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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dexin Wang Dexin Wang Principal Investigator Gas Technology Institute 1700 South Mount Prospect Rd Des Plaines, Il 60018 847-768-0533 dexin.wang@gastechnology.org TransporT MeMbrane Condenser for WaTer and energy reCovery froM poWer planT flue gas proMIs/projeCT no.: nT0005350 Background One area of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program's research is being performed to develop advanced technologies to reuse power plant cooling water and associated waste heat and to investigate methods to recover water from power plant flue gas. Considering the quantity of water withdrawn and consumed by power plants, any recovery or reuse of this water can significantly reduce the plant's water requirements. Coal occurs naturally with water present (3-60 weight %), and the combustion

2

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new waste heat and water recovery technology based on a nanoporous ceramic membrane vapor separation mechanism has been developed for power plant flue gas application. The recovered water vapor and its latent heat from the flue gas can increase the power plant boiler efficiency and reduce water consumption. This report describes the development of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in details for power plant flue gas application. The two-stage TMC design can achieve maximum heat and water recovery based on practical power plant flue gas and cooling water stream conditions. And the report includes: Two-stage TMC water and heat recovery system design based on potential host power plant coal fired flue gas conditions; Membrane performance optimization process based on the flue gas conditions, heat sink conditions, and water and heat transport rate requirement; Pilot-Scale Unit design, fabrication and performance validation test results. Laboratory test results showed the TMC system can exact significant amount of vapor and heat from the flue gases. The recovered water has been tested and proved of good quality, and the impact of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas on the membrane has been evaluated. The TMC pilot-scale system has been field tested with a slip stream of flue gas in a power plant to prove its long term real world operation performance. A TMC scale-up design approach has been investigated and an economic analysis of applying the technology has been performed.

Dexin Wang

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

3

Linear Motor Powered Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This special issue on linear-motor powered transportation covers both supporting technologies and innovative transport systems in various parts of the World, as this technology moves from the lab to commercial operations. ...

Thornton, Richard D.

4

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas Gas Technology Institute (GTI) will develop a membrane separation technology to recover water...

5

Water Transport Exploratory Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploratory Studies Exploratory Studies Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies 2007 kickoff meeting February 13-14, 2007 DOE Forrestal Building Rod Borup Mukundan Rangachary, Bryan Pivovar, Yu Seung Kim, John Davey, David Wood, Tom Springer, Muhammad Arif , Ken Chen, Simon Cleghorn, Will Johnson, Karren More, Peter Wilde, Tom Zawodzinski Los Alamos National Lab This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information Objectives * Develop understanding of water transport in PEM Fuel Cells (non-design-specific) * Evaluate structural and surface properties of materials affecting water transport and performance * Develop (enable) new components and operating methods * Accurately model water transport within the fuel cell * Develop a better understanding of the effects of

6

Transportation and Stationary Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat, hydrogen and power (CHHP) "trigeneration" systems can hypothetically be configured to provide (1

7

ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but the commercial electric vehicle industry continued tostrong interest in the electric vehicle industry to developTuyl, Effect of Electric Vehicles on the Power Industry, SAE

Cairns, Elton J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Research Addressing Power Plant Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Power Plant Water Management to Minimize Water Use while Providing Reliable Electricity Generation Water and Energy 2 Water and Energy are inextricably linked. Because...

9

NREL: Water Power Research - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Projects NREL's water power R&D projects support industry efforts to develop and deploy cost-effective water power...

10

NREL: Water Power Research - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications Access NREL publications on water power research. 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop Report. Driscoll, R.; NREL Report No. MP-5000-51584. 2011 Marine and Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop: Final Report. Li, Y.; NREL Report No. TP-5000-51421; DOE/GO-102011-3374. "Commercialization Path and Challenges for Marine Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy." 2011 IEEE PES (Power and Energy Society) General Meeting: The Electrification of Transportation and the Grid of the Future, 24-28 July 2011, Detroit, Michigan. Piscataway, NJ: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 8 pp.; NREL Report No. CP-5000-49959. Conventional Hydropower Technologies (Fact Sheet). Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP). (2011). 2 pp.; NREL Report No. FS-5000-52168;

11

High power gas transport laser  

SciTech Connect

Continuous wave output power from a gas transport laser is substantially increased by disposing a plurality of parallel cylindrically tubular cathodes in the main stream transversely of the direction of gas flow and spaced above a coextensive segmented anode in the opposite wall of the channel. Ballast resistors are connected between the cathodes, respectively, and the power supply to optimize the uniform arcless distribution of current passing between each cathode and the anode. Continuous output power greater than 3 kW is achieved with this electrode configuration.

Fahlen, T.S.; Kirk, R.F.

1978-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

12

NREL: Water Power Research - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis Grid Integration Read more about NREL's offshore wind research and development activities. Printable Version Water Power Research...

13

Water Transport and Sorption in Nafion Membrane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport and Sorption in Nafion Membrane Title Water Transport and Sorption in Nafion Membrane Publication Type Book Chapter Year of Publication 2012 Authors Kusoglu, Ahmet, and...

14

Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power Dams and Works (Virginia) Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power Dams and Works (Virginia)...

15

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Notices My stuff Energy blogs Login | Sign Up Search Facebook icon Twitter icon Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term > Water Power Forum Content Group...

16

Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Agenda...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I: Project Overview and Federal Perspective Moderator: Marc Melaina, NREL 1. Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Analysis Scope and Approach Fred Joseck, U.S....

17

Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop: "An...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seminar 2008 Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop "An Automaker's Views on the Transition to Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles" Phoenix, AZ 27 October 2008 Britta...

18

NETL Water and Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water and Power Plants Review Water and Power Plants Review A review meeting was held on June 20, 2006 of the NETL Water and Power Plants research program at the Pittsburgh NETL site. Thomas Feeley, Technology Manager for the Innovations for Existing Plants Program, gave background information and an overview of the Innovations for Existing Plants Water Program. Ongoing/Ending Projects Alternative Water Sources Michael DiFilippo, a consultant for EPRI, presented results from the project "Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities". John Rodgers, from Clemson University, presented results from the project "An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation".

19

Marietta Power & Water - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marietta Power & Water - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Marietta Power & Water - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For...

20

Water Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Gateway Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Water Power Jump to: navigation, search Water Power Basics High-level information about about water power: the clean, affordable electricity that will move our nation towards energy independence by harnessing tides, rivers, currents, wave, and marine energy. Click to learn about Hydropower: Hydroelectric-collage2.jpg When flowing water is captured and turned into electricity, it is called hydroelectric power or hydropower. Hydropower is the largest source of renewable electricity in the United States, allows the nation to avoid 200 million metric tons of carbon emissions each year, and is responsible for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Electricity for road transport, flexible power systems and wind power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

road transport, flexible power systems and wind power road transport, flexible power systems and wind power (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity for road transport, flexible power systems and wind power Country Denmark Coordinates 56.26392°, 9.501785° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.26392,"lon":9.501785,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water power Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry Water power OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum Graham7781 28 Mar 2013 - 15:16...

23

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term > Water Power Forum Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: Performance Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post...

24

Holyoke Water Power Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Holyoke Water Power Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Holyoke Water Power Company Place Massachusetts Utility Id 8779 Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes Activity...

25

Electrokinetic Power Generation from Liquid Water Microjets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrokinetic power generation using liquid water microjetscalculations of power generation and conversion efficiency.for electrokinetic power generation. By creating a jet of

Duffin, Andrew M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

3D Visualization of Water Transport in Ferns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3D Visualization of Water Transport in Ferns 3D Visualization of Water Transport in Ferns Print Monday, 08 April 2013 00:00 Plants transport water through elongated cells called...

27

Modeling water use at thermoelectric power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The withdrawal and consumption of water at thermoelectric power plants affects regional ecology and supply security of both water and electricity. The existing field data on US power plant water use, however, is of limited ...

Rutberg, Michael J. (Michael Jacob)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Water transport properties of fuel cell ionomers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We will report transport parameters measured for several available perfluorosulfonate membranes. The water sorption characteristics, diffusion coefficient of water, electroosmotic drag, and conductivity will be compared for these materials. The intrinsic properties of the membranes will be the basis of our comparison. An objective look at transport parameters should enable us to compare membranes without the skewing effects of extensive features such as membrane thickness. 8 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Springer, T.E.; Davey, J.; Valerio, J.; Gottesfeld, S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Fuel Cell Water Transport Mechanism  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Transport Mechanism Project Summary Full Title: Neutron Imaging Study of the Water Transport Mechanism in a Working Fuel Cell Project ID: 183 Principal Investigator: Muhammad...

30

OpenEI Community - Water power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgcommunitytaxonomyterm2330 en OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogopenei-launches-new-water-powe...

31

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities - EPRI The objective of this project is evaluation and development of the use of produced water...

32

Water power | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water power Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 28 March, 2013 - 15:16 OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum community...

33

Federal Incentives for Water Power (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the federal incentives available as of April 2013 for the development of water power technologies.

Not Available

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Modeling the Prospects for Hydrogen Powered Transportation Through 2100  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen fueled transportation has been proposed as a low carbon alternative to the current gasoline-powered

Sandoval, Reynaldo.

35

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internet-Based, GIS Catalog of Non-Traditional Sources of Cooling Water for Use at Coal-Fired Power Plants Internet-Based, GIS Catalog of Non-Traditional Sources of Cooling Water for Use at Coal-Fired Power Plants GIS Catalog Graphic Arthur Langhus Layne, LLC will create an internet-based, geographic information system (GIS) catalog of non-traditional sources of cooling water for coal-fired power plants. The project will develop data to identify the availability of oil and gas produced water, abandoned coal mine water, industrial waste water, and low-quality ground water. By pairing non-traditional water sources to power plant water needs, the research will allow power plants that are affected by water shortages to continue to operate at full-capacity without adversely affecting local communities or the environment. The nationwide catalog will identify the location, water withdrawal, and

36

Burbank Water and Power - Solar Water Heater Rebate Program (California) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Burbank Water and Power - Solar Water Heater Rebate Program Burbank Water and Power - Solar Water Heater Rebate Program (California) Burbank Water and Power - Solar Water Heater Rebate Program (California) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $1,500 Provider Rebates Burbank Water and Power is providing incentives for the purchase of solar water heaters. Incentives are only available to residential customers with electric water heaters. There is a limit of one solar water heater per year per property. Applicants must provide access to their residence for a pre-inspection to verify the existing use of an electric water heater. Customers must comply with all code and permit requirements. More

37

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Demands Using Alternative Water Supplies: Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Demands Using Alternative Water Supplies: Power Demand Options in Regions of Water Stress and Future Carbon Management Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting a regional modeling assessment of non-traditional water sources for use in thermoelectric power plants. The assessment includes the development of a model to characterize water quantity and quality from several sources of non-traditional water, initially focused within the Southeastern United States. The project includes four primary tasks: (1) identify water sources, needs, and treatment options; (2) assess and model non-traditional water quantity and quality; (3) identify and characterize water treatment options including an assessment of cost; and (4) develop a framework of metrics, processes, and modeling aspects that can be applied to other regions of the United States.

38

Wind Power Today, 2010, Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP)  

SciTech Connect

Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term > Water Power Forum Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: gateway Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry gateway OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum Graham7781 28 Mar 2013 - 15:16 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft Global Marine Renewable Energy Conference (GMREC) OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum Group members (8) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2084454102

40

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Water Management Power Plant Water Management The availability of clean and reliable sources of water is a critical issue across the United States and throughout the world. Under the Innovations for Existing Plants Program (IEP), the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has pursued an integrated water-energy R&D program that addresses water management issues relative to coal-based power generation. This initiative intended to clarify the link between energy and water, deepen the understanding of this link and its implications, and integrate current water-related R&D activities into a national water-energy R&D program. Please click on each research area for additional information. Non-Traditional Sources of Process and Cooling Water Non-Traditional Sources of Process and Cooling Water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides an overview of the Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program's water power research activities.

Not Available

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

NREL: Water Power Research - Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thadison, program coordinator Technical Management Fort Felker, center director, National Wind Technology Center Walter Musial, supervisor, offshore and water power systems Arielle...

43

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Polls Q & A Events Notices My stuff Linked Data Search: Community search... within: Water Power Forum Entire site People Search Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon...

44

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Extraction From Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas-Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Coal occurs naturally with water present (3-60 weight %), and the combustion...

45

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

would otherwise be evaporated from the stack. This water would then be available for power plant operations such as cooling tower or flue gas desulfurization make-up water. An...

46

Burbank Water and Power - Solar Water Heater Rebate Program ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burbank Water and Power - Solar Water Heater Rebate Program (California) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. No...

47

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Study of the Use of Saline Formations for Combined Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Needs and Carbon Sequestration at a Regional-Scale Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the...

48

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

including: assessment of the availability and proximity of impaired waters at twelve power plant locations spanning the major geographic regions of the continental 48 states;...

49

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Cooling Towers GE Global Research will develop treatment technologies to enable power plant use of non-traditional waters. Using effective treatment methods to make...

50

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

was to identify cost saving alternatives to the current coal- fired power plant cooling process using non-traditional water sources such as coal mine discharges....

51

Session 2A Water and Gas Transport Through Cementitious Materials  

Water and Gas Transport Through Cementitious Materials State of the art ... Novel methods for liquid permeability measurement of saturated ...

52

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term > Water Power Forum Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: numerical modeling Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Document numerical modeling MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Ocop 1 18 Apr 2013 - 13:56 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft Global Marine Renewable Energy Conference (GMREC) OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum Group members (8) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 208438428

53

NREL: Water Power Research Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerial photo of ocean waves breaking as they near the shore. Aerial photo of ocean waves breaking as they near the shore. NREL's water power technologies research leverages 35 years of experience developing renewable energy technologies to support the U.S. Department of Energy Water Power Program's efforts to research, test, evaluate, develop and demonstrate deployment of innovative water power technologies. These include marine and hydrokinetic technologies, a suite of renewable technologies that harness the energy from untapped wave, tidal, current and ocean thermal resources, as well as technologies and processes to improve the efficiency, flexibility, and environmental performance of hydropower generation. The vision of the water power team at NREL is to be an essential partner for the technical development and deployment of water power technologies.

54

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds CBS (1) community (1) Cost (1) Current (1) current energy (1) DOE (1) forum (1) gateway (1) GMREC (1) LCOE (2) levelized cost of energy (1) marine energy (1) MHK (1) numerical modeling (1) ocean energy (1) OpenEI (1) Performance (1) Tidal (1) Water power (1) Wave (1) Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft Global Marine Renewable Energy Conference (GMREC) OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum Group members (8) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

55

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term > Water Power Forum Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: community Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry community OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum Graham7781 28 Mar 2013 - 15:16 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... 2013 projects and funding Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft more Group members (10) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Vanessa.gregory Alison.labonte Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

56

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term > Water Power Forum Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: forum Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry forum OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum Graham7781 28 Mar 2013 - 15:16 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... 2013 projects and funding Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft more Group members (10) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Vanessa.gregory Alison.labonte Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

57

NREL: Water Power Research - Resource Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Characterization Resource Characterization Building on its success in wind resource characterization and assessment, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has extended its capabilities to the field of water power. NREL's team of scientists, engineers and computer experts has broad experience in physical oceanography, meteorology, modeling, data analysis, and Geographic Information Systems. Many years of experience in wind assessment have enabled NREL to develop the skills and methodologies to evaluate the development potential of many different water-based energy technologies. Read about NREL's current water power resource characterization projects. Printable Version Water Power Research Home Capabilities Design Review & Analysis Device & Component Testing

58

City of Glendale Water Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glendale Water Power Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Glendale Water & Power Place Glendale, California Zip 91206 Product California-based water and electrical utility. The...

59

Pasadena Water and Power - Solar Power Installation Rebate | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pasadena Water and Power - Solar Power Installation Rebate Pasadena Water and Power - Solar Power Installation Rebate Pasadena Water and Power - Solar Power Installation Rebate < Back Eligibility Commercial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Systems up to 30 kW have the option of receiving an expected performance based buydown (EPBB) or a performance based incentive (PBI). Systems larger than 30 kW are only eligible for the PBI. EPBB (effective 6/1/12): Residential: $1.40/watt AC Commercial and all PPAs: $0.85/watt AC Non-profits and Government: $1.60/watt AC Income-qualified residential: $4.00/watt PBI (effective 6/1/12): Residential: $0.212/kWh Commercial and all PPAs: $0.129/kWh

60

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application of Pulsed Electrical Fields for Advanced Cooling in Coal-Fired Power Plants Application of Pulsed Electrical Fields for Advanced Cooling in Coal-Fired Power Plants Drexel University is conducting research with the overall objective of developing technologies to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. The goal of this research is to develop a scale-prevention technology based on a novel filtration method and an integrated system of physical water treatment in an effort to reduce the amount of water needed for cooling tower blowdown. This objective is being pursued under two coordinated, National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored research and development projects. In both projects, pulsed electrical fields are employed to promote the precipitation and removal of mineral deposits from power plant cooling water, thereby allowing the water to be recirculated for longer periods of time before fresh makeup water has to be introduced into the cooling water system.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Water Management Power Plant Water Management A Synergistic Combination of Advanced Separation and Chemical Scale Inhibitor Technologies for Efficient Use of Impaired Water as Cooling Water in Coal-Based Power Plants – Nalco Company Example of Pipe Scaling The overall objective of this project, conducted by Nalco Company in partnership with Argonne National Laboratory, is to develop advanced-scale control technologies to enable coal-based power plants to use impaired water in recirculating cooling systems. The use of impaired water is currently challenged technically and economically due to additional physical and chemical treatment requirements to address scaling, corrosion, and biofouling. Nalco's research focuses on methods to economically manage scaling issues (see Figure 1). The overall approach uses synergistic

62

Water Use for Electric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes how thermoelectric plants use water and the strengths, limitations, and costs of available technologies for increasing water use efficiency (gal/MWh). The report will be of value to power company strategic planners, environmental managers, and generation managers as well as regulators, water resource managers, and environmentalists.

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

63

Simulation of water transport in heated rock salt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes computer simulation studies on water transport in German rock salt. Based on JOCKWERS experimental investigations on water content and water liberation, the object of these studies was to select a water transport model, that matches the water inflow which was measured in some heater experiments in the Asse Salt Mine. The main result is, that an evaporation front model, with Knudsen-type vapor transport combined with fluid transport by thermal expansion of the adsorbed water layers in the non evaporated zone, showed the best agreement with experimental evidence.

Schlich, M.; Jockwer, N.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Interfacial Water-Transport Effects in Proton-Exchange Membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1993,"TheContactAngle betweenWaterandtheSurfaceofDesorption,andTransportofWaterin PolymerElectrolyteVaporization?ExchangeModel forWaterSorptionandFluxin

Kienitz, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Use of Restored Wetlands to Enhance Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand on Surface Water Use The Use of Restored Wetlands to Enhance Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand on Surface Water Use Photo of a Temperate Wetland. Photo of a Temperate Wetland Applied Ecological Services, Inc. (AES) will study the use of restored wetlands to help alleviate the increasing stress on surface and groundwater resources from thermoelectric power plant cooling requirements. The project will develop water conservation and cooling strategies using restored wetlands. Furthermore, the project aims to demonstrate the benefits of reduced water usage with added economic and ecological values at thermoelectric power plant sites, including: enhancing carbon sequestration in the corresponding wetlands; improving net heat rates from existing power generation units; avoiding limitations when low-surface

66

"2012 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Transportation"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation" Transportation" "(Data from form EIA-861 schedule 4B)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Customers (Count)","Sales (Megawatthours)","Revenues (Thousands Dollars)","Average Price (cents/kWh)" "Northern California Power Agny","CA","Political Subdivision",1,366159,20892,5.705718 "Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","CT","Power Marketer",2,33816,2550.5,7.5422877 "HESS CORPORATION","CT","Power Marketer",1,106596,5490,5.1502871 "American PowerNet","DC","Power Marketer",1,148928,8161,5.4798292 "Reliant Energy Northeast LLC","DC","Power Marketer",1,200803,13152,6.5497029

67

Water Disclosure in the Electric Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This topical brief provides an overview of two of the prominent water disclosure mechanisms affecting the electric power industry, the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) and Carbon Disclosure Project Water Disclosure (CDP Water), and identifies connections to relevant EPRI research. The document was developed through EPRI's Program 55 Strategic Water Issues, and the Energy Sustainability Interest Group. This collaborative interest group was launched in 2008 and is made up of nearly 30 companies representi...

2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

68

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanofiltration Treatment Options for Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Treatment Demands Nanofiltration Treatment Options for Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Treatment Demands Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting a study on the use of nanofiltration (NF) treatment options to enable use of non-traditional water sources as an alternative to freshwater make-up for thermoelectric power plants. The project includes a technical and economic evaluation of NF for two types of water that contain moderate to high levels of total dissolved solids (TDS): (1) cooling tower recirculating water and (2) produced waters from oil & gas extraction operations. Reverse osmosis (RO) is the most mature and commonly considered option for high TDS water treatment. However, RO is generally considered to be too expensive to make treatment of produced waters for power plant use a feasible application. Therefore, SNL is investigating the use of NF, which could be a more cost effective treatment option than RO. Similar to RO, NF is a membrane-based process. Although NF is not as effective as RO for the removal of TDS (typical salt rejection is ~85 percent, compared to >95 percent for RO), its performance should be sufficient for typical power plant applications. In addition to its lower capital cost, an NF system should have lower operating costs because it requires less pressure to achieve an equivalent flux of product water.

69

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Air2Air™ Technology to Recover Fresh-Water from the Normal Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants – SPX Cooling Systems Use of Air2Air™ Technology to Recover Fresh-Water from the Normal Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants – SPX Cooling Systems In this project, SPX Cooling Systems, formerly Marley Cooling Technologies, Inc., evaluates the performance of its patented Air2Air(tm) condensing technology in cooling tower applications at coal-fired electric power plants. Researchers quantify Air2Air(tm) water conservation capabilities with results segmented by season and time of day. They determine the pressure drop and energy use during operation. Additionally, SPX Cooling Systems develops a collection method for the recovered water, analyzes water quality, and identifies potential on-site processes capable of utilizing the recovered water.

70

3D Visualization of Water Transport in Ferns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3D Visualization of Water Transport 3D Visualization of Water Transport in Ferns 3D Visualization of Water Transport in Ferns Print Monday, 08 April 2013 00:00 Plants transport water through elongated cells called xylem. However, in trees such as eucalyptus or redwood, the xylem tissue-better known as wood-bears the weight of the branches and leaves, giving rise to the often massive canopies characteristic of these species. We know much about water transport in woody plants, but considerably less about primitive plants such as ferns. Not only have ferns played an important role in the evolution of trees and shrubs but collectively, these plant forms are a fascinating study in contrasts because ferns use xylem strictly for water transport, leaving structural support to other tissues. Given the global distribution and impressive diversity of ferns, how has their xylem evolved to deal with variable habitat water availability?

71

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term > Water Power Forum Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: MHK Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Document MHK MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft Kch 1 18 Apr 2013 - 13:33 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... 2013 projects and funding Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft more Group members (10) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Vanessa.gregory Alison.labonte Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142253780

72

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term > Water Power Forum Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: marine energy Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Document marine energy MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft Kch 1 18 Apr 2013 - 13:33 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... 2013 projects and funding Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft more Group members (10) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Vanessa.gregory Alison.labonte Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

73

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term > Water Power Forum Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: Cost Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Document Cost MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Ocop 1 18 Apr 2013 - 13:56 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... 2013 projects and funding Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft more Group members (10) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Vanessa.gregory Alison.labonte Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142286501

74

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term > Water Power Forum Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: CBS Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Document CBS MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft Kch 1 18 Apr 2013 - 13:33 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... 2013 projects and funding Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft more Group members (10) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Vanessa.gregory Alison.labonte Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142234690

75

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term > Water Power Forum Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: Current Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Document Current MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Ocop 1 18 Apr 2013 - 13:56 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... 2013 projects and funding Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft more Group members (10) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Vanessa.gregory Alison.labonte Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142235402

76

EERE: Water Power Program Home Page  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

along with some recent developments in cutting edge technology facilitated by the Water Power Program. A map depicting U.S. hydropower potential. Top Ten Things You Didn't Know...

77

Loveland Water & Power- Refrigerator Recycling Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Loveland Water & Power is providing an incentive for its customers to recycle their old refrigerators. Interested customers can call the utility to arrange a time to pick up the old...

78

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry OpenEI OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum Graham7781 28 Mar 2013 - 15:16 Groups Menu You must...

79

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Innovative Fresh Water Production Process for Fossil Fired Power Plants An Innovative Fresh Water Production Process for Fossil Fired Power Plants Using Energy Stored in Main Condenser Cooling Water - University of Florida This project replaces the cooling tower in a fossil fired power plant with an innovative diffusion driven desalination (DDD) plant that will render the power plant a net producer of fresh water. The energy required to drive the desalination process comes from the main condenser cooling water, which would otherwise be discharged. Saline water is used to condense the low pressure steam exiting the turbine. The hot, saline water exiting the condenser is sprayed into the top of a diffusion tower. The diffusion tower is filled with high surface area packing material such as that used in air stripping towers to enhance the water/air surface area. Air is blown through the bottom of the tower and becomes humidified. The humidified air goes to a direct-contact condenser where the fresh water is condensed. This process has an advantage over conventional desalination technology in that it may be driven by waste heat with very low thermodynamic availability. Also, cold air is a byproduct of this process which can be used to cool buildings.

80

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management Carnegie Mellon University, in a joint effort with the University of Pittsburgh, is conducting a study of the use of treated municipal wastewater as cooling system makeup for coal fired power plants. This project builds upon a study sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy entitled, "Reuse of Treated Internal or External Wastewaters in the Cooling Systems of Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants," which showed that treated municipal wastewater is the most common and widespread source in the United States. Data analysis revealed that 81 percent of power plants proposed for construction by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) would have sufficient cooling water supply from one to two publicly owned treatment works (POTW) within a 10-mile radius, while 97 percent of the proposed power plants would be able to meet their cooling water needs with one to two POTWs within 25 miles of these plants. Thus, municipal wastewater will be the impaired water source most likely to be locally available in sufficient and reliable quantities for power plants. Results of initial studies indicate that it is feasible to use secondary treated municipal wastewater as cooling system makeup. The biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, and phosphorus in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, although current research is demonstrating that these problems can be controlled through aggressive chemical management. It is currently unclear whether tertiary treatment of municipal waste water prior to its re-use can be a cost-effective option to aggressive chemical management of the bulk cooling water volume.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Transport of radioactive droplet moisture from a source in a nuclear power plant spray pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In addition to a change in the microclimate in the region surrounding a nuclear power plant resulting from the emission of vapor form a cooling tower, evaporation of water from the water surface of a cooling pond or a spray pond, in the latter case direct radioactive contamination of the underlying surface around the nuclear power plant can also occur due to discharge of process water (radioactive) into the pond and its transport in the air over a certain distance in the form of droplet moisture. A typical example may be the situation at the Zaporozhe nuclear power plant in 1986 when accidental discharge of process water into the cooling pond occurred. Below we present a solution for the problem of transport of droplet moisture taking into account its evaporation, which may be used to estimate the scale of radioactive contamination of the locality.

Elokhin, A.P.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Intensity of Transportation. Environmental Science &and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model, Version 1.5.Water Intensity of Transportation. Environmental Science &

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

against * steady state and transient operational cell data. Complete fuel cell water transport model improvements * and code package development to include two phase flow....

84

Neutron Imaging Study of the Water Transport in Operating Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Durability (B) Cost (C) Performance This project is conducting fundamental studies of water transport in the fuel cell. Insights gained from these studies will be applied toward...

85

Before Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Before Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Testimony of Mark Gabriel, Administrator WAPA...

86

Before House Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

House Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources Before House Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources Before House Subcommittee on...

87

FirstEnergy (West Penn Power) - Residential Solar Water Heating...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FirstEnergy (West Penn Power) - Residential Solar Water Heating Program (Pennsylvania) FirstEnergy (West Penn Power) - Residential Solar Water Heating Program (Pennsylvania)...

88

City Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs City Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Eligibility Commercial Nonprofit...

89

Burbank Water & Power - Energy Solutions Business Rebate Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Burbank Water & Power - Energy Solutions Business Rebate Program Burbank Water & Power - Energy Solutions Business Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Nonprofit Savings For...

90

Loveland Water & Power - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here Home Savings Loveland Water & Power - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Loveland Water & Power - Commercial and Industrial Energy...

91

Burbank Water & Power - Green Building Incentive Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Savings Burbank Water & Power - Green Building Incentive Program Burbank Water & Power - Green Building Incentive Program...

92

Safe Harbor Water Power Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harbor Water Power Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Safe Harbor Water Power Corp Place Pennsylvania Utility Id 16537 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC...

93

Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Session...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is the light duty vehicle OEM strategy? * Are there viable renewable pathways? * biogas (WWTP) landfill gas ? * utility scale solarwind power? * Do we have the...

94

Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Attendees...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shawna Energetics Incorporated Melaina Marc NREL Moreland Greg Sentech Novachek Frank Xcel Energy Patel Pinakin FuelCell Energy Penev Michael NREL Petri Randy Versa Power Systems...

95

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Groups > Groups > Water Power Forum Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds There are no feeds from external sites for this group. Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Group members (10) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Vanessa.gregory Alison.labonte Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel Recent content Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... 2013 projects and funding Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft more Group members (10) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Vanessa.gregory Alison.labonte Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load)

96

Water Power Program Contacts and Organization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Power Program Contacts and Organization Water Power Program Contacts and Organization Water Power Program Contacts and Organization The Wind and Water Power Technologies Office within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) supports the development, deployment, and commercialization of wind and water power technologies. The Wind and Water Power Technologies Office is one Office that contains two distinct Programs: wind and water. The Wind Program and the Water Power Program operate as integrated, but separate entities within the office. Organization This organization chart shows the management structure for the Water Power Program. This organization chart shows the management structure for the Water Power Program. General Information U.S. Department of Energy - Water Power Program

97

Electrokinetic Power Generation from Liquid Water Microjets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although electrokinetic effects are not new, only recently have they been investigated for possible use in energy conversion devices. We have recently reported the electrokinetic generation of molecular hydrogen from rapidly flowing liquid water microjets [Duffin et al. JPCC 2007, 111, 12031]. Here, we describe the use of liquid water microjets for direct conversion of electrokinetic energy to electrical power. Previous studies of electrokinetic power production have reported low efficiencies ({approx}3%), limited by back conduction of ions at the surface and in the bulk liquid. Liquid microjets eliminate energy dissipation due to back conduction and, measuring only at the jet target, yield conversion efficiencies exceeding 10%.

Duffin, Andrew M.; Saykally, Richard J.

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduction of Water Use in Wet FGD Systems – USR Group, Inc. Reduction of Water Use in Wet FGD Systems – USR Group, Inc. The project team demonstrates the use of regenerative heat exchange to reduce flue gas temperature and minimize evaporative water consumption in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired boilers. Most water consumption in coal-fired power plants occurs due to evaporative water losses. For example, a 500-megawatt (MW) power plant will loose approximately 5,000 - 6,000 gallons per minute (gpm) to evaporation and 500 gpm in the wet FGD system. Installation of regenerative reheat on FGD systems is expected to reduce water consumption to one half of water consumption using conventional FGD technology. Electrostatic Precipitator Researchers are conducting pilot-scale tests of regenerative heat exchange to determine the reduction in FGD water consumption that can be achieved and assessing the resulting impact on air pollution control (APC) systems. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc. as the prime contractor, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Southern Company, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI). The team is conducting an analysis of the improvement in the performance of the APC systems and the resulting reduction in capital and operating costs. The tests are intended to determine the impact of operation at cooler flue gas temperatures on FGD water consumption, electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate removal (see Figure 1), SO3 removal, and Hg removal. Additionally, tests are conducted to assess the potential negative impact of excessive corrosion rates in the regenerative heat exchanger.

99

Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants, December 2010 Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants, December 2010 Energy and water are both essential to sustainable development and economic productivity. Ample supplies of water are essential to energy production, and water management is dependent on ample supplies of energy for water treatment and transportation. The critical nexus between energy and water has been recognized in a variety of recent studies, but the policy and regulatory machinery that this nexus depends on is not keeping up with the growing challenges. Population growth and societal demand for improved quality of life will require more clean water for drinking and sanitation, more water for

100

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers Pilot-Scale Condensing Heat Exchanger Tubing Pilot-Scale Condensing Heat Exchanger Tubing Lehigh University will conduct pilot-scale testing of a condensing heat exchanger to recover water from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Testing will include using a slipstream of flue gas from a natural gas-fired boiler with sulfur trioxide injection and slipstreams of flue gas from two coal-fired boilers. The project continues the development of condensing heat exchanger technology for coal-fired boilers initially started under the U.S. Department of Energy's Project DE-FC26-06NT42727 (Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas). In particular, Lehigh researchers will: (1) expand the database on water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Features > Groups Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Content type Blog entry Discussion Document Event Poll Question Keywords Author Apply NickL Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... Posted by: NickL 13 Dec 2013 - 14:38 Hi Vanessa- I connected with one of our MHK experts regarding your question, please see his responses below: 1. There was only one US commercial deployment (selling power to a utility) in... Vanessa.gregory 2013 projects and funding Posted by: Vanessa.gregory 13 Dec 2013 - 09:12 Good morning, I am researching energy generation from waves, tides, ocean currents, and marine thermal gradients for a report and I am looking for two specific sets of information. 1. Any new U.... Alison.labonte Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers

102

Corrosion Product Transport during Boiling Water Reactor and Pressurized Water Reactor Startups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrosion product transport to Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) steam generators and to the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) reactor vessel during startups is of increased interest due to reductions in feedwater transport rates during normal operation and the recent emphasis on minimizing total transport during the cycle. Reductions in transport will reduce deposition on the fuel and the tendency for hot spot formation in BWRs and reduce surface fouling and the tendency for formation of aggressive chemical sol...

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

103

Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal reports Coal reports Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector With Data through 2010 | Release Date: November 16, 2012 | Next Release Date: December 2013 | Correction Previous editions Year: 2011 2004 Go Figure 1. Deliveries from major coal basins to electric power plants by rail, 2010 Background In this latest release of Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) significantly expands upon prior versions of this report with the incorporation of new EIA survey data. Figure 1. Percent of total U.S. rail shipments represented in data figure data Previously, EIA relied solely on data from the U.S. Surface Transportation Board (STB), specifically their confidential Carload Waybill Sample. While valuable, due to the statistical nature of the Waybill data,

104

NREL: Water Power Research - Economic and Power System Modeling and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis NREL has a long history of successful research to understand and improve the cost of renewable energy technologies, their possible deployment scenarios, and the economic impacts of this deployment. As a research laboratory, NREL is a neutral third party and can provide an unbiased perspective of methodologies and approaches used to estimate direct and indirect economic impacts of offshore renewable energy projects. Deployment and Economic Impact NREL's economic analysis team is working to provide stakeholders with the tools necessary to understand potential deployment scenarios of water power technologies and the economic impacts of this deployment. The team is working to improve the representation of marine and

105

Role of Water States on Water Uptake and Proton Transport in Nafion using  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of Water States on Water Uptake and Proton Transport in Nafion using Role of Water States on Water Uptake and Proton Transport in Nafion using Molecular Simulations and Bimodal Network Title Role of Water States on Water Uptake and Proton Transport in Nafion using Molecular Simulations and Bimodal Network Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL5396E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Hwang, Gi Suk, Massoud Kaviany, Jeffrey T. Gostick, Brian L. Kienitz, Adam Z. Weber, and Moo Hwan Kim Journal Polymer Volume 52 Start Page 2584 Issue 12 Pagination 2584-2593 Date Published 05/2011 Keywords Proton conductivity, Water diffusivity, Water uptake Abstract Using molecular simulations and a bimodal-domain network, the role of water state on Nafion water uptake and water and proton transport is investigated. Although the smaller domains provide moderate transport pathways, their effectiveness remains low due to strong, resistive water molecules/domain surface interactions. The water occupancy of the larger domains yields bulk-like water, and causes the observed transition in the water uptake and significant increases in transport properties.

106

Rail Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis & Projections Analysis & Projections ‹ See all Coal Reports Rail Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector Release Date: June 16, 2011 | Next Release Date: July 2012 | full report Introduction The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is releasing a series of estimated data based on the confidential, carload waybill sample obtained from the U.S. Surface Transportation Board (Carload Waybill Sample). These estimated data represent a continuation of EIA's data and analysis products related to coal rail transportation. These estimated data also address a need expressed by EIA's customers for more detailed coal transportation rate data. Having accurate coal rail transportation rate data is important to understanding the price of electricity for two main reasons. First,

107

PEM fuel cells for transportation and stationary power generation applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe recent activities at LANL devoted to polymer electrolyte fuel cells in the contexts of stationary power generation and transportation applications. A low cost/high performance hydrogen or reformate/air stack technology is being developed based on ultralow Pt loadings and on non-machined, inexpensive elements for flow-fields and bipolar plates. On board methanol reforming is compared to the option of direct methanol fuel cells because of recent significant power density increases demonstrated in the latter.

Cleghorn, S.J.; Ren, X.; Springer, T.E.; Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Gottesfeld, S.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Understanding Water Uptake and Transport in Nafion Using X-ray...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Understanding Water Uptake and Transport in Nafion Using X-ray Microtomography Title Understanding Water Uptake and Transport in Nafion Using X-ray Microtomography Publication Type...

109

NREL: Water Power Research - Grid Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grid Integration Grid Integration High-voltage transmission lines and towers silouetted against a blue sky with the first glow of the rising sun on the horizon behind them. The national need for transmission improvements will have a direct impact on the effective use of renewable energy sources. For marine and hydrokinetic technologies to play a larger role in supplying the nation's energy needs, integration into the U.S. power grid is an important challenge to address. Efficient integration of variable power resources like water power is a critical part of the deployment planning and commercialization process. Variable and weather-dependent resources can create operational concerns for grid operators. These concerns include conventional generation ramping, load/generation balancing, and planning

110

Before the House Subcommittee on Water and Power | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Before The Subcommittee On Water And Power, Committee On Natural Resources, U.S. House Of Representatives Subject: Western Area Power Administration's Borrowing Authority...

111

Evaluating the costs of desalination and water transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Working paper FNU-41 revised Many regions of the world are facing formidable freshwater scarcity. Although there is substantial scope for economizing on the consumption of water without affecting its service level, the main response to water scarcity has been to increase the supply. To a large extent, this is done by transporting water from places where it is abundant to places where it is scarce. At a smaller scale, and without a lot of public and political attention, people have started to tap into the sheer limitless resource of desalinated water. This study looks at the development of desalination and its costs over time. The unit costs of desalinated water for five main processes are evaluated, followed by regressions to analyze the main influencing factors to the costs. The unit costs for all processes have fallen considerably over the years. This study suggests that a cost of 1 $/m 3 for seawater desalination and 0.6 $/m 3 for brackish water would be feasible today. The costs will continue to decline in the future as technology progresses. In addition, a literature review on the costs of water transport is conducted in order to estimate the total cost of desalination and the transport of desalinated water to selected water stress cities. Transport costs range from a few cents per cubic meter to over a dollar. A 100 m vertical lift is about as costly as a 100 km horizontal transport (0.05-0.06$/m 3). Transport makes desalinated water prohibitively expensive in highlands and continental interiors, but not elsewhere.

Yuan Zhou A; Richard S. J. Tol B

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Evaluating the costs of desalination and water transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] Many regions of the world are facing formidable freshwater scarcity. Although there is substantial scope for economizing on the consumption of water without affecting its service level, the main response to water scarcity has been to increase the supply. To a large extent, this is done by transporting water from places where it is abundant to places where it is scarce. At a smaller scale and without a lot of public and political attention, people have started to tap into the sheer limitless resource of desalinated water. This study looks at the development of desalination and its costs over time. The unit costs of desalinated water for five main processes are evaluated, followed by regressions to analyze the main influencing factors to the costs. The unit costs for all processes have fallen considerably over the years. This study suggests that a cost of $1/m 3 for seawater desalination and $0.6/m 3 for brackish water would be feasible today. The costs will continue to decline in the future as technology progresses. In addition, a literature review on the costs of water transport is conducted in order to estimate the total cost of desalination and the transport of desalinated water to selected water stress cities. Transport costs range from a few cents per cubic meter to over a dollar. A 100 m vertical lift is about as costly as a 100 km horizontal transport ($0.050.06/m 3). Transport makes desalinated water prohibitively expensive in highlands and continental interiors but not elsewhere.

Yuan Zhou; Richard S. J. Tol

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Liquid-fueled SOFC power sources for transportation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Traditionally, fuel cells have been developed for space or stationary terrestrial applications. As the first commercial 200-kW systems were being introduced by ONSI and Fuji Electric, the potentially much larger, but also more challenging, application in transportation was beginning to be addressed. As a result, fuel cell-powered buses have been designed and built, and R&D programs for fuel cell-powered passenger cars have been initiated. The engineering challenge of eventually replacing the internal combustion engine in buses, trucks, and passenger cars with fuel cell systems is to achieve much higher power densities and much lower costs than obtainable in systems designed for stationary applications. At present, the leading fuel cell candidate for transportation applications is, without question, the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). Offering ambient temperature start-up and the potential for a relatively high power density, the polymer technology has attracted the interest of automotive manufacturers worldwide. But the difficulties of fuel handling for the PEFC have led to a growing interest in exploring the prospects for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) operating on liquid fuels for transportation applications. Solid oxide fuel cells are much more compatible with liquid fuels (methanol or other hydrocarbons) and are potentially capable of power densities high enough for vehicular use. Two SOFC options for such use are discussed in this report.

Myles, K.M.; Doshi, R.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Water Power Forum - Q & A | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum - Q & A Home > Water Power Forum Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds No questions have been added to this group yet. Groups Menu You must login in order to...

115

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmentally-Safe Control of Zebra Mussel Fouling - Environmentally-Safe Control of Zebra Mussel Fouling - New York State Education Department Coal-fired power plants within North America need an effective, economical, and non-polluting technique for managing infestations of zebra mussels within their facilities, particularly in cooling water intake systems. Unfortunately, due to a lack of options, many facilities have relied on the use of broad-spectrum, chemical biocides for control of these freshwater, macro-fouling mussels. Biocide treatments, such as continuous chlorination for three weeks, are widely regarded as environmentally unacceptable. Chlorine, for example, can combine with organic compounds in water resulting in the formation of trihalomethanes, dioxins, and other potentially carcinogenic substances. Because of this, there is growing concern within the power generation industry that such broad-spectrum biocides will be banned by individual states and/or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This would result in a crisis situation for the electric utility industry. Even if such an outright ban does not occur, the reduction in the use of such biocides is generally viewed by coal-fired and other power generating industries as environmentally prudent and desirable.

116

Electric Power Plant Cooling Water Intakes and Related Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of Drought on U.S. Steam Impact of Drought on U.S. Steam Electric Power Plant Cooling Water Intakes and Related Water Resource Management Issues April 2009 DOE/NETL-2009/1364 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

117

Marietta Power and Water - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marietta Power and Water - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Marietta Power and Water - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Marietta Power and Water - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate $500 Program Info State Georgia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Heat Pump: $150 Water Heater: $250 Heat Pump and Water Heater: $500 Provider Marietta Power and Water Marietta Power and Water provides rebates for electric water heaters ($250) and electric and dual-fuel heat pumps ($150). If both a water heater and heat pump are installed simultaneously, a rebate of $500 is available. Electric and dual-fuel heat pumps may be installed in newly constructed

118

Water Power Program: Program Plans, Implementation, and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Power Program Water Power Program HOME ABOUT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES INFORMATION RESOURCES NEWS EVENTS EERE » Water Power Program » About Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Budget Peer Review 2011 Contacts Plans, Implementation, and Results Here you'll find an overview of the Water Power Program and links to its program planning, implementation, and results documents. This list summarizes the program's water power research, development, and demonstration activities. Read more about: Overview Learn more about this EERE Office. Plans Discover the plans, budgets, and analyses that set the direction of office priorities and activities. Implementation Find out how the office controls, implements, and adjusts its plans and manages its activities.

119

Water Power Program: Program Plans, Implementation, and Results  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Power Program Water Power Program HOME ABOUT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES INFORMATION RESOURCES NEWS EVENTS EERE » Water Power Program » About Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Budget Peer Review 2011 Contacts Plans, Implementation, and Results Here you'll find an overview of the Water Power Program and links to its program planning, implementation, and results documents. This list summarizes the program's water power research, development, and demonstration activities. Read more about: Overview Learn more about this EERE Office. Plans Discover the plans, budgets, and analyses that set the direction of office priorities and activities. Implementation Find out how the office controls, implements, and adjusts its plans and manages its activities.

120

Consolidated Water Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Consolidated Water Power Co Place Wisconsin Utility Id 4247 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.0843/kWh Commercial: $0.0557/kWh Industrial: $0.0533/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Consolidated Water Power Co (Wisconsin). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Water Use for Power Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Use for Power Production Water Use for Power Production Project Summary Full Title: Consumptive Water Use for U.S. Power Production Project ID: 205 Principal Investigator: Paul Torcellini Keywords: Water, energy use, electricity generation Purpose Estimate the water consumption at power plants to provide a metric for determining water efficiency in building cooling systems. Performer Principal Investigator: Paul Torcellini Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Address: 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 Telephone: 303-384-7528 Email: paul_torcellini@nrel.gov Additional Performers: R. Judkoff, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; N. Long, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Period of Performance End: December 2003 Project Description Type of Project: Analysis

122

Role of Water States on Water Uptake and Proton Transport in Nafion using Molecular Simulations and Bimodal Network  

SciTech Connect

Using molecular simulations and a bimodal domain network, the role of water state on Nafion water uptake and water and proton transport is investigated. Although the smaller domains provide moderate transport pathways, their effectiveness remains low due to strong, resistive water molecules/domain surface interactions. The water occupancy of the larger domains yields bulk-like water, and causes the observed transition in the water uptake and significant increases in transport properties.

Michigan, U.; Hwang, Gi Suk; Kaviany, Massoud; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Kientiz, Brian; Weber, Adam Z.; Kim, Moo Hwan

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

123

Electrokinetic Power Generation from Liquid Water Microjets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrokinetic energy to electrical power. Previous studiescurrents to generate electrical power have employed twodetermine the electrical power that can be generated from

Duffin, Andrew M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $1,000 Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Provider Energy Efficiency '''''This program reopened on October 3, 2011 for 2012 applications. Funding is limited and must be reserved through online application before the installation of qualifying solar water heating systems. See Gulf Power's [http://www.gulfpower.com/renewable/solarThermal.asp Solar Water Heating] web site for more information.''''' Gulf Power offers a Solar Thermal Water Heating rebate to customers who install water heaters. This program started after the original pilot

125

Investigating the adsorption and transport of water in MFI zeolite pores for water desalination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The permeability of reverse osmosis membranes is limited by the diffusive transport of water across a non-porous polyamide active layer. Alternatively, fabricating a microporous active layer capable of rejecting salt ions ...

Humplik, Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transportation and Stationary Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop On October 27, 2008, more than 55 participants from industry, state and federal government, utilities, national laboratories, and other groups met to discuss the topic of integrating stationary fuel cell combined heat and power (CHP) systems and hydrogen production infrastructure for vehicles. The workshop was co-hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Fuel Cell Council, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and was held in conjunction with the Fuel Cell Seminar in Phoenix, Arizona. Plenary presentations provided an overview of the integration concept and perspective on the opportunity from federal, state and industry organizations. Workshop participants met in breakout sessions to consider the potential to leverage early hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure requirements by co-producing hydrogen in stationary fuel cell CHP applications at select facilities (e.g., military bases, postal facilities, airports, hospitals, etc.). The efficiency, reliability, and emissions benefits of these CHP systems have the potential to offset the up-front capital costs and financial risks associated with producing hydrogen for early vehicle markets.

127

Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Earth |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Earth Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Earth May 29, 2013 - 12:07pm Addthis A sample image from the AWSIS system. A sample image from the AWSIS system. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy Sobering news from experts: Rising populations, regional droughts, and decreasing groundwater levels are draining the nation's fresh water supply. And it's not just that we're using that water for our personal consumption; even the electricity we rely on to power our society requires a lot of water. In fact, major energy producers - like coal-fired power plants, which produce about 40 percent of our electricity - require about 150 billion gallons of fresh water per day to produce the electricity we

128

Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Earth |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Earth Finding Alternative Water Sources for Power Plants with Google Earth May 29, 2013 - 12:07pm Addthis A sample image from the AWSIS system. A sample image from the AWSIS system. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy Sobering news from experts: Rising populations, regional droughts, and decreasing groundwater levels are draining the nation's fresh water supply. And it's not just that we're using that water for our personal consumption; even the electricity we rely on to power our society requires a lot of water. In fact, major energy producers - like coal-fired power plants, which produce about 40 percent of our electricity - require about 150 billion gallons of fresh water per day to produce the electricity we

129

Loveland Water and Power - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a majority of the cost of the upgrades but the customer will be invoiced 0.04 per square foot. Contact Loveland Water and Power, or visit the Platte River Power Authority...

130

Use of Alternate Water Sources for Power Plant Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report lays out a framework developed to evaluate the potential use of non-traditional water supplies for cooling new or existing power plants. The report will be of value to environment, generation, and planning managers within power companies.

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Water Cooling of High Power Light Emitting Diode Henrik Srensen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Cooling of High Power Light Emitting Diode Henrik Sørensen Department of Energy Technology and product lifetime. The high power Light Emitting Diodes (LED) belongs to the group of electronics

Sørensen, Henrik

132

City Water Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City Water Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate City Water Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs City Water Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate Refrigerator Recycling: 2 units Insulation: $1,000 Program Info State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washer: $150 Central Air Conditioner: $9 per kBTUh Air-Source Heat Pumps: $300/ton Geothermal Heat Pump: $500 Refrigerator Recycling: $50 per appliance Insulation: 30% Provider Energy Services Office City Water Light and Power (CWLP) offers rebates to Springfield residential

133

Loveland Water & Power - Home Energy Audit Rebate Program (Colorado) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loveland Water & Power - Home Energy Audit Rebate Program Loveland Water & Power - Home Energy Audit Rebate Program (Colorado) Loveland Water & Power - Home Energy Audit Rebate Program (Colorado) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Manufacturing Heating Heat Pumps Insulation Maximum Rebate $500 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 50% of the cost up to $500 Loveland Water and Power (LWP) is providing an incentive for customers living in single-family detached homes or attached townhouses that wish to upgrade the energy efficiency of eligible homes. Customers can schedule a

134

Before the House Subcommittee on Water and Power | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Before The Subcommittee on Water And Power Committee on Natural Resources, U.S. House Of Representatives Subject: H.R. 1719, which, if enacted, would direct the...

135

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY - Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY August 2005 Revised May 2007 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory DOE Gasification...

136

Available Technologies: Heat-powered Water Pump and Purifier  

Berkeley Lab engineer Leif Steinhour has developed a heat-powered pump that purifies water while moving the fluid. The technology requires no moving ...

137

Glendale Water and Power - Small Business Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Information California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Installation of Energy-Saving Upgrades: Free Glendale Water and Power offers incentives to small business...

138

NREL: Water Power Research - Device and Component Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing NREL houses the nation's premier laboratory facilities for testing offshore wind and water power devices and maintains a staff of offshore-trained test engineers and...

139

City Water Light and Power - Solar Rewards Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Rewards Program City Water Light and Power - Solar Rewards Program Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings For Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate 15,000 per...

140

Use of Reclaimed Water for Power Plant Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTENTS Chapter 1 - Introduction .......................................................................................................... 1 Power Plants Need Water .................................................................................................. 1 Meeting Water Demands in a Water-Constrained Environment ....................................... 3 Purpose and Structure of the Report .................................................................................. 3 Chapter 2 - Database of Reclaimed Water Use for Cooling ................................................... 5 Data Collection .................................................................................................................. 5 The Database...................................................................................................................... 7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Musings on Water (and Power) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Musings on Water (and Power) Musings on Water (and Power) Musings on Water (and Power) January 9, 2012 - 4:46pm Addthis Stephanie Price Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Yes, this is energy related, very directly in my case. My household water comes from a well, and every drop of water that I use in the house has to be pumped out of the ground by an electrically operated pump; therefore, the less water I use, the less the pump has to operate, and the less electricity is used. (This is true for municipal water users too - there's a lot of electricity involved in providing potable water to a city and treating the wastewater.) This past summer I replaced my bathroom faucets with low-flow faucets (kitchen yet to be done). The showerheads are also low flow, as are the toilets, which were replaced years ago, which helps reduce water (and

142

Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 January 27, 2012 - 11:30am Addthis A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams. The East Coast, as shown above, has strong tides that could be tapped to produce energy. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams. The East Coast, as shown above, has strong tides that could be tapped to produce energy. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology Hoyt Battey Water Power Market Acceleration and Deployment Team Lead, Wind and Water Power Program

143

Desalination-of water by vapor-phase transport through hydrophobic nanopores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a new approach to desalination of water whereby a pressure difference across a vapor-trapping nanopore induces selective transport of water by isothermal evaporation and condensation across the pore. Transport ...

Lee, Jongho

144

Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt Based Repository Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt Based...

145

Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power Dams and Works  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power Dams Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power Dams and Works (Virginia) Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power Dams and Works (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia State Corporation Commission It is the policy of the Commonwealth of Virginia to encourage the utilization of its water resources to the greatest practicable extent, to control the waters of the Commonwealth, and also to construct or reconstruct dams in any rivers or streams within the Commonwealth for the

146

Corona Department of Water and Power - Solar Partnership Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corona Department of Water and Power - Solar Partnership Rebate Corona Department of Water and Power - Solar Partnership Rebate Program Corona Department of Water and Power - Solar Partnership Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Residential:$3,660 Commercial: $30,500 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $1.22 per watt-AC Provider Corona Department of Water and Power Corona Department of Water and Power is providing rebates for residential and commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems. The rebate amount for 2013 is $1.22 per watt up to $3,660 for residential systems and $30,500 for commercial systems. Customers must submit an application and receive approval prior to beginning the installation. See website above for

147

Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Single-family unit: $2,000 Two- to three-family units: $4,000 Multi-family units (four or more): $10,000 Businesses: $25,000 Program Info Start Date 03/2010 Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 25% of costs Provider Minnesota Power Minnesota Power offers a 25% rebate for qualifying solar thermal water heating systems. The maximum award for single-family customers is $2,000 per customer; $4,000 for 2-3 family unit buildings; $10,000 for buildings

148

Water Recovery From Humidified Power Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recovery of water from humidified cycles using a scrubber-desaturator, and the recovered water's clean-up and reuse have been shown to be practical, with comparatively low increases in capital costs and heat rates.

1998-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

149

Water Resource Trends and Implications for the Electric Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water resources, both surface and groundwater, are subject to significant variation and change with respect to volume, flow, and quality. This report evaluates observed water resource trends within the United States and their implications for electric power generation. The report also addresses how individual companies have responded to these changes. The report will be of value to environment, generation, and planning managers within power companies, government agencies, and water resource stakeholders ...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

150

Transport in shales and the design of improved water-based shale drilling fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transport of water and ions in shales and its impact on shale stability were studied to facilitate the improvement of water-based muds as shale drilling fluids. Transport parameters associated with flows driven by gradients in pressure and chemical potential were quantified in key laboratory and full-scale experiments. The experimental results show that the low-permeability matrices of intact, clay-rich shales can act as imperfect or leaky membranes that will sustain osmotic flow of water. Moreover, the ability of shales to act as osmotic membranes is shown to provide a powerful new means for stabilizing these rocks when exposed to water-based drilling fluids. Guidelines are presented for effective exploitation of shale membrane action and induced osmotic flows through optimized water-based drilling fluid formulation. In addition, special attention is given to induced electro-osmotic water flow in shales driven by electric potential gradients, which may provide an exciting, new, environmentally benign means for stabilizing shale formations.

Oort, E. van; Hale, A.H.; Mody, F.K.; Roy, S.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Water Power Program: Resource Assessment and Characterization  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource This report, created by the Electric Power Research Institute, assesses ocean wave energy potential along the U.S. coasts....

152

Lunar dust transport and potential interactions with power system components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The lunar surface is covered by a thick blanket of fine dust. This dust may be readily suspended from the surface and transported by a variety of mechanisms. As a consequence, lunar dust can accumulate on sensitive power components, such as photovoltaic arrays and radiator surfaces, reducing their performance. In addition to natural mechanisms, human activities on the Moon will disturb significant amounts of lunar dust. Of all the mechanisms identified, the most serious is rocket launch and landing. The return of components from the Surveyor III provided a rare opportunity to observe the effects of the nearby landing of the Apollo 12 lunar module. The evidence proved that significant dust accumulation occurred on the Surveyor at a distance of 155 m. From available information on particle suspension and transport mechanisms, a series of models was developed to predict dust accumulation as a function of distance from the lunar module. The accumulation distribution was extrapolated to a future lunar lander scenario. These models indicate that accumulation is expected to be substantial even as far as 2 km from the landing site. Estimates of the performance penalties associated with lunar dust coverage on radiators and photovoltaic arrays are presented. Because of the lunar dust adhesive and cohesive properties, the most practical dust defensive strategy appears to be the protection of sensitive components from the arrival of lunar dust by location, orientation, or barriers.

Katzan, C.M.; Edwards, J.L.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Lehigh University This project determines the feasibility of using low grade power plant waste heat to dry lignite and sub-bituminous coals before they are burned in...

154

Water recovery using waste heat from coal fired power plants.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential to treat non-traditional water sources using power plant waste heat in conjunction with membrane distillation is assessed. Researchers and power plant designers continue to search for ways to use that waste heat from Rankine cycle power plants to recover water thereby reducing water net water consumption. Unfortunately, waste heat from a power plant is of poor quality. Membrane distillation (MD) systems may be a technology that can use the low temperature waste heat (<100 F) to treat water. By their nature, they operate at low temperature and usually low pressure. This study investigates the use of MD to recover water from typical power plants. It looks at recovery from three heat producing locations (boiler blow down, steam diverted from bleed streams, and the cooling water system) within a power plant, providing process sketches, heat and material balances and equipment sizing for recovery schemes using MD for each of these locations. It also provides insight into life cycle cost tradeoffs between power production and incremental capital costs.

Webb, Stephen W.; Morrow, Charles W.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Dwyer, Brian P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Rail transportation of coal-water slurry fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In view of the anticipated near-term appearance of commercial coal-water slurry (CWS) fuels, least-cost modes of their transportation should be considered now. Unlike dilute pipeline transport slurries (typically 50 percent solids) a CWS fuel is a stable, highly-loaded (typically 70 percent or more solids) with vastly different rheological properties. The high solids loading and stabilization against settling produce effective viscosities one or more orders of magnitude greater than those of dilute slurries. Pipeline transportation of such fuels for more than a few miles thus becomes economically unattractive. In the future, further physical refinement or slight dilution of CWS fuels may permit long-range transmission by slurry pipeline once they become available. In the meantime, distribution of these fuels to serve widely dispersed industrial users will be accomplished by barge or rail. In the latter case the high flow-friction characteristics will preclude use of the unit ''Tank Train'' system designed for loading and unloading via a single connection at high rates of flow. This limitation does not rule out assembly of unit trains of individually-loaded tank cars if desired. The optimum location of CWS fuel plants relative to mine-mouth coal preparation plants and/or pipeline terminals will require modeling of multi-mode transportation networks in order to determine the least-cost combination for serving the needs of industrial as well as utility CWS users.

Green, L.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

NREL: Water Power Research - Economic and Power System Modeling and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis NREL's Economic Analysis and power system modeling integrates data from device deployment and programmatic research into deployment and scenario models to quantify the economic and societal benefits of developing cost-competitive marine and hydrokinetic systems. It also identifies policy mechanisms, market designs, and supply chain needs to support various deployment scenarios, provide information and training to potential members of the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry and effectively collaborate with all associated stakeholders. JEDI Modeling NREL worked with industry members to develop and provide public access to an easy-to-use input-output model that estimates the jobs and economic development impacts (JEDI) of MHK projects in the United States. The JEDI

157

Municipal waste water as a source of cooling water for California electric power plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses sources of municipal waste water for potential use as cooling water in California power plants. It notes the major factors which affect this practice. Municipal treatment facilities in California with discharge volumes deemed adequate to supply new power plants are identified. Also included is a summary of the experiences of several utilities in California and other western states with existing or planned applications of municipal waste water in power plant cooling towers.

MacDonald, T.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Burbank Water and Power - Residential and Commercial Solar Support Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Burbank Water and Power - Residential and Commercial Solar Support Burbank Water and Power - Residential and Commercial Solar Support Program Burbank Water and Power - Residential and Commercial Solar Support Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Low-Income Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Maximum Rebate Maximum payment of 400,000 per year for performance-based incentives Program Info Start Date 1/1/2010 Expiration Date 12/31/2016 State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount PV rebates will be awarded via lottery on August 12, 2013 Residential PV: $1.28/W CEC-AC Commercial PV (less than 30 kW): $0.97/W CEC-AC Commercial PV (30 kW or larger): ineligible at this time Solar Water Heaters (residential domestic hot water only; not pools):

159

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY - Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY August 2005 Revised May 2007 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory DOE Gasification Technology Manager: Gary J. Stiegel DOE Project Manager: James R. Longanbach Project Manager: Michael D. Rutkowski Principal Investigators: Michael G. Klett Norma J. Kuehn Ronald L. Schoff Vladimir Vaysman Jay S. White Power Plant Water Usage and Loss Study i August 2005 TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...................................................................................................................... I LIST OF TABLES.............................................................................................................................III

160

Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program's water power research activities. Water power is the nation's largest source of clean, domestic, renewable energy. Harnessing energy from rivers, manmade waterways, and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses can help secure America's energy future. Water power technologies fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower facilities include run-of-the-river, storage, and pumped storage. Most conventional hydropower plants use a diversion structure, such as a dam, to capture water's potential energy via a turbine for electricity generation. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies obtain energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams and ocean thermal gradients to generate electricity. The United States has abundant water power resources, enough to meet a large portion of the nation's electricity demand. Conventional hydropower generated 257 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity in 2010 and provides 6-7% of all electricity in the United States. According to preliminary estimates from the Electric Power Resource Institute (EPRI), the United States has additional water power resource potential of more than 85,000 megawatts (MW). This resource potential includes making efficiency upgrades to existing hydroelectric facilities, developing new low-impact facilities, and using abundant marine and hydrokinetic energy resources. EPRI research suggests that ocean wave and in-stream tidal energy production potential is equal to about 10% of present U.S. electricity consumption (about 400 terrawatt-hours per year). The greatest of these resources is wave energy, with the most potential in Hawaii, Alaska, and the Pacific Northwest. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Water Power Program works with industry, universities, other federal agencies, and DOE's national laboratories to promote the development and deployment of technologies capable of generating environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity from the nation's water resources.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Update on use of mine pool water for power generation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2004, nearly 90 percent of the country's electricity was generated at power plants using steam-based systems (EIA 2005). Electricity generation at steam electric plants requires a cooling system to condense the steam. With the exception of a few plants using air-cooled condensers, most U.S. steam electric power plants use water for cooling. Water usage occurs through once-through cooling or as make-up water in a closed-cycle system (generally involving one or more cooling towers). According to a U.S. Geological Survey report, the steam electric power industry withdrew about 136 billion gallons per day of fresh water in 2000 (USGS 2005). This is almost the identical volume withdrawn for irrigation purposes. In addition to fresh water withdrawals, the steam electric power industry withdrew about 60 billion gallons per day of saline water. Many parts of the United States are facing fresh water shortages. Even areas that traditionally have had adequate water supplies are reaching capacity limits. New or expanded steam electric power plants frequently need to turn to non-traditional alternate sources of water for cooling. This report examines one type of alternate water source-groundwater collected in underground pools associated with coal mines (referred to as mine pool water in this report). In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) funded Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to evaluate the feasibility of using mine pool water in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. That report (Veil et al. 2003) identified six small power plants in northeastern Pennsylvania (the Anthracite region) that had been using mine pool water for over a decade. It also reported on a pilot study underway at Exelon's Limerick Generating Station in southeastern Pennsylvania that involved release of water from a mine located about 70 miles upstream from the plant. The water flowed down the Schuylkill River and augmented the natural flow so that the Limerick plant could withdraw a larger volume of river water. The report also included a description of several other proposed facilities that were planning to use mine pool water. In early 2006, NETL directed Argonne to revisit the sites that had previously been using mine pool water and update the information offered in the previous report. This report describes the status of mine pool water use as of summer 2006. Information was collected by telephone interviews, electronic mail, literature review, and site visits.

Veil, J. A.; Puder, M. G.; Environmental Science Division

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

Burbank Water & Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

163

Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Burbank Water and Power Country United States Headquarters Location Burbank, California Recovery Act Funding $20,000,000.00 Total Project Value $62,650,755.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project Coordinates 34.1808392°, -118.3089661° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

164

Long Island Power Authority - Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long Island Power Authority - Residential Solar Water Heating Long Island Power Authority - Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate Program Long Island Power Authority - Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $1,500 or 50% of installed cost; $2,000 for systems purchased by 12/31/13 Program Info Funding Source LIPA Efficiency Long Island Program Start Date December 2010 State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $20 per kBTU (based on SRCC collector rating) Bonus Incentive for systems purchased by 12/31/13: 2 Collector system: $500 bonus rebate 1 Collector system: $250 bonus rebate Provider Long Island Power Authority '''''Note: For system purchased by December 31, 2013, LIPA is providing a

165

South Feather Water and Power Agency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feather Water and Power Agency Feather Water and Power Agency Jump to: navigation, search Name South Feather Water and Power Agency Place California Utility Id 14191 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=South_Feather_Water_and_Power_Agency&oldid=41154

166

Redlands Water & Power Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Redlands Water & Power Company Redlands Water & Power Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Redlands Water & Power Company Place Colorado Utility Id 15787 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Redlands_Water_%26_Power_Company&oldid=411435" Categories:

167

GreyStone Power- Solar Water Heating Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

GreyStone Power, an electricity cooperative serving 103,000 customers in Georgia, introduced a solar water heating rebate in March 2009. This $500 rebate is available to customers regardless of...

168

Burbank Water and Power- Business Bucks Energy Efficiency Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Burbank Water and Power (BWP) offers the Business Bucks Grant Program to its small and mid-sized business customers for installation of energy efficient equipment. Businesses with monthly...

169

Corona Department of Water & Power- Solar Partnership Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Corona Department of Water & Power is providing rebates for residential and commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems. The rebate amount for 2013 is $1.22 per watt up to $3,660 for residential...

170

Use of reclaimed water for power plant cooling.  

SciTech Connect

Freshwater demands are steadily increasing throughout the United States. As its population increases, more water is needed for domestic use (drinking, cooking, cleaning, etc.) and to supply power and food. In arid parts of the country, existing freshwater supplies are not able to meet the increasing demands for water. New water users are often forced to look to alternative sources of water to meet their needs. Over the past few years, utilities in many locations, including parts of the country not traditionally water-poor (e.g., Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, and North Carolina) have needed to reevaluate the availability of water to meet their cooling needs. This trend will only become more extreme with time. Other trends are likely to increase pressure on freshwater supplies, too. For example, as populations increase, they will require more food. This in turn will likely increase demands for water by the agricultural sector. Another example is the recent increased interest in producing biofuels. Additional water will be required to grow more crops to serve as the raw materials for biofuels and to process the raw materials into biofuels. This report provides information about an opportunity to reuse an abundant water source -- treated municipal wastewater, also known as 'reclaimed water' -- for cooling and process water in electric generating facilities. The report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Innovations for Existing Plants research program (Feeley 2005). This program initiated an energy-water research effort in 2003 that includes the availability and use of 'nontraditional sources' of water for use at power plants. This report represents a unique reference for information on the use of reclaimed water for power plant cooling. In particular, the database of reclaimed water user facilities described in Chapter 2 is the first comprehensive national effort to identify and catalog those plants that are using reclaimed water for cooling.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

171

Program on Technology Innovation: Power Generation and Water Sustainability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This brochure summarizes the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Report 1015371, Program on Technology Innovation: An Energy/Water Sustainability Program for the Electric Power Industry. It presents a research planbased on business, economic, and technical considerationsthat would create and test new technology and science to overcome present and future constraints on thermoelectric and hydroelectric generation resulting from limited fresh water availability. The 10 year plan has an overall budget o...

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

172

Burbank Water and Power - Green Building Incentive Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Burbank Water and Power - Green Building Incentive Program Burbank Water and Power - Green Building Incentive Program Burbank Water and Power - Green Building Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State California Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider Rebates The U.S. Green Building Council is a non-profit organization that promotes the design and construction of buildings that are environmentally responsible, profitable, and healthy places to live and work. The Green Building Council developed the Leadership in Energy and Environmental

173

E&WR - Water-Energy Interface: Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E&WR - Water-Energy Interface E&WR - Water-Energy Interface Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation: A Modeling Framework The purpose of this study, conducted by the National Mine Land Reclamation Center at West Virginia University, is to develop and demonstrate a framework for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects, and environmental benefits of using mine water for thermo-electric power generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering, and environmental factors to be considered and evaluated in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. Development and demonstration of the framework involves the following activities: A field investigation and case study conducted for the proposed Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. This 300 megawatt power plant has been proposed to burn coal refuse from the Champion coal refuse pile, which is the largest coal waste pile in Western Pennsylvania. The field study, based on previous mine pool research conducted by the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC), identifies mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2,000 to 3,000 gpm power plant water requirement.

174

Municipal waste water as a source of cooling water for California electric power plants  

SciTech Connect

The results of an investigation of sources of municipal waste water for potential use as cooling water in California power plants and the major factors which affect this practice are presented. Municipal treatment facilities in California with discharge volumes deemed adequate to supply new power plants are identified. Also included is a summary of the experiences of several utilities in California and other western states with existing or planned applications of municipal waste water in power plant cooling towers. Due to limited supplies of high-quality water, municipal waste water is increasingly viewed as an alternative source of supply for a variety of water uses, including electric power plant evaporative cooling. In California, enough municipal effluent is discharged to the ocean to conceivably supply the total projected cooling water needs of new power plants for the next 20 years or more. A number of existing applications of such waste water for power plant cooling, including several California cases, demonstrate the technical feasibility of its use for this purpose. However, a combination of economic, environmental, and geographic factors reduce the likelihood of widespread use of this alternative for meeting anticipated large increases in power plant water requirements in the state. The most important factors are: the long distances involved; the public health concerns; added costs and environmental effects; and unreliability of supply quality.

McDonald, T.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

USE of mine pool water for power plant cooling.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water and energy production issues intersect in numerous ways. Water is produced along with oil and gas, water runs off of or accumulates in coal mines, and water is needed to operate steam electric power plants and hydropower generating facilities. However, water and energy are often not in the proper balance. For example, even if water is available in sufficient quantities, it may not have the physical and chemical characteristics suitable for energy or other uses. This report provides preliminary information about an opportunity to reuse an overabundant water source--ground water accumulated in underground coal mines--for cooling and process water in electric generating facilities. The report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), which has implemented a water/energy research program (Feeley and Ramezan 2003). Among the topics studied under that program is the availability and use of ''non-traditional sources'' of water for use at power plants. This report supports NETL's water/energy research program.

Veil, J. A.; Kupar, J. M .; Puder, M. G.

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

176

Wind and Water Power Technologies FY'14 Budget At-a-Glance |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind and Water Power Technologies FY'14 Budget At-a-Glance Wind and Water Power Technologies FY'14 Budget At-a-Glance Wind and Water Power Technologies FY'14 Budget At-a-Glance, a...

177

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility and initial development of an integrated, deterministic model of the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reports Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 1: Feasibility Study (1004931), published in 2004; Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 2: Initial Deterministic Model Development and Deposit Characterization (1012207) published in 2007; and Boiler Water Deposition ...

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

178

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility and initial development of an integrated, deterministic model of the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in the following Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reports: 1004931, Boiler Water Deposition Model: Part 1: Feasibility Study, published in 2004; 1012207, Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 2: Initial Deterministic Model Development and Deposit Characterization, published in 2007; 1014128, Boiler Water Deposition Model fo...

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

179

Consumptive Water Use for U.S. Power Production  

SciTech Connect

A study of power plants and their respective water consumption was completed to effectively analyze evaporative cooling systems. This technical paper will aid the High Performance Buildings Research Program by providing a metric in determining water efficiency in building cooling systems. Further analysis is planned to determine the overall water efficiency of evaporative cooling systems compared to conventional direct expansion systems and chiller systems with cooling towers.

Torcellini, P.; Long, N.; Judkoff, R.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Performance of an Air Cooled Condenser (ACC) Using SPX Wind Guide Technology Improved Performance of an Air Cooled Condenser (ACC) Using SPX Wind Guide Technology SPX Cooling Technologies is developing physical enhancements for air cooled condensers (ACC) to improve fan airflow in windy conditions. By removing cross-wind effects on ACC fans, the SPX wind guides will increase ACC performance, thereby increasing the overall efficiency of the power plant. This project will add wind guides to an existing ACC cooling process at a selected coal-fired power plant in order to quantify the efficiency improvement. SPX Cooling Technologies will also employ computational fluid dynamic modeling to examine and conduct a pilot-scale test to resolve application and optimization issues and determine the effectiveness of the wind guide technology.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Use of Degraded Water Sources as Cooling Water in Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In electricity production, nearly all thermal power plants reject heat either to a large body of water (once-through cooling) or to the atmosphere via wet cooling towers the predominant form of cooling in California. These towers, however, use considerable quantities of water. Competing state demands for freshwater have forced California thermal power plants to consider alternative cooling water supplies, though the availability of such supplies and data on their use and impact is limited. In fac...

2003-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

182

Guangdong Global Power and Water Industries Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Power and Water Industries Ltd Global Power and Water Industries Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Guangdong Global Power and Water Industries Ltd Place Meizhou, Guangdong Province, China Sector Solar Product China-based JV researcher and developer of solar PV and power projects Coordinates 24.321199°, 116.118919° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":24.321199,"lon":116.118919,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

183

City Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs City Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Nonprofit Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Insulation: $3,000 Retro-Commissioning: $50,000 Lighting: $15,000 Program Info State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air-Source Heat Pumps: $300/ton Geothermal Heat Pump: $500/ton Insulation: 30% Retro-Commissioning Study: $0.30 per sq. ft. of conditioned space Retro-Commissioning EMC: varies Lighting: $3 - $35/unit Lighting (Custom): $0.28/Watt reduced Water Loop Heat Pump: Contact CWLP

184

Liquid water transport in fuel cell gas diffusion layers Aimy Ming Jii Bazylak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid water transport in fuel cell gas diffusion layers by Aimy Ming Jii Bazylak Bachelor means, without the permission of the author. #12;ii Liquid water transport in fuel cell gas diffusion State University) Abstract Liquid water management has a major impact on the performance and durability

Victoria, University of

185

Combined characteristics and finite volume methods for sediment transport and bed morphology in surface water flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract: We propose a new numerical method for solving the equations of coupled sediment transport and bed morphology by free-surface water flows. The mathematical formulation of these models consists of the shallow water equations for the hydraulics, ... Keywords: Bed morphology, Finite volume scheme, Method of characteristics, Sediment transport, Shallow water equations

Fayssal Benkhaldoun; Mohammed Sead

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Water rocket - Electrolysis propulsion and fuel cell power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water Rocket is the collective name for an integrated set of technologies that offer new options for spacecraft propulsion, power, energy storage, and structure. Low pressure water stored on the spacecraft is electrolyzed to generate, separate, and pressurize gaseous hydrogen and oxygen. These gases, stored in lightweight pressure tanks, can be burned to generate thrust or recombined to produce electric power. As a rocket propulsion system, Water Rocket provides the highest feasible chemical specific impulse (-400 seconds). Even higher specific impulse propulsion can be achieved by combining Water Rocket with other advanced propulsion technologies, such as arcjet or electric thrusters. With innovative pressure tank technology, Water Rocket's specific energy [Wh/kg] can exceed that of the best foreseeable batteries by an order of magnitude, and the tanks can often serve as vehicle structural elements. For pulsed power applications, Water Rocket propellants can be used to drive very high power density generators, such as MHD devices or detonation-driven pulse generators. A space vehicle using Water Rocket propulsion can be totally inert and non-hazardous during assembly and launch. These features are particularly important for the timely development and flight qualification of new classes of spacecraft, such as microsats, nanosats, and refuelable spacecraft.

Carter, P H; Dittman, M D; Kare, J T; Militsky, F; Myers, B; Weisberg, A H

1999-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

187

Recent content in Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recent content in Water Power Forum Recent content in Water Power Forum Home Name Post date sort icon Type OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum Graham7781 28 Mar 2013 - 15:16 Blog entry Global Marine Renewable Energy Conference (GMREC) Kch 3 Apr 2013 - 14:26 Event MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft Kch 9 Apr 2013 - 13:30 Document MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Ocop 18 Apr 2013 - 13:41 Document Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers Alison.labonte 26 Nov 2013 - 11:43 Question 2013 projects and funding Vanessa.gregory 13 Dec 2013 - 09:12 Question Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... NickL 13 Dec 2013 - 14:38 Answer Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... 2013 projects and funding

188

Pasadena Water and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pasadena Water and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Pasadena Water and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Pasadena Water and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Nonprofit Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate Energy Efficiency Partnering Program: The total standard rebate received may not exceed 50% of the project's cost. Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Efficiency Partnership Retrofit Savings: $0.055 - $0.44 per kWh that the new project saves compared to the energy use allowed under Title

189

Direct Power and Water Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power and Water Corporation Power and Water Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Direct Power and Water Corporation Place Albuquerque, New Mexico Zip 87107 Product DP&W is specialised in engineering, designing and installing turnkey photovoltaic systems. Coordinates 35.08418°, -106.648639° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.08418,"lon":-106.648639,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

190

Western Water and Power Production WWPP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water and Power Production WWPP Water and Power Production WWPP Jump to: navigation, search Name Western Water and Power Production (WWPP) Place Albuquerque, New Mexico Zip 88340 Sector Biomass Product Developer and Builder of Biomass Energy Plants. Coordinates 35.08418°, -106.648639° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.08418,"lon":-106.648639,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

191

Combined heat and power for drinking water production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABB Kraftwerke AG, of Mannheim, Germany, is presently involved in two huge projects aimed at supplying electric power and drinking water in the Arabian Gulf. To limit fuel consumption as much as possible, electricity and water are produced in CHP plants. These plants are powered either by gas turbines equipped with HRSGs, or by conventional boilers feeding controlled extraction-condensing steam turbines. The selection of one of the two systems depends mainly on the type of fuel available (oil or natural gas), on the power/water loads through the year and other local factors. The gas turbine-based CHP systems can be setup in a shorter time and feature a slightly higher overall efficiency. The steam turbine solution, once the plant is commissioned, needs less maintenance. In the final analysis, operating costs of the two solutions are equivalent.

Chellini, R.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt Based Repository Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt Based Repository The study summarizes the initial work on numerical modeling, simulations, and experimental results related to nuclear waste storage in a salt repository. The study reflects the project's preliminary effort at simulating the fluid flow and heat transport processes, before treating the fully coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrologic-chemical (TMHC) coupled processes in the future. Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt Based Repository More Documents & Publications Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository

193

Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt Based Repository Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt Based Repository The study summarizes the initial work on numerical modeling, simulations, and experimental results related to nuclear waste storage in a salt repository. The study reflects the project's preliminary effort at simulating the fluid flow and heat transport processes, before treating the fully coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrologic-chemical (TMHC) coupled processes in the future. Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt Based Repository More Documents & Publications Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt

194

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fate of As, Se, Hg in a Passive Integrated System for Treatment of Fossil Plant Wastewater - Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Fate of As, Se, Hg in a Passive Integrated System for Treatment of Fossil Plant Wastewater - Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) TVA, in cooperation with EPRI and the American Electric Power (AEP), is installing a demonstration passive treatment system at the Paradise Fossil Plant near Drakesboro, Kentucky, to treat ammonia in the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) effluent stream. The passive system is used to convert ammonia in the wastewater to nitrate in an aerobic component, followed by denitrification in anaerobic wetlands. In addition to NH 4, the wastewater stream also contains other hazardous pollutants captured from flue gas emissions, including arsenic (As), selenium (Se), and mercury (Hg). Biogeochemical reactions could affect the retention and speciation of As, Se, and Hg in the wastewater as it moves through the treatment system. A more thorough understanding of these transformations is needed. For this project, an extraction trench component is being used for removal of As, Se, and Hg. This extraction trench is integrated into the passive system components described above, which is installed and operated by TVA with support from EPRI.

195

Seasonal Variations in the Vertically Integrated Water Vapor Transport Fields over the Southern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal mean fields of precipitable water and the zonal and meridional components of the vertically integrated atmospheric water vapor transport fields are calculated from five years of Southern Hemisphere data (1 September 1973 through 31 ...

David A. Howarth

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Gravity Scaling of a Power Reactor Water Shield  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water based reactor shielding is being considered as an affordable option for potential use on initial lunar surface reactor power systems. Heat dissipation in the shield from nuclear sources must be rejected by an auxillary thermal hydraulic cooling system. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection between the core surface and an array of thermosyphon radiator elements. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design has been previously evaluated at lower power levels (Pearson

Robert S. Reid; J. Boise Pearson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Development and Demonstration of a Modeling Framework for Assessing the Efficacy of Using Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

Thermoelectric power plants use large volumes of water for condenser cooling and other plant operations. Traditionally, this water has been withdrawn from the cleanest water available in streams and rivers. However, as demand for electrical power increases it places increasing demands on freshwater resources resulting in conflicts with other off stream water users. In July 2002, NETL and the Governor of Pennsylvania called for the use of water from abandoned mines to replace our reliance on the diminishing and sometimes over allocated surface water resource. In previous studies the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC) at West Virginia University has demonstrated that mine water has the potential to reduce the capital cost of acquiring cooling water while at the same time improving the efficiency of the cooling process due to the constant water temperatures associated with deep mine discharges. The objectives of this project were to develop and demonstrate a user-friendly computer based design aid for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects and potential environmental benefits for using mine water for thermoelectric generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering and environmental factors to be considered in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. A field investigation and case study was conducted for the proposed 300 MW Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. The field study based on previous research conducted by NMLRC identified mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2-3,000gpm water supply requirement of Beech Hollow. A water collection, transportation and treatment system was designed around this facility. Using this case study a computer based design aid applicable to large industrial water users was developed utilizing water collection and handling principals derived in the field investigation and during previous studies of mine water and power plant cooling. Visual basic software was used to create general information/evaluation modules for a range of power plant water needs that were tested/verified against the Beech Hollow project. The program allows for consideration of blending mine water as needed as well as considering potential thermal and environmental benefits that can be derived from using constant temperature mine water. Users input mine water flow, quality, distance to source, elevations to determine collection, transport and treatment system design criteria. The program also evaluates low flow volumes and sustainable yields for various sources. All modules have been integrated into a seamless user friendly computer design aid and user's manual for evaluating the capital and operating costs of mine water use. The framework will facilitate the use of mine water for thermoelectric generation, reduce demand on freshwater resources and result in environmental benefits from reduced emissions and abated mine discharges.

None

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the beginning of the commercial steam and power generation industry, deposits on heat transfer surfaces of the steam-water cycle equipment in fossil plant units have been a challenge. Deposits form at nearly all locations within the steam-water cycle, particularly in boiler tubes where failures can have substantial negative impacts on unit availability and reliability. Accumulation of internal deposits can adversely affect the performance and availability of boilers and turbines in fossil steam-wat...

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

199

Reuse of Produced Water from CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery, Coal-Bed Methane, and Mine Pool Water by Coal-Based Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power generation in the Illinois Basin is expected to increase by as much as 30% by the year 2030, and this would increase the cooling water consumption in the region by approximately 40%. This project investigated the potential use of produced water from CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (CO{sub 2}-EOR) operations; coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery; and active and abandoned underground coal mines for power plant cooling in the Illinois Basin. Specific objectives of this project were: (1) to characterize the quantity, quality, and geographic distribution of produced water in the Illinois Basin; (2) to evaluate treatment options so that produced water may be used beneficially at power plants; and (3) to perform a techno-economic analysis of the treatment and transportation of produced water to thermoelectric power plants in the Illinois Basin. Current produced water availability within the basin is not large, but potential flow rates up to 257 million liters per day (68 million gallons per day (MGD)) are possible if CO{sub 2}-enhanced oil recovery and coal bed methane recovery are implemented on a large scale. Produced water samples taken during the project tend to have dissolved solids concentrations between 10 and 100 g/L, and water from coal beds tends to have lower TDS values than water from oil fields. Current pretreatment and desalination technologies including filtration, adsorption, reverse osmosis (RO), and distillation can be used to treat produced water to a high quality level, with estimated costs ranging from $2.6 to $10.5 per cubic meter ($10 to $40 per 1000 gallons). Because of the distances between produced water sources and power plants, transportation costs tend to be greater than treatment costs. An optimization algorithm was developed to determine the lowest cost pipe network connecting sources and sinks. Total water costs increased with flow rate up to 26 million liters per day (7 MGD), and the range was from $4 to $16 per cubic meter ($15 to $60 per 1000 gallons), with treatment costs accounting for 13 ?? 23% of the overall cost. Results from this project suggest that produced water is a potential large source of cooling water, but treatment and transportation costs for this water are large.

Chad Knutson; Seyed Dastgheib; Yaning Yang; Ali Ashraf; Cole Duckworth; Priscilla Sinata; Ivan Sugiyono; Mark Shannon; Charles Werth

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

200

Development and Analysis of Advanced High-Temperature Technology for Nuclear Heat Transport and Power Conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project by the Thermal Hydraulics Research Laboratory at U.C. Berkeley Studied advanced high-temperature heat transport and power conversion technology, in support of the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative and Generation IV.

Per F. Peterson

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Systems-level design of ion transport membrane oxy-combustion power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oxy-fuel combustion, particularly using an integrated oxygen ion transport membrane (ITM), is a thermodynamically attractive concept that seeks to mitigate the penalties associated with CO 2 capture from power plants. ...

Mancini, Nicholas D. (Nicholas David)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Radiolysis Concerns for Water Shielding in Fission Surface Power Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of radiolysis concerns with regard to water shields for fission surface power. A review of the radiolysis process is presented and key parameters and trends are identified. From this understanding of the radiolytic decomposition of water, shield pressurization and corrosion are identified as the primary concerns. Existing experimental and modeling data addressing concerns are summarized. It was found that radiolysis of pure water in a closed volume results in minimal, if any net decomposition, and therefore reduces the potential for shield pressurization and corrosion.

Schoenfeld, Michael P. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ER24, MSFC, AL 35812 (United States); Anghaie, Samim [Innovative Space Power and Propulsion Institute, 800 SW Archer Rd. Bldg.554, P.O. Box 116502, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-6502 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

203

NREL: Water Power Research - Computer-Aided Engineering Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer-Aided Engineering Tools Computer-Aided Engineering Tools Computer simulation of a floating point absorber in water. The water is represented by blue and red stripes. The absorber is represented by a red disk above water connected to a blue disk below water. NREL develops advanced computer-aided engineering (CAE) tools to support the wind and water power industries with state-of-the-art design and analysis capabilities. NREL is developing a suite of integrated CAE tools for wave and tidal energy converters that will provide a full range of simulation capabilities for single devices and arrays for research, development and demonstration efforts at all technology readiness levels. These CAE tools will produce realistic models that simulate the behavior of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) systems in complex environments-waves,

204

Superior Water, Light and Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water, Light and Power Co Water, Light and Power Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Superior Water, Light and Power Co Place Wisconsin Utility Id 18336 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.1050/kWh Commercial: $0.0835/kWh Industrial: $0.0674/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Superior Water, Light and Power Co (Wisconsin). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

205

Water Extraction from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program was to develop a liquid disiccant-based flue gas dehydration process technology to reduce water consumption in coal-fired power plants. The specific objective of the program was to generate sufficient subscale test data and conceptual commercial power plant evaluations to assess process feasibility and merits for commercialization. Currently, coal-fired power plants require access to water sources outside the power plant for several aspects of their operation in addition to steam cycle condensation and process cooling needs. At the present time, there is no practiced method of extracting the usually abundant water found in the power plant stack gas. This project demonstrated the feasibility and merits of a liquid desiccant-based process that can efficiently and economically remove water vapor from the flue gas of fossil fuel-fired power plants to be recycled for in-plant use or exported for clean water conservation. After an extensive literature review, a survey of the available physical and chemical property information on desiccants in conjunction with a weighting scheme developed for this application, three desiccants were selected and tested in a bench-scale system at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). System performance at the bench scale aided in determining which desiccant was best suited for further evaluation. The results of the bench-scale tests along with further review of the available property data for each of the desiccants resulted in the selection of calcium chloride as the desiccant for testing at the pilot-scale level. Two weeks of testing utilizing natural gas in Test Series I and coal in Test Series II for production of flue gas was conducted with the liquid desiccant dehumidification system (LDDS) designed and built for this study. In general, it was found that the LDDS operated well and could be placed in an automode in which the process would operate with no operator intervention or adjustment. Water produced from this process should require little processing for use, depending on the end application. Test Series II water quality was not as good as that obtained in Test Series I; however, this was believed to be due to a system upset that contaminated the product water system during Test Series II. The amount of water that can be recovered from flue gas with the LDDS is a function of several variables, including desiccant temperature, L/G in the absorber, flash drum pressure, liquid-gas contact method, and desiccant concentration. Corrosion will be an issue with the use of calcium chloride as expected but can be largely mitigated through proper material selection. Integration of the LDDS with either low-grade waste heat and or ground-source heating and cooling can affect the parasitic power draw the LDDS will have on a power plant. Depending on the amount of water to be removed from the flue gas, the system can be designed with no parasitic power draw on the power plant other than pumping loads. This can be accomplished in one scenario by taking advantage of the heat of absorption and the heat of vaporization to provide the necessary temperature changes in the desiccant with the flue gas and precipitates that may form and how to handle them. These questions must be addressed in subsequent testing before scale-up of the process can be confidently completed.

Bruce C. Folkedahl; Greg F. Weber; Michael E. Collings

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

Glendale Water and Power - Energy Efficiency Appliance Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Appliance Rebate Energy Efficiency Appliance Rebate Program Glendale Water and Power - Energy Efficiency Appliance Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount First rebate amount purchased outside Glendale, second purchased inside Glendale. Clothes Washer: $60 - $80 Refrigerator: $60 - $80 Dishwasher: $30 - $40 Room Air Conditioners: $50 - $60 Central Air Conditioners: $100 - $125/ton Ceiling Fan: $15 - $20 Solar Attic Fan $100 - $125 Pool Pump: $100 - $125 Provider GWP Rebate Program Glendale Water and Power (GPW) offers the Smart Home Energy and Water Saving Rebate Program that includes several incentives for residential

207

Pipelines to Power Lines: Gas Transportation for Electricity Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas-fired power generation represents a major growth market for the natural gas industry; but the large, high pressure, highly variable loads required for individual power generators can be difficult to serve. This report, cosponsored by the Gas Research Institute and EPRI, is a design stage assessment of the engineering and costs of the pipelines needed to handle these types of loads.

1995-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

208

Transport coefficients in Lorentz plasmas with the power-law kappa-distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transport coefficients in Lorentz plasma with the power-law kappa-distribution are studied by means of using the transport equation and the macroscopic laws of Lorentz plasma without magnetic field. Expressions of electric conductivity, thermoelectric coefficient and thermal conductivity for the power-law kappa-distribution are accurately derived. It is shown that these transport coefficients are modified significantly by the kappa-parameter, and in the limit of the parameter kappa to infinit they are reduced to the standard forms for a Maxwellian distribution.

Jiulin, Du

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Modelling Prospects for Hydrogen-powered Transportation Until 2100  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from transportation are: replacement of gasoline and diesel with biofuels, all-electric cars or near improvements, such as those promised by further penetration of electric­gasoline hybrid vehicles, are probably all-electric plug-in hybrids, and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. Although large-scale

210

Gravity Scaling of a Power Reactor Water Shield  

SciTech Connect

Water based reactor shielding is being considered as an affordable option for potential use on initial lunar surface reactor power systems. Heat dissipation in the shield from nuclear sources must be rejected by an auxillary thermal hydraulic cooling system. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection between the core surface and an array of thermosyphon radiator elements. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design has been previously evaluated at lower power levels (Pearson, 2006). The current baseline assumes that 5.5 kW are dissipated in the water shield, the preponderance on the core surface, but with some volumetric heating in the naturally circulating water as well. This power is rejected by a radiator located above the shield with a surface temperature of 370 K. A similarity analysis on a water-based reactor shield is presented examining the effect of gravity on free convection between a radiation shield inner vessel and a radiation shield outer vessel boundaries. Two approaches established similarity: 1) direct scaling of Rayleigh number equates gravity-surface heat flux products, 2) temperature difference between the wall and thermal boundary layer held constant on Earth and the Moon. Nussult number for natural convection (laminar and turbulent) is assumed of form Nu = CRa{sup n}. These combined results estimate similarity conditions under Earth and Lunar gravities. The influence of reduced gravity on the performance of thermosyphon heat pipes is also examined.

Reid, Robert S.; Pearson, J. Boise [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

211

Thermodynamic properties of ammonia-water mixtures for power cycles  

SciTech Connect

Power cycles with ammonia-water mixtures as working fluids have been shown to reach higher thermal efficiencies than the traditional steam turbine (Rankine) cycle with water as the working fluid. Different correlations for the thermodynamic properties of ammonia-water mixtures have been used in studies of ammonia-water mixture cycles described in the literature. Four of these correlations are compared in this paper. The differences in thermal efficiencies for a bottoming Kalina cycle when these four property correlations are used are in the range 0.5 to 3.3%. The properties for saturated liquid and vapor according to three of the correlations and available experimental data are also compared at high pressures and temperatures [up to 20 MPa and 337 C (610 K)]. The difference in saturation temperature for the different correlations is up to 20%, and the difference in saturation enthalpy is as high as 100% when the pressure is 20 MPa.

Thorin, E. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)]|[Maelardalen Univ., Vaesteraas (Sweden). Dept. of Energy; Dejfors, C.; Svedberg, G. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Extra-terrestrial nuclear power stations : transportation and operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many challenges exist when considering nuclear power to provide electricity for bases on the Moon or Mars, including launch safety, landing safety, deployment, control, and protecting the astronauts from radiation. Examples ...

Kane, Susan Christine

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Zero Emission Power Plants Using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and Oxygen Transport Membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Siemens Westinghouse Power Corp. (SWPC) is engaged in the development of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell stationary power systems. SWPC has combined DOE Developmental funds with commercial customer funding to establish a record of successful SOFC field demonstration power systems of increasing size. SWPC will soon deploy the first unit of a newly developed 250 kWe Combined Heat Power System. It will generate electrical power at greater than 45% electrical efficiency. The SWPC SOFC power systems are equipped to operate on lower number hydrocarbon fuels such as pipeline natural gas, which is desulfurized within the SOFC power system. Because the system operates with a relatively high electrical efficiency, the CO2 emissions, {approx}1.0 lb CO2/ kW-hr, are low. Within the SOFC module the desulfurized fuel is utilized electrochemically and oxidized below the temperature for NOx generation. Therefore the NOx and SOx emissions for the SOFC power generation system are near negligible. The byproducts of the power generation from hydrocarbon fuels that are released into the environment are CO2 and water vapor. This forward looking DOE sponsored Vision 21 program is supporting the development of methods to capture and sequester the CO2, resulting in a Zero Emission power generation system. To accomplish this, SWPC is developing a SOFC module design, to be demonstrated in operating hardware, that will maintain separation of the fuel cell anode gas, consisting of H2, CO, H2O and CO2, from the vitiated air. That anode gas, the depleted fuel stream, containing less than 18% (H2 + CO), will be directed to an Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) Afterburner that is being developed by Praxair, Inc.. The OTM is supplied air and the depleted fuel. The OTM will selectively transport oxygen across the membrane to oxidize the remaining H2 and CO. The water vapor is then condensed from the totally 1.5.DOC oxidized fuel stream exiting the afterburner, leaving only the CO2 in gaseous form. That CO2 can then be compressed and sequestered, resulting in a Zero Emission power generation system operating on hydrocarbon fuel that adds only water vapor to the environment. Praxair has been developing oxygen separation systems based on dense walled, mixed electronic, oxygen ion conducting ceramics for a number of years. The oxygen separation membranes find applications in syngas production, high purity oxygen production and gas purification. In the SOFC afterburner application the chemical potential difference between the high temperature SOFC depleted fuel gas and the supplied air provides the driving force for oxygen transport. This permeated oxygen subsequently combusts the residual fuel in the SOFC exhaust. A number of experiments have been carried out in which simulated SOFC depleted fuel gas compositions and air have been supplied to either side of single OTM tubes in laboratory-scale reactors. The ceramic tubes are sealed into high temperature metallic housings which precludes mixing of the simulated SOFC depleted fuel and air streams. In early tests, although complete oxidation of the residual CO and H2 in the simulated SOFC depleted fuel was achieved, membrane performance degraded over time. The source of degradation was found to be contaminants in the simulated SOFC depleted fuel stream. Following removal of the contaminants, stable membrane performance has subsequently been demonstrated. In an ongoing test, the dried afterburner exhaust composition has been found to be stable at 99.2% CO2, 0.4% N2 and 0.6%O2 after 350 hours online. Discussion of these results is presented. A test of a longer, commercial demonstration size tube was performed in the SWPC test facility. A similar contamination of the simulated SOFC depleted fuel stream occurred and the performance degraded over time. A second test is being prepared. Siemens Westinghouse and Praxair are collaborating on the preliminary design of an OTM equipped Afterburner demonstration unit. The intent is to test the afterburner in conjunction with a reduced size SOFC test module that has the anode gas separati

Shockling, Larry A.; Huang, Keqin; Gilboy, Thomas E. (Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation); Christie, G. Maxwell; Raybold, Troy M. (Praxair, Inc.)

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

214

Thermodynamic and transport property modeling in super critical water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a thermally-based, remediation and waste-treatment process that relies on unique property changes of water when water is heated and pressurized above its critical point. Above its ...

Kutney, Michael C. (Michael Charles)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Structure and Transport Properties of Nanoconfined Water in Porous ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molecular simulations of the behavior of water confined in nanopores of silica using a dissociative interatomic water potential reproduces this anomalously high

216

Water vulnerabilities for existing coal-fired power plants.  

SciTech Connect

This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the Existing Plants Research Program's overall research effort by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. Water consumption by all users in the United States over the 2005-2030 time period is projected to increase by about 7% (from about 108 billion gallons per day [bgd] to about 115 bgd) (Elcock 2010). By contrast, water consumption by coal-fired power plants over this period is projected to increase by about 21% (from about 2.4 to about 2.9 bgd) (NETL 2009b). The high projected demand for water by power plants, which is expected to increase even further as carbon-capture equipment is installed, combined with decreasing freshwater supplies in many areas, suggests that certain coal-fired plants may be particularly vulnerable to potential water demand-supply conflicts. If not addressed, these conflicts could limit power generation and lead to power disruptions or increased consumer costs. The identification of existing coal-fired plants that are vulnerable to water demand and supply concerns, along with an analysis of information about their cooling systems and related characteristics, provides information to help focus future research and development (R&D) efforts to help ensure that coal-fired generation demands are met in a cost-effective manner that supports sustainable water use. This study identified coal-fired power plants that are considered vulnerable to water demand and supply issues by using a geographical information system (GIS) that facilitated the analysis of plant-specific data for more than 500 plants in the NETL's Coal Power Plant Database (CPPDB) (NETL 2007a) simultaneously with 18 indicators of water demand and supply. Two types of demand indicators were evaluated. The first type consisted of geographical areas where specific conditions can generate demand vulnerabilities. These conditions include high projected future water consumption by thermoelectric power plants, high projected future water consumption by all users, high rates of water withdrawal per square mile (mi{sup 2}), high projected population increases, and areas projected to be in a water crisis or conflict by 2025. The second type of demand indicator was plant specific. These indicators were developed for each plant and include annual water consumption and withdrawal rates and intensities, net annual power generation, and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. The supply indictors, which are also area based, include areas with low precipitation, high temperatures, low streamflow, and drought. The indicator data, which were in various formats (e.g., maps, tables, raw numbers) were converted to a GIS format and stored, along with the individual plant data from the CPPDB, in a single GIS database. The GIS database allowed the indicator data and plant data to be analyzed and visualized in any combination. To determine the extent to which a plant would be considered 'vulnerable' to a given demand or supply concern (i.e., that the plant's operations could be affected by water shortages represented by a potential demand or supply indicator), criteria were developed to categorize vulnerability according to one of three types: major, moderate, or not vulnerable. Plants with at least two major demand indicator values and/or at least four moderate demand indicator values were considered vulnerable to demand concerns. By using this approach, 144 plants were identified as being subject to demand concerns only. Plants with at least one major supply indicator value and/or at least two moderate supply indicator values were considered vulnerable to supply concerns. By using this approach, 64 plants were identified as being subject to supply concerns only. In addition, 139 plants were identified as subject to both demand and supply concerns. Therefore, a total of 347 plants were considere

Elcock, D.; Kuiper, J.; Environmental Science Division

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

217

Visualization of Fuel Cell Water Transport and Characterization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Single-channel, multiple channel and header flows * Flow patterns, instabilities and pressure drop Optimized GDLBipolar Plate Combination GDL to channel transport ...

218

Program on Technology Innovation: Water Resources for Thermoelectric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to severe drought conditions in the Southwest in recent years, EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory have sponsored three related assessments of water supplies in the San Juan Basin area of the four-corner intersection of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Two of the studies assess the use of saline waters in power plants. The third describes the adaptation of a deterministic watershed model to forecast the impact of climate change on river hydrology in t...

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

219

Loveland Water and Power - Refrigerator Recycling Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Refrigerator Recycling Program Refrigerator Recycling Program Loveland Water and Power - Refrigerator Recycling Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate Limit one rebate per account per year Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator and Freezer Recycling: $35 Loveland Water and Power is providing an incentive for its customers to recycle their old refrigerators. Interested customers can call the utility to arrange a time to pick up the old refrigerator. The old refrigerator should be brought outside but remain plugged in so the utility can make it is in working condition. the utility will then take the refrigerator to a recycling facility and issue a $35 bill credit. Other Information

220

Glendale Water and Power - Solar Solutions Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Solutions Program Solar Solutions Program Glendale Water and Power - Solar Solutions Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate 50% of the gross installed system cost Payment will not exceed $100,000 per customer per fiscal year Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Program is on hold Provider Glendale Water and Power '''''Note: This program is currently closed. Contact the utility for more information or to be put on a wait list for when the program is reopened. ''''' The Solar Solutions program provides all customer groups with an incentive to install photovoltaic (PV) systems on their homes and buildings. Rebate

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Los Angeles Department of Water & Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Los Angeles Department of Water & Power (Redirected from City of Los Angeles, California (Utility Company)) Jump to: navigation, search Name Los Angeles Department of Water & Power Place California Utility Id 11208 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile.

222

Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Sector Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Sector Sector Fred Joseck U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop (TSPI) Transportation and Stationary Power Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop (TSPI) Integration Workshop (TSPI) Phoenix, Arizona October 27, 2008 2 Why Integration? * Move away from conventional thinking...fuel and power generation/supply separate * Make dramatic change, use economies of scale,

223

Affordable Solar Hot Water and Power LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water and Power LLC Water and Power LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Affordable Solar Hot Water and Power LLC Place Dothan, Alabama Zip 36305 Sector Solar Product Solar and Energy Efficiency for buildings and homes Year founded 2006 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 334-828-1024 Website http://www.asolarpro.com Coordinates 31.2070554°, -85.4994192° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.2070554,"lon":-85.4994192,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

224

A fracture network model for water flow and solute transport  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes code development work and sample calculations for FRACNET, a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and solute transport in fractured porous media. The model analyzes flow and transport by generating a fracture network based on statistical characteristics of fractures obtained from well logs and other data. After a network is generated, flow and tracer transport are computed for appropriate boundary conditions and wellbore source/sink terms. In addition, for a given realization, the code can be used to indicate whether the medium can be treated as an equivalent porous medium. 18 refs., 7 figs.

Robinson, B.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Water transport in fuel cell membranes measured by laser interferometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) The coefficients of electro-osmotic drag were found to increase with the increasing water content, which indicates that the Grotthuss mechanism of proton transfer is not active in the membranes with low water ...

Kim, Jungik, 1973-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A Generalized Transport Theory: Water-Mass Composition and Age  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general theory to describe and understand advective and diffusive ocean transport is reported. It allows any passive tracer field with an atmospheric source to be constructed by superposing sea surface contributions with a generalized Green's ...

Thomas W. N. Haine; Timothy M. Hall

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Session 5: Renewable Energy in the Transportation and Power SectorsŽ  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5: "Renewable Energy in the Transportation and Power 5: "Renewable Energy in the Transportation and Power Sectors" Mr. Michael Schaal: Well, let's get started and we'll have people come in as we move along. Welcome to the session which addresses the topic of renewable energy and the transportation and power sectors, a topic that is very much on the minds of the public at large, policymakers who are pondering the cost benefits and preferred outcomes of a variety of current and potential future laws and regulations, and also researchers who are busily involved with pushing the state-of-the-art in a number of key technology areas and also technology developer who are weighing the risks and benefits of pursuing different business plans in this evolving market, and environmentalists who are

228

Analysis of Intense Poleward Water Vapor Transports into High Latitudes of Western North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant cool season precipitation along the western coast of North America is often associated with intense water vapor transport (IWVT) from the Pacific Ocean during favorable synoptic-scale flow regimes. These relatively narrow and intense ...

Alain Roberge; John R. Gyakum; Eyad H. Atallah

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Precipitation and Water Vapor Transport in the Southern Hemisphere with Emphasis on the South American Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DecemberMarch climatologies of precipitation and vertically integrated water vapor transport were analyzed and compared to find the main paths by which moisture is fed to high-rainfall regions in the Southern Hemisphere in this season. The ...

Josefina Moraes Arraut; Prakki Satyamurty

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Derived Over-Ocean Water Vapor Transports from Satellite-Retrieved E ? P Datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology is developed for deriving atmospheric water vapor transports over the World Oceans from satellite-retrieved precipitation (P) and evaporation (E) datasets. The motivation for developing the method is to understand climatically ...

Byung-Ju Sohn; Eric A. Smith; Franklin R. Robertson; Seong-Chan Park

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Turbulence, Condensation, and Liquid Water Transport in Numerically Simulated Nonprecipitating Stratocumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Condensation and turbulent liquid water transport in stratocumulus clouds involve complicated interactions between turbulence dynamics and cloud microphysical processes, and play essential roles in defining the cloud structure. This work aims at ...

Shouping Wang; Qing Wang; Graham Feingold

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Water Vapor Transport Paths and Accumulation during Widespread Snowfall Events in Northeastern China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study aims to identify the distinct characteristics of water vapor transport (WVT) and its role in supplying moisture for widespread snowfall (WS) events in northeastern China (NEC). Fifty WS events in NEC were selected based on cumulative ...

Bo Sun; Huijun Wang

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Conservative numerical simulation of multi-component transport in two-dimensional unsteady shallow water flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An explicit finite volume model to simulate two-dimensional shallow water flow with multi-component transport is presented. The governing system of coupled conservation laws demands numerical techniques to avoid unrealistic values of the transported ... Keywords: ?-? model, 35L65, 65M06, 65M12, 76M12, 76M20, Coupled system, Multi-component transport, Reactive source terms, Shallow flow, Solute constraints, Turbulence, Variable domain, Well-balanced approach

J. Murillo; P. Garca-Navarro; J. Burguete

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Fish-Friendly Turbine Making a Splash in Water Power | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fish-Friendly Turbine Making a Splash in Water Power Fish-Friendly Turbine Making a Splash in Water Power October 21, 2011 - 10:29am Addthis A computer simulation of the Alden...

235

Simulation of water flow and solute transport in free-drainage lysimeters and field soils with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulation of water flow and solute transport in free-drainage lysimeters and field soils with heterogeneous structures H. M. ABDOU & M. FLURY Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Center for Multiphase for studying the fate and transport of chemicals in soil. Large-scale field lysimeters are used to assess

Flury, Markus

236

Summary status of advanced water electrolysis and hydrogen storage/transport R and D  

SciTech Connect

Major projects within the framework of the U.S. DOE Chemical/Hydrogen Energy Systems Program are described. Goals, accomplishments and status of investigations into advanced water electrolysis and hydrogen storage/transport are summarized. Electrolytic hydrogen production systems include: SPE electrolyzers; static feed water electrolysis; high temperature electrolysis; and other advanced concepts. Hydrogen transport studies have emphasized the characterization of hydrogen embrittlement effects on conventional natural gas pipeline steels.

Mezzina, A.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Assessment of Ice Plugging of the Cooling Water Intake at American Electric Power's Conesville Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The American Electrical Power (AEP) Conesville power plant is shutting down the last unit that uses a once-through cooling system. Currently, warm water from the existing cooling system is routed to the intake area to control ice buildup. After the last unit is shut down, there will be no control of the ice buildup in the trash racks, making complete blockage of the intake facility a possibility. A sediment-control structure was built in 2000 to prevent sediment buildup at the intake facility. The sedime...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

238

Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt This report summarizes efforts to simulate coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes occurring within a generic hypothetical high-level waste (HLW) repository in bedded salt; chemical processes of the system allow precipitation and dissolution of salt with elevated temperatures that drive water and water vapor flow around hot waste packages. Characterizing salt backfill processes is an important objective of the exercise. An evidence-based algorithm for mineral dehydration is also applied in the modeling. The Finite Element Heat and Mass transfer code (FEHM) is used to simulate coupled thermal,

239

Program on Technology Innovation: Ion Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Advanced Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents an Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Technology Innovation (TI) project that provides background information and increased understanding to EPRI members of the potential benefits of integrating ion transport membrane (ITM) technology for oxygen production with integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and oxyfuel combustion pulverized coal power plants. This TI project also generated new learning by conducting literature reviews of existing and new air separation technolo...

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

240

Performance enhancement using power beaming for electric propulsion earth orbital transporters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An electric propulsion Earth orbital transport vehicle (EOTV) can effectively deliver large payloads using much less propellant than chemical transfer methods. By using an EOTV instead of a chemical upper stage, either a smaller launch vehicle can be used for the same satellite mass or larger satellite can be deployed using the same launch vehicle. However, the propellant mass savings from using the higher specific impulse of electric propulsion may not be enough to overcome the disadvantage of the added mass and cost of the electric propulsion power source. Power system limitations have been a major factor delaying the acceptance and use of electric propulsion. This paper outlines the power requirements of electric propulsion technology being developed today, including arcjets, magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters, and ion engines. Power supply characteristics are discussed for nuclear, solar, and power-beaming systems. Operational characteristics are given for each, as are the impacts of the power supply alternative on the overall craft performance. Because of its modular nature, the power-beaming approach is able to meet the power requirements of all three electric propulsion types. Also, commonality of approach allows different electric propulsion approaches to be powered by a single power supply approach. Power beaming exhibits better flexibility and performance than on-board nuclear or solar power systems.

Dagle, J.E.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Burbank Water and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Burbank Water and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Products purchased from a Burbank retailer are typically awarded higher rebates than those purchased outside Burbank. Inside Burbank: Ceiling Fans: $25 (maximum three) Clothes Washer: $50 Dishwasher: $35 Refrigerator/Freezer: $75 Room A/C: $35 Low E Windows/Doors: $2.00/sq ft

242

Loveland Water and Power - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Energy Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Loveland Water and Power - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Manufacturing Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate $50,000 per year Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: See Program Website Cooling Efficiency Room AC: $50 - $110/ton, plus $3.50 - $5.00 for each 0.1 above minimum SEER, IEER, or EER Economizer: $250 Motion Sensor Controls: $75 Building Envelope Window Replacement: $1.50/sq. ft.

243

Offshore transport of dense water from the East Greenland shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from a mooring deployed at the edge of the East Greenland shelf south of Denmark Strait from September 2007 to October 2008 are analyzed to investigate the processes by which dense water is transferred off the shelf. It is found that water ...

B. E. Harden; R. S. Pickart; I. A. Renfrew

244

Regional Energy and Water Cycles: Transports from Ocean to Land  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flows of energy and water from ocean to land are examined in the context of the land energy and water budgets, for land as a whole and for continents. Most atmospheric reanalyses have large errors of up to 15 W m?2 in the top-of-atmosphere (...

Kevin E. Trenberth; John T. Fasullo

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Regional energy and water cycles: Transports from ocean to land  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flows of energy and water from ocean to land are examined in the context of the land energy and water budgets, for land as a whole and for continents. Most atmospheric reanalyses have large errors of up to 15 W m-2 in the top-of-atmosphere (...

Kevin E. Trenberth; John T. Fasullo

246

Georgia Power- Residential Solar and Heat Pump Water Heater Rebate (Georgia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Georgia Power customers may be eligible for rebates up to $250 each toward the installation costs of a 50 gallon or greater solar water heater or heat pump water heater. The solar water heater or...

247

Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Part 600: Applications for Licenses and Preliminary Permits Under the Water Power Act (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations provide instructions for applications proposing the construction, repair, or operation of hydropower sources. Applications are reviewed by the Water Power and Control Commission.

248

Advanced system analysis for indirect methanol fuel cell power plants for transportation applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The indirect methanol cell fuel concept actively pursued by the USDOE and General Motors Corporation proposes the development of an electrochemical engine'' (e.c.e.), an electrical generator capable for usually efficient and clean power production from methanol fuel for the transportation sector. This on-board generator works in consort with batteries to provide electrical power to drive propulsion motors for a range of electric vehicles. Success in this technology could do much to improve impacted environmental areas and to convert part of the transportation fleet to natural gas- and coal-derived methanol as the fuel source. These developments parallel work in Europe and Japan where various fuel cell powered vehicles, often fueled with tanked or hydride hydrogen, are under active development. Transportation applications present design challenges that are distinctly different from utility requirements, the thrust of most of previous fuel cell programs. In both cases, high conversion efficiency (fuel to electricity) is essential. However, transportation requirements dictate as well designs for high power densities, rapid transients including short times for system start up, and consumer safety. The e.c.e. system is formed from four interacting components: (1) the fuel processor; (2) the fuel cell stack; (3) the air compression and decompression device; and (4) the condensing cross flow heat exchange device. 2 figs.

Vanderborgh, N.E.; McFarland, R.D.; Huff, J.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Advanced system analysis for indirect methanol fuel cell power plants for transportation applications  

SciTech Connect

The indirect methanol cell fuel concept actively pursued by the USDOE and General Motors Corporation proposes the development of an electrochemical engine'' (e.c.e.), an electrical generator capable for usually efficient and clean power production from methanol fuel for the transportation sector. This on-board generator works in consort with batteries to provide electrical power to drive propulsion motors for a range of electric vehicles. Success in this technology could do much to improve impacted environmental areas and to convert part of the transportation fleet to natural gas- and coal-derived methanol as the fuel source. These developments parallel work in Europe and Japan where various fuel cell powered vehicles, often fueled with tanked or hydride hydrogen, are under active development. Transportation applications present design challenges that are distinctly different from utility requirements, the thrust of most of previous fuel cell programs. In both cases, high conversion efficiency (fuel to electricity) is essential. However, transportation requirements dictate as well designs for high power densities, rapid transients including short times for system start up, and consumer safety. The e.c.e. system is formed from four interacting components: (1) the fuel processor; (2) the fuel cell stack; (3) the air compression and decompression device; and (4) the condensing cross flow heat exchange device. 2 figs.

Vanderborgh, N.E.; McFarland, R.D.; Huff, J.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Energy penalty analysis of possible cooling water intake structurerequirements on existing coal-fired power plants.  

SciTech Connect

Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act requires that cooling water intake structures must reflect the best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact. Many existing power plants in the United States utilize once-through cooling systems to condense steam. Once-through systems withdraw large volumes (often hundreds of millions of gallons per day) of water from surface water bodies. As the water is withdrawn, fish and other aquatic organisms can be trapped against the screens or other parts of the intake structure (impingement) or if small enough, can pass through the intake structure and be transported through the cooling system to the condenser (entrainment). Both of these processes can injure or kill the organisms. EPA adopted 316(b) regulations for new facilities (Phase I) on December 18, 2001. Under the final rule, most new facilities could be expected to install recirculating cooling systems, primarily wet cooling towers. The EPA Administrator signed proposed 316(b) regulations for existing facilities (Phase II) on February 28, 2002. The lead option in this proposal would allow most existing facilities to achieve compliance without requiring them to convert once-through cooling systems to recirculating systems. However, one of the alternate options being proposed would require recirculating cooling in selected plants. EPA is considering various options to determine best technology available. Among the options under consideration are wet-cooling towers and dry-cooling towers. Both types of towers are considered to be part of recirculating cooling systems, in which the cooling water is continuously recycled from the condenser, where it absorbs heat by cooling and condensing steam, to the tower, where it rejects heat to the atmosphere before returning to the condenser. Some water is lost to evaporation (wet tower only) and other water is removed from the recirculating system as a blow down stream to control the building up of suspended and dissolved solids. Makeup water is withdrawn, usually from surface water bodies, to replace the lost water. The volume of makeup water is many times smaller than the volume needed to operate a once-through system. Although neither the final new facility rule nor the proposed existing facility rule require dry cooling towers as the national best technology available, the environmental community and several States have supported the use of dry-cooling technology as the appropriate technology for addressing adverse environmental impacts. It is possible that the requirements included in the new facility rule and the ongoing push for dry cooling systems by some stakeholders may have a role in shaping the rule for existing facilities. The temperature of the cooling water entering the condenser affects the performance of the turbine--the cooler the temperature, the better the performance. This is because the cooling water temperature affects the level of vacuum at the discharge of the steam turbine. As cooling water temperatures decrease, a higher vacuum can be produced and additional energy can be extracted. On an annual average, once-through cooling water has a lower temperature than recirculated water from a cooling tower. By switching a once-through cooling system to a cooling tower, less energy can be generated by the power plant from the same amount of fuel. This reduction in energy output is known as the energy penalty. If a switch away from once-through cooling is broadly implemented through a final 316(b) rule or other regulatory initiatives, the energy penalty could result in adverse effects on energy supplies. Therefore, in accordance with the recommendations of the Report of the National Energy Policy Development Group (better known as the May 2001 National Energy Policy), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through its Office of Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), has studied the energy penalty resulting from converting plants with once-through cooling to wet towers or indirect-dry towers. Five l

Veil, J. A.; Littleton, D. J.; Gross, R. W.; Smith, D. N.; Parsons, E.L., Jr.; Shelton, W. W.; Feeley, T. J.; McGurl, G. V.

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

251

Use of Incremental Pricing in Coal Supply and Transportation Agreements to Achieve Power Sales: Report Series of Fuel and Power Market Integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increased power market competition is transforming into increased fuel supply competition. This report examines the role that "incremental pricing" for coal supply and transportation services plays in permitting power generators to achieve greater power sales. Surprisingly, the outlook for using such mechanisms for this purpose is more restricted than one might expect.

1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

252

Summary of ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport computer codes used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). [Contaminant transport computer codes  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information on computer codes for numerical and analytical models that have been used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to model ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport. Organizations conducting modeling at the INEL include: EG G Idaho, Inc., US Geological Survey, and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company. Information concerning computer codes included in this report are: agency responsible for the modeling effort, name of the computer code, proprietor of the code (copyright holder or original author), validation and verification studies, applications of the model at INEL, the prime user of the model, computer code description, computing environment requirements, and documentation and references for the computer code.

Bandy, P.J.; Hall, L.F.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Storing carbon dioxide in saline formations : analyzing extracted water treatment and use for power plant cooling.  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to address the potential to scale up of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture and sequestration in the United States saline formations, an assessment model is being developed using a national database and modeling tool. This tool builds upon the existing NatCarb database as well as supplemental geological information to address scale up potential for carbon dioxide storage within these formations. The focus of the assessment model is to specifically address the question, 'Where are opportunities to couple CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use for existing and expanding power plants, and what are the economic impacts of these systems relative to traditional power systems?' Initial findings indicate that approximately less than 20% of all the existing complete saline formation well data points meet the working criteria for combined CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water treatment systems. The initial results of the analysis indicate that less than 20% of all the existing complete saline formation well data may meet the working depth, salinity and formation intersecting criteria. These results were taken from examining updated NatCarb data. This finding, while just an initial result, suggests that the combined use of saline formations for CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use may be limited by the selection criteria chosen. A second preliminary finding of the analysis suggests that some of the necessary data required for this analysis is not present in all of the NatCarb records. This type of analysis represents the beginning of the larger, in depth study for all existing coal and natural gas power plants and saline formations in the U.S. for the purpose of potential CO{sub 2} storage and water reuse for supplemental cooling. Additionally, this allows for potential policy insight when understanding the difficult nature of combined potential institutional (regulatory) and physical (engineered geological sequestration and extracted water system) constraints across the United States. Finally, a representative scenario for a 1,800 MW subcritical coal fired power plant (amongst other types including supercritical coal, integrated gasification combined cycle, natural gas turbine and natural gas combined cycle) can look to existing and new carbon capture, transportation, compression and sequestration technologies along with a suite of extracting and treating technologies for water to assess the system's overall physical and economic viability. Thus, this particular plant, with 90% capture, will reduce the net emissions of CO{sub 2} (original less the amount of energy and hence CO{sub 2} emissions required to power the carbon capture water treatment systems) less than 90%, and its water demands will increase by approximately 50%. These systems may increase the plant's LCOE by approximately 50% or more. This representative example suggests that scaling up these CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration technologies to many plants throughout the country could increase the water demands substantially at the regional, and possibly national level. These scenarios for all power plants and saline formations throughout U.S. can incorporate new information as it becomes available for potential new plant build out planning.

Dwyer, Brian P.; Heath, Jason E.; Borns, David James; Dewers, Thomas A.; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse D.; McNemar, Andrea; Krumhansl, James Lee; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Power Program Water Power Program supports the development of advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. The program works to promote the development and deployment of these new tech- nologies, known as marine and hydrokinetic technologies, to assess the potential extractable energy from rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters, and to help industry harness this renew- able, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity. The program's research and development efforts fall under two categories: Technology Development and Market Acceleration. Technology Development The Water Power Program works with industry partners, universities, and the Department of Energy's national

255

Los Angeles Department of Water & Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Name Los Angeles Department of Water & Power Place California Utility Id 11208 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png A-1 Rate A Commercial A-1 Rate B (TOU) Commercial

256

Pasadena Water and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Pasadena Water and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Ceiling Fan: Limit two Room A/C: Limit two Attic/Roof Fan: Limit two Shade Screens: Installation must be made to windows on south, west or east walls; screens must reflect 70% of the sun's heat and glare Skylights/Light Tubes: Limit one Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Incentive amounts increase with purchase from Pasadena retailers and with

257

Burbank Water and Power - Energy Solutions Business Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Solutions Business Rebate Program Energy Solutions Business Rebate Program Burbank Water and Power - Energy Solutions Business Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Nonprofit Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Heat Pumps Heating Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Home Weatherization Insulation Design & Remodeling Maximum Rebate Each incentive will may not exceed 25% of the installed cost of a measure. The annual customer rebate total may not exceed $100,000. Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central Air Conditioning: $150 - $500 per ton Heat Pump Retrofits: $175 - $525 per ton Motor Replacements: $35 - $1,260 Thermal Energy Storage: $800 per KW saved Lighting/Chiller Retrofits/Cool Roofing: $0.05 per first year kWh savings

258

SAFETY EVALUATION OF LIGHT-WATER-MODERATED POWER REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

Important problems associated with safety evaluation are reviewed. In contrast to absolute safety,'' the concept of social safety'' is explained and factors to compose social safety'' are evaluated. Some comments are made on the philosophy of safety evaluation. A core spray and enclosure spray systems, which are essential with respect to safety evaluation of the maximum credible accident of light-water-moderated power reactors, are analyzed in detail. In evaluation of a core spray system, detailed analysis is made on loss-of- coolant accident, and effects of core spray system design (spray initiation time, spray flow rate, spray distribution, etc.) on fission release are quantitatively clarified. In evaluation of an enclosure spray system, various product release reduction factors are calculated and relative importance of an enclosure spray system is discussed. A hypothetical accident is analyzed. (auth)

Togo, Y.

1963-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Los Angeles Department of Water & Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from LADWP) (Redirected from LADWP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Los Angeles Department of Water & Power Place California Utility Id 11208 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png A-1 Rate A Commercial

260

A Microfluidic Pore Network Approach to Investigate Water Transport in Fuel Cell Porous Transport Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pore network modelling has traditionally been used to study displacement processes in idealized porous media related to geological flows, with applications ranging from groundwater hydrology to enhanced oil recovery. Very recently, pore network modelling has been applied to model the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Discrete pore network models have the potential to elucidate transport phenomena in the GDL with high computational efficiency, in contrast to continuum or molecular dynamics modelling that require extensive computational resources. However, the challenge in studying the GDL with pore network modelling lies in defining the network parameters that accurately describe the porous media as well as the conditions of fluid invasion that represent realistic transport processes. In this work, we discuss the first stage of developing and validating a GDL-representative pore network model. We begin with a two-dimensional pore network model with a single mobile pha...

Bazylak, A; Markicevic, B; Sinton, D; Djilali, N

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Study on the Mode of Power Plant Circulating Water Waste Heat Regenerative Thermal System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power Plant Circulating Water (PPCW) waste heat recycling is an important way of increasing a power plants primary energy ratio. According to the PPCW waste heat regenerative thermal system, the authors propose two modes of heat pump heat regenerative ... Keywords: heat pump, power plant circulating water (PPCW), waste heat recycling, energy saving

Bi Qingsheng; Ma Yanliang; Yang Zhifu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

DoubleDip: leveraging thermoelectric harvesting for low power monitoring of sporadic water use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present DoubleDip, a low power monitoring system for enabling non-intrusive water flow detection. DoubleDip taps into minute thermal gradients in pipes for both replenishing energy reserves and performing low power wakeup. One of the remaining issues ... Keywords: energy harvesting, low power, sustainability, thermoelectric, water monitoring

Paul Martin; Zainul Charbiwala; Mani Srivastava

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it into nuclear, coal-fired plants, hydroelectricity, etc.comparison, a large coal-fired plant capacity is around 1water use for coal-fired power plants and nuclear plants are

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Visualization of Fuel Cell Water Transport and Performance Characterization under Freezing Conditions  

SciTech Connect

In this program, Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), General Motors (GM) and Michigan Technological University (MTU) have focused on fundamental studies that address water transport, accumulation and mitigation processes in the gas diffusion layer and flow field channels of the bipolar plate. These studies have been conducted with a particular emphasis on understanding the key transport phenomena which control fuel cell operation under freezing conditions. Technical accomplishments are listed below: Demonstrated that shutdown air purge is controlled predominantly by the water carrying capacity of the purge stream and the most practical means of reducing the purge time and energy is to reduce the volume of liquid water present in the fuel cell at shutdown. The GDL thermal conductivity has been identified as an important parameter to dictate water accumulation within a GDL. Found that under the normal shutdown conditions most of the GDL-level water accumulation occurs on the anode side and that the mass transport resistance of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) thus plays a critically important role in understanding and optimizing purge. Identified two-phase flow patterns (slug, film and mist flow) in flow field channel, established the features of each pattern, and created a flow pattern map to characterize the two-phase flow in GDL/channel combination. Implemented changes to the baseline channel surface energy and GDL materials and evaluated their performance with the ex situ multi-channel experiments. It was found that the hydrophilic channel (contact angle ? ? 10?) facilitates the removal of liquid water by capillary effects and by reducing water accumulation at the channel exit. It was also found that GDL without MPL promotes film flow and shifts the slug-to-film flow transition to lower air flow rates, compared with the case of GDL with MPL. Identified a new mechanism of water transport through GDLs based on Haines jump mechanism. The breakdown and redevelopment of the water paths in GDLs lead to an intermittent water drainage behavior, which is characterized by dynamic capillary pressure and changing of breakthrough location. MPL was found to not only limit the number of water entry locations into the GDL (thus drastically reducing water saturation), but also stabilizes the water paths (or morphology). Simultaneously visualized the water transport on cathode and anode channels of an operating fuel cell. It was found that under relatively dry hydrogen/air conditions at lower temperatures, the cathode channels display a similar flow pattern map to the ex-situ experiments under similar conditions. Liquid water on the anode side is more likely formed via condensation of water vapor which is transported through the anode GDL. Investigated the water percolation through the GDL with pseudo-Hele-Shaw experiments and simulated the capillary-driven two-phase flow inside gas diffusion media, with the pore size distributions being modeled by using Weibull distribution functions. The effect of the inclusion of the microporous layer in the fuel cell assembly was explored numerically. Developed and validated a simple, reliable computational tool for predicting liquid water transport in GDLs. Developed a new method of determining the pore size distribution in GDL using scanning electron microscope (SEM) image processing, which allows for separate characterization of GDL wetting properties and pore size distribution. Determined the effect of surface wettability and channel cross section and bend dihedral on liquid holdup in fuel cell flow channels. A major thrust of this research program has been the development of an optimal combination of materials, design features and cell operating conditions that achieve a water management strategy which facilitates fuel cell operation under freezing conditions. Based on our various findings, we have made the final recommendation relative to GDL materials, bipolar design and surface properties, and the combination of materials, design featur

Kandlikar, S.G.; Lu, Z.; Rao, N.; Sergi, J.; Rath, C.; Dade, C.; Trabold, T.; Owejan, J.; Gagliardo, J.; Allen, J.; Yassar, R.S.; Medici, E.; Herescu, A.

2010-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report Report NREL/TP-6A50-56324 December 2012 Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors April Lee, Owen Zinaman, and Jeffrey Logan National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.jisea.org Technical Report NREL/TP-6A50-56324 December 2012 Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors April Lee, Owen Zinaman, and Jeffrey Logan

266

Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors  

SciTech Connect

Use of both natural gas and renewable energy has grown significantly in recent years. Both forms of energy have been touted as key elements of a transition to a cleaner and more secure energy future, but much of the current discourse considers each in isolation or concentrates on the competitive impacts of one on the other. This paper attempts, instead, to explore potential synergies of natural gas and renewable energy in the U.S. electric power and transportation sectors.

Lee, A.; Zinaman, O.; Logan, J.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Integration of Ion Transport Membrane Technology with Oxy-Combustion Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in conjunction with Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., (AP) has reviewed oxy-combustion, a methodology to burn coal using oxygen rather than air to aid in removing carbon by producing a more concentrated stream of carbon dioxide (CO2) for remediation, which reduces the cost and energy required to do so. This report discusses the ion transport membrane (ITM), a technology developed by AP under a Cooperative Agreement with the United States ...

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

268

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation banner Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration T-Shirt Contest Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive...

269

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Print banner Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration T-Shirt Contest Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive...

270

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Transportation and Air Quality Transportation Energy Policy Analysis Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Appliance Energy...

271

Recent Articles on Water-Related Impacts on Power Plant Siting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

States in 1995, USGS Circular 1200, 1998 Recent Articles on Water-Related Impacts on Power Plant Siting and Operation May 2006 Issue of Power Magazine California's Efforts to End...

272

Hand powered portable ultraviolet sterilizing water bottle with active UV dose sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A portable hand powered water sterilization device was created to address a portion of the growing epidemic of global water contamination. As being more supply chain independent and having an active dose sensing component ...

Das, Chandan (Chandan K.)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

pH Adjustment of Power Plant Cooling Water with Flue Gas/Fly Ash  

to fossil fuel burning power plants to control mineral precipitation in cooling water. Flue gas, which is 10% CO2, could be diverted into a plants cooling water

274

Demonstration of Clyde Bergemann Water Cannons at Alabama Power Company's Plant Miller Unit 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the findings of a demonstration of Clyde Bergemann Water Cannons at Alabama Power Company's Plant Miller Unit 1.

2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

275

Benthic Microbial Fuel Cell Persistent power supply for in-water ...  

Benthic Microbial Fuel Cell Persistent power supply for in-water sensors ... and high-density sensor arrays where the cost of battery replacement is high.

276

pH Adjustment of Power Plant Cooling Water with Flue Gas/ Fly ...  

The discovery represents a cost-effective way to utilize materials indigenous to fossil fuel burning power platns to control mineral precipitation is cooling water.

277

Impact of drought on U.S. steam electric power plant cooling water intakes and related water resource management issues.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements their overall research effort by evaluating water availability at power plants under drought conditions. While there are a number of competing demands on water uses, particularly during drought conditions, this report focuses solely on impacts to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet. Included are both fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants. One plant examined also uses biomass as a fuel. The purpose of this project is to estimate the impact on generation capacity of a drop in water level at U.S. steam electric power plants due to climatic or other conditions. While, as indicated above, the temperature of the water can impact decisions to halt or curtail power plant operations, this report specifically examines impacts as a result of a drop in water levels below power plant submerged cooling water intakes. Impacts due to the combined effects of excessive temperatures of the returned cooling water and elevated temperatures of receiving waters (due to high ambient temperatures associated with drought) may be examined in a subsequent study. For this study, the sources of cooling water used by the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet were examined. This effort entailed development of a database of power plants and cooling water intake locations and depths for those plants that use surface water as a source of cooling water. Development of the database and its general characteristics are described in Chapter 2 of this report. Examination of the database gives an indication of how low water levels can drop before cooling water intakes cease to function. Water level drops are evaluated against a number of different power plant characteristics, such as the nature of the water source (river vs. lake or reservoir) and type of plant (nuclear vs. fossil fuel). This is accomplished in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, the nature of any compacts or agreements that give priority to users (i.e., which users must stop withdrawing water first) is examined. This is examined on a regional or watershed basis, specifically for western water rights, and also as a function of federal and state water management programs. Chapter 5 presents the findings and conclusions of this study. In addition to the above, a related intent of this study is to conduct preliminary modeling of how lowered surface water levels could affect generating capacity and other factors at different regional power plants. If utility managers are forced to take some units out of service or reduce plant outputs, the fuel mix at the remaining plants and the resulting carbon dioxide emissions may change. Electricity costs and other factors may also be impacted. Argonne has conducted some modeling based on the information presented in the database described in Chapter 2 of this report. A separate report of the modeling effort has been prepared (Poch et al. 2009). In addition to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet, this modeling also includes an evaluation of power production of hydroelectric facilities. The focus of this modeling is on those power plants located in the western United States.

Kimmell, T. A.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

278

Initial Screening of Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles for High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK B188 Initial Screening of Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles for High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process, nor is such a process available for commercialization. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Fossil fuels are polluting and carbon dioxide emissions from their combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. Almost 800 literature references were located which pertain to thermochemical production of hydrogen from water and over 100 thermochemical watersplitting cycles were examined. Using defined criteria and quantifiable metrics, 25 cycles have been selected for more detailed study.

Brown, L.C.; Funk, J.F.; Showalter, S.K.

1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Heat and water transport in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell electrode  

SciTech Connect

In the present scenario of a global initiative toward a sustainable energy future, the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) has emerged as one of the most promising alternative energy conversion devices for various applications. Despite tremendous progress in recent years, a pivotal performance limitation in the PEFC comes from liquid water transport and the resulting flooding phenomena. Liquid water blocks the open pore space in the electrode and the fibrous diffusion layer leading to hindered oxygen transport. The electrode is also the only component in the entire PEFC sandwich which produces waste heat from the electrochemical reaction. The cathode electrode, being the host to several competing transport mechanisms, plays a crucial role in the overall PEFC performance limitation. In this work, an electrode model is presented in order to elucidate the coupled heat and water transport mechanisms. Two scenarios are specifically considered: (1) conventional, Nafion{reg_sign} impregnated, three-phase electrode with the hydrated polymeric membrane phase as the conveyer of protons where local electro-neutrality prevails; and (2) ultra-thin, two-phase, nano-structured electrode without the presence of ionomeric phase where charge accumulation due to electro-statics in the vicinity of the membrane-CL interface becomes important. The electrode model includes a physical description of heat and water balance along with electrochemical performance analysis in order to study the influence of electro-statics/electro-migration and phase change on the PEFC electrode performance.

Mukherjee, Partha P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rod L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ranjan, Devesh [TEXAS A& M UNIV

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

North Brazil Current rings and transport of southern waters in a high resolution numerical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

North Brazil Current rings and transport of southern waters in a high resolution numerical of the North Brazil Current (NBC) retroflection and North Brazil Current rings. The model mean and seasonal circulation feature near the western boundary is the North Brazil Current (NBC), which has sources

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Simulation Study of Heat Transportation in an Aquifer about Well-water-source Heat Pump  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study of groundwater reinjection, pumping and heat transportation in an aquifer plays an important theoretical role in ensuring the stability of deep-well water reinjection and pumping as well as smooth reinjection. Based on the related conception of underground hydrogeology and the rationale of seepage flow mechanics, a geologic conceptual model of doublet reinjection and a seepage flow model of heat transportation are proposed in this paper. The temperature distribution in the temperature field was obtained by a coupled method of the heat transportation equation and groundwater seepage flow equation fitting for the seepage-affected section. The temperature changes in aquifer and heat storage efficiency are analyzed under different working conditions. All the work referenced above provided references for the popularization and evaluation of well-water source heat pump.

Cong, X.; Liu, Y.; Yang, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Recovery, transport, and disposal of CO{sub 2} from an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect

Initiatives to limit CO{sub 2} emissions have drawn considerable interest to integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation, a process that reduces CO{sub 2} production and is amenable to CO{sub 2} capture. This paper presents a comparison of energy systems that encompass fuel supply, an IGCC system, CO{sub 2} recovery using commercial technologies, CO{sub 2} transport by pipeline, and land-based sequestering in geological reservoirs. The intent is to evaluate the energy efficiency impacts of controlling CO{sub 2} in such a system, and to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an equivalent CO{sub 2} budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps. The value used for the equivalent CO{sub 2} budget is 1 kg CO{sub 2}/kWh. The base case for the comparison is a 458-MW IGCC system using an air-blown Kellogg Rust Westinghouse (KRW) agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, Illinois No.6 bituminous coal, and in-bed sulfur removal. Mining, transportation, and preparation of the coal and limestone result in a net electric power production of 448 MW with a 0.872 kg/kWh CO{sub 2} release rate. For comparison, the gasifier output was taken through a water-gas shift to convert CO to CO{sub 2}, and processed in a Selexol unit to recover CO{sub 2} prior to the combustion turbine. A 500-km pipeline then took the CO{sub 2} to geological sequestering. The net electric power production was 383 MW with a 0.218 kg/kWh CO{sub 2} release rate.

Livengood, C.D.; Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Berry, G.F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

Water Power Program: Hydropower Resource Assessment and Characterizati...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and other environmental services can affect the availability of water resources for energy production, and competing uses are taken into consideration when developing water...

284

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Transportation of Depleted Uranium Materials in Support of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Program Issues associated with transport of depleted UF6 cylinders and conversion products. Conversion Plan Transportation Requirements The DOE has prepared two Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) for the proposal to build and operate depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6) conversion facilities at its Portsmouth and Paducah gaseous diffusion plant sites, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The proposed action calls for transporting the cylinder at ETTP to Portsmouth for conversion. The transportation of depleted UF6 cylinders and of the depleted uranium conversion products following conversion was addressed in the EISs.

285

Direct methanol fuel cells: Developments for portable power and for potential transportation applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors describe here results of recent efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), devoted to potential application of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs) as (1) portable power sources at the 50 W level, and (2) primary power sources for electric vehicles. In general, DMFC R and D efforts focus on further improvements in anode catalytic activity, fuel utilization (as related to methanol crossover) and air cathode performance in the presence of the presence of the significant flux of aqueous methanol from anode to cathode. There are significant differences between technical parameters and targets for the two different DMFC applications, which the authors have addressed. They include the lower cell temperature (about 60 C) preferred in portable power vs. operation around 100 C as target temperature for transportation applications, and the much stronger concern for cost of catalyst and any other stack materials in DMFCs developed for potential transportation applications. Most, if not all, recent DMFC work for either portable power or potential transportation applications has strongly focused on cells with polymeric (primarily PFSA) membrane electrolytes. In work at LANL, thin film catalysts bonded to the membrane, e.g., by the decal method, provided best results in terms of catalyst utilization and overall cell performance. In most tests, the single DMFC hardware consisted of uncatalyzed carbon-cloth gas-diffusion backings and graphite blocks with machined serpentine flow channels--quite similar to hardware employed in work with hydrogen/air PEFCs. However, the machined graphite hardware has recently been replaced by alternative, non-machined flow-field/bipolar plates, which enables effective air and aqueous methanol solution distribution along an active area of 50 cm{sup 2}, at a pitch per cell of 2 mm.

Ren, X.; Thomas, S.C.; Zelenay, P.; Gottesfeld, S.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Structure and Transport of Water and Hydrated Ions Within Hydrophobic, Nanoscale Channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project includes an experimental and modeling investigation into water and hydrated ion structure and transport at nanomaterials interfaces. This is a topic relevant to understanding the function of many biological systems such as aquaporins that efficiently shuttle water and ion channels that permit selective transport of specific ions across cell membranes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are model nanoscale, hydrophobic channels that can be functionalized, making them artificial analogs for these biological channels. This project investigates the microscopic properties of water such as water density distributions and dynamics within CNTs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and the structure of hydrated ions at CNT interfaces via X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Another component of this work is molecular simulation, which can predict experimental measurables such as the proton relaxation times, chemical shifts, and can compute the electronic structure of CNTs. Some of the fundamental questions this work is addressing are: (1) what is the length scale below which nanoscale effects such as molecular ordering become important, (2) is there a relationship between molecular ordering and transport?, and (3) how do ions interact with CNT interfaces? These are questions of interest to the scientific community, but they also impact the future generation of sensors, filters, and other devices that operate on the nanometer length scale. To enable some of the proposed applications of CNTs as ion filtration media and electrolytic supercapacitors, a detailed knowledge of water and ion structure at CNT interfaces is critical.

Holt, J K; Herberg, J L; Wu, Y; Schwegler, E; Mehta, A

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

home power 114 / august & september 2006 in Solar Hot Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water entering the heat exchanger, and the hot water being produced. "I don't know..." I replied. The graphs show that the ultimate temperature of the solar-produced hot water is indeed higher therms) Percentage of hot water produced annually: Approximately 70 percent Equipment Collectors: Two

Knowles, David William

288

Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in PEM Fuel Cells: in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization J. Vernon Cole and Ashok Gidwani CFDRC Prepared for: DOE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Kickoff Meeting February 13, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information. Background Water Management Issues Arise From: ƒ Generation of water by cathodic reaction ƒ Membrane humidification requirements ƒ Capillary pressure driven transport through porous MEA and GDL materials ƒ Scaling bipolar plate channel dimensions J.H. Nam and M. Kaviany, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 46, pp. 4595-4611 (2003) Relevant Barriers and Targets ƒ Improved Gas Diffusion Layer, Flow Fields, Membrane Electrode Assemblies Needed to Improve Water Management: * Flooding blocks reactant transport

289

Post-processing of polymer foam tissue scaffolds with high power ultrasound: a route to increased pore interconnectivity, pore size and fluid transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We expose thick polymer foam tissue scaffolds to high power ultrasound and study its effect on the openness of the pore architecture and fluid transport through the scaffold. Our analysis is supported by measurements of fluid uptake during insonification and imaging of the scaffold microstructure via x-ray computed tomography, scanning electron microscopy and acoustic microscopy. The ultrasonic treatment is found to increase the mean pore size by over 10%. More striking is the improvement in fluid uptake: for scaffolds with only 40% water uptake via standard immersion techniques, we can routinely achieve full saturation of the scaffold over approximately one hour of exposure. These desirable modifications occur with no loss of scaffold integrity and negligible mass loss, and are optimized when the ultrasound treatment is coupled to a pre-wetting stage with ethanol. Our findings suggest that high power ultrasound is a highly targetted and efficient means to promote pore interconnectivity and fluid transport in...

Watson, N J; Reinwald, Y; White, L J; Ghaemmaghami, A M; Morgan, S P; Rose, F R A J; Povey, M J W; Parker, N G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Post-processing of polymer foam tissue scaffolds with high power ultrasound: a route to increased pore interconnectivity, pore size and fluid transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We expose thick polymer foam tissue scaffolds to high power ultrasound and study its effect on the openness of the pore architecture and fluid transport through the scaffold. Our analysis is supported by measurements of fluid uptake during insonification and imaging of the scaffold microstructure via x-ray computed tomography, scanning electron microscopy and acoustic microscopy. The ultrasonic treatment is found to increase the mean pore size by over 10%. More striking is the improvement in fluid uptake: for scaffolds with only 40% water uptake via standard immersion techniques, we can routinely achieve full saturation of the scaffold over approximately one hour of exposure. These desirable modifications occur with no loss of scaffold integrity and negligible mass loss, and are optimized when the ultrasound treatment is coupled to a pre-wetting stage with ethanol. Our findings suggest that high power ultrasound is a highly targetted and efficient means to promote pore interconnectivity and fluid transport in thick foam tissue scaffolds.

N J Watson; R K Johal; Y Reinwald; L J White; A M Ghaemmaghami; S P Morgan; F R A J Rose; M J W Povey; N G Parker

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

291

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Risks » Transportation Health Risks » Transportation DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Transportation A discussion of health risks associated with transport of depleted UF6. Transport Regulations and Requirements In the future, it is likely that depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinders will be transported to a conversion facility. For example, it is currently anticipated that the cylinders at the ETTP Site in Oak Ridge, TN, will be transported to the Portsmouth Site, OH, for conversion. Uranium hexafluoride has been shipped safely in the United States for over 40 years by both truck and rail. Shipments of depleted UF6 would be made in accordance with all applicable transportation regulations. Shipment of depleted UF6 is regulated by the

292

Characterization of oil transport in the power cylinder of internal combustion engines during steady state and transient operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engine friction, wear, and oil consumption are some of the primary interests for the automotive industry. However, there is currently a lack of understanding of the fundamentals involving oil transport inside the power ...

Przesmitzki, Steve (Steve Victor)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Energy/Water Sustainability and the Electric Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processing CT injection Inlet air cooling Ash handling Scrubbing Boiler make-up Cooling #12;10© 2009 Electric Systems #12;8© 2009 Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. All rights reserved. Thermoelectric Power

Keller, Arturo A.

294

Innovative fuel designs for high power density pressurized water reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the ways to lower the cost of nuclear energy is to increase the power density of the reactor core. Features of fuel design that enhance the potential for high power density are derived based on characteristics of ...

Feng, Dandong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Engineering quality control of solar-powered intelligent water-saving irrigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development tendency of the agricultural irrigation technology is Automatic water-saving irrigation, powered by solar energy and achieved control purposes by moisture content monitoring techniques and the variable irrigation technology. In this paper, ... Keywords: intelligent, quality control, solar power, water-saving irrigation

Liu Xiaochu; Wu Hualong; Ling Jingpeng; Tao Jianhua; Yao Li

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transportation systems are an often overlooked critical infrastructure component. These systems comprise a widely diverse elements whose operation impact all aspects of society today. This chapter introduces the key transportation sectors and illustrates ...

Mark Hartong; Rajn Goel; Duminda Wijesekera

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

WaterTransport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water management in Proton Exchange Membrane, PEM, Fuel Cells is challenging because of the inherent conflicts between the requirements for efficient low and high power operation. Particularly at low powers, adequate water must be supplied to sufficiently humidify the membrane or protons will not move through it adequately and resistance losses will decrease the cell efficiency. At high power density operation, more water is produced at the cathode than is necessary for membrane hydration. This excess water must be removed effectively or it will accumulate in the Gas Diffusion Layers, GDLs, between the gas channels and catalysts, blocking diffusion paths for reactants to reach the catalysts and potentially flooding the electrode. As power density of the cells is increased, the challenges arising from water management are expected to become more difficult to overcome simply due to the increased rate of liquid water generation relative to fuel cell volume. Thus, effectively addressing water management based issues is a key challenge in successful application of PEMFC systems. In this project, CFDRC and our partners used a combination of experimental characterization, controlled experimental studies of important processes governing how water moves through the fuel cell materials, and detailed models and simulations to improve understanding of water management in operating hydrogen PEM fuel cells. The characterization studies provided key data that is used as inputs to all state-of-the-art models for commercially important GDL materials. Experimental studies and microscopic scale models of how water moves through the GDLs showed that the water follows preferential paths, not branching like a river, as it moves toward the surface of the material. Experimental studies and detailed models of water and airflow in fuel cells channels demonstrated that such models can be used as an effective design tool to reduce operating pressure drop in the channels and the associated costs and weight of blowers and pumps to force air and hydrogen gas through the fuel cell. Promising improvements to materials structure and surface treatments that can potentially aid in managing the distribution and removal of liquid water were developed; and improved steady-state and freeze-thaw performance was demonstrated for a fuel cell stack under the self-humidified operating conditions that are promising for stationary power generation with reduced operating costs.

J. Vernon Cole; Abhra Roy; Ashok Damle; Hari Dahr; Sanjiv Kumar; Kunal Jain; Ned Djilai

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

298

A dynamic isotope power system for Space Exploration Initiative surface transport systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dynamic Isotope Power System (DIPS) Demonstration Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy with support funding from NASA, is currently focused on the development of a standardized 2.5-kWe portable generator for multiple applications on the lunar or Martian surface. A variety of remote and mobile potential applications have been identified by NASA, including surface rovers for both short- and extended-duration missions, remote power to science packages, and backup to central base power. Recent work focused on refining the 2.5-kWe design and emphasizing the compatibility of the system with potential surface transport systems. Work included an evaluation of the design to ensure compatibility with the Martian atmosphere while imposing only a minor mass penalty on lunar operations. Additional work included a study performed to compare the DIPS with regenerative fuel cell systems for lunar mobile and remote power systems. Power requirements were reviewed and a modular system chosen for the comparison. 4 refs.

Hunt, M.E.; Harty, R.B.; Cataldo, R. (Rockwell International Corp., Rocketdyne Div., Canoga Park, CA (United States) NASA, Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Fiscal Year 2011 Water Power Program Peer Review | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Peer Review » Fiscal Peer Review » Fiscal Year 2011 Water Power Program Peer Review Fiscal Year 2011 Water Power Program Peer Review In November 2011, the Water Power Program held their Annual Peer Review Meeting in Alexandria, Virginia. The purpose of the meeting was to evaluate DOE-funded hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic R&D projects for their contribution to the mission and goals of the Water Power Program and to assess progress made against stated objectives. At the review, approximately 85 projects were presented, representing a DOE investment of over $100 million over the last few years. In addition to the formal review, this event was an excellent opportunity for the water power community to share ideas and solutions to address challenges facing the hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic energy industries.

300

City of Burbank Water and Power, California (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burbank Water and Power, California (Utility Company) Burbank Water and Power, California (Utility Company) (Redirected from Burbank Water and Power) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Burbank Water and Power Place Burbank, California Utility Id 2507 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] SGIC[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project was awarded $20,000,000 Recovery

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Burbank Water & Power - Business Bucks Energy Efficiency Grant...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Cooling Cooling Other Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Insulation Water...

302

Advanced Power Plant Modeling with Applications to an Advanced Boiling Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wave fronts. However, in most power plant transient performance models, there are few heat exchangersAdvanced Power Plant Modeling with Applications to an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor and a Heat Introduction This paper presents two advanced modeling methods, and two applications, for power plant

Mitchell, John E.

303

Transporting of a Cell-Sized Phospholipid Vesicle Across Water/Oil Interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a cell-sized water droplet, with a diameter of several tens of micro meter, is placed in oil containing phospholipids, a stable cell-sized vesicle is spontaneously formed as a water-in-oil phospholipid emulsion (W/O CE) with a phospholipid monolayer. We transferred the lipid vesicle thus formed in the oil phase to the water phase across the water/oil interface by micromanipulation, which suggests that the vesicle is transformed from a phospholipid monolayer as W/O CE into a bilayer. The lipid vesicle can then be transported back into the oil phase. This novel experimental procedure may be a useful tool for creating a model cellular system, which, together with a microreactor, is applicable as a micrometer-scale biochemical reaction field.

Hase, M; Hamada, T; Yoshikawa, K; Hase, Masahiko; Yamada, Ayako; Hamada, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Distributed Reforming of Renewable Liquids via Water Splitting using Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reforming of Renewable Reforming of Renewable Liquids via Water Splitting using Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) * U. (Balu) Balachandran, T. H. Lee, C. Y. Park, and S. E. Dorris Energy Systems Division E-mail: balu@anl.gov * Work supported by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program of DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Presented at the Bio-derived Liquids Working Group (BILIWG) Meeting, Nov. 6, 2007. BILIWG Meeting, Nov. 6, 2007 2 Objective & Rationale Objective: Develop compact dense ceramic membrane reactors that enable the efficient and cost-effective production of hydrogen by reforming renewable liquid fuels using pure oxygen produced by water splitting and transported by an OTM. Rationale: Membrane technology provides the means to attack barriers to the

305

Surface water transport and distribution of uranium in contaminated sediments near a nuclear weapons processing facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The extent of remobilization of uranium from contaminated soils adjacent to a nuclear weapons processing facility during episodic rain events was investigated. In addition, information on the solid phase associations of U in floodplain and suspended sediments was assessed by an eight-step sequential extraction procedure to gauge U chemical lability and its propensity for transport. Comparisons were drawn between the easily dispersible, or water dispersible clay fraction (WDC) of the floodplain sediments to the stream suspended sediments transported during storms. Mass flux estimates determined from base flow measurements potentially underestimate the amount of U transported from contaminated terrestrial sources to surface water systems. During the storm events measured, approximately 145 7 to 2 8 3 8 % more U was mobilized to Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) relative to base flow calculations. The suspended sediment load transports the bulk of U in labile forms predominantly as acid soluble (specifically adsorbed), MnO2 occluded and organically bound phases. This implies that U may be available to the environment under a range of changing conditions (e.g., Eh and pH). Sequential extractions of the floodplain sediments demonstrated the presence of chemically labile forms, but in different proportions to the suspended sediments. More U was associated with the organically bound phases in the floodplain sediments, while the easily dispersible fraction of floodplain sediments correlated with the suspended sediments. A strong relationship exists between the suspended sediments and the WDC fraction, suggesting that fine particles are eroded from the floodplain and transported in labile forms. This study demonstrates the need to revise current monitoring schemes to include mass transport evaluation during storms. In addition, sequential extraction studies provide knowledge of U chemical lability in contaminated sediments, which may suggest environmentally sound and more cost effective remediation techniques than ones currently in use.

Batson, Vicky Lynn

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Water and Power Conservation _.. a way of life  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... denial of service, financial loss, or legal ... with reliability of the transmission network, generally including ... As provided in Federal Power Act Section ...

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

307

Federal, Public Power Districts, Rural Water Users & Western...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rates Federal Customers Bureau of Reclamation (Mni Wiconi project) Ellsworth AFB, South Dakota Turtle Mountain & Fort Totten, North Dakota Public Power Districts Municipal...

308

Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single Family Homes (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

This document focuses on managing the driving forces which move air and moisture across the building envelope. While other previously published Measure Guidelines focus on elimination of air pathways, the ultimate goal of this Measure Guideline is to manage drivers which cause air flow and water vapor transport across the building envelope (and also within the home), control air infiltration, keep relative humidity (RH) within acceptable limits, avoid combustion safety problems, improve occupant comfort, and reduce house energy use.

Cummings, J.; Withers, C.; Martin, E.; Moyer, N.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The viability of biomass as transportation fuel depends upon the allocation of limited resources for fuel, power, and products. By focusing on mature markets, this report identifies how biomass is projected to be most economically used in the long term and the implications for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and petroleum use. In order to better understand competition for biomass between these markets and the potential for biofuel as a market-scale alternative to petroleum-based fuels, this report presents results of a micro-economic analysis conducted using the Biomass Allocation and Supply Equilibrium (BASE) modeling tool. The findings indicate that biofuels can outcompete biopower for feedstocks in mature markets if research and development targets are met. The BASE tool was developed for this project to analyze the impact of multiple biomass demand areas on mature energy markets. The model includes domestic supply curves for lignocellulosic biomass resources, corn for ethanol and butanol production, soybeans for biodiesel, and algae for diesel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Ruth, M.; Mai, T.; Newes, E.; Aden, A.; Warner, E.; Uriarte, C.; Inman, D.; Simpkins, T.; Argo, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Consumptive Water Use for U.S. Power Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the analyzed hydroelectric dams. 5 Table 3. United States Water Consumption per kWh of Energy Consumed by State Thermoelectric Hydroelectric 1 Thermoelectric Hydroelectric...

311

Light Water Reactor Materials for Commercial Nuclear Power ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Light Water Reactor Materials for Commercial Nuclear ... First- Principles Theory of Magnetism, Crystal Field and Phonon Spectrum of UO2.

312

Muscatine Power and Water - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

clothes washers, dryers, ranges, room air and central air conditioners, ground source heat pumps, and water heaters are eligible for this program. The rebate amount...

313

Burbank Water and Power - Residential and Commercial Solar Support...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Income Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings For Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Maximum Rebate Maximum...

314

Wind Power Answer In Times of Water Scarcity (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Strategic energy planning is paramount during times of dramatic population growth, global warming, increasing energy demands, and concerns over energy security, food security, and economic development. Recent concerns over water scarcity have moved the energy-water issue to the forefront of energy options discussions. This presentation describes the current water challenges in the United States and presents a case for wind energy as one way to mitigate the problem of water scarcity in several U.S. regions while providing a clean and sustainable economic future for America.

Flowers, L.; Reategui, S.

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

315

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meier AKMeier@lbl.gov (510) 486-4740 Links Transportation and Air Quality Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

316

Conventional Hydropower Technologies (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Power Water Power Program supports the development of technologies that harness the nation's renewable hydropower resources to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity. Most conventional hydropower plants use a diver- sion structure, such as a dam, to capture water's potential energy via a turbine for electricity generation. The program's conventional hydropower activities focus on increasing generating capacity and efficiency at existing hydroelectric facilities, adding hydroelectric generating capacity to exist- ing non-powered dams, adding new low impact hydropower, increasing advanced pumped-storage hydropower capacity, and reducing potential environmental impacts of conven- tional hydropower production. The program's research and

317

In situ separation of root hydraulic redistribution of soil water from liquid and vapor transport  

SciTech Connect

Nocturnal increases in water potential ( ) and water content (WC) in the upper soil profile are often attributed to root water efflux into the soil, a process termed hydraulic lift or hydraulic redistribution (HR). We have previously reported HR values up to ~0.29 mm day-1 in the upper soil for a seasonally dry old-growth ponderosa pine site. However, unsaturated liquid or vapor flux of water between soil layers independent of roots also contributes to the diurnal patterns in WC, confounding efforts to determine the actual magnitude of HR. In this study, we estimated liquid (Jl) and vapor (Jv) soil water fluxes and their impacts on quantifying HR in situ by applying existing data sets of , WC, temperature (T) and soil physical properties to soil water transport equations. Under moist conditions, Jl between layers was estimated to be larger than necessary to account for measured nocturnal increases in WC of upper soil layers. However, as soil drying progressed unsaturated hydraulic conductivity declined rapidly such that Jl was irrelevant (< 2E-06 cm hr-1 at 0-60 cm depths) to total water flux by early August. In surface soil at depths above 15 cm, large T fluctuations can impact Jv leading to uncertainty concerning the role, if any, of HR in nocturnal WC dynamics. Vapor flux was estimated to be the highest at the shallowest depths measured (20 - 30 cm) where it could contribute up to 40% of hourly increases in nocturnal soil moisture depending on thermal conditions. While both HR and net soil water flux between adjacent layers contribute to WC in the 15-65 cm soil layer, HR was the dominant process and accounted for at least 80% of the diurnal increases in WC. While the absolute magnitude of HR is not easily quantified, total diurnal fluctuations in upper soil water content can be quantified and modeled, and remain highly applicable for establishing the magnitude and temporal dynamics of total ecosystem water flux.

Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL; Brooks, J Renee [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR; Dragila, Maria [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Meinzer, Rick [USDA Forest Service

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Pilot Program (Florida...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New...

319

HEAVY WATER MODERATED POWER REACTORS PROGRESS REPORT, SEPTEMBER 1961  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the end of September l961, construction of the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor was about 90% complete. Thirty-two compacted tubes of crushed, fused uranium oxide in Zircaloy sheaths were fabricated for irradiation tests and destructive evaluation. lrradiation tests of the tubes were started in the Vallecitos Boiling Water Reactor and at Savannah River. The fabrication process for the tubes included steps designed to exclude hydrogenous material from the oxide cores, thereby eliminating the probable cause of sheath failures in previous irradiations. Additional experimental data on heat transfer burnout of tubes in subcooled water at pressures of about 100 to 1000 psi showed that the burnout heat flux is not affected significantiy by pressure in this range. The data were correlated in terms of water velocity and subcooling. (auth)

Hood, R.R. comp.

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

City Water Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

City Water Light and Power - Solar Rewards Program | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

322

Burbank Water & Power - Energy Solutions Business Rebate Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

323

Burbank Water & Power - Green Building Incentive Program (California...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

324

Glendale Water and Power - Solar Solutions Program (California...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

325

Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program (Florida) |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

326

GreyStone Power - Solar Water Heating Program (Georgia) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

327

Burbank Water and Power - Residential and Commercial Solar Support...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

328

City Water Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

329

Burbank Water & Power - Business Bucks Energy Efficiency Grant...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

330

Atmospheric Water Vapor Transport in NCEPNCAR Reanalyses: Comparison with River Discharge in the Central United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors extract the water transport produced by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction reanalysis for a 10-yr period, 198493, and compare its convergence into two river basins with an independent dataset, river discharge (...

William J. Gutowski Jr.; Yibin Chen; Zekai tles

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Development of an artificial neural network-based software for prediction of power plant canal water discharge temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plant cooling water systems that interact with nearby effluents are complex non-linear, large-time-delay systems. A neural network-based software tool was developed for prediction of the canal water discharge temperature at a coal-fired power plant ... Keywords: Canal water thermal discharge, Neural networks, Power plants

Carlos E. Romero; Jiefeng Shan

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

City Water Light and Power - Solar Rewards Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » City Water Light and Power - Solar Rewards Program City Water Light and Power - Solar Rewards Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $15,000 per account Program Info Start Date 01/23/2012 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $1,500/kW Provider City Water Light and Power '''''Note: Funding for the Solar Rewards program has been exhausted. Check the program web site for more information regarding additional funding, expected March 2013.''''' City Water, Light and Power (CWLP) is now offering residential and commercial customers a $1,500 per kilowatt (kW) rebate for installing solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Rebates are limited to $15,000 per customer

333

OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Skip to Main Content Area Skip to Main Content Area Wiki Apps Datasets Community Home Groups Community Central Green Button Applications Developer Utility Rate FRED: FRee Energy Database More Public Groups Private Groups Features Groups Blog posts Content Stream Documents Discussions Polls Q & A Events Notices My stuff Energy blogs Login | Sign Up Search Facebook icon Twitter icon » OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum Home > Groups > Water Power Forum Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 28 March, 2013 - 15:16 community forum gateway OpenEI Water power OpenEI has launched a new Water Power Gateway, which contains links to critical public data sets, up-to-date information on technologies and events, a community forum to discuss topics of interest, links to major

334

City of Glendale Water and Power Smart Grid Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water and Power Smart Grid Project Water and Power Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead City of Glendale Water and Power Country United States Headquarters Location Glendale, California Recovery Act Funding $20,000,000.00 Total Project Value $51,302,425.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: City of Glendale Water and Power Smart Grid Project Coordinates 34.1425078°, -118.255075° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

335

Recent Articles on Water-Related Impacts on Power Plant Siting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Andrea McNemar National Energy Technology Laboratory A Water Constrained Future - How Power Producers Can Minimize the Impact in the West May 1 - 2, 2007 San Diego, CA Estimating...

336

FirstEnergy (West Penn Power)- Residential Solar Water Heating Program (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

West Penn Power, a First Energy utility, provides rebates to residential customers for purchasing and installing qualifying solar water heating systems. Eligible systems may receive a rebate of up...

337

Use of Non-Traditional Water for Power Plant Applications: An...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Non-Traditional Water for Power Plant Applications: An Overview of DOENETL R&D Efforts November 1, 2009 DOENETL-311040609 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an...

338

Modelling of a solar-powered supercritical water biomass gasifier Laurance A Watson1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modelling of a solar-powered supercritical water biomass gasifier Laurance A Watson1 , John D Pye2 to efficiently gasify biomass would offer one potential source of sustainable hydrocarbons and deliver desirable

339

Thermal desalination : structural optimization and integration in clean power and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large number of resources are dedicated to seawater desalination and will only grow as world-wide water scarcity increases. In arid areas with high temperature and salinity seawater, thermal desalination and power plants ...

Zak, Gina Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

PowerProjections2003(avgusing5-03water,BrokerPrices)(amended...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PowerProjections2003(avgusing5-03water,BrokerPrices)(amended).xls SLIP Energy WY Gross Gen from Hydro LP Dolores Gen. Total SLIP Gross Gen Avg. Plant Use SLIP Net Gen @ Plant...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The Formation and Fate of Trihalomethanes in Power Plant Cooling Water Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trihalomethanes (THMs) are semi-volatile compounds that form in water when chlorine or bromine reacts with dissolved organic carbon. This report investigates the formation and fate of THM compounds in power plant cooling water systems, THM health risks, a generalized mechanism of THM formation, and the applicability of existing THM research to power plant cooling. The report presents results of a two-site sampling and analytical program designed to identify THM formation potential in cooling towers using...

2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

342

Investigation of the performance and water transport of a polymer electrolyte membrane (pem) fuel cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel cell performance was obtained as functions of the humidity at the anode and cathode sites, back pressure, flow rate, temperature, and channel depth. The fuel cell used in this work included a membrane and electrode assembly (MEA) which possessed an active area of 25, 50, and 100 cm2 with the Nafion 117 and 115 membranes. Higher flow rates of inlet gases increase the performance of a fuel cell by increasing the removal of the water vapor, and decrease the mass transportation loss at high current density. Higher flow rates, however, result in low fuel utilization. An important factor, therefore, is to find the appropriate stoichiometric flow coefficient and starting point of stoichiometric flow rate in terms of fuel cell efficiency. Higher air supply leads to have better performance at the constant stoichiometric ratio at the anode, but not much increase after the stoichiometric ratio of 5. The effects of the environmental conditions and the channel depth for an airbreathing polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell were investigated experimentally. Triple serpentine designs for the flow fields with two different flow depths was used. The shallow flow field deign improves dramatically the performance of the air-breathing fuel cell at low relative humidity, and slightly at high relative humidity. For proton exchange membrane fuel cells, proper water management is important to obtain maximum performance. Water management includes the humidity levels of the inlet gases as well as the understanding of the water process within the fuel cell. Two important processes associated with this understanding are (1) electro-osmotic drag of water molecules, and (2) back diffusion of the water molecules. There must be a neutral water balance over time to avoid the flooding, or drying the membranes. For these reasons, therefore, an investigation of the role of water transport in a PEM fuel cell is of particular importance. In this study, through a water balance experiment, the electro-osmotic drag coefficient was quantified and studied. For the cases where the anode was fully hydrated and the cathode suffered from the drying, when the current density was increased, the electro- osmotic drag coefficient decreased.

Park, Yong Hun

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

NREL: Water Power Research - Computer-Aided Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Engineering NREL is collaborating with other national laboratories, federal agencies, universities, and industry members to develop comprehensive and validated sets of computer-aided engineering modeling tools to accelerate the development of marine hydrokinetic technologies and improve the performance of hydroelectric facilities. Recent modeling efforts include: Wave Energy Converter Device and Array Modeling Current Device and Array Performance Modeling and Optimization Reference Model Development Wave Energy Converter Device Modeling Computer simulation that illustrates the flow patterns of water, represented by red circles and dots, around several two-bladed current turbines that appear to e floating in blue water. Simulation of the turbulent flow field entering and passing through an

344

384 Power plant waste water sampling and analysis plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the 384 Power House Sampling and Analysis Plan. The Plan describes sampling methods, locations, frequency, analytes, and stream descriptions. The effluent streams from 384, were characterized in 1989, in support of the Stream Specific Report (WHC-EP-0342, Addendum 1).

Hagerty, K.J.; Knotek, H.M.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Wind and Water Power Technologies FY'14 Budget At-a-Glance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 WIND & WATER POWER TECHNOLOGIES WIND POWER PROGRAM FY14 BUDGET AT-A-GLANCE Wind and Water Power Technologies accelerates U.S. deployment of clean, affordable and reliable domestic wind power through research, development and demonstration. These advanced technology investments directly contribute to the President's goals for the United States to double renewable electricity generation again by 2020 and to achieve 80 percent of its electricity from clean, carbon-free energy sources by 2035 through reducing costs and increasing performance of wind energy systems. Wind power currently provides 3.5 percent of the nation's electricity, and more wind-powered electricity generation capacity was installed in the United States in 2012 than

346

Optimization under Uncertainty for Water Consumption in a Pulverized Coal Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

Pulverized coal (PC) power plants are widely recognized as major water consumers whose operability has started to be affected by drought conditions across some regions of the country. Water availability will further restrict the retrofitting of existing PC plants with water-expensive carbon capture technologies. Therefore, national efforts to reduce water withdrawal and consumption have been intensified. Water consumption in PC plants is strongly associated to losses from the cooling water cycle, particularly water evaporation from cooling towers. Accurate estimation of these water losses requires realistic cooling tower models, as well as the inclusion of uncertainties arising from atmospheric conditions. In this work, the cooling tower for a supercritical PC power plant was modeled as a humidification operation and used for optimization under uncertainty. Characterization of the uncertainty (air temperature and humidity) was based on available weather data. Process characteristics including boiler conditions, reactant ratios, and pressure ratios in turbines were calculated to obtain the minimum water consumption under the above mentioned uncertainties. In this study, the calculated conditions predicted up to 12% in reduction in the average water consumption for a 548 MW supercritical PC power plant simulated using Aspen Plus. Optimization under uncertainty for these large-scale PC plants cannot be solved with conventional stochastic programming algorithms because of the computational expenses involved. In this work, we discuss the use of a novel better optimization of nonlinear uncertain systems (BONUS) algorithm which dramatically decreases the computational requirements of the stochastic optimization.

Juan M. Salazar; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila Diwekar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Optimization Under Uncertainty for Water Consumption in a Pulverized Coal Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pulverized coal (PC) power plants are widely recognized as major water consumers whose operability has started to be affected by drought conditions across some regions of the country. Water availability will further restrict the retrofitting of existing PC plants with water-expensive carbon capture technologies. Therefore, national efforts to reduce water withdrawal and consumption have been intensified. Water consumption in PC plants is strongly associated to losses from the cooling water cycle, particularly water evaporation from cooling towers. Accurate estimation of these water losses requires realistic cooling tower models, as well as the inclusion of uncertainties arising from atmospheric conditions. In this work, the cooling tower for a supercritical PC power plant was modeled as a humidification operation and used for optimization under uncertainty. Characterization of the uncertainty (air temperature and humidity) was based on available weather data. Process characteristics including boiler conditions, reactant ratios, and pressure ratios in turbines were calculated to obtain the minimum water consumption under the above mentioned uncertainties. In this study, the calculated conditions predicted up to 12% in reduction in the average water consumption for a 548 MW supercritical PC power plant simulated using Aspen Plus. Optimization under uncertainty for these large-scale PC plants cannot be solved with conventional stochastic programming algorithms because of the computational expenses involved. In this work, we discuss the use of a novel better optimization of nonlinear uncertain systems (BONUS) algorithm which dramatically decreases the computational requirements of the stochastic optimization.

Juan M. Salazara; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila M. Diwekara

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

ANN Models for Steam Turbine Power Output Toward Condenser Circulating Water Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aimed the costliness and the complex process of performance test for steam turbine power output toward circulating water flux and in view of the nonlinear advantage about neural network, it brings forward predicting the performance using artificial ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, steam turbine power output, performance prediction

Jia Ruixuan; Xu Hong

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Influence of Cooling Circulating Water Flow on Back Pressure Variation of Thermal Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under certain conditions, condenser pressure can be considered as back pressure of the steam turbine, which has great influence on the unit power. Based on the back pressure calculation model, influence on back pressure variation by adjusting circulating ... Keywords: Cold-end system, back pressure, cooling water flow, unit power

Nian Zhonghua, Liu Jizhen, Liu Guangjian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of modeling the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in EPRI report 1004931, Boiler Water Deposition Model: Part 1: Feasibility Study, published in 2004. This report presents findings of follow-up activities directed toward the ultimate goal of developing an aggregate model that is applicable to the important deposition phenomena in fossil drum-type boilers.

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

351

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of current and near-future transportation fuel production inof current and future transportation fuel production in theof existing and near-future transportation fuel production

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Ideal Desalination through Graphyne-4 Membrane: Nanopores for Quantized Water Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graphyne-4 sheet exhibits promising potential for nanoscale desalination to achieve both high water permeability and salt rejection rate. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations on pore-size effects suggest that graphyne-4, with 4 acetylene bonds between two adjacent phenyl rings, has the best performance with 100% salt rejection and an unprecedented water permeability, to our knowledge, of ~13L/cm2/day/MPa, about 10 times higher than the state-of-the-art nanoporous graphene reported previously (Nano Lett.s 2012, 12, 3602-3608). In addition, the membrane entails very low energy consumption for producing 1m3 of fresh water, i.e., 3.6e-3 kWh/m3, three orders of magnitude less than the prevailing commercial membranes based on reverse osmosis. Water flow rate across the graphyne-4 sheet exhibits intriguing nonlinear dependence on the pore size owing to the quantized nature of water flow at the nanoscale. Such novel transport behavior has important implications to the design of highly effective and efficient desalination membranes.

Chongqin Zhu; Hui Li; Xiao Cheng Zeng; Sheng Meng

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

353

Fundamentals of Melt-Water Interfacial Transport Phenomena: Improved Understanding for Innovative Safety Technologies in ALWRs  

SciTech Connect

The interaction and mixing of high-temperature melt and water is the important technical issue in the safety assessment of water-cooled reactors to achieve ultimate core coolability. For specific advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, deliberate mixing of the core-melt and water is being considered as a mitigative measure, to assure ex-vessel core coolability. The goal of this work is to provide the fundamental understanding needed for melt-water interfacial transport phenomena, thus enabling the development of innovative safety technologies for advanced LWRs that will assure ex-vessel core coolability. The work considers the ex-vessel coolability phenomena in two stages. The first stage is the melt quenching process and is being addressed by Argonne National Lab and University of Wisconsin in modified test facilities. Given a quenched melt in the form of solidified debris, the second stage is to characterize the long-term debris cooling process and is being addressed by Korean Maritime University in via test and analyses. We then address the appropriate scaling and design methodologies for reactor applications.

M. Anderson; M. Corradini; K.Y. Bank; R. Bonazza; D. Cho

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

354

ZERO EMISSION POWER PLANTS USING SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS AND OXYGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over 16,700 hours of operational experience was gained for the Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) elements of the proposed SOFC/OTM zero-emission power generation concept. It was repeatedly demonstrated that OTMs with no additional oxidation catalysts were able to completely oxidize the remaining depleted fuel in a simulated SOFC anode exhaust at an O{sub 2} flux that met initial targets. In such cases, neither residual CO nor H{sub 2} were detected to the limits of the gas chromatograph (<10 ppm). Dried OTM afterburner exhaust streams contained up to 99.5% CO{sub 2}. Oxygen flux through modified OTMs was double or even triple that of the standard OTMs used for the majority of testing purposes. Both the standard and modified membranes in laboratory-scale and demonstration-sized formats exhibited stable performance over extended periods (2300 to 3500 hours or 3 to 5 months). Reactor contaminants, were determined to negatively impact OTM performance stability. A method of preventing OTM performance degradation was developed and proven to be effective. Information concerning OTM and seal reliability over extended periods and through various chemical and thermal shocks and cycles was also obtained. These findings were used to develop several conceptual designs for pilot (10 kWe) and commercial-scale (250 kWe) SOFC/OTM zero emission power generation systems.

G. Maxwell Christie; Troy M. Raybold

2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

355

Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury, Arsenic, and Fine Particulate Matter From Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kevin crist Kevin crist Principal Investigator Ohio University Research and Technology Center Athens, OH 45701 740-593-4751 cristk@ohiou.edu Environmental and Water Resources Evaluation of thE Emission, transport, and dEposition of mErcury, arsEnic, and finE particulatE mattEr from coal-BasEd powEr plants in thE ohio rivEr vallEy rEgion Background The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has established an aggressive research initiative to address the technical and scientific issues surrounding the impact of coal-based power systems on ambient levels of fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ), nitrogen oxides (NO X ), mercury/air toxics, and acid gases. Regulatory drivers such as the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, the 1997 revised National Ambient Air Quality Standards, and the 2005 Clean Air

356

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accumulation of internal deposits can adversely affect the performance and availability of boilers and turbines in fossil steam-water cycles. Deposition in drum boilers has been identified as the area of broadest concern to the industry; therefore, an improved understanding of deposition in drum boilers is expected to represent the greatest source of benefits and value to end users. The overall objective of the modeling described here is to develop a comprehensive, integrated model for deposition process...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

357

Unstructured finite volume discretisation of bed friction and convective flux in solute transport models linked to the shallow water equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The finite volume discretisation of the shallow water equations has been the subject of many previous studies, most of which deal with a well-balanced conservative discretisation of the convective flux and bathymetry. However, the bed friction discretisation ... Keywords: Bed friction, Depth averaged models, Finite volume method, High order schemes, Scalar transport, Shallow water equations, Unstructured mesh

L. Cea; M. E. Vzquez-Cendn

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Secretary Chu Announces more than $200 Million for Solar and Water Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

more than $200 Million for Solar and Water more than $200 Million for Solar and Water Power Technologies Secretary Chu Announces more than $200 Million for Solar and Water Power Technologies April 22, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - On the 40th Anniversary of Earth Day, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced that the Department will invest more than $200 million over five years to expand and accelerate the development, commercialization, and use of solar and water power technologies throughout the United States. This funding underscores the Administration's commitment to foster a robust clean-energy sector in the United States - that will create American manufacturing jobs and a workforce with the required technical training to speed the implementation of cutting-edge technologies. Today's announcement represents a down payment that will help

359

Institutional impediments to using alternative water sources in thermoelectric power plants.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the Existing Plants Research Program's overall research effort by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. Obtaining adequate water supplies for cooling and other operations at a reasonable cost is a key factor in siting new and maintaining existing thermoelectric power plant operations. One way to reduce freshwater consumption is to use alternative water sources such as reclaimed (or recycled) water, mine pool water, and other nontraditional sources. The use of these alternative sources can pose institutional challenges that can cause schedule delays, increase costs, or even require plants to abandon their plans to use alternative sources. This report identifies and describes a variety of institutional challenges experienced by power plant owners and operators across the country, and for many of these challenges it identifies potential mitigating approaches. The information comes from publically available sources and from conversations with power plant owners/operators familiar with using alternative sources. Institutional challenges identified in this investigation include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Institutional actions and decisions that are beyond the control of the power plant. Such actions can include changes in local administrative policies that can affect the use of reclaimed water, inaccurate growth projections regarding the amount of water that will be available when needed, and agency workloads and other priorities that can cause delays in the permitting and approval processes. (2) Developing, cultivating, and maintaining institutional relationships with the purveyor(s) of the alternative water source, typically a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), and with the local political organizations that can influence decisions regarding the use of the alternative source. Often a plan to use reclaimed water will work only if local politics and power plant goals converge. Even then, lengthy negotiations are often needed for the plans to come to fruition. (3) Regulatory requirements for planning and developing associated infrastructure such as pipelines, storage facilities, and back-up supplies that can require numerous approvals, permits, and public participation, all of which can create delays and increased costs. (4) Permitting requirements that may be difficult to meet, such as load-based discharge limits for wastewater or air emissions limitations for particulate matter (which will be in the mist of cooling towers that use reclaimed water high in dissolved solids). (5) Finding discharge options for cooling tower blowdown of reclaimed water that are acceptable to permitting authorities. Constituents in this wastewater can limit options for discharge. For example, discharge to rivers requires National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits whose limits may be difficult to meet, and underground injection can be limited because many potential injection sites have already been claimed for disposal of produced waters from oil and gas wells or waters associated with gas shale extraction. (6) Potential liabilities associated with using alternative sources. A power plant can be liable for damages associated with leaks from reclaimed water conveyance systems or storage areas, or with mine water that has been contaminated by unscrupulous drillers that is subsequently discharged by the power plant. (7) Community concerns that include, but are not limited to, increased saltwater drift on farmers fields; the possibility that the reclaimed water will contaminate local drinking water aquifers; determining the 'best' use of WWTP effluent; and potential health concerns associated with emissions from the cooling towers that use recycled water. (8) Interveners that raise public concerns about the potential for emissions of emergi

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

360

Uses of power plant discharge water in greenhouse production  

SciTech Connect

A TVA research study on the use of waste heat in thermal effluents from power plant, fossil-fired or nuclear, for environmental control in greehhouses is described in terms of the engineering objectives, horticultural obj ectives, design, operation, and performance testing of the greenhouse facility, and preliminary results with an empty greenhouse and one used to grow cucumbers. The engineering system has performed as designed to date, although modifications to permit futare performance evaluations are planned. The horticultural production has been satisfactory to date and other crops, varieties, and rooting media will be tested to increase production. (LCL)

Bond, B.J.; Furlong, W.K.; King, L.D.; Madewell, C.E.; Martin, J.B.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

362

Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.  

SciTech Connect

Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

363

HEAVY WATER MODERATED POWER REACTORS. Progress Report for October 1959  

SciTech Connect

Continued progress is reported on the design and construction of the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor; 78% of the firm design and 17% of the construction were complete at the end of October 1959. Approximateiy 15% of the firm design for the isolated coolant loops of the HWCTR was also complete. The results of further fabrication tests and irradiation tests of fuel tubes of natural uranium metal are reported. One of the metal tubes failed under irradiation, while other irradiations of metal fuels progressed satisfactorily. (auth)

Hood, R.R.; Isakoff, L. comps.

1959-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Subtask 1.24 - Optimization of Cooling Water Resources for Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has developed an interactive, Web-based decision support system (DSS{copyright} 2007 EERC Foundation) to provide power generation utilities with an assessment tool to address water supply issues when planning new or modifying existing generation facilities. The Web-based DSS integrates water and wastewater treatment technology and water law information with a geographic information system-based interactive map that links to state and federal water quality and quantity databases for North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Wisconsin, and Iowa.

Daniel Stepan; Richard Shockey; Bethany Kurz; Wesley Peck

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

COOLING WATER ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES AT U.S. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This report has been prepared for the Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), for the purpose of providing a status report on the challenges and opportunities facing the U.S. commercial nuclear energy industry in the area of plant cooling water supply. The report was prompted in part by recent Second Circuit and Supreme Court decisions regarding cooling water system designs at existing thermo-electric power generating facilities in the U.S. (primarily fossil and nuclear plants). At issue in the courts have been Environmental Protection Agency regulations that define what constitutes Best Technology Available for intake structures that withdraw cooling water that is used to transfer and reject heat from the plants steam turbine via cooling water systems, while minimizing environmental impacts on aquatic life in nearby water bodies used to supply that cooling water. The report was also prompted by a growing recognition that cooling water availability and societal use conflicts are emerging as strategic energy and environmental issues, and that research and development (R&D) solutions to emerging water shortage issues are needed. In particular, cooling water availability is an important consideration in siting decisions for new nuclear power plants, and is an under-acknowledged issue in evaluating the pros and cons of retrofitting cooling towers at existing nuclear plants. Because of the significant ongoing research on water issues already being performed by industry, the national laboratories and other entities, this report relies heavily on ongoing work. In particular, this report has relied on collaboration with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), including its recent work in the area of EPA regulations governing intake structures in thermoelectric cooling water systems.

Gary Vine

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

AN EVALUATION OF HEAVY WATER REACTORS FOR POWER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reference designs for pressurized and direct-boiling D/sub 2/O reactors were prepared for electrical outputs of 20, 100, and 250 electrical Mw. A number of possible core designs were considered and those utilized which seemed most appropriate to give low-cost power. The technology and costs available today were employed in the preparation of the over-all plant designs. The Consolidated Western Steel Division of U. S. Steel Corporation assisted by preparing a comprehensive report on the design of large pressure vessels and containment vessels. Zr-clad U fuel elements were used as the study basis, but the effect of using UO/sub 2/ and stainless steel cladding was also considered. The principal results found were: (1) Over a wide range of operating conditions snd economic situations, enriched U (up to perhaps 1.4% U/sup 235/) is presently more economic to employ in D/sub 2/O reactors than is natural U. (2) In the longer range, the use of natural U may become more economic as Zr fabrication costs decrease, continuous charge-discharge devices are developed to permit longer exposure levels, and pressure-vessel technology advances so that the large critical masses and core diameters required are not such sn economic penalty on the natural U. The results agree quite well with the data and discussions of the Canadians. (auth)

Herron, D.P.; Newkirk, W.H.; Puishes, A.

1957-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Smart Grid Demonstration Project  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Angeles Department of Water and Power Smart Grid Demonstration Project Angeles Department of Water and Power Smart Grid Demonstration Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Country United States Headquarters Location Los Angeles, California Recovery Act Funding $60,280,000.00 Total Project Value $120,560,000.00 Coordinates 34.0522342°, -118.2436849° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

368

City of Burbank Water and Power, California (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power, California (Utility Company) Power, California (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Burbank Water and Power Place Burbank, California Utility Id 2507 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] SGIC[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project was awarded $20,000,000 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $62,650,755.

369

EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

REID, ROBERT S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PEARSON, J. BOSIE [Los Alamos National Laboratory; STEWART, ERIC T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

370

Experimental Evaluation of the Thermal Performance of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 deg. C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 deg. C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

Pearson, J. Boise; Stewart, Eric T. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Reid, Robert S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Due to limited parking, all visitors are strongly encouraged to: Due to limited parking, all visitors are strongly encouraged to: 1) car-pool, 2) take the Lab's special conference shuttle service, or 3) take the regular off-site shuttle. If you choose to use the regular off-site shuttle bus, you will need an authorized bus pass, which can be obtained by contacting Eric Essman in advance. Transportation & Visitor Information Location and Directions to the Lab: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is located in Berkeley, on the hillside directly above the campus of University of California at Berkeley. The address is One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720. For comprehensive directions to the lab, please refer to: http://www.lbl.gov/Workplace/Transportation.html Maps and Parking Information: On Thursday and Friday, a limited number (15) of barricaded reserved parking spaces will be available for NON-LBNL Staff SNAP Collaboration Meeting participants in parking lot K1, in front of building 54 (cafeteria). On Saturday, plenty of parking spaces will be available everywhere, as it is a non-work day.

372

Transportation Energy Futures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Comparative Analysis of Future Transportation Fuels. ucB-prominentlyin our transportation future, powering electricTransportation Energy Futures Daniel Sperling Mark A.

DeLuchi, Mark A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

A NOVEL CONCEPT FOR REDUCING WATER USAGE AND INCREASING EFFICIENCY IN POWER GENERATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to apply a unique ice thermal storage (ITS) technology to cooling the intake air to gas turbines used for power generation. In Phase I, the work includes theoretical analysis, computer simulation, engineering design and cost evaluation of this novel ITS technology. The study includes two typical gas turbines (an industrial and an aeroderivative type gas turbine) operated at two different geographic locations: Phoenix, AZ and Houston, TX. Simulation runs are performed to generate data for both power output (KW) and heat rate (Btu/KWh) as well as water recovery (acre ft/yr) in terms of intake air temperature and humidity based on weather data and turbine performance curves. Preliminary engineering design of a typical equipment arrangement for turbine inlet air-cooling operation using the ITS system is presented. A cost analysis has been performed to demonstrate the market viability of the ITS technology. When the ITS technology is applied to gas turbines, a net power gain up to 40% and a heat rate reduction as much as 7% can be achieved. In addition, a significant amount of water can be recovered (up to 200 acre-ft of water per year for a 50 MW turbine). The total cost saving is estimated to be $500,000/yr for a 50 MW gas turbine generator. These results have clearly demonstrated that the use of ITS technology to cool the intake-air to gas turbines is an efficient and cost effective means to improve the overall performance of its power generation capacity with an important added benefit of water recovery in power plant operation. Thus, further development of ITS technology for commercial applications in power generation, particularly in coal-based IGCC power plants is warranted.

Shiao-Hung Chiang; Guy Weismantel

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Characteristics of water chemistry in heavy water recovery system of nuclear power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The moisture inside the coolant and moderator system areas of Candu-type nuclear power plant is recycled to prevent the deuterium of value from being lost and the tritium of harm from being spread to the natural environment. The deuterium is separated ... Keywords: anion, breakthrough time, cation, deuterium recovery, ion exchange, resin ratio

In Hyoung Rhee; Hyun Kyoung Ahn; Hyun Jun Jeong

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

New England Wind Forum: A Wind Powering America Project - Newsletter #6 - September 2010, (NEWF), Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

6 - September 2010 6 - September 2010 WIND AND WATER POWER PROGRAM PIX 16204 New England and Northeast Look to the Horizon...and Beyond, for Offshore Wind In early December, Boston hosted the American Wind Energy Association's second annual Offshore Wind Project Workshop. U.S. and European offshore wind stakeholders convened to discuss the emerging U.S. offshore wind industry and provided evidence of a significant increase in activity along the Atlantic Coast from the Carolinas to Maine. The wind power industry and policymakers are looking to offshore for long-term growth, driven by aggressive policy goals, economic develop- ment opportunities, a finite set of attractive land-based wind sites, and immense wind energy potential at a modest distance from major population centers.

376

Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tree ring studies indicate that, for the greater part of the last three decades, New Mexico has been relatively 'wet' compared to the long-term historical norm. However, during the last several years, New Mexico has experienced a severe drought. Some researchers are predicting a return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters to supplement current fresh water supplies for power plant operation and cooling and other uses. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored three related assessments of water supplies in the San Juan Basin area of the four-corner intersection of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. These were (1) an assessment of using water produced with oil and gas as a supplemental supply for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS); (2) a field evaluation of the wet-surface air cooling (WSAC) system at SJGS; and (3) the development of a ZeroNet systems analysis module and an application of the Watershed Risk Management Framework (WARMF) to evaluate a range of water shortage management plans. The study of the possible use of produced water at SJGS showed that produce water must be treated to justify its use in any reasonable quantity at SJGS. The study identified produced water volume and quality, the infrastructure needed to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements, and delivery and treatment economics. A number of produced water treatment alternatives that use off-the-shelf technology were evaluated along with the equipment needed for water treatment at SJGS. Wet surface air-cooling (WSAC) technology was tested at the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS) to determine its capacity to cool power plant circulating water using degraded water. WSAC is a commercial cooling technology and has been used for many years to cool and/or condense process fluids. The purpose of the pilot test was to determine if WSAC technology could cool process water at cycles of concentration considered highly scale forming for mechanical draft cooling towers. At the completion of testing, there was no visible scale on the heat transfer surfaces and cooling was sustained throughout the test period. The application of the WARMF decision framework to the San Juan Basis showed that drought and increased temperature impact water availability for all sectors (agriculture, energy, municipal, industry) and lead to critical shortages. WARMF-ZeroNet, as part of the integrated ZeroNet decision support system, offers stakeholders an integrated approach to long-term water management that balances competing needs of existing water users and economic growth under the constraints of limited supply and potential climate change.

C. McGowin; M. DiFilippo; L. Weintraub

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

377

Summary of Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD) Water Management Installations at U.S. Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an inventory of zero liquid discharge (ZLD) water management systems currently operating at U.S. power generating stations. A total of 146 ZLD operations were identified and described. The report discusses the numerous treatment methods used at these ZLD facilities along with their merits and detractions of each method.

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

378

Program on Technology Innovation: An Energy/Water Sustainability Research Program for the Electric Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a research plan, based on business and economic as well as technical considerations, that would create and test new technology and science to overcome present and future constraints on thermoelectric generation resulting from limited freshwater availability. The report will be of value to power company strategic planners, environmental managers, and generation managers as well as regulators, water resource managers, and environmentalists.

2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

379

Risk contribution from low power and shutdown of a pressurized water reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry (a pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (a boiling water reactor), were selected for study by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, respectively. The program objectives included assessing the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and comparing estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences, and other qualitative and quantitative results with full power accidents as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope included a Level 3 PRA for traditional internal events and a Level 1 PRA on fire, flooding, and seismically induced core damage sequences. 12 refs., 7 tabs.

Chu, T.L.; Pratt, W.T.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Multiphase Reactive Transport modeling of Stable Isotope Fractionation of Infiltrating Unsaturated Zone Pore Water and Vapor Using TOUGHREACT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of transport and isotope fractionation provide a method to quantitatively interpret vadose zone pore water stable isotope depth profiles based on soil properties, climatic conditions, and infiltration. We incorporate the temperature-dependent equilibration of stable isotopic species between water and water vapor, and their differing diffusive transport properties into the thermodynamic database of the reactive transport code TOUGHREACT. These simulations are used to illustrate the evolution of stable isotope profiles in semiarid regions where recharge during wet seasons disturbs the drying profile traditionally associated with vadose zone pore waters. Alternating wet and dry seasons lead to annual fluctuations in moisture content, capillary pressure, and stable isotope compositions in the vadose zone. Periodic infiltration models capture the effects of seasonal increases in precipitation and predict stable isotope profiles that are distinct from those observed under drying (zero infiltration) conditions. After infiltration, evaporation causes a shift to higher 18O and D values, which are preserved in the deeper pore waters. The magnitude of the isotopic composition shift preserved in deep vadose zone pore waters varies inversely with the rate of infiltration.

Singleton, Michael J.; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Conrad, Mark E.; DePaolo, Donald J.

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Production and Power Generation Systems. SR46-2009;Biorefining Electric Power Generation Glass, Sand & Clayproduction; thermoelectric power generation is responsible

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Modeling Studies on the Transport of Benzene and H2S in CO2-Water Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, reactive transport simulations were used to assess the mobilization and transport of organics with supercritical CO{sub 2} (SCC), and the co-injection and transport of H{sub 2}S with SCC. These processes were evaluated at conditions of typical storage reservoirs, and for cases of hypothetical leakage from a reservoir to an overlying shallower fresh water aquifer. Modeling capabilities were developed to allow the simulation of multiphase flow and transport of H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, as well as specific organic compounds (benzene), coupled with multicomponent geochemical reaction and transport. This included the development of a new simulator, TMVOC-REACT, starting from existing modules of the TOUGH2 family of codes. This work also included an extensive literature review, calculation, and testing of phase-partitioning properties for mixtures of the phases considered. The reactive transport simulations presented in this report are primarily intended to illustrate the capabilities of the new simulator. They are also intended to help evaluate and understand various processes at play, in a more qualitative than quantitative manner, and only for hypothetical scenarios. Therefore, model results are not intended as realistic assessments of groundwater quality changes for specific locations, and they certainly do not provide an exhaustive evaluation of all possible site conditions, especially given the large variability and uncertainty in hydrogeologic and geochemical parameter input into simulations. The first step in evaluating the potential mobilization and transport of organics was the identification of compounds likely to be present in deep storage formations, and likely to negatively impact freshwater aquifers if mobilized by SCC. On the basis of a literature review related to the occurrence of these organic compounds, their solubility in water and SCC, and their toxicity (as reflected by their maximum contaminant levels MCL), benzene was selected as a key compound for inclusion into numerical simulations. Note that considering additional organic compounds and/or mixtures of such compounds in the simulations was beyond the scope of this study, because of the effort required to research, calculate, and validate the phase-partitioning data necessary for simulations. The injection of CO{sub 2} into a deep saline aquifer was simulated, followed by modeling the leaching of benzene by SCC and transport of benzene to an overlying aquifer along a hypothetical leakage pathway. One- and two-dimensional models were set up for this purpose. The target storage formation was assumed to initially contain about 10{sup -4} ppm benzene. Model results indicate that: (1) SCC efficiently extracts benzene from the storage formation. (2) Assuming equilibrium, the content of benzene in SCC is roportional to the concentration of benzene in the aqueous and solid phases. (3) Benzene may co-migrate with CO{sub 2} into overlying aquifers if a leakage pathway is present. Because the aqueous solubility of benzene in contact with CO{sub 2} is lower than the aqueous solubility of CO{sub 2}, benzene is actually enriched in the CO{sub 2} phase as the plume advances. (4) For the case studied here, the resulting aqueous benzene concentration in the overlying aquifer is on the same order of magnitude as the initial concentration in the storage formation. This generic modeling study illustrates, in a semi-quantitative manner, the possible mobilization of benzene by SCC. The extent to which the mobilization of this organic compound evolves temporally and spatially depends on a large number of controlling parameters and is largely site specific. Therefore, for more 'truly' predictive work, further sensitivity studies should be conducted, and further modeling should be integrated with site-specific laboratory and/or field experimental data. The co-injection of H{sub 2}S with CO{sub 2} into a deep saline aquifer was also simulated. In addition, the model considered leakage of the supercritical CO{sub 2}+H{sub 2}S mixture along a preferential p

Zheng, L.; Spycher, N.; Xu, T.; Apps, J.; Kharaka, Y.; Birkholzer, J.T.

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

383

The Water Vapor Transport Associated with the 3050 Day Oscillation over the Asian Monsoon Regions during 1979 Summer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we examine the water vapor transport over the entire Asian monsoon region using the FGGE III-b data of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL). Effort is ...

Tsing-Chang Chen; Ming-Cheng Yen; Masato Murakami

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Effect of makeup water properties on the condenser fouling in power planr cooling system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermoelectric power industry in the U.S. uses a large amount of fresh water. As available freshwater for use in thermoelectric power production becomes increasingly limited, use of nontraditional water sources is of growing interest. Utilization of nontraditional water, in cooling systems increases the potential for mineral precipitation on heat exchanger surfaces. In that regard, predicting the accelerated rate of scaling and fouling in condenser is crucial to evaluate the condenser performance. To achieve this goal, water chemistry should be incorporated in cooling system modeling and simulation. This paper addresses the effects of various makeup water properties on the cooling system, namely pH and aqueous speciation, both of which are important factors affecting the fouling rate in the main condenser. Detailed modeling of the volatile species desorption (i.e. CO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}), the formation of scale in the recirculating system, and the relationship between water quality and the corresponding fouling rates is presented.

Safari, I.; Walker, M.; Abbasian, J.; Arastoopour, H.; Hsieh, M-K.; Dzombak, D.; Miller, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Mass-transport considerations pertinent to aqueous-phase reactions of gases in liquid-water clouds  

SciTech Connect

Reactions of gases in liquid-water clouds are potentially important in the transformation of atmospheric pollutants affecting their transport in the atmosphere and subsequent removal and deposition to the surface. Such processes consist of the following sequence of steps. Mass-transport of the reagent gas or gases to the air-water interface; transfer across the interface and establishment of solubility equilibria locally at the interface; mass-transport of the dissolved gas or gases within the aqeuous phase; aqueous-phase chemical reactions(s); mass-transport of reaction product(s) and possible subsequent evolution into the gas-phase. Description of the rate of the overall process requires identification of the rate-limiting step (or steps) and evaluation of the rate of such step(s). Identification of the rate-limiting step may be achieved by evaluation and comparison of the characteristic times pertinent to the several processes and may be readily carried out by methods outlined herein, for known or assumed reagent concentrations, drop size, and fundamental constants as follows: gas- and aqueous-phase diffusion coefficients; Henry's law coefficient and other pertinent equilibrium constants; interfacial mass-transfer accommodation coefficient; aqueous-phase reaction rate constant(s). A graphical method is described whereby it may be ascertained whether a given reaction is controlled solely by reagent solubility and intrinsic chemical kinetics or is mass-transport limited by one or another of the above processes. In the absence of mass-transport limitation, reaction rates may be evaluated uniformly for the entire liquid-water content of the cloud using equilibrium reagent concentrations. In contrast, where appreciable mass-transport limitation is indicated, evaluation of the overall rate requires knowledge of and integration over the drop-size distribution characterizing the cloud. 68 references, 16 figures.

Schwartz, S.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydroelectric power plants (although operators can choose to shut generatorshydroelectric power that it generates. Because the wind or solar generators

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A White Paper Describing Produced Water from Production ofper Million Photovoltaic Produced Water Renewable Fuelsaccount for how average produced water (PW) volumes in each

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Modeling Studies on the Transport of Benzene and H2S in CO2-Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characterization of produced water from four offshore oilOrganic matrix in produced water from the Osage-Skiatookfrom sulfide-rich produced water using gas chromatography/

Zheng, L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Supporting Water, Ecological, and Transportation Systems in the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as well as in water conservation might help to slow anyrecent years because water conservation efforts is expecteddemand management and water conservation and the use of

Beck, Judy; Kamke, Sherry; Majerus, Kimberly

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

DESIGN OF HYBRID POWER GENERATION CYCLES EMPLOYING AMMONIA-WATER-CARBON DIOXIDE MIXTURES  

SciTech Connect

A power cycle generates electricity from the heat of combustion of fossil fuels. Its efficiency is governed by the cycle configuration, the operating parameters, and the working fluid. Typical. designs use pure water as the fluid. in the last two decades, hybrid cycles based on ammonia-water, and carbon-dioxide mixtures as the working fluid have been proposed. These cycles may improve the power generation efficiency of Rankine cycles by 15%. Improved efficiency is important for two reasons: it lowers the cost of electricity being produced, and by reducing the consumption of fossil fuels per unit power, it reduces the generation of environmental pollutants. The goal of this project is to develop a computational optimization-based method for the design and analysis of hybrid bottoming power cycles to minimize the usage of fossil fuels. The development of this methodology has been achieved by formulating this task as that of selecting the least cost power cycle design from all possible configurations. They employ a detailed thermodynamic property prediction package they have developed under a DOE-FETC grant to model working fluid mixtures. Preliminary results from this work suggest that a pure NH{sub 3} cycle outperforms steam or the expensive Kalina cycle.

Ashish Gupta

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Simple strategies for minimization of cooling water usage in binary power plants  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal resources which could be used for the production of electrical power in the United States are located for the most part in the semi-arid western regions of the country. The availability of ground or surface water in the quantity or quality desired for a conventional wet'' heat rejections system represents a barrier to the development of these resources with the binary cycle technology. This paper investigates some simple strategies to minimize the cooling water usage of binary power plants. The cooling water usage is reduced by increasing the thermal efficiency of the plant. Three methods of accomplishing this are considered here: increasing the average source temperature, by increasing the geofluid outlet temperature; decreasing pinch points on the heat rejection heat exchangers, increasing their size; and using internal recuperation within the cycle. In addition to the impact on water usage, the impact on cost-of-electricity is determined. The paper shows that some of these strategies can reduce the cooling water requirements 20 to 30% over that for a plant similar to the Heber Binary Plant, with a net reduction in the cost-of-electricity of about 15%. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Simple strategies for minimization of cooling water usage in binary power plants  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal resources which could be used for the production of electrical power in the United States are located for the most part in the semi-arid western regions of the country. The availability of ground or surface water in the quantity or quality desired for a conventional wet'' heat rejections system represents a barrier to the development of these resources with the binary cycle technology. This paper investigates some simple strategies to minimize the cooling water usage of binary power plants. The cooling water usage is reduced by increasing the thermal efficiency of the plant. Three methods of accomplishing this are considered here: increasing the average source temperature, by increasing the geofluid outlet temperature; decreasing pinch points on the heat rejection heat exchangers, increasing their size; and using internal recuperation within the cycle. In addition to the impact on water usage, the impact on cost-of-electricity is determined. The paper shows that some of these strategies can reduce the cooling water requirements 20 to 30% over that for a plant similar to the Heber Binary Plant, with a net reduction in the cost-of-electricity of about 15%. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature MarketProjected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUELS Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES SERIES: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market A Study Sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 2013 Prepared by NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Golden, Colorado 80401-3305 managed by Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DC-A36-08GO28308 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

394

Use of Non-Traditional Water for Power Plant Applications: An Overview of DOE/NETL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Non-Traditional Water Use of Non-Traditional Water for Power Plant Applications: An Overview of DOE/NETL R&D Efforts November 1, 2009 DOE/NETL-311/040609 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy,

395

A Survey of Water Use and Sustainability in the United States with a Focus on Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has identified water resource sustainability and its relation to electric power as one of the key challenges within EPRI's Electricity Technology Roadmap. This report presents an overview of present and future freshwater availability and generation demand for fresh water in the United States. The report takes a first step toward development of a comprehensive framework for evaluating possible impacts of water supply limitations on electric power generation and management approaches to limiting these...

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

396

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the ninth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, comparative analyses were performed for lignite and PRB coals to determine how unit performance varies with coal product moisture. Results are given showing how the coal product moisture level and coal rank affect parameters such as boiler efficiency, station service power needed for fans and pulverizers and net unit heat rate. Results are also given for the effects of coal drying on cooling tower makeup water and comparisons are made between makeup water savings for various times of the year.

Edward Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Harun Bilirgen; Wei Zhang

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Title: Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration of Ways to Reduce Operating Costs of Small Producers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title: Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration of Ways to Reduce produced water to create "green" electricity usable on site or for transmission off site . The goal the environmental impact by creating green electricity using produced water and no additional fossil fuel. Approach

398

DYNAMIC SIMULATION OF MULTI-PASS PRESSURIZED WATER NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS BY ANALOG COMPUTER TECHNIQUES  

SciTech Connect

A kinetic model of the primary loop of a multi-pass pressurized water reactor power plant is developed to evaluate, by analog computer techniques, the transient response characteristics under conditions of steam generator load and reactor control rod perturbations. Using the 2-pass 28 Mw(t) SM-2 reactor as a typical plant, transient behavior patterns are illustrated and examined for a variety of load inputs, variations in plant constants, and analog model simplifications. (auth)

Brondel, J.O.

1961-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Impact of Key Electric Power Industry Regulatory Issues on Opportunities in Water Quality Trading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on EPRI water quality trading (WQT) research on nutrients (i.e., nitrogen and phosphorus), this technical update explores potential application of WQT for other electric power generation waste streams and pollutants in addition to considering the potential impact of existing regulatory issues on the trading for nutrient credits. For each of the opportunities identified, a discussion of potential issues associated with that application is discussed. This document also identifies ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

400

Summary of ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport computer codes used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information on computer codes for numerical and analytical models that have been used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to model ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport. Organizations conducting modeling at the INEL include: EG&G Idaho, Inc., US Geological Survey, and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company. Information concerning computer codes included in this report are: agency responsible for the modeling effort, name of the computer code, proprietor of the code (copyright holder or original author), validation and verification studies, applications of the model at INEL, the prime user of the model, computer code description, computing environment requirements, and documentation and references for the computer code.

Bandy, P.J.; Hall, L.F.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

CIVILIAN POWER REACTOR PROGRAM. PART II. ECONOMIC POTENTIAL AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. HEAVY WATER-MODERATED POWER REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The reactor design which forms the base for the current economic status of D/sub 2/O-moderated reactors was estimated from developments in several reactor programs. However, since a heavy water-moderated reactor was not operated on natural U fuel at power reactor conditions, considerable improvement from this current status can be foreseen. A summary of improvements is presented concerning the concept which would result solely from operation of succeeding generation plants without a parallel development program, and improvements which would result from the successful completion of the development program as presented. One plant size was used in the evaluation of plant potential, with a 300 Mw/sub e/ nominal rating. The boiling D/sub 2/O-cooled, pressure tube direct cycle plant design was used. The current development program is outlined; this work includes several items leading to the long-range development of the concept. (auth)

Hutton, J.H.; Davis, S.A.; Graves, C.C.; Duffy, J.G. comps.

1960-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

402

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Association: Power Plants. http://www.geo-energy.org/and Operating Electric Power Plants in the Upper ColoradoCosts Cut Through Power Plant Co-Location. Filtration &

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Oil Biomass Geothermal Power Generation (kWh/power generation, which includes nuclear, natural gas, andPower Generation . 65 3.3.3 Crude Oil and Natural Gas

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intensive as natural gas-fired power plants (16), and open-demand, whereas natural gas-fired power plants are easy tonuclear, and natural gas-fired power plants are the types of

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Cost of transporting coal to power plants rose almost 50% in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The average cost of shipping coal by railroad to power plants increased almost 50% in the United States from 2001 to 2010.

406

Cost of transporting coal to power plants rose almost 50% in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, ... The average cost of shipping coal by railroad to power plants increased almost 50% in the United ... National numbers can be ...

407

TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXASTRANS TEXAS TRANSPORTATION HALL HONOR OF HALL HONOR OF TEXASTRAN HALL HONOR OF TEXASTRAN HALL HONOR OF Inductees #12;2 TEXAS TRANSPORTATION HALL HONOR OF L NOR OF Texas is recognized as having one of the finest multimodal transportation systems in the world. The existence of this system has been key

408

Water use in the development and operation of geothermal power plants.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is increasingly recognized for its potential to reduce carbon emissions and U.S. dependence on foreign oil. Energy and environmental analyses are critical to developing a robust set of geothermal energy technologies. This report summarizes what is currently known about the life cycle water requirements of geothermal electric power-generating systems and the water quality of geothermal waters. It is part of a larger effort to compare the life cycle impacts of large-scale geothermal electricity generation with other power generation technologies. The results of the life cycle analysis are summarized in a companion report, Life Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison to Other Power Systems. This report is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 gives the background of the project and its purpose, which is to inform power plant design and operations. Chapter 2 summarizes the geothermal electricity generation technologies evaluated in this study, which include conventional hydrothermal flash and binary systems, as well as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists but water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 3 describes the methods and approach to this work and identifies the four power plant scenarios evaluated: a 20-MW EGS plant, a 50-MW EGS plant, a 10-MW binary plant, and a 50-MW flash plant. The two EGS scenarios include hydraulic stimulation activities within the construction stage of the life cycle and assume binary power generation during operations. The EGS and binary scenarios are assumed to be air-cooled power plants, whereas the flash plant is assumed to rely on evaporative cooling. The well field and power plant design for the scenario were based on simulations using DOE's Geothermal Economic Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM). Chapter 4 presents the water requirements for the power plant life cycle for the scenarios evaluated. Geology, reservoir characteristics, and local climate have various effects on elements such as drilling rate, the number of production wells, and production flow rates. Over the life cycle of a geothermal power plant, from construction through 30 years of operation, plant operations is where the vast majority of water consumption occurs. Water consumption refers to the water that is withdrawn from a resource such as a river, lake, or non-geothermal aquifer that is not returned to that resource. For the EGS scenarios, plant operations consume between 0.29 and 0.72 gal/kWh. The binary plant experiences similar operational consumption, at 0.27 gal/kWh. Far less water, just 0.01 gal/kWh, is consumed during operations of the flash plant because geofluid is used for cooling and is not replaced. While the makeup water requirements are far less for a hydrothermal flash plant, the long-term sustainability of the reservoir is less certain due to estimated evaporative losses of 14.5-33% of produced geofluid at operating flash plants. For the hydrothermal flash scenario, the average loss of geofluid due to evaporation, drift, and blowdown is 2.7 gal/kWh. The construction stage requires considerably less water: 0.001 gal/kWh for both the binary and flash plant scenarios and 0.01 gal/kWh for the EGS scenarios. The additional water requirements for the EGS scenarios are caused by a combination of factors, including lower flow rates per well, which increases the total number of wells needed per plant, the assumed well depths, and the hydraulic stimulation required to engineer the reservoir. Water quality results are presented in Chapter 5. The chemical composition of geofluid has important implications for plant operations and the potential environmental impacts of geothermal energy production. An extensive dataset containing more than 53,000 geothermal geochemical data points was compiled and analyzed for general trends and statistics for typical geofluids. Geofluid composition was found to vary significantly both among and within geothermal fields. Seven main chemical constituents were found to

Clark, C. E.; Harto, C. B.; Sullivan, J. L.; Wang, M. Q. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

409

Water use in the development and operation of geothermal power plants.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is increasingly recognized for its potential to reduce carbon emissions and U.S. dependence on foreign oil. Energy and environmental analyses are critical to developing a robust set of geothermal energy technologies. This report summarizes what is currently known about the life cycle water requirements of geothermal electric power-generating systems and the water quality of geothermal waters. It is part of a larger effort to compare the life cycle impacts of large-scale geothermal electricity generation with other power generation technologies. The results of the life cycle analysis are summarized in a companion report, Life Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison to Other Power Systems. This report is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 gives the background of the project and its purpose, which is to inform power plant design and operations. Chapter 2 summarizes the geothermal electricity generation technologies evaluated in this study, which include conventional hydrothermal flash and binary systems, as well as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists but water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 3 describes the methods and approach to this work and identifies the four power plant scenarios evaluated: a 20-MW EGS plant, a 50-MW EGS plant, a 10-MW binary plant, and a 50-MW flash plant. The two EGS scenarios include hydraulic stimulation activities within the construction stage of the life cycle and assume binary power generation during operations. The EGS and binary scenarios are assumed to be air-cooled power plants, whereas the flash plant is assumed to rely on evaporative cooling. The well field and power plant design for the scenario were based on simulations using DOE's Geothermal Economic Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM). Chapter 4 presents the water requirements for the power plant life cycle for the scenarios evaluated. Geology, reservoir characteristics, and local climate have various effects on elements such as drilling rate, the number of production wells, and production flow rates. Over the life cycle of a geothermal power plant, from construction through 30 years of operation, plant operations is where the vast majority of water consumption occurs. Water consumption refers to the water that is withdrawn from a resource such as a river, lake, or non-geothermal aquifer that is not returned to that resource. For the EGS scenarios, plant operations consume between 0.29 and 0.72 gal/kWh. The binary plant experiences similar operational consumption, at 0.27 gal/kWh. Far less water, just 0.01 gal/kWh, is consumed during operations of the flash plant because geofluid is used for cooling and is not replaced. While the makeup water requirements are far less for a hydrothermal flash plant, the long-term sustainability of the reservoir is less certain due to estimated evaporative losses of 14.5-33% of produced geofluid at operating flash plants. For the hydrothermal flash scenario, the average loss of geofluid due to evaporation, drift, and blowdown is 2.7 gal/kWh. The construction stage requires considerably less water: 0.001 gal/kWh for both the binary and flash plant scenarios and 0.01 gal/kWh for the EGS scenarios. The additional water requirements for the EGS scenarios are caused by a combination of factors, including lower flow rates per well, which increases the total number of wells needed per plant, the assumed well depths, and the hydraulic stimulation required to engineer the reservoir. Water quality results are presented in Chapter 5. The chemical composition of geofluid has important implications for plant operations and the potential environmental impacts of geothermal energy production. An extensive dataset containing more than 53,000 geothermal geochemical data points was compiled and analyzed for general trends and statistics for typical geofluids. Geofluid composition was found to vary significantly both among and within geothermal fields. Seven main chemical constituents were found to

Clark, C. E.; Harto, C. B.; Sullivan, J. L.; Wang, M. Q. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

410

The Integration of a Structural Water Gas Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is in response to a requirement for a system that combines water gas shift technology with separation technology for coal derived synthesis gas. The justification of such a system would be improved efficiency for the overall hydrogen production. By removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas stream, the water gas shift equilibrium would force more carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and maximize the total hydrogen produced. Additional benefit would derive from the reduction in capital cost of plant by the removal of one step in the process by integrating water gas shift with the membrane separation device. The answer turns out to be that the integration of hydrogen separation and water gas shift catalysis is possible and desirable. There are no significant roadblocks to that combination of technologies. The problem becomes one of design and selection of materials to optimize, or at least maximize performance of the two integrated steps. A goal of the project was to investigate the effects of alloying elements on the performance of vanadium membranes with respect to hydrogen flux and fabricability. Vanadium was chosen as a compromise between performance and cost. It is clear that the vanadium alloys for this application can be produced, but the approach is not simple and the results inconsistent. For any future contracts, large single batches of alloy would be obtained and rolled with larger facilities to produce the most consistent thin foils possible. Brazing was identified as a very likely choice for sealing the membranes to structural components. As alloying was beneficial to hydrogen transport, it became important to identify where those alloying elements might be detrimental to brazing. Cataloging positive and negative alloying effects was a significant portion of the initial project work on vanadium alloying. A water gas shift catalyst with ceramic like structural characteristics was the second large goal of the project. Alumina was added as a component of conventional high temperature water gas shift iron oxide based catalysts. The catalysts contained Fe-Al-Cr-Cu-O and were synthesized by co-precipitation. A series of catalysts were prepared with 5 to 50 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, with 8 wt% Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 4 wt% CuO, and the balance Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. All of the catalysts were compared to a reference WGS catalyst (88 wt% FeO{sub x}, 8 wt% Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and 4 wt% CuO) with no alumina. Alumina addition to conventional high temperature water gas shift catalysts at concentrations of approximately 15 wt% increased CO conversion rates and increase thermal stability. A series of high temperature water gas shift catalysts containing iron, chromia, and copper oxides were prepared with small amounts of added ceria in the system Fe-Cr-Cu-Ce-O. The catalysts were also tested kinetically under WGS conditions. 2-4 wt% ceria addition (at the expense of the iron oxide content) resulted in increased reaction rates (from 22-32% higher) compared to the reference catalyst. The project goal of a 10,000 liter per day WGS-membrane reactor was achieved by a device operating on coal derived syngas containing significant amounts of carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide. The membrane flux was equivalent to 52 scfh/ft{sup 2} based on a 600 psi syngas inlet pressure and corresponded to membranes costing $191 per square foot. Over 40 hours of exposure time to syngas has been achieved for a double membrane reactor. Two modules of the Chart reactor were tested under coal syngas for over 75 hours with a single module tested for 50 hours. The permeance values for the Chart membranes were similar to the REB reactor though total flux was reduced due to significantly thicker membranes. Overall testing of membrane reactors on coal derived syngas was over 115 hours for all reactors tested. Testing of the REB double membrane device exceeded 40 hours. Performance of the double membrane reactor has been similar to the results for the single reactor with good maintenance of flux even after these long exposures to hydrogen sulfide. Of special in

Thomas Barton; Tiberiu Popa

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

411

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation (GREET) Model, Version 1.5. Argonne NationalLaboratory: Argonne, IL, 1999; http://and Petroleum Gasoline. Argonne National Laboratory:

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Transportation and Power Requirements for He 3 Mining of the Jovian Planets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bi?modal fusion propulsion system that can be used for transportation to and the mining of He 3 from the Jovian planets is proposed. It consists of the Gasdynamic Mirror (GDM) fusion reactor which is analyzed for utilization as a propulsion device

Terry Kammash; Ricky Tang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

WATERMAN: Technical and Economic Guidelines for Evaluating Power Plant Water Management Options: Volumes 1 and 2: Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The WATERMAN code is the first software specifically designed to assist utility engineers and chemists in developing and revising complex integrated power plant water balances. As such, this IBM PC code enables quick and accurate assessments of water uses throughout the plant, identifies recycle/reuse options, and evaluates the impacts of such options on plant makeup water needs, process water chemistry, and wastewater treatment requirements.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

HEAVY-WATER-MODERATED POWER REACTORS ENGINEERING AND ECONOMIC EVALUATIONS. VOLUME I. SUMMARY REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Capital investments and the cost of power were estimated for 21 heavy- water-moderated, natural-uraniumfueled power-reactor plants, ranging in capacity from 100 to 460 Mw(e). Comparisons were made of hot- and coldmoderator reactors and of the relative merits of pressuretube and pressure-vessel designs. Reactors cooled with liquid D/sub 2/O, boiling D/sub 2/O, /sub 2/O steam, and helium were evalunted. A cold-moderator pressure-tube reactor cooled with boiling D/sub 2/O shows the most economic promise of the D/sub 2/Omoderated reactor systems studied to date. Reactors of this type have sufficient reactivity to permit satisfactory fuel exposures, but the development of additional technology is a prerequisite for optimum designs. At capacities of 300 and 400 Mw(e), the estimated power costs from the current designs of boiling-D/sub 2/O pressure-tabe reactor plants are 11.3 and 9.8 mills/kwh, respectively. From liquid-D/sub 2/-cooled concepts of comparable capacities the indicated power costs are 7 to 20% higher. With an active development program, a power cost of 8.0 to 8.5 mills/kwh may be attained in a 300 Mw(e) boiling-D/sub 2/O reactor plant within the next decade. (auth)

1960-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Scaling dependence on time and distance in nonlinear fractional diffusion equations and possible applications to the water transport in soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, fractional derivatives have been employed to analyze various systems in engineering, physics, finance and hidrology. For instance, they have been used to investigate anomalous diffusion processes which are present in different physical systems like: amorphous semicondutors, polymers, composite heterogeneous films and porous media. They have also been used to calculate the heat load intensity change in blast furnace walls, to solve problems of control theory \\ and dynamic problems of linear and nonlinear hereditary mechanics of solids. In this work, we investigate the scaling properties related to the nonlinear fractional diffusion equations and indicate the possibilities to the applications of these equations to simulate the water transport in unsaturated soils. Usually, the water transport in soils with anomalous diffusion, the dependence of concentration on time and distance may be expressed in term of a single variable given by $\\lambda _{q}=x/t^{q}.$ In particular, for $q=1/2$ the systems obey Fick's law and Richards' equation for water transport. We show that a generalization of Richards' equation via fractional approach can incorporate the above property.

Kwok Sau Fa; E. K. Lenzi

2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Forecasting and Diagnostic Analysis of Plume Transport around a Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nonreactive Lagrangian atmospheric diffusion model is used for the simulation of SO2 concentration around the As Pontes 1400-MW power plant located in northwestern Spain. This diffusion model has two kinds of input: 1) diagnostic wind fields ...

J. A. Souto; V. Prez-Muuzuri; M. deCastro; M. J. Souto; J. J. Casares; T. Lucas

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Observations of Shallow-Water Transport and Shear in Western Florida Bay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acoustic Doppler profiler (ADP) data are used to describe depth-integrated transport and vertical shear at two study sites along the open western boundary of Florida Bay. During a 404-day study period, transport was into the bay at the northern ...

Ned P. Smith

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Water footprint of electric power generation : modeling its use and analyzing options for a water-scarce future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interdependency between water and energy, sometimes called the water-energy nexus, is growing in importance as demand for both water and energy increases. Energy is required for water treatment and supply, while virtually ...

Delgado Martn, Anna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

The energy water nexus : increasing water supply by desalination integrated with renewable power and reducing water demand by corporate water footprinting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Growing populations and periodic drought conditions have exacerbated water stress in many areas worldwide. Consequently, it would be valuable to manage both supply and demand (more)

Clayton, Mary Elizabeth

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

Low rank fuels such as subbituminous coals and lignites contain significant amounts of moisture compared to higher rank coals. Typically, the moisture content of subbituminous coals ranges from 15 to 30 percent, while that for lignites is between 25 and 40 percent, where both are expressed on a wet coal basis. High fuel moisture has several adverse impacts on the operation of a pulverized coal generating unit. High fuel moisture results in fuel handling problems, and it affects heat rate, mass rate (tonnage) of emissions, and the consumption of water needed for evaporative cooling. This project deals with lignite and subbituminous coal-fired pulverized coal power plants, which are cooled by evaporative cooling towers. In particular, the project involves use of power plant waste heat to partially dry the coal before it is fed to the pulverizers. Done in a proper way, coal drying will reduce cooling tower makeup water requirements and also provide heat rate and emissions benefits. The technology addressed in this project makes use of the hot circulating cooling water leaving the condenser to heat the air used for drying the coal (Figure 1). The temperature of the circulating water leaving the condenser is usually about 49 C (120 F), and this can be used to produce an air stream at approximately 43 C (110 F). Figure 2 shows a variation of this approach, in which coal drying would be accomplished by both warm air, passing through the dryer, and a flow of hot circulating cooling water, passing through a heat exchanger located in the dryer. Higher temperature drying can be accomplished if hot flue gas from the boiler or extracted steam from the turbine cycle is used to supplement the thermal energy obtained from the circulating cooling water. Various options such as these are being examined in this investigation. This is the eleventh Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, the development of analyses to determine the costs and financial benefits of coal drying was continued. The details of the model and key assumptions being used in the economic evaluation are described in this report.

Edward Levy

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A bimodal power and propulsion system based on cermet fuel and heat pipe energy transport  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bimodal space reactor systems provide both thermal propulsion for the spacecraft orbital transfer and electrical power to the spacecraft bus once it is on station. These systems have the potential to increase both the available payload in high energy orbits and the available power to that payload. These increased mass and power capabilities can be used to either reduce mission cost by permitting the use of smaller launch vehicles or to provide increased mission performance from the current launch vehicle. A major barrier to the deployment of these bimodal systems has been the cost associated with their development. This paper describes a bimodal reactor system with performance potential to permit more than 70% of the instrumented payload of the Titan IV/Centaur to be launched from the Atlas IIAS. The development cost is minimized by basing the design on existing component technologies.

Polansky, G.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gunther, N.A. [Gunther (Norman A.), San Jose, CA (United States); Rochow, R.F. [Novatech, Lynchburg, VA (United States); Bixler, C.H. [Bixler (Charles H.), Mannford, OK (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Design of On-chip Power Transport and Coupling Components for a Silicon Woodpile Accelerator  

SciTech Connect

Three-dimensional woodpile photonic bandgap (PBG) waveguide enables high-gradient and efficient laser driven acceleration, while various accelerator components, including laser couplers, power transmission lines, woodpile accelerating and focusing waveguides, and energy recycling resonators, can be potentially integrated on a single monolithic structure via lithographic fabrications. This paper will present designs of this on-chip accelerator based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide. Laser power is coupled from free-space or fiber into SOI waveguide by grating structures on the silicon surface, split into multiple channels to excite individual accelerator cells, and eventually gets merged into the power recycle pathway. Design and simulation results will be presented regarding various coupling components involved in this network.

Wu, Ziran; Ng, C.; McGuinness, C.; Colby, E.; /SLAC

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

423

Aggregation and transport kinetics of crude oil and sediment in estuarine waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling the transport and fate of spilled crude oil is important for estimating short and long-term toxicity effects in coastal ecosystems. This research project investigates the partitioning of hydrocarbons from a surface crude oil slick, the resurfacing of chemically dispersed crude oil droplets, the suitability of in-situ field instruments for oil and sediment characterization, and the aggregation and settling of dispersed oil and suspended sediments. An initial laboratory study was conducted to investigate apparent hydrocarbon solubility in petroleum/water systems. Mixing shear and initial crude oil layer thickness were related empirically to oil entrainment rate. A model describing hydrocarbons partitioned in colloidal and soluble phases was consistent with experimental data. A second laboratory study was conducted to investigate the influence of coalescence kinetics on mean droplet size and resurfacing rate of chemically dispersed crude oil droplets. Increased mean shear rates resulted in mean droplet diameters and oil resurfacing rates. A third laboratory study was conducted to compare particle size and fractal dimension measurements obtained using a submersible flow cytometer, an electrozone particle counter, and a light scattering particle sizer. Measured particles included latex beads, crude oil, clay, crude oil-clay aggregates, and crude oil-silica aggregates. Tested instruments gave consistent size measurements for all particle systems, suggesting their suitability for sizing marine particles. To describe the aggregation kinetics of oil-sediment systems, a modified Smoluchowski model based on coalesced sphere (CS) assumptions was developed. Observed collision efficiency values (?OBS) were related to collision efficiency values for single particle type systems (?HOMO) and those for two particle type systems (?HET) using a probabilistic approach. For clay and crude oil, ?HOMO values were higher than the ?HOMO value for silica. Clay-oil and silica-oil have similar ?HET values. Thus, crude oil can significantly increase the aggregation rates of noncohesive sediments such as silica. The CS model above was modified to incorporate sediment fractal geometry. The ability of this modified coalesced fractal sphere (mCFS) model to fit experimental data sets was better than that of a coalesced sphere (CS) model. Because of their reduced settling rates, sediments with lower fractal dimension form more aggregate with dispersed oil.

Sterling, Michael Conroy, Jr.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

SOLERAS: Solar-Powered Water Desalination Project at Yanbu: Energy delivery system performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an analysis of the performance of the energy delivery subsystem composed of a steam generator and superheater, a steam engine, and steam condensing equipment. When combined, the thermodynamic processes involved in this subsystem form a basic Rankine power cycle. Water is the cycle working fluid. The prime mover is a Skinner RV-1 Unaflow steam engine. The steam condensing equipment includes a condensate pump, boiler feed pump, deaerator, condensate tank, steam condenser, and an absorption refrigeration unit. Control problems, environmental effects, and characterization of the equipment are included in this report. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Water Vapor Transport and the Production of Precipitation in the Eastern Fertile Crescent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study presented here attempts to quantify the significance of southerly water vapor fluxes on precipitation occurring in the eastern Fertile Crescent region. The water vapor fluxes were investigated at high temporal and spatial resolution by ...

J. P. Evans; R. B. Smith

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

A Cell-Integrated Semi-Lagrangian Semi-Implicit Shallow-Water Model (CSLAM-SW) with Conservative and Consistent Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Cartesian semi-implicit solver using the Conservative Semi-Lagrangian Multitracer (CSLAM) transport scheme is constructed and tested for shallow-water (SW) flows. The SW equations solver (CSLAM-SW) uses a discrete semi-implicit continuity ...

May Wong; William C. Skamarock; Peter H. Lauritzen; Roland B. Stull

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Mathematical modeling of chemical oil-soluble transport for water control in porous media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High water-cut is a long-standing problem in the upstream petroleum industry. Typically one-fourth of the produced fluids from oil wells worldwide are hydrocarbons and the remaining is water. Self-selective in-situ gel formation is a new potential technology ... Keywords: Gelation, Numerical modeling, Porous media, Tetra-methyl-ortho-silicate or tetramethoxysilane (TMOS), Water cut

H. Valiollahi; Z. Ziabakhsh; P. L. J. Zitha

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

SOLERAS - Solar-Powered Water Desalination Project at Yanbu: PKI collectors performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seawater desalination pilot plant at Yanbu in Saudi Arabia is a unique experiment in which an indirect bulk freeze desalination process is integrated with a stand-alone solar cogeneration power plant. Thermal energy is stored in molten salt and is converted into shaft power required for primary refrigeration by a conventional steam engine. An absorption refrigeration unit is thermally driven by the exhaust steam of the engine to produce additional refrigeration. Crystallization of water molecules from the brine into essentially pure water ice is accomplished by the freeze desalination process, which employs indirect heat transfer technique. Solar energy concentrated by the dish collector is transferred to a silicone polymer low-viscosity liquid circulated through the receiver, which is a monotube cavity mounted at the concentrator focal area in a stainless steel encased housing. A flux trap mounted at the mouth of the cavity receiver deflects stray radiation into the cavity. This document concerns itself with the solar collector and the solar collector field subsystem and presents the results of scientific investigations during the past 18 months since the plant installation. 13 refs., 206 figs.

Hamad, G.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

VISTA -- A Vehicle for Interplanetary Space Transport Application Powered by Inertial Confinement Fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is an ideal technology to power self-contained single-stage piloted (manned) spacecraft within the solar system because of its inherently high power/mass ratios and high specific impulses (i.e., high exhaust velocities). These technological advantages are retained when ICF is utilized with a magnetic thrust chamber, which avoids the plasma thermalization and resultant degradation of specific impulse that are unavoidable with the use of mechanical thrust chambers. We started with Rod Hyde's 1983 description of an ICF-powered engine concept using a magnetic thrust chamber, and conducted a more detailed systems study to develop a viable, realistic, and defensible spacecraft concept based on ICF technology projected to be available in the first half of the 21st century. The results include an entirely new conical spacecraft conceptual design utilizing near-existing radiator technology. We describe the various vehicle systems for this new concept, estimate the missions performance capabilities for general missions to the planets within the solar system, and describe in detail the performance for the baseline mission of a piloted roundtrip to Mars with a 100-ton payload. For this mission, we show that roundtrips totaling {ge}145 days are possible with advanced DT fusion technology and a total (wet) spacecraft mass of about 6000 metric tons. Such short-duration missions are advantageous to minimize the known cosmic-radiation hazards to astronauts, and are even more important to minimize the physiological deteriorations arising from zero gravity. These ICF-powered missions are considerably faster than those available using chemical or nuclear-electric-propulsion technologies with minimum-mass vehicle configurations. VISTA also offers onboard artificial gravity and propellant-based shielding from cosmic rays, thus reducing the known hazards and physiological deteriorations to insignificant levels. We emphasize, however, that the degree to which an ICF-powered vehicle can outperform a vehicle using any other realistic technology depends on the degree to which terrestrial-based ICF research can develop the necessary energy gain from ICF targets. With aggressive progress in such terrestrial research, VISTA will be able to make roundtrip missions to Pluto in {approx}7 years, and missions to points just beyond the solar system within a human lifetime.

Orth, C D

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation; although hydroelectric dams do not remove anywater consumption: hydroelectric dams. Although not asair, the production of hydroelectric power also results in

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Purge gas protected transportable pressurized fuel cell modules and their operation in a power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell generator apparatus and method of its operation involves: passing pressurized oxidant gas and pressurized fuel gas into modules containing fuel cells, where the modules are each enclosed by a module housing surrounded by an axially elongated pressure vessel, and where there is a purge gas volume between the module housing and pressure vessel; passing pressurized purge gas through the purge gas volume to dilute any unreacted fuel gas from the modules; and passing exhaust gas and circulated purge gas and any unreacted fuel gas out of the pressure vessel; where the fuel cell generator apparatus is transportable when the pressure vessel is horizontally disposed, providing a low center of gravity. 11 figs.

Zafred, P.R.; Dederer, J.T.; Gillett, J.E.; Basel, R.A.; Antenucci, A.B.

1996-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

432

Assessment of a Transportable 200-kW Fuel Cell in Rural Applications: Site 1: Central Georgia EMC/Oglethorpe Power Corporation, Jack son, Georgia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dispersed generation is particularly attractive to electric cooperatives in rural areas due to low customer densities and sometimes rapid load growth at the end of long lines. EPRI and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) are cosponsoring a project to demonstrate the use of transportable 200 kW phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants in rural dispersed generation applications. This interim report details the project and describes the first year of operation of a transportable fuel c...

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

433

Cooling Requirements and Water Use Impacts of Advanced Coal-fired Power Plants with CO2 Capture and Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In addition to the large cost impact that comes with including CO2 capture in coal power plants, the consumption of water also increases. The increase in water consumption could represent a significant barrier to the implementation of CO2 capture. Although it is assumed that technology improvements might reduce the cost and power consumption of future CO2 capture systems, it might not be feasible to implement CO2 capture if additional water is not available at a site. In addition, because many regions of...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

434

THERMODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF AMMONIA-WATER-CARBON DIOXIDE MIXTURES FOR DESIGNING NEW POWER GENERATION CYCLES  

SciTech Connect

This project was undertaken with the goal of developing a computational package for the thermodynamic properties of ammonia-water-carbon dioxide mixtures at elevated temperature and pressure conditions. This objective was accomplished by modifying an existing set of empirical equations of state for ammonia-water mixtures. This involved using the Wagner equation of state for the gas phase properties of carbon dioxide. In the liquid phase, Pitzer's ionic model was used. The implementation of this approach in the form of a computation package that can be used for the optimization of power cycles required additional code development. In particular, this thermodynamic model consisted of a large set of non-linear equations. Consequently, in the interest of computational speed and robustness that is required when applied to optimization problems, analytic gradients were incorporated in the Newton solver routines. The equations were then implemented using a stream property predictor to make initial guesses of the composition, temperature, pressure, enthalpy, entropy, etc. near a known state. The predictor's validity is then tested upon the convergence of an iteration. It proved difficult to obtain experimental data from the literature that could be used to test the accuracy of the new thermodynamic property package, and this remains a critical need for future efforts in the area. It was possible, however, to assess the feasibility of using this complicated property prediction package for power cycle design and optimization. Such feasibility was first demonstrated by modification of our Kalina cycle optimization code to use the package with either a deterministic optimizer, MINOS, or a stochastic optimizer using differential evolution, a genetic-algorithm-based technique. Beyond this feasibility demonstration, a new approach to the design and optimization of power cycles was developed using a graph theoretic approach.

Ashish Gupta

2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

VOLATILE TRANSPORT INSIDE SUPER-EARTHS BY ENTRAPMENT IN THE WATER-ICE MATRIX  

SciTech Connect

Whether volatiles can be entrapped in a background matrix composing planetary envelopes and be dragged via convection to the surface is a key question in understanding atmospheric fluxes, cycles, and composition. In this paper, we consider super-Earths with an extensive water mantle (i.e., water planets), and the possibility of entrapment of methane in their extensive water-ice envelopes. We adopt the theory developed by van der Waals and Platteeuw for modeling solid solutions, often used for modeling clathrate hydrates, and modify it in order to estimate the thermodynamic stability field of a new phase called methane filled ice Ih. We find that in comparison to water ice VII the filled ice Ih structure may be stable not only at the high pressures but also at the high temperatures expected at the core-water mantle transition boundary of water planets.

Levi, A.; Podolak, M. [Department of Geophysics and Planetary Science, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Sasselov, D., E-mail: amitlevi.planetphys@gmail.com [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

436

Supplemental Power for the town of Browning Waste-Water Treatment Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report is issued for the "Supplemental power for the Town of Browning waste-water treatment facility" under the Field Verification Program for Small Wind Turbines Grant. The grant application was submitted on April 16, 1999 wherein the full description of this project is outlined. The project was initially designed to test the Bergy small wind turbines, 10 kW, applicability to residential and commercial applications. The objectives of the project were the following: 1. To verify the performance of the BWC Excel-S/E model wind turbine in an operational application in the fierce winds and severe weather conditions of the Class V winds of the Blackfeet Indian Reservation of Northern Montana. 2. To open up the Blackfeet reservation and northern Montana, to government sponsored, regionally distributed wind generation programs. 3. To examine the natural partnership of wind/electric with water pumping and water purification applications whose requirements parallel the variably available nature of energy produced by wind. 4. To provide data and hands-on experience to citizens, scientists, political leaders, utility operators and Tribal planners with regard to the potential uses of small-capacity, distributed-array wind turbines on the Blackfeet Reservation and in other areas of northern Montana. This project has not been without a few, which were worked out and at the time of this report continue to be worked on with the installation of two new Trace Technologies invertors and a rebuilt one with new technology inside. For the most part when the system has worked it produced power that was used within the wastewater system as was the purpose of this project.

William Morris; Dennis Fitzpatrick

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

437

Supporting Water, Ecological, and Transportation Systems in the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonpoint Source Pollution from Land Use Workshop. Novemberasked to investigate pollution from land use activities. Newland and water interactions and point and non-point sources of pollution

Beck, Judy; Kamke, Sherry; Majerus, Kimberly

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suh, S. Water Embodied in Bioethanol in the United States.Use in the Production of Bioethanol and Petroleum Gasoline.for Producing Biofuels: Bioethanol and Biodiesel. Biomass

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Rain water transport and storage in a model sandy soil with hydrogel particle additives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study rain water infiltration and drainage in a dry model sandy soil with superabsorbent hydrogel particle additives by measuring the mass of retained water for non-ponding rainfall using a self-built 3D laboratory set-up. In the pure model sandy soil, the retained water curve measurements indicate that instead of a stable horizontal wetting front that grows downward uniformly, a narrow fingered flow forms under the top layer of water-saturated soil. This rain water channelization phenomenon not only further reduces the available rain water in the plant root zone, but also affects the efficiency of soil additives, such as superabsorbent hydrogel particles. Our studies show that the shape of the retained water curve for a soil packing with hydrogel particle additives strongly depends on the location and the concentration of the hydrogel particles in the model sandy soil. By carefully choosing the particle size and distribution methods, we may use the swollen hydrogel particles to modify the soil pore structure, to clog or extend the water channels in sandy soils, or to build water reservoirs in the plant root zone.

Y. Wei; D. J. Durian

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

440

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GREET Pathway for Corn Ethanol. California Air Resourcesthat for each m 3 of corn ethanol produced in the Unitedthe water footprint of corn ethanol production will be on

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation water power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The Carnol process for CO{sub 2} mitigation from power plants and the transportation sector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) mitigation process is developed which converts waste CO{sub 2}, primarily from coal-fired power plant stack gases, to methanol for use as a liquid fuel and a coproduct carbon for use as a materials commodity. The Carnol process chemistry consists of methane decomposition to produce hydrogen which is catalytically reacted with the recovered waste CO{sub 2} to produce methanol. The carbon is either stored or sold. A process design is modeled, and mass and energy balances are presented as a function of reactor pressure and temperature conditions. The Carnol process is a viable alternative to sequestering CO{sub 2} in the ocean for purposes of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions from coal burning power plants. Over 90% of the CO{sub 2} from the coal burning plant is used in the process which results in a net CO{sub 2} emission reduction of over 90% compared to that obtained for conventional methanol production by steam reforming of methane. Methanol, as an alternative liquid fuel for automotive engines and for fuel cells, achieves additional CO{sub 2} emission reduction benefits. The economics of the process is greatly enhanced when carbon can be sold as a materials commodity. The process design and economics could possibly be achieved by developing a molten metal (tin) methane decomposition reactor and a liquid phase, slurry catalyst, methanol synthesis reactor directly using the solvent saturated with CO{sub 2} scrubbed from the power plant stack gases. The application of CO{sub 2} mitigation technologies, such as the Carnol process, depends to some extent, on how serious the country and the world takes the global greenhouse gas warming problem.

Steinberg, M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

The Carnol process for CO{sub 2} mitigation from power plants and the transportation sector  

SciTech Connect

A CO{sub 2} mitigation process is developed which converts waste CO{sub 2} primarily recovered from coal-fired power plant stack gases with natural gas, to produce methanol as a liquid fuel and coproduct carbon as a materials commodity. The Carnol process chemistry consists of methane decomposition to produce hydrogen which is catalytically reacted with the recovered waste CO{sub 2} to produce methanol. The carbon is either stored or sold as a materials commodity. A process design is modeled and mass and energy balances are presented as a function of reactor pressure and temperature conditions. The Carnol process is a viable alternative to sequestering CO{sub 2} in the ocean for purposes of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions from coal burning power plants. Over 90% of the CO{sub 2} from the coal burning plant is used in the process which results in a net CO{sub 2} emission reduction of over 90% compared to that obtained for conventional methanol production by steam reforming of methane. Methanol as an alternative liquid fuel for automotive engines and for fuel cells achieves additional CO{sub 2} emission reduction benefits. The economics of the process is greatly enhanced when carbon can be sold as a materials commodity. Improvement in process design and economics should be achieved by developing a molten metal (tin) methane decomposition reactor and a liquid phase, slurry catalyst, methanol synthesis reactor directly using the solvent saturated with CO{sub 2} scrubbed from the power plant stack gases. The benefits of the process warrants its further development.

Steinberg, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Advanced Technology

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-Traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assessed opportunities for improving water quality associated with coal-fired power generation including the use of non-traditional waters for cooling, innovative technology for recovering and reusing water within power plants, novel approaches for the removal of trace inorganic compounds from ash pond effluents, and novel approaches for removing biocides from cooling tower blowdown. This research evaluated specifically designed pilot-scale constructed wetland systems for treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters for reuse in thermoelectric power generation and other purposes. The overall objective of this project was to decrease targeted constituents in non-traditional waters to achieve reuse criteria or discharge limitations established by the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Clean Water Act (CWA). The six original project objectives were completed, and results are presented in this final technical report. These objectives included identification of targeted constituents for treatment in four non-traditional water sources, determination of reuse or discharge criteria for treatment, design of constructed wetland treatment systems for these non-traditional waters, and measurement of treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters, as well as determination of the suitability of the treated non-traditional waters for reuse or discharge to receiving aquatic systems. The four non-traditional waters used to accomplish these objectives were ash basin water, cooling water, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) water, and produced water. The contaminants of concern identified in ash basin waters were arsenic, chromium, copper, mercury, selenium, and zinc. Contaminants of concern in cooling waters included free oxidants (chlorine, bromine, and peroxides), copper, lead, zinc, pH, and total dissolved solids. FGD waters contained contaminants of concern including arsenic, boron, chlorides, selenium, mercury, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and zinc. Similar to FGD waters, produced waters contained contaminants of concern that are predominantly inorganic (arsenic, cadmium, chlorides, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, sulfide, zinc, total dissolved solids), but also contained some organics (benzene, PAHs, toluene, total organic carbon, total suspended solids, and oil and grease). Constituents of concern that may cause chemical scaling, biofouling and corrosion, such as pH, hardness and ionic strength, and nutrients (P, K, and N) may also be found in all four non-traditional waters. NPDES permits were obtained for these non-traditional waters and these permit limits are summarized in tabular format within this report. These limits were used to establish treatment goals for this research along with toxicity values for Ceriodaphnia dubia, water quality criteria established by the US EPA, irrigation standards established by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), and reuse standards focused on minimization of damage to the power plant by treated waters. Constructed wetland treatment systems were designed for each non-traditional water source based on published literature reviews regarding remediation of the constituents of concern, biogeochemistry of the specific contaminants, and previous research. During this study, 4 non-traditional waters, which included ash basin water, cooling water, FGD water and produced water (PW) were obtained or simulated to measure constructed wetland treatment system performance. Based on data collected from FGD experiments, pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment systems can decrease aqueous concentrations of elements of concern (As, B, Hg, N, and Se). Percent removal was specific for each element, including ranges of 40.1% to 77.7% for As, 77.6% to 97.8% for Hg, 43.9% to 88.8% for N, and no measureable removal to 84.6% for Se. Other constituents of interest in final outflow samples should have aqueous characteristics sufficient for discharge, with the exception of chlorides (<2000 mg/L). Based on total dissolved solids, co-

John Rodgers; James Castle

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

444

Wetland Water Cooling Partnership: The Use of Restored Wetlands to Enhance Thermoelectric Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand on Surface Water Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pierina noceti Pierina noceti Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-5428 pierina.noceti@netl.doe.gov steven I. apfelbaum Principal Investigator Applied Ecological Services, Inc. 17921 Smith Road P.O. Box 256 Brodhead, WI 53520 608-897-8641 steve@appliedeco.com Wetland Water Cooling PartnershiP: the Use of restored Wetlands to enhanCe thermoeleCtriC PoWer Plant Cooling and mitigate the demand on sUrfaCe Water Use Background Thermoelectric power plants require a significant volume of water to operate, accounting for 39 percent of freshwater (136 billion gallons per day) withdrawn in the United States in 2000, according to a U.S. Geological Survey study. This significant use of water ranks second only to the agricultural sector

445

Requirements for Power Plant and Power Line Development (Wisconsin) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Requirements for Power Plant and Power Line Development (Wisconsin) Requirements for Power Plant and Power Line Development (Wisconsin) Requirements for Power Plant and Power Line Development (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Wind Solar Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Public Service Commission of Wisconsin

446

Transport of Bottom Water in the Romanche Fracture Zone and the Chain Fracture Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two moored arrays deployed in the Romanche Fracture Zone and Chain Fracture Zone in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean provide two-year-long time series of current and temperature in the Lower North Atlantic Deep Water and the Antarctic Bottom Water. ...

Herl Mercier; Kevin G. Speer

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

The Impact of the Sierra Nevada on Low-Level Winds and Water Vapor Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To understand the influence of the Sierra Nevada on the water cycle in California the authors have analyzed low-level winds and water vapor fluxes upstream of the mountain range in regional climate model simulations. In a low Froude number (Fr) ...

Jinwon Kim; Hyun-Suk Kang

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Supporting Water, Ecological, and Transportation Systems in the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

office. Participants included transportation and environmental professionals involved with stormwater managementEnvironmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Great Lakes National Program Office (GLNPO) Lake Michigan Lakewide ManagementEnvironmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Great Lakes National Program Office (GLNPO) Lake Michigan Lakewide Management

Beck, Judy; Kamke, Sherry; Majerus, Kimberly

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

The Integration of a Structural Water-Gas-Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 The InTegraTIon of a STrucTural WaTer- gaS-ShIfT caTalyST WITh a VanadIum alloy hydrogen TranSporT deVIce Description The purpose of this project is to produce a scalable device that simultaneously performs both water-gas-shift (WGS) and hydrogen separation from a coal-derived synthesis gas stream. The justification of such a system is the improved efficiency for the overall production of hydrogen. Removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas (syngas) stream allows the WGS reaction to convert more carbon monoxide (CO) to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and maximizes the total hydrogen produced. An additional benefit is the reduction in capital cost of plant construction due to the removal of one step in the process by integrating WGS with the membrane separation device.

450

SOLERAS - Solar-Powered Water Desalination Project at Yanbu: Indirect freeze desalination system performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The desalination subsystem of the solar-powered desalination pilot project located at Yanbu, Saudi Arabia, was operated successfully for two years. Water production rates of 180 m/sup 3//day can be obtained for a period of 24 hours. In addition, once the proper procedures are followed, water production can continue for long periods of time at rates of 135 m/sup 3//day. Electrical energy costs to produce one m/sup 3/ of potable water is SR 1.66 in Saudi Arabia and $1.66 to $2.21 in the United States. As with any new process, a number of important details must be learned to obtain the most out of the system. Some of these details are: (1) product water production rate and efficiency are maximized for this system at 10% salinity and ..delta..Ts greater than 3/degree/C, (2) the anhydrous ammonia must be kept clean, (3) the ice in the freezer tubes must be melted without decreasing the salinity of the mixture in the slurry separator, (4) the salinity of the mixture going through each of the freezer tubes must be the same, and (5) the salinity of the slurry must be less than 11%. The authors