slice that are overlapped by the frustum and a second act of testing the rays in the packet for intersection with any objects at least partially bounded by the one or more cells overlapped by the frustum.

Wald, Ingo; Ize, Santiago; Parker, Steven G; Knoll, Aaron

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

425

Source characterization studies at the Paraho semiworks oil shale retort. [Redistribution of trace and major elements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to determine the redistribution of trace and major elements and species during aboveground oil shale retorting, a comprehensive program was carried out for the sampling and analysis of feedstock, products, effluents, and ambient particulates from the Paraho Semiworks Retort. Samples were obtained during two periods in 1977 when the retort was operating in the direct mode. The data were used to construct mass balances for 31 trace and major elements in various effluents, including the offgas. The computed mass balances indicated that approx. 1% or greater fractions of the As, Co, Hg, N, Ni, S, and Se were released during retorting and redistributed to the product oil, retort water, or product offgas. The fraction released for these seven elements ranged from approx. 1% for Co and Ni to 50 to 60% for Hg and N. Approximately 20% of the S and 5% each of the As and Se were released. Ambient aerosols were found to be elevated near the retorting facility and associated crushing and retorted shale disposal sites. Approximately 50% of these particles were in the respirable range (< 5 ..mu..m). The elevated dust loadings are presented very local, as indicated by relatively low aerosol loadings at background sites 100 to 200 m away. State-of-the-art dust control measures were not employed. 15 figures, 19 tables.

Fruchter, J.S.; Wilkerson, C.L.; Evans, J.C.; Sanders, R.W.; Abel, K.W.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Electric Utility Trace Substances Synthesis Report: Volumes 1-4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive evaluation of human health risks from trace substances in electric utility stack plumes was carried out for each of 600 U.S. power plants. Emissions estimates were based on measurements at 43 units. Under realistic assumptions of exposure and plant configuration, inhalation risks were well below one in one million for increased cancer likelihood to all individuals exposed to emissions from power plants. Mercury case studies at four power plants showed health risks lower than federal guide...

1995-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

427

Electric Utility Trace Substances Synthesis Report: Volumes 1-4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive evaluation of human health risks from trace substances in electric utility stack plumes was carried out for each of 600 U.S. power plants. Emissions estimates were based on measurements at 43 units. Under realistic assumptions of exposure and plant configuration, inhalation risks were well below one in one million for increased cancer likelihood to all individuals exposed to emissions from power plants. Mercury case studies at four power plants showed health risks lower than federal guide...

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

428

Trace Metals Determination in Flue Gas Desulfurization Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers are used on coal-fired power plants to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions to air. While effective for this purpose, wet FGD scrubbers produce an aqueous blowdown stream that contains trace levels of metals adsorbed from flue gas. Power plant owners need to measure concentrations of these metals for purposes of process control, discharge monitoring, or design and operation of wastewater treatment systems. FGD water has proven to be a very difficult matrix to analyze a...

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

429

Washability of trace elements in product coals from Illinois mines. Technical report, 1 December 1993--28 February 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The existing trace element washability data on Illinois coals are based on float-sink methods, and these data are not applicable to modern froth flotation or column flotation processes. Particularly, there is a lack of washability data on samples from modern preparation plants, as well as other product (as-shipped) coals. The goal of this project is to provide the needed trace element washability data on as-shipped coals that were collected during 1992--1993 from Illinois mines. During the second quarter, froth flotation/release analysis (FF/RA) tests on 34 project samples were completed at {minus}100, {minus}200, and {minus}400 mesh particle sizes. Products from the FF/RA tests were analyzed for ash, moisture, and some for total S and heating value (BTU), and the resulting data are being used to construct a series of washability curves. For example, these curves can show variation in BTU or combustible recovery as a function of the amount of ash or S rejected. Composite samples, each having 80% of the total BTU (or combustibles), were prepared for the {minus}100 and {minus}200 mesh FF/RA tests and submitted for trace element analysis. The composite samples for the {minus}400 mesh FF/RA tests will be submitted soon, and the analytical results are expected to be available in 3--4 months. The trace element data on the composite samples will indicate the potential for the removal of each element from the coals at the chosen flotation conditions and particle sizes.

Demir, I.; Ruch, R.R.; Harvey, R.D.; Steele, J.D.; Khan, S. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Bose-Einstein condensation in dark power-law laser traps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate theoretically an original route to achieve Bose-Einstein condensation using dark power-law laser traps. We propose to create such traps with two crossing blue-detuned Laguerre-Gaussian optical beams. Controlling their azimuthal order l allows for the exploration of a multitude of power-law trapping situations in one, two, and three dimensions, ranging from the usual harmonic trap to an almost square-well potential, in which a quasihomogeneous Bose gas can be formed. The usual cigar-shaped and disk-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates obtained in a 1D or 2D harmonic trap take the generic form of a 'finger' or of a 'hockey puck' in such Laguerre-Gaussian traps. In addition, for a fixed atom number, higher transition temperatures are obtained in such configurations when compared with a harmonic trap of the same volume. This effect, which results in a substantial acceleration of the condensation dynamics, requires a better but still reasonable focusing of the Laguerre-Gaussian beams.

Jaouadi, A. [Universite Paris-Sud, Institut des Sciences Moleculaires d'Orsay (ISMO), F-91405 Orsay (France); CNRS, Orsay, F-91405 France (France); Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moleculaire et Applications (LSAMA), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science of Tunis, University of Tunis El Manar, T-2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Gaaloul, N. [Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Welfengarten 1, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universitaet, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Viaris de Lesegno, B.; Pruvost, L. [CNRS, Laboratoire Aime Cotton (LAC), F-91405 Orsay (France); Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay, F-91405 France (France); Telmini, M. [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moleculaire et Applications (LSAMA), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science of Tunis, University of Tunis El Manar, T-2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Charron, E. [Universite Paris-Sud, Institut des Sciences Moleculaires d'Orsay (ISMO), F-91405 Orsay (France); CNRS, Orsay, F-91405 (France)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Long-term drifts of stray electric fields in a Paul trap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the evolution of quasi-static stray electric fields in a linear Paul trap over a period of several months. Depending on how these electric fields are initially induced we observe very different time scales for the field drifts. Photo-induced electric fields decay on time scales of days. We interpret this as photo-electrically generated charges on insulating materials which decay via discharge currents. In contrast, stray fields due to the exposure of the ion trap to a beam of Ba atoms mainly exhibit slow dynamics on the order of months. We explain this observation as a consequence of a coating of the trap electrodes by the atomic beam. This may lead to contact potentials which can slowly drift over time due to atomic diffusion and chemical processes on the surface. In order not to perturb the field evolutions, we suppress the generation of additional charges and atomic coatings in the Paul trap during the measurements. For this, we shield the ion trap from ambient light and only allow the use of near-infrared lasers. Furthermore, we minimize the flux of atoms into the ion trap chamber. Long-term operation of our shielded trap led us to a regime of very low residual electric field drifts of less than 0.03 V/m per day.

Arne Härter; Artjom Krükow; Andreas Brunner; Johannes Hecker Denschlag

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

432

Long-term drifts of stray electric fields in a Paul trap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the evolution of stray electric fields in a linear Paul trap over a period of several months. We demonstrate a way to clearly distinguish between the two main sources of these fields, namely insulated charged up patches and patch charges originating from contact potentials. To achieve high sensitivity in these measurements, we operate the trap in a way that strongly suppresses the generation of additional patch charges. For this, we shield the ion trap from ambient light and only allow the use of near-infrared lasers. Furthermore, we minimize additional contaminations of the trap electrodes by minimizing the flux of atoms into the ion trap chamber. We find that photo-induced electric fields decay on time scales of days. In contrast, stray fields due to contamination-induced contact potentials on trap electrodes mainly exhibit slow dynamics on the order of months, probably dominated by diffusion and slow chemical processes. Long-term operation of our shielded trap led us to a regime of very low ...

Härter, Arne; Brunner, Andreas; Denschlag, Johannes Hecker

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Analysis of Short-Bunch Production with the APS Booster and a Bunch Compressor Michael Borland, AOD/OAG ∗ August 8, 2003 1 Abstract There is significant interest among x-ray scientists in short-pulse x-rays. The x-rays from the APS ring, although very bright, are produced by an electron bunch with an rms length of more than 30 ps. Typically, it is only a linear accelerator that can produce a very short bunch. An idea was brought to my attention by Glenn Decker that might allow us to produce a short bunch using the APS booster. This idea involves extracting the beam from the booster at 3 to 4 GeV, while it is still relatively short, then compressing it with a magnetic bunch compressor. In this note, we present a preliminary analysis of this idea, along with the related idea of using a nonequilibrium beam from the APS photoinjector. 2 Background We will begin with an examination of the ideal result

434

The PVM 3.4 tracing facility and XPVM 1.1  

SciTech Connect

One problem in developing a parallel program is monitoring its behavior for debugging and performance tuning. This paper discusses an enhanced tracing facility and tool for PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine), a message passing library for parallel processing in a heterogeneous environment. PVM supports mixed collections of workstation clusters, shared-memory multiprocessors, and massively parallel processors. The upcoming release of PVM, Version 3.4, contains a new, improved tracing facility which provides flexible, efficient access to run-time program information. This new tracing system supports a buffering mechanism to reduce perturbation of user applications caused by tracing, and a more flexible trace event definition scheme based on a self-defining data format. The new scheme expedites collection of program execution histories and allows for integration of user-defined custom trace events. Tracing instrumentation is built into the PVM library and allows on-the-fly adjustments to each task`s trace event mask, for control over the level of tracing detail. The graphical console and monitor XPVM have also been updated for better access to the new tracing functionality. Several new views have been implemented to utilize the additional tracing information now possible, including user-defined events. XPVM system has also been optimized for better real-time monitoring.

Kohl, J.A.; Geist, G.A.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Testing quantum physics in space using optically trapped nanospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent developments in space technology like micro-propulsion systems for drag-free control, thermal shielding, ultra-stable laser sources and stable optical cavities set an ideal platform for quantum optomechanical experiments with optically trapped dielectric spheres. Here, we will provide an overview of the results of recent studies aiming at the realization of the space mission MAQRO to test the foundations of quantum physics in a parameter regime orders of magnitude beyond existing experiments. In particular, we will discuss DECIDE, which is an experiment to prepare and then study a Schr\\"odinger-cat-type state, where a dielectric nanosphere of around 100nm radius is prepared in a superposition of being in two clearly distinct positions at the same time. This superposition leads to double-slit-type interference, and the visibility of the interference pattern will be compared to the predictions of quantum theory. This approach allows for testing for possible deviations from quantum theory as our test objects approach macroscopic dimensions. With DECIDE, it will be possible to distinctly test several prominent theoretical models that predict such deviations, for example: the Di\\'osi-Pensrose model, the continuous-spontaneous-localization model of Ghirardi, Rimini, Weber and Pearle, and the model of K\\'arolyh\\'azy.

Rainer Kaltenbaek

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

436

Dynamics of Methane Trapped in C(60) Interstices  

SciTech Connect

In order to understand the hindered rotational and vibrational dynamics of methane trapped in C{sub 60} interstices and to determine the structure around the interstitial site, they have carried out inelastic neutron scattering studies of the methane/C{sub 60} system. At temperatures of 20K and below, they observe inelastic peaks from rotational transitions of the CH{sub 4}. These transitions allow unambiguous assignment of the hindered rotational energy levels and a determination of the interaction potential. The appearance of two peaks for one of the J = 0{r_arrow}3 transitions implies the existence of two distinct kinds of interstitial sites and the measured transition energies suggest a rotational barrier of about 26 and 16 meV for these sites. Time-dependent changes in peak heights indicate slow t{sub 1/2} ({approx} 2.6 hrs) triplet{r_arrow}quintet nuclear spin conversion that necessarily accompanies the J = 1{r_arrow}0 rotational relaxation. They also have observed a sharp inelastic peak at 9.3 meV, which corresponds to a local vibrational mode of CH{sub 4} rattling in its cage at {approximately} 2.2 THz. Other peaks involving higher-energy vibrational excitations in CD{sub 4}/C{sub 60} correspond in energy to assigned peaks in the inelastic neutron scattering spectra of C{sub 60}, albeit sometimes with different intensities.

KING, HARRY F.; KWEI, GEORGE H.; MOROSIN, BRUNO; TROUW, FRANS

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Particle trap for compressed gas insulated transmission systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particle trap is provided for gas insulated transmission lines having a central high voltage conductor supported within an outer coaxial conductive sheath by a dielectric support member. A cavity between the inner conductor and outer sheath is filled with a dielectric insulating gas. A cone-like particle deflector, mounted to the inner conductor, deflects moving particles away from the support member, to radially outer portions of the cavity. A conductive shield is disposed adjacent the outer sheath to form a field-free region in radially outer portions of the cavity, between the shield and the sheath. Particles traveling along the cavity are deflected by the cone-like deflector into the field-free region where they are held immobile. In a vertical embodiment, particles enter the field-free region through an upper end of a gap formed between shield and sheath members. In a horizontal embodiment, the deflector cone has a base which is terminated radially internally of the shield. Apertures in the shield located adjacent the deflector allow passage of deflected particles into the field-free region. The dielectric support member is thereby protected from contaminating particles that may otherwise come to rest thereon.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Particle trap for compressed gas insulated transmission systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particle trap is provided for gas insulated transmission lines having a central high voltage conductor supported within an outer coaxial conductive sheath by a dielectric support member. A cavity between the inner conductor and outer sheath is filled with a dielectric insulating gas. A cone-like particle deflector, mounted to the inner conductor, deflects moving particles away from the support member, to radially outer portions of the cavity. A conductive shield is disposed adjacent the outer sheath to form a field-free region in radially outer portions of the cavity, between the shield and the sheath. Particles traveling along the cavity are deflected by the cone-like deflector into the field-free region where they are held immobile. In a vertical embodiment, particles enter the field-free region through an upper end of a gap formed between shield and sheath members. In a horizontal embodiment, the deflector cone has a base which is terminated radially internally of the shield. Apertures in the shield located adjacent the deflector allow passage of deflected particles into the field-free region. The dielectric support member is thereby protected from contaminating particles that may otherwise come to rest thereon.

Cookson, A.H.

1984-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

439

Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a certification framework (CF) for certifying the safety and effectiveness of geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites. Safety and effectiveness are achieved if CO{sub 2} and displaced brine have no significant impact on humans, other living things, resources, or the environment. In the CF, we relate effective trapping to CO{sub 2} leakage risk which takes into account both the impact and probability of leakage. We achieve simplicity in the CF by using (1) wells and faults as the potential leakage pathways, (2) compartments to represent environmental resources that may be impacted by leakage, (3) CO{sub 2} fluxes and concentrations in the compartments as proxies for impact to vulnerable entities, (4) broad ranges of storage formation properties to generate a catalog of simulated plume movements, and (5) probabilities of intersection of the CO{sub 2} plume with the conduits and compartments. We demonstrate the approach on a hypothetical GCS site in a Texas Gulf Coast saline formation. Through its generality and flexibility, the CF can contribute to the assessment of risk of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage as part of the certification process for licensing and permitting of GCS sites around the world regardless of the specific regulations in place in any given country.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Bryant, Steven L.; Nicot, Jean-Philippe

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Temperature-Driven Structural Phase Transition for Trapped Ions and a Proposal for its Experimental Detection  

SciTech Connect

A Wigner crystal formed with trapped ions can undergo a structural phase transition, which is determined only by the mechanical conditions on a classical level. Instead of this classical result, we show that through consideration of quantum and thermal fluctuation, a structural phase transition can be driven solely by a change in the system's temperature. We determine a finite-temperature phase diagram for trapped ions using the renormalization group method and the path integral formalism, and propose an experimental scheme to observe the predicted temperature-driven structural phase transition, which is well within the reach of the current ion trap technology.

Gong Zhexuan; Lin, G.-D.; Duan, L.-M. [Department of Physics and MCTP, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trap trace analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Method and apparatus for regenerating cold traps within liquid-metal systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Oxide and hydride impurities of a liquid metal such as sodium are removed from a cold trap by heating to a temperature at which the metal hydroxide is stable in a molten state. The partial pressure of hydrogen within the system is measured to determine if excess hydride or oxide is present. Excess hydride is removed by venting hydrogen gas while excess oxide can be converted to molten hydroxide through the addition of hydrogen. The resulting, molten hydroxide is drained from the trap which is then returned to service at cold trap temperatures within the liquid-metal system.

McKee, Jr., John M. (Hinsdale, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

TRImP - A new facility to produce and trap radioactive isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the Kernfysisch Vensneller Institiutr (KVI) in Groningen, NL, a new facility (TRImP) is under development. It aims for producing, slowing down, and trapping of radioactive isotopes in order to perform accurate measurements on fundamental symmetries and interactions. A production target station and a dual magnetic separator installed and commissioned. We will slow down the isotopes of interest using an ion catcher and in a further stage a radiofrequency quadropole gas cooler (RFQ). The isotopes will finally be trapped in an atomic trap for precision studies.

Sohani, M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

TRImP - A new facility to produce and trap radioactive isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the Kernfysisch Vensneller Institiutr (KVI) in Groningen, NL, a new facility (TRImP) is under development. It aims for producing, slowing down, and trapping of radioactive isotopes in order to perform accurate measurements on fundamental symmetries and interactions. A production target station and a dual magnetic separator installed and commissioned. We will slow down the isotopes of interest using an ion catcher and in a further stage a radiofrequency quadropole gas cooler (RFQ). The isotopes will finally be trapped in an atomic trap for precision studies.

M. Sohani

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

444

Radial transport of energetic ions in the presence of trapped electron mode turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nature of transport of hot ions is studied in the presence of microturbulence generated by the trapped electron mode in a Tokamak using massively parallel, first principle based global nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation, and with the help of a passive tracer method. Passing and trapped hot ions are observed to exhibit inverse and inverse square scaling with energy, while those with isotropic pitch distribution are found to exhibit inverse dependence on energy. For all types of hot ions, namely, isotropic, passing, and trapped, the radial transport appears to be subdiffusive for the parameters considered.

Chowdhury, J.; Wang, W.; Ethier, S.; Manickam, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Ganesh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Light Trapping for Thin Silicon Solar Cells by Femtosecond Laser Texturing: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Femtosecond laser texturing is used to create nano- to micron-scale surface roughness that strongly enhances light-trapping in thin crystalline silicon solar cells. Light trapping is crucial for thin solar cells where a single light-pass through the absorber is insufficient to capture the weakly absorbed red and near-infrared photons, especially with an indirect-gap semiconductor absorber layer such as crystalline Si which is less than 20 um thick. We achieve enhancement of the optical absorption from light-trapping that approaches the Yablonovitch limit.

Lee, B. G.; Lin, Y. T.; Sher, M. J.; Mazur, E.; Branz, H. M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Improved measurement accuracy in a Long Trace Profiler: Compensation for laser pointing instability  

SciTech Connect

Laser pointing instability adds to the error of slope measurements taken with the Long Trace Profiler (LTP). As with carriage pitch error, this laser pointing error must be accounted for and subtracted from the surface under test (SUT) slope measurement. In the past, a separate reference beam (REF) allowed characterization of the component of slope error from carriage pitch. However, the component of slope error from laser pointing manifests itself differently in the SUT measured slope. An analysis of angle error propagation is given, and the effect of these errors on measured slope is determined. Then a method is proposed for identifying these errors and subtracting them from the measured SUT slope function. Separate measurements of carriage pitch and laser pointing instability isolate these effects, so that the effectiveness of the error identification algorithm may be demonstrated.

Irick, S.C.

1993-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

447

Automatic Seedpoint Selection and Tracing of Microstructures in the Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope Mouse Brain Data Set  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope (KESM) enables imaging of an entire mouse brain at sub-micrometer resolution. By using the data sets from the KESM, we can trace the neuronal and vascular structures of the whole mouse brain. I investigated effective methods for automatic seedpoint selection on 3D data sets from the KESM. Furthermore, based on the detected seedpoints, I counted the total number of somata and traced the neuronal structures in the KESM data sets. In the first step, the acquired images from KESM were preprocessed as follows: inverting, noise filtering and contrast enhancement, merging, and stacking to create 3D volumes. Second, I used a morphological object detection algorithm to select seedpoints in the complex neuronal structures. Third, I used an interactive 3D seedpoint validation and a multi-scale approach to identify incorrectly detected somata due to the dense overlapping structures. Fourth, I counted the number of somata to investigate regional differences and morphological features of the mouse brain. Finally, I traced the neuronal structures using a local maximum intensity projection method that employs moving windows. The contributions of this work include reducing time required for setting seedpoints, decreasing the number of falsely detected somata, and improving 3D neuronal reconstruction and analysis performance.

Kim, Dongkun

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Triplet Transport to and Trapping by Acceptor End Groups on Conjugated  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Triplet Transport to and Trapping by Acceptor End Groups on Conjugated Triplet Transport to and Trapping by Acceptor End Groups on Conjugated Polyfluorene Chains Paiboon Sreearunothai, Alexis Estrada, Sadayuki Asaoka, Marta Kowalczyk, Seogjoo Jang, Andrew R. Cook, Jack M. Preses and John R. Miller J. Phys. Chem. C 115, 19569-19577 (2011). [Find paper at ACS Publications] Abstract: Triplet excited states created in polyfluorene (pF) molecules having average lengths up to 170 repeat units were transported to and captured by trap groups at the ends in less ~40 ns. Almost all of the triplets attached to the chains reached the trap groups, ruling out the presence of substantial numbers of defects that prevent transport. The transport yields a diffusion coefficient D of at least 3 x 10-4 cm2 s-1, which is 30 times typical molecular diffusion and close to a value for triplet transport

449

Additional Steam Traps Increase Production of a Drum Oven at a Petroleum Jelly Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Additional steam traps were installed on the drum oven at a petroleum jelly production facility at an ExxonMobil plant in Nigeria. The installation improved heat transfer and saved energy.

Not Available

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Integrated photonic structures for light trapping in thin-film Si solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the mechanisms for an efficient light trapping structure for thin-film silicon solar cells. The design combines a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and periodic gratings. Using photonic band theories and numerical ...

Sheng, Xing

451

Scattering of Coastal-Trapped Waves by Irregularities in Coastline and Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scattering of freely-propapting coastal-trapped waves (CTWs) by large variations in coastline and topography is studied using a numerical model which accomodates arbitrary density stratification, bathymetry and coastline. Particular attention ...

John L. Wilkin; David C. Chapman

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

The Scattering of Long Coastal-Trapped Waves in Frictional Seas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scattering of coastal-trapped waves (CTWs) by a region of irregular shelf bathymetry is determined from a circulation integral of the depth-integrated momentum equations. For relatively weak stratification the conservation of geostrophic mass ...

John F. Middleton; Mark A. Merrifield

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Bear Trap Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trap Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Trap Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bear Trap Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Bear Trap Hot Spring Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Norris, Montana Coordinates 45.5679836°, -111.690808° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

454

Effects of trap anisotropy on impurity scattering regime in a Fermi gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate the low-lying oscillation modes and the ballistic expansion properties of a harmonically trapped gas of fermionic K40 atoms containing thermal Rb87 impurities as functions of the anisotropy of the trap. Numerical results are obtained by solving the Vlasov-Landau equations for the one-body phase-space distribution functions and are used to test simple scaling Ansatzes. Starting from the gas in a weak impurity-scattering regime inside a spherical trap, the time scales associated to motions in the axial and azimuthal directions enter into competition as the trap is deformed to an elongated cigar-like shape. This competition gives rise to coexistence of collisionless and hydrodynamic behaviors in the low-lying surface modes of the gas as well as to a dependence of the aspect ratio of the expanding cloud on the collision time.

P. Capuzzi; P. Vignolo; M. P. Tosi

2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

455

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3, 2013 Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of...

456

An injection-locked 674 nm laser for Strontium-88 ion trapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy levels of the valence electron of a single trapped ??Sr+ ion can be harnessed as an effective qubit for quantum information processing. The qubit transition to a metastable energy state can be stimulated by a laser ...

Katz, Rena J. (Rena Jenelle)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

A Comparison of Long Coastal Trapped Wave Theory with Observations off Peru  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The agreement between coastal trapped wave theory and observation is studied for the case of observations made off Peru during the 1977 CUEA JOINT-II experiment. Wave properties are calculated using a numerical model with realistic, horizontally ...

K. H. Brink

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Synoptic Forcing Of Coastal-Trapped Disturbances in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated by recent observations along the west coast of the United States, the authors investigate the generation and propagation of coastal-trapped disturbances in the marine atmospheric boundary layer. Analytic solutions are obtained in a ...

A. M. Rogerson; R. M. Samelson

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Sensitivity of Coastally Trapped Disturbance Dynamics to Barrier Height and Topographic Variability in a Numerical Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of a coastally trapped disturbance (CTD) to topographic height is examined using simulations of the 15–18 May 1985 CTD. These simulations include three with uniform topography, in which the North American west coast mountains are ...

K. J. Tory; P. L. Jackson; C. J. C. Reason

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Scattering of Coastally Trapped Waves by Changes in Continental Shelf Width  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scattering of dispersive, barotropic, coastally-trapped waves by narrowing and widening shelves is investigated. The shelves considered maintain a shelf-similar exponential shape. For such shelves, previous investigators have shown that no ...

Ian Webster

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trap trace analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Technological assessment of light-trapping technology for thin-film Si solar cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proposed light trapping technology of Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) with Diffraction Grating (DG) and Anti-Reflection Coating (ARC) for thin film Si solar cell was analyzed from the technology, market, and ...

Susantyoko, Rahmat Agung

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Depletion, quantum jumps, and temperature measurements of ??Sr? ions in a linear Paul Trap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the design and construction of two laser systems to probe the 674nm transition of ??Sr? ions in a linear Paul trap. The first laser system made use of a molecular transition in Iodine to stabilize the ...

Richerme, Philip J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Mesoscale Eddy Formation and Shock Features Associated with a Coastally Trapped Disturbance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 28 August 2002, a visually striking sequence of events appeared in satellite imagery showing a coastally trapped disturbance (CTD) propagating northward along the coast of California against a northerly background flow. As a narrow tongue of ...

Stephen D. Burk; William T. Thompson

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Vertically aligned gas-insulated transmission line having particle traps at the inner conductor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Gas insulated electrical apparatus having first and second conductors separated by an insulating support within an insulating gas environment, and particle traps disposed along the surface of the high potential conductor for trapping and inactivating foreign particles which may be present within the insulating gas medium. Several embodiments of the invention were developed which are particularly suited for vertically aligned gas insulated transmission lines. The particle traps are grooves or cavities formed into the walls of the tubular inner conductor, without extending into the hollow portion of the conductor. In other embodiments, the traps are appendages or insert flanges extending from the inner conductor, with the insulator supports contacting the appendages instead of the inner conductor.

Dale, Steinar J. (Monroeville, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

A Modeling Study of Nonstationary Trapped Mountain Lee Waves. Part II: Nonlinearity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generation of nonstationary trapped mountain lee waves through nonlinear wave dynamics without any concomitant change in the background flow is investigated by conducting two-dimensional mountain wave simulations. These simulations ...

Louisa B. Nance; Dale R. Durran

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Cessation of the 22–25 June 2006 Coastally Trapped Wind Reversal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coastally trapped wind reversals (CTWRs) occur periodically in the marine boundary layer off the western coast of the United States and dramatically change the low-level wind regime and coastal weather. Southerly flow becomes established with the ...

David A. Rahn; Thomas R. Parish

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Sea Surface Mixed Layer during the 10–11 June 1994 California Coastally Trapped Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A midlevel, coastally trapped atmospheric event occurred along the California coast 10–11 June 1994. This feature reversed the surface wind field along the coast in a northerly phase progression. Along the central California coast, the winds at ...

C. E. Dorman; L. Armi; J. M. Bane; D. P. Rogers

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

468