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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation sector model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains input data and parameters used in the model of the transportation sector of the National Energy Modeling System. The list of Transportation Sector Model variables includes parameters for the following: Light duty vehicle modules (fuel economy, regional sales, alternative fuel vehicles); Light duty vehicle stock modules; Light duty vehicle fleet module; Air travel module (demand model and fleet efficiency model); Freight transport module; Miscellaneous energy demand module; and Transportation emissions module. Also included in these appendices are: Light duty vehicle market classes; Maximum light duty vehicle market penetration parameters; Aircraft fleet efficiency model adjustment factors; and List of expected aircraft technology improvements.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Technology detail in a multi-sector CGE model : transport under climate policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A set of three analytical models is used to study the imbedding of specific transport technologies within a multi-sector, multi-region evaluation of constraints on greenhouse emissions. Key parameters of a computable general ...

Schafer, Andreas.

3

Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrifica...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector...

4

Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model. The NEMS Transportation Model comprises a series of semi-independent models which address different aspects of the transportation sector. The primary purpose of this model is to provide mid-term forecasts of transportation energy demand by fuel type including, but not limited to, motor gasoline, distillate, jet fuel, and alternative fuels (such as CNG) not commonly associated with transportation. The current NEMS forecast horizon extends to the year 2010 and uses 1990 as the base year. Forecasts are generated through the separate consideration of energy consumption within the various modes of transport, including: private and fleet light-duty vehicles; aircraft; marine, rail, and truck freight; and various modes with minor overall impacts, such as mass transit and recreational boating. This approach is useful in assessing the impacts of policy initiatives, legislative mandates which affect individual modes of travel, and technological developments. The model also provides forecasts of selected intermediate values which are generated in order to determine energy consumption. These elements include estimates of passenger travel demand by automobile, air, or mass transit; estimates of the efficiency with which that demand is met; projections of vehicle stocks and the penetration of new technologies; and estimates of the demand for freight transport which are linked to forecasts of industrial output. Following the estimation of energy demand, TRAN produces forecasts of vehicular emissions of the following pollutants by source: oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, total carbon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrificati...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Transportation Sector Electrification Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrification 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies...

6

Model documentation report: Transportation sector model of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of TRAN for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirements of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, 57(b)(1)). Third, it permits continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Modeling the Transport Sector: The Role of Existing Fuel Taxes in Climate Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Existing fuel taxes play a major role in determining the welfare effects of exempting the transportation sector from measures to control greenhouse gases. To study this phenomenon we modify the MIT Emissions Prediction and ...

Paltsev, Sergey.

8

Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection...

9

Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The attachments contained within this appendix provide additional details about the model development and estimation process which do not easily lend themselves to incorporation in the main body of the model documentation report. The information provided in these attachments is not integral to the understanding of the model`s operation, but provides the reader with opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of some of the model`s underlying assumptions. There will be a slight degree of replication of materials found elsewhere in the documentation, made unavoidable by the dictates of internal consistency. Each attachment is associated with a specific component of the transportation model; the presentation follows the same sequence of modules employed in Volume 1. The following attachments are contained in Appendix F: Fuel Economy Model (FEM)--provides a discussion of the FEM vehicle demand and performance by size class models; Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Model--describes data input sources and extrapolation methodologies; Light-Duty Vehicle (LDV) Stock Model--discusses the fuel economy gap estimation methodology; Light Duty Vehicle Fleet Model--presents the data development for business, utility, and government fleet vehicles; Light Commercial Truck Model--describes the stratification methodology and data sources employed in estimating the stock and performance of LCT`s; Air Travel Demand Model--presents the derivation of the demographic index, used to modify estimates of personal travel demand; and Airborne Emissions Model--describes the derivation of emissions factors used to associate transportation measures to levels of airborne emissions of several pollutants.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Yucca MountainTransportation: Private Sector Perspective  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transportation: Private Sector "Lessons Learned" US Transport Council David Blee Executive Director dblee@ustransportcouncil.org DOE Transportation External Coordination (TEC)...

11

Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrifica...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV) Vehicle Technology Advancement and...

12

Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologi...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

More Documents & Publications Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies Program Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum...

13

Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Appendix consists of two unpublished reports produced by Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., under contract to Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These two reports formed the basis for the subsequent development of the Fuel Economy Model described in Volume 1. They are included in order to document more completely the efforts undertaken to construct a comprehensive model of automobile fuel economy. The supplemental reports are as follows: Supplement 1--Documentation Attributes of Technologies to Improve Automotive Fuel Economy; Supplement 2--Analysis of the Fuel Economy Boundary for 2010 and Comparison to Prototypes.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hybrid hydrogen-carbon (H{sub 2}CAR) process for the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels is proposed wherein biomass is the carbon source and hydrogen is supplied from carbon-free energy. To implement this concept, a process has been designed to co-feed a biomass gasifier with H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} recycled from the H{sub 2}-CO to liquid conversion reactor. Modeling of this biomass to liquids process has identified several major advantages of the H{sub 2}CAR process. The land area needed to grow the biomass is <40% of that needed by other routes that solely use biomass to support the entire transportation sector. Whereras the literature estimates known processes to be able to produce {approx}30% of the United States transportation fuel from the annual biomass of 1.366 billion tons, the H{sub 2}CAR process shows the potential to supply the entire United States transportation sector from that quantity of biomass. The synthesized liquid provides H{sub 2} storage in an open loop system. Reduction to practice of the H{sub 2}CAR route has the potential to provide the transportation sector for the foreseeable future, using the existing infrastructure. The rationale of using H{sub 2} in the H{sub 2}CAR process is explained by the significantly higher annualized average solar energy conversion efficiency for hydrogen generation versus that for biomass growth. For coal to liquids, the advantage of H{sub 2}CAR is that there is no additional CO{sub 2} release to the atmosphere due to the replacement of petroleum with coal, thus eliminating the need to sequester CO{sub 2}.

Agrawal, R.; Singh, N.R.; Ribeiro, F.H.; Delgass, W.N. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Chemical Engineering and Energy Center at Discovery Park

2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

15

Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologi...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies Program Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies Program 2012 DOE Hydrogen...

16

End use energy consumption data base: transportation sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transportation fuel and energy use estimates developed a Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the End Use Energy Consumption Data Base are documented. The total data base contains estimates of energy use in the United States broken down into many categories within all sectors of the economy: agriculture, mining, construction, manufacturing, commerce, the household, electric utilities, and transportation. The transportation data provided by ORNL generally cover each of the 10 years from 1967 through 1976 (occasionally 1977 and 1978), with omissions in some models. The estimtes are broken down by mode of transport, fuel, region and State, sector of the economy providing transportation, and by the use to which it is put, and, in the case of automobile and bus travel, by the income of the traveler. Fuel types include natural gas, motor and aviation gasoline, residual and diesel oil, liuqefied propane, liquefied butane, and naphtha- and kerosene-type jet engine fuels. Electricity use is also estimated. The mode, fuel, sector, and use categories themselves subsume one, two, or three levels of subcategories, resulting in a very detailed categorization and definitive accounting.

Hooker, J.N.; Rose, A.B.; Greene, D.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Name Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG...

18

The Practice of Cost Benefit Analysis in the Transport Sector...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Practice of Cost Benefit Analysis in the Transport Sector a Mexican Perspective Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Practice of Cost Benefit Analysis in...

19

Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologi...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Overview 3 Relevance FY09101112 Project: Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies Program Project Objective: To promote economic growth and...

20

Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologi...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

information. DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies Program Robin Erickson, Executive Director Utah Clean Cities...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation sector model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Changing US Electric Sector Business Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Changing US Electric Sector Business Model CATEE 2013 Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference San Antonio, Texas December 17, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-57 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16...-18 Copyright © 2013 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved. • Fundamentals of the US Electric Sector Business Model • Today’s Challenges Faced by U.S. Electric Sector • The Math Does Not Lie: A Look into the Sector’s Future • Disruption to Today...

Aliff, G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Global Climate Change and the Transportation Sector: An Update on Issues and Mitigation Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is clear from numerous energy/economic modeling exercises that addressing the challenges posed by global climate change will eventually require the active participation of all industrial sectors and all consumers on the planet. Yet, these and similar modeling exercises indicate that large stationary CO2 point sources (e.g., refineries and fossil-fired electric power plants) are often the first targets considered for serious CO2 emissions mitigation. Without participation of all sectors of the global economy, however, the challenges of climate change mitigation will not be met. Because of its operating characteristics, price structure, dependence on virtually one energy source (oil), enormous installed infrastructure, and limited technology alternatives, at least in the near-term, the transportation sector will likely represent a particularly difficult challenge for CO2 emissions mitigation. Our research shows that climate change induced price signals (i.e., putting a price on carbon that is emitted to the atmosphere) are in the near term insufficient to drive fundamental shifts in demand for energy services or to transform the way these services are provided in the transportation sector. We believe that a technological revolution will be necessary to accomplish the significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. This paper presents an update of ongoing research into a variety of technological options that exist for decarbonizing the transportation sector and the various tradeoffs among them.

Geffen, CA; Dooley, JJ; Kim, SH

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

23

ANALYSIS OF MEASURES FOR REDUCING TRANSPORTATION SECTOR GREENHOUSE GAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(CO2) emission reduction estimates were obtained for each of the measures. The package of measures the problem of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the Canadian transportation sector. Reductions-makers will require estimates of both the potential emission reductions and the costs or benefits associated

24

Vehicle Technologies Office: Transitioning the Transportation Sector -  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of EnergyofProject is onModeling andReport ||Student Competitions

25

HOW DO WE CONVERT THE TRANSPORT SECTOR TO RENEWABLE ENERGY AND IMPROVE THE SECTOR'S INTERPLAY WITH THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..........................................................................................................16 #12;2 1. Summary The global energy scene is currently dominated by two overriding concerns relies almost 100 % on oil, and in 2004 transport energy use amounted to 26% of total world energy useHOW DO WE CONVERT THE TRANSPORT SECTOR TO RENEWABLE ENERGY AND IMPROVE THE SECTOR'S INTERPLAY

26

Energy-economy interactions revisited within a comprehensive sectoral model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model with considerable sector and technology detail, the ``All Modular Industry Growth Assessment'' Model (AMIGA). It is argued that a detailed model is important to capture and understand the several rolls that energy plays within the economy. Fundamental consumer and industrial demands are for the services from energy; hence, energy demand is a derived demand based on the need for heating, cooling mechanical, electrical, and transportation services. Technologies that provide energy-services more efficiently (on a life cycle basis), when adopted, result in increased future output of the economy and higher paths of household consumption. The AMIGA model can examine the effects on energy use and economic output of increases in energy prices (e.g., a carbon charge) and other incentive-based policies or energy-efficiency programs. Energy sectors and sub-sector activities included in the model involve energy extraction conversion and transportation. There are business opportunities to produce energy-efficient goods (i.e., appliances, control systems, buildings, automobiles, clean electricity). These activities are represented in the model by characterizing their likely production processes (e.g., lighter weight motor vehicles). Also, multiple industrial processes can produce the same output but with different technologies and inputs. Secondary recovery, i.e., recycling processes, are examples of these multiple processes. Combined heat and power (CHP) is also represented for energy-intensive industries. Other modules represent residential and commercial building technologies to supply energy services. All sectors of the economy command real resources (capital services and labor).

Hanson, D. A.; Laitner, J. A.

2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

27

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

leg/leginx.asp 4. EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with22, (4), 10. EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projectionsto the Annual Energy Outlook 2007. Transportation Demand

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

UZ Colloid Transport Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

M. McGraw

2000-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

29

Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's Transportation Sector: Methods...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

has two objectives. The first is to examine methodological issues involved in using guidelines to measure co-benefits from transport projects (developing baselines,...

30

FY 16 EERE Budget Webinar-Sustainable Transportation Sector ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

requests) and an opportunity to ask questions. Deputy Assistant Secretary Reuben Sarkar will be leading the webinar for Sustainable Transportation on March 3, 2015, from 2:30...

31

Global Climate Change and the Unique Challenges Posed by the Transportation Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Addressing the challenges posed by global climate change will eventually require the active participation of all industrial sectors and consumers on the planet. To date, however, most efforts to address climate change have focused on only a few sectors of the economy (e.g., refineries and fossil-fired electric power plants) and a handful of large industrialized nations. While useful as a starting point, these efforts must be expanded to include other sectors of the economy and other nations. The transportation sector presents some unique challenges, with its nearly exclusive dependence on petroleum based products as a fuel source coupled with internal combustion engines as the prime mover. Reducing carbon emissions from transportation systems is unlikely to be solely accomplished by traditional climate mitigation policies that place a price on carbon. Our research shows that price signals alone are unlikely to fundamentally alter the demand for energy services or to transform the way energy services are provided in the transportation sector. We believe that a technological revolution will be necessary to accomplish the significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector.

Dooley, J.J.; Geffen, C.A.; Edmonds, J.A.

2002-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

32

High Penetration of Renewable Energy in the Transportation Sector: Scenarios, Barriers, and Enablers; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transportation accounts for 71% of U.S. petroleum use and 33% of its greenhouse gases emissions. Pathways toward reduced greenhouse gas emissions and petroleum dependence in the transportation sector have been analyzed in considerable detail, but with some limitations. To add to this knowledge, the U.S. Department of Energy has launched a study focused on underexplored greenhouse-gas-abatement and oil-savings opportunities related to transportation. This Transportation Energy Futures study analyzes specific issues and associated key questions to strengthen the existing knowledge base and help cultivate partnerships among federal agencies, state and local governments, and industry.

Vimmerstedt, L.; Brown, A.; Heath, G.; Mai, T.; Ruth, M.; Melaina, M.; Simpkins, T.; Steward, D.; Warner, E.; Bertram, K.; Plotkin, S.; Patel, D.; Stephens, T.; Vyas, A.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A review of life-cycle analysis studies on liquid biofuel systems for the transport sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Advanced" (or second generation) biofuels · Bioethanol (E100, E85, E10, ETBE) from lignocellu- losicA review of life-cycle analysis studies on liquid biofuel systems for the transport sector Eric D interest in biofuels for climate change mitigation. This article reviews the rich literature of published

34

Electric vehicles and renewable energy in the transport sector energy system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy resources, such as wind power. Economic aspects for electric vehicles interactingElectric vehicles and renewable energy in the transport sector ­ energy system consequences Main focus: Battery electric vehicles and hydrogen based fuel cell vehicles Lars Henrik Nielsen and Kaj

35

Post-2012 Climate Instruments in the transport sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:Plug Power Inc JumpPortage, NewOR) JumpInformation transport

36

Methodology for Modeling Building Energy Performance across the Commercial Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report uses EnergyPlus simulations of each building in the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to document and demonstrate bottom-up methods of modeling the entire U.S. commercial buildings sector (EIA 2006). The ability to use a whole-building simulation tool to model the entire sector is of interest because the energy models enable us to answer subsequent 'what-if' questions that involve technologies and practices related to energy. This report documents how the whole-building models were generated from the building characteristics in 2003 CBECS and compares the simulation results to the survey data for energy use.

Griffith, B.; Long, N.; Torcellini, P.; Judkoff, R.; Crawley, D.; Ryan, J.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Lorentz Violation of the Photon Sector in Field Theory Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compare the Lorentz violation terms of the pure photon sector between two field theory models, namely the minimal standard model extension (SME) and the standard model supplement (SMS). From the requirement of the identity of the intersection for the two models, we find that the free photon sector of the SMS can be a subset of the photon sector of the minimal SME. We not only obtain some relations between the SME parameters, but also get some constraints on the SMS parameters from the SME parameters. The CPT-odd coefficients $(k_{AF})^{\\alpha}$ of the SME are predicted to be zero. There are 15 degrees of freedom in the Lorentz violation matrix $\\Delta^{\\alpha\\beta}$ of free photons of the SMS related with the same number of degrees of freedom in the tensor coefficients $(k_F)^{\\alpha\\beta\\mu\

Zhou Lingli; Bo-Qiang Ma

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Use of both natural gas and renewable energy has grown significantly in recent years. Both forms of energy have been touted as key elements of a transition to a cleaner and more secure energy future, but much of the current discourse considers each in isolation or concentrates on the competitive impacts of one on the other. This paper attempts, instead, to explore potential synergies of natural gas and renewable energy in the U.S. electric power and transportation sectors.

Lee, A.; Zinaman, O.; Logan, J.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a critical role in combustion processes just as chemicalparameters are essential for combustion modeling; molecularwith Application to Combustion. Transport Theor Stat 2003;

Brown, N.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Modeling distributed generation in the buildings sectors  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0,InformationU.S. Crude Oil3 13,,8.1 64.1 4.2Modeling

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation sector model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Life cycle GHG emissions from Malaysian oil palm bioenergy development: The impact on transportation sector's energy security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on transportation sector's energy security Mohd Nor Azman Hassan a,n , Paulina Jaramillo a , W. Michael Griffin a sector accounts for 41% of the country's total energy use. The country is expected to become a net oil% of total energy consumption. This is expected to increase to about 1100 PJ in 2015 extrapolat- ing

Jaramillo, Paulina

42

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policies in the Electricity Sector. Discussion Paper 99-51,emissions from the electricity sector. Several states have2020 emissions from the electricity sector by 18%. Extending

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Reduction in tribological energy losses in the transportation and electric utilities sectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a study of ways and means of advancing the national energy conservation effort, particularly with regard to oil, via progress in the technology of tribology. The report is confined to two economic sectors: transportation, where the scope embraces primarily the highway fleets, and electric utilities. Together these two sectors account for half of the US energy consumption. Goal of the study is to ascertain the energy sinks attributable to tribological components and processes and to recommend long-range research and development (R and D) programs aimed at reducing these losses. In addition to the obvious tribological machine components such as bearings, piston rings, transmissions and so on, the study also extends to processes which are linked to tribology indirectly such as wear of machine parts, coatings of blades, high temperature materials leading to higher cycle efficiencies, attenuation of vibration, and other cycle improvements.

Pinkus, O.; Wilcock, D.F.; Levinson, T.M.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Biofuels in the U.S. Transportation Sector (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Sustained high world oil prices and the passage of the Energy Policy Act 2005 (EPACT) have encouraged the use of agriculture-based ethanol and biodiesel in the transportation sector; however, both the continued growth of the biofuels industry and the long-term market potential for biofuels depend on the resolution of critical issues that influence the supply of and demand for biofuels. For each of the major biofuelscorn-based ethanol, cellulosic ethanol, and biodieselresolution of technical, economic, and regulatory issues remains critical to further development of biofuels in the United States.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Transportation Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (TAMS) Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (TAMS) Application Center for Transportation Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies T he Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) TAMS application is a web-based tool that supports

46

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Through Greater Efficiency: The Potential for Conservation in California’s Residential Sector. Report

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE is conducting a comprehensive technical analysis of a flexible-fuel transportation system in the United States -- that is, a system that could easily switch between petroleum and another fuel, depending on price and availability. The DOE Alternative Fuels Assessment is aimed directly at questions of energy security and fuel availability, but covers a wide range of issues. This report examines environmental, health, and safety concerns associated with a switch to alternative- and flexible-fuel vehicles. Three potential alternatives to oil-based fuels in the transportation sector are considered: methanol, compressed natural gas (CNG), and electricity. The objective is to describe and discuss qualitatively potential environmental, health, and safety issues that would accompany widespread use of these three fuels. This report presents the results of exhaustive literature reviews; discussions with specialists in the vehicular and fuel-production industries and with Federal, State, and local officials; and recent information from in-use fleet tests. Each chapter deals with the end-use and process emissions of air pollutants, presenting an overview of the potential air pollution contribution of the fuel --relative to that of gasoline and diesel fuel -- in various applications. Carbon monoxide, particulate matter, ozone precursors, and carbon dioxide are emphasized. 67 refs., 6 figs. , 8 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Model documentation report: Commercial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module is a simulation tool based upon economic and engineering relationships that models commercial sector energy demands at the nine Census Division level of detail for eleven distinct categories of commercial buildings. Commercial equipment selections are performed for the major fuels of electricity, natural gas, and distillate fuel, for the major services of space heating, space cooling, water heating, ventilation, cooking, refrigeration, and lighting. The algorithm also models demand for the minor fuels of residual oil, liquefied petroleum gas, steam coal, motor gasoline, and kerosene, the renewable fuel sources of wood and municipal solid waste, and the minor services of office equipment. Section 2 of this report discusses the purpose of the model, detailing its objectives, primary input and output quantities, and the relationship of the Commercial Module to the other modules of the NEMS system. Section 3 of the report describes the rationale behind the model design, providing insights into further assumptions utilized in the model development process to this point. Section 3 also reviews alternative commercial sector modeling methodologies drawn from existing literature, providing a comparison to the chosen approach. Section 4 details the model structure, using graphics and text to illustrate model flows and key computations.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Modeling diffusion of electrical appliances in the residential sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency Standards in the Residential Electricity Sector.France. USDOE (2001). Residential Energy Consumption Survey,long-term response of residential cooling energy demand to

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Liberalization in the Water Sector: Three leading models.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the pervasive changes in other infrastructure sectors, one must note the remarkably slow pace of reform in the water sector. Moreover, the most systematic reforms until now have been implemented in developed . By reform, we mean substantial changes in decision rights, changes that modify the governance and in many

Boyer, Edmond

51

Modeling diffusion of electrical appliances in the residential sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a methodology for modeling residential appliance uptake as a function of root macroeconomic drivers. The analysis concentrates on four major energy end uses in the residential sector: refrigerators, washing machines, televisions and air conditioners. The model employs linear regression analysis to parameterize appliance ownership in terms of household income, urbanization and electrification rates according to a standard binary choice (logistic) function. The underlying household appliance ownership data are gathered from a variety of sources including energy consumption and more general standard of living surveys. These data span a wide range of countries, including many developing countries for which appliance ownership is currently low, but likely to grow significantly over the next decades as a result of economic development. The result is a 'global' parameterization of appliance ownership rates as a function of widely available macroeconomic variables for the four appliances studied, which provides a reliable basis for interpolation where data are not available, and forecasting of ownership rates on a global scale. The main value of this method is to form the foundation of bottom-up energy demand forecasts, project energy-related greenhouse gas emissions, and allow for the construction of detailed emissions mitigation scenarios.

McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

2009-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

52

Nuclear Energy R&D Imperative 3: Enable a Transition Away from Fossil Fuel in the Transportation and Industrial Sectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As described in the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Nuclear Energy R&D Roadmap, nuclear energy can play a significant role in supplying energy for a growing economy while reducing both our dependence on foreign energy supplies and emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. The industrial and transportation sectors are responsible for more than half of the greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S., and imported oil supplies 70% of the energy used in the transportation sector. It is therefore important to examine the various ways nuclear energy can facilitate a transition away from fossil fuels to secure environmentally sustainable production and use of energy in the transportation and manufacturing industry sectors. Imperative 3 of the Nuclear Energy R&D Roadmap, entitled “Enable a Transition Away from Fossil Fuels by Producing Process Heat for use in the Transportation and Industrial Sectors”, addresses this need. This document presents an Implementation Plan for R&D efforts related to this imperative. The expanded use of nuclear energy beyond the electrical grid will contribute significantly to overcoming the three inter-linked energy challenges facing U.S. industry: the rising and volatile prices for premium fossil fuels such as oil and natural gas, dependence on foreign sources for these fuels, and the risks of climate change resulting from carbon emissions. Nuclear energy could be used in the industrial and transportation sectors to: • Generate high temperature process heat and electricity to serve industrial needs including the production of chemical feedstocks for use in manufacturing premium fuels and fertilizer products, • Produce hydrogen for industrial processes and transportation fuels, and • Provide clean water for human consumption by desalination and promote wastewater treatment using low-grade nuclear heat as a useful additional benefit. Opening new avenues for nuclear energy will significantly enhance our nation’s energy security through more effective utilization of our country’s resources while simultaneously providing economic stability and growth (through predictable energy prices and high value jobs), in an environmentally sustainable and secure manner (through lower land and water use, and decreased byproduct emissions). The reduction in imported oil will also increase the retention of wealth within the U.S. economy while still supporting economic growth. Nuclear energy is the only non-fossil fuel that has been demonstrated to reliably supply energy for a growing industrial economy.

David Petti; J. Stephen Herring

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Modeling updates in the Transportation sector  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquidsYear JanYear Jan FebNaturalWorking Group1 st

54

A historical view and proposal analysis of the strategic role of the transportation sector in the economic development of post-war Liberia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis examines the proposals for building and improving the transportation sector in Liberia, primarily the roads while providing immediate social opportunities and employment for many of the poor in Liberia. As ...

Kwame Corkrum, Ellen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Ecological Modelling 192 (2006) 143159 Nitrogen transformation and transport modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model; Transformation; Transport; Nitrification; Denitrification; RT3D 1. Introduction Nitrogen of this paper are to develop a nitro- gen transport and transformation model for saturated groundwater systemsEcological Modelling 192 (2006) 143­159 Nitrogen transformation and transport modeling

Clement, Prabhakar

56

SATURATED ZONE FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODEL ABSTRACTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the saturated zone (SZ) flow and transport model abstraction task is to provide radionuclide-transport simulation results for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) calculations. This task includes assessment of uncertainty in parameters that pertain to both groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in the models used for this purpose. This model report documents the following: (1) The SZ transport abstraction model, which consists of a set of radionuclide breakthrough curves at the accessible environment for use in the TSPA-LA simulations of radionuclide releases into the biosphere. These radionuclide breakthrough curves contain information on radionuclide-transport times through the SZ. (2) The SZ one-dimensional (I-D) transport model, which is incorporated in the TSPA-LA model to simulate the transport, decay, and ingrowth of radionuclide decay chains in the SZ. (3) The analysis of uncertainty in groundwater-flow and radionuclide-transport input parameters for the SZ transport abstraction model and the SZ 1-D transport model. (4) The analysis of the background concentration of alpha-emitting species in the groundwater of the SZ.

B.W. ARNOLD

2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

57

RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT MODELS UNDER AMBIENT CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this model report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) radionuclide transport model, which evaluates, by means of three-dimensional numerical models, the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the UZ, under ambient conditions, from the repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

S. Magnuson

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this report is to provide estimates of volumes and development costs of known nonassociated gas reserves in selected, potentially important supplier nations, using a standard set of costing algorithms and conventions. Estimates of undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves and the cost of drilling development wells, production equipment, gas processing facilities, and pipeline construction are made at the individual field level. A discounted cash-flow model of production, investment, and expenses is used to estimate the present value cost of developing each field on a per-thousand-cubic-foot (Mcf) basis. These gas resource cost estimates for individual accumulations (that is, fields or groups of fields) then were aggregated into country-specific price-quantity curves. These curves represent the cost of developing and transporting natural gas to an export point suitable for tanker shipments or to a junction with a transmission line. The additional costs of LNG or methanol conversion are not included. A brief summary of the cost of conversion to methanol and transportation to the United States is contained in Appendix D: Implications of Gas Development Costs for Methanol Conversion.

none,

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

To appear in International Journal of Hydrogen Energy 1 Sustainable Convergence of Electricity and Transport Sectors in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

grid investments such as new power generation installations. Keywords: Hydrogen economy, fuel cell sector based on fuel cell vehicles (FCVs). A comprehensive robust optimization planning model AFV Alternative-Fuel Vehicle. FCV Fuel Cell Vehicle. GV Gasoline Vehicle. HHV Higher Heating Value

Cañizares, Claudio A.

60

Modeling regional transportation demand in China and the impacts of a national carbon constraint  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate and energy policy in China will have important and uneven impacts on the country’s regionally heterogeneous transport system. In order to simulate these impacts, transport sector detail is added to a multi-sector, ...

Kishimoto, Paul

2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation sector model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Potential for Energy-Efficient Technologies to Reduce Carbon Emissions in the United States: Transport Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The world is searching for a meaningful answer to the likelihood that the continued build-up of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will cause significant changes in the earth`s climate. If there is to be a solution, technology must play a central role. This paper presents the results of an assessment of the potential for cost-effective technological changes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the U.S. transportation sector by the year 2010. Other papers in this session address the same topic for buildings and industry. U.S.transportation energy use stood at 24.4 quadrillion Btu (Quads) in 1996, up 2 percent over 1995 (U.S. DOE/EIA, 1997, table 2.5). Transportation sector carbon dioxide emissions amounted to 457.2 million metric tons of carbon (MmtC) in 1995, almost one third of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions (U.S. DOE/EIA,1996a, p. 12). Transport`s energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions are growing, apparently at accelerating rates as energy efficiency improvements appear to be slowing to a halt. Cost-effective and nearly cost-effective technologies have enormous potential to slow and even reverse the growth of transport`s CO{sub 2} emissions, but technological changes will take time and are not likely to occur without significant, new public policy initiatives. Absent new initiatives, we project that CO{sub 2} emissions from transport are likely to grow to 616 MmtC by 2010, and 646 MmtC by 2015. An aggressive effort to develop and implement cost-effective technologies that are more efficient and fuels that are lower in carbon could reduce emissions by about 12% in 2010 and 18% in 2015, versus the business-as- usual projection. With substantial luck, leading to breakthroughs in key areas, reductions over the BAU case of 17% in 2010 and 25% in 2015,might be possible. In none of these case are CO{sub 2} emissions reduced to 1990 levels by 2015.

Greene, D.L.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Global Climate Change, Developing Countries and Transport Sector Options in South Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Global Climate Change: Developing Countries and Transporton Global Climate Change: Developing Countries and Transporton Global Climate Change: Developing Countries and Transport

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Model documentation report: Commercial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. This report serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1)). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the US Commercial Building Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the US Commercial Building Sector to Support and continuing development of a model of time varying energy consumption in the US commercial building stock targeting very low future energy consumption in the building stock. Model use has highlighted the scale

65

Model documentation report: Industrial sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of the NEMS Industrial Model for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects. The NEMS Industrial Demand Model is a dynamic accounting model, bringing together the disparate industries and uses of energy in those industries, and putting them together in an understandable and cohesive framework. The Industrial Model generates mid-term (up to the year 2015) forecasts of industrial sector energy demand as a component of the NEMS integrated forecasting system. From the NEMS system, the Industrial Model receives fuel prices, employment data, and the value of industrial output. Based on the values of these variables, the Industrial Model passes back to the NEMS system estimates of consumption by fuel types.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The U. S. transportation sector in the year 2030: results of a two-part Delphi survey.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two-part Delphi Survey was given to transportation experts attending the Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy in August, 2011. The survey asked respondents about trends in the US transportation sector in 2030. Topics included: alternative vehicles, high speed rail construction, rail freight transportation, average vehicle miles traveled, truck versus passenger car shares, vehicle fuel economy, and biofuels in different modes. The survey consisted of two rounds -- both asked the same set of seven questions. In the first round, respondents were given a short introductory paragraph about the topic and asked to use their own judgment in their responses. In the second round, the respondents were asked the same questions, but were also given results from the first round as guidance. The survey was sponsored by Argonne National Lab (ANL), the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL), and implemented by University of California at Davis, Institute of Transportation Studies. The survey was part of the larger Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project run by the Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Of the 206 invitation letters sent, 94 answered all questions in the first round (105 answered at least one question), and 23 of those answered all questions in the second round. 10 of the 23 second round responses were at a discussion section at Asilomar, while the remaining were online. Means and standard deviations of responses from Round One and Two are given in Table 1 below. One main purpose of Delphi surveys is to reduce the variance in opinions through successive rounds of questioning. As shown in Table 1, the standard deviations of 25 of the 30 individual sub-questions decreased between Round One and Round Two, but the decrease was slight in most cases.

Morrison, G.; Stephens, T.S. (Energy Systems); (Univ. of California at Davis); (ES)

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

67

Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports according to Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Integration of renewable energy into the transport and electricity sectors through V2G  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keywords: V2G Vehicle to grid Energy system analysis Sustainable energy systems Electric vehicle EV for electricity, transport and heat, includes hourly fluctuations in human needs and the environment (wind energy systems allows integration of much higher levels of wind electricity without excess electric

Firestone, Jeremy

69

Industrial Sector Energy Efficiency Modeling (ISEEM) Framework Documentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model Part I, Energy Technology Systems Analysis Programme,A Report of the Energy Technology Systems Analysis Project,Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment

Karali, Nihan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Phenomenology of the minimal B ? L Model: the Higgs sector at the Large Hadron Collider and future linear colliders.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis is devoted to the study of the phenomenology of the Higgs sector of the minimal B ?L extension of the Standard Model at… (more)

Pruna, Giovanni Marco

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Statewide and Electricity-Sector Models for Economic Assessments of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

economic models applied to such diverse fields as climate change policy, alternative- fueled vehicles, fuel Economic Research Organization and Affiliate Faculty with the Public Policy Center UHM. Paul Bernstein, Ph....................................................................................................................... 6 2. The Hawaii Computable General Equilibrium Model (H-CGE)............................ 8 2.a. Data

72

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Considerable research has focused on energy efficiency and fuel substitution options for light-duty vehicles, while much less attention has been given to medium- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, aircraft, marine vessels, trains, pipeline, and off-road equipment. This report brings together the salient findings from an extensive review of literature on future energy efficiency options for these non-light-duty modes. Projected activity increases to 2050 are combined with forecasts of overall fuel efficiency improvement potential to estimate the future total petroleum and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current levels. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Vyas, A. D.; Patel, D. M.; Bertram, K. M.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Decision Models for Bulk Energy Transportation Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mouth generation at Powder River Basin · How much impact would 25% wind penetration have on price ? 2 What is modeled · spatial & temporal · energy flows · nodal prices (fuel & elec) · SO2, allowance price1 Decision Models for Bulk Energy Transportation Networks Electrical Engineering Professor Jim Mc

Tesfatsion, Leigh

74

Disentangling dark sector models using weak lensing statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform multi-plane ray-tracing using the GLAMER gravitational lensing code within high-resolution light-cones extracted from the CoDECS simulations: a suite of cosmological runs featuring a coupling between Dark Energy and Cold Dark Matter. We show that the presence of the coupling is evident not only in the redshift evolution of the normalisation of the convergence power spectrum, but also in differences in non-linear structure formation with respect to {\\Lambda}CDM. Using a tomographic approach under the assumption of a {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology, we demonstrate that weak lensing measurements would result in a {\\sigma}8 value that changes with the source redshift if the true underlying cosmology is a coupled Dark Energy one. This provides a generic null test for these types of models. We also find that different models of coupled Dark Energy can show either an enhanced or a suppressed correlation between convergence maps with differing source redshifts as compared to {\\Lambda}CDM. This would provide a direc...

Giocoli, Carlo; Baldi, Marco; Meneghetti, Massimo; Moscardini, Lauro; Petkova, Margarita; -,; Astronomia, Dipartimento di Fisica e; di Bologna, Alma Mater Studiorum Università; di Bologna, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico; di Bologna, INFN - Sezione; Université, Aix Marseille; CNRS,; LAM,; France,; Laboratory, Jet Propulsion; Physics, Department of; Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet),

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Distributed Energy: Modeling Penetration in Industrial Sector Over the Long-Term  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributed Energy: Modeling Penetration in Industrial Sector over the Long-Term Lorna Greening, Private Consultant, Los Alamos, NM Distributed energy (DE) sources provide a number of benefits when utilized. For industrial facilities... and the generation of steam. Within the framework of a US energy system model (MARKAL using the assumptions underlying AEO 2005), where all sources of energy supply and demand are depicted, the potential penetration of DE options is evaluated. The industrial...

Greening, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988 (Public Law 100-494), Section 400EE, states that the Secretary of Energy ...shall study methanol plants, including the costs and practicability of such plants that are (A) capable of utilizing current domestic supplies of unutilized natural gas; (B) relocatable; or (C) suitable for natural gas to methanol conversion by natural gas distribution companies...'' The purpose of this report is to characterize unutilized gas within the lower 48 states and to perform an economic analysis of methanol plants required by the act. The approach with regard to unutilized lower 48 gas is to (1) compare the costs of converting such gas to methanol against the expected price of gasoline over the next 20 years, and (2) compare the economics of converting such gas to methanol against the economics of using the gas as a pipeline-transported fuel. This study concludes that remote gas and low-Btu gas generally cannot be converted to methanol at costs near the expected competitive value of gasoline because of the poor economies of scale of small methanol plants.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Climate Impact of Transportation A Model Comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transportation contributes to a significant and rising share of global energy use and GHG emissions. Therefore modeling future travel demand, its fuel use, and resulting CO2 emission is highly relevant for climate change mitigation. In this study we compare the baseline projections for global service demand (passenger-kilometers, ton-kilometers), fuel use, and CO2 emissions of five different global transport models using harmonized input assumptions on income and population. For four models we also evaluate the impact of a carbon tax. All models project a steep increase in service demand over the century. Technology is important for limiting energy consumption and CO2 emissions, but quite radical changes in the technology mix are required to stabilize or reverse the trend. While all models project liquid fossil fuels dominating up to 2050, they differ regarding the use of alternative fuels (natural gas, hydrogen, biofuels, and electricity), because of different fuel price projections. The carbon tax of US$200/tCO2 in 2050 stabilizes or reverses global emission growth in all models. Besides common findings many differences in the model assumptions and projections indicate room for improvement in modeling and empirical description of the transport system.

Girod, Bastien; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Grahn, Maria; Kitous, Alban; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Model for assessing bronchial mucus transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors propose a scheme for the assessment of regional mucus transport using inhaled Tc-99m aerosol particles and quantitative analysis of serial gamma-camera images. The model treats input to inner and intermediate lung regions as the total of initial deposition there plus subsequent transport into these regions from more peripheral airways. It allows for interregional differences in the proportion of particles deposited on the mucus-bearing conducting airways, and does not require a gamma image 24 hr after particle inhalation. Instead, distribution of particles reaching the respiratory bronchioles or alveoli is determined from a Kr-81m ventilation image, while the total amount of such deposition is obtained from 24-hr Tc-99m retention measured with a sensitive counter system. The model is applicable to transport by mucociliary action or by cough, and has been tested in ten normal and ten asthmatic subjects.

Agnew, J.E.; Bateman, J.R.M.; Pavia, D.; Clarke, S.W.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF) model (18-sector version)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new 18-sector Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF) model is designed for convenient study of future industrial energy consumption, taking into account the composition of production, energy prices, and certain kinds of policy initiatives. Electricity and aggregate fossil fuels are modeled. Changes in energy intensity in each sector are driven by autonomous technological improvement (price-independent trend), the opportunity for energy-price-sensitive improvements, energy price expectations, and investment behavior. Although this decision-making framework involves more variables than the simplest econometric models, it enables direct comparison of an econometric approach with conservation supply curves from detailed engineering analysis. It also permits explicit consideration of a variety of policy approaches other than price manipulation. The model is tested in terms of historical data for nine manufacturing sectors, and parameters are determined for forecasting purposes. Relatively uniform and satisfactory parameters are obtained from this analysis. In this report, LIEF is also applied to create base-case and demand-side management scenarios to briefly illustrate modeling procedures and outputs.

Ross, M.H. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics); Thimmapuram, P.; Fisher, R.E.; Maciorowski, W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Assessment of Historic Trend in Mobility and Energy Use in India Transportation Sector Using Bottom-up Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transportation mobility in India has increased significantly in the past decades. From 1970 to 2000, motorized mobility (passenger-km) has risen by 888%, compared with an 88% population growth (Singh,2006). This contributed to many energy and environmental issues, and an energy strategy incorporates efficiency improvement and other measures needs to be designed. Unfortunately, existing energy data do not provide information on driving forces behind energy use and sometime show large inconsistencies. Many previous studies address only a single transportation mode such as passenger road travel; did not include comprehensive data collection or analysis has yet been done, or lack detail on energy demand by each mode and fuel mix. The current study will fill a considerable gap in current efforts, develop a data base on all transport modes including passenger air and water, and freight in order to facilitate the development of energy scenarios and assess significance of technology potential in a global climate change model. An extensive literature review and data collection has been done to establish the database with breakdown of mobility, intensity, distance, and fuel mix of all transportation modes. Energy consumption was estimated and compared with aggregated transport consumption reported in IEA India transportation energy data. Different scenarios were estimated based on different assumptions on freight road mobility. Based on the bottom-up analysis, we estimated that the energy consumption from 1990 to 2000 increased at an annual growth rate of 7% for the mid-range road freight growth case and 12% for the high road freight growth case corresponding to the scenarios in mobility, while the IEA data only shows a 1.7% growth rate in those years.

Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation sector model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ISTUM PC: industrial sector technology use model for the IBM-PC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A project to improve and enhance the Industrial Sector Technology Use Model (ISTUM) was originated in the summer of 1983. The project had dix identifiable objectives: update the data base; improve run-time efficiency; revise the reference base case; conduct case studies; provide technical and promotional seminars; and organize a service bureau. This interim report describes which of these objectives have been met and which tasks remain to be completed. The most dramatic achievement has been in the area of run-time efficiency. From a model that required a large proportion of the total resources of a mainframe computer and a great deal of effort to operate, the current version of the model (ISTUM-PC) runs on an IBM Personal Computer. The reorganization required for the model to run on a PC has additional advantages: the modular programs are somewhat easier to understand and the data base is more accessible and easier to use. A simple description of the logic of the model is given in this report. To generate the necessary funds for completion of the model, a multiclient project is proposed. This project will extend the industry coverage to all the industrial sectors, including the construction of process flow models for chemicals and petroleum refining. The project will also calibrate this model to historical data and construct a base case and alternative scenarios. The model will be delivered to clients and training provided. 2 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

Roop, J.M.; Kaplan, D.T.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Carnol process for CO{sub 2} mitigation from power plants and the transportation sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) mitigation process is developed which converts waste CO{sub 2}, primarily from coal-fired power plant stack gases, to methanol for use as a liquid fuel and a coproduct carbon for use as a materials commodity. The Carnol process chemistry consists of methane decomposition to produce hydrogen which is catalytically reacted with the recovered waste CO{sub 2} to produce methanol. The carbon is either stored or sold. A process design is modeled, and mass and energy balances are presented as a function of reactor pressure and temperature conditions. The Carnol process is a viable alternative to sequestering CO{sub 2} in the ocean for purposes of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions from coal burning power plants. Over 90% of the CO{sub 2} from the coal burning plant is used in the process which results in a net CO{sub 2} emission reduction of over 90% compared to that obtained for conventional methanol production by steam reforming of methane. Methanol, as an alternative liquid fuel for automotive engines and for fuel cells, achieves additional CO{sub 2} emission reduction benefits. The economics of the process is greatly enhanced when carbon can be sold as a materials commodity. The process design and economics could possibly be achieved by developing a molten metal (tin) methane decomposition reactor and a liquid phase, slurry catalyst, methanol synthesis reactor directly using the solvent saturated with CO{sub 2} scrubbed from the power plant stack gases. The application of CO{sub 2} mitigation technologies, such as the Carnol process, depends to some extent, on how serious the country and the world takes the global greenhouse gas warming problem.

Steinberg, M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The Carnol process for CO{sub 2} mitigation from power plants and the transportation sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A CO{sub 2} mitigation process is developed which converts waste CO{sub 2}, primarily recovered from coal-fired power plant stack gases with natural gas, to produce methanol as a liquid fuel and coproduct carbon as a materials commodity. The Carnol process chemistry consists of methane decomposition to produce hydrogen which is catalytically reacted with the recovered waste CO{sub 2} to produce methanol. The carbon is either stored or sold as a materials commodity. A process design is modelled and mass and energy balances are presented as a function of reactor pressure and temperature conditions. The Carnol process is a viable alternative to sequestering CO{sub 2} in the ocean for purposes of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions from coal burning power plants. Over 90% of the CO{sub 2} from the coal burning plant is used in the process which results in a net CO{sub 2} emission reduction of over 90% compared to that obtained for conventional methanol production by steam reforming of methane. Methanol as an alternative liquid fuel for automotive engines and for fuel cells achieves additional CO{sub 2} emission reduction benefits. The economics of the process is greatly enhanced when carbon can be sold as a materials commodity. Improvement in process design and economics should be achieved by developing a molten metal (tin) methane decomposition reactor and a liquid phase, slurry catalyst, methanol synthesis reactor directly using the solvent saturated with CO{sub 2} scrubbed from the power plant stack gases. The benefits of the process warrant its further development.

Steinberg, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Large-Scale Utilization of Biomass Energy and Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in the Transport and Electricity Sectors under Stringent CO2 Concentration Limit Scenarios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the potential role of large scale, dedicated commercial biomass energy systems under global climate policies designed to meet atmospheric concentrations of CO2 at 400ppm and 450ppm by the end of the century. We use an integrated assessment model of energy and agriculture systems to show that, given a climate policy in which terrestrial carbon is appropriately valued equally with carbon emitted from the energy system, biomass energy has the potential to be a major component of achieving these low concentration targets. A key aspect of the research presented here is that the costs of processing and transporting biomass energy at much larger scales than current experience are explicitly incorporated into the modeling. From the scenario results, 120-160 EJ/year of biomass energy is produced globally by midcentury and 200-250 EJ/year by the end of this century. In the first half of the century, much of this biomass is from agricultural and forest residues, but after 2050 dedicated cellulosic biomass crops become the majority source, along with growing utilization of waste-to-energy. The ability to draw on a diverse set of biomass based feedstocks helps to reduce the pressure for drastic large-scale changes in land use and the attendant environmental, ecological, and economic consequences those changes would unleash. In terms of the conversion of bioenergy feedstocks into value added energy, this paper demonstrates that biomass is and will continue to be used to generate electricity as well as liquid transportation fuels. A particular focus of this paper is to show how climate policies and technology assumptions - especially the availability of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies - affect the decisions made about where the biomass is used in the energy system. The potential for net-negative electric sector emissions through the use of CCS with biomass feedstocks provides an attractive part of the solution for meeting stringent emissions constraints; we find that at carbon prices above 150$/tCO2, over 90% of biomass in the energy system is used in combination with CCS. Despite the higher technology costs of CCS, it is a very important tool in controlling the cost of meeting a target, offsetting the venting of CO2 from sectors of the energy system that may be more expensive to mitigate, such as oil use in transportation. CCS is also used heavily with other fuels such as coal and natural gas, and by 2095 a total of 1530 GtCO2 has been stored in deep geologic reservoirs. The paper also discusses the role of cellulosic ethanol and Fischer-Tropsch biomass derived transportation fuels as two representative conversion processes and shows that both technologies may be important contributors to liquid fuels production, with unique costs and emissions characteristics.

Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

85

Transport Analysis of Trace Tritium Experiments on JET using TRANSP Code and Comparison with Theory-Based Transport Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transport Analysis of Trace Tritium Experiments on JET using TRANSP Code and Comparison with Theory-Based Transport Models

86

Do homes that are more energy efficient consume less energy?: A structural equation model for England's residential sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy consumption from the residential sector is a complex sociotechnical problem that can be explained using a combination of physical, demographic and behavioural characteristics of a dwelling and its occupants. A structural equation model (SEM...

Kelly, Scott

87

Multimodal Transport Modeling for Nairobi, Kenya: Insights and Recommendations with an Evidence-Based Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multimodal Transport Modeling for Nairobi, Kenya: Insights and Recommendations with an Evidence-5 August 2009 #12;Multimodal Transport Modeling for Nairobi, Kenya: Insights and Recommendations

California at Berkeley, University of

88

A smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for reactive transport...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for reactive transport and mineral precipitation in porous and fractured porous media. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for reactive...

89

Essays on the Effect of Climate Change on Agriculture and Agricultural Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate change impacts on grain transportation flows, this study employs two modeling systems, a U.S. agricultural sector model and an international grain transportation model, with linked inputs/outputs. The main findings are that under climate change: 1...

Attavanich, Witsanu

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

90

Modeling Carrier Behavior in Sequential Auction Transportation Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Carrier Behavior in Sequential Auction Transportation Markets M. A. Figliozzi, University ______________________________________________________________________________ August 10-15, 2003 2 Title: Modeling Carrier Behavior in Sequential Auction Transportation Markets Miguel Phone: 301-405-0752 Fax: 301-405-2585 eMail: masmah@umd.edu Abstract Online markets for transportation

Bertini, Robert L.

91

Modeling Climate-Water Impacts on Electricity Sector Capacity Expansion: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change has the potential to exacerbate water availability concerns for thermal power plant cooling, which is responsible for 41% of U.S. water withdrawals. This analysis describes an initial link between climate, water, and electricity systems using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) electricity system capacity expansion model. Average surface water projections from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 3 (CMIP3) data are applied to surface water rights available to new generating capacity in ReEDS, and electric sector growth is compared with and without climate-influenced water rights. The mean climate projection has only a small impact on national or regional capacity growth and water use because most regions have sufficient unappropriated or previously retired water rights to offset climate impacts. Climate impacts are notable in southwestern states that purchase fewer water rights and obtain a greater share from wastewater and other higher-cost water resources. The electric sector climate impacts demonstrated herein establish a methodology to be later exercised with more extreme climate scenarios and a more rigorous representation of legal and physical water availability.

Cohen, S. M.; Macknick, J.; Averyt, K.; Meldrum, J.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of coupling to the electricity sector. The chapter examinesfrom the transportation and electricity sectors together.transportation and electricity sectors will likely interact

Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

FTT:Power : A global model of the power sector with induced technological change and natural resource depletion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work introduces a model of Future Technology Transformations for the power sector (FTT:Power), a representation of global power systems based on market competition, induced technological change (ITC) and natural resource use and depletion. It is the first component of a family of sectoral bottom-up models of technology, designed for integration into the global macroeconometric model E3MG. ITC occurs as a result of technological learning produced by cumulative investment and leads to highly nonlinear, irreversible and path dependent technological transitions. The model uses a dynamic coupled set of logistic differential equations. As opposed to traditional bottom-up energy models based on systems optimisation, such differential equations offer an appropriate treatment of the times and structure of change involved in sectoral technology transformations, as well as a much reduced computational load. Resource use and depletion are represented by local cost-supply curves, which give rise to different regional...

Mercure, J -F

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Documentation of TRU biological transport model (BIOTRAN)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inclusive of Appendices, this document describes the purpose, rationale, construction, and operation of a biological transport model (BIOTRAN). This model is used to predict the flow of transuranic elements (TRU) through specified plant and animal environments using biomass as a vector. The appendices are: (A) Flows of moisture, biomass, and TRU; (B) Intermediate variables affecting flows; (C) Mnemonic equivalents (code) for variables; (D) Variable library (code); (E) BIOTRAN code (Fortran); (F) Plants simulated; (G) BIOTRAN code documentation; (H) Operating instructions for BIOTRAN code. The main text is presented with a specific format which uses a minimum of space, yet is adequate for tracking most relationships from their first appearance to their formulation in the code. Because relationships are treated individually in this manner, and rely heavily on Appendix material for understanding, it is advised that the reader familiarize himself with these materials before proceeding with the main text.

Gallegos, A.F.; Garcia, B.J.; Sutton, C.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Minimal Scalar Sector of 3-3-1 Models without Exotic Electric Charges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the minimal set of Higgs scalars, for models based on the local gauge group $SU(3)_c \\otimes SU(3)_L \\otimes U(1)_X$ which do not contain particles with exotic electric charges. We show that only two Higgs $SU(3)_L$ triplets are needed in order to properly break the symmetry. The exact tree-level scalar mass matrices resulting from symmetry breaking are calculated at the minimum of the most general scalar potential, and the gauge bosons are obtained, together with their couplings to the physical scalar fields. We show how the scalar sector introduced is enough to produce masses for fermions in a particular model which is an $E_6$ subgroup. By using experimental results we constrain the scale of new physics to be above 1.3 TeV.

William A. Ponce; Yithsbey Giraldo; Luis A. Sanchez

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Phenomenology of the minimal $B-L$ Model: the Higgs sector at the Large Hadron Collider and future Linear Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This Thesis is devoted to the study of the phenomenology of the Higgs sector of the minimal $B-L$ extension of the Standard Model at present and future colliders. Firstly, the motivations that call for the minimal $B-L$ extension are summarised. In addition, the model is analysed in its salient parts. Moreover, a detailed review of the phenomenological allowed Higgs sector parameter space is given. Finally, a complete survey of the distinctive Higgs boson signatures of the model at both the Large Hadron Collider and the future linear colliders is presented.

Giovanni Marco Pruna

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

97

Singular Vector Analysis for Atmospheric Chemical Transport Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are presented for a simulation of atmospheric pollution in East Asia in March 2001. The singular valuesSingular Vector Analysis for Atmospheric Chemical Transport Models Wenyuan Liao and Adrian Sandu for atmospheric chemical transport models. The distinguishing feature of these models is the presence of stiff

Sandu, Adrian

98

ON THE RECOVERY OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS IN GROUNDWATER MODELLING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON THE RECOVERY OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS IN GROUNDWATER MODELLING IAN KNOWLES AND AIMIN YAN. Introduction Saturated flow and single phase solute transport in confined ground- water systems are modelled one has to resort to indirect, or inverse, techniques to populate the model. In a groundwater system

Knowles, Ian W.

99

ON THE RECOVERY OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS IN GROUNDWATER MODELLING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON THE RECOVERY OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS IN GROUNDWATER MODELLING IAN KNOWLES AND AIMIN YAN. Introduction Saturated flow and single phase solute transport in confined ground­ water systems are modelled to resort to indirect, or inverse, techniques to populate the model. In a groundwater system one

Knowles, Ian W.

100

Transportation Sector Market Transition: Using History and Geography to Envision Possible Hydrogen Infrastructure Development and Inform Public Policy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the challenges to building an infrastructure for hydrogen, for use as transportation fuel. Deployment technologies and policies that could quicken deployment are addressed.

Brown, E.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation sector model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Testing, and Design Optimization Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization This presentation, which focuses on...

102

Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Testing and Design Optimization Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization Part of a 100 million fuel cell award...

103

Modeling Oxygen Transport in Three-Dimensional Capillary Networks.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of this thesis was to examine how the use of real 3-dimensional (3D) capillary network geometries affect models of oxygen transport to tissue.… (more)

Fraser, Graham M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Model documentation report: Industrial sector demand module of the national energy modeling system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of the NEMS Industrial Model for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirements of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its model. Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

A Model for the Public Sector to Foster Sustainable Business Development .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Businesses play an important role in the economic, environmental and social health of our communities. The public sector can foster sustainable business development through economic… (more)

Becker, Brie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Adaptive Methods for Modelling Transport Processes in Fractured Subsurface Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ discrete Galerkin method applying finite differences for the discretization in time and the StreamlineAdaptive Methods for Modelling Transport Processes in Fractured Subsurface Systems 3rd­adaptive methods for modelling transport processes in fractured rock. As a simplification, ideal tracers

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

107

Turbulent Flow and Transport Modeling by Long Waves and Currents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation presents models for turbulent flow and transport by currents and long waves in large domain. From the Navier-Stokes equations, a fully nonlinear depth-integrated equation model for weakly dispersive, turbulent and rotational flow...

Kim, Dae Hong

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

108

ImSET 3.1: Impact of Sector Energy Technologies Model Description and User's Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 3.1 version of the Impact of Sector Energy Technologies (ImSET) model represents the next generation of the previously-built ImSET model (ImSET 2.0) that was developed in 2005 to estimate the macroeconomic impacts of energy-efficient technology in buildings. In particular, a special-purpose version of the Benchmark National Input-Output (I-O) model was designed specifically to estimate the national employment and income effects of the deployment of Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)–developed energy-saving technologies. In comparison with the previous versions of the model, this version features the use of the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis 2002 national input-output table and the central processing code has been moved from the FORTRAN legacy operating environment to a modern C++ code. ImSET is also easier to use than extant macroeconomic simulation models and incorporates information developed by each of the EERE offices as part of the requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act. While it does not include the ability to model certain dynamic features of markets for labor and other factors of production featured in the more complex models, for most purposes these excluded features are not critical. The analysis is credible as long as the assumption is made that relative prices in the economy would not be substantially affected by energy efficiency investments. In most cases, the expected scale of these investments is small enough that neither labor markets nor production cost relationships should seriously affect national prices as the investments are made. The exact timing of impacts on gross product, employment, and national wage income from energy efficiency investments is not well-enough understood that much special insight can be gained from the additional dynamic sophistication of a macroeconomic simulation model. Thus, we believe that this version of ImSET is a cost-effective solution to estimating the economic impacts of the development of energy-efficient technologies.

Scott, Michael J.; Livingston, Olga V.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Roop, Joseph M.; Schultz, Robert W.

2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

109

Reduced Fast Ion Transport Model For The Tokamak Transport Code TRANSP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fast ion transport models presently implemented in the tokamak transport code TRANSP [R. J. Hawryluk, in Physics of Plasmas Close to Thermonuclear Conditions, CEC Brussels, 1 , 19 (1980)] are not capturing important aspects of the physics associated with resonant transport caused by instabilities such as Toroidal Alfv#19;en Eigenmodes (TAEs). This work describes the implementation of a fast ion transport model consistent with the basic mechanisms of resonant mode-particle interaction. The model is formulated in terms of a probability distribution function for the particle's steps in phase space, which is consistent with the MonteCarlo approach used in TRANSP. The proposed model is based on the analysis of fast ion response to TAE modes through the ORBIT code [R. B. White et al., Phys. Fluids 27 , 2455 (1984)], but it can be generalized to higher frequency modes (e.g. Compressional and Global Alfv#19;en Eigenmodes) and to other numerical codes or theories.

Podesta,, Mario; Gorelenkova, Marina; White, Roscoe

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

110

ab initio Electronic Transport Model with Explicit Solution to the Linearized Boltzmann Transport Equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accurate models of carrier transport are essential for describing the electronic properties of semiconductor materials. To the best of our knowledge, the current models following the framework of the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) either rely heavily on experimental data (i.e., semi-empirical), or utilize simplifying assumptions, such as the constant relaxation time approximation (BTE-cRTA). While these models offer valuable physical insights and accurate calculations of transport properties in some cases, they often lack sufficient accuracy -- particularly in capturing the correct trends with temperature and carrier concentration. We present here a general transport model for calculating low-field electrical drift mobility and Seebeck coefficient of n-type semiconductors, by explicitly considering all relevant physical phenomena (i.e. elastic and inelastic scattering mechanisms). We first rewrite expressions for the rates of elastic scattering mechanisms, in terms of ab initio properties, such as the ban...

Faghaninia, Alireza; Lo, Cynthia S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Modeling the impact of complexity on transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis aimed to understand the drivers of total transportation costs during supply chain complexity events, in particular new product launches, in a fast moving consumer goods company in the United States. The research ...

Fernandez, Jose A. (Jose Antonio Fernandez Chavira)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Modeling atmospheric deposition using a stochastic transport model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An advanced stochastic transport model has been modified to include the removal mechanisms of dry and wet deposition. Time-dependent wind and turbulence fields are generated with a prognostic mesoscale numerical model and are used to advect and disperse individually released particles that are each assigned a mass. These particles are subjected to mass reduction in two ways depending on their physical location. Particles near the surface experience a decrease in mass using the concept of a dry deposition velocity, while the mass of particles located within areas of precipitation are depleted using a scavenging coefficient. Two levels of complexity are incorporated into the particle model. The simple case assumes constant values of dry deposition velocity and scavenging coefficient, while the more complex case varies the values according to meteorology, surface conditions, release material, and precipitation intensity. Instantaneous and cumulative dry and wet deposition are determined from the mass loss due to these physical mechanisms. A useful means of validating the model results is with data available from a recent accidental release of Cesium-137 from a steel-processing furnace in Algeciras, Spain in May, 1998. This paper describes the deposition modeling technique, as well as a comparison of simulated concentration and deposition with measurements taken for the Algeciras release.

Buckley, R.L.

1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

113

Technology investment decisions under uncertainty : a new modeling framework for the electric power sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effectively balancing existing technology adoption and new technology development is critical for successfully managing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the fossil-dominated electric power generation sector. The long ...

Santen, Nidhi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Scaling up and modeling for transport and flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& modélisation des écoulements de fluides en milieux poreux DUBROVNIK, CROATIA 13-16 OCTOBER 2008 BOOK for Transport and Flow in Porous Media Dubrovnik, Croatia, 13-16 October 2008 Book of abstracts #12;Contents and Modeling for Transport and Flow in Porous Media, held at Dubrovnik, Croatia, 13­16 October 2008

Rogina, Mladen

115

Development of a scalable model for predicting arsenic transport coupled with oxidation and adsorption reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modeling; Contaminant transport; Scaling; Numerical modeling 1. Introduction Management of groundwaterDevelopment of a scalable model for predicting arsenic transport coupled with oxidation is critical for predicting its transport dynamics in groundwater systems. We completed batch experiments

Clement, Prabhakar

116

Modeling spin magnetization transport in a spatially varying magnetic field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a framework for modeling the transport of any number of globally conserved quantities in any spatial configuration and apply it to obtain a model of magnetization transport for spin-systems that is valid in new regimes (including high-polarization). The framework allows an entropy function to define a model that explicitly respects the laws of thermodynamics. Three facets of the model are explored. First, it is expressed as nonlinear partial differential equations that are valid for the new regime of high dipole-energy and polarization. Second, the nonlinear model is explored in the limit of low dipole-energy (semi-linear), from which is derived a physical parameter characterizing separative magnetization transport (SMT). It is shown that the necessary and sufficient condition for SMT to occur is that the parameter is spatially inhomogeneous. Third, the high spin-temperature (linear) limit is shown to be equivalent to the model of nuclear spin transport of Genack and Redfield. Differences among the three forms of the model are illustrated by numerical solution with parameters corresponding to a magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) experiment. A family of analytic, steady-state solutions to the nonlinear equation is derived and shown to be the spin-temperature analog of the Langevin paramagnetic equation and Curie's law. Finally, we analyze the separative quality of magnetization transport, and a steady-state solution for the magnetization is shown to be compatible with Fenske's separative mass transport equation.

Rico A. R. Picone; Joseph L. Garbini; John A. Sidles

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

117

A fractional dispersion model for overland solute transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the kinematic-wave overland flow equation and a fractional dispersion-advection equation, a process-oriented, physically-based model is developed for overland solute transport. Two scenarios, one consisting of downslope and the other...

Deng, Zhi-Qiang; de Lima, M. Isabel P.; Singh, Vijay P.; de Lima, Jo??o L. M. P.

2006-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

118

Modelling Ammonium Transporters in Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Symbiosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transporter which exists in plants, viz. LjAMT1;1, our simulations support an hypothesis about why LjAMT2 potential as a natural plant This research is founded by the BioBITs Project (Converging Technologies 2007 to play a fundamen- tal role for plant mineral acquisition, which takes place in the arbuscular mycorrhiza

Troina, Angelo

119

Models for residential- and commercial-sector energy-conservation analysis: applications, limitations, and future potential. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews four of the major models used by the Department of Energy (DOE) for energy conservation analyses in the residential- and commercial-building sectors. The objective is to provide a critical analysis of how these models can serve as tools for DOE and its Conservation Policy Office in evaluating and quantifying their policy and program requirements. For this, the study brings together information on the models' analytical structure and their strengths and limitations in policy applications these are then employed to assess the most-effective role for each model in addressing future issues of buildings energy-conservation policy and analysis. The four models covered are: Oak Ridge Residential Energy Model; Micro Analysis of Transfers to Households/Comprehensive Human Resources Data System (MATH/CHRDS) Model; Oak Ridge Commercial Energy Model; and Brookhaven Buildings Energy Conservation Optimization Model (BECOM).

Cole, Henry E.; Fullen, Robert E.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Boltzmann-Langevin transport model for heavy-ion collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies exhibit catastrophic phenomena which requires descriptions based on stochastic transport models. First, the Boltzmann-Langevin model, which provides an example of such stochastic approaches, is briefly described. Then, a projection method for obtaining numerical solutions of the Boltzmann-Langevin equation is discussed. Finally, some applications of the model to heavy-ion collisions are presented.

Ayik, S. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States)]|[Joint Institute for Heavy-Ion Research, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation sector model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

EUROPEAN ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND DECARBONIZATION STRATEGIES BEYOND 2030 --A SECTORAL MULTI-MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EUROPEAN ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND DECARBONIZATION STRATEGIES BEYOND 2030 -- A SECTORAL MULTI-1800, USA **h.foerster@oeko.de Published 5 December 2013 Energy efficiency and decarbonization are important by improving energy efficiency, by at least 20%, and by investing in new and cleaner energy infrastructures

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

122

An Ab Initio Model of Electron Transport in Hematite (a-Fe2O3...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Ab Initio Model of Electron Transport in Hematite (a-Fe2O3) Basal Planes. An Ab Initio Model of Electron Transport in Hematite (a-Fe2O3) Basal Planes. Abstract: Transport of...

123

Global Transportation Roadmap Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to: navigation,GigaCreteInformation| Open EnergyTransportation

124

Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model ...

Locatelli, R.

125

Transport Phenomena in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes I. Modeling Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and optimization of fuel cells in a design and development environment. Kreuer et al.19 recently presented of ongoing efforts to develop more comprehensive compu- tational fuel cell model14-18 that allow analysis of the fundamental transport mechanisms. In the context of multidimensional fuel cell modeling, practical

Struchtrup, Henning

126

155: Numerical Models of Groundwater Flow and Transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

155: Numerical Models of Groundwater Flow and Transport EKKEHARD HOLZBECHER1 AND SHAUL SOREK2 1. #12;2402 GROUNDWATER Calibration as a task cannot be separated from the other tasks. Inverse modeling of the Negev, J. Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Sede Boker, Israel The article gives an introduction

Sorek, Shaul

127

Tungsten Transport in JET H-mode Plasmas in Hybrid Scenario, Experimental Observations and Modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tungsten Transport in JET H-mode Plasmas in Hybrid Scenario, Experimental Observations and Modelling

128

A three-dimensional model of microbial transport and biodegradation at the Schoolcraft, Michigan, site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dimensional reactive transport modeling of carbon tetrachloride (CT) bioremediation at the Schoolcraft site in western

129

Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

130

A Stochastic Model of Transport in Three-Dimensional Porous Media1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lee2 Modeling of solute transport remains a key issue in the area of groundwater contamination transport, non-Fickian dispersion, random walk, stochastic processes. INTRODUCTION Solute transport modelA Stochastic Model of Transport in Three-Dimensional Porous Media1 Cyril Fleurant2 and Jan van der

Boyer, Edmond

131

Allocating city space to multiple transportation modes: A new modeling approach consistent with the physics of transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Allocating city space to multiple transportation modes: A new modeling approach consistent with the physics of transport Eric J. Gonzales, Nikolas Geroliminis, Michael J. Cassidy and Carlos F. Daganzo WORKING PAPER UCB-ITS-VWP-2008-1 March 2008 #12;Allocating city space to multiple transportation modes

Kammen, Daniel M.

132

CHLORINATED SOLVENTS TRANSPORT AND NATURAL ATTENUATION MODELING IN GROUNDWATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte - France, fabrice.quiot@ineris.fr 2. ENVIROS, Spain S.L., Passeig de Rubi 29-31, 08197 Valldoreix - Spain, sjordana@enviros.biz 3. ANTEA, Direction Technique, 3 avenue Claude Guillemin in order to bring a better and common practice of the use of transport models concerning various pollutants

Boyer, Edmond

133

Targeted Observations for Atmospheric Chemistry and Transport Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for a simulation of atmospheric pollution in East Asia in March 2001 show that the optimal location of observations, targeted observations. 1 Introduction Our ability to anticipate and manage changes in atmospheric pollutantTargeted Observations for Atmospheric Chemistry and Transport Models Adrian Sandu Department

Sandu, Adrian

134

Reactive Transport Modeling and Geophysical Monitoring of Bioclogging at Reservoir Scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactive Transport Modeling and Geophysical Monitoring of Bioclogging at Reservoir Scale Vikranth scale using a combination of reactive transport modeling and geophysical imaging tools (EM & seismic Sacramento basin, California; the model well (Citizen Green #1) was characterized using sonic, electrical

Hubbard, Susan

135

A Microscopic Traffic Simulation Model for Transportation Planning in Georgios Papageorgiou, Pantelis Damianou, Andreas Pitsilides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Microscopic Traffic Simulation Model for Transportation Planning in Cyprus Georgios Papageorgiou. This paper presents the microscopic simulation model development of a major traffic network of Nicosia simulation model is developed and utilized for transportation planning. 1. Introduction The demand

Pitsillides, Andreas

136

Analytical model for flux saturation in sediment transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transport of sediment by a fluid along the surface is responsible for dune formation, dust entrainment and for a rich diversity of patterns on the bottom of oceans, rivers, and planetary surfaces. Most previous models of sediment transport have focused on the equilibrium (or saturated) particle flux. However, the morphodynamics of sediment landscapes emerging due to surface transport of sediment is controlled by situations out-of-equilibrium. In particular, it is controlled by the saturation length characterizing the distance it takes for the particle flux to reach a new equilibrium after a change in flow conditions. The saturation of mass density of particles entrained into transport and the relaxation of particle and fluid velocities constitute the main relevant relaxation mechanisms leading to saturation of the sediment flux. Here we present a theoretical model for sediment transport which, for the first time, accounts for both these relaxation mechanisms and for the different types of sediment entrainment prevailing under different environmental conditions. Our analytical treatment allows us to derive a closed expression for the saturation length of sediment flux, which is general and can thus be applied under different physical conditions.

T. Pähtz; E. J. R. Parteli; J. F. Kok; H. J. Herrmann

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

137

A completely solvable model with an infinite number of Dirac observables for a real sector of complexified Ashtekar gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a reduced model for a real sector of complexified Ashtekar gravity that does not correspond to a subset of Einstein's gravity but for which the programme of canonical quantization can be carried out completely, both, via the reduced phase space approach or along the lines of the algebraic quantization programme.\\\\ This model stands in a certain correspondence to the frequently treated cylindrically symmetric waves.\\\\ In contrast to other models that have been looked at up to now in terms of the new variables the reduced phase space is infinite dimensional while the scalar constraint is genuinely bilinear in the momenta.\\\\ The infinite number of Dirac observables can be expressed in compact and explicit form in terms of the original phase space variables.\\\\ They turn out, as expected, to be non-local and form naturally a set of countable cardinality.

T. Thiemann

1993-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

138

Multiscale modeling for fluid transport in nanosystems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomistic-scale behavior drives performance in many micro- and nano-fluidic systems, such as mircrofludic mixers and electrical energy storage devices. Bringing this information into the traditionally continuum models used for engineering analysis has proved challenging. This work describes one such approach to address this issue by developing atomistic-to-continuum multi scale and multi physics methods to enable molecular dynamics (MD) representations of atoms to incorporated into continuum simulations. Coupling is achieved by imposing constraints based on fluxes of conserved quantities between the two regions described by one of these models. The impact of electric fields and surface charges are also critical, hence, methodologies to extend finite-element (FE) MD electric field solvers have been derived to account for these effects. Finally, the continuum description can have inconsistencies with the coarse-grained MD dynamics, so FE equations based on MD statistics were derived to facilitate the multi scale coupling. Examples are shown relevant to nanofluidic systems, such as pore flow, Couette flow, and electric double layer.

Lee, Jonathan W.; Jones, Reese E.; Mandadapu, Kranthi Kiran; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Comb models for transport along spiny dendrites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This chapter is a contribution in the "Handbook of Applications of Chaos Theory" ed. by Prof. Christos H Skiadas. The chapter is organized as follows. First we study the statistical properties of combs and explain how to reduce the effect of teeth on the movement along the backbone as a waiting time distribution between consecutive jumps. Second, we justify an employment of a comb-like structure as a paradigm for further exploration of a spiny dendrite. In particular, we show how a comb-like structure can sustain the phenomenon of the anomalous diffusion, reaction-diffusion and L\\'evy walks. Finally, we illustrate how the same models can be also useful to deal with the mechanism of ta translocation wave / translocation waves of CaMKII and its propagation failure. We also present a brief introduction to the fractional integro-differentiation in appendix at the end of the chapter.

Méndez, V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers: radionuclide transport modeling for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SERATRA, a transient, two-dimensional (laterally-averaged) computer model of sediment-contaminant transport in rivers, satisfactorily resolved the distribution of sediment and radionuclide concentrations in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system in New York. By modeling the physical processes of advection, diffusion, erosion, deposition, and bed armoring, SERATRA routed three sediment size fractions, including cohesive soils, to simulate three dynamic flow events. In conjunction with the sediment transport, SERATRA computed radionuclide levels in dissolved, suspended sediment, and bed sediment forms for four radionuclides (/sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu, and /sup 3/H). By accounting for time-dependent sediment-radionuclide interaction in the water column and bed, SERATA is a physically explicit model of radionuclide fate and migration. Sediment and radionuclide concentrations calculated by SERATA in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system are in reasonable agreement with measured values. SERATRA is in the field performance phase of an extensive testing program designed to establish the utility of the model as a site assessment tool. The model handles not only radionuclides but other contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals and other toxic chemicals. Now that the model has been applied to four field sites, including the latest study of the Cattaraugus Creek stream system, it is recommended that a final model be validated through comparison of predicted results with field data from a carefully controlled tracer test at a field site. It is also recommended that a detailed laboratory flume be tested to study cohesive sediment transport, deposition, and erosion characteristics. The lack of current understanding of these characteristics is one of the weakest areas hindering the accurate assessment of the migration of radionuclides sorbed by fine sediments of silt and clay.

Onishi, Y.; Yabusaki, S.B.; Kincaid, C.T.; Skaggs, R.L.; Walters, W.H.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation sector model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Advancements in the ADAPT Photospheric Flux Transport Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maps of the solar photospheric magnetic flux are fundamental drivers for simulations of the corona and solar wind which makes photospheric simulations important predictors of solar events on Earth. However, observations of the solar photosphere are only made intermittently over small regions of the solar surface. The Air Force Data Assimilative Photospheric Flux Transport (ADAPT) model uses localized ensemble Kalman filtering techniques to adjust a set of photospheric simulations to agree with the available observations. At the same time this information is propagated to areas of the simulation that have not been observed. ADAPT implements a local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) to accomplish data assimilation, allowing the covariance structure of the flux transport model to influence assimilation of photosphere observations while eliminating spurious correlations between ensemble members arising from a limited ensemble size. We give a detailed account of the ADAPT model and the implementation of the LETKF. Advantages of the LETKF scheme over previously implemented assimilation methods are highlighted.

Kyle S. Hickmann; Humberto C. Godinez; Carl J. Henney; C. Nick Arge

2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

142

COMPARISON OF RF CAVITY TRANSPORT MODELS FOR BBU SIMULATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transverse focusing effect in RF cavities plays a considerable role in beam dynamics for low-energy beamline sections and can contribute to beam breakup (BBU) instability. The purpose of this analysis is to examine RF cavity models in simulation codes which will be used for BBU experiments at Jefferson Lab and improve BBU simulation results. We review two RF cavity models in the simulation codes elegant and TDBBU (a BBU simulation code developed at Jefferson Lab). elegant can include the Rosenzweig-Serafini (R-S) model for the RF focusing effect. Whereas TDBBU uses a model from the code TRANSPORT which considers the adiabatic damping effect, but not the RF focusing effect. Quantitative comparisons are discussed for the CEBAF beamline. We also compare the R-S model with the results from numerical simulations for a CEBAF-type 5-cell superconducting cavity to validate the use of the R-S model as an improved low-energy RF cavity transport model in TDBBU. We have implemented the R-S model in TDBBU. It will improve BBU simulation results to be more matched with analytic calculations and experimental results.

Ilkyoung Shin,Byung Yunn,Todd Satogata,Shahid Ahmed

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Modeling of heavy metal transport in a contaminated soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observed depth profiles in soils polluted by Zn and Cu that originate from a metal smelter are quantitatively interpreted by combining the production history of the smelter with established transport models. Using independent laboratory and field data, we were able to calculate the present depth profiles semiquantitatively by applying the pure convection model without parameter fitting. The agreement of the calculated depth profiles with the experimental data can be improved by including dispersion effects in the convection-dispersion model or the stochastic convection model. For the latter model, the depth profiles were calculated analytically. These models were used to calculate the expected depth profiles in the future and to judge possible remediation strategies. 48 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Cernik, M.; Federer, P.; Borkovec, M.; Sticher, H. [Inst. of Terrestrial Ecology, Schlieren (Switzerland)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation in ancient Egypt entailed the use of boats2007 Land transport in Roman Egypt: A study of economics andDieter 1991 Building in Egypt: Pharaonic stone masonry. New

Vinson, Steve

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is one of nine PMRs supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) being developed by the Yucca Mountain Project for the Site Recommendation Report (SRR). The EBS PMR summarizes the development and abstraction of models for processes that govern the evolution of conditions within the emplacement drifts of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Details of these individual models are documented in 23 supporting Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs). Nineteen of these AMRs are for process models, and the remaining 4 describe the abstraction of results for application in TSPA. The process models themselves cluster around four major topics: ''Water Distribution and Removal Model, Physical and Chemical Environment Model, Radionuclide Transport Model, and Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model''. One AMR (Engineered Barrier System-Features, Events, and Processes/Degradation Modes Analysis) summarizes the formal screening analysis used to select the Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) included in TSPA and those excluded from further consideration. Performance of a potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository depends on both the natural barrier system (NBS) and the engineered barrier system (EBS) and on their interactions. Although the waste packages are generally considered as components of the EBS, the EBS as defined in the EBS PMR includes all engineered components outside the waste packages. The principal function of the EBS is to complement the geologic system in limiting the amount of water contacting nuclear waste. A number of alternatives were considered by the Project for different EBS designs that could provide better performance than the design analyzed for the Viability Assessment. The design concept selected was Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II).

E.L. Hardin

2000-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

146

Building 235-F Goldsim Fate And Transport Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel, at the request of Area Completion Projects (ACP), evaluated In-Situ Disposal (ISD) alternatives that are under consideration for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of Building 235-F and the Building 294-2F Sand Filter. SRNL personnel developed and used a GoldSim fate and transport model, which is consistent with Musall 2012, to evaluate relative to groundwater protection, ISD alternatives that involve either source removal and/or the grouting of portions or all of 235-F. This evaluation was conducted through the development and use of a Building 235-F GoldSim fate and transport model. The model simulates contaminant release from four 235-F process areas and the 294-2F Sand Filter. In addition, it simulates the fate and transport through the vadose zone, the Upper Three Runs (UTR) aquifer, and the Upper Three Runs (UTR) creek. The model is designed as a stochastic model, and as such it can provide both deterministic and stochastic (probabilistic) results. The results show that the median radium activity concentrations exceed the 5 ?Ci/L radium MCL at the edge of the building for all ISD alternatives after 10,000 years, except those with a sufficient amount of inventory removed. A very interesting result was that grouting was shown to basically have minimal effect on the radium activity concentration. During the first 1,000 years grouting may have some small positive benefit relative to radium, however after that it may have a slightly deleterious effect. The Pb-210 results, relative to its 0.06 ?Ci/L PRG, are essentially identical to the radium results, but the Pb-210 results exhibit a lesser degree of exceedance. In summary, some level of inventory removal will be required to ensure that groundwater standards are met.

Taylor, G. A.; Phifer, M. A.

2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

147

A hybrid model for particle transport and electron energy distributions in positive column electrical discharges using equivalent species transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A hybrid model for particle transport and electron energy distributions in positive column electrical discharges using equivalent species transport Fred Y. Huanga) and Mark J. Kushnerb) Departm&t of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, 1406 West Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801

Kushner, Mark

148

A Statistical Model to Assess Indirect CO2 Emissions of the UAE Residential Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Determination of household energy using ?fingerprints? from energy billing data. Energy Research 10(4), pp: 393?405. [5] Snakin JPA, 2000. An engineering model for heating energy and emission assessment The case of North Karelia, Finland. Applied Energy...

Radhi, H.; Fikry, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Upscaling reactive transport in porous media : laboratory visualization and stochastic models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solute transport models are essential tools for understanding and forecasting chemical concentrations in groundwater. Advection-dispersion based models can adequately predict spatial averages of conservative solute ...

Oates, Peter M. (Peter Michael), 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Decarbonising the English residential sector: modelling policies, technologies and behaviour within a heterogeneous building stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Housing Energy Fact File HHLD Household HLP Heat Loss Parameter HTCC Heat Transfer Convective Coefficient IAM Integrated Assessment Model IEA International Energy Agency LED Light Emitting Diode LEED Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design... Housing Energy Fact File HHLD Household HLP Heat Loss Parameter HTCC Heat Transfer Convective Coefficient IAM Integrated Assessment Model IEA International Energy Agency LED Light Emitting Diode LEED Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design...

Kelly, Scott

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

151

Dark matter from the scalar sector of 3-3-1 models without exotic electric charges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that three SU(2) singlet neutral scalars (two CP-even and one CP-odd) in the spectrum of models based on the gauge symmetry SU(3)_c X SU(3)_L X U(1)_X, which do not contain exotic electric charges, are realistic candidates for thermally generated self-interacting dark matter in the Universe, a type of dark matter that has been recently proposed in order to overcome some difficulties of collisionless cold dark matter models at the galactic scale. These candidates arise without introducing a new mass scale in the model and/or without the need for a discrete symmetry to stabilize them, but at the expense of tuning several combinations of parameters of the scalar potential.

Simonetta Filippi; William A. Ponce; Luis A. Sanchez

2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

152

Final Report on Hierarchical Coupled Modeling and Prediction of Regional Climate Change in the Atlantic Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the course of this project, we have accomplished the following: a) Carried out studies of climate changes in the past using a hierarchy of intermediate coupled models (Chang et al., 2008; Wan et al 2009; Wen et al., 2010a,b) b) Completed the development of a Coupled Regional Climate Model (CRCM; Patricola et al., 2011a,b) c) Carried out studies testing hypotheses testing the origin of systematic errors in the CRCM (Patricola et al., 2011a,b) d) Carried out studies of the impact of air-sea interaction on hurricanes, in the context of barrier layer interactions (Balaguru et al)

Saravanan, Ramalingam [Texas A& M University

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

153

Price Responsiveness in the AEO2003 NEMS Residential and Commercial Buildings Sector Models  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper describes the demand responses to changes in energy prices in the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 versions of the Residential and Commercial Demand Modules of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). It updates a similar paper completed for the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 version of the NEMS.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Preliminary Environmental Flow and Transport Modeling at the INEEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is located in southeastern Idaho in the USA. The primary mission since the laboratory was founded in 1949 has been nuclear reactor research. Fifty-two reactors have been built and operated on the INEEL. Other principal activities at the laboratory have been reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Low-level radioactive waste generated on site and mixed and transuranic waste from the Rocky Flats plutonium processing facility in Colorado has been disposed on the INEEL at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Waste disposal at the RWMC began in 1952 with shallow land burial in pits and trenches. The INEEL was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. The resulting environmental assessments of the potential negative health impacts of disposed waste at the RWMC have required the use of predictive numerical simulations. A petroleum reservoir simulator called TETRAD was modified for use in simulating environmental flow and transport. Use of this code has allowed the complex subsurface stratigraphy to be simulated, including an extensive region of unsaturated fractured basalt. Dual continual simulation approaches have been used to assess combined aqueous- and gaseous-phase transport of volatile organic compounds as well as dissolved-phase transport of radionuclides. Calibration of the simulator to available monitoring data has increased the confidence in the simulator results to the point where the model sensitivities are being used to direct additional characterization efforts. Eventually, as the model calibration improves and confidence in the model predictions increases, the simulator will be used as a decision tool for selecting remedial alternatives for the wastes buried at the RWMC. An overview of the overall program including a summary of laboratory actinide migration studies will be presented.

J. D. Navratil; J. M. McCarthy; S. O. Magnuson

1999-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

155

Preliminary Environmental Flow and Transport Modeling at the INEEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is located in southeastern Idaho in the USA. The primary mission since the laboratory was founded in 1949 has been nuclear reactor research. Fifty-two reactors have been built and operated on the INEEL. Other principal activities at the laboratory have been reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Low-level radioactive waste generated on site and mixed and transuranic waste from the Rocky Flats plutonium processing facility in Colorado has been disposed on the INEEL at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Waste disposal at the RWMC began in 1952 with shallow land burial in pits and trenches. The INEEL was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. The resulting environmental assessments of the potential negative health impacts of disposed waste at the RWMC have required the use of predictive numerical simulations. A petroleum reservoir simulator called TETRAD was modified for use in simulating environmental flow and transport. Use of this code has allowed the complex subsurface stratigraphy to be simulated, including an extensive region of unsaturated fractured basalt. Dual continual simulation approaches have been used to assess combined aqueous- and gaseous-phase transport of volatile organic compounds as well as dissolved-phase transport of radionuclides. Calibration of the simulator to available monitoring data has increased the confidence in the simulator results to the point where the model sensitivities are being used to direct additional characterization efforts. Eventually, as the model calibration improves and confidence in the model predictions increases, the simulator will be used as a decision tool for selecting remedial alternatives for the wastes buried at the RWMC. An overview of the overall program including a summary of laboratory actinide migration studies will be presented.

Magnuson, Swen O; Mccarthy, James Michael; Navratil, James Dale

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Environmental Transport Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis report is one of the technical reports documenting the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows relationships among the reports developed for biosphere modeling and biosphere abstraction products for the TSPA-LA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]) (TWP). This figure provides an understanding of how this report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application (LA). This report is one of the five reports that develop input parameter values for the biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the conceptual model and the mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the Biosphere Model Report in Figure 1-1, contain detailed description of the model input parameters. The output of this report is used as direct input in the ''Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis'' and in the ''Disruptive Event Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis'' that calculate the values of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the groundwater and volcanic ash exposure scenarios, respectively. The purpose of this analysis was to develop biosphere model parameter values related to radionuclide transport and accumulation in the environment. These parameters support calculations of radionuclide concentrations in the environmental media (e.g., soil, crops, animal products, and air) resulting from a given radionuclide concentration at the source of contamination (i.e., either in groundwater or in volcanic ash). The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]).

M. Wasiolek

2004-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

157

A model of sediment resuspension and transport dynamics in southern Lake Michigan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model of sediment resuspension and transport dynamics in southern Lake Michigan Jing Lou-three-dimensional suspended sediment transport model was developed and generalized to include combined wave-current effects to study bottom sediment resuspension and transport in southern Lake Michigan. The results from a three

158

Case Studies in Using Interval Data Energy Models for Savings Verification: Lessons from the Grocery Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

responsible for driving energy use at the five stores. However, it?s recognized that poor regressions, defined by low R2 and high CV(RMSE), may still produce ?accurate? savings or at least savings that are good enough for some situations. Since many... to evaluate accuracy throughout this research. SAVINGS ANALYSIS This section outlines the process for determining the regression model specifications. Included is an analysis of possible driving variables and data resolution as well as an evaluation...

Effinger, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Environmental Transport Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis report is one of the technical reports documenting the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows relationships among the reports developed for biosphere modeling and biosphere abstraction products for the TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan: for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (TWP) (BSC 2003 [163602]). Some documents in Figure 1-1 may be under development and not available when this report is issued. This figure provides an understanding of how this report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application (LA), but access to the listed documents is not required to understand the contents of this report. This report is one of the reports that develops input parameter values for the biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003 [160699]) describes the conceptual model, the mathematical model, and the input parameters. The purpose of this analysis is to develop biosphere model parameter values related to radionuclide transport and accumulation in the environment. These parameters support calculations of radionuclide concentrations in the environmental media (e.g., soil, crops, animal products, and air) resulting from a given radionuclide concentration at the source of contamination (i.e., either in groundwater or volcanic ash). The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2003 [163602]). This analysis develops values of parameters associated with many features, events, and processes (FEPs) applicable to the reference biosphere (DTN: M00303SEPFEPS2.000 [162452]), which are addressed in the biosphere model (BSC 2003 [160699]). The treatment of these FEPs is described in BSC (2003 [160699], Section 6.2). Parameter values developed in this report, and the related FEPs, are listed in Table 1-1. The relationship between the parameters and FEPs was based on a comparison of the parameter definition and the FEP descriptions as presented in BSC (2003 [160699], Section 6.2). The parameter values developed in this report support the biosphere model and are reflected in the TSPA through the biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). Biosphere modeling focuses on radionuclides screened for the TSPA-LA (BSC 2002 [160059]). The same list of radionuclides is used in this analysis (Section 6.1.4). The analysis considers two human exposure scenarios (groundwater and volcanic ash) and climate change (Section 6.1.5). This analysis combines and revises two previous reports, ''Transfer Coefficient Analysis'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [152435]) and ''Environmental Transport Parameter Analysis'' (CRWMS M&O 2001 [152434]), because the new ERMYN biosphere model requires a redefined set of input parameters. The scope of this analysis includes providing a technical basis for the selection of radionuclide- and element-specific biosphere parameters (except for Kd) that are important for calculating BDCFs based on the available radionuclide inventory abstraction data. The environmental transport parameter values were developed specifically for use in the biosphere model and may not be appropriate for other applications.

M. A. Wasiolek

2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

160

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Industrial Sector Technology...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Industrial Sector Technology Use Model (ISTUM): industrial energy use in the United States, 1974-2000. Volume 1. Primary model documentation. Final report...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation sector model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Aerosols and clouds in chemical transport models and climate models.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clouds exert major influences on both shortwave and longwave radiation as well as on the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of clouds in climate models is a major unsolved problem because of high sensitivity of radiation and hydrology to cloud properties and processes, incomplete understanding of these processes, and the wide range of length scales over which these processes occur. Small changes in the amount, altitude, physical thickness, and/or microphysical properties of clouds due to human influences can exert changes in Earth's radiation budget that are comparable to the radiative forcing by anthropogenic greenhouse gases, thus either partly offsetting or enhancing the warming due to these gases. Because clouds form on aerosol particles, changes in the amount and/or composition of aerosols affect clouds in a variety of ways. The forcing of the radiation balance due to aerosol-cloud interactions (indirect aerosol effect) has large uncertainties because a variety of important processes are not well understood precluding their accurate representation in models.

Lohmann,U.; Schwartz, S. E.

2008-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

162

Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 2 Climate and Transportation Solutions Chapter 3:Gas Emissions in the Transportation Sector by John Conti,Chase, and John Maples Transportation is the single largest

Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Azimuthal Anisotropies as Stringent Test for Nuclear Transport Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Azimuthal distributions of charged particles and intermediate mass fragments emitted in Au+Au collisions at 600AMeV have been measured using the FOPI facility at GSI-Darmstadt. Data show a strong increase of the in-plane azimuthal anisotropy ratio with the charge of the detected fragment. Intermediate mass fragments are found to exhibit a strong momentum-space alignment with respect of the reaction plane. The experimental results are presented as a function of the polar center-of-mass angle and over a broad range of impact parameters. They are compared to the predictions of the Isospin Quantum Molecular Dynamics model using three different parametrisations of the equation of state. We show that such highly accurate data provide stringent test for microscopic transport models and can potentially constrain separately the stiffness of the nuclear equation of state and the momentum dependence of the nuclear interaction.

P. Crochet; F. Rami; R. Dona; the FOPI Collaboration

1997-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Critical review: Radionuclide transport, sediment transport, and water quality mathematical modeling; and radionuclide adsorption/desorption mechanisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a detailed literature review of radionuclide transport models applicable to rivers, estuaries, coastal waters, the Great Lakes, and impoundments. Some representatives sediment transport and water quality models were also reviewed to evaluate if they can be readily adapted to radionuclide transport modeling. The review showed that most available transport models were developed for dissolved radionuclide in rivers. These models include the mechanisms of advection, dispersion, and radionuclide decay. Since the models do not include sediment and radionuclide interactions, they are best suited for simulating short-term radionuclide migration where: (1) radionuclides have small distribution coefficients; (2) sediment concentrations in receiving water bodies are very low. Only 5 of the reviewed models include full sediment and radionuclide interactions: CHMSED developed by Fields; FETRA SERATRA, and TODAM developed by Onishi et al, and a model developed by Shull and Gloyna. The 5 models are applicable to cases where: (1) the distribution coefficient is large; (2) sediment concentrations are high; or (3) long-term migration and accumulation are under consideration. The report also discusses radionuclide absorption/desorption distribution ratios and addresses adsorption/desorption mechanisms and their controlling processes for 25 elements under surface water conditions. These elements are: Am, Sb, C, Ce, Cm, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, I, Fe, Mn, Np, P, Pu, Pm, Ra, Ru, Sr, Tc, Th, {sup 3}H, U, Zn and Zr.

Onishi, Y.; Serne, R.J.; Arnold, E.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Thompson, F.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Options in ISEEM Global Energy Model: 2010-2050 Scenario Analysis for Least-Cost Carbon Reduction in Iron and Steel Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the modeling work carried out in this project was to quantify long-term scenarios for the future emission reduction potentials in the iron and steel sector. The main focus of the project is to examine the impacts of carbon reduction options in the U.S. iron and steel sector under a set of selected scenarios. In order to advance the understanding of carbon emission reduction potential on the national and global scales, and to evaluate the regional impacts of potential U.S. mitigation strategies (e.g., commodity and carbon trading), we also included and examined the carbon reduction scenarios in China’s and India’s iron and steel sectors in this project. For this purpose, a new bottom-up energy modeling framework, the Industrial Sector Energy Efficiency Modeling (ISEEM), (Karali et al. 2012) was used to provide detailed annual projections starting from 2010 through 2050. We used the ISEEM modeling framework to carry out detailed analysis, on a country-by-country basis, for the U.S., China’s, and India’s iron and steel sectors. The ISEEM model applicable to iron and steel section, called ISEEM-IS, is developed to estimate and evaluate carbon emissions scenarios under several alternative mitigation options - including policies (e.g., carbon caps), commodity trading, and carbon trading. The projections will help us to better understand emission reduction potentials with technological and economic implications. The database for input of ISEEM-IS model consists of data and information compiled from various resources such as World Steel Association (WSA), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), China Steel Year Books, India Bureau of Mines (IBM), Energy Information Administration (EIA), and recent LBNL studies on bottom-up techno-economic analysis of energy efficiency measures in the iron and steel sector of the U.S., China, and India, including long-term steel production in China. In the ISEEM-IS model, production technology and manufacturing details are represented, in addition to the extensive data compiled from recent studies on bottom-up representation of efficiency measures for the sector. We also defined various mitigation scenarios including long-term production trends to project country-specific production, energy use, trading, carbon emissions, and costs of mitigation. Such analyses can provide useful information to assist policy-makers when considering and shaping future emissions mitigation strategies and policies. The technical objective is to analyze the costs of production and CO{sub 2} emission reduction in the U.S, China, and India’s iron and steel sectors under different emission reduction scenarios, using the ISEEM-IS as a cost optimization model. The scenarios included in this project correspond to various CO{sub 2} emission reduction targets for the iron and steel sector under different strategies such as simple CO{sub 2} emission caps (e.g., specific reduction goals), emission reduction via commodity trading, and emission reduction via carbon trading.

Karali, Nihan; Xu, Tengfang; Sathaye, Jayant

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Introduction Meaningful simulations of radiation transport applications require realistic definitions of material composition and densities. When seeking that information for applications in fields such as homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety, researchers usually encounter a variety of materials for which elemental compositions are not readily available or densities are not defined. Publication of the Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling, Revision 0, in 2006 was the first step toward mitigating this problem. Revision 0 of this document listed 121 materials, selected mostly from the combined personal libraries of staff at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and thus had a scope that was recognized at the time to be limited. Nevertheless, its creation did provide a well-referenced source of some unique or hard-to-define material data in a format that could be used directly in radiation transport calculations being performed at PNNL. Moreover, having a single common set of material definitions also helped to standardize at least one aspect of the various modeling efforts across the laboratory by providing separate researchers the ability to compare different model results using a common basis of materials. The authors of the 2006 compendium understood that, depending on its use and feedback, the compendium would need to be revised to correct errors or inconsistencies in the data for the original 121 materials, as well as to increase (per users suggestions) the number of materials listed. This 2010 revision of the compendium has accomplished both of those objectives. The most obvious change is the increased number of materials from 121 to 372. The not-so-obvious change is the mechanism used to produce the data listed here. The data listed in the 2006 document were compiled, evaluated, entered, and error-checked by a group of individuals essentially by hand, providing no library file or mechanism for revising the data in a consistent and traceable manner. The authors of this revision have addressed that problem by first compiling all of the information (i.e., numbers and references) for all the materials into a single database, maintained at PNNL, that was then used as the basis for this document.

McConn, Ronald J.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.; Rucker, Robert A.; Williams III, Robert

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

167

Large-Scale Evacuation Network Model for Transporting Evacuees with Multiple Priorities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mathematical optimization model called Triage-Assignment-Transportation (TAT) model is suggested in order to decide on the tactical routing assignment of several classes of evacuation vehicles between staging areas and shelters in the nearby area. The model...

Na, Hyeong Suk

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Transportation planning for mega events : a model of urban change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

My study is about opportunities for revolutionary developments in urban transport. Often, we think of transport and urban development as an evolutionary process, yet there exist a few opportunities for cities to revolutionize ...

Kassens, Eva

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Multicomponent reactive transport modeling of uranium bioremediation field experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biostimulation field experiments with acetate amendment are being performed at a former uranium mill tailings site in Rifle, Colorado, to investigate subsurface processes controlling in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater. An important part of the research is identifying and quantifying field-scale models of the principal terminal electron-accepting processes (TEAPs) during biostimulation and the consequent biogeochemical impacts to the subsurface receiving environment. Integrating abiotic chemistry with the microbially mediated TEAPs in the reaction network brings into play geochemical observations (e.g., pH, alkalinity, redox potential, major ions, and secondary minerals) that the reactive transport model must recognize. These additional constraints provide for a more systematic and mechanistic interpretation of the field behaviors during biostimulation. The reaction network specification developed for the 2002 biostimulation field experiment was successfully applied without additional calibration to the 2003 and 2007 field experiments. The robustness of the model specification is significant in that 1) the 2003 biostimulation field experiment was performed with 3 times higher acetate concentrations than the previous biostimulation in the same field plot (i.e., the 2002 experiment), and 2) the 2007 field experiment was performed in a new unperturbed plot on the same site. The biogeochemical reactive transport simulations accounted for four TEAPs, two distinct functional microbial populations, two pools of bioavailable Fe(III) minerals (iron oxides and phyllosilicate iron), uranium aqueous and surface complexation, mineral precipitation, and dissolution. The conceptual model for bioavailable iron reflects recent laboratory studies with sediments from the Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site that demonstrated that the bulk (~90%) of Fe(III) bioreduction is associated with the phyllosilicates rather than the iron oxides. The uranium reaction network includes a U(VI) surface complexation model based on laboratory studies with Old Rifle UMTRA sediments and aqueous complexation reactions that include ternary complexes (e.g., calcium-uranyl-carbonate). The bioreduced U(IV), Fe(II), and sulfide components produced during the experiments are strongly associated with the solid phases and may play an important role in long-term uranium immobilization.

Fang, Yilin; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Morrison, Stan J.; Amonette, James E.; Long, Philip E.

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

A Radionuclide Transport Model for the Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain Bruce A. Robinson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Radionuclide Transport Model for the Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain Bruce A. Robinson Zhiming model calculations for radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. The model developed by the Yucca Mountain Project based on calibrations to site data. The particle-tracking technique

Lu, Zhiming

171

To appear in the SIGGRAPH conference proceedings A Practical Model for Subsurface Light Transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be simulated accurately but slowly by solving the full radiative transfer equation [1]. Only a few papersTo appear in the SIGGRAPH conference proceedings A Practical Model for Subsurface Light Transport introduces a simple model for subsurface light transport in translucent materials. The model enables

Stanford University

172

A radiation transport coupled particle-in-cell simulation. I. Description of the model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A radiation transport coupled particle-in-cell simulation. I. Description of the model Hae June-dimensional radiation transport model is coupled with a particle-in-cell simulation in order to incorporate such as ground, radiative, and metastable state atoms are treated with a fluid model combined with the Holstein

Lee, Hae June

173

Modeling the Prospects for Hydrogen Powered Transportation Through 2100  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen fueled transportation has been proposed as a low carbon alternative to the current gasoline-powered

Sandoval, Reynaldo.

174

Heavy Duty Diesel Particulate Matter and Fuel Consumption Modeling for Transportation Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model for Heavy Duty Diesel Vehicles. TransportationAir Contaminant Emissions from Diesel- fueled Engines. Factfor Measuring Emissions from Diesel Engines. 1. Regulated

Scora, George Alexander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Validation Analysis of the Shoal Groundwater Flow and Transport Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental restoration at the Shoal underground nuclear test is following a process prescribed by a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Characterization of the site included two stages of well drilling and testing in 1996 and 1999, and development and revision of numerical models of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport. Agreement on a contaminant boundary for the site and a corrective action plan was reached in 2006. Later that same year, three wells were installed for the purposes of model validation and site monitoring. The FFACO prescribes a five-year proof-of-concept period for demonstrating that the site groundwater model is capable of producing meaningful results with an acceptable level of uncertainty. The corrective action plan specifies a rigorous seven step validation process. The accepted groundwater model is evaluated using that process in light of the newly acquired data. The conceptual model of ground water flow for the Project Shoal Area considers groundwater flow through the fractured granite aquifer comprising the Sand Springs Range. Water enters the system by the infiltration of precipitation directly on the surface of the mountain range. Groundwater leaves the granite aquifer by flowing into alluvial deposits in the adjacent basins of Fourmile Flat and Fairview Valley. A groundwater divide is interpreted as coinciding with the western portion of the Sand Springs Range, west of the underground nuclear test, preventing flow from the test into Fourmile Flat. A very low conductivity shear zone east of the nuclear test roughly parallels the divide. The presence of these lateral boundaries, coupled with a regional discharge area to the northeast, is interpreted in the model as causing groundwater from the site to flow in a northeastward direction into Fairview Valley. Steady-state flow conditions are assumed given the absence of groundwater withdrawal activities in the area. The conceptual and numerical models were developed based upon regional hydrogeologic investigations conducted in the 1960s, site characterization investigations (including ten wells and various geophysical and geologic studies) at Shoal itself prior to and immediately after the test, and two site characterization campaigns in the 1990s for environmental restoration purposes (including eight wells and a year-long tracer test). The new wells are denoted MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3, and are located to the northnortheast of the nuclear test. The groundwater model was generally lacking data in the north-northeastern area; only HC-1 and the abandoned PM-2 wells existed in this area. The wells provide data on fracture orientation and frequency, water levels, hydraulic conductivity, and water chemistry for comparison with the groundwater model. A total of 12 real-number validation targets were available for the validation analysis, including five values of hydraulic head, three hydraulic conductivity measurements, three hydraulic gradient values, and one angle value for the lateral gradient in radians. In addition, the fracture dip and orientation data provide comparisons to the distributions used in the model and radiochemistry is available for comparison to model output. Goodness-of-fit analysis indicates that some of the model realizations correspond well with the newly acquired conductivity, head, and gradient data, while others do not. Other tests indicated that additional model realizations may be needed to test if the model input distributions need refinement to improve model performance. This approach (generating additional realizations) was not followed because it was realized that there was a temporal component to the data disconnect: the new head measurements are on the high side of the model distributions, but the heads at the original calibration locations themselves have also increased over time. This indicates that the steady-state assumption of the groundwater model is in error. To test the robustness of the model d

A. Hassan; J. Chapman

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Real-time capable first principle based modelling of tokamak turbulent transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A real-time capable core turbulence tokamak transport model is developed. This model is constructed from the regularized nonlinear regression of quasilinear gyrokinetic transport code output. The regression is performed with a multilayer perceptron neural network. The transport code input for the neural network training set consists of five dimensions, and is limited to adiabatic electrons. The neural network model successfully reproduces transport fluxes predicted by the original quasilinear model, while gaining five orders of magnitude in computation time. The model is implemented in a real-time capable tokamak simulator, and simulates a 300s ITER discharge in 10s. This proof-of-principle for regression based transport models anticipates a significant widening of input space dimensionality and physics realism for future training sets. This aims to provide unprecedented computational speed coupled with first-principle based physics for real-time control and integrated modelling applications.

Breton, S; Felici, F; Imbeaux, F; Aniel, T; Artaud, J F; Baiocchi, B; Bourdelle, C; Camenen, Y; Garcia, J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Technical Work Plan for: Near Field Environment: Engineered System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical work plan (TWP) describes work activities to be performed by the Near-Field Environment Team. The objective of the work scope covered by this TWP is to generate Revision 03 of EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction, referred to herein as the radionuclide transport abstraction (RTA) report. The RTA report is being revised primarily to address condition reports (CRs), to address issues identified by the Independent Validation Review Team (IVRT), to address the potential impact of transport, aging, and disposal (TAD) canister design on transport models, and to ensure integration with other models that are closely associated with the RTA report and being developed or revised in other analysis/model reports in response to IVRT comments. The RTA report will be developed in accordance with the most current version of LP-SIII.10Q-BSC and will reflect current administrative procedures (LP-3.15Q-BSC, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''; LP-SIII.2Q-BSC, ''Qualification of Unqualified Data''; etc.), and will develop related Document Input Reference System (DIRS) reports and data qualifications as applicable in accordance with prevailing procedures. The RTA report consists of three models: the engineered barrier system (EBS) flow model, the EBS transport model, and the EBS-unsaturated zone (UZ) interface model. The flux-splitting submodel in the EBS flow model will change, so the EBS flow model will be validated again. The EBS transport model and validation of the model will be substantially revised in Revision 03 of the RTA report, which is the main subject of this TWP. The EBS-UZ interface model may be changed in Revision 03 of the RTA report due to changes in the conceptualization of the UZ transport abstraction model (a particle tracker transport model based on the discrete fracture transfer function will be used instead of the dual-continuum transport model previously used). Validation of the EBS-UZ interface model will be revised to be consistent with model changes.

J.D. Schreiber

2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

178

Long-Range Atmospheric Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: A Global 3-D Model Analysis Including Evaluation of Arctic Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the global 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem to simulate long-range atmospheric transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). To evaluate the model’s ability to simulate PAHs with different volatilities, ...

Friedman, Carey

179

TRANSVIP: a solute transport model based on the spatial variability of intrinsic permeability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

groundwater flow and solute transport in three dimensions in both saturated and unsaturated porous media. The model simulates mechanical dispersion using a spatially vari- able intrinsic permeability field. This approach provides a, more realistic physical.... TRANSVIP is a three-dimensional flow and transport model capable of simulating contaminant transport in both saturated and unsaturated porous me- dia and does not assume Fickian dispersion. In TRANSVIP, the flow deviations that cause mechanical...

Freeze, Geoffrey Allan

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A unified model of electroporation and molecular transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological membranes form transient, conductive pores in response to elevated transmembrane voltage, a phenomenon termed electroporation. These pores facilitate electrical and molecular transport across cell membranes that ...

Smith, Kyle Christopher

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation sector model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A Mixed Finite-Element Discretization of the Energy-Transport Model for Semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Mixed Finite-Element Discretization of the Energy-Transport Model for Semiconductors Stefan Holst #12;tting mixed #12;nite-element method is used to discretize the stationary energy. Energy-transport models describe the ow of electrons through a semi- conductor device, in uenced by di

Pietra, Paola

182

A non-isothermal PEM fuel cell model including two water transport mechanisms in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A non-isothermal PEM fuel cell model including two water transport mechanisms in the membrane K Freiburg Germany A dynamic two-phase flow model for proton exchange mem- brane (PEM) fuel cells and the species concentrations. In order to describe the charge transport in the fuel cell the Poisson equations

Münster, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität

183

Modeling of transport and reaction in an engineered barrier for radioactive waste confinement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling of transport and reaction in an engineered barrier for radioactive waste confinement G bentonite; Radioactive waste; Modelling; KIRMAT code; Chemical transformations; Mass transport 0169;1. Introduction A particular radioactive waste disposal design proposes to store waste in deep geological layers

Montes-Hernandez, German

184

Addressing model bias and uncertainty in three dimensional groundwater transport forecasts for a physical aquifer experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Addressing model bias and uncertainty in three dimensional groundwater transport forecasts, and D. M. Rizzo (2008), Addressing model bias and uncertainty in three dimensional groundwater transport. Introduction [2] Eigbe et al. [1998] provide an excellent review of groundwater applications of the linear

Vermont, University of

185

Multiscale models of atmospheric mercury: bromine chemistry, air-sea exchange, and global transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

entrainment of RGM-rich air from the free troposphere (25­40%). Oxidation of Hg0 by Cl is minor (3Multiscale models of atmospheric mercury: bromine chemistry, air-sea exchange, and global transport Multiscale models of atmospheric mercury: bromine chemistry, air-sea exchange, and global transport Abstract

Holmes, Christopher D.

186

Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButler TinaContact-Information-Transmission SignTransport

187

Vehicle Technologies Office: Transitioning the Transportation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Office: Transitioning the Transportation Sector - Exploring the Intersection of H2 Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office: Transitioning the Transportation...

188

Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral Approach Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport:...

189

Analytical modeling of contaminant transport and horizontal well hydraulics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transport from one-, two-, and three-dimensional finite sources in a finite-thickness aquifer using Green's function method. A library of unpublished analytical solutions with different finite source geometry is provided. A graphically integrated software...

Park, Eungyu

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

A turbulent transport network model in MULTIFLUX coupled with TOUGH2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new numerical method is described for the fully iterated, conjugate solution of two discrete submodels, involving (a) a transport network model for heat, moisture, and airflows in a high-permeability, air-filled cavity; and (b) a variably saturated fractured porous medium. The transport network submodel is an integrated-parameter, computational fluid dynamics solver, describing the thermal-hydrologic transport processes in the flow channel system of the cavity with laminar or turbulent flow and convective heat and mass transport, using MULTIFLUX. The porous medium submodel, using TOUGH2, is a solver for the heat and mass transport in the fractured rock mass. The new model solution extends the application fields of TOUGH2 by integrating it with turbulent flow and transport in a discrete flow network system. We present demonstrational results for a nuclear waste repository application at Yucca Mountain with the most realistic model assumptions and input parameters including the geometrical layout of the nuclear spent fuel and waste with variable heat load for the individual containers. The MULTIFLUX and TOUGH2 model elements are fully iterated, applying a programmed reprocessing of the Numerical Transport Code Functionalization model-element in an automated Outside Balance Iteration loop. The natural, convective airflow field and the heat and mass transport in a representative emplacement drift during postclosure are explicitly solved in the new model. The results demonstrate that the direction and magnitude of the air circulation patterns and all transport modes are strongly affected by the heat and moisture transport processes in the surrounding rock, justifying the need for a coupled, fully iterated model solution such as the one presented in the paper.

Danko, G.; Bahrami, D.; Birkholzer, J.T.

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Theoretical Description of Heavy Impurity Transport and its Application to the Modelling of Tungsten in JET and ASDEX Upgrade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretical Description of Heavy Impurity Transport and its Application to the Modelling of Tungsten in JET and ASDEX Upgrade

192

A Multi-Model Analysis of the Regional and Sectoral Roles of Bioenergy in Near- and Long-Term CO2 Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the near term and the longer term the contribution of bioenergy in different LIMITS scenarios as modeled by the participating models in the LIMITS project. With These scenarios have proven useful for exploring a range of outcomes for bioenergy use in response to both regionally diverse near term policies and the transition to a longer-term global mitigation policy and target. The use of several models has provided a source of heterogeneity in terms of incorporating uncertain assumptions about future socioeconomics and technology, as well as different paradigms for how the world may respond to policies. The results have also highlighted the heterogeneity and versatility of bioenergy itself, with different types of resources and applications in several energy sectors. In large part due to this versatility, the contribution of bioenergy to climate mitigation is a robust response across all models, despite their differences.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Klein, David; McCollum, David; Tavoni, Massimo; van der Zwaan, Bob; Van Vuuren, Detlef

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

REVIEW AND ANALYSIS Research Activities at U.S. Government Agencies in Subsurface Reactive Transport Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subsurface reactive transport modeling may be defi ned as the use of mathematical models to simulate the fate and transport of dissolved species and particulates in groundwater as these species are transported through porous media and react with each other, with mineral surfaces, and with microbes associated with the porous media matrix. This type of modeling has evolved over the last 30 yr from a specialized research topic involving a dozen or so practitioners (with often large stacks of computer punch cards) to a common offi ce tool found today on the personal computer (and occasional supercomputer) of many environmental chemists, geochemists, and soil scientists. The devel-

All T. Cygan; Caroline T. Stevens; Robert W. Puls; Steven B. Yabusaki; Robert D; David R. Turner

194

Toward Optimized Bioclogging and Biocementation Through Combining Advanced Geophysical Monitoring and Reactive Transport Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and electrical techniques); (ii) developing and using a reactive transport simulator capable of predicting and Reactive Transport Modeling Approaches Christopher G Hubbard1 , Susan S. Hubbard1 , Yuxin Wu1 , Vikranth heterogeneities at the field scale. Optimization of these strategies requires advances in mechanistic reactive

Hubbard, Susan

195

Parallelization of a relaxation scheme modelling the bedload transport of sediments in shallow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parallelization of a relaxation scheme modelling the bedload transport of sediments in shallow the cohesive strength of the soil particles. Once detached, the sediments can be transported downstream as non-cohesive sediment before its deposition. BANG Project, INRIA-Paris-Rocquencourt & LAGA, Universiy Paris 13 Nord

Boyer, Edmond

196

* All figures are in color on the Coastal Sediments Proceedings DVD. NONUNIFORM SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MODELING AT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1783 * All figures are in color on the Coastal Sediments Proceedings DVD. NONUNIFORM SEDIMENT@ncche.olemiss.edu. Abstract: A depth-averaged two-dimensionalnonuniform sediment transport model is applied to the beaches. The sediment transport, bed change and sorting equations are solved simultaneously and implicitly at the same

US Army Corps of Engineers

197

Finite-Volume-Particle Methods for Models of Transport of Pollutant in Shallow Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finite-Volume-Particle Methods for Models of Transport of Pollutant in Shallow Water Alina Chertock of shallow water equations and the pollutant propagation is described by a transport equation. The idea and the pollution computations: the shallow water equations are numerically integrated using a #12;nite- volume

Kurganov, Alexander

198

Modeling electronic structure and transport properties of graphene with resonant scattering centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling electronic structure and transport properties of graphene with resonant scattering centers present a detailed numerical study of the electronic properties of single-layer graphene with resonant and transport properties of functionalized graphene in a broad range of concentration of impurities from

199

Multicomponent reactive transport modeling at the Ratones uranium mine, Cceres (Spain)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multicomponent reactive transport modeling at the Ratones uranium mine, Cáceres (Spain) Modelación management. The Ratones uranium mine was abandoned and flooded in 1974. Due to its reducing underground water, uranium, reactive transport, granite hydrochemistry, Ratones mine. Resumen La inundación de minas

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

200

ANALYSIS OF MODELS FOR QUANTUM TRANSPORT OF ELECTRONS IN GRAPHENE LAYERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF MODELS FOR QUANTUM TRANSPORT OF ELECTRONS IN GRAPHENE LAYERS RAYMOND EL HAJJ transport of electrons in a graphene layer. We treat two situations. First, when the particles can move by a selfconsistent po- tential, which is the trace in the plane of the graphene of the 3D Poisson potential

Méhats, Florian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation sector model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Oceanic transports of heat and salt from a global model and data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A state estimate produced by ECCO-GODAE from a global one-degree model and data spanning the years 1992-2005 is analyzed in terms of transports of volume, temperature, and freshwater. The estimate is assessed to be ...

Olson, Elise

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

E-Print Network 3.0 - agent transport modeling Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: agent transport modeling Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Lecture Notes in Computer Science 1 Internet Agents for Effective Collaboration Summary: we present WAPM, a Web...

203

Observations and modeling of wave-acceleration-induced sediment transport in the surfzone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Onshore sediment transport and sandbar migration are important to the morphological evolution of beaches, but are not understood well. Here, a new model that accounts for accelerations of wave-orbital velocities predicts ...

Hoefel, Fernanda Gemael, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Improving parameterization of scalar transport through vegetation in a coupled ecosystem-atmosphere model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several regional-scale ecosystem models currently parameterize subcanopy scalar transport using a rough-wall boundary eddy diffusivity formulation. This formulation predicts unreasonably high soil evaporation beneath tall, ...

Link, Percy Anne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Modeling Studies on the Transport of Benzene and H2S in CO2-Water Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interest in subcritical (hot/liquid) water from 298 K to 473subcritical region. Modeling Studies on the Transport of Benzene and H 2 S in CO 2 -Water

Zheng, L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Mathematical Geology, Vol. 33, No. 1, 2001 Modeling Uranium Transport in Koongarra,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical Geology, Vol. 33, No. 1, 2001 Modeling Uranium Transport in Koongarra, Australia waste disposal safety assessment studies. The Koongarra uranium deposit in the Alligator Rivers region weathering over several million years, during which many climatological, hydrological, and geological changes

Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

207

Computers & Geosciences 29 (2003) 351359 A case against Kd-based transport models: natural attenuation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

attenuation at a mill tailings site Chen Zhu* Department of Geology and Planetary Science, University)-based transport model. The study site is a contaminated groundwater aquifer underneath a uranium mill tailings

Polly, David

208

Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VII - Tritium Transport Model Documentation Package  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume VII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the tritium transport model documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

None

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Comparisons Between Different Forward Models For Light Transport In Tissues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The radiative transfer equation to describe the laser radiation transport in scattering, absorbing and emitting the radiative heat transfer equation, which can be applied to almost all the electromagnetic radiation. The diffusion approximation method is controlled by a differential equation, which is derived from radiative

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

210

Conventional Transportation Planning Models: Review and Prospects for Alternatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of 1964 ($ 375 m) Highway Oriented 1970s Oil Crisis, Back to the City Transit Oriented (Urban Mass-Aid Highway Act of 1956) 1960s Fiscal Crisis, Urban Exodus Suburbanization Urban Mass Transportation Act-Private Partnership 1990s Global Warming CAAA 1990, ISTEA 1991, TEA21 1998 2000s Alternative Energy Sources Terrorism

Nagurney, Anna

211

Field, Laboratory, and Modeling Study of Reactive Transport of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of New York, Flushing, New York 11367, Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole Bay, MA, shed light on coupled control of chemistry and hydrology on reactive transport), phosphate (5), and oxyanions of molybdenum (6) and uranium (7, 8) in aquifers. In addition

212

Modeling requirements for full-scope reactor simulators of fission-product transport during severe accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes in the needs and requirements to properly and efficiently model fission product transport on full scope reactor simulators. Current LWR simulators can be easily adapted to model severe accident phenomena and the transport of radionuclides. Once adapted these simulators can be used as a training tool during operator training exercises for training on severe accident guidelines, for training on containment venting procedures, or as training tool during site wide emergency training exercises.

Ellison, P.G.; Monson, P.R. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Mitchell, H.A. (Concord Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Modeling requirements for full-scope reactor simulators of fission-product transport during severe accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes in the needs and requirements to properly and efficiently model fission product transport on full scope reactor simulators. Current LWR simulators can be easily adapted to model severe accident phenomena and the transport of radionuclides. Once adapted these simulators can be used as a training tool during operator training exercises for training on severe accident guidelines, for training on containment venting procedures, or as training tool during site wide emergency training exercises.

Ellison, P.G.; Monson, P.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Mitchell, H.A. [Concord Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Stochastic Dynamic Demand Inventory Models with Explicit Transportation Costs and Decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the policy where several small loads will be dispatched as a single, combined load. From an inventory-modeling perspec- tive, the integrated inventory-transportation problems add dispatch quantities as decision variables to the stochastic dynamic inventory...): The vendor makes the inventory replen- ishment decisions on how much to order from the outside supplier. 2. Pure Outbound Transportation Models (PO): The collection depot makes the delivery schedules of order dispatches to the buyer(s). 3. Integrated...

Zhang, Liqing

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Journal of Transportation Engineering Modelling Automobile Driver's Toll-Lane Choice Behaviour at a Toll Plaza  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Transportation Engineering Modelling Automobile Driver's Toll-Lane Choice Behaviour at a Toll Plaza --Manuscript Draft-- Manuscript Number: TEENG-1181R3 Full Title: Modelling Automobile Driver to develop a random utility based discrete multinomial choice model for the behaviour of automobile drivers

Kundu, Debasis

216

Estimates for temperature in projectile like fragment in geometric and transport models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Projectile like fragments emerging from heavy ion collision have an excitation energy which is often labeled by a temperature. This temperature was recently calculated using a geometric model. We expand the geometric model to include also dynamic effects using a transport model. The temperatures so deduced agree quite well with values of temperature needed to fit experimental data.

Mallik, S; Chaudhuri, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

A MODEL FOR THE FLEET SIZING OF DEMAND RESPONSIVE TRANSPORTATION SERVICES WITH TIME WINDOWS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A MODEL FOR THE FLEET SIZING OF DEMAND RESPONSIVE TRANSPORTATION SERVICES WITH TIME WINDOWS Marco a demand responsive transit service with a predetermined quality for the user in terms of waiting time models; Continuous approximation models; Paratransit services; Demand responsive transit systems. #12;3 1

Dessouky, Maged

218

A Model of Gas-Phase Transport During the Initial Stages of Sintering of Silicon Carbide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Model of Gas-Phase Transport During the Initial Stages of Sintering of Silicon Carbide Anil Kaza investigate this process using a computational model based on codiffusion of multiple gas species, which This paper describes a computational model that tracks diffu- sion of multiple gas species and so predicts

Matthewson, M. John

219

HYDROGEOCHEM: A coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and GEOCHEMical equilibria in reactive multicomponent systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the development of a hydrogeochemical transport model for multicomponent systems. The model is designed for applications to proper hydrological setting, accommodation of complete suite of geochemical equilibrium processes, easy extension to deal with chemical kinetics, and least constraints of computer resources. The hydrological environment to which the model can be applied is the heterogeneous, anisotropic, saturated-unsaturated subsurface media under either transient or steady state flow conditions. The geochemical equilibrium processes included in the model are aqueous complexation, adsorption-desorption, ion exchange, precipitation-dissolution, redox, and acid-base reactions. To achieve the inclusion of the full complement of these geochemical processes, total analytical concentrations of all chemical components are chosen as the primary dependent variables in the hydrological transport equations. Attendant benefits of this choice are to make the extension of the model to deal with kinetics of adsorption-desorption, ion exchange, precipitation-dissolution, and redox relatively easy. To make the negative concentrations during the iteration between the hydrological transport and geochemical equilibrium least likely, an implicit form of transport equations are proposed. To alleviate severe constraints of computer resources in terms of central processing unit (CPU) time and CPU memory, various optional numerical schemes are incorporated in the model. The model consists of a hydrological transport module and geochemical equilibrium module. Both modules were thoroughly tested in code consistency and were found to yield plausible results. The model is verified with ten examples. 79 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

Yeh, G.T.; Tripathi, V.S.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

A fully resolved active musculo-mechanical model for esophageal transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Esophageal transport is a physiological process that mechanically transports an ingested food bolus from the pharynx to the stomach via the esophagus, a multi-layered muscular tube. This process involves interactions between the bolus, the esophagus, and the neurally coordinated activation of the esophageal muscles. In this work, we use an immersed boundary (IB) approach to simulate peristaltic transport in the esophagus. The bolus is treated as a viscous fluid that is actively transported by the muscular esophagus, which is modeled as an actively contracting, fiber-reinforced tube. A simplified version of our model is verified by comparison to an analytic solution to the tube dilation problem. Three different complex models of the multi-layered esophagus, which differ in their activation patterns and the layouts of the mucosal layers, are then extensively tested. To our knowledge, these simulations are the first of their kind to incorporate the bolus, the multi-layered esophagus tube, and muscle activation i...

Kou, Wenjun; Griffith, Boyce E; Pandolfino, John E; Kahrilas, Peter J; Patankar, Neelesh A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation sector model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Model simulation and experiments of flow and mass transport through a nano-material gas filter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computational model for evaluating the performance of nano-material packed-bed filters was developed. The porous effects of the momentum and mass transport within the filter bed were simulated. For the momentum transport, an extended Ergun-type model was employed and the energy loss (pressure drop) along the packed-bed was simulated and compared with measurement. For the mass transport, a bulk dsorption model was developed to study the adsorption process (breakthrough behavior). Various types of porous materials and gas flows were tested in the filter system where the mathematical models used in the porous substrate were implemented and validated by comparing with experimental data and analytical solutions under similar conditions. Good agreements were obtained between experiments and model predictions.

Yang, Xiaofan; Zheng, Zhongquan C.; Winecki, Slawomir; Eckels, Steve

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Advanced Methods for Incorporating Solar Energy Technologies into Electric Sector Capacity-Expansion Models: Literature Review and Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because solar power is a rapidly growing component of the electricity system, robust representations of solar technologies should be included in capacity-expansion models. This is a challenge because modeling the electricity system--and, in particular, modeling solar integration within that system--is a complex endeavor. This report highlights the major challenges of incorporating solar technologies into capacity-expansion models and shows examples of how specific models address those challenges. These challenges include modeling non-dispatchable technologies, determining which solar technologies to model, choosing a spatial resolution, incorporating a solar resource assessment, and accounting for solar generation variability and uncertainty.

Sullivan, P.; Eurek, K.; Margolis, R.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Atmospheric transport and dispersion modeling for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation doses that may have resulted from operations at the Hanford Site are being estimated in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. One of the project subtasks, atmospheric transport, is responsible for estimating the transport, diffusion and deposition of radionuclides released to the atmosphere. This report discusses modeling transport and diffusion in the atmospheric pathway. It is divided into three major sections. The first section of the report presents the atmospheric modeling approach selected following discussion with the Technical Steering Panel that directs the HEDR Project. In addition, the section discusses the selection of the MESOI/MESORAD suite of atmospheric dispersion models that form the basis for initial calculations and future model development. The second section of the report describes alternative modeling approaches that were considered. Emphasis is placed on the family of plume and puff models that are based on Gaussian solution to the diffusion equations. The final portion of the section describes the performance of various models. The third section of the report discusses factors that bear on the selection of an atmospheric transport modeling approach for HEDR. These factors, which include the physical setting of the Hanford Site and the available meteorological data, serve as constraints on model selection. Five appendices are included in the report. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Ramsdell, J.V.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Uncertainty quantication in environmental flow and transport models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

78] V. P. Singh, Kinematic Wave Modeling in Water Resources:V. P. Singh, “Kinematic wave modeling in water resources: awater content ? and precipitation rate, whose motion can be approximated using kinematic wave

Wang, Peng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Analytical modelling of hydrogen transport in reactor containments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are two diffusion processes, molecular and turbulent, which should be modelled in different ways. Molecular diffusion is modelled by Wilke's formula for the multi-component gas diffusion, where the diffusion constants ...

Manno, V.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Ris-R-1201(EN) Radon Transport Modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is a numerical computer model of soil-gas and radon trans- port in porous media. It can be used, for example radon exhalation from building materials such as concrete. The finite-volume model is a technical

227

Transport enhancement and suppression in turbulent magnetic reconnection: A self-consistent turbulence model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through the enhancement of transport, turbulence is expected to contribute to the fast reconnection. However, the effects of turbulence are not so straightforward. In addition to the enhancement of transport, turbulence under some environment shows effects that suppress the transport. In the presence of turbulent cross helicity, such dynamic balance between the transport enhancement and suppression occurs. As this result of dynamic balance, the region of effective enhanced magnetic diffusivity is confined to a narrow region, leading to the fast reconnection. In order to confirm this idea, a self-consistent turbulence model for the magnetic reconnection is proposed. With the aid of numerical simulations where turbulence effects are incorporated in a consistent manner through the turbulence model, the dynamic balance in the turbulence magnetic reconnection is confirmed.

Yokoi, N. [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)] [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Higashimori, K.; Hoshino, M. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Multiphase transport model for relativistic heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The full source code of the AMPT model in the FORTRAN 77 language and instructions for users are available online at the OSCAR [60] and EPAPS [61] websites. The default AMPT model is named version 1.x, and the AMPT model with string melting is named...

Lin, ZW; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Zhang, B.; Pal, S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Modeling electron transport in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the theoretical background on modeling electron transport in the presence of electric and magnetic fields by incorporating the effects of the Lorentz force on electron motion into the Boltzmann transport equation. Electromagnetic fields alter the electron energy and trajectory continuously, and these effects can be characterized mathematically by differential operators in terms of electron energy and direction. Numerical solution techniques, based on the discrete-ordinates and finite-element methods, are developed and implemented in an existing radiation transport code, SCEPTRE.

Fan, Wesley C.; Drumm, Clifton Russell; Pautz, Shawn D.; Turner, C. David

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Phase II Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents pertinent transport data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support parameterization of the Phase II FF CAU transport model.

DeNovio, Nicole M.; Bryant, Nathan; King, Chrissi B.; Bhark, Eric; Drellack, Sigmund L.; Pickens, John F.; Farnham, Irene; Brooks, Keely M.; Reimus, Paul; Aly, Alaa

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Constructing a Model Transport Equation for a Massless Bose Gas and its Analytic Solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model kinetic equation is constructed for the transport of a massless Bose gas. This equation is applied to solution of the boundary value problem for the transport of radiation in the half-space occupied by a dispersive medium that is in local thermal equilibrium with the radiation. It is shown that the difference in temperature between the dispersive medium and the incident radiation depends substantially on the character of the scattering properties of the particles of the medium.

A. V. Latyshev; A. A. Yushkanov

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

232

Finite-element discretization of a linearized 2 -D model for lubricated oil transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finite-element discretization of a linearized 2 - D model for lubricated oil transportation V acts as a lubricant by coating the wall of the pipeline, thus preventing the oil from adhering is devoted to the numerical simulation of a linearized model for the lubricated trans- portation of heavy

Frey, Pascal

233

Assimilation of satellite images into a sediment transport model of Lake Michigan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by combining the satellite data with the numerical model. In our application, we find that data assimilationAssimilation of satellite images into a sediment transport model of Lake Michigan Jonathan R consider two data assimilation methods, direct insertion and a kriging-based approach, and perform

Stroud, Jonathan

234

A model for reactive porous transport during re-wetting of hardened concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model for reactive porous transport during re-wetting of hardened concrete Michael Chapwanya residing in the porous concrete matrix. The main hypothesis in this model is that the reaction product hydration; Porous media; Reaction-diffusion equations; Vari- able porosity. 1. Introduction Concrete

Stockie, John

235

ABSORPTION-DELAY MODELS OF HEAT TRANSPORT R.E. SHOWALTER AND D.B. VISARRAGA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSORPTION-DELAY MODELS OF HEAT TRANSPORT R.E. SHOWALTER AND D.B. VISARRAGA Abstract. A temperature jump in the water traveling through a pipe is delayed by the absorption of heat into the pipe wall transfer, absorption, memory, kinetic models, approximation. 1 #12;2 R.E. SHOWALTER AND D.B. VISARRAGA 1

236

Identification of Segments of French Urban Public Transport with a Latent Class Frontier Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identification of Segments of French Urban Public Transport with a Latent Class Frontier Model from 1995 to 2002 with unbalanced panel data. The latent class frontier model is used allowing the identification of different segments in the production frontier. We find that there are three statistically

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

237

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystems National Security Tourism Transportation Water Resources NOAA Satellite and Information Service National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) National Climatic DataNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet AGRICULTURE Overview A wide

238

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 NOAA Satellite and Information Service National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Ecosystems National Security Tourism Transportation Water Resources Climate information can be usedNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet COASTAL HAZARDS OVERVIEW Global

239

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be used most effectively. #12;NOAA Satellite and Information Service National Environmental Satellite Insurance Litigation Marine and Coastal Ecosystems National Security TOURISM Transportation WaterNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet TOURISM Overview Tourism

240

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agency (IEA), 2004c. CO2 emissions from fuel combustion,12. Global Energy-Related CO2 Emissions by End-Use Sector,2030. Energy-Related CO2 Emissions (GtC) Transport Buildings

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation sector model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fuel Cells for Transportation | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOE R&D Activities Fuel Cells for Transportation Fuel Cells for Transportation Photo of Ford Focus fuel cell car in front of windmills The transportation sector is the single...

242

Constructing transportable behavioural models for nonlinear electronic devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use radial basis functions to model the input--output response of an electronic device. A new methodology for producing models that accuratly describe the response of the device over a wide range of operating points is introduced. A key to the success of the method is the ability to find a polynomial relationship between the model parameters and the operating points of the device.

David M. Walker; R. Brown; N. B. Tufillaro

1998-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

243

Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Incident.docx More Documents & Publications Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure First Responder Initial Response Procedure TEPP Model Needs Assessment Document...

244

Diffusion Dominant Solute Transport Modelling In Deep Repository Under The Effect of Emplacement Media Degradation - 13285  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deep geologic disposal of high activity and long-lived radioactive waste is being actively considered and pursued in many countries, where low permeability geological formations are used to provide long term waste contaminant with minimum impact to the environment and risk to the biosphere. A multi-barrier approach that makes use of both engineered and natural barriers (i.e. geological formations) is often used to further enhance the containment performance of the repository. As the deep repository system subjects to a variety of thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical (THCM) effects over its long 'operational' lifespan (e.g. 0.1 to 1.0 million years, the integrity of the barrier system will decrease over time (e.g. fracturing in rock or clay)). This is broadly referred as media degradation in the present study. This modelling study examines the effects of media degradation on diffusion dominant solute transport in fractured media that are typical of deep geological environment. In particular, reactive solute transport through fractured media is studied using a 2-D model, that considers advection and diffusion, to explore the coupled effects of kinetic and equilibrium chemical processes, while the effects of degradation is studied using a pore network model that considers the media diffusivity and network changes. Model results are presented to demonstrate the use of a 3D pore-network model, using a novel architecture, to calculate macroscopic properties of the medium such as diffusivity, subject to pore space changes as the media degrade. Results from a reactive transport model of a representative geological waste disposal package are also presented to demonstrate the effect of media property change on the solute migration behaviour, illustrating the complex interplay between kinetic biogeochemical processes and diffusion dominant transport. The initial modelling results demonstrate the feasibility of a coupled modelling approach (using pore-network model and reactive transport model) to examine the long term behaviour of deep geological repositories with media property change under complex geochemical conditions. (authors)

Kwong, S. [National Nuclear Laboratory (United Kingdom)] [National Nuclear Laboratory (United Kingdom); Jivkov, A.P. [Research Centre for Radwaste and Decommissioning and Modelling and Simulation Centre, University of Manchester (United Kingdom)] [Research Centre for Radwaste and Decommissioning and Modelling and Simulation Centre, University of Manchester (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Provider","All Sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Green Mountain Power Corp","Investor-Owned",2477751,835602,896610,745539,0 2,"Central...

246

Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the analysis of the available transport parameter data conducted in support of the development of a Corrective Action Unit (CAU) groundwater flow model for Central and Western Pahute Mesa: CAUs 101 and 102.

Drici, Warda

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

248

Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrification |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of EnergyAdministrative2| DepartmentEnergy 2Waste

249

Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of EnergyAdministrative2| DepartmentEnergy 2Waste| Department

250

Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of EnergyAdministrative2| DepartmentEnergy 2Waste| Department|

251

Restructuring our Transportation Sector | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l LPROJECTS IN RENEWABLE ENERGYWorld OilEnergyRestructuring our

252

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Transportation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for) Electricity Export 1 Combustion Emissions (MMT CO 2 e Million Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide Equivalent) Total Emissions Offsite Emissions + Onsite Emissions Energy...

253

Modeling the coupled mechanics, transport, and growth processes in collagen tissues.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to develop tools to model and simulate the processes of self-assembly and growth in biological systems from the molecular to the continuum length scales. The model biological system chosen for the study is the tendon fiber which is composed mainly of Type I collagen fibrils. The macroscopic processes of self-assembly and growth at the fiber scale arise from microscopic processes at the fibrillar and molecular length scales. At these nano-scopic length scales, we employed molecular modeling and simulation method to characterize the mechanical behavior and stability of the collagen triple helix and the collagen fibril. To obtain the physical parameters governing mass transport in the tendon fiber we performed direct numerical simulations of fluid flow and solute transport through an idealized fibrillar microstructure. At the continuum scale, we developed a mixture theory approach for modeling the coupled processes of mechanical deformation, transport, and species inter-conversion involved in growth. In the mixture theory approach, the microstructure of the tissue is represented by the species concentration and transport and material parameters, obtained from fibril and molecular scale calculations, while the mechanical deformation, transport, and growth processes are governed by balance laws and constitutive relations developed within a thermodynamically consistent framework.

Holdych, David J.; Nguyen, Thao D.; Klein, Patrick A.; in't Veld, Pieter J.; Stevens, Mark Jackson

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Conceptual model for transport processes in the Culebra Dolomite Member, Rustler Formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation represents a possible pathway for contaminants from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant underground repository to the accessible environment. The geologic character of the Culebra is consistent with a double-porosity, multiple-rate model for transport in which the medium is conceptualized as consisting of advective porosity, where solutes are carried by the groundwater flow, and fracture-bounded zones of diffusive porosity, where solutes move through slow advection or diffusion. As the advective travel length or travel time increases, the nature of transport within a double-porosity medium changes. This behavior is important for chemical sorption, because the specific surface area per unit mass of the diffusive porosity is much greater than in the advective porosity. Culebra transport experiments conducted at two different length scales show behavior consistent with a multiple-rate, double-porosity conceptual model for Culebra transport. Tracer tests conducted on intact core samples from the Culebra show no evidence of significant diffusion, suggesting that at the core scale the Culebra can be modeled as a single-porosity medium where only the advective porosity participates in transport. Field tracer tests conducted in the Culebra show strong double-porosity behavior that is best explained using a multiple-rate model.

Holt, R.M. [Holt Hydrogeology, Placitas, NM (United States)] [Holt Hydrogeology, Placitas, NM (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a salt dome repository: a technical memorandum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of high-level radioactive wastes is a major environmental problem influencing further development of nuclear energy in this country. Salt domes in the Gulf Coast Basin are being investigated as repository sites. A major concern is geologic and hydrologic stability of candidate domes and potential transport of radionuclides by groundwater to the biosphere prior to their degradation to harmless levels of activity. This report conceptualizes a regional geohydrologic model for transport of radionuclides from a salt dome repository. The model considers transport pathways and the physical and chemical changes that would occur through time prior to the radionuclides reaching the biosphere. Necessary, but unknown inputs to the regional model involve entry and movement of fluids through the repository dome and across the dome-country rock interface and the effect on the dome and surrounding strata of heat generated by the radioactive wastes.

Kier, R.S.; Showalter, P.A.; Dettinger, M.D.

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

256

PATHWAY: a simulation model of radionuclide-transport through agricultural food chains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PATHWAY simulates the transport of radionuclides from fallout through an agricultural ecosystem. The agro-ecosystem is subdivided into several land management units, each of which is used either for grazing animals, for growing hay, or for growing food crops. The model simulates the transport of radionuclides by both discrete events and continuous, time-dependent processes. The discrete events include tillage of soil, harvest and storage of crops,and deposition of fallout. The continuous processes include the transport of radionuclides due to resuspension, weathering, rain splash, percolation, leaching, adsorption and desorption of radionuclides in the soil, root uptake, foliar absorption, growth and senescence of vegetation, and the ingestion assimilation, and excretion of radionuclides by animals. Preliminary validation studies indicate that the model dynamics and simulated values of radionuclide concentrations in several agricultural products agree well with measured values when the model is driven with site specific data on deposition from world-wide fallout.

Kirchner, T.B.; Whicker, F.W.; Otis, M.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Essays on Modeling the Economic Impacts of a Foreign Animal Disease on the United States Agricultural Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ............. 181 Table 49: Enhanced Surveillance Summary Statistics (Millions $2004) ....................... 183 Table 50: Regular Surveillance Summary Statistics (Millions $2004) .......................... 184 Table 51: Summary Statistics for Daily Data... ......................................................................................... 34 3.2 Economic/Epidemic Model Development .......................................... 34 3.3 General Framework ............................................................................. 51 3.4 Modeling Combined Economic...

Hagerman, Amy Deann

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

258

Heat Transport in Groundwater Systems--Finite Element Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into groundwater aquifers for long term energy storage. Analytical solutions are available that predict water temperatures as hot water is injected into a groundwater aquifer, but little field and laboratory data are available to verify these models. The objectives...

Grubaugh, E. K.; Reddell, D. L.

259

On EOQ Cost Models with Arbitrary Purchase and Transportation ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In inventory control, the economic order quantity cost model (EOQ) is the most fundamental ... it is possible to evaluate this upper bound by means of an algorithm. .... Noting that the convexity structure does not change within each interval, Lee ...

Birbil

2014-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

260

Modeling of Transport in Lithium Ion Battery Electrodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to model the solid state diffusion behavior in several generated electrode morphologies. Developed computational codes were used to generate targeted structures under prescribed conditions of particle shape, size, and overall morphology. The diffusion...

Martin, Michael

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation sector model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Thermalization at lowest energies? A view from a transport model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the Isospin Quantum Molecular Dynamics (IQMD) model we analyzed the production of pions and kaons in the energy range of 1-2 AGeV in order to study the question why thermal models could achieve a successful description. For this purpose we study the variation of pion and kaon yields using different elementary cross sections. We show that several ratios appear to be rather robust versus their variations.

C Hartnack; H Oeschler; J Aichelin

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

262

Lattice-gas model for active vesicle transport by molecular motors with opposite polarities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a multi-species lattice gas model for motor protein driven collective cargo transport on cellular filaments. We use this model to describe and analyze the collective motion of interacting vesicle cargoes being carried by oppositely directed molecular motors, moving on a single biofilament. Building on a totally asymmetric exclusion process (TASEP) to characterize the motion of the interacting cargoes, we allow for mass exchange with the environment, input and output at filament boundaries and focus on the role of interconversion rates and how they affect the directionality of the net cargo transport. We quantify the effect of the various different competing processes in terms of non-equilibrium phase diagrams. The interplay of interconversion rates, which allow for flux reversal and evaporation/deposition processes introduce qualitatively new features in the phase diagrams. We observe regimes of three-phase coexistence, the possibility of phase re-entrance and a significant flexibility in how the different phase boundaries shift in response to changes in control parameters. The moving steady state solutions of this model allows for different possibilities for the spatial distribution of cargo vesicles, ranging from homogeneous distribution of vesicles to polarized distributions, characterized by inhomogeneities or {\\it shocks}. Current reversals due to internal regulation emerge naturally within the framework of this model. We believe this minimal model will clarify the understanding of many features of collective vesicle transport, apart from serving as the basis for building more exact quantitative models for vesicle transport relevant to various {\\it in-vivo} situations.

Sudipto Muhuri; Ignacio Pagonabarraga

2010-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

263

Sustainable Transportation Energy Pathways Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Security of Energy Supply, esp. in transportation sector · Air Pollutant Emissions · Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG of air pollutant emissions. · World transportation sector 97% dependent on oil. · # vehicles projected strategy should have a "portfolio" approach with multiple solutions Fuel Alternatives · Hydrogen · Biofuels

Handy, Susan L.

264

A Practical Model for Subsurface Light Transport Henrik Wann Jensen Stephen R. Marschner Marc Levoy Pat Hanrahan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by solving the full radiative transfer equation [1]. Only a few papers in graphics have taken this approachA Practical Model for Subsurface Light Transport Henrik Wann Jensen Stephen R. Marschner Marc Levoy transport in translucent materials. The model enables efficient simulation of effects that BRDF models

O'Brien, James F.

265

Event simulations in a transport model for intermediate energy heavy ion collisions: Applications to multiplicity distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform transport model calculations for central collisions of mass 120 on mass 120 at laboratory beam energy in the range 20 MeV/nucleon to 200 MeV/nucleon. A simplified yet accurate method allows calculation of fluctuations in systems much larger than what was considered feasible in a well-known and already existing model. The calculations produce clusters. The distribution of clusters is remarkably similar to that obtained in equilibrium statistical model.

Mallik, S; Chaudhuri, G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Event simulations in a transport model for intermediate energy heavy ion collisions: Applications to multiplicity distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform transport model calculations for central collisions of mass 120 on mass 120 at laboratory beam energy in the range 20 MeV/nucleon to 200 MeV/nucleon. A simplified yet accurate method allows calculation of fluctuations in systems much larger than what was considered feasible in a well-known and already existing model. The calculations produce clusters. The distribution of clusters is remarkably similar to that obtained in equilibrium statistical model.

S. Mallik; S. Das Gupta; G. Chaudhuri

2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

267

Radiation transport modeling using extended quadrature method of moments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiative transfer equation describes the propagation of radiation through a material medium. While it provides a highly accurate description of the radiation field, the large phase space on which the equation is defined makes it numerically challenging. As a consequence, significant effort has gone into the development of accurate approximation methods. Recently, an extended quadrature method of moments (EQMOM) has been developed to solve univariate population balance equations, which also have a large phase space and thus face similar computational challenges. The distinct advantage of the EQMOM approach over other moment methods is that it generates moment equations that are consistent with a positive phase space density and has a moment inversion algorithm that is fast and efficient. The goal of the current paper is to present the EQMOM method in the context of radiation transport, to discuss advantages and disadvantages, and to demonstrate its performance on a set of standard one-dimensional benchmark problems that encompass optically thin, thick, and transition regimes. Special attention is given in the implementation to the issue of realizability—that is, consistency with a positive phase space density. Numerical results in one dimension are promising and lay the foundation for extending the same framework to multiple dimensions.

Vikas, V., E-mail: vvikas@iastate.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, 2271 Howe Hall, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Hauck, C.D., E-mail: hauckc@ornl.gov [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Wang, Z.J., E-mail: zjw@ku.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, 2120 Learned Hall, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Fox, R.O., E-mail: rofox@iastate.edu [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, 2114 Sweeney Hall, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

A model for reactive porous transport during re-wetting of hardened concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a mathematical model that captures the transport of liquid water in hardened concrete, as well as the chemical reactions that occur between the infiltrating water and the residual calcium silicate compounds that reside in the porous concrete matrix. We investigate the hypothesis that the reaction product -- calcium silicate hydrate gel -- clogs the pores within the concrete thereby hindering water transport. Using numerical simulations, we determine the sensitivity of the model solution to changes in various physical parameters, and compare to experimental results available in the literature.

Chapwanya, Michael; Stockie, John M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents an updated analysis of water-level data performed to provide the saturated-zone, site-scale flow and transport model (CRWMS M&O 2000) with the configuration of the potentiometric surface, target water-level data, and hydraulic gradients for model calibration. The previous analysis was presented in ANL-NBS-HS-000034, Rev 00 ICN 01, Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model (USGS 2001). This analysis is designed to use updated water-level data as the basis for estimating water-level altitudes and the potentiometric surface in the SZ site-scale flow and transport model domain. The objectives of this revision are to develop computer files containing (1) water-level data within the model area (DTN: GS010908312332.002), (2) a table of known vertical head differences (DTN: GS0109083 12332.003), and (3) a potentiometric-surface map (DTN: GS010608312332.001) using an alternate concept from that presented in ANL-NBS-HS-000034, Rev 00 ICN 01 for the area north of Yucca Mountain. The updated water-level data include data obtained from the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program (EWDP) and data from borehole USW WT-24. In addition to being utilized by the SZ site-scale flow and transport model, the water-level data and potentiometric-surface map contained within this report will be available to other government agencies and water users for ground-water management purposes. The potentiometric surface defines an upper boundary of the site-scale flow model, as well as provides information useful to estimation of the magnitude and direction of lateral ground-water flow within the flow system. Therefore, the analysis documented in this revision is important to SZ flow and transport calculations in support of total system performance assessment.

P. Tucci

2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

270

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

developers also market ‘fuzzy logic’ control systems, e.g. ,so- called 'fuzzy logic' or expert control, or rule-basedsystems or fuzzy logic is model-predictive control using

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Transported PDF Modeling of Nonpremixed Turbulent CO/H-2/N-2 Jet Flames  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Turbulent CO/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} (“syngas”) flames are simulated using a transported composition probability density function (PDF) method. A consistent hybrid Lagrangian particle/Eulerian mesh algorithm is used to solve the modeled PDF transport equation. The model includes standard k–? turbulence, gradient transport for scalars, and Euclidean minimum spanning tree (EMST) mixing. Sensitivities of model results to variations in the turbulence model, the treatment of radiation heat transfer, the choice of chemical mechanism, and the PDF mixing model are explored. A baseline model reproduces the measured mean and rms temperature, major species, and minor species profiles reasonably well, and captures the scaling that is observed in the experiments. Both our results and the literature suggest that further improvements can be realized with adjustments in the turbulence model, the radiation heat transfer model, and the chemical mechanism. Although radiation effects are relatively small in these flames, consideration of radiation is important for accurate NO prediction. Chemical mechanisms that have been developed specifically for fuels with high concentrations of CO and H{sub 2} perform better than a methane mechanism that was not designed for this purpose. It is important to account explicitly for turbulence–chemistry interactions, although the details of the mixing model do not make a large difference in the results, within reasonable limits.

Zhao, xinyu; Haworth, D. C.; Huckaby, E. David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Simplified 1-D Hydrodynamic and Salinity Transport Modeling of the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta: Sea Level Rise and Water Diversion Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrodynamic and Salinity Transport Modeling of the Sacramento–San Joaquinhydrodynamic and salinity transport mod- eling of the Sacramento–San Joaquin

Fleenor, William E.; Bombardelli, Fabian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Hydrologic Nuclide Transport Models in Cyder, A Geologic Disposal Software Library - 13328  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Component level and system level abstraction of detailed computational geologic repository models have resulted in four rapid computational models of hydrologic radionuclide transport at varying levels of detail. Those models are described, as is their implementation in Cyder, a software library of interchangeable radionuclide transport models appropriate for representing natural and engineered barrier components of generic geology repository concepts. A proof of principle demonstration was also conducted in which these models were used to represent the natural and engineered barrier components of a repository concept in a reducing, homogenous, generic geology. This base case demonstrates integration of the Cyder open source library with the Cyclus computational fuel cycle systems analysis platform to facilitate calculation of repository performance metrics with respect to fuel cycle choices. (authors)

Huff, Kathryn D. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. How to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions becomes extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models.

Sathaye, J.; Xu, T.; Galitsky, C.

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Integrated Canada-U.S. Power Sector Modeling with the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electric power system in North America is linked between the United States and Canada. Canada has historically been a net exporter of electricity to the United States. The extent to which this remains true will depend on the future evolution of power markets, technology deployment, and policies. To evaluate these and related questions, we modify the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to include an explicit representation of the grid-connected power system in Canada to the continental United States. ReEDS is unique among long-term capacity expansion models for its high spatial resolution and statistical treatment of the impact of variable renewable generation on capacity planning and dispatch. These unique traits are extended to new Canadian regions. We present example scenario results using the fully integrated Canada-U.S. version of ReEDS to demonstrate model capabilities. The newly developed, integrated Canada-U.S. ReEDS model can be used to analyze the dynamics of electricity transfers and other grid services between the two countries under different scenarios.

Martinez, A.; Eurek, K.; Mai, T.; Perry, A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Fundamentals of public-private partnerships in the transportation sector : international methodologies of highway public-private partnerships and a framework to increase the probability of success and allocate risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 2009 the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) gave the US infrastructure sector a grade D, based on the current and future needs of the nation's infrastructure and estimates that by year 2020, the US surface ...

Butler, Ryan, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A mixed finite-element scheme of a semiconductor energy-transport model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A mixed finite-element scheme of a semiconductor energy-transport model using dual entropy variables Stephan Gadau, Ansgar J¨ungel, and Paola Pietra Abstract. One-dimensional stationary energy employing a mixed-hybrid finite- element method which has the advantage to fulfill current conser- vation

Hanke-Bourgeois, Martin

278

User's manual for the Sandia Waste-Isolation Flow and Transport model (SWIFT).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a three-dimensional finite-difference model (SWIFT) which is used to simulate flow and transport processes in geologic media. The model was developed for use by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in the analysis of deep geologic nuclear waste-disposal facilities. This document, as indicated by the title, is a user's manual and is intended to facilitate the use of the SWIFT simulator. Mathematical equations, submodels, application notes, and a description of the program itself are given herein. In addition, a complete input data guide is given along with several appendices which are helpful in setting up a data-input deck. Computer code SWIFT (Sandia Waste Isolation, Flow and Transport Model) is a fully transient, three-dimensional model which solves the coupled equations for transport in geologic media. The processes considered are: (1) fluid flow; (2) heat transport; (3) dominant-species miscible displacement; and (4) trace-species miscible displacement. The first three processes are coupled via fluid density and viscosity. Together they provide the velocity field on which the fourth process depends.

Reeves, Mark; Cranwell, Robert M.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Equidimensional modelling of ow and transport processes in fractured porous systems I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

decomposition into a fracture problem and a matrix problem. This decoupled treatment of fracture and matrix;erent hydraulic properties of fractures and the porous matrix lead to very heterogeneous ow and trans1 Equidimensional modelling of ow and transport processes in fractured porous systems I Susanna

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

280

MODELING TRITIUM TRANSPORT IN PBLI BREEDER BLANKETS UNDER STEADY STATE , M. Abdou1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING TRITIUM TRANSPORT IN PBLI BREEDER BLANKETS UNDER STEADY STATE H. Zhang1 , A. Ying1 , M breeder blankets under realistic reactor-like conditions in this paper. Tritium concentration. Tritium behavior in the liquid metal breeder blanket requires a thorough understanding of the sequence

Abdou, Mohamed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation sector model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization J. Vernon Cole and Ashok Gidwani CFDRC Prepared for: DOE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Kickoff MeetingWater Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design fuel cell design and operation; Demonstrate improvements in water management resulting in improved

282

Reduced Order Model Compensator Control of Species Transport in a CVD Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reduced Order Model Compensator Control of Species Transport in a CVD Reactor G.M. Kepler, H for computation of feedback controls and compensators in a high pressure chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) reactor, through open­loop optimization [6, 21, 34]. However, because of process variability and the in­ creasing

283

MANHAZ position paper on: Modelling of Pollutant Transport in the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANHAZ position paper on: Modelling of Pollutant Transport in the Atmosphere Torben Mikkelsen July, Denmark I Atmospheric dispersion: Basic The dispersion of pollutants is intimately related to the state 2003 Atmospheric Physics Division Wind Energy Department Risø National Laboratory Dk-4000 Roskilde

284

COMSOL Modeling of Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport in Two-Dimensional Geometries With Heterogeneities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMSOL Modeling of Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport in Two-Dimensional Geometries, Environmental Sys- tems. 1 Introduction Groundwater contributes an large portion of stream flow and subsequently% of a streams nitrogen load has been discharged from groundwater. The surficial aquifer geometry in this area

Gobbert, Matthias K.

285

Fluctuations in a kinetic transport model for quantum friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a linear Boltzmann equation that arises in a model for quantum friction. It describes a particle that is slowed down by the emission of bosons. We study the stochastic process generated by this Boltzmann equation and we show convergence of its spatial trajectory to a multiple of Brownian motion with exponential scaling. The asymptotic position of the particle is finite in mean, even though its absolute value is typically infinite. This is contrasted to an approximation that neglects the influence of fluctuations, where the mean asymptotic position is infinite.

Roland Bauerschmidt; Wojciech de Roeck; Jürg Fröhlich

2014-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

286

Peristaltic Transport of a Rheological Fluid: Model for Movement of Food Bolus Through Esophagus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluid mechanical peristaltic transport through esophagus has been of concern in the paper. A mathematical model has been developed with an aim to study the peristaltic transport of a rheological fluid for arbitrary wave shapes and tube lengths. The Ostwald-de Waele power law of viscous fluid is considered here to depict the non-Newtonian behaviour of the fluid. The model is formulated and analyzed with the specific aim of exploring some important information concerning the movement of food bolus through the esophagus. The analysis has been carried out by using lubrication theory. The study is particularly suitable for cases where the Reynolds number is small. The esophagus is treated as a circular tube through which the transport of food bolus takes places by periodic contraction of the esophageal wall. Variation of different variables concerned with the transport phenomena such as pressure, flow velocity, particle trajectory and reflux are investigated for a single wave as well as for a train of periodic peristaltic waves. Locally variable pressure is seen to be highly sensitive to the flow index `n'. The study clearly shows that continuous fluid transport for Newtonian/rheological fluids by wave train propagation is much more effective than widely spaced single wave propagation in the case of peristaltic movement of food bolus in the esophagus.

J. C. Misra; S. Maiti

2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

287

Transport-theoretic model for the electron-proton-hydrogen atom auroa. II. Model results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a companion paper, a self-consistent transport-theoretic model for the combined electron-proton-hydrogen atom aurora was described. In this paper, numberical results based on the model are presented. This is done for the pure electron aurora, the pure proton-hydrogen atom aurora, and finally for the combined aurora. Adopting commonly used types of energy distributions for the incident particle (electron and proton) fluxes, the authors give numerical solutions for the precipitating electron, proton, and hydrogen atom differential number fluxes. Results are also given for ionization yields and emission yields of the following features: N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative group (3914 {Angstrom}), N{sub 2} second positive group (3371 {Angstrom}), selected N{sub 2} Lyman-Birge-Hopfields bands (1325, 1354, 1383, 1493, and all bands between 1700 and 1800 {Angstrom}), O I (1356 {Angstrom}), L{sub {alpha}} (1216 {Angstrom}), H{sub {beta}} (4861 {Angstrom}), and H{sub {alpha}} (6563 {Angstrom}). The yield at 1493 {Angstrom} also contains a contribution from N I (1493 {Angstrom}), which in fact dominates LBH emission. A major new result of this study is that the secondary electron flux produced by the proton-hydrogen atom aurora is much softer than that produced by the electron aurora. This increased softness is due to the fact that (for energies of aurora interest) cross sections for secondary electron flux produced by the proton-hydrogen atom aurora is much softer than that produced by the electron aurora. This increased softness is due to the fact that (for energies of auroral interest) cross sections for secondary electron production by proton and hydrogen atom impact decrease exponentially with increasing secondary electron energy, whereas the cross sections for electron impact decrease as an inverse power law with increasing secondary energy.

Strickland, D.J. [Computational Physics, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States); Daniell, R.E. Jr. [Computational Physics, Inc., Newton, MA (United States); Basu, B. [Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States)] [and others

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Direct coupling of a genome-scale microbial in silico model and a groundwater reactive transport model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The activity of microorganisms often plays an important role in dynamic natural attenuation or engineered bioremediation of subsurface contaminants, such as chlorinated solvents, metals, and radionuclides. To evaluate and/or design bioremediated systems, quantitative reactive transport models are needed. State-of-the-art reactive transport models often ignore the microbial effects or simulate the microbial effects with static growth yield and constant reaction rate parameters over simulated conditions, while in reality microorganisms can dynamically modify their functionality (such as utilization of alternative respiratory pathways) in response to spatial and temporal variations in environmental conditions. Constraint-based genome-scale microbial in silico models, using genomic data and multiple-pathway reaction networks, have been shown to be able to simulate transient metabolism of some well studied microorganisms and identify growth rate, substrate uptake rates, and byproduct rates under different growth conditions. These rates can be identified and used to replace specific microbially-mediated reaction rates in a reactive transport model using local geochemical conditions as constraints. We previously demonstrated the potential utility of integrating a constraint based microbial metabolism model with a reactive transport simulator as applied to bioremediation of uranium in groundwater. However, that work relied on an indirect coupling approach that was effective for initial demonstration but may not be extensible to more complex problems that are of significant interest (e.g., communities of microbial species, multiple constraining variables). Here, we extend that work by presenting and demonstrating a method of directly integrating a reactive transport model (FORTRAN code) with constraint-based in silico models solved with IBM ILOG CPLEX linear optimizer base system (C library). The models were integrated with BABEL, a language interoperability tool. The modeling system is designed in such a way that constraint-based models targeting different microorganisms or competing organism communities can be easily plugged into the system. Constraint-based modeling is very costly given the size of a genome-scale reaction network. To save computation time, a binary tree is traversed to examine the concentration and solution pool generated during the simulation in order to decide whether the constraint-based model should be called. We also show preliminary results from the integrated model including a comparison of the direct and indirect coupling approaches.

Fang, Yilin; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Garg, Srinath; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

289

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector. Technical report twelve: Economic analysis of alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Altemative Fuels Assessment, the Department of Energy (DOE) is studying the use of derivatives of natural gas, including compressed natural gas and methanol, as altemative transportation fuels. A critical part of this effort is determining potential sources of natural gas and the economics of those sources. Previous studies in this series characterized the economics of unutilized gas within the lower 48 United States, comparing its value for methanol production against its value as a pipelined fuel (US Department of Energy 1991), and analyzed the costs of developing undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves in several countries (US Department of Energy 1992c). This report extends those analyses to include Alaskan North Slope natural gas that either is not being produced or is being reinjected. The report includes the following: A description of discovered and potential (undiscovered) quantities of natural gas on the Alaskan North Slope. A discussion of proposed altemative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. A comparison of the economics of the proposed alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the costs of transporting Alaskan North Slope gas to markets in the lower 48 States as pipeline gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), or methanol. It is not intended to recommend one alternative over another or to evaluate the relative economics or timing of using North Slope gas in new tertiary oil recovery projects. The information is supplied in sufficient detail to allow incorporation of relevant economic relationships (for example, wellhead gas prices and transportation costs) into the Altemative Fuels Trade Model, the analytical framework DOE is using to evaluate various policy options.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Cosmic constraint on unified model of dark sectors in flat and non-flat varying gravitational constant theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations indicate that most universal matter are invisible and gravitational constant $G(t)$ maybe depends on the time. The theory of variation of $G$ (VG) is explored in this paper, with naturally resulting to the invisible components in universe. We utilize the observational data: lookback time data, model-independent gamma ray bursts data, growth function of matter linear perturbations, type Ia supernovae data with systematic errors, cosmic microwave background, and baryon acoustic oscillation data from the radial scale measurement and the peak-positions measurement, to restrict the unified model (UM) of dark components in VG theory. Using the best-fit values of parameters with the covariance matrix, constraints on the variation of $G$ are $(\\frac{G}{G_{0}})_{z=3.5}\\simeq 1.0003^{+0.0014}_{-0.0016}$ and $(\\frac{\\dot{G}}{G})_{today}\\simeq 0.7977^{+2.3566}_{-2.3566}\\times 10^{-13} yr^{-1}$ in a flat geometry, the small uncertainties around constants. Limit on equation of state of dark matter is $w_{0dm}=...

Lu, Jianbo; Wu, Yabo; Xu, Lixin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

GREET 1.0 -- Transportation fuel cycles model: Methodology and use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the development and use of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel-cycle emissions and energy use associated with various transportation fuels for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, Co, NOx, SOx, and particulate matter measuring 10 microns or less) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates the total fuel-cycle energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption using various transportation fuels. The GREET model includes 17 fuel cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, clean diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydropower, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; and landfill gases to methanol. This report presents fuel-cycle energy use and emissions for a 2000 model-year car powered by each of the fuels that are produced from the primary energy sources considered in the study.

Wang, M.Q.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Uncertainty Analysis Framework - Hanford Site-Wide Groundwater Flow and Transport Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) embarked on a new initiative to strengthen the technical defensibility of the predictions being made with a site-wide groundwater flow and transport model at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. In FY 2000, the focus of the initiative was on the characterization of major uncertainties in the current conceptual model that would affect model predictions. The long-term goals of the initiative are the development and implementation of an uncertainty estimation methodology in future assessments and analyses using the site-wide model. This report focuses on the development and implementation of an uncertainty analysis framework.

Cole, Charles R.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Thorne, Paul D.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Rogers, Phillip M.

2001-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

293

A scaleable architecture for the modeling and simulation of intelligent transportation systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A distributed, scaleable architecture for the modeling and simulation of Intelligent Transportation Systems on a network of workstations or a parallel computer has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The resulting capability provides a modular framework supporting plug-in models, hardware, and live data sources; visually realistic graphics displays to support training and human factors studies; and a set of basic ITS models. The models and capabilities are described, along with atypical scenario involving dynamic rerouting of smart vehicles which send probe reports to and receive traffic advisories from a traffic management center capable of incident detection.

Ewing, T.; Tentner, A.

1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

294

Numerical modeling of mixed sediment resuspension, transport, and deposition during the March 1998 episodic events in southern Lake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical modeling of mixed sediment resuspension, transport, and deposition during the March 1998 2006; published 17 February 2007. [1] A two-dimensional sediment transport model capable of simulating sediment resuspension of mixed (cohesive plus noncohesive) sediment is developed and applied

295

A critical view on transport and entanglement in models of photosynthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum effects in biological light-harvesting molecules, such as quantum coherence of excitonic states and entanglement have recently gained much attention. We observe a certain discrepancy between the original experimental work and several theoretical treatments of coherent excitation transport in light-harvesting molecules. Contrary to what is generally stated, we argue that entanglement in such molecules is generally not equivalent to the presence of coherence but mostly introduced by initial assumptions underlying the models, and that entanglement, as opposite to coherence, seems to play no role in the transport efficiency.

Tiersch, Markus; Briegel, Hans J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Application of canonical profiles transport model to the H-mode shots in tokamaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The linear and nonlinear versions of the Canonical Profiles Transport Model (CPTM), which includes both heat and particle transport equations, are used to simulate core and pedestal plasma for JET, and MAST H-mode shots. Simulations by the nonlinear version show reasonable agreement with experiment for both ELMy and ELM-free shots. RMS deviations of calculated results from the experimental ones are on the level 10-12% in main. The calculated ion and electron temperature profiles are very insensitive to the change of the deposited peaked power profiles. The calculated pedestal temperature rapidly increases with plasma current; density profile peaking increases at low collisionalities.

Dnestrovskij, Yu. N.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Danilov, A. V.; Lysenko, S. E.; Cherkasov, S. V. [Institute of Tokamak Physics, Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Gerasimov, S. N.; Hender, T. C.; Voitsekhovitch, I. A.; Roach, C. M.; Walsh, M. J. [Culham Science Centre, EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association (United Kingdom)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Transport Modeling of Membrane Extraction of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon from Water for Ion Mobility Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Membrane-extraction Ion Mobility Spectrometry (ME-IMS) is a feasible technique for the continuous monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water. This work studies theoretically the time-dependent characteristics of sampling and detection of trichloroethylene (TCE). The sampling is configured so that aqueous contaminants permeate through a hollow polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane and are carried away by a transport gas flowing through the membrane tube into IMS analyzer. The theoretical study is based on a two-dimensional transient fluid flow and mass transport model. The model describes the TCE mixing in the water, permeation through the membrane layer, and convective diffusion in the air flow inside membrane tube. The effect of various transport gas flow rates on temporal profiles of IMS signal intensity is investigated. The results show that fast time response and high transport yield can be achieved for ME-IMS by controlling the flow rate in the extraction membrane tube. These modeled time-response profiles are important for determining duty cycles of field-deployable sensors for monitoring chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Du, Yongzhai [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Xu, Jun [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Modeling engine oil vaporization and transport of the oil vapor in the piston ring pack on internal combustion engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model was developed to study engine oil vaporization and oil vapor transport in the piston ring pack of internal combustion engines. With the assumption that the multi-grade oil can be modeled as a compound of several ...

Cho, Yeunwoo, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Analysis of methods and models for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes in the agricultural sector of the US economy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this research was to assist the US Department of Energy (DOE) in developing methods for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts due to the effects of increases in the ambient concentration of CO/sub 2/ on agricultural production. First, a comprehensive literature search was undertaken to determine what types of models and methods have been developed, which could be effectively used to conduct assessments of the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/ buildup. Specific attention was focused upon models and methods for assessing the physical impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes on crop yields; national and multi-regional agricultural sector models; and macroeconomic models of the US economy. The second task involved a thorough investigation of the research efforts being conducted by other public and private sector organizations in order to determine how more recent analytical methods being developed outside of DOE could be effectively integrated into a more comprehensive analysis of the direct economic impacts of CO/sub 2/ buildup. The third and final task involved synthesizing the information gathered in the first two tasks into a systematic framework for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes originating in the agricultural sector of the US economy. It is concluded that the direct economic impacts of CO/sub 2/ on the agricultural sector and the indirect economic impacts caused by spillover effects from agriculture to other sectors of the economy will be pervasive; however, the direction and magnitude of these impacts on producers and consumers cannot be determined a priori.

Callaway, J.M.; Cronin, F.J.; Currie, J.W.; Tawil, J.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Modeling and Diagnostics of Fuel Cell Porous Media for Improving Water Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When a fuel cell is operating at high current density, water accumulation is a significant cause of performance and component degradation. Investigating the water transport inside the fuel cell is a challenging task due to opacity of the components, the randomness of the porous materials, and the difficulty in gain access to the interior for measurement due to the small dimensions of components. Numerical simulation can provide a good insight of the evolution of the water transport under different working condition. However, the validation of those simulations is remains an issue due the same experimental obstacles associated with in-situ measurements. The discussion herein will focus on pore-network modeling of the water transport on the PTL and the insights gained from simulations as well as in the validation technique. The implications of a recently published criterion to characterize PTL, based on percolation theory, and validate numerical simulation are discussed.

Allen, Jeff; M'edici, Ezequiel

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation sector model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Assimilation of satellite images into a sediment transport model of Lake Michigan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we develop and examine several schemes for combining daily images obtained from the Sea-viewing Wide Field Spectrometer (SeaWiFS) with a two-dimensional sediment transport model of Lake Michigan. We consider two data assimilation methods, direct insertion and a kriging-based approach, and perform a forecasting study focused on a 2-month period in spring 1998 when a large storm caused substantial amounts of sediment resuspension and horizontal sediment transport in the lake. By beginning with the simplest possible forecast method and sequentially adding complexity we are able to assess the improvements offered by combining the satellite data with the numerical model. In our application, we find that data assimilation schemes that include both the data and the lake dynamics improve forecast root mean square error by 40% over purely model-based approaches and by 20% over purely data-based approaches.

Stroud, J.; Lesht, B.; Beletsky, D.; Stein, M.; Univ. of Pennsylvania; NOAA; Univ. of Michigan; Univ. of Chicago

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Mathematical Modeling of Transport and Degradation of Feedstuffs in the Small Intestine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a mathematical modeling of the digestion in the small intestine. The main interest of our work is to consider, at the same time, different aspects of the digestion i.e. the transport of the bolus all along the intestine, feedstuffs degradation according to the enzymes and local physical conditions, and nutrients absorption. A system of coupled ordinary differential equations is used to model these phenomena. The major unknowns of this system are the position of the bolus and its composition. This system of equations is solved numerically. We present different numerical computations for the degradation, absorption and transport of the bolus with acceptable accuracy with experimental data. The main feature and interest of this model are its generality. Even if we are at an early stage of development, our approach can be adapted to treat any kind of feedstuffs in any non-ruminant animal to predict the composition and velocity of bolus in the small intestine.

Taghipoor, Masoomeh; Georgelin, Christine; Licois, Jean-René; Barles, Guy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

MONTE CARLO SIMULATION MODEL OF ENERGETIC PROTON TRANSPORT THROUGH SELF-GENERATED ALFVEN WAVES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new Monte Carlo simulation model for the transport of energetic protons through self-generated Alfven waves is presented. The key point of the model is that, unlike the previous ones, it employs the full form (i.e., includes the dependence on the pitch-angle cosine) of the resonance condition governing the scattering of particles off Alfven waves-the process that approximates the wave-particle interactions in the framework of quasilinear theory. This allows us to model the wave-particle interactions in weak turbulence more adequately, in particular, to implement anisotropic particle scattering instead of isotropic scattering, which the previous Monte Carlo models were based on. The developed model is applied to study the transport of flare-accelerated protons in an open magnetic flux tube. Simulation results for the transport of monoenergetic protons through the spectrum of Alfven waves reveal that the anisotropic scattering leads to spatially more distributed wave growth than isotropic scattering. This result can have important implications for diffusive shock acceleration, e.g., affect the scattering mean free path of the accelerated particles in and the size of the foreshock region.

Afanasiev, A.; Vainio, R., E-mail: alexandr.afanasiev@helsinki.fi [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki (Finland)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Analytical model of electron transport in polycrystalline, degenerately doped ZnO films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analytical description of the charge carrier transport, valid for non-degenerated and degenerated semiconductors, was developed, critically reviewed, and fitted to the temperature-dependent Hall mobility data of magnetron sputtered, degenerately doped ZnO:Al films. Our extended model for grain boundary scattering in semiconductors of arbitrary degeneracy is based on previous models from literature and suitable to describe the Hall mobility of the carriers as a function of the free carrier concentration and the temperature at the same time. It is mathematically simple enough for a fast fit procedure, which is not possible with most of the previous models. Applying a combined transport model consisting of ionized impurity scattering, phonon scattering, and grain boundary scattering in degenerate semiconductors, we were able to determine the trap density at the grain boundaries N{sub t} ? 3?×?10{sup 13} to 5?×?10{sup 13?}cm{sup ?2} and the deformation potential E{sub ac} in the range of 5?eV to 9?eV depending on the details of the transport model.

Bikowski, André, E-mail: andre.bikowski@helmholtz-berlin.de; Ellmer, Klaus [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Institute for Solar Fuels, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

305

FINAL REPORT:Observation and Simulations of Transport of Molecules and Ions Across Model Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the this new grant we developed a robust methodology for investigating a wide range of properties of phospho-lipid bilayers. The approach developed is unique because despite using periodic boundary conditions, we can simulate an entire experiment or process in detail. For example, we can follow the entire permeation process in a lipid-membrane. This includes transport from the bulk aqueous phase to the lipid surface; permeation into the lipid; transport inside the lipid; and transport out of the lipid to the bulk aqueous phase again. We studied the transport of small gases in both the lipid itself and in model protein channels. In addition, we have examined the transport of nanocrystals through the lipid membrane, with the main goal of understanding the mechanical behavior of lipids under stress including water and ion leakage and lipid flip flop. Finally we have also examined in detail the deformation of lipids when under the influence of external fields, both mechanical and electrostatic (currently in progress). The important observations and conclusions from our studies are described in the main text of the report

MURAD, SOHAIL [University of Illinois at Chicago] [University of Illinois at Chicago; JAMESON, CYNTHIA J [University of Illinois at Chicago] [University of Illinois at Chicago

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

306

Process Intensification - Chemical Sector Focus  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Process Intensification - Chemical Sector Focus 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction ......

307

Peristaltic Transport of a Rheological Fluid: Model for Movement of Food Bolus Through Esophagus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluid mechanical peristaltic transport through esophagus has been of concern in the paper. A mathematical model has been developed with an aim to study the peristaltic transport of a rheological fluid for arbitrary wave shapes and tube lengths. The Ostwald-de Waele power law of viscous fluid is considered here to depict the non-Newtonian behaviour of the fluid. The model is formulated and analyzed with the specific aim of exploring some important information concerning the movement of food bolus through the esophagus. The analysis has been carried out by using lubrication theory. The study is particularly suitable for cases where the Reynolds number is small. The esophagus is treated as a circular tube through which the transport of food bolus takes places by periodic contraction of the esophageal wall. Variation of different variables concerned with the transport phenomena such as pressure, flow velocity, particle trajectory and reflux are investigated for a single wave as well as for a train of periodic per...

Misra, J C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

The Role of Dispersion in Radionuclide Transport - Data and Modeling Requirements: Revision No. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the collaborative effort of the members of an ad hoc subcommittee of the Underground Test Area Project Technical Working Group. This subcommittee was to answer questions and concerns raised by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, regarding Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units (CAUs) 101 and 102. The document attempts to synthesize the combined comments made by each member of this subcommittee into insights made in the role of dispersion in radionuclide transport data and modeling. Dispersion is one of many processes that control the concentration of radionuclides in groundwater beneath the Nevada Test Site where CAUs 101 and 102 are located. In order to understand the role of dispersion in radionuclide transport, there is a critical need for CAU- or site-specific data related to transport parameters which is currently lacking, particularly in the case of Western a nd Central Pahute Mesa. The purpose of this technical basis document is to: (1) define dispersion and its role in contaminant transport, (2) present a synopsis of field-scale dispersion measurements, (3) provide a literature review of theories to explain field-scale dispersion, (4) suggest approaches to account for dispersion in CAU-scale radionuclide modeling, and (5) to determine if additional dispersion measurements should be made at this time.

Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. Final draft, technical memorandum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical memorandum was prepared to: (1) describe a typical basalt radionuclide repository site, (2) describe geologic and hydrologic processes associated with regional radionuclide transport in basalts, (3) define the parameters required to model regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site, and (4) develop a ''conceptual model'' of radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. In a general hydrological sense, basalts may be described as layered sequences of aquifers and aquitards. The Columbia River Basalt, centered near the semi-arid Pasco Basin, is considered by many to be typical basalt repository host rock. Detailed description of the flow system including flow velocities with high-low hydraulic conductivity sequences are not possible with existing data. However, according to theory, waste-transport routes are ultimately towards the Columbia River and the lengths of flow paths from the repository to the biosphere may be relatively short. There are many physical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear processes with associated parameters that together determine the possible pattern of radionuclide migration in basalts and surrounding formations. Brief process descriptions and associated parameter lists are provided. Emphasis has been placed on the use of the distribution coefficient in simulating ion exchange. The use of the distribution coefficient approach is limited because it takes into account only relatively fast mass transfer processes. In general, knowledge of hydrogeochemical processes is primitive.

Walton, W.C.; Voorhees, M.L.; Prickett, T.A.

1980-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

310

Computing observables in curved multifield models of inflation - A guide (with code) to the transport method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe how to apply the transport method to compute inflationary observables in a broad range of multiple-field models. The method is efficient and encompasses scenarios with curved field-space metrics, violations of slow-roll conditions and turns of the trajectory in field space. It can be used for an arbitrary mass spectrum, including massive modes and models with quasi-single-field dynamics. In this note we focus on practical issues. It is accompanied by a Mathematica code which can be used to explore suitable models, or as a basis for further development.

Mafalda Dias; Jonathan Frazer; David Seery

2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

311

Computing observables in curved multifield models of inflation - A guide (with code) to the transport method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe how to apply the transport method to compute inflationary observables in a broad range of multiple-field models. The method is efficient and encompasses scenarios with curved field-space metrics, violations of slow-roll conditions and turns of the trajectory in field space. It can be used for an arbitrary mass spectrum, including massive modes and models with quasi-single-field dynamics. In this note we focus on practical issues. It is accompanied by a Mathematica code which can be used to explore suitable models, or as a basis for further development.

Dias, Mafalda; Seery, David

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

J/psi production in relativistic heavy ion collisions from a multiphase transport model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the present study is a hybrid model based on three Monte Carlo models for the three stages of relativistic heavy ion collisions, i.e., the heavy ion jet interaction generator J?c production in relativistic heavy ion collision Bin Zhang,1 C.M. Ko,2 Bao...V. With this dynamic transport model, we find that the net number of produced J/c from the parton and hadron phases is smaller than that expected from initial nucleon-nucleon collisions, contrary to the J/c en- ?2002 The American Physical Society1 ZHANG, KO, LI...

Zhang, B.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Lin, ZW; Pal, S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Modeling hydrology and reactive transport in roads: The effect of cracks, the edge, and contaminant properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this research was to provide a tool for regulators to evaluate the groundwater contamination from the use of virgin and secondary materials in road construction. A finite element model, HYDRUS2D, was used to evaluate generic scenarios for secondary material use in base layers. Use of generic model results for particular applications was demonstrated through a steel slag example. The hydrology and reactive transport of contaminants were modeled in a two-dimensional cross section of a road. Model simulations showed that in an intact pavement, lateral velocities from the edge towards the centerline may transport contaminants in the base layer. The dominant transport mechanisms are advection closer to the edge and diffusion closer to the centerline. A shoulder joint in the pavement allows 0.03 to 0.45 m{sup 3}/day of infiltration per meter of joint length as a function of the base and subgrade hydrology and the rain intensity. Scenario simulations showed that salts in the base layer of pavements are depleted by 99% in the first 20 years, whereas the metals may not reach the groundwater in 20 years at any significant concentrations if the pavement is built on adsorbing soils.

Apul, Defne S. [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft St., Mail Stop 307, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)], E-mail: Defne.apul@utoledo.edu; Gardner, Kevin H. [Environmental Research Group, Department of Civil Engineering, 35 Colovos Road, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)], E-mail: Kevin.gardner@unh.edu; Eighmy, T. Taylor [Environmental Research Group, Department of Civil Engineering, 35 Colovos Road, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)], E-mail: Taylor.eighmy@unh.edu

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Comparative study of micromixing models in transported scalar PDF simulations of turbulent nonpremixed bluff body flames  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulation results are presented for turbulent jet diffusion flames with various levels of turbulence-chemistry interaction, stabilized behind a bluff body (Sydney Flames HM1-3). Interaction between turbulence and combustion is modeled with the transported joint-scalar PDF approach. The mass density function transport equation is solved in a Lagrangian manner. A second-moment-closure turbulence model is applied to obtain accurate mean flow and turbulent mixing fields. The behavior of two micromixing models is discussed: the Euclidean minimum spanning tree model and the modified Curl coalescence dispersion model. The impact of the micromixing model choice on the results in physical space is small, although some influence becomes visible as the amount of local extinction increases. Scatter plots and profiles of conditional means and variances of thermochemical quantities, conditioned on the mixture fraction, are discussed both within and downstream of the recirculation region. A distinction is made between local extinction and incomplete combustion, based on the CO species mass fraction. The differences in qualitative behavior between the micromixing models are explained and quantitative comparison to experimental data is made. (author)

Merci, Bart [Department of Flow, Heat and Combustion Mechanics, Ghent University-UGent, Ghent (Belgium); Roekaerts, Dirk [Department of Multi-Scale Physics, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Naud, Bertrand [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Pope, Stephen B. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

TransCom model simulations of CH? and related species: linking transport, surface flux and chemical loss with CH? variability in the troposphere and lower stratosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A chemistry-transport model (CTM) intercomparison experiment (TransCom-CH?) has been designed to investigate the roles of surface emissions, transport and chemical loss in simulating the global methane distribution. Model ...

Patra, P. K.

316

A reaction-based paradigm to model reactive chemical transport in groundwater with general kinetic and equilibrium reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a reaction-based water quality transport model in subsurface flow systems. Transport of chemical species with a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by M partial differential equations (PDEs). Decomposition via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network transforms M species reactive transport equations into two sets of equations: a set of thermodynamic equilibrium equations representing NE equilibrium reactions and a set of reactive transport equations of M-NE kinetic-variables involving no equilibrium reactions (a kinetic-variable is a linear combination of species). The elimination of equilibrium reactions from reactive transport equations allows robust and efficient numerical integration. The model solves the PDEs of kinetic-variables rather than individual chemical species, which reduces the number of reactive transport equations and simplifies the reaction terms in the equations. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the coupled transport and reaction equations. Simulation comparisons with exact solutions were performed to verify numerical accuracy and assess the effectiveness of various numerical strategies to deal with different application circumstances. Two validation examples involving simulations of uranium transport in soil columns are presented to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate reactive transport with complex reaction networks involving both kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

Zhang, Fan [ORNL; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh [University of Central Florida, Orlando; Parker, Jack C [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Pace, Molly [ORNL; Kim, Young Jin [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Simplified 1-D Hydrodynamic and Salinity Transport Modeling of the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta: Sea Level Rise and Water Diversion Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrodynamic and Salinity Transport Modeling of the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta: Sea Level Rise and Water Diversion Effects

Fleenor, William E.; Bombardelli, Fabian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A model for thermally driven heat and air transport in passive solar buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model for transient interzone heat and air flow transport in passive solar buildings is presented incorporating wall boundary layers in stratified zones, and with interzone transport via apertures (doors and windows). The model includes features that have been observed in measurements taken in more than a dozen passive solar buildings. The model includes integral formulations of the laminar and turbulent boundary layer equations for the vertical walls which are then coupled to a one-dimensional core model for each zone. The cores in each zone exchange mass and energy through apertures that are modeled by an orifice type equation. The procedure is transient in that time dependence is retained only in the core equations which are solved by an explicit method. The model predicts room stratification of about 2/sup 0/C/m (1.1/sup 0/F/ft) for a room-to-room temperature difference of 0.56/sup 0/C(1/sup 0/F) which is in general agreement with the data.

Jones, G.F.; Balcomb, J.D.; Otis, D.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Model for thermally driven heat and air transport in passive solar buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model for transient interzone heat and air flow transport in passive solar buildings is presented incorporating wall boundary layers in stratified zones, and with interzone transport via apertures (doors and windows). The model includes features that have been observed in measurements taken in more than a dozen passive solar buildings. The model includes integral formulations of the laminar and turbulent boundary layer equations for the vertical walls which are then coupled to a one-dimensional core model for each zone. The cores in each zone exchange mass and energy through apertures that are modeled by an orifice type equation. The procedure is transient in that time dependence is retained only in the core equations which are solved by an explicit method. The model predicts room stratification of about 2/sup 0/C/m (1.1/sup 0/F/ft) for a room-to-room temperature difference of 0.56/sup 0/C(1/sup 0/F) which is in general agreement with the data. 38 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

Jones, G.F.; Balcomb, J.D.; Otis, D.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Comparison of one-, two-, and three-dimensional models for mass transport of radionuclides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical memorandum compares one-, two-, and three-dimensional models for studying regional mass transport of radionuclides in groundwater associated with deep repository disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In addition, this report outlines the general conditions for which a one- or two-dimensional model could be used as an alternate to a three-dimensional model analysis. The investigation includes a review of analytical and numerical models in addition to consideration of such conditions as rock and fluid heterogeneity, anisotropy, boundary and initial conditions, and various geometric shapes of repository sources and sinks. Based upon current hydrologic practice, each review is taken separately and discussed to the extent that the researcher can match his problem conditions with the minimum number of model dimensions necessary for an accurate solution.

Prickett, T.A.; Voorhees, M.L.; Herzog, B.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation sector model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Predicting Fate and Transport of Contaminants in the Vadose Zone using a Soil Screening Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil Screening Levels (SSLs) are threshold concentrations below which there is no concern for the migration of residual soil contaminants to the aquifer above maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). At sites where contaminant concentrations exceed SSLs, further study maybe warranted under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). SSLs are based upon simplified fate and transport assumptions, but the guidance allows the flexibility to develop a detailed modeling approach that accounts for complex site variables such as degradation and thickness of the vadose zone. The distinct advantage of the detailed modeling is that individual sites may calculate a less restrictive, but still protective SSL. A Multi-Layer Vadose Zone Contaminant Migration Model [VZCOMML(C)] was developed at the Savannah River Site to allay the higher costs of detailed modeling and achieve a higher clean-up level. The software model is faster, simpler, and less expensive to us e than other commercially available codes.

Rucker, G.

2002-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

322

Using a scalable modeling and simulation framework to evaluate the benefits of intelligent transportation systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A scalable, distributed modeling and simulation framework has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory to study Intelligent Transportation Systems. The framework can run on a single-processor workstation, or run distributed on a multiprocessor computer or network of workstations. The framework is modular and supports plug-in models, hardware, and live data sources. The initial set of models currently includes road network and traffic flow, probe and smart vehicles, traffic management centers, communications between vehicles and centers, in-vehicle navigation systems, roadway traffic advisories. The modeling and simulation capability has been used to examine proposed ITS concepts. Results are presented from modeling scenarios from the Advanced Driver and Vehicle Advisory Navigation Concept (ADVANCE) experimental program to demonstrate how the framework can be used to evaluate the benefits of ITS and to plan future ITS operational tests and deployment initiatives.

Ewing, T.; Tentner, A.

2000-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

323

A critical view on transport and entanglement in models of photosynthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We revisit critically the recent claims, inspired by quantum optics and quantum information, that there is entanglement in the biological pigment protein complexes, and that it is responsible for the high transport efficiency. While unexpectedly long coherence times were experimentally demonstrated, the existence of entanglement is, at the moment, a purely theoretical conjecture; it is this conjecture that we analyze. As demonstrated by a toy model, a similar transport phenomenology can be obtained without generating entanglement. Furthermore, we also argue that even if entanglement does exist, it is purely incidental and seems to plays no essential role for the transport efficiency. We emphasize that our paper is not a proof that entanglement does not exist in light-harvesting complexes - this would require a knowledge of the system and its parameters well beyond the state of the art. Rather, we present a counter-example to the recent claims of entanglement, showing that the arguments, as they stand at the moment, are not sufficiently justified and hence cannot be taken as proof for the existence of entanglement, let alone of its essential role, in the excitation transport.

Markus Tiersch; Sandu Popescu; Hans J. Briegel

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

324

Area-preserving maps models of gyro-averaged ${\\bf E} \\times {\\bf B}$ chaotic transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discrete maps have been extensively used to model 2-dimensional chaotic transport in plasmas and fluids. Here we focus on area-preserving maps describing finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on ${\\bf E} \\times {\\bf B}$ chaotic transport in magnetized plasmas with zonal flows perturbed by electrostatic drift waves. FLR effects are included by gyro-averaging the Hamiltonians of the maps which, depending on the zonal flow profile, can have monotonic or non-monotonic frequencies. In the limit of zero Larmor radius, the monotonic frequency map reduces to the standard Chirikov-Taylor map, and, in the case of non-monotonic frequency, the map reduces to the standard nontwist map. We show that in both cases FLR leads to chaos suppression, changes in the stability of fixed points, and robustness of transport barriers. FLR effects are also responsible for changes in the phase space topology and zonal flow bifurcations. Dynamical systems methods based on recurrence time statistics are used to quantify the dependence on the Larmor radius of the threshold for the destruction of transport barriers.

J. D. da Fonseca; D. del-Castillo-Negrete; I. L. Caldas

2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

325

Area-preserving maps models of gyroaveraged E×B chaotic transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discrete maps have been extensively used to model 2-dimensional chaotic transport in plasmas and fluids. Here we focus on area-preserving maps describing finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on E?×?B chaotic transport in magnetized plasmas with zonal flows perturbed by electrostatic drift waves. FLR effects are included by gyro-averaging the Hamiltonians of the maps which, depending on the zonal flow profile, can have monotonic or non-monotonic frequencies. In the limit of zero Larmor radius, the monotonic frequency map reduces to the standard Chirikov-Taylor map, and in the case of non-monotonic frequency, the map reduces to the standard nontwist map. We show that in both cases FLR leads to chaos suppression, changes in the stability of fixed points, and robustness of transport barriers. FLR effects are also responsible for changes in the phase space topology and zonal flow bifurcations. Dynamical systems methods based on the counting of recurrences times are used to quantify the dependence on the Larmor radius of the threshold for the destruction of transport barriers.

Fonseca, J. D. da, E-mail: jfonseca@if.usp.br; Caldas, I. L., E-mail: ibere@if.usp.br [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP 5315-970 (Brazil); Castillo-Negrete, D. del, E-mail: delcastillod@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-8071 (United States)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Final Report Coupling in silico microbial models with reactive transport models to predict the fate of contaminants in the subsurface.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project successfully accomplished its goal of coupling genome-scale metabolic models with hydrological and geochemical models to predict the activity of subsurface microorganisms during uranium bioremediation. Furthermore, it was demonstrated how this modeling approach can be used to develop new strategies to optimize bioremediation. The approach of coupling genome-scale metabolic models with reactive transport modeling is now well enough established that it has been adopted by other DOE investigators studying uranium bioremediation. Furthermore, the basic principles developed during our studies will be applicable to much broader investigations of microbial activities, not only for other types of bioremediation, but microbial metabolism in diversity of environments. This approach has the potential to make an important contribution to predicting the impact of environmental perturbations on the cycling of carbon and other biogeochemical cycles.

Lovley, Derek R.

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Introduction Transport in disordered graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Ballistic transport in disordered graphene P, Gornyi, Mirlin Ballistic transport in disordered graphene #12;Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Outline 1 Introduction Model Experimental motivation Transport in clean graphene 2

Fominov, Yakov

328

Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. With the working of energy programs and policies on carbon regulation, how to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions become extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions (e.g., carbon emission) for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models. In this report, we first conduct brief overview on different representations of end-use technologies (mitigation measures) in various energy-climate models, followed by problem statements, and a description of the basic concepts of quantifying the cost of conserved energy including integrating non-regrets options. A non-regrets option is defined as a GHG reduction option that is cost effective, without considering their additional benefits related to reducing GHG emissions. Based upon these, we develop information on costs of mitigation measures and technological change. These serve as the basis for collating the data on energy savings and costs for their future use in integrated assessment models. In addition to descriptions of the iron and steel making processes, and the mitigation measures identified in this study, the report includes tabulated databases on costs of measure implementation, energy savings, carbon-emission reduction, and lifetimes. The cost curve data on mitigation measures are available over time, which allows an estimation of technological change over a decade-long historical period. In particular, the report will describe new treatment of technological change in energy-climate modeling for this industry sector, i.e., assessing the changes in costs and energy-savings potentials via comparing 1994 and 2002 conservation supply curves. In this study, we compared the same set of mitigation measures for both 1994 and 2002 -- no additional mitigation measure for year 2002 was included due to unavailability of such data. Therefore, the estimated potentials in total energy savings and carbon reduction would most likely be more conservative for year 2002 in this study. Based upon the cost curves, the rate of change in the savings potential at a given cost can be evaluated and be used to estimate future rates of change that can be the input for energy-climate models. Through characterizing energy-efficiency technology costs and improvement potentials, we have developed and presented energy cost curves for energy efficiency measures applicable to the U.S. iron and steel industry for the years 1994 and 2002. The cost curves can change significantly under various scenarios: the baseline year, discount rate, energy intensity, production, industry structure (e.g., integrated versus secondary steel making and number of plants), efficiency (or mitigation) measures, share of iron and steel production to which the individual measures can be applied, and inclusion of other non-energy benefits. Inclusion of other non-energy benefits from implementing mitigation measures can reduce the costs of conserved energy significantly. In addition, costs of conserved energy (CCE) for individual mitigation measures increase with the increases in discount rates, resulting in a general increase in total cost of mitigation measures for implementation and operation with a higher discount rate. In 1994, integrated steel mills in the U.S. produced 55.

Xu, T.T.; Sathaye, J.; Galitsky, C.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

329

Finite element modelling of transport and drift effects in tokamak divertor and SOL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A finite element code is used to simulate transport of a single-species plasma in the edge and divertor of a tokamak. The physical model is based on Braginskii`s fluid equations for the conservation of particles, parallel momentum, ion and electron energy. In modelling recycling, transport of neutral density and energy is treated in the diffusion approximation. The electrostatic potential is obtained from the generalized Ohm`s law. It is used to compute the electric field and the associated E x B drift. In a first approximation, transport is assumed to be ambipolar. The system of equations is discretized on an unstructured triangular mesh, thus permitting good spatial resolution near the X-point and an accurate description of divertor plates of arbitrary shape. Special care must be taken to prevent numerical corruption of the highly anisotropic thermal diffusion. Comparisons will be made between simulations and experimental results from TdeV. This will focus, in particular, on density and temperature profiles at the divertor plates, and on the plasma parallel velocity in the SOL. The asymmetry in the power deposited to the inner and outer divertors and the effect of magnetic field reversal will be considered. Comparisons with B2-Eirene simulation results will also be presented.

Simard, M.; Marchand, R. [INRS-Energie et Materiaux, Varennes, Quebec (Canada); Boucher, C.; Gunn, J.P. [Centre Canadien de Fusion Magnetique, Varennes, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Development and applications of GREET 2.7 -- The Transportation Vehicle-CycleModel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory has developed a vehicle-cycle module for the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model. The fuel-cycle GREET model has been cited extensively and contains data on fuel cycles and vehicle operations. The vehicle-cycle model evaluates the energy and emission effects associated with vehicle material recovery and production, vehicle component fabrication, vehicle assembly, and vehicle disposal/recycling. With the addition of the vehicle-cycle module, the GREET model now provides a comprehensive, lifecycle-based approach to compare the energy use and emissions of conventional and advanced vehicle technologies (e.g., hybrid electric vehicles and fuel cell vehicles). This report details the development and application of the GREET 2.7 model. The current model includes six vehicles--a conventional material and a lightweight material version of a mid-size passenger car with the following powertrain systems: internal combustion engine, internal combustion engine with hybrid configuration, and fuel cell with hybrid configuration. The model calculates the energy use and emissions that are required for vehicle component production; battery production; fluid production and use; and vehicle assembly, disposal, and recycling. This report also presents vehicle-cycle modeling results. In order to put these results in a broad perspective, the fuel-cycle model (GREET 1.7) was used in conjunction with the vehicle-cycle model (GREET 2.7) to estimate total energy-cycle results.

Burnham, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Wu, Y.

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

331

Modeling the Energy Use of a Connected and Automated Transportation System (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Early research points to large potential impacts of connected and automated vehicles (CAVs) on transportation energy use - dramatic savings, increased use, or anything in between. Due to a lack of suitable data and integrated modeling tools to explore these complex future systems, analyses to date have relied on simple combinations of isolated effects. This poster proposes a framework for modeling the potential energy implications from increasing penetration of CAV technologies and for assessing technology and policy options to steer them toward favorable energy outcomes. Current CAV modeling challenges include estimating behavior change, understanding potential vehicle-to-vehicle interactions, and assessing traffic flow and vehicle use under different automation scenarios. To bridge these gaps and develop a picture of potential future automated systems, NREL is integrating existing modeling capabilities with additional tools and data inputs to create a more fully integrated CAV assessment toolkit.

Gonder, J.; Brown, A.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

A two-phase flow model of sediment transport: transition from bedload to suspended load  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transport of dense particles by a turbulent flow depends on two dimensionless numbers. Depending on the ratio of the shear velocity of the flow to the settling velocity of the particles (or the Rouse number), sediment transport takes place in a thin layer localized at the surface of the sediment bed (bedload) or over the whole water depth (suspended load). Moreover, depending on the sedimentation Reynolds number, the bedload layer is embedded in the viscous sublayer or is larger. We propose here a two-phase flow model able to describe both viscous and turbulent shear flows. Particle migration is described as resulting from normal stresses, but is limited by turbulent mixing and shear-induced diffusion of particles. Using this framework, we theoretically investigate the transition between bedload and suspended load.

Filippo Chiodi; Philippe Claudin; Bruno Andreotti

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

333

Deep sub-threshold $?$ and $?$ production in nuclear collisions with the UrQMD transport model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results on deep sub threshold hyperon production in nuclear collisions, with the UrQMD transport model. Introducing anti-kaon+baryon and hyperon+hyperon strangeness exchange reactions we obtain a good description of experimental data on single strange hadron production in Ar+KCl reactions at $E_{lab}=1.76$ A GeV. We find that the hyperon strangeness exchange is the dominant process contributing to the $\\Xi^-$ yield, however remains short of explaining the $\\Xi^-/\\Lambda$ ratio measured with the HADES experiment. We also discuss possible reasons for the discrepancy with previous studies and the experimental results, finding that many details of the transport simulation may have significant effects on the final $\\Xi^-$ yield.

G. Graef; J. Steinheimer; Feng Li; Marcus Bleicher

2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

334

Prediction of continental shelf sediment transport using a theoretical model of the wave-current boundary layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents an application of the Grant-Madsen-Glenn bottom boundary layer model (Grant and Madsen, 1979; Glenn and Grant, 1987) to predictions of sediment transport on the continental shelf. The analysis is a ...

Goud, Margaret R

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Leading without Followers: How Politics and Market Dynamics Trapped Innovations in Japan's Domestic Galapagos Telecommunications Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3) the source of business models; 4) the overall pattern ofand shaped the business models for equipment manufacturers.trajectories and business models. The sector, largely closed

Kushida, Kenji E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Multi-fluid transport code modeling of time-dependent recycling in ELMy H-mode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simulations of a high-confinement-mode (H-mode) tokamak discharge with infrequent giant type-I ELMs are performed by the multi-fluid, multi-species, two-dimensional transport code UEDGE-MB, which incorporates the Macro-Blob approach for intermittent non-diffusive transport due to filamentary coherent structures observed during the Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and simple time-dependent multi-parametric models for cross-field plasma transport coefficients and working gas inventory in material surfaces. Temporal evolutions of pedestal plasma profiles, divertor recycling, and wall inventory in a sequence of ELMs are studied and compared to the experimental time-dependent data. Short- and long-time-scale variations of the pedestal and divertor plasmas where the ELM is described as a sequence of macro-blobs are discussed. It is shown that the ELM recovery includes the phase of relatively dense and cold post-ELM divertor plasma evolving on a several ms scale, which is set by the transport properties of H-mode barrier. The global gas balance in the discharge is also analyzed. The calculated rates of working gas deposition during each ELM and wall outgassing between ELMs are compared to the ELM particle losses from the pedestal and neutral-beam-injection fueling rate, correspondingly. A sensitivity study of the pedestal and divertor plasmas to model assumptions for gas deposition and release on material surfaces is presented. The performed simulations show that the dynamics of pedestal particle inventory is dominated by the transient intense gas deposition into the wall during each ELM followed by continuous gas release between ELMs at roughly a constant rate.

Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Hollmann, E. M. [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Rognlien, T. D.; Lasnier, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Unterberg, E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Multi-fluid transport code modeling of time-dependent recycling in ELMy H-mode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simulations of a high-confinement-mode (H-mode) tokamak discharge with infrequent giant type-I ELMs are performed by the multi-fluid, multi-species, two-dimensional transport code UEDGE-MB, which incorporates the Macro-Blob approach for intermittent non-diffusive transport due to filamentary coherent structures observed during the Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and simple time-dependent multi-parametric models for cross-field plasma transport coefficients and working gas inventory in material surfaces. Temporal evolutions of pedestal plasma profiles, divertor recycling, and wall inventory in a sequence of ELMs are studied and compared to the experimental time-dependent data. Short- and long-time-scale variations of the pedestal and divertor plasmas where the ELM is described as a sequence of macro-blobs are discussed. It is shown that the ELM recovery includes the phase of relatively dense and cold post-ELM divertor plasma evolving on a several ms scale, which is set by the transport properties of H-mode barrier. The global gas balance in the discharge is also analyzed. The calculated rates of working gas deposition during each ELM and wall outgassing between ELMs are compared to the ELM particle losses from the pedestal and neutral-beam-injection fueling rate, correspondingly. A sensitivity study of the pedestal and divertor plasmas to model assumptions for gas deposition and release on material surfaces is presented. The performed simulations show that the dynamics of pedestal particle inventory is dominated by the transient intense gas deposition into the wall during each ELM followed by continuous gas release between ELMs at roughly a constant rate.

Pigarov, A. Yu. [University of California, San Diego; Krasheninnikov, S. I. [University of California, La Jolla; Rognlien, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Hollmann, E. M. [University of California, San Diego; Lasnier, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Unterberg, Ezekial A [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Groundwater Fate and Transport Modeling for Texarkana Wood Preserving Company Superfund Site, Texarkana, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fate and transport model results are presented for the Texarkana Wood Preserving Company (TWPC)superfund site. The conceptual model assumes two sources of contamination, specifically, the areas around the old and new process areas. Recent data show the presence of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) in the aquifer that are also sources of dissolved contamination in the aquifer. A flow model was constructed and calibrated against measured hydraulic heads at permanent monitoring wells. Good matches were obtained between model simulated heads and most measured heads. An unexplained exception occurs at monitoring well MW-13 down gradient of the site beyond the measured contaminant plume where the model predicts heads that are more than 2 ft. lower than reported field measurements. Adjusting hydraulic parameters in the model could not account for this anomaly and still preserve the head matches at other wells. There is likely a moderate deficiency in the conceptual model or perhaps a data error. Other information such as substantial amounts of infiltrating surface water in the area or a correction in surveyed elevation would improve the flow model. A particle tracking model calculated a travel time from the new process area to the Day’s Creek discharge location on the order of 40 years. Travel times from the old process area to Day’s Creek were calculated to be on the order of 80 years. While these calculations are subject to some uncertainty, travel times of decades are indicated.

Arnett, Ronald Chester

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Upscaling of Long-Term U(VI) Desorption from Pore Scale Kinetics to Field-Scale Reactive Transport Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of the project is the development of scientifically defensible approaches for upscaling reactive transport models (RTM) through a detailed understanding of U(VI) desorption across several spatial scales: bench-, intermediate-, and field-scales. The central hypothesis of the project is that the development of this methodology will lead to a scientifically defensible approach for conceptual model development for multicomponent RTM at contaminated DOE sites, leading to predictive transport simulations with reduced uncertainty.

Steefel, Carl I.; Li Li; Davis, J.A.; Curtis, G.P.; Honeyman, B.D.; Kent, D.B.; Kohler, M.; Rodriguez, D.R.; Johnson, K.J.; Miller, A.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

A transmission/escape probabilities model for neutral particle transport in the outer regions of a diverted tokamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new computational model for neutral particle transport in the outer regions of a diverted tokamak plasma chamber is presented. The model is based on the calculation of transmission and escape probabilities using first-flight integral transport theory and the balancing of fluxes across the surfaces bounding the various regions. The geometrical complexity of the problem is included in precomputed probabilities which depend only on the mean free path of the region.

Stacey, W.M.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

REPRESENTING AEROSOL DYNAMICS AND PROPERTIES IN CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELS BY THE METHOD OF MOMENTS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols, suspensions of solid or liquid particles, are an important multi-phase system. Aerosols scatter and absorb shortwave (solar) radiation, affecting climate (Charlson et al., 1992; Schwartz, 1996) and visibility; nucleate cloud droplet formation, modifying the reflectivity of clouds (Twomey et al., 1984; Schwartz and Slingo, 1996) as well as contributing to composition of cloudwater and to wet deposition (Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998); and affect human health through inhalation (NRC, 1998). Existing and prospective air quality regulations impose standards on concentrations of atmospheric aerosols to protect human health and welfare (EPA, 1998). Chemical transport and transformation models representing the loading and geographical distribution of aerosols and precursor gases are needed to permit development of effective and efficient strategies for meeting air quality standards, and for examining aerosol effects on climate retrospectively and prospectively for different emissions scenarios. Important aerosol properties and processes depend on their size distribution: light scattering, cloud nucleating properties, dry deposition, and penetration into airways of lungs. The evolution of the mass loading itself depends on particle size because of the size dependence of growth and removal processes. For these reasons it is increasingly recognized that chemical transport and transformation models must represent not just the mass loading of atmospheric particulate matter but also the aerosol microphysical properties and the evolution of these properties if aerosols are to be accurately represented in these models. If the size distribution of the aerosol is known, a given property can be evaluated as the integral of the appropriate kernel function over the size distribution. This has motivated the approach of determining aerosol size distribution, and of explicitly representing this distribution and its evolution in chemical transport models.

SCHWARTZ,S.E.; MCGRAW,R.; BENKOVITZ,C.M.; WRIGHT,D.L.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Virginia Tech Comprehensive Power-based Fuel Consumption Model: Model Development and Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transportation sector consumes approximately 30% of the total energy in the United States, which is mostlyVirginia Tech Comprehensive Power-based Fuel Consumption Model: Model Development and Testing, Moran, Saerens, and Van den Bulck 2 ABSTRACT Existing fuel consumption and emission models suffer from

Rakha, Hesham A.

343

Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main contribution of this report is to characterize the underlying residential and transport sector end use energy consumption in India. Each sector was analyzed in detail. End-use sector-level information regarding adoption of particular technologies was used as a key input in a bottom-up modeling approach. The report looks at energy used over the period 1990 to 2005 and develops a baseline scenario to 2020. Moreover, the intent of this report is also to highlight available sources of data in India for the residential and transport sectors. The analysis as performed in this way reveals several interesting features of energy use in India. In the residential sector, an analysis of patterns of energy use and particular end uses shows that biomass (wood), which has traditionally been the main source of primary energy used in households, will stabilize in absolute terms. Meanwhile, due to the forces of urbanization and increased use of commercial fuels, the relative significance of biomass will be greatly diminished by 2020. At the same time, per household residential electricity consumption will likely quadruple in the 20 years between 2000 and 2020. In fact, primary electricity use will increase more rapidly than any other major fuel -- even more than oil, in spite of the fact that transport is the most rapidly growing sector. The growth in electricity demand implies that chronic outages are to be expected unless drastic improvements are made both to the efficiency of the power infrastructure and to electric end uses and industrial processes. In the transport sector, the rapid growth in personal vehicle sales indicates strong energy growth in that area. Energy use by cars is expected to grow at an annual growth rate of 11percent, increasing demand for oil considerably. In addition, oil consumption used for freight transport will also continue to increase .

de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael; Zhou, Nan; Sathaye, Jayant

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Modeling of Gas Phase Transport and Composition Evolution during the Initial Stage Sintering of Boron Carbide with Carbon Additions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Modeling of Gas Phase Transport and Composition Evolution during the Initial Stage Sintering the pores close. This process is examined using a computational model based on co-diffusion of multiple gas is to model the gas diffusion to determine the needed hold time as a function of key parameters

Matthewson, M. John

345

Angular momentum transport modeling: achievements of a gyrokinetic quasi-linear approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QuaLiKiz, a model based on a local gyrokinetic eigenvalue solver is expanded to include momentum flux modeling in addition to heat and particle fluxes. Essential for accurate momentum flux predictions, the parallel asymmetrization of the eigenfunctions is successfully recovered by an analytical fluid model. This is tested against self-consistent gyrokinetic calculations and allows for a correct prediction of the ExB shear impact on the saturated potential amplitude by means of a mixing length rule. Hence, the effect of the ExB shear is recovered on all the transport channels including the induced residual stress. Including these additions, QuaLiKiz remains ~10 000 faster than non-linear gyrokinetic codes allowing for comparisons with experiments without resorting to high performance computing. The example is given of momentum pinch calculations in NBI modulation experiments.

Cottier, P; Camenen, Y; Gurcan, O D; Casson, F J; Garbet, X; Hennequin, P; Tala, T

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport model of the ventilation experiment in Opalinus clay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the construction and operational phases of a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository constructed in a clay formation, ventilation of underground drifts will cause desaturation and oxidation of the rock. The Ventilation Experiment (VE) was performed in a 1.3 m diameter unlined horizontal microtunnel on Opalinus clay at Mont Terri underground research laboratory in Switzerland to evaluate the impact of desaturation on rock properties. A multiphase flow and reactive transport model of VE is presented here. The model accounts for liquid, vapor and air flow, evaporation/condensation and multicomponent reactive solute transport with kinetic dissolution of pyrite and siderite and local-equilibrium dissolution/precipitation of calcite, ferrihydrite, dolomite, gypsum and quartz. Model results reproduce measured vapor flow, liquid pressure and hydrochemical data and capture the trends of measured relative humidities, although such data are slightly overestimated near the rock interface due to uncertainties in the turbulence factor. Rock desaturation allows oxygen to diffuse into the rock and triggers pyrite oxidation, dissolution of calcite and siderite, precipitation of ferrihydrite, dolomite and gypsum and cation exchange. pH in the unsaturated rock varies from 7.8 to 8 and is buffered by calcite. Computed changes in the porosity and the permeability of Opalinus clay in the unsaturated zone caused by oxidation and mineral dissolution/precipitation are smaller than 5%. Therefore, rock properties are not expected to be affected significantly by ventilation of underground drifts during construction and operational phases of a HLW repository in clay.

Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.; Major, J.C.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Initialization of hydrodynamics in relativistic heavy ion collisions with an energy-momentum transport model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A key ingredient of hydrodynamical modeling of relativistic heavy ion collisions is thermal initial conditions, an input that is the consequence of a pre-thermal dynamics which is not completely understood yet. In the paper we employ a recently developed energy-momentum transport model of the pre-thermal stage to study influence of the alternative initial states in nucleus-nucleus collisions on flow and energy density distributions of the matter at the starting time of hydrodynamics. In particular, the dependence of the results on isotropic and anisotropic initial states is analyzed. It is found that at the thermalization time the transverse flow is larger and the maximal energy density is higher for the longitudinally squeezed initial momentum distributions. The results are also sensitive to the relaxation time parameter, equation of state at the thermalization time, and transverse profile of initial energy density distribution: Gaussian approximation, Glauber Monte Carlo profiles, etc. Also, test results ensure that the numerical code based on the energy-momentum transport model is capable of providing both averaged and fluctuating initial conditions for the hydrodynamic simulations of relativistic nuclear collisions.

V. Yu. Naboka; S. V. Akkelin; Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov

2015-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

348

Groundwater Reactive Transport Models, 2012, 141-159 141 Fan Zhang, Gour-Tsyh (George) Yeh, Jack C. Parker and Xiaonan Shi (Eds)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Groundwater Reactive Transport Models, 2012, 141-159 141 Fan Zhang, Gour-Tsyh (George) Yeh, Jack C: Reactive Flow & Transport Code for Use on Laptops to Leadership-Class Supercomputers G. E. Hammond1 , P. C, a next-generation reactive flow and transport code for modeling subsurface processes, has been designed

Mills, Richard

349

Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH{sub 4}{sup +} production during urea hydrolysis were incorporated in the model and captured critical changes in the major metal species. The electrical phase increases were potentially due to ion exchange processes that modified charge structure at mineral/water interfaces. Our study revealed the potential of geophysical monitoring for geochemical changes during urea hydrolysis and the advantages of combining multiple approaches to understand complex biogeochemical processes in the subsurface.

Wu, Y.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Spycher, N.; Hubbard, S.S.; Zhang, G.; Williams, K.H.; Taylor, J.; Fujita, Y.; Smith, R.

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Asymmetric quantum transport in a double-stranded Kronig-Penney model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a double-stranded Kronig-Penney model and analyze its transport properties. The asymmetric fluxes between two strands with suddenly alternating localization patterns are found as the energy is varied. The zero-size limit of the internal lines connecting two strands is examined using quantum graph vertices with four edges. We also consider a two-dimensional Kronig-Penney lattice with two types of alternating layers with $\\delta$ and $\\delta'$ connections, and show that the existence of energy bands in which the quantum flux can flow only in selected directions.

Taksu Cheon; Sergey S. Poghosyan

2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

351

Exotic quantum transport in double-stranded Kronig-Penney model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce double-stranded Kronig-Penney model and analyze its transport properties. The asymmetric fluxes between two strands with suddenly alternating localization patterns are found as the energy is varied. The zero-size limit of the internal lines connecting two strands is examined using quantum graph vertices with four edges. We also consider a two-dimensional Kronig-Penney lattice with two types of alternating layers with $\\delta$ and $\\delta'$ connections, and show that the existence of energy bands in which the quantum flux can flow only in selected directions.

Taksu Cheon; Sergey S. Poghosyan

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

Mesoscopic modeling of multi-physicochemical transport phenomena in porous media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present our recent progress on mesoscopic modeling of multi-physicochemical transport phenomena in porous media based on the lattice Boltzmann method. Simulation examples include injection of CO{sub 2} saturated brine into a limestone rock, two-phase behavior and flooding phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, and electroosmosis in homogeneously charged porous media. It is shown that the lattice Boltzmann method can account for multiple, coupled physicochemical processes in these systems and can shed some light on the underlying physics occuning at the fundamental scale. Therefore, it can be a potential powerful numerical tool to analyze multi-physicochemical processes in various energy, earth, and environmental systems.

Kang, Qinjin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Moran [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukherjee, Partha P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lichtner, Peter C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gasemissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2000, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published a new set of baseline greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions scenarios in the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) (Nakicenovic et al., 2000). The SRES team defined four narrative storylines (A1, A2, B1 and B2) describing the relationships between the forces driving GHG and aerosol emissions and their evolution during the 21st century. The SRES reports emissions for each of these storylines by type of GHG and by fuel type to 2100 globally and for four world regions (OECD countries as of 1990, countries undergoing economic reform, developing countries in Asia, rest of world). Specific assumptions about the quantification of scenario drivers, such as population and economic growth, technological change, resource availability, land-use changes, and local and regional environmental policies, are also provided. End-use sector-level results for buildings, industry, or transportation or information regarding adoption of particular technologies and policies are not provided in the SRES. The goal of this report is to provide more detailed information on the SRES scenarios at the end use level including historical time series data and a decomposition of energy consumption to understand the forecast implications in terms of end use efficiency to 2030. This report focuses on the A1 (A1B) and B2 marker scenarios since they represent distinctly contrasting futures. The A1 storyline describes a future of very rapid economic growth, low population growth, and the rapid introduction of new and more efficient technologies. Major underlying themes are convergence among regions, capacity building, and increased cultural and social interactions, with a substantial reduction in regional differences in per capita income. The B2 storyline describes a world with an emphasis on economic, social, and environmental sustainability, especially at the local and regional levels. It is a world with moderate population growth, intermediate levels of economic development, and less rapid and more diverse technological change (Nakicenovic et al., 2000). Data were obtained from the SRES modeling teams that provide more detail than that reported in the SRES. For the A1 marker scenario, the modeling team provided final energy demand and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions by fuel for industry, buildings, and transportation for nine world regions. Final energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions for three sectors (industry, transport, buildings) for the four SRES world regions were provided for the B2 marker scenario. This report describes the results of a disaggregation of the SRES projected energy use and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions for the industrial, transport, and buildings sectors for 10 world regions (see Appendix 1) to 2030. An example of further disaggregation of the two SRES scenarios for the residential buildings sector in China is provided, illustrating how such aggregate scenarios can be interpreted at the end use level.

Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Sinton, Jonathan; Worrell, Ernst; Zhou, Nan; Sathaye, Jayant; Levine, Mark

2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

354

Macroscopic theory of dark sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple Lagrangian with squared covariant divergence of a vector field as a kinetic term turned out an adequate tool for macroscopic description of the dark sector. The zero-mass field acts as the dark energy. Its energy-momentum tensor is a simple additive to the cosmological constant. Massive fields {\\phi}_{I} with {\\phi}^{K}{\\phi}_{K}0 describe two different forms of dark matter. The space-like ({\\phi}^{K}{\\phi}_{K}0) massive field displays repulsive elasticity. In balance with dark energy and ordinary matter it provides a four parametric diversity of regular solutions of the Einstein equations describing different possible cosmological and oscillating non-singular scenarios of evolution of the universe. In particular, the singular big bang turns into a regular inflation-like transition from contraction to expansion with the accelerate expansion at late times. The fine-tuned Friedman-Robertson-Walker singular solution is a particular limiting case at the boundary of existence of regular oscillating solutions in the absence of vector fields. The simplicity of the general covariant expression for the energy-momentum tensor allows to display the main properties of the dark sector analytically and avoid unnecessary model assumptions.

Boris E. Meierovich

2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

355

Coupled modeling of groundwater flow solute transport, chemical reactions and microbial processes in the 'SP' island  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Redox Zone Experiment was carried out at the Aespoe HRL in order to study the redox behavior and the hydrochemistry of an isolated vertical fracture zone disturbed by the excavation of an access tunnel. Overall results and interpretation of the Redox Zone Project were reported by /Banwart et al, 1995/. Later, /Banwart et al, 1999/ presented a summary of the hydrochemistry of the Redox Zone Experiment. Coupled groundwater flow and reactive transport models of this experiment were carried out by /Molinero, 2000/ who proposed a revised conceptual model for the hydrogeology of the Redox Zone Experiment which could explain simultaneously measured drawdown and salinity data. The numerical model was found useful to understand the natural system. Several conclusions were drawn about the redox conditions of recharge waters, cation exchange capacity of the fracture zone and the role of mineral phases such as pyrite, calcite, hematite and goethite. This model could reproduce the measured trends of dissolved species, except for bicarbonate and sulfate which are affected by microbially-mediated processes. In order to explore the role of microbial processes, a coupled numerical model has been constructed which accounts for water flow, reactive transport and microbial processes. The results of this model is presented in this report. This model accounts for groundwater flow and reactive transport in a manner similar to that of /Molinero, 2000/ and extends the preliminary microbial model of /Zhang, 2001/ by accounting for microbially-driven organic matter fermentation and organic matter oxidation. This updated microbial model considers simultaneously the fermentation of particulate organic matter by yeast and the oxidation of dissolved organic matter, a product of fermentation. Dissolved organic matter is produced by yeast and serves also as a substrate for iron-reducing bacteria. Model results reproduce the observed increase in bicarbonate and sulfate concentration, thus adding additional evidence for the possibility of organic matter oxidation as the main source of bicarbonate. Model results indicate that pH and Eh are relatively stable. The dissolution-precipitation trends of hematite, pyrite and calcite also coincide with those indicated by the conceptual model. A thorough sensitivity analysis has been performed for the most relevant microbial parameters as well as for initial and boundary POC and DOC concentrations. The results of such analysis indicate that computed concentrations of bicarbonate, sulfate and DOC are sensitive to most of the microbial parameters, including specific growth rates, half-saturation constants, proportionality coefficients and yield coefficients. Model results, however, are less sensitive to the yield coefficient of DOC to iron-reducer bacteria. The sensitivity analysis indicates that changes in fermentation microbial parameters affect the growth of the iron-reducer, thus confirming the interconnection of both microbial processes. Computed concentrations of bicarbonate and sulfate are found to be sensitive to changes in the initial concentration of POC and the boundary concentration of DOC, but they lack sensitivity to the initial concentration of DOC and the boundary concentration of POC. The explanation for such result is related to the fact that POC has a low mobility due to its large molecular weight. DOC, however, can migrate downwards. Although a coupled hydro-bio-geochemical 1-D model can reproduce the observed ''unexpected'' increase of concentrations of bicarbonate and sulfate at a depth of 70 m, further modeling work is required in order to obtain a similar conclusion under the more realistic two dimensional conditions of the fracture zone.

Samper, Javier; Molinero, Jorg; Changbing, Yang; Zhang, Guoxiang

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Development of a Hydrodynamic and Transport model of Bellingham Bay in Support of Nearshore Habitat Restoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, a hydrodynamic model based on the unstructured-grid finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) was developed for Bellingham Bay, Washington. The model simulates water surface elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity in a three-dimensional domain that covers the entire Bellingham Bay and adjacent water bodies, including Lummi Bay, Samish Bay, Padilla Bay, and Rosario Strait. The model was developed using Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s high-resolution Puget Sound and Northwest Straits circulation and transport model. A sub-model grid for Bellingham Bay and adjacent coastal waters was extracted from the Puget Sound model and refined in Bellingham Bay using bathymetric light detection and ranging (LIDAR) and river channel cross-section data. The model uses tides, river inflows, and meteorological inputs to predict water surface elevations, currents, salinity, and temperature. A tidal open boundary condition was specified using standard National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predictions. Temperature and salinity open boundary conditions were specified based on observed data. Meteorological forcing (wind, solar radiation, and net surface heat flux) was obtained from NOAA real observations and National Center for Environmental Prediction North American Regional Analysis outputs. The model was run in parallel with 48 cores using a time step of 2.5 seconds. It took 18 hours of cpu time to complete 26 days of simulation. The model was calibrated with oceanographic field data for the period of 6/1/2009 to 6/26/2009. These data were collected specifically for the purpose of model development and calibration. They include time series of water-surface elevation, currents, temperature, and salinity as well as temperature and salinity profiles during instrument deployment and retrieval. Comparisons between model predictions and field observations show an overall reasonable agreement in both temporal and spatial scales. Comparisons of root mean square error values for surface elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity time series are 0.11 m, 0.10 m/s, 1.28oC, and 1.91 ppt, respectively. The model was able to reproduce the salinity and temperature stratifications inside Bellingham Bay. Wetting and drying processes in tidal flats in Bellingham Bay, Samish Bay, and Padilla Bay were also successfully simulated. Both model results and observed data indicated that water surface elevations inside Bellingham Bay are highly correlated to tides. Circulation inside the bay is weak and complex and is affected by various forcing mechanisms, including tides, winds, freshwater inflows, and other local forcing factors. The Bellingham Bay model solution was successfully linked to the NOAA oil spill trajectory simulation model “General NOAA Operational Modeling Environment (GNOME).” Overall, the Bellingham Bay model has been calibrated reasonably well and can be used to provide detailed hydrodynamic information in the bay and adjacent water bodies. While there is room for further improvement with more available data, the calibrated hydrodynamic model provides useful hydrodynamic information in Bellingham Bay and can be used to support sediment transport and water quality modeling as well as assist in the design of nearshore restoration scenarios.

Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang

2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

357

Foreign direct investment in the electricity sector: the Indian perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

So far, India is losing out in the competition against other emerging economies to attract more foreign direct investment to its electricity sector. This is in large part because the Indian approach towards power sector reforms is more haphazard than the more orderly and sensitive growth model of Singapore and Latin American economies. (author)

Sharma, A.K.; Vohra, Ekta

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Searching for Dark Sector  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2)ScienceScientists InSearchsuperconduct* FindDark Sector

359

Sector1 Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) SrEvaluating the Seasonalsw ' b 0 % bP. May,2015Sector 1

360

Sector4 FAQs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) SrEvaluating the Seasonalsw ' b 0 % bP. May,2015Sector 1FAQs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation sector model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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361

Sector4 redirect  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) SrEvaluating the Seasonalsw ' b 0 % bP. May,2015Sector 1FAQs

362

A Complete Transport Validated Model on a Zeolite Membrane for Carbon Dioxide Permeance and Capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CO2 emissions from major industries cause serious global environment problems and their mitigation is urgently needed. The use of zeolite membranes is a very efficient way in order to capture CO2 from some flue gases. The dominant transport mechanism at low temperature andor high pressure is the diffusion through the membrane. This procedure can be divided in three steps: Adsorption of the molecules of the species in the surface of the membrane, then a driving force gives a path where the species follow inside the membrane and finally the species desorbed from the surface of the membrane. The current work is aimed at developing a simulation model for the CO2 transport through a zeolite membrane and estimate the diffusion phenomenon through a very thin membrane of 150 nm in a Wicke-Kallenbach cell. The cell is cylindrical in shape with diameter of 19 mm and consists of a retentate gas chamber, a permeate gas chamber which are separated by a cylindrical zeolite membrane. This apparatus have been modeled wit...

Gkanas, Evangelos I; Stubos, Athanasios K; Makridis, Sofoklis S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Modeling Studies on the Transport of Benzene and H2S in CO2-Water Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, reactive transport simulations were used to assess the mobilization and transport of organics with supercritical CO{sub 2} (SCC), and the co-injection and transport of H{sub 2}S with SCC. These processes were evaluated at conditions of typical storage reservoirs, and for cases of hypothetical leakage from a reservoir to an overlying shallower fresh water aquifer. Modeling capabilities were developed to allow the simulation of multiphase flow and transport of H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, as well as specific organic compounds (benzene), coupled with multicomponent geochemical reaction and transport. This included the development of a new simulator, TMVOC-REACT, starting from existing modules of the TOUGH2 family of codes. This work also included an extensive literature review, calculation, and testing of phase-partitioning properties for mixtures of the phases considered. The reactive transport simulations presented in this report are primarily intended to illustrate the capabilities of the new simulator. They are also intended to help evaluate and understand various processes at play, in a more qualitative than quantitative manner, and only for hypothetical scenarios. Therefore, model results are not intended as realistic assessments of groundwater quality changes for specific locations, and they certainly do not provide an exhaustive evaluation of all possible site conditions, especially given the large variability and uncertainty in hydrogeologic and geochemical parameter input into simulations. The first step in evaluating the potential mobilization and transport of organics was the identification of compounds likely to be present in deep storage formations, and likely to negatively impact freshwater aquifers if mobilized by SCC. On the basis of a literature review related to the occurrence of these organic compounds, their solubility in water and SCC, and their toxicity (as reflected by their maximum contaminant levels MCL), benzene was selected as a key compound for inclusion into numerical simulations. Note that considering additional organic compounds and/or mixtures of such compounds in the simulations was beyond the scope of this study, because of the effort required to research, calculate, and validate the phase-partitioning data necessary for simulations. The injection of CO{sub 2} into a deep saline aquifer was simulated, followed by modeling the leaching of benzene by SCC and transport of benzene to an overlying aquifer along a hypothetical leakage pathway. One- and two-dimensional models were set up for this purpose. The target storage formation was assumed to initially contain about 10{sup -4} ppm benzene. Model results indicate that: (1) SCC efficiently extracts benzene from the storage formation. (2) Assuming equilibrium, the content of benzene in SCC is roportional to the concentration of benzene in the aqueous and solid phases. (3) Benzene may co-migrate with CO{sub 2} into overlying aquifers if a leakage pathway is present. Because the aqueous solubility of benzene in contact with CO{sub 2} is lower than the aqueous solubility of CO{sub 2}, benzene is actually enriched in the CO{sub 2} phase as the plume advances. (4) For the case studied here, the resulting aqueous benzene concentration in the overlying aquifer is on the same order of magnitude as the initial concentration in the storage formation. This generic modeling study illustrates, in a semi-quantitative manner, the possible mobilization of benzene by SCC. The extent to which the mobilization of this organic compound evolves temporally and spatially depends on a large number of controlling parameters and is largely site specific. Therefore, for more 'truly' predictive work, further sensitivity studies should be conducted, and further modeling should be integrated with site-specific laboratory and/or field experimental data. The co-injection of H{sub 2}S with CO{sub 2} into a deep saline aquifer was also simulated. In addition, the model considered leakage of the supercritical CO{sub 2}+H{sub 2}S mixture along a preferential p

Zheng, L.; Spycher, N.; Xu, T.; Apps, J.; Kharaka, Y.; Birkholzer, J.T.

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

364

Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an updated analysis of water-level data performed to provide the ''Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]) (referred to as the saturated zone (SZ) site-scale flow model or site-scale SZ flow model in this report) with the configuration of the potentiometric surface, target water-level data, and hydraulic gradients for calibration of groundwater flow models. This report also contains an expanded discussion of uncertainty in the potentiometric-surface map. The analysis of the potentiometric data presented in Revision 00 of this report (USGS 2001 [DIRS 154625]) provides the configuration of the potentiometric surface, target heads, and hydraulic gradients for the calibration of the SZ site-scale flow model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]). Revision 01 of this report (USGS 2004 [DIRS 168473]) used updated water-level data for selected wells through the year 2000 as the basis for estimating water-level altitudes and the potentiometric surface in the SZ site-scale flow and transport model domain based on an alternative interpretation of perched water conditions. That revision developed computer files containing: Water-level data within the model area (DTN: GS010908312332.002); A table of known vertical head differences (DTN: GS010908312332.003); and A potentiometric-surface map (DTN: GS010608312332.001) using an alternative concept from that presented by USGS (2001 [DIRS 154625]) for the area north of Yucca Mountain. The updated water-level data presented in USGS (2004 [DIRS 168473]) include data obtained from the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program (EWDP) Phases I and II and data from Borehole USW WT-24. This document is based on Revision 01 (USGS 2004 [DIRS 168473]) and expands the discussion of uncertainty in the potentiometric-surface map. This uncertainty assessment includes an analysis of the impact of more recent water-level data and the impact of adding data from the EWDP Phases III and IV wells. In addition to being utilized by the SZ site-scale flow model, the water-level data and potentiometric-surface map contained within this report will be available to other government agencies and water users for groundwater management purposes. The potentiometric surface defines an upper boundary of the site-scale flow model and provides information useful to estimation of the magnitude and direction of lateral groundwater flow within the flow system. Therefore, the analysis documented in this revision is important to SZ flow and transport calculations in support of total system performance assessment (TSPA).

K. Rehfeldt

2004-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

365

Estimated United States Transportation Energy Use 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A flow chart depicting energy flow in the transportation sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 31,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of energy were used throughout the United States in transportation activities. Vehicles used in these activities include automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, buses, airplanes, rail, and ships. The transportation sector is powered primarily by petroleum-derived fuels (gasoline, diesel and jet fuel). Biomass-derived fuels, electricity and natural gas-derived fuels are also used. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the transportation sector.

Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

366

Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DRAFT FOR PUBLIC COMMENT SEPTEMBER, 2014 ENERGY SECTOR CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance Table of...

367

Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector Energy Efficiency Programs (2009 CIEE Report) Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector Energy...

368

Final report on LDRD project: A phenomenological model for multicomponent transport with simultaneous electrochemical reactions in concentrated solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A phenomenological model was developed for multicomponent transport of charged species with simultaneous electrochemical reactions in concentrated solutions, and was applied to model processes in a thermal battery cell. A new general framework was formulated and implemented in GOMA (a multidimensional, multiphysics, finite-element computer code developed and being enhanced at Sandia) for modeling multidimensional, multicomponent transport of neutral and charged species in concentrated solutions. The new framework utilizes the Stefan-Maxwell equations that describe multicomponent diffusion of interacting species using composition-insensitive binary diffusion coefficients. The new GOMA capability for modeling multicomponent transport of neutral species was verified and validated using the model problem of ternary gaseous diffusion in a Stefan tube. The new GOMA-based thermal battery computer model was verified using an idealized battery cell in which concentration gradients are absent; the full model was verified by comparing with that of Bernardi and Newman (1987) and validated using limited thermal battery discharge-performance data from the open literature (Dunning 1981) and from Sandia (Guidotti 1996). Moreover, a new Liquid Chemkin Software Package was developed, which allows the user to handle manly aspects of liquid-phase kinetics, thermodynamics, and transport (particularly in terms of computing properties). Lastly, a Lattice-Boltzmann-based capability was developed for modeling pore- or micro-scale phenomena involving convection, diffusion, and simplified chemistry; this capability was demonstrated by modeling phenomena in the cathode region of a thermal battery cell.

CHEN,KEN S.; EVANS,GREGORY H.; LARSON,RICHARD S.; NOBLE,DAVID R.; HOUF,WILLIAM G.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Transportation Policy Analysis and Systems Planning Fall 2009/2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SYLLABUS WWS 527a Transportation Policy Analysis and Systems Planning Fall 2009/2010 Course Description Part 1. Perspective on the Transportation Sector of the Economy: Its Function, Its Players, Its of Course Elements of the transportation sector of the economy, the player, the technologies

Singh, Jaswinder Pal

370

Comparison of surface meteorological data representativeness for the Weldon Spring transport and dispersion modeling analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is conducting the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project under the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). The major goals of the SFMP are to eliminate potential hazards to the public and the environment that associated with contamination at SFMP sites and to make surplus property available for other uses to the extent possible. This report presents the results of analysis of available meteorological data from stations near the Weldon Spring site. Data that are most representative of site conditions are needed to accurately model the transport and dispersion of air pollutants associated with remedial activities. Such modeling will assist the development of mitigative measures. 17 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

Lazaro, M.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Comprehensive inverse modeling for the study of carrier transport models in sub-50nm MOSFETs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct quantitative 2-D characterization of sub-50 nm MOSFETs continues to be elusive. This research develops a comprehensive indirect inverse modeling technique for extracting 2-D device topology using combined log(I)-V ...

Djomehri, Ihsan Jahed, 1976-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Models for source term, flow, transport and dose assessment in NRC`s Iterative Performance Assessment, Phase 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The core consequence modules for the recently completed Phase 2 Iterative Performance Assessment (IPA) of the Yucca Mountain repository for high-level nuclear waste depend on models for releases from the engineered barrier system (source term), flow of liquid and gas, transport of radionuclides in the geosphere and assessment of dose to target populations. The source term model includes temperature and moisture phenomena in the near-field environment, general, pitting and crevice corrosion, contact of the waste form by water, dissolution and oxidation of the waste form, and transport of dissolved and gaseous radionuclides from the waste package by advection and diffusion. The liquid flow and transport models describe water flow through fractures and matrix in both the unsaturated and saturated zones. Models for flow of gas and transport of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} released from the engineered barrier system to the atmosphere take into account repository heat and the geothermal gradient. The dose assessment model calculates doses to a regional population and a farm family for an assumed reference biosphere in the vicinity of the repository. The Phase 2 IPA led to a number of suggestions for model improvement: (1) improve the ability of the models to include spatial and temporal variability in the parameters; (2) improve the coupling among processes, especially the effects of changing environments in the waste packages; (3) develop more mechanistic models, but abstracted for use in total system performance assessment; and (4) use more site specific parameters, especially for the dose assessments.

McCartin, T.; Codell, R.; Neel, R.; Ford, W.; Wescott, R.; Bradbury, J. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Sagar, B.; Walton, J. [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

THE APPLICATION OF THE LAND TRANSFORMATION, GROUNDWATER FLOW AND SOLUTE TRANSPORT MODELS FOR MICHIGAN'S GRAND TRAVERSE BAY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 THE APPLICATION OF THE LAND TRANSFORMATION, GROUNDWATER FLOW AND SOLUTE TRANSPORT MODELS). The two hydrogeologic models that are being used here allow us to explore the dynamics of groundwater flow Meeting, New Orleans, Louisiana, March 14, 2001. #12;2 INTRODUCTION Grand Traverse Bay and the Grand

374

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 NOAA Satellite and Information Service National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Ecosystems National Security Tourism Transportation Water Resources Climate information can be usedNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet COAStAl HAzArDS Overview Global

375

Tritium transport in the NuMI decay pipe region - modeling and comparison with experimental data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NuMI (Neutrinos at Main Injector) beam facility at Fermilab is designed to produce an intense beam of muon neutrinos to be sent to the MINOS underground experiment in Soudan, Minnesota. Neutrinos are created by the decay of heavier particles. In the case of NuMI, the decaying particles are created by interaction of high-energy protons in a target, creating mostly positive pions. These particles can also interact with their environment, resulting in production of a variety of short-lived radionuclides and tritium. In the NuMI beam, neutrinos are produced by 120 GeV protons from the Fermilab Main Injector accelerator which are injected into the NuMI beam line using single turn extraction. The beam line has been designed for 400 kW beam power, roughly a factor of 2 above the initial (2005-06) running conditions. Extracted protons are bent downwards at a 57mr angle towards the Soudan Laboratory. The meson production target is a 94 cm segmented graphite rod, cooled by water in stainless tubes on the top and bottom of the target. The target is followed by two magnetic horns which are pulsed to 200 kA in synchronization with the passage of the beam, producing focusing of the secondary hadron beam and its daughter neutrinos. Downstream of the second horn the meson beam is transported for 675 m in an evacuated 2 m diameter beam (''decay'') pipe. Subsequently, the residual mesons and protons are absorbed in a water cooled aluminum/steel absorber immediately downstream of the decay pipe. Some 200 m of rock further downstream ranges out all of the residual muons. During beam operations, after installation of the chiller condensate system in December 2005, the concentration of tritiated water in the MINOS sump flow of 177 gpm was around 12 pCi/ml, for a total of 0.010 pCi/day. A simple model of tritium transport and deposition via humidity has been constructed to aid in understanding how tritium reaches the sump water. The model deals with tritium transported as HTO, water in which one hydrogen atom has been replaced with tritium. Based on concepts supported by the modeling, a dehumidification system was installed during May 2006 that reduced the tritium level in the sump by a factor of two. This note is primarily concerned with tritium that was produced in the NuMI target pile, carried by air flow into the target hall and down the decay pipe passageway (where most of it was deposited). The air is exhausted through the existing air vent shaft EAV2 (Figure 1).

Hylen, J.; Plunkett, R.; /Fermilab

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Correcting transport errors during advection of aerosol and cloud moment sequences in eulerian models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Moment methods are finding increasing usage for simulations of particle population balance in box models and in more complex flows including two-phase flows. These highly efficient methods have nevertheless had little impact to date for multi-moment representation of aerosols and clouds in atmospheric models. There are evidently two reasons for this: First, atmospheric models, especially if the goal is to simulate climate, tend to be extremely complex and take many man-years to develop. Thus there is considerable inertia to the implementation of novel approaches. Second, and more fundamental, the nonlinear transport algorithms designed to reduce numerical diffusion during advection of various species (tracers) from cell to cell, in the typically coarse grid arrays of these models, can and occasionally do fail to preserve correlations between the moments. Other correlated tracers such as isotopic abundances, composition of aerosol mixtures, hydrometeor phase, etc., are subject to this same fate. In the case of moments, this loss of correlation can and occasionally does give rise to unphysical moment sets. When this happens the simulation can come to a halt. Following a brief description and review of moment methods, the goal of this paper is to present two new approaches that both test moment sequences for validity and correct them when they fail. The new approaches work on individual grid cells without requiring stored information from previous time-steps or neighboring cells.

McGraw R.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

How does the mass transport in disk galaxy models influence the character of orbits?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the regular or chaotic nature of orbits of stars moving in the meridional (R,z) plane of an axially symmetric time-dependent disk galaxy model with a central, spherically symmetric nucleus. In particular, mass is linearly transported from the disk to the galactic nucleus, in order to mimic, in a way, the case of self-consistent interactions of an actual N-body simulation. We thus try to unveil the influence of this mass transportation on the different families of orbits of stars by monitoring how the percentage of chaotic orbits, as well as the percentages of orbits of the main regular resonant families, evolve as the galaxy develops a dense and massive nucleus in its core. The SALI method is applied to samples of orbits in order to distinguish safely between ordered and chaotic motion. In addition, a method based on the concept of spectral dynamics is used for identifying the various families of regular orbits and also for recognizing the secondary resonances that bifurcate from them. Our computat...

Zotos, Euaggelos E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Public Sector Electric Efficiency Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) Bureau of Energy and Recycling administers the public sector energy efficiency programs required by the Illinois Energy...

379

Energy Sector Market Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of energy market analysis sponsored by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Weatherization and International Program (WIP) within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The analysis was conducted by a team of DOE laboratory experts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with additional input from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The analysis was structured to identify those markets and niches where government can create the biggest impact by informing management decisions in the private and public sectors. The analysis identifies those markets and niches where opportunities exist for increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy use.

Arent, D.; Benioff, R.; Mosey, G.; Bird, L.; Brown, J.; Brown, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Aabakken, J.; Parks, K.; Lapsa, M.; Davis, S.; Olszewski, M.; Cox, D.; McElhaney, K.; Hadley, S.; Hostick, D.; Nicholls, A.; McDonald, S.; Holloman, B.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Technology Mapping of the Renewable Energy, Buildings and Transport...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the Renewable Energy, Buildings and Transport Sectors: Policy Drivers and International Trade Aspects AgencyCompany Organization: International Centre for Trade and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation sector model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Mainstreaming Transport Co-benefits Approach: A Guide to Evaluating...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guide to Evaluating Transport Projects AgencyCompany Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies Focus Area: Multi-sector Impact Evaluation Topics: Best Practices...

382

Energy Department Awards $45 Million to Deploy Advanced Transportation...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

is helping to build a strong 21st century transportation sector that cuts harmful pollution, creates jobs and leads to a more sustainable energy future," said Energy...

383

Transportation Energy Futures Study: The Key Results and Conclusions...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Futures study, which highlights underexplored opportunities to reduce petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions from the U.S. transportation sector. There will be...

384

The Lepton Sector of a Fourth Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In extensions of the standard model with a heavy fourth generation one important question is what makes the fourth-generation lepton sector, particularly the neutrinos, so different from the lighter three generations. We study this question in the context of models of electroweak symmetry breaking in warped extra dimensions, where the flavor hierarchy is generated by the localization of the zero-mode fermions in the extra dimension. In this setup the Higgs sector is localized near the infrared brane, whereas the Majorana mass term is localized at the ultraviolet brane. As a result, light neutrinos are almost entirely Majorana particles, whereas the fourth generation neutrino is mostly a Dirac fermion. We show that it is possible to obtain heavy fourth-generation leptons in regions of parameter space where the light neutrino masses and mixings are compatible with observation. We study the impact of these bounds, as well as the ones from lepton flavor violation, on the phenomenology of these models.

Gustavo Burdman; Leandro Da Rold; Ricardo D. Matheus

2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

385

Transport model analysis of the transverse momentum and rapidity dependence of pion interferometry at SPS energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on the UrQMD transport model, the transverse momentum and the rapidity dependence of the Hanbury-Brown-Twiss (HBT) radii $R_L$, $R_O$, $R_S$ as well as the cross term $R_{OL}$ at SPS energies are investigated and compared with the experimental NA49 and CERES data. The rapidity dependence of the $R_L$, $R_O$, $R_S$ is weak while the $R_{OL}$ is significantly increased at large rapidities and small transverse momenta. The HBT "life-time" issue (the phenomenon that the calculated $\\sqrt{R_O^{2}-R_S^{2}}$ value is larger than the correspondingly extracted experimental data) is also present at SPS energies.

Qingfeng Li; Marcus Bleicher; Xianglei Zhu; Horst Stoecker

2006-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

386

Transport and seismoelectric properties of porous permeable rock : numerical modeling and laboratory measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this thesis is to better understand the transport and seismoelectric (SE) properties of porous permeable rock. Accurate information of rock transport properties, together with pore geometry, can aid us to ...

Zhan, Xin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

A general performance model for parallel sweeps on orthogonal grids for particle transport calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

particle transport calculations is an important problem in many applications targeted by the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative of the United States Department of Energy. One common approach to deterministic particle transport calculations...

Mathis, Mark Michael

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Mixing Cell Model: A One-Dimensional Numerical Model for Assessment of Water Flow and Contaminant Transport in the Unsaturated Zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the Mixing Cell Model code, a one-dimensional model for water flow and solute transport in the unsaturated zone under steady-state or transient flow conditions. The model is based on the principles and assumptions underlying mixing cell model formulations. The unsaturated zone is discretized into a series of independent mixing cells. Each cell may have unique hydrologic, lithologic, and sorptive properties. Ordinary differential equations describe the material (water and solute) balance within each cell. Water flow equations are derived from the continuity equation assuming that unit-gradient conditions exist at all times in each cell. Pressure gradients are considered implicitly through model discretization. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and moisture contents are determined by the material-specific moisture characteristic curves. Solute transport processes include explicit treatment of advective processes, first-order chain decay, and linear sorption reactions. Dispersion is addressed through implicit and explicit dispersion. Implicit dispersion is an inherent feature of all mixing cell models and originates from the formulation of the problem in terms of mass balance around fully mixed volume elements. Expressions are provided that relate implicit dispersion to the physical dispersion of the system. Two FORTRAN codes were developed to solve the water flow and solute transport equations: (1) the Mixing-Cell Model for Flow (MCMF) solves transient water flow problems and (2) the Mixing Cell Model for Transport (MCMT) solves the solute transport problem. The transient water flow problem is typically solved first by estimating the water flux through each cell in the model domain as a function of time using the MCMF code. These data are stored in either ASCII or binary files that are later read by the solute transport code (MCMT). Code output includes solute pore water concentrations, water and solute inventories in each cell and at each specified output time, and water and solute fluxes through each cell and specified output time. Computer run times for coupled transient water flow and solute transport were typically several seconds on a 2 GHz Intel Pentium IV desktop computer. The model was benchmarked against analytical solutions and finite-element approximations to the partial differential equations (PDE) describing unsaturated flow and transport. Differences between the maximum solute flux estimated by the mixing-cell model and the PDE models were typically less than two percent.

A. S. Rood

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

ECRH and transport modeling in tandem mirrors and divertor physics. Task II. Annual progress report on fusion plasma theory, January 1-September 31, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A summary of work during this period is given for the following: ecrh and transport modeling in tandem mirrors and divertor physics. (MOW)

Emmert, G A

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Transportation Secure Data Center: Real-world Data for Planning, Modeling, and Analysis (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC) at www.nrel.gov/tsdc provides free, web-based access to detailed transportation data from a variety of travel surveys conducted across the nation. While preserving the privacy of survey participants, this online repository makes vital transportation data broadly available to users from the comfort of their own desks via a secure online connection.

Not Available

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GHG fuels such as compressed natural gas, low-GHG ethanol,LPG) Methane Compressed natural gas (CNG) Ethanol production

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2005; Energy Information Administration, U.S. Department of0383(2007); Energy Information Administration: 2007. http://0383(2006); Energy Information Administration: Washington,

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the production process for ethanol fuel including theS4). With the exception of ethanol, fuel CO 2 intensity ispolicy results in zero ethanol ?ex-fuel vehicle penetration

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in hybrid vehicles and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are notlower production cost. Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) doC.DHEV C.DSL C.ETHX Fuel Cell - Hydrogen C.FCH Conventional

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the adoption of alternative fuel vehicles: The case of07: 2007. 21. CEC State Alternative Fuel Plan. CEC-600-2007-972. (28) CEC. State Alternative Fuel Plan; CEC-600-2007-

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is sensitive to the cost of fuel cell technology, oil price,lower production cost. Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) do

Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Numerical modeling of a thermohydrochemical (T-H-C) coupling and the implications to radionuclide transport.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermohydrochemical (T-H-C) processes result from the placement of heat-generating radioactive materials in unsaturated, fractured geologic materials. The placement of materials in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository will result in complex environmental conditions. Simple models are developed liking the thermohydrological effects simulated with TOUGHZ to system chemistry, with an example presented for chloride. Perturbations to near-field chemistry could have a significant impact on the migration of actinides and fission products in geologic materials. Various conceptual models to represent fractures are utilized in TOUGHZ simulations of thermohydrological processes. The simulated moisture redistribution is then coupled to simple chemical models to demonstrate the potential magnitude of T-H-C processes. The concentration of chloride in solution (returning to the engineered barrier system) is demonstrated, in extreme cases, to exceed 100,000 mg/L. The implication is that the system (typically ambient chemical and hydrological conditions) in which radionuclide transport is typically simulated and measured may be significantly different from the perturbed system.

Esh, D. W.; Scheetz, B. E.

1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

398

Short-term CO? abatement in the European power sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper focuses on the possibilities for short term abatement in response to a CO2 price through fuel switching in the European power sector. The model E-Simulate is used to simulate the electricity generation in Europe ...

Delarue, Erik D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

actuales del sector: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electric Sector Business Model CATEE 2013 Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference San Antonio, Texas December 17, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-57 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy...

400

african crop sectors: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electric Sector Business Model CATEE 2013 Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference San Antonio, Texas December 17, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-57 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation sector model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

CEC-500-2010-FS-002 Assess New Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CEC-500-2010-FS-002 Assess New Transportation and Land-Use Patterns in a Carbon-Constrained Future TRANSPORTATION ENERGY RESEARCH PIER Transportation Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/ transportation/ March 2010 The Issue California's transportation sector is the single largest contributor of greenhouse gas

402

Laboratory And Lysimeter Experimentation And Transport Modeling Of Neptunium And Strontium In Savannah River Site Sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) conducts performance assessment (PA) calculations to determine the appropriate amount of low-level radiological waste that can be safely disposed on site. Parameters are included in these calculations that account for the interaction between the immobile solid phase and the mobile aqueous phase. These parameters are either the distribution coefficient (K{sub d} value) or the apparent solubility value (K{sub sp}). These parameters are readily found in the literature and are used throughout the DOE complex. One shortcoming of K{sub d} values is that they are only applicable to a given set of solid and aqueous phase conditions. Therefore, a given radionuclide may have several K{sub d} values as it moves between formations and comes into contact with different solids and different aqueous phases. It is expected that the K{sub d} construct will be appropriate to use for a majority of the PA and for a majority of the radionuclides. However, semi-mechanistic models would be more representative in isolated cases where the chemistry is especially transitory or the radionuclide chemistry is especially complex, bringing to bear multiple species of varying sorption tendencies to the sediment. Semi-mechanistic models explicitly accommodate the dependency of K{sub d} values, or other sorption parameters, on contaminant concentration, competing ion concentrations, pH-dependent surface charge on the adsorbent, and solute species distribution. Incorporating semi-mechanistic concepts into geochemical models is desirable to make the models more robust and technically defensible. Furthermore, these alternative models could be used to augment or validate a Kd?based DOE Order 435.1 Performance Assessment. The objectives of this study were to: 1) develop a quantitative thermodynamically-based model for neptunium sorption to SRS sediments, and 2) determine a sorption constant from an SRS 11-year lysimeter study. The modeling studies were conducted with existing data sets. The first data set used laboratory generated Np sorption data as a function of concentration (three orders of magnitude) and as a function of pH (four orders of magnitude of proton concentration). In this modeling exercise, a very simple solution was identified by assuming that all sorption occurred only to the iron oxides in the sediment and that all the added NpO{sub 4}{sup -} remained in the oxidized state and was not reduced to the Np(IV) state (as occurs rapidly with Pu(V)). With rather limited input data, very good agreement between experimental and modeling results was observed. This modeling approach would be easy to add to the PA with little additional data requirements. This model would be useful in a system where pH is expected to change greatly, such as directly beneath a grout or concrete structure. The second model discussed in the report was to derive strontium K{sub d} values from data collected in an 11-year-old field transport study. In this controlled lysimeter study, a sensitivity analysis was conducted of hydrological and chemical processes that influence contaminant transport, including diffusion coefficients, seepage velocity, and K{sub d} value. The best overall K{sub d} derived from the model fit to the data was 32 L kg{sup -1}, which was the same value that was previously measured in traditional laboratory batch sorption studies. This was an unexpected result given the differences in experimental conditions between the batch test and the lysimeter flow through test, in particular the differences between strontium adsorption and desorption processes occurring in the latter test and not in the former. There were some trends in the lysimeter strontium data that were not predicted by the K{sub d} model, which suggest that other geochemical processes are likely also controlling strontium transport. Strontium release and cation exchange are being evaluated. These results suggest that future modeling efforts (e.g., PAs) could be improved by employing a more robust semi-empirical modeling approach to transient or complex conditio

Kaplan, Daniel I.; Powell, B. A.; Miller, Todd J.

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

403

Variably Saturated Flow and Multicomponent Biogeochemical Reactive Transport Modeling of a Uranium Bioremediation Field Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field experiments at a former uranium mill tailings site have identified the potential for stimulating indigenous bacteria to catalyze the conversion of aqueous uranium in the +6 oxidation state to immobile solid-associated uranium in the +4 oxidation state. This effectively removes uranium from solution resulting in groundwater concentrations below actionable standards. Three-dimensional, coupled variably-saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a 2008 in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment is used to better understand the interplay of transport rates and biogeochemical reaction rates that determine the location and magnitude of key reaction products. A comprehensive reaction network, developed largely through previous 1-D modeling studies, was used to simulate the impacts on uranium behavior of pulsed acetate amendment, seasonal water table variation, spatially-variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. A principal challenge is the mechanistic representation of biologically-mediated terminal electron acceptor process (TEAP) reactions whose products significantly alter geochemical controls on uranium mobility through increases in pH, alkalinity, exchangeable cations, and highly reactive reduction products. In general, these simulations of the 2008 Big Rusty acetate biostimulation field experiment in Rifle, Colorado confirmed previously identified behaviors including (1) initial dominance by iron reducing bacteria that concomitantly reduce aqueous U(VI), (2) sulfate reducing bacteria that become dominant after {approx}30 days and outcompete iron reducers for the acetate electron donor, (3) continuing iron-reducer activity and U(VI) bioreduction during dominantly sulfate reducing conditions, and (4) lower apparent U(VI) removal from groundwater during dominantly sulfate reducing conditions. New knowledge on simultaneously active metal and sulfate reducers has been incorporated into the modeling. In this case, an initially small population of slow growing sulfate reducers is active from the initiation of biostimulation. Three-dimensional, variably saturated flow modeling was used to address impacts of a falling water table during acetate injection. These impacts included a significant reduction in aquifer saturated thickness and isolation of residual reactants and products, as well as unmitigated uranium, in the newly unsaturated vadose zone. High permeability sandy gravel structures resulted in locally high flow rates in the vicinity of injection wells that increased acetate dilution. In downgradient locations, these structures created preferential flow paths for acetate delivery that enhanced local zones of TEAP reactivity and subsidiary reactions. Conversely, smaller transport rates associated with the lower permeability lithofacies (e.g., fine) and vadose zone were shown to limit acetate access and reaction. Once accessed by acetate, however, these same zones limited subsequent acetate dilution and provided longer residence times that resulted in higher concentrations of TEAP products when terminal electron donors and acceptors were not limiting. Finally, facies-based porosity and reactive surface area variations were shown to affect aqueous uranium concentration distributions; however, the ranges were sufficiently small to preserve general trends. Large computer memory and high computational performance were required to simulate the detailed coupled process models for multiple biogeochemical components in highly resolved heterogeneous materials for the 110-day field experiment and 50 days of post-biostimulation behavior. In this case, a highly-scalable subsurface simulator operating on 128 processor cores for 12 hours was used to simulate each realization. An equivalent simulation without parallel processing would have taken 60 days, assuming sufficient memory was available.

Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Williams, Kenneth H.; Murray, Christopher J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Dayvault, Richard; Waichler, Scott R.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Spane, Frank A.; Long, Philip E.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Phase I Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a summary and framework of available transport data and other information directly relevant to the development of the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (RMSM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99 groundwater transport model. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are briefly summarized with reference to the complete documentation.

Nathan Bryant

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Recent Site-Wide Transport Modeling Related to the Carbon Tetrachloride Plume at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon tetrachloride transport in the unconfined aquifer system at the Hanford Site has been the subject of follow-on studies since the Carbon Tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Demonstration (ITRD) Program was completed in FY 2002. These scoping analyses were undertaken to provide support for strategic planning and guidance for the more robust modeling needed to obtain a final record of decision (ROD) for the carbon tetrachloride plume in the 200 West Area. This report documents the technical approach and the results of these follow-on, site-wide scale-modeling efforts. The existing site-wide groundwater model was used in this effort. The work extended that performed as part of the ITRD modeling study in which a 200 West Area scale submodel was developed to examine arrival concentrations at an arbitrary boundary between the 200 E and 200 W areas. These scoping analyses extended the analysis to predict the arrival of the carbon tetrachloride plume at the Columbia River. The results of these analyses illustrate the importance of developing field-scale estimates of natural attenuation parameters, abiotic degradation rate and soil/water equilibrium sorption coefficient, for carbon tetrachloride. With these parameters set to zero, carbon tetrachloride concentrations will exceed the compliance limit of 5 ?g/L outside the 200 Area Plateau Waste Management Area, and the aquifer source loading and area of the aquifer affected will continue to grow until arrival rates of carbon tetrachloride equal source release rates, estimated at 33 kg/yr. Results of this scoping analysis show that the natural attenuation parameters are critical in predicting the future movement of carbon tetrachloride from the 200 West Area. Results also show the significant change in predictions between continual source release from the vadose zone and complete source removal.

Bergeron, Marcel P.; Cole, C R.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Computer Modeling of Transport of Oxidizing Species in Grain Boundaries during Zirconium Corrosion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zirconium (Zr) based alloys are widely used as the cladding materials in light-water reactors. The water-side corrosion of these alloys degrades their structural integrity and poses serious safety concerns. During the Zr corrosion process, a thin Zr oxide (ZrO2) layer forms on the alloy surface and serves as a barrier layer for further corrosion. The majority of the oxide has the monoclinic phase. At the transition region between the oxide and the metal, the oxide contains a thin layer of stabilized tetragonal phase. It is found that the texture of the tetragonal layer determines the protectiveness of the oxide for corrosion. The transport of oxidizing species, such as anion defects, cation defects, and electron through the tetragonal oxide layer could be the rate limiting step of the corrosion. The defect diffusion can be affected by the growing stresses and microstructures such as grain boundaries and dislocations. In this work molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the anion and cation diffusion in bulk and at grain boundaries in tetragonal ZrO2. The results show that defect diffusion at grain boundaries is complex and the behavior strongly depends on the grain boundary type. For most of the grain boundaries studied the defect diffusion are much slower than in the bulk, implying that grain boundaries may not be fast defect transport paths during corrosion. The connection between the modeling results and published experimental work will also be discussed. This work is funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Idaho National Laboratory.

Xian-Ming Bai; Yongfeng Zhang; Michael R. Tonks

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Pb-Pb collisions at root s(NN)=2.76 TeV in a multiphase transport model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The multiplicity and elliptic flow of charged particles produced in Pb-Pb collisions at center of mass energy root s(NN) = 2.76 TeV from the Large Hadron Collider are studied in a multiphase transport (AMPT) model. With the standard parameters...

Xu, Jun; Ko, Che Ming.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 88, 144305 (2013) Two-channel model for nonequilibrium thermal transport in pump-probe experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

150 nm of the Al/Si0.99Ge0.01 interface. The extra thermal resistance in this region is a result. INTRODUCTION The magnitude of a material's thermal conductivity and spe- cific heat is determinedPHYSICAL REVIEW B 88, 144305 (2013) Two-channel model for nonequilibrium thermal transport in pump

Cahill, David G.

409

NUMERICAL MODELING OF CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT IN FRACTURED POROUS MEDIA USING MIXED FINITE ELEMENT AND FINITE VOLUME METHODS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mathematical model for contaminant species passing through fractured porous media is presented. In the numerical model, we combine two locally conservative methods, i.e. mixed finite element (MFE) and the finite volume methods. Adaptive triangle mesh is used for effective treatment of the fractures. A hybrid MFE method is employed to provide an accurate approximation of velocities field for both the fractures and matrix which are crucial to the convection part of the transport equation. The finite volume method and the standard MFE method are used to approximate the convection and dispersion terms respectively. The model is used to investigate the interaction of adsorption with transport and to extract information on effective adsorption distribution coefficients. Numerical examples in different fractured media illustrate the robustness and efficiency of the proposed numerical model.

Taylor, G.; Dong, C.; Sun, S.

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

410

Climate Action Plans and Long-Range Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Action Plans and Long-Range Transportation Plans in the Pacific Northwest: A Review Climate Change and Impacts Mitigation versus Adaptation Impacts of Climate Change: Nation & the Pacific Northwest Climate Change Planning Efforts Transportation Sector Response - Survey Recommendations Continued

Bertini, Robert L.

411

Quantitative analysis of alternative transportation under environmental constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis focuses on the transportation sector and its role in emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and conventional pollutant emissions. Specifically, it analyzes the potential for hydrogen based transportation, introducing ...

Sandoval López, Reynaldo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

study reflects the project's preliminary effort at simulating the fluid flow and heat transport processes, before treating the fully coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrologic-chemical...

413

Modelling of reactive gas transport in unsaturated soil. A coupled thermo-hydro-chemical-mechanical approach.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis presents the development of a reactive gas transport equation under coupled framework of thermal, hydraulic, chemical and mechanical (THCM) behaviour of variably saturated… (more)

Masum, Shakil Al

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Direct Insertion of MODIS Radiances in a Global Aerosol Transport Model CLARK WEAVER,* ARLINDO DA SILVA, MIAN CHIN,# PAUL GINOUX,@ OLEG DUBOVIK,&,@@  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is directly inserted into the Goddard Chemistry and Aerosol Radiation Transport model (GOCART), which aerosol radiative forcing in the thermody- namic equation of GCMs, 3) to account for the reduc- tionDirect Insertion of MODIS Radiances in a Global Aerosol Transport Model CLARK WEAVER,* ARLINDO DA

Chin, Mian

415

IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 10, NO. 1, JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2004 37 Monte Carlo Modeling of the Light Transport in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

absorption, thin-film coatings, and uneven or irregular surfaces by tracking the photon polarization aerogel layer [10]. Several models have also been proposed for modeling optical transport in organic light

Kanicki, Jerzy

416

Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What's Working and Why Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What's Working and Why Presentation by...

417

Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

JANUARY 2015 ENERGY SECTOR CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY Energy Sector...

418

On the Sensitivity of Atmospheric Model Implied Ocean Heat Transport to the Dominant Terms of the Surface Energy Balance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oceanic meridional heat transport (T{sub o}) implied by an atmospheric General Circulation Model (GCM) can help evaluate a model's readiness for coupling with an ocean GCM. In this study we examine the T{sub o} from benchmark experiments of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project, and evaluate the sensitivity of T{sub o} to the dominant terms of the surface energy balance. The implied global ocean TO in the Southern Hemisphere of many models is equatorward, contrary to most observationally-based estimates. By constructing a hybrid (model corrected by observations) T{sub o}, an earlier study demonstrated that the implied heat transport is critically sensitive to the simulated shortwave cloud radiative effects, which have been argued to be principally responsible for the Southern Hemisphere problem. Systematic evaluation of one model in a later study suggested that the implied T{sub o} could be equally as sensitive to a model's ocean surface latent heat flux. In this study we revisit the problem with more recent simulations, making use of estimates of ocean surface fluxes to construct two additional hybrid calculations. The results of the present study demonstrate that indeed the implied T{sub o} of an atmospheric model is very sensitive to problems in not only the surface net shortwave, but the latent heat flux as well. Many models underestimate the shortwave radiation reaching the surface in the low latitudes, and overestimate the latent heat flux in the same region. The additional hybrid transport calculations introduced here could become useful model diagnostic tests as estimates of implied ocean surface fluxes are improved.

Gleckler, P J

2004-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

419

Wave transport for a scalar model of the Love waves Guillaume Bal Leonid Ryzhik y  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the wavelength. The transport equation accounts for the multiple scattering of the Love waves analyzed using radiative transfer equations for more than thirty years [5, 6, 7, 8, 14]. A systematic and eÃ?cient way to obtain transport equations is presented in [16, 18]. The mathematics involved in this process

Ryzhik, Lenya

420

Wave transport for a scalar model of the Love waves Guillaume Bal Leonid Ryzhik \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the wavelength. The transport equation accounts for the multiple scattering of the Love waves using radiative transfer equations for more than thirty years [5, 6, 7, 8, 14]. A systematic and efficient way to obtain transport equations is presented in [16, 18]. The mathematics involved

Bal, Guillaume

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation sector model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Transport Model Linear Evaluation Parametric Scan: limit of Te,i = 0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, G. W. Hammett Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 2011 U.S. Transport Task Force]. In addition, the outward heat flux is less than the convective heat flux, due to preferential transport of low-ion coupling suppress the edge Ti resulting in a steep ion temperature gradient and low Ti /Te which drive

Hammett, Greg

422

Laser experiments explore the hidden sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently, the laser experiments BMV and GammeV, searching for light shining through walls, have published data and calculated new limits on the allowed masses and couplings for axion-like particles. In this note we point out that these experiments can serve to constrain a much wider variety of hidden-sector particles such as, e.g., minicharged particles and hidden-sector photons. The new experiments improve the existing bounds from the older BFRT experiment by a factor of two. Moreover, we use the new PVLAS constraints on a possible rotation and ellipticity of light after it has passed through a strong magnetic field to constrain pure minicharged particle models. For masses <~0.05 eV, the charge is now restricted to be less than (3-4)x10^(-7) times the electron electric charge. This is the best laboratory bound and comparable to bounds inferred from the energy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background.

M. Ahlers; H. Gies; J. Jaeckel; J. Redondo; A. Ringwald

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

423

Constraining Dark Sectors with Monojets and Dijets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider dark sector particles (DSPs) that obtain sizeable interactions with Standard Model fermions from a new mediator. While these particles can avoid observation in direct detection experiments, they are strongly constrained by LHC measurements. We demonstrate that there is an important complementarity between searches for DSP production and searches for the mediator itself, in particular bounds on (broad) dijet resonances. This observation is crucial not only in the case where the DSP is all of the dark matter but whenever - precisely due to its sizeable interactions with the visible sector - the DSP annihilates away so efficiently that it only forms a dark matter subcomponent. To highlight the different roles of DSP direct detection and LHC monojet and dijet searches, as well as perturbativity constraints, we first analyse the exemplary case of an axial-vector mediator and then generalise our results. We find important implications for the interpretation of LHC dark matter searches in terms of simpli...

Chala, Mikael; McCullough, Matthew; Nardini, Germano; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Numerical modeling of deep groundwater flow and heat transport in the Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical modeling approach has been used to evaluate quantitatively the effects of fluid flow on contemporary heat flow in an intracratonic basin. The authors have selected the Williston basin for this hydrodynamic study because of the opportunity it presents to assess the relation of deep groundwater flow to basin geothermics and the associated features of diagenesis and petroleum accumulation. The finite element method is used to solve the coupled equations of fluid flow and heat transport in two-dimensional sections of the basin. Both the fluid- and heat-flow regime are assumed to be at steady state, and the fluid flow is driven primarily by the water-table relief which is taken to be a subdued replica of land-surface topography. Buoyancy forces may also affect flow through fluid density gradients created by temperature and salinity effects. Three southwest-northwest oriented sections across the basin were modeled using available and estimated parameter data. The predicted flow patterns are most strongly affected by the topography, but the Devonian salt unit and Cretaceous shale unit exert some control. Cross-formational flow is especially important near the downdip, solution edge of the salt beds. Flow rates rarely exceed 0.5 m/year in the deep-central part of the basin, yet there does exist a marked effect on heat flow, albeit subdued by the blanket effect of the low-permeability Cretaceous shales. The regional effect of the topography-driven flow system is reflected in present-day salinity patterns and heat-flow data.

Garven, G.; Vigrass, L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

ORNL/TM-2009/222 Center for Transportation Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ESTIMATION OF GASOLINE CONSUMPTION BY PUBLIC SECTOR..............41 5.1 Federal Civilian Motor/Commercial Sectors..............................................29 4.3 Off-highway Gasoline Consumption by EquipmentORNL/TM-2009/222 Center for Transportation Analysis Energy and Transportation Science Division OFF

426

E-Print Network 3.0 - abelian hidden sectors Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Physics ; Geosciences 9 CLNS 951381 SOME REMARKS ON SUPERSTRING PHENOMENOLOGY Lambda Summary: contains the standard model, and a hidden sector (The need for a...

427

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World Energy Outlook (IEA 2008), the bottom up models supporting IPCC “economic mitigation potentials” (IPCC 2007), the buildings chapter of the US assessment

Coffey, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the USconditioning. Very low energy buildings in particular tendand customization in most low energy buildings, the best

Coffey, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Impacts of urban transportation mode split on CO{sub 2} emissions in Jinan, China.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the world's largest developing country, China currently is undergoing rapid urbanization and motorization, which will result in far-reaching impacts on energy and the environment. According to estimates, energy use and carbon emissions in the transportation sector will comprise roughly 30% of total emissions by 2030. Since the late 1990s, transportation-related issues such as energy, consumption, and carbon emissions have become a policy focus in China. To date, most research and policies have centered on vehicle technologies that promote vehicle efficiency and reduced emissions. Limited research exists on the control of greenhouse gases through mode shifts in urban transportation - in particular, through the promotion of public transit. The purpose of this study is to establish a methodology to analyze carbon emissions from the urban transportation sector at the Chinese city level. By using Jinan, the capital of China's Shandong Province, as an example, we have developed an analytical model to simulate energy consumption and carbon emissions based on the number of trips, the transportation mode split, and the trip distance. This model has enabled us to assess the impacts of the transportation mode split on energy consumption and carbon emissions. Furthermore, this paper reviews a set of methods for data collection, estimation, and processing for situations where statistical data are scarce in China. This paper also describes the simulation of three transportation system development scenarios. The results of this study illustrate that if no policy intervention is implemented for the transportation mode split (the business-as-usual (BAU) case), then emissions from Chinese urban transportation systems will quadruple by 2030. However, a dense, mixed land-use pattern, as well as transportation policies that encourage public transportation, would result in the elimination of 1.93 million tons of carbon emissions - approximately 50% of the BAU scenario emissions.

He, D.; Meng, F.; Wang, M.; He, K. (Energy Systems); (Energy Foundation); (Tsinghua Univ.)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

A Validation Process for the Groundwater Flow and Transport Model of the Faultless Nuclear Test at Central Nevada Test Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many sites of groundwater contamination rely heavily on complex numerical models of flow and transport to develop closure plans. This has created a need for tools and approaches that can be used to build confidence in model predictions and make it apparent to regulators, policy makers, and the public that these models are sufficient for decision making. This confidence building is a long-term iterative process and it is this process that should be termed ''model validation.'' Model validation is a process not an end result. That is, the process of model validation cannot always assure acceptable prediction or quality of the model. Rather, it provides safeguard against faulty models or inadequately developed and tested models. Therefore, development of a systematic approach for evaluating and validating subsurface predictive models and guiding field activities for data collection and long-term monitoring is strongly needed. This report presents a review of model validation studies that pertain to groundwater flow and transport modeling. Definitions, literature debates, previously proposed validation strategies, and conferences and symposia that focused on subsurface model validation are reviewed and discussed. The review is general in nature, but the focus of the discussion is on site-specific, predictive groundwater models that are used for making decisions regarding remediation activities and site closure. An attempt is made to compile most of the published studies on groundwater model validation and assemble what has been proposed or used for validating subsurface models. The aim is to provide a reasonable starting point to aid the development of the validation plan for the groundwater flow and transport model of the Faultless nuclear test conducted at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA). The review of previous studies on model validation shows that there does not exist a set of specific procedures and tests that can be easily adapted and applied to determine the validity of site-specific groundwater models. This is true for both deterministic and stochastic models, with the latter posing a more difficult and challenging problem when it comes to validation. This report then proposes a general validation approach for the CNTA model, which addresses some of the important issues recognized in previous validation studies, conferences, and symposia as crucial to the process. The proposed approach links model building, model calibration, model predictions, data collection, model evaluations, and model validation in an iterative loop. The approach focuses on use of collected validation data to reduce model uncertainty and narrow the range of possible outcomes of stochastic numerical models. It accounts for the stochastic nature of the numerical CNTA model, which used Monte Carlo simulation approach. The proposed methodology relies on the premise that absolute validity is not even a theoretical possibility and is not a regulatory requirement. Rather, it highlights the importance of testing as many aspects of the model as possible and using as many diverse statistical tools as possible for rigorous checking and confidence building in the model and its predictions. It is this confidence that will eventually allow for regulator and public acceptance of decisions based on the model predictions.

Ahmed Hassan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Analysis of methods and models for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes in the agricultural sector of the US economy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alternative methods for quantifying the economic impacts associated with future increases in the ambient concentration of CO/sub 2/ were examined. A literature search was undertaken, both to gain a better understanding of the ways in which CO/sub 2/ buildup could affect crop growth and to identify the different methods available for assessing the impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes on crop yields. The second task involved identifying the scope of both the direct and indirect economic impacts that could occur as a result of CO/sub 2/-induced changes in crop yields. The third task then consisted of a comprehensive literature search to identify what types of economic models could be used effectively to assess the kinds of direct and indirect economic impacts that could conceivably occur as a result of CO/sub 2/ buildup. Specific attention was focused upon national and multi-regional agricultural sector models, multi-country agricultural trade models, and macroeconomic models of the US economy. The fourth and final task of this research involved synthesizing the information gathered in the previous tasks into a systematic framework for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes related to agricultural production.

Callaway, J.M.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

The Need for a Photon-Photon Collider in addition to LHC & ILC for Unraveling the Scalar Sector of the Randall-Sundrum Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the Randall-Sundrum model there can be a rich new phenomenology associated with Higgs-radion mixing. A photon-photon collider would provide a crucial complement to the LHC and a future ILC collider for fully determining the parameters of the model and definitively testing it.

Gunion, J F

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Phase I Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents transport data and data analyses for Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU 97. The purpose of the data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support parameterization of the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU transport model. Specific task objectives were as follows: • Identify and compile currently available transport parameter data and supporting information that may be relevant to the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU. • Assess the level of quality of the data and associated documentation. • Analyze the data to derive expected values and estimates of the associated uncertainty and variability. The scope of this document includes the compilation and assessment of data and information relevant to transport parameters for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU subsurface within the context of unclassified source-term contamination. Data types of interest include mineralogy, aqueous chemistry, matrix and effective porosity, dispersivity, matrix diffusion, matrix and fracture sorption, and colloid-facilitated transport parameters.

John McCord

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Transportation Secure Data Center: Real-World Data for Planning, Modeling and Analysis (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) have launched the free, web-based Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC). The TSDC (www.nrel.gov/tsdc) preserves respondent anonymity while making vital transportation data available to a broad group of users through secure, online access. The TSDC database gives, metropolitan planning organizations, universities, national laboratories, air quality management districts, disaster planning agencies and auto manufacturers free-of-charge web-based access to valuable transportation data. The TSDC's two levels of access make composite data available with simple online registration, and allow researchers to use detailed spatial data after completing a straight forward application process.

Not Available

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Transportation Secure Data Center: Real-World Data for Planning, Modeling, and Analysis (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC) - an NREL-operated resource that provides secure access to detailed GPS travel data for valuable research purposes in a way that protects original participant privacy.

Not Available

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

The Evaluation of Transportation and Land Use Plans Using Linked Economic and GIS Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Attempts to base the economic evaluation travel no state isurban economyand and economic evaluations. for devlsing andEvaluation of Transportation and Land Use Plans Using Linked Economic and

Johnston, Robert A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Pore-scale modeling of electrical and fluid transport in Berea sandstone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this paper is to test how well numerical calculations can predict transport properties of porous permeable rock, given its 3D digital microtomography (?CT) image. For this study, a Berea 500 sandstone sample ...

Zhan, Xin

438

Analysis and modeling of Spain's power sector in order to define the best incentive policies for achieving an optimum energy mix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of this thesis is the development of a model of the Spanish energy mix in order to be able to forecast its evolution in function of exogenous variables such as the public opinion about specific technologies, the ...

Ibáñez López, A. Santiago (Antonio Santiago)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the origin, structure and continuing development of a model of time varying energy consumption in the US commercial building stock. The model is based on a flexible structure that disaggregates the stock into various categories (e.g. by building type, climate, vintage and life-cycle stage) and assigns attributes to each of these (e.g. floor area and energy use intensity by fuel type and end use), based on historical data and user-defined scenarios for future projections. In addition to supporting the interactive exploration of building stock dynamics, the model has been used to study the likely outcomes of specific policy and innovation scenarios targeting very low future energy consumption in the building stock. Model use has highlighted the scale of the challenge of meeting targets stated by various government and professional bodies, and the importance of considering both new construction and existing buildings.

Coffey, Brian; Borgeson, Sam; Selkowitz, Stephen; Apte, Josh; Mathew, Paul; Haves, Philip

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Uranium Removal from Groundwater via In Situ Biostimulation: Field-Scale Modeling of Transport and Biological Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 2002 and 2003, bioremediation experiments in the unconfined aquifer of the Old Rifle UMTRA field site in western Colorado provided evidence for the immobilization of hexavalent uranium in groundwater by iron-reducing Geobacter sp. stimulated by acetate amendment. As the bioavailable Fe(III) terminal electron acceptor was depleted in the zone just downgradient of the acetate injection gallery, sulfate-reducing organisms came to dominate the microbial community. In the present study, we use multicomponent reactive transport modeling to analyze data from the 2002 field experiment to 1) identify the dominant transport and biological processes controlling uranium mobility during biostimulation, 2) determine field-scale parameters for these modeled processes, and 3) apply the calibrated process models to history match observations during the 2003 field experiment. In spite of temporally and spatially variable observations during the field-scale biostimulation experiments, the coupled process simulation approach was able to establish a quantitative characterization of the principal flow, transport, and reaction processes that could be applied without modification to describe the 2003 field experiment. Insights gained from this analysis include field-scale estimates of bioavailable Fe(III) mineral, and the magnitude of uranium bioreduction during biostimulated growth of the iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing microorganisms.

Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Long, Philip E.; Resch, Charles T.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Komlos, John; Jaffe, Peter R.; Morrison, Stan J.; Dayvault, Richard; White, David C.; Anderson, Robert T.

2007-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation sector model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Phase II Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document, the Phase II Frenchman Flat transport report, presents the results of radionuclide transport simulations that incorporate groundwater radionuclide transport model statistical and structural uncertainty, and lead to forecasts of the contaminant boundary (CB) for a set of representative models from an ensemble of possible models. This work, as described in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) strategy (FFACO, 1996; amended 2010), forms an essential part of the technical basis for subsequent negotiation of the compliance boundary of the Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU) by Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Underground nuclear testing via deep vertical shafts was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1951 until 1992. The Frenchman Flat area, the subject of this report, was used for seven years, with 10 underground nuclear tests being conducted. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NNSA/NSO initiated the UGTA Project to assess and evaluate the effects of underground nuclear tests on groundwater at the NTS and vicinity through the FFACO (1996, amended 2010). The processes that will be used to complete UGTA corrective actions are described in the “Corrective Action Strategy” in the FFACO Appendix VI, Revision No. 2 (February 20, 2008).

Gregg Ruskuaff

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

CLEAR (Calculates Logical Evacuation And Response): A Generic Transportation Network Model for the Calculation of Evacuation Time Estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the methodology and application of the computer model CLEAR (Calculates Logical Evacuation And Response) which estimates the time required for a specific population density and distribution to evacuate an area using a specific transportation network. The CLEAR model simulates vehicle departure and movement on a transportation network according to the conditions and consequences of traffic flow. These include handling vehicles at intersecting road segments, calculating the velocity of travel on a road segment as a function of its vehicle density, and accounting for the delay of vehicles in traffic queues. The program also models the distribution of times required by individuals to prepare for an evacuation. In order to test its accuracy, the CLEAR model was used to estimate evacuatlon tlmes for the emergency planning zone surrounding the Beaver Valley Nuclear Power Plant. The Beaver Valley site was selected because evacuation time estimates had previously been prepared by the licensee, Duquesne Light, as well as by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency. A lack of documentation prevented a detailed comparison of the estimates based on the CLEAR model and those obtained by Duquesne Light. However, the CLEAR model results compared favorably with the estimates prepared by the other two agencies.

Moeller, M. P.; Urbanik, II, T.; Desrosiers, A. E.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

A mixed SOC-turbulence model for nonlocal transport and Levy-fractional Fokker-Planck equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The phenomena of nonlocal transport in magnetically confined plasma are theoretically analyzed. A hybrid model is proposed, which brings together the notion of inverse energy cascade, typical of drift-wave- and two-dimensional fluid turbulence, and the ideas of avalanching behavior, associable with self-organized critical (SOC) behavior. Using statistical arguments, it is shown that an amplification mechanism is needed to introduce nonlocality into dynamics. We obtain a consistent derivation of nonlocal Fokker-Planck equation with space-fractional derivatives from a stochastic Markov process with the transition probabilities defined in reciprocal space. The hybrid model observes the Sparre Andersen universality and defines a new universality class of SOC.

Alexander V. Milovanov; Jens Juul Rasmussen

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

444

Decoupled Sectors and Wolf-Rayet Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The universe may contain several decoupled matter sectors which primarily couple through gravity to the Standard Model degrees of freedom. We focus here on the description of astrophysical environments that allow for comparable densities and spatial distributions of visible matter and decoupled dark matter. We discuss four Wolf-Rayet galaxies (NGC 1614, NGC 3367, NGC 4216 and NGC 5430) which should contain comparable amounts of decoupled dark and visible matter in the star forming regions. This could lead to the observation of Gamma Ray Burst events with physics modified by jets of dark matter radiation.

Willy Fischler; Jimmy Lorshbough; Dustin Lorshbough

2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

445

Numerical modeling of mixed sediment resuspension, transport, and deposition during the March 1998 episodic events in southern Lake Michigan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two-dimensional sediment transport model capable of simulating sediment resuspension of mixed (cohesive+noncohesive) sediment is developed and applied to quantitatively simulate the March 1998 resuspension events in southern Lake Michigan. Some characteristics of the model are the capability to incorporate several floc size classes, a physically-based settling velocity formula, bed armoring, and sediment availability limitation. Important resuspension parameters were estimated from field and laboratory measurement data. The model reproduced the resuspension plume (observed by the SeaWIFS satellite and field instruments) and recently measured sedimentation rate distribution (using radiotracer techniques) fairly well. Model results were verified with field measurements of suspended sediment concentration and settling flux (by ADCPs and sediment traps). Both wave conditions and sediment bed properties (critical shear stress, fine sediment fraction, and limited sediment availability or source) are the critical factors that determine the concentration distribution and width of the resuspension plume. The modeled sedimentation pattern shows preferential accumulation of sediment on the eastern side of the lake, which agrees with the observed sedimentation pattern despite a predominance of particle sources from the western shoreline. The main physical mechanisms determining the sedimentation pattern are 1) the two counter-rotating circulation gyres producing offshore mass transport along the southeastern coast during northerly wind and 2) the settling velocity of sediment flocs which controls the deposition location.

Lee, Cheegwan; Schwab, David J.; Beletsky, Dmitry; Stroud, Jonathan; Lesht, B. M.

2007-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

446

Numerical modeling of mixed sediment resuspension, transport, and deposition during the March 1998 episodic events in southern Lake Michigan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two-dimensional sediment transport model capable of simulating sediment resuspension of mixed (cohesive plus noncohesive) sediment is developed and applied to quantitatively simulate the March 1998 resuspension events in southern Lake Michigan. Some characteristics of the model are the capability to incorporate several floc size classes, a physically based settling velocity formula, bed armoring, and sediment availability limitation. Important resuspension parameters were estimated from field and laboratory measurement data. The model reproduced the resuspension plume (observed by the SeaWIFS satellite and field instruments) and recently measured sedimentation rate distribution (using radiotracer techniques) fairly well. Model results were verified with field measurements of suspended sediment concentration and settling flux (by ADCPs and sediment traps). Both wave conditions and sediment bed properties (critical shear stress, fine sediment fraction, and limited sediment availability or source) are the critical factors that determine the concentration distribution and width of the resuspension plume. The modeled sedimentation pattern shows preferential accumulation of sediment on the eastern side of the lake, which agrees with the observed sedimentation pattern despite a predominance of particle sources from the western shoreline. The main physical mechanisms determining the sedimentation pattern are (1) the two counter-rotating circulation gyres producing offshore mass transport along the southeastern coast during northerly wind and (2) the settling velocity of sediment flocs which controls the deposition location.

Lee, C.; Schwab, D. J.; Beletsky, D.; Stroud, J.; Lesht, B.; PNNL; NOAA; Univ. of Michigan; Univ. of Pennsylvania

2007-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

447

Regional groundwater flow and tritium transport modeling and risk assessment of the underground test area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The groundwater flow system of the Nevada Test Site and surrounding region was evaluated to estimate the highest potential current and near-term risk to the public and the environment from groundwater contamination downgradient of the underground nuclear testing areas. The highest, or greatest, potential risk is estimated by assuming that several unusually rapid transport pathways as well as public and environmental exposures all occur simultaneously. These conservative assumptions may cause risks to be significantly overestimated. However, such a deliberate, conservative approach ensures that public health and environmental risks are not underestimated and allows prioritization of future work to minimize potential risks. Historical underground nuclear testing activities, particularly detonations near or below the water table, have contaminated groundwater near testing locations with radioactive and nonradioactive constituents. Tritium was selected as the contaminant of primary concern for this phase of the project because it is abundant, highly mobile, and represents the most significant contributor to the potential radiation dose to humans for the short term. It was also assumed that the predicted risk to human health and the environment from tritium exposure would reasonably represent the risk from other, less mobile radionuclides within the same time frame. Other contaminants will be investigated at a later date. Existing and newly collected hydrogeologic data were compiled for a large area of southern Nevada and California, encompassing the Nevada Test Site regional groundwater flow system. These data were used to develop numerical groundwater flow and tritium transport models for use in the prediction of tritium concentrations at hypothetical human and ecological receptor locations for a 200-year time frame. A numerical, steady-state regional groundwater flow model was developed to serve as the basis for the prediction of the movement of tritium from the underground testing areas on a regional scale. The groundwater flow model was used in conjunction with a particle-tracking code to define the pathlines followed by groundwater particles originating from 415 points associated with 253 nuclear test locations. Three of the most rapid pathlines were selected for transport simulations. These pathlines are associated with three nuclear test locations, each representing one of the three largest testing areas. These testing locations are: BOURBON on Yucca Flat, HOUSTON on Central Pahute Mesa, and TYBO on Western Pahute Mesa. One-dimensional stochastic tritium transport simulations were performed for the three pathlines using the Monte Carlo method with Latin hypercube sampling. For the BOURBON and TYBO pathlines, sources of tritium from other tests located along the same pathline were included in the simulations. Sensitivity analyses were also performed on the transport model to evaluate the uncertainties associated with the geologic model, the rates of groundwater flow, the tritium source, and the transport parameters. Tritium concentration predictions were found to be mostly sensitive to the regional geology in controlling the horizontal and vertical position of transport pathways. The simulated concentrations are also sensitive to matrix diffusion, an important mechanism governing the migration of tritium in fractured carbonate and volcanic rocks. Source term concentration uncertainty is most important near the test locations and decreases in importance as the travel distance increases. The uncertainty on groundwater flow rates is as important as that on matrix diffusion at downgradient locations. The risk assessment was performed to provide conservative and bounding estimates of the potential risks to human health and the environment from tritium in groundwater. Risk models were designed by coupling scenario-specific tritium intake with tritium dose models and cancer and genetic risk estimates using the Monte Carlo method. Estimated radiation doses received by individuals from chronic exposure to tritium, and the corre

None

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 3 -- Residential and commercial sector DSM analyses: Detailed results from the DBEDT DSM assessment model; Part 1, Technical potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. Numerous tables and figures illustrating the technical potential for demand-side management are included.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Grand challenge problems in environmental modeling and remediation: Groundwater contaminant transport. Final project report 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The over-reaching goal of the Groundwater Grand Challenge component of the Partnership in Computational Science (PICS) was to develop and establish the massively parallel approach for the description of groundwater flow and transport and to address the problem of uncertainties in the data and its interpretation. This necessitated the development of innovative algorithms and the implementation of massively parallel computational tools to provide a suite of simulators for groundwater flow and transport in heterogeneous media. This report summarizes the activities and deliverables of the Groundwater Grand Challenge project funded through the High Performance Computing grand challenge program of the Department of Energy from 1995 through 1997.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System (TRAGIS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System (TRAGIS) Model and Network Databases The Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System (TRAGIS) model is a geographic information system tool for modeling transportation routing. TRAGIS offers numerous options for route calculation

451

Ghost condensation and CPT violation in neutrino sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider CPT violation in neutrino sector, which is induced by ghost condensation. A model with extra dimension is suggested where ghost condensation occurs at a distant location separated from the SM brane. Right handed neutrinos in the bulk, which are originally introduced to explain small Yukawa couplings, play the role of messenger fields communicating ghost condensation and the standard model sector and lead to a sizable CPT violation in neutrino sector at the leading order. The model provides a resolution to the recent MINOS anomaly without spoiling any experimental constraints and may be able to be tested by observing an interesting phenomenon, twinkling cosmic microwave background radiation, with timescale about O(10-100) minutes at future CMB observations e.g. Planck.

Shinji Mukohyama; Seong Chan Park

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

452

The Development of an Effective Transportation Risk Assessment Model for Analyzing the Transport of Spent Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste to the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Past approaches for assessing the impacts of transporting spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste have not been effectively implemented or have used relatively simple approaches. The Yucca Mountain Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) analysis considers 83 origins, 34 fuel types, 49,914 legal weight truck shipments, 10,911 rail shipments, consisting of 59,250 shipment links outside Nevada (shipment kilometers and population density pairs through urban, suburban or rural zones by state), and 22,611 shipment links in Nevada. There was additional complexity within the analysis. The analysis modeled the behavior of 41 isotopes, 1091 source terms, and used 8850 food transfer factors (distinct factors by isotope for each state). The model also considered different accident rates for legal weight truck, rail, and heavy haul truck by state, and barge by waterway. To capture the all of the complexities of the transportation analysis, a Microsoft{reg_sign} Access database was created. In the Microsoft{reg_sign} Access approach the data is placed in individual tables and equations are developed in queries to obtain the overall impacts. While the query might be applied to thousands of table entries, there is only one equation for a particular impact. This greatly simplifies the validation effort. Furthermore, in Access, data in tables can be linked automatically using query joins. Another advantage built into MS Access is nested queries, or the ability to develop query hierarchies. It is possible to separate the calculation into a series of steps, each step represented by a query. For example, the first query might calculate the number of shipment kilometers traveled through urban, rural and suburban zones for all states. Subsequent queries could join the shipment kilometers query results with another table containing the state and mode specific accident rate to produce accidents by state. One of the biggest advantages of the nested queries is in validation. Temporarily restricting the query to one origin, one shipment, or one state and validating that the query calculation is returning the expected result allows simple validation. The paper will show the flexibility of the assessment tool to consider a wide variety of impacts. Through the use of pre-designed queries, impacts by origin, mode, fuel type or many other parameters can be obtained.

McSweeney; Thomas; Winnard; Ross; Steven B.; Best; Ralph E.

2001-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

453

Validation, Proof-of-Concept, and Postaudit of the Groundwater Flow and Transport Model of the Project Shoal Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The groundwater flow and radionuclide transport model characterizing the Shoal underground nuclear test has been accepted by the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. According to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) between DOE and the State of Nevada, the next steps in the closure process for the site are then model validation (or postaudit), the proof-of-concept, and the long-term monitoring stage. This report addresses the development of the validation strategy for the Shoal model, needed for preparing the subsurface Corrective Action Decision Document-Corrective Action Plan and the development of the proof-of-concept tools needed during the five-year monitoring/validation period. The approach builds on a previous model, but is adapted and modified to the site-specific conditions and challenges of the Shoal site.

Ahmed Hassan

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Modeling most likely pathways for smuggling radioactive and special nuclear materials on a worldwide multimodal transportation network  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear weapons proliferation is an existing and growing worldwide problem. To help with devising strategies and supporting decisions to interdict the transport of nuclear material, we developed the Pathway Analysis, Threat Response and Interdiction Options Tool (PATRIOT) that provides an analytical approach for evaluating the probability that an adversary smuggling radioactive or special nuclear material will be detected during transit. We incorporate a global, multi-modal transportation network, explicit representation of designed and serendipitous detection opportunities, and multiple threat devices, material types, and shielding levels. This paper presents the general structure of PATRIOT, and focuses on the theoretical framework used to model the reliabilities of all network components that are used to predict the most likely pathways to the target.

Saeger, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cuellar, Leticia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Modeling most likely pathways for smuggling radioactive and special nuclear materials on a worldwide multi-modal transportation network  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear weapons proliferation is an existing and growing worldwide problem. To help with devising strategies and supporting decisions to interdict the transport of nuclear material, we developed the Pathway Analysis, Threat Response and Interdiction Options Tool (PATRIOT) that provides an analytical approach for evaluating the probability that an adversary smuggling radioactive or special nuclear material will be detected during transit. We incorporate a global, multi-modal transportation network, explicit representation of designed and serendipitous detection opportunities, and multiple threat devices, material types, and shielding levels. This paper presents the general structure of PATRIOT, all focuses on the theoretical framework used to model the reliabilities of all network components that are used to predict the most likely pathways to the target.

Saeger, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cuellar, Leticia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

456

Correlation between Median Household Income and LEED Sustainable Site Criteria for Public Transportation Access and a Regression Model Predicting Appraised Unit Value of Unimproved Parcels in Houston, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transportation access. Moreover, the regression model for predicting appraised unit value of a parcel suggested that the coefficient of Number of Light Rail Stations was positive, while the coefficient of Number of Bus Stops was negative. This result contradicted...

Ji, Qundi

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

457

Modeling transport of dissolved silica in a forested headwater catchment: Implications for defining the hydrochemical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in groundwater to be related to the saturation deficit in this zone. A positive correlation between the average and have emphasized the need for a rational, nonempirical approach for the identification stream water chemistry can provide valuable insight into the transport of dissolved materials

Scanlon, Todd

458

Multiscale modeling of fluid transport in heterogeneous materials using discrete Boltzmann methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transport in porous materials like ceramics, concrete, soils, and rocks plays an impor- tant role in many geometries like porous materials. Here, we review some of our previous work and discuss some recent environmental and technological processes [11.For example, the service life and durability of concrete can

Bentz, Dale P.

459

Effects of pore-scale velocity and pore-scale physical processes on contaminant biodegradation during transport in groundwater: modeling and experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF PORE-SCALE VELOCITY AND PORE-SCALE PHYSICAL PROCESSES ON CONTAMINANT BIODEGRADATION DURING TRANSPORT IN GROUNDWATER: MODELING AND EXPERIMENTS A Dissertation by ITZA MENDOZA SANCHEZ Submitted to the Office... PROCESSES ON CONTAMINANT BIODEGRADATION DURING TRANSPORT IN GROUNDWATER: MODELING AND EXPERIMENTS A Dissertation by ITZA MENDOZA SANCHEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Mendoza Sanchez, Itza

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Effects of pore-scale velocity and pore-scale physical processes on contaminant biodegradation during transport in groundwater: modeling and experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF PORE-SCALE VELOCITY AND PORE-SCALE PHYSICAL PROCESSES ON CONTAMINANT BIODEGRADATION DURING TRANSPORT IN GROUNDWATER: MODELING AND EXPERIMENTS A Dissertation by ITZA MENDOZA SANCHEZ Submitted to the Office... PROCESSES ON CONTAMINANT BIODEGRADATION DURING TRANSPORT IN GROUNDWATER: MODELING AND EXPERIMENTS A Dissertation by ITZA MENDOZA SANCHEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Mendoza Sanchez, Itza

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Modeling the Hydrogeochemical Transport of Radionuclides through Engineered Barriers System in the Proposed LLW Disposal Site of Taiwan - 12082  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proposed site for final disposal of low-level radioactive waste located in Daren Township of Taitung County along the southeastern coast has been on the selected list in Taiwan. The geology of the Daren site consists of argillite and meta-sedimentary rocks. A mined cavern design with a tunnel system of 500 m below the surface is proposed. Concrete is used as the main confinement material for the engineered barrier. To investigate the hydrogeochemical transport of radionuclides through engineered barriers system, HYDROGEOCHEM5.0 model was applied to simulate the complex chemical interactions among radionuclides, the cement minerals of the concrete, groundwater flow, and transport in the proposed site. The simulation results showed that the engineered barriers system with the side ditch efficiently drained the ground water and lowered the concentration of the concrete degradation induced species (e.g., hydrogen ion, sulfate, and chloride). The velocity of groundwater observed at side ditch gradually decreased with time due to the fouling of pore space by the mineral formation of ettringite and thaumasite. The short half-life of Co-60, Sr-90 and Cs-137 significantly reduced the concentrations, whereas the long half-life of I-129(1.57x10{sup 7} years) and Am-241(432 years) remain stable concentrations at the interface of waste canister and concrete barrier after 300 years. The mineral saturation index (SI) was much less than zero due to the low aqueous concentration of radionuclide, so that the precipitation formation of Co-60, Sr-90, I-129, Cs-137 and Am-241 related minerals were not found. The effect of adsorption/desorption (i.e., surface complexation model) could be a crucial geochemical mechanism for the modeling of liquid-solid phase behavior of radionuclide in geochemically dynamic environments. Moreover, the development of advanced numerical models that are coupled with hydrogeochemical transport and dose assessment of radionuclide is required in the future. (authors)

Lin, Wen-Sheng [Hydrotech Research Institute, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, Chen-Wuing; Tsao, Jui-Hsuan [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Li, Ming-Hsu [Institute of Hydrological and Oceanic Sciences, National Central University, Jhongli, Taiwan (China)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Modeling Groundwater Flow and Transport of Radionuclides at Amchitka Island's Underground Nuclear Tests: Milrow, Long Shot, and Cannikin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1963, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive material in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site (NTS), but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these locations, Amchitka Island, Alaska is the subject of this report. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. Long Shot was an 80-kiloton-yield test conducted at a depth of 700 meters (m) on October 29, 1965 (DOE, 2000). Milrow had an announced yield of about 1,000 kilotons, and was detonated at a depth of 1,220 m on October 2, 1969. Cannikin had an announced yield less than 5,000 kilotons, and was conducted at a depth of 1,790 m on November 6, 1971. The purpose of this work is to provide a portion of the information needed to conduct a human-health risk assessment of the potential hazard posed by the three underground nuclear tests on Amchitka Island. Specifically, the focus of this work is the subsurface transport portion, including the release of radionuclides from the underground cavities and their movement through the groundwater system to the point where they seep out of the ocean floor and into the marine environment. This requires a conceptual model of groundwater flow on the island using geologic, hydrologic, and chemical information, a numerical model for groundwater flow, a conceptual model of contaminant release and transport properties from the nuclear test cavities, and a numerical model for contaminant transport. Needed for the risk assessment are estimates of the quantity of radionuclides (in terms of mass flux) from the underground tests on Amchitka that could discharge to the ocean, the time of possible discharge, and the location in terms of distance from shoreline. The radionuclide data presented here are all reported in terms of normalized masses to avoid presenting classified information. As only linear processes are modeled, the results can be readily scaled by the true classified masses for use in the risk assessment. The modeling timeframe for the risk assessment was set at 1,000 years, though some calculations are extended to 2,000 years. This first section of