Sample records for transportation sector liquids

  1. A review of life-cycle analysis studies on liquid biofuel systems for the transport sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    " liquid biofuels (biodiesel and sugar/starch bioethanol) and potential "future" liquid biofuels (Fischer-Tropsch fu- els, dimethyl ether, and cellulosic bioethanol) are included. Striking features of the LCAs, SVO) from rapeseed · Bioethanol (E100, E85, E10, ethyl tetrabutyl ether or ETBE) from grains or seeds

  2. Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrificati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Transportation Sector Electrification Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrification 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies...

  3. Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, R.; Singh, N.R.; Ribeiro, F.H.; Delgass, W.N. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Chemical Engineering and Energy Center at Discovery Park

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid hydrogen-carbon (H{sub 2}CAR) process for the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels is proposed wherein biomass is the carbon source and hydrogen is supplied from carbon-free energy. To implement this concept, a process has been designed to co-feed a biomass gasifier with H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} recycled from the H{sub 2}-CO to liquid conversion reactor. Modeling of this biomass to liquids process has identified several major advantages of the H{sub 2}CAR process. The land area needed to grow the biomass is <40% of that needed by other routes that solely use biomass to support the entire transportation sector. Whereras the literature estimates known processes to be able to produce {approx}30% of the United States transportation fuel from the annual biomass of 1.366 billion tons, the H{sub 2}CAR process shows the potential to supply the entire United States transportation sector from that quantity of biomass. The synthesized liquid provides H{sub 2} storage in an open loop system. Reduction to practice of the H{sub 2}CAR route has the potential to provide the transportation sector for the foreseeable future, using the existing infrastructure. The rationale of using H{sub 2} in the H{sub 2}CAR process is explained by the significantly higher annualized average solar energy conversion efficiency for hydrogen generation versus that for biomass growth. For coal to liquids, the advantage of H{sub 2}CAR is that there is no additional CO{sub 2} release to the atmosphere due to the replacement of petroleum with coal, thus eliminating the need to sequester CO{sub 2}.

  4. Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrifica...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV) Vehicle Technology Advancement and Demonstration Activity Advanced Vehicle...

  5. Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    tiarravt043erickson2010p.pdf More Documents & Publications Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies Program Utah Clean Cities Transportation...

  6. Restructuring our Transportation Sector | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingof EnhancedRestructuring our Transportation Sector

  7. Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Name Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction...

  8. The Practice of Cost Benefit Analysis in the Transport Sector...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Practice of Cost Benefit Analysis in the Transport Sector a Mexican Perspective Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Practice of Cost Benefit Analysis in...

  9. Liquid Transportation Fuels from Coal and Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liquid Transportation Fuels from Coal and Biomass Technological Status, Costs, and Environmental for liquid fuels produced from coal or biomass. · Evaluate environmental, economic, policy, and social Impacts Panel on Alternative Liquid Transportation Fuels DOE LDV Workshop 7-26-10 Mike Ramage and Jim

  10. ANALYSIS OF MEASURES FOR REDUCING TRANSPORTATION SECTOR GREENHOUSE GAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (CO2) emission reduction estimates were obtained for each of the measures. The package of measures the problem of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the Canadian transportation sector. Reductions-makers will require estimates of both the potential emission reductions and the costs or benefits associated

  11. End use energy consumption data base: transportation sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooker, J.N.; Rose, A.B.; Greene, D.L.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transportation fuel and energy use estimates developed a Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the End Use Energy Consumption Data Base are documented. The total data base contains estimates of energy use in the United States broken down into many categories within all sectors of the economy: agriculture, mining, construction, manufacturing, commerce, the household, electric utilities, and transportation. The transportation data provided by ORNL generally cover each of the 10 years from 1967 through 1976 (occasionally 1977 and 1978), with omissions in some models. The estimtes are broken down by mode of transport, fuel, region and State, sector of the economy providing transportation, and by the use to which it is put, and, in the case of automobile and bus travel, by the income of the traveler. Fuel types include natural gas, motor and aviation gasoline, residual and diesel oil, liuqefied propane, liquefied butane, and naphtha- and kerosene-type jet engine fuels. Electricity use is also estimated. The mode, fuel, sector, and use categories themselves subsume one, two, or three levels of subcategories, resulting in a very detailed categorization and definitive accounting.

  12. HOW DO WE CONVERT THE TRANSPORT SECTOR TO RENEWABLE ENERGY AND IMPROVE THE SECTOR'S INTERPLAY WITH THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to these concerns, since it on the whole is based on fossil fuels and shows a very fast growth rate. The transport integrated in the energy system and increase the share of fuels based on sustainable energy. Around 90HOW DO WE CONVERT THE TRANSPORT SECTOR TO RENEWABLE ENERGY AND IMPROVE THE SECTOR'S INTERPLAY

  13. Electric vehicles and renewable energy in the transport sector energy system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in transport fuel consumption and fuel substitution, and the CO2-emission reduction achievable in the overall have direct implications for the road transport emissions. Options in the power sector, as to reduce CO2-emissions in particular, may become options for the transportation sector as well. Based

  14. Transportation Sector Energy Use by Type from EIA AEO 2011 Early...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This dataset is an excerpt from the spreadsheet Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011, isolating Transportation Sector energy use by Type. Data and Resources...

  15. Transportation Sector Energy Use by Mode from EIA AEO 2011 Early...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This dataset is an excerpt from the spreadsheet Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011, isolating Transportation Sector energy use by Mode. Data and Resources...

  16. Meeting U.S. Liquid Transport Fuel Needs with a Nuclear Hydrogen Biomass System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The two major energy challenges for the United States are replacing crude oil in our transportation system and eliminating greenhouse gas emissions. A domestic-source greenhouse-gas-neutral nuclear hydrogen biomass system to replace oil in the transportation sector is described. Some parts of the transportation system can be electrified with electricity supplied by nuclear energy sources that do not emit significant quantities of greenhouse gases. Other components of the transportation system require liquid fuels. Biomass can be converted to greenhouse-gas-neutral liquid fuels; however, the conversion of biomass-to-liquid fuels is energy intensive. There is insufficient biomass to meet U.S. liquid fuel demands and provide the energy required to process the biomass-to-liquid fuels. With the use of nuclear energy to provide heat, electricity, and hydrogen for the processing of biomass-to-liquid fuels, the liquid fuel production per unit of biomass is dramatically increased, and the available biomass could meet U.S. liquid fuel requirements.

  17. The role of private participation in enhancing the Indian transport sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Nand, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian transport sector, one of the largest transport networks in the world, faces some serious issues. These may be identified as follows: * Unmet demand for service and infrastructure * Conflicting responsibilities ...

  18. Integration of renewable energy into the transport and electricity sectors through V2G

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Integration of renewable energy into the transport and electricity sectors through V2G Henrik Lund Renewable energy Wind powerQ1 a b s t r a c t Large-scale sustainable energy systems will be necessary replace oil in the transportation sector, and (2) since today's inexpensive and abundant renewable energy

  19. Modeling the Transport Sector: The Role of Existing Fuel Taxes in Climate Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paltsev, Sergey.

    Existing fuel taxes play a major role in determining the welfare effects of exempting the transportation sector from measures to control greenhouse gases. To study this phenomenon we modify the MIT Emissions Prediction and ...

  20. Technology detail in a multi-sector CGE model : transport under climate policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schafer, Andreas.

    A set of three analytical models is used to study the imbedding of specific transport technologies within a multi-sector, multi-region evaluation of constraints on greenhouse emissions. Key parameters of a computable general ...

  1. Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains input data and parameters used in the model of the transportation sector of the National Energy Modeling System. The list of Transportation Sector Model variables includes parameters for the following: Light duty vehicle modules (fuel economy, regional sales, alternative fuel vehicles); Light duty vehicle stock modules; Light duty vehicle fleet module; Air travel module (demand model and fleet efficiency model); Freight transport module; Miscellaneous energy demand module; and Transportation emissions module. Also included in these appendices are: Light duty vehicle market classes; Maximum light duty vehicle market penetration parameters; Aircraft fleet efficiency model adjustment factors; and List of expected aircraft technology improvements.

  2. Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's Transportation Sector: Methods...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    has two objectives. The first is to examine methodological issues involved in using guidelines to measure co-benefits from transport projects (developing baselines,...

  3. FY 16 EERE Budget Webinar-Sustainable Transportation Sector ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    requests) and an opportunity to ask questions. Deputy Assistant Secretary Reuben Sarkar will be leading the webinar for Sustainable Transportation on March 3, 2015, from 2:30...

  4. High Penetration of Renewable Energy in the Transportation Sector: Scenarios, Barriers, and Enablers; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vimmerstedt, L.; Brown, A.; Heath, G.; Mai, T.; Ruth, M.; Melaina, M.; Simpkins, T.; Steward, D.; Warner, E.; Bertram, K.; Plotkin, S.; Patel, D.; Stephens, T.; Vyas, A.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation accounts for 71% of U.S. petroleum use and 33% of its greenhouse gases emissions. Pathways toward reduced greenhouse gas emissions and petroleum dependence in the transportation sector have been analyzed in considerable detail, but with some limitations. To add to this knowledge, the U.S. Department of Energy has launched a study focused on underexplored greenhouse-gas-abatement and oil-savings opportunities related to transportation. This Transportation Energy Futures study analyzes specific issues and associated key questions to strengthen the existing knowledge base and help cultivate partnerships among federal agencies, state and local governments, and industry.

  5. Toward new solid and liquid phase systems for the containment, transport and delivery of hydrogen

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Toward new solid and liquid phase systems for the containment, transport and delivery of hydrogen.Solid and liquid hydrogen carriers for use in hydrogen storage and delivery.

  6. Policies to Reduce Emissions from the Transportation Sector | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroupPerfectenergyInformation to Reduce Emissions from the Transportation

  7. FY 2016 EERE Budget Webinar-Sustainable Transportation Sector |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartment of Energy 1.Department ofDepartmentFY6

  8. Fact #619: April 19, 2010 Transportation Sector Revenue by Industry |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartment of EnergyEnergy 5: March 22, 2010Statistics

  9. Ris Energy Report 5 New and emerging technologies for renewable energy 51 in the transport sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risř Energy Report 5 New and emerging technologies for renewable energy 51 in the transport sector technologies and fuels based on renewable energy sources. Primary renewable energy sources and their conversion With the prominent exception of biomass, renewable energy resources--solar, wind, ocean, hydro--and nu- clear power

  10. Reimagining liquid transportation fuels : sunshine to petrol.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Terry Alan (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Hogan, Roy E., Jr.; McDaniel, Anthony H. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Dedrick, Daniel E. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Stechel, Ellen Beth; Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Miller, James Edward; Allendorf, Mark D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Ambrosini, Andrea; Coker, Eric Nicholas; Staiger, Chad Lynn; Chen, Ken Shuang; Ermanoski, Ivan; Kellog, Gary L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two of the most daunting problems facing humankind in the twenty-first century are energy security and climate change. This report summarizes work accomplished towards addressing these problems through the execution of a Grand Challenge LDRD project (FY09-11). The vision of Sunshine to Petrol is captured in one deceptively simple chemical equation: Solar Energy + xCO{sub 2} + (x+1)H{sub 2}O {yields} C{sub x}H{sub 2x+2}(liquid fuel) + (1.5x+.5)O{sub 2} Practical implementation of this equation may seem far-fetched, since it effectively describes the use of solar energy to reverse combustion. However, it is also representative of the photosynthetic processes responsible for much of life on earth and, as such, summarizes the biomass approach to fuels production. It is our contention that an alternative approach, one that is not limited by efficiency of photosynthesis and more directly leads to a liquid fuel, is desirable. The development of a process that efficiently, cost effectively, and sustainably reenergizes thermodynamically spent feedstocks to create reactive fuel intermediates would be an unparalleled achievement and is the key challenge that must be surmounted to solve the intertwined problems of accelerating energy demand and climate change. We proposed that the direct thermochemical conversion of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O to CO and H{sub 2}, which are the universal building blocks for synthetic fuels, serve as the basis for this revolutionary process. To realize this concept, we addressed complex chemical, materials science, and engineering problems associated with thermochemical heat engines and the crucial metal-oxide working-materials deployed therein. By project's end, we had demonstrated solar-driven conversion of CO{sub 2} to CO, a key energetic synthetic fuel intermediate, at 1.7% efficiency.

  11. Charge Transport and Glassy Dynamics in Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sangoro, Joshua R [ORNL; Kremer, Friedrich [University of Leipzig

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionic liquids (ILs) exhibit unique features such as low melting points, low vapor pressures, wide liquidus temperature ranges, high thermal stability, high ionic conductivity, and wide electrochemical windows. As a result, they show promise for use in variety of applications: as reaction media, in batteries and supercapacitors, in solar and fuel cells, for electrochemical deposition of metals and semiconductors, for protein extraction and crystallization, and many others. Because of the ease with which they can be supercooled, ionic liquids offer new opportunities to investigate long-standing questions regarding the nature of the dynamic glass transition and its possible link to charge transport. Despite the significant steps achieved from experimental and theoretical studies, no generally accepted quantitative theory of dynamic glass transition to date has been capable of reproducing all the experimentally observed features. In this Account, we discuss recent studies of the interplay between charge transport and glassy dynamics in ionic liquids as investigated by a combination of several experimental techniques including broadband dielectric spectroscopy, pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance, dynamic mechanical spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Based on EinsteinSmoluchowski relations, we use dielectric spectra of ionic liquids to determine diffusion coefficients in quantitative agreement with independent pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, but spanning a broader range of more than 10 orders of magnitude. This approach provides a novel opportunity to determine the electrical mobility and effective number density of charge carriers as well as their types of thermal activation from the measured dc conductivity separately. We also unravel the origin of the remarkable universality of charge transport in different classes of glass-forming ionic liquids.

  12. Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, A.; Zinaman, O.; Logan, J.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of both natural gas and renewable energy has grown significantly in recent years. Both forms of energy have been touted as key elements of a transition to a cleaner and more secure energy future, but much of the current discourse considers each in isolation or concentrates on the competitive impacts of one on the other. This paper attempts, instead, to explore potential synergies of natural gas and renewable energy in the U.S. electric power and transportation sectors.

  13. Life cycle GHG emissions from Malaysian oil palm bioenergy development: The impact on transportation sector's energy security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    on transportation sector's energy security Mohd Nor Azman Hassan a,n , Paulina Jaramillo a , W. Michael Griffin a sector accounts for 41% of the country's total energy use. The country is expected to become a net oil% of total energy consumption. This is expected to increase to about 1100 PJ in 2015 extrapolat- ing

  14. Giant Liquid Argon Observatory for Proton Decay, Neutrino Astrophysics and CP-violation in the Lepton Sector (GLACIER)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Badertscher, A; Degunda, U; Epprecht, L; Horikawa, S; Knecht, L; Lazzaro, C; Lussi, D; Marchionni, A; Natterer, G; Otiougova, P; Resnati, F; Rubbia, A; Strabel, C; Ulbricht, J; Viant, T

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GLACIER (Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging ExpeRiment) is a large underground observatory for proton decay search, neutrino astrophysics and CP-violation studies in the lepton sector. Possible underground sites are studied within the FP7 LAGUNA project (Europe) and along the JPARC neutrino beam in collaboration with KEK (Japan). The concept is scalable to very large masses.

  15. Liquid water transport in fuel cell gas diffusion layers Aimy Ming Jii Bazylak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Liquid water transport in fuel cell gas diffusion layers by Aimy Ming Jii Bazylak Bachelor means, without the permission of the author. #12;ii Liquid water transport in fuel cell gas diffusion State University) Abstract Liquid water management has a major impact on the performance and durability

  16. On the Mechanism of Activated Transport in Glassy Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vassiliy Lubchenko; Pyotr Rabochiy

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore several potential issues that have been raised over the years regarding the "entropic droplet" scenario of activated transport in liquids, due to Wolynes and coworkers, with the aim of clarifying the status of various approximations of the random first order transition theory (RFOT) of the structural glass transition. In doing so, we estimate the mismatch penalty between alternative aperiodic structures, above the glass transition; the penalty is equal to the typical magnitude of free energy fluctuations in the liquid. The resulting expressions for the activation barrier and the cooperativity length contain exclusively bulk, static properties; in their simplest form they contains only the bulk modulus and the configurational entropy per unit volume. The expressions are universal in that they do not depend explicitly on the molecular detail. The predicted values for the barrier and cooperativity length and, in particular, the temperature dependence of the barrier are in satisfactory agreement with observation. We thus confirm that the entropic droplet picture is indeed not only internally-consistent but is also fully constructive, consistent with the apparent success of its many quantitative predictions. A simple view of a glassy liquid as a locally metastable, degenerate pattern of frozen-in stress emerges in the present description. Finally, we derive testable relationships between the bulk modulus and several characteristics of glassy liquids and peculiarities in low-temperature glasses.

  17. Reduction in tribological energy losses in the transportation and electric utilities sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinkus, O.; Wilcock, D.F.; Levinson, T.M.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a study of ways and means of advancing the national energy conservation effort, particularly with regard to oil, via progress in the technology of tribology. The report is confined to two economic sectors: transportation, where the scope embraces primarily the highway fleets, and electric utilities. Together these two sectors account for half of the US energy consumption. Goal of the study is to ascertain the energy sinks attributable to tribological components and processes and to recommend long-range research and development (R and D) programs aimed at reducing these losses. In addition to the obvious tribological machine components such as bearings, piston rings, transmissions and so on, the study also extends to processes which are linked to tribology indirectly such as wear of machine parts, coatings of blades, high temperature materials leading to higher cycle efficiencies, attenuation of vibration, and other cycle improvements.

  18. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Policies in the Electricity Sector. Discussion Paper 99-51,emissions from the electricity sector. Several states have2020 emissions from the electricity sector by 18%. Extending

  19. Biofuels in the U.S. Transportation Sector (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustained high world oil prices and the passage of the Energy Policy Act 2005 (EPACT) have encouraged the use of agriculture-based ethanol and biodiesel in the transportation sector; however, both the continued growth of the biofuels industry and the long-term market potential for biofuels depend on the resolution of critical issues that influence the supply of and demand for biofuels. For each of the major biofuelscorn-based ethanol, cellulosic ethanol, and biodieselresolution of technical, economic, and regulatory issues remains critical to further development of biofuels in the United States.

  20. Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model. The NEMS Transportation Model comprises a series of semi-independent models which address different aspects of the transportation sector. The primary purpose of this model is to provide mid-term forecasts of transportation energy demand by fuel type including, but not limited to, motor gasoline, distillate, jet fuel, and alternative fuels (such as CNG) not commonly associated with transportation. The current NEMS forecast horizon extends to the year 2010 and uses 1990 as the base year. Forecasts are generated through the separate consideration of energy consumption within the various modes of transport, including: private and fleet light-duty vehicles; aircraft; marine, rail, and truck freight; and various modes with minor overall impacts, such as mass transit and recreational boating. This approach is useful in assessing the impacts of policy initiatives, legislative mandates which affect individual modes of travel, and technological developments. The model also provides forecasts of selected intermediate values which are generated in order to determine energy consumption. These elements include estimates of passenger travel demand by automobile, air, or mass transit; estimates of the efficiency with which that demand is met; projections of vehicle stocks and the penetration of new technologies; and estimates of the demand for freight transport which are linked to forecasts of industrial output. Following the estimation of energy demand, TRAN produces forecasts of vehicular emissions of the following pollutants by source: oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, total carbon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds.

  1. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE is conducting a comprehensive technical analysis of a flexible-fuel transportation system in the United States -- that is, a system that could easily switch between petroleum and another fuel, depending on price and availability. The DOE Alternative Fuels Assessment is aimed directly at questions of energy security and fuel availability, but covers a wide range of issues. This report examines environmental, health, and safety concerns associated with a switch to alternative- and flexible-fuel vehicles. Three potential alternatives to oil-based fuels in the transportation sector are considered: methanol, compressed natural gas (CNG), and electricity. The objective is to describe and discuss qualitatively potential environmental, health, and safety issues that would accompany widespread use of these three fuels. This report presents the results of exhaustive literature reviews; discussions with specialists in the vehicular and fuel-production industries and with Federal, State, and local officials; and recent information from in-use fleet tests. Each chapter deals with the end-use and process emissions of air pollutants, presenting an overview of the potential air pollution contribution of the fuel --relative to that of gasoline and diesel fuel -- in various applications. Carbon monoxide, particulate matter, ozone precursors, and carbon dioxide are emphasized. 67 refs., 6 figs. , 8 tabs.

  2. Biomass and Natural Gas to Liquid Transportation Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Session 1-D: Natural Gas & Biomass to Liquids Josephine Elia, Graduate Student, Princeton University

  3. Nuclear Energy R&D Imperative 3: Enable a Transition Away from Fossil Fuel in the Transportation and Industrial Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Petti; J. Stephen Herring

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As described in the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Nuclear Energy R&D Roadmap, nuclear energy can play a significant role in supplying energy for a growing economy while reducing both our dependence on foreign energy supplies and emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. The industrial and transportation sectors are responsible for more than half of the greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S., and imported oil supplies 70% of the energy used in the transportation sector. It is therefore important to examine the various ways nuclear energy can facilitate a transition away from fossil fuels to secure environmentally sustainable production and use of energy in the transportation and manufacturing industry sectors. Imperative 3 of the Nuclear Energy R&D Roadmap, entitled “Enable a Transition Away from Fossil Fuels by Producing Process Heat for use in the Transportation and Industrial Sectors”, addresses this need. This document presents an Implementation Plan for R&D efforts related to this imperative. The expanded use of nuclear energy beyond the electrical grid will contribute significantly to overcoming the three inter-linked energy challenges facing U.S. industry: the rising and volatile prices for premium fossil fuels such as oil and natural gas, dependence on foreign sources for these fuels, and the risks of climate change resulting from carbon emissions. Nuclear energy could be used in the industrial and transportation sectors to: • Generate high temperature process heat and electricity to serve industrial needs including the production of chemical feedstocks for use in manufacturing premium fuels and fertilizer products, • Produce hydrogen for industrial processes and transportation fuels, and • Provide clean water for human consumption by desalination and promote wastewater treatment using low-grade nuclear heat as a useful additional benefit. Opening new avenues for nuclear energy will significantly enhance our nation’s energy security through more effective utilization of our country’s resources while simultaneously providing economic stability and growth (through predictable energy prices and high value jobs), in an environmentally sustainable and secure manner (through lower land and water use, and decreased byproduct emissions). The reduction in imported oil will also increase the retention of wealth within the U.S. economy while still supporting economic growth. Nuclear energy is the only non-fossil fuel that has been demonstrated to reliably supply energy for a growing industrial economy.

  4. Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Volume 2: Part 4, Transportation sector; Part 5, Forestry sector; Part 6, Agricultural sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume, the second of two such volumes, contains sector-specific guidance in support of the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration. This voluntary reporting program was authorized by Congress in Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The General Guidelines, bound separately from this volume, provide the overall rationale for the program, discuss in general how to analyze emissions and emission reduction/carbon sequestration projects, and address programmatic issues such as minimum reporting requirements, time parameters, international projects, confidentiality, and certification. Together, the General Guidelines and the guidance in these supporting documents will provide concepts and approaches needed to prepare the reporting forms. This second volume of sector-specific guidance covers the transportation sector, the forestry sector, and the agricultural sector.

  5. A historical view and proposal analysis of the strategic role of the transportation sector in the economic development of post-war Liberia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwame Corkrum, Ellen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the proposals for building and improving the transportation sector in Liberia, primarily the roads while providing immediate social opportunities and employment for many of the poor in Liberia. As ...

  6. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nuclear Historical Primary Energy Consumption by sector Energy Use by Sector (EJ Services Transportation Agriculture

  7. Transport of free surface liquid films and drops by external ratchets and self-ratcheting mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uwe Thiele; Karin John

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the usage of ratchet mechanisms to transport a continuous phase in several micro-fluidic settings. In particular, we study the transport of a dielectric liquid in a heterogeneous ratchet capacitor that is periodically switched on and off. The second system consists of drops on a solid substrate that are transported by different types of harmonic substrate vibrations. We argue that the latter can be seen as a self-ratcheting process and discuss analogies between the employed class of thin film equations and Fokker-Planck equations for transport of discrete objects in a 'particle ratchet'.

  8. The Potential for Energy-Efficient Technologies to Reduce Carbon Emissions in the United States: Transport Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world is searching for a meaningful answer to the likelihood that the continued build-up of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will cause significant changes in the earth`s climate. If there is to be a solution, technology must play a central role. This paper presents the results of an assessment of the potential for cost-effective technological changes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the U.S. transportation sector by the year 2010. Other papers in this session address the same topic for buildings and industry. U.S.transportation energy use stood at 24.4 quadrillion Btu (Quads) in 1996, up 2 percent over 1995 (U.S. DOE/EIA, 1997, table 2.5). Transportation sector carbon dioxide emissions amounted to 457.2 million metric tons of carbon (MmtC) in 1995, almost one third of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions (U.S. DOE/EIA,1996a, p. 12). Transport`s energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions are growing, apparently at accelerating rates as energy efficiency improvements appear to be slowing to a halt. Cost-effective and nearly cost-effective technologies have enormous potential to slow and even reverse the growth of transport`s CO{sub 2} emissions, but technological changes will take time and are not likely to occur without significant, new public policy initiatives. Absent new initiatives, we project that CO{sub 2} emissions from transport are likely to grow to 616 MmtC by 2010, and 646 MmtC by 2015. An aggressive effort to develop and implement cost-effective technologies that are more efficient and fuels that are lower in carbon could reduce emissions by about 12% in 2010 and 18% in 2015, versus the business-as- usual projection. With substantial luck, leading to breakthroughs in key areas, reductions over the BAU case of 17% in 2010 and 25% in 2015,might be possible. In none of these case are CO{sub 2} emissions reduced to 1990 levels by 2015.

  9. conf. International Society of Exposure Analysis, Stresa, Italy, 21-25 Sept. 2003 The stakes of air pollution in the transport sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of air pollution in the transport sector Robert JOUMARD French National Institute for Transport@inrets.fr Abstract The main pollutants are listed for today and the future according to the progression of air of public concern regarding air pollution and environment. These pollutants are headed by carbon dioxide

  10. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    within fossil fuel electricity generation are (1) to shiftin electricity generation and transportation fuels. The GHGfossil fuel-based electricity generation, is assumed. After

  11. Ion transport and storage of ionic liquids in ionic polymer conductor network composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heflin, Randy

    , have shown a great promise for ap- plications in energy storage, conversion devices, and otherIon transport and storage of ionic liquids in ionic polymer conductor network composites Yang Liu,1, USA 6 Department of Chemistry, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA Received 24 February

  12. The U. S. transportation sector in the year 2030: results of a two-part Delphi survey.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, G.; Stephens, T.S. (Energy Systems); (Univ. of California at Davis); (ES)

    2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-part Delphi Survey was given to transportation experts attending the Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy in August, 2011. The survey asked respondents about trends in the US transportation sector in 2030. Topics included: alternative vehicles, high speed rail construction, rail freight transportation, average vehicle miles traveled, truck versus passenger car shares, vehicle fuel economy, and biofuels in different modes. The survey consisted of two rounds -- both asked the same set of seven questions. In the first round, respondents were given a short introductory paragraph about the topic and asked to use their own judgment in their responses. In the second round, the respondents were asked the same questions, but were also given results from the first round as guidance. The survey was sponsored by Argonne National Lab (ANL), the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL), and implemented by University of California at Davis, Institute of Transportation Studies. The survey was part of the larger Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project run by the Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Of the 206 invitation letters sent, 94 answered all questions in the first round (105 answered at least one question), and 23 of those answered all questions in the second round. 10 of the 23 second round responses were at a discussion section at Asilomar, while the remaining were online. Means and standard deviations of responses from Round One and Two are given in Table 1 below. One main purpose of Delphi surveys is to reduce the variance in opinions through successive rounds of questioning. As shown in Table 1, the standard deviations of 25 of the 30 individual sub-questions decreased between Round One and Round Two, but the decrease was slight in most cases.

  13. Communication: Unusual structure and transport in ionic liquid-hexane mixtures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liang, Min [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology; Khatun, Sufia [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology; Castner, Edward W. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    2015-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionic liquids having a sufficiently amphiphilic cation can dissolve large volume fractions of alkanes, leading to mixtures with intriguing properties on molecular length scales. The trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium cation paired with the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide anion provides an ionic liquid that can dissolve large mole fractions of hexane. We present experimental results on mixtures of n-C6D14 with this ionic liquid. High- energy X-ray scattering studies reveal a persistence of the characteristic features of ionic liquid structure even for 80% dilution with n-C6D14. NMR self-diffusion results reveal decidedly non-hydrodynamic behavior where the self-diffusion of the neutral, non-polar n-C6D14 is on average a factor of 21 times faster than for the cation. Exploitation of the unique structural and transport properties of these mixtures may lead to new opportunities for designer solvents for enhanced chemical reactivity and interface science.

  14. Liquid Transportation Fuels from Coal and Biomass | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy and EmissionsDepartment of

  15. Large-Scale Utilization of Biomass Energy and Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in the Transport and Electricity Sectors under Stringent CO2 Concentration Limit Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

    2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the potential role of large scale, dedicated commercial biomass energy systems under global climate policies designed to meet atmospheric concentrations of CO2 at 400ppm and 450ppm by the end of the century. We use an integrated assessment model of energy and agriculture systems to show that, given a climate policy in which terrestrial carbon is appropriately valued equally with carbon emitted from the energy system, biomass energy has the potential to be a major component of achieving these low concentration targets. A key aspect of the research presented here is that the costs of processing and transporting biomass energy at much larger scales than current experience are explicitly incorporated into the modeling. From the scenario results, 120-160 EJ/year of biomass energy is produced globally by midcentury and 200-250 EJ/year by the end of this century. In the first half of the century, much of this biomass is from agricultural and forest residues, but after 2050 dedicated cellulosic biomass crops become the majority source, along with growing utilization of waste-to-energy. The ability to draw on a diverse set of biomass based feedstocks helps to reduce the pressure for drastic large-scale changes in land use and the attendant environmental, ecological, and economic consequences those changes would unleash. In terms of the conversion of bioenergy feedstocks into value added energy, this paper demonstrates that biomass is and will continue to be used to generate electricity as well as liquid transportation fuels. A particular focus of this paper is to show how climate policies and technology assumptions - especially the availability of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies - affect the decisions made about where the biomass is used in the energy system. The potential for net-negative electric sector emissions through the use of CCS with biomass feedstocks provides an attractive part of the solution for meeting stringent emissions constraints; we find that at carbon prices above 150$/tCO2, over 90% of biomass in the energy system is used in combination with CCS. Despite the higher technology costs of CCS, it is a very important tool in controlling the cost of meeting a target, offsetting the venting of CO2 from sectors of the energy system that may be more expensive to mitigate, such as oil use in transportation. CCS is also used heavily with other fuels such as coal and natural gas, and by 2095 a total of 1530 GtCO2 has been stored in deep geologic reservoirs. The paper also discusses the role of cellulosic ethanol and Fischer-Tropsch biomass derived transportation fuels as two representative conversion processes and shows that both technologies may be important contributors to liquid fuels production, with unique costs and emissions characteristics.

  16. Method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport, and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGrail, Bernard P. (Pasco, WA); Martin, Paul F. (Richland, WA); Lindenmeier, Clark W. (Richland, WA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions. The method and apparatus of the present invention permit distinguishing individual precipitation events and their effect on dissolution behavior isolated to the specific event. The present invention is especially useful for dynamically measuring hydraulic parameters when a chemical reaction occurs between a particulate material and either liquid or gas (e.g. air) or both, causing precipitation that changes the pore structure of the test material.

  17. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Transportation sector energy demand Transportation energy use grows slowly in comparison with historical trend figure data Transportation sector energy consumption grows at an...

  18. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Transportation sector energy demand Growth in transportation energy consumption flat across projection figure data The transportation sector consumes 27.1 quadrillion Btu of energy...

  19. How do we convert the transport sector to renewable energy and improve the sec-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Information Service Department Risř National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy Technical University of Denmark with the energy system? Edited by Hans Larsen and Leif Sřnderberg Petersen Risř-R-1703(EN) July 2009 Main findings with the energy system? Main findings and recommendations from the Workshop on Transport ­ Renewable Energy

  20. The Carnol process for CO{sub 2} mitigation from power plants and the transportation sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) mitigation process is developed which converts waste CO{sub 2}, primarily from coal-fired power plant stack gases, to methanol for use as a liquid fuel and a coproduct carbon for use as a materials commodity. The Carnol process chemistry consists of methane decomposition to produce hydrogen which is catalytically reacted with the recovered waste CO{sub 2} to produce methanol. The carbon is either stored or sold. A process design is modeled, and mass and energy balances are presented as a function of reactor pressure and temperature conditions. The Carnol process is a viable alternative to sequestering CO{sub 2} in the ocean for purposes of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions from coal burning power plants. Over 90% of the CO{sub 2} from the coal burning plant is used in the process which results in a net CO{sub 2} emission reduction of over 90% compared to that obtained for conventional methanol production by steam reforming of methane. Methanol, as an alternative liquid fuel for automotive engines and for fuel cells, achieves additional CO{sub 2} emission reduction benefits. The economics of the process is greatly enhanced when carbon can be sold as a materials commodity. The process design and economics could possibly be achieved by developing a molten metal (tin) methane decomposition reactor and a liquid phase, slurry catalyst, methanol synthesis reactor directly using the solvent saturated with CO{sub 2} scrubbed from the power plant stack gases. The application of CO{sub 2} mitigation technologies, such as the Carnol process, depends to some extent, on how serious the country and the world takes the global greenhouse gas warming problem.

  1. The Carnol process for CO{sub 2} mitigation from power plants and the transportation sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CO{sub 2} mitigation process is developed which converts waste CO{sub 2}, primarily recovered from coal-fired power plant stack gases with natural gas, to produce methanol as a liquid fuel and coproduct carbon as a materials commodity. The Carnol process chemistry consists of methane decomposition to produce hydrogen which is catalytically reacted with the recovered waste CO{sub 2} to produce methanol. The carbon is either stored or sold as a materials commodity. A process design is modelled and mass and energy balances are presented as a function of reactor pressure and temperature conditions. The Carnol process is a viable alternative to sequestering CO{sub 2} in the ocean for purposes of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions from coal burning power plants. Over 90% of the CO{sub 2} from the coal burning plant is used in the process which results in a net CO{sub 2} emission reduction of over 90% compared to that obtained for conventional methanol production by steam reforming of methane. Methanol as an alternative liquid fuel for automotive engines and for fuel cells achieves additional CO{sub 2} emission reduction benefits. The economics of the process is greatly enhanced when carbon can be sold as a materials commodity. Improvement in process design and economics should be achieved by developing a molten metal (tin) methane decomposition reactor and a liquid phase, slurry catalyst, methanol synthesis reactor directly using the solvent saturated with CO{sub 2} scrubbed from the power plant stack gases. The benefits of the process warrant its further development.

  2. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vyas, A. D.; Patel, D. M.; Bertram, K. M.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable research has focused on energy efficiency and fuel substitution options for light-duty vehicles, while much less attention has been given to medium- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, aircraft, marine vessels, trains, pipeline, and off-road equipment. This report brings together the salient findings from an extensive review of literature on future energy efficiency options for these non-light-duty modes. Projected activity increases to 2050 are combined with forecasts of overall fuel efficiency improvement potential to estimate the future total petroleum and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current levels. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  3. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Transportation Equipment (NAICS 336), January 2014 (MECS 2010)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006) | DepartmentTextiles

  4. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this report is to provide estimates of volumes and development costs of known nonassociated gas reserves in selected, potentially important supplier nations, using a standard set of costing algorithms and conventions. Estimates of undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves and the cost of drilling development wells, production equipment, gas processing facilities, and pipeline construction are made at the individual field level. A discounted cash-flow model of production, investment, and expenses is used to estimate the present value cost of developing each field on a per-thousand-cubic-foot (Mcf) basis. These gas resource cost estimates for individual accumulations (that is, fields or groups of fields) then were aggregated into country-specific price-quantity curves. These curves represent the cost of developing and transporting natural gas to an export point suitable for tanker shipments or to a junction with a transmission line. The additional costs of LNG or methanol conversion are not included. A brief summary of the cost of conversion to methanol and transportation to the United States is contained in Appendix D: Implications of Gas Development Costs for Methanol Conversion.

  5. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of transportation fuel from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, Energy International, the Department of Defense, and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research.

  6. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Science (CFFS) is a research consortium with participants from the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, West Virginia University, University of Utah, and Auburn University. The CFFS is conducting a research program to develop C1 chemistry technology for the production of clean transportation fuel from resources such as coal and natural gas, which are more plentiful domestically than petroleum. The processes under development will convert feedstocks containing one carbon atom per molecular unit into ultra clean liquid transportation fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) and hydrogen, which many believe will be the transportation fuel of the future. Feedstocks include synthesis gas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification, coalbed methane, light products produced by Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, methanol, and natural gas.

  7. Model documentation report: Transportation sector model of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of TRAN for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirements of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, 57(b)(1)). Third, it permits continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

  8. Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The attachments contained within this appendix provide additional details about the model development and estimation process which do not easily lend themselves to incorporation in the main body of the model documentation report. The information provided in these attachments is not integral to the understanding of the model`s operation, but provides the reader with opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of some of the model`s underlying assumptions. There will be a slight degree of replication of materials found elsewhere in the documentation, made unavoidable by the dictates of internal consistency. Each attachment is associated with a specific component of the transportation model; the presentation follows the same sequence of modules employed in Volume 1. The following attachments are contained in Appendix F: Fuel Economy Model (FEM)--provides a discussion of the FEM vehicle demand and performance by size class models; Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Model--describes data input sources and extrapolation methodologies; Light-Duty Vehicle (LDV) Stock Model--discusses the fuel economy gap estimation methodology; Light Duty Vehicle Fleet Model--presents the data development for business, utility, and government fleet vehicles; Light Commercial Truck Model--describes the stratification methodology and data sources employed in estimating the stock and performance of LCT`s; Air Travel Demand Model--presents the derivation of the demographic index, used to modify estimates of personal travel demand; and Airborne Emissions Model--describes the derivation of emissions factors used to associate transportation measures to levels of airborne emissions of several pollutants.

  9. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988 (Public Law 100-494), Section 400EE, states that the Secretary of Energy ...shall study methanol plants, including the costs and practicability of such plants that are (A) capable of utilizing current domestic supplies of unutilized natural gas; (B) relocatable; or (C) suitable for natural gas to methanol conversion by natural gas distribution companies...'' The purpose of this report is to characterize unutilized gas within the lower 48 states and to perform an economic analysis of methanol plants required by the act. The approach with regard to unutilized lower 48 gas is to (1) compare the costs of converting such gas to methanol against the expected price of gasoline over the next 20 years, and (2) compare the economics of converting such gas to methanol against the economics of using the gas as a pipeline-transported fuel. This study concludes that remote gas and low-Btu gas generally cannot be converted to methanol at costs near the expected competitive value of gasoline because of the poor economies of scale of small methanol plants.

  10. Journal of Power Sources 164 (2007) 189195 Modeling water transport in liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Power Sources 164 (2007) 189­195 Modeling water transport in liquid feed direct methanol management in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) is very critical and complicated because of many interacting rights reserved. Keywords: Direct methanol fuel cell; Water transport; Mathematical modeling; Three

  11. C1 Chemistry for the Production of Ultra-Clean Liquid Transportation Fuels and Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center (Tank & Automotive Command--TACOM), and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this research program during the six months of the subject contract from October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003. The results are presented in thirteen detailed reports on research projects headed by various faculty members at each of the five CFFS Universities. Additionally, an Executive Summary has been prepared that summarizes the principal results of all of these projects during the six-month reporting period.

  12. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center (Tank & Automotive Command--TACOM), and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this research program during the six months of the subject contract from October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003. The results are presented in thirteen detailed reports on research projects headed by various faculty members at each of the five CFFS Universities. Additionally, an Executive Summary has been prepared that summarizes the principal results of all of these projects during the six-month reporting period.

  13. Communication: Unusual structure and transport in ionic liquid-hexane mixtures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liang, Min; Khatun, Sufia; Castner, Edward W.

    2015-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionic liquids having a sufficiently amphiphilic cation can dissolve large volume fractions of alkanes, leading to mixtures with intriguing properties on molecular length scales. The trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium cation paired with the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide anion provides an ionic liquid that can dissolve large mole fractions of hexane. We present experimental results on mixtures of n-C6D14 with this ionic liquid. High- energy X-ray scattering studies reveal a persistence of the characteristic features of ionic liquid structure even for 80% dilution with n-C6D14. NMR self-diffusion results reveal decidedly non-hydrodynamic behavior where the self-diffusion of the neutral, non-polar n-C6D14 is on average a factor of 21more »times faster than for the cation. Exploitation of the unique structural and transport properties of these mixtures may lead to new opportunities for designer solvents for enhanced chemical reactivity and interface science.« less

  14. C1 Chemistry for the Production of Ultra-Clean Liquid Transportation Fuels and Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Professors and graduate students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and hydrocarbon gases and liquids produced from coal. An Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center, and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report summarizes the results obtained in this program during the period October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2006. The results are presented in detailed reports on 16 research projects headed by professors at each of the five CFFS Universities and an Executive Summary. Some of the highlights from these results are: (1) Small ({approx}1%) additions of acetylene or other alkynes to the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction increases its yield, causes chain initiation, and promotes oxygenate formation. (2) The addition of Mo to Fe-Cu-K/AC F-T catalysts improves catalyst lifetime and activity. (3) The use of gas phase deposition to place highly dispersed metal catalysts on silica or ceria aerogels offers promise for both the F-T and the water-gas shift WGS reactions. (4) Improved activity and selectivity are exhibited by Co F-T catalysts in supercritical hexane. (5) Binary Fe-M (M=Ni, Mo, Pd) catalysts exhibit excellent activity for dehydrogenation of gaseous alkanes, yielding pure hydrogen and carbon nanotubes in one reaction. A fluidized-bed/fixed-bed methane reactor was developed for continuous hydrogen and nanotube production. (6) A process for co-production of hydrogen and methyl formate from methanol has been developed. (7) Pt nanoparticles on stacked-cone carbon nanotubes easily strip hydrogen from liquids such as cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane, tetralin and decalin, leaving rechargeable aromatic phases. (8) Hydrogen volume percentages produced during reforming of methanol in supercritical water in the output stream are {approx}98%, while CO and CO2 percentages are <2 %.

  15. Operational Challenges in Gas-To-Liquid (GTL) Transportation Through Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godwin A. Chukwu; Santanu Khataniar; Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil production from Alaskan North Slope oil fields has steadily declined. In the near future, ANS crude oil production will decline to such a level (200,000 to 400,000 bbl/day) that maintaining economic operation of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) will require pumping alternative products through the system. Heavy oil deposits in the West Sak and Ugnu formations are a potential resource, although transporting these products involves addressing important sedimentation issues. One possibility is the use of Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) technology. Estimated recoverable gas reserves of 38 trillion cubic feet (TCF) on the North Slope of Alaska can be converted to liquid with GTL technology and combined with the heavy oils for a product suitable for pipeline transport. Issues that could affect transport of this such products through TAPS include pumpability of GTL and crude oil blends, cold restart of the pipeline following a prolonged winter shutdown, and solids deposition inside the pipeline. This study examined several key fluid properties of GTL, crude oil and four selected blends under TAPS operating conditions. Key measurements included Reid Vapor Pressure, density and viscosity, PVT properties, and solids deposition. Results showed that gel strength is not a significant factor for the ratios of GTL-crude oil blend mixtures (1:1; 1:2; 1:3; 1:4) tested under TAPS cold re-start conditions at temperatures above - 20 F, although Bingham fluid flow characteristics exhibited by the blends at low temperatures indicate high pumping power requirements following prolonged shutdown. Solids deposition is a major concern for all studied blends. For the commingled flow profile studied, decreased throughput can result in increased and more rapid solid deposition along the pipe wall, resulting in more frequent pigging of the pipeline or, if left unchecked, pipeline corrosion.

  16. C1 Chemistry for the Production of Ultra-Clean Liquid Transportation Fuels and Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of transportation fuel from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, Energy International, the Department of Defense, and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this research program during the first six months of the subject contract (DE-FC26-02NT-4159), from October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003.

  17. Mathematical modeling of liquid/liquid hollow fiber membrane contactor accounting for interfacial transport phenomena: Extraction of lanthanides as a surrogate for actinides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1994-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is divided into two parts. The second part is divided into the following sections: experimental protocol; modeling the hollow fiber extractor using film theory; Graetz model of the hollow fiber membrane process; fundamental diffusive-kinetic model; and diffusive liquid membrane device-a rigorous model. The first part is divided into: membrane and membrane process-a concept; metal extraction; kinetics of metal extraction; modeling the membrane contactor; and interfacial phenomenon-boundary conditions-applied to membrane transport.

  18. Liquid natural gas as a transportation fuel in the heavy trucking industry. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, W.H.

    1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report encompasses the second year of a proposed three year project with emphasis focused on fundamental research issues in Use of Liquid Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel in the Heavy Trucking Industry. These issues may be categorized as (1) direct diesel replacement with LNG fuel, and (2) long term storage/utilization of LNG vent gases produced by tank storage and fueling/handling operation. The results of this work are expected to enhance utilization of LNG as a transportation fuel. The paper discusses the following topics: (A) Fueling Delivery to the Engine, Engine Considerations, and Emissions: (1) Atomization and/or vaporization of LNG for direct injection diesel-type natural gas engines; (2) Fundamentals of direct replacement of diesel fuel by LNG in simulated combustion; (3) Distribution of nitric oxide and emissions formation from natural gas injection; and (B) Short and long term storage: (1) Modification by partial direct conversion of natural gas composition for improved storage characteristics; (2) LNG vent gas adsorption and recovery using activate carbon and modified adsorbents; (3) LNG storage at moderate conditions.

  19. Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of coupling to the electricity sector. The chapter examinesfrom the transportation and electricity sectors together.transportation and electricity sectors will likely interact

  20. Effects of heat and mass transport on the hydrodynamics and stability of liquid desiccant films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pineda Vargas, Sergio Manuel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    5.8 Average liquid properties heat capacity, thermal5.9 Average liquid properties heat capacity, thermalFigure 5.8: Average liquid properties heat capacity, thermal

  1. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Science (CFFS) is a research consortium with participants from the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University. The CFFS is conducting a research program to develop C1 chemistry technology for the production of clean transportation fuel from resources such as coal and natural gas, which are more plentiful domestically than petroleum. The processes under development will convert feedstocks containing one carbon atom per molecular unit into ultra clean liquid transportation fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) and hydrogen, which many believe will be the transportation fuel of the future. These feedstocks include synthesis gas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. Some highlights of the results obtained during the first year of the current research contract are summarized as: (1) Terminal alkynes are an effective chain initiator for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reactions, producing normal paraffins with C numbers {ge} to that of the added alkyne. (2) Significant improvement in the product distribution towards heavier hydrocarbons (C{sub 5} to C{sub 19}) was achieved in supercritical fluid (SCF) FT reactions compared to that of gas-phase reactions. (3) Xerogel and aerogel silica supported cobalt catalysts were successfully employed for FT synthesis. Selectivity for diesel range products increased with increasing Co content. (4) Silicoaluminophosphate (SAPO) molecular sieve catalysts have been developed for methanol to olefin conversion, producing value-added products such as ethylene and propylene. (5) Hybrid Pt-promoted tungstated and sulfated zirconia catalysts are very effective in cracking n-C{sub 36} to jet and diesel fuel; these catalysts will be tested for cracking of FT wax. (6) Methane, ethane, and propane are readily decomposed to pure hydrogen and carbon nanotubes using binary Fe-based catalysts containing Mo, Ni, or Pd in a single step non-oxidative reaction. (7) Partial dehydrogenation of liquid hydrocarbons (cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane) has been performed using catalysts consisting of Pt and other metals on stacked-cone carbon nanotubes. (8) An understanding of the catalytic reaction mechanisms of the catalysts developed in the CFFS C1 program is being achieved by structural characterization using multiple techniques, including XAFS and Moessbauer spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, NMR, ESR, and magnetometry.

  2. Gas Transport and Control in Thick-Liquid Inertial Fusion Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debonnel, Christophe Sylvain

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    c v is the solid or liquid heat capacity at constant volume,heat capacities and might be slightly retrograde. Retrograde liquid-

  3. Transportation Sector Market Transition: Using History and Geography to Envision Possible Hydrogen Infrastructure Development and Inform Public Policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, E.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the challenges to building an infrastructure for hydrogen, for use as transportation fuel. Deployment technologies and policies that could quicken deployment are addressed.

  4. To appear in International Journal of Hydrogen Energy 1 Sustainable Convergence of Electricity and Transport Sectors in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    sector based on fuel cell vehicles (FCVs). A comprehensive robust optimization planning model AFV Alternative-Fuel Vehicle. FCV Fuel Cell Vehicle. GV Gasoline Vehicle. HHV Higher Heating Value grid investments such as new power generation installations. Keywords: Hydrogen economy, fuel cell

  5. Lithium Ion Transport Mechanism in Ternary Polymer Electrolyte-Ionic Liquid Mixtures - A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diddo Diddens; Andreas Heuer

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The lithium transport mechanism in ternary polymer electrolytes, consisting of PEO/LiTFSI and various fractions of the ionic liquid N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide, are investigated by means of MD simulations. This is motivated by recent experimental findings [Passerini et al., Electrochim. Acta 2012, 86, 330-338], which demonstrated that these materials display an enhanced lithium mobility relative to their binary counterpart PEO/LiTFSI. In order to grasp the underlying microscopic scenario giving rise to these observations, we employ an analytical, Rouse-based cation transport model [Maitra at al., PRL 2007, 98, 227802], which has originally been devised for conventional polymer electrolytes. This model describes the cation transport via three different mechanisms, each characterized by an individual time scale. It turns out that also in the ternary electrolytes essentially all lithium ions are coordinated by PEO chains, thus ruling out a transport mechanism enhanced by the presence of ionic-liquid molecules. Rather, the plasticizing effect of the ionic liquid contributes to the increased lithium mobility by enhancing the dynamics of the PEO chains and consequently also the motion of the attached ions. Additional focus is laid on the prediction of lithium diffusion coefficients from the simulation data for various chain lengths and the comparison with experimental data, thus demonstrating the broad applicability of our approach.

  6. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through July 1999.

  7. Engineering development of ceramic membrane reactor system for converting natural gas to hydrogen and synthesis gas for liquid transportation fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through June 1998.

  8. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through November 1999.

  9. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through February 1999.

  10. Engineering development of ceramic membrane reactor system for converting natural gas to hydrogen and synthesis gas for liquid transportation fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through April 1998.

  11. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through September 1999.

  12. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through January 2000.

  13. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through December 1999.

  14. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through October 1999.

  15. An improved Monte Carlo study of coherent scattering effects of low energy charged particle transport in Percus-Yevick liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tattersall, W J; Boyle, G J; White, R D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We generalize a simple Monte Carlo (MC) model for dilute gases to consider the transport behavior of positrons and electrons in Percus-Yevick model liquids under highly non-equilibrium conditions, accounting rigorously for coherent scattering processes. The procedure extends an existing technique [Wojcik and Tachiya, Chem. Phys. Lett. 363, 3--4 (1992)], using the static structure factor to account for the altered anisotropy of coherent scattering in structured material. We identify the effects of the approximation used in the original method, and develop a modified method that does not require that approximation. We also present an enhanced MC technique that has been designed to improve the accuracy and flexibility of simulations in spatially-varying electric fields. All of the results are found to be in excellent agreement with an independent multi-term Boltzmann equation solution, providing benchmarks for future transport models in liquids and structured systems.

  16. Charge transport and breakdown physics in liquid/solid insulation systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jadidian, Jouya

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid dielectrics provide superior electrical breakdown strength and heat transfer capability, especially when used in combination with liquid-immersed solid dielectrics. Over the past half-century, there has been extensive ...

  17. Assessment of Historic Trend in Mobility and Energy Use in India Transportation Sector Using Bottom-up Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consumption reported in IEA India transportation energyin mobility, while the IEA data only shows a 1.7% growthWB, 2004). According to the IEA energy balance for India,

  18. Operations of the LR56 radioactive liquid cask transport system at U.S. Department of Energy sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, J.S. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hornstra, D.J. [Performance Development Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sazawal, V.K. [NUMATEC, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States); Clement, G. [SGN, St. Quentin en Yvelines (France)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LR56 cask system is licensed for use in France under Certificate of Compliance F/309/B(U)F for transport of 4,000-liter volumes of radioactive liquids. Three LR56 cask systems (with modifications for use at Department of Energy (DOE) sites) have been purchased for delivery at the Hanford Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The LR56 cask systems will be used for on-site transfers of Type B quantities of radioactive liquid waste. The ORNL unit will also be used as a Type A packaging for transfers of radioactive liquids between DOE sites. This paper discusses LR56 operating features and the use of the cask system at the three DOE sites.

  19. A Life-Cycle Assessment Comparing Select Gas-to-Liquid Fuels with Conventional Fuels in the Transportation Sector

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHEEnergyReliability2015GrossA FewA LIMITED LIABILITYA

  20. Assessment of Historic Trend in Mobility and Energy Use in India Transportation Sector Using Bottom-up Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation mobility in India has increased significantly in the past decades. From 1970 to 2000, motorized mobility (passenger-km) has risen by 888%, compared with an 88% population growth (Singh,2006). This contributed to many energy and environmental issues, and an energy strategy incorporates efficiency improvement and other measures needs to be designed. Unfortunately, existing energy data do not provide information on driving forces behind energy use and sometime show large inconsistencies. Many previous studies address only a single transportation mode such as passenger road travel; did not include comprehensive data collection or analysis has yet been done, or lack detail on energy demand by each mode and fuel mix. The current study will fill a considerable gap in current efforts, develop a data base on all transport modes including passenger air and water, and freight in order to facilitate the development of energy scenarios and assess significance of technology potential in a global climate change model. An extensive literature review and data collection has been done to establish the database with breakdown of mobility, intensity, distance, and fuel mix of all transportation modes. Energy consumption was estimated and compared with aggregated transport consumption reported in IEA India transportation energy data. Different scenarios were estimated based on different assumptions on freight road mobility. Based on the bottom-up analysis, we estimated that the energy consumption from 1990 to 2000 increased at an annual growth rate of 7% for the mid-range road freight growth case and 12% for the high road freight growth case corresponding to the scenarios in mobility, while the IEA data only shows a 1.7% growth rate in those years.

  1. Visualization of Liquid Water Transport in a PEFC X. G. Yang,* F. Y. Zhang, A. L. Lubawy, and C. Y. Wang*,z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electrolyte fuel cell PEFC , the mechanics of liquid water transport, starting from droplet emergence and methanol PEFCs. Neutron beams can penetrate through a metal fuel cell to image the real-time liquid water to achieve high performance and lon- gevity of polymer electrolyte fuel cells PEFCs . At high current density

  2. Toward new solid and liquid phase systems for the containment, transport and delivery of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storage Tube Trailer Liquid H2 Truck H2 Pipeline Multi-vehicle filling stations Feedstock: N. gas, Coal, Biomass Pet. Coke, Resids. Future: Carbon sequestration Storage: Underground well? Output: Depends

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office: Transitioning the Transportation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Transitioning the Transportation Sector - Exploring the Intersection of H2 Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office: Transitioning the Transportation Sector -...

  4. Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive Committee Getting to Berkeley...

  5. Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Print Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive Committee Getting to...

  6. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Transportation Sector Energy Demand On This Page Growth in transportation energy... CAFE and greenhouse gas... Travel demand for personal... New technologies promise better......

  7. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of transport properties in liquid and dense-plasma plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kress, J. D.; Cohen, James S.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Horner, D. A.; Collins, L. A. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have calculated the viscosity and self-diffusion coefficients of plutonium in the liquid phase using quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) and in the dense-plasma phase using orbital-free molecular dynamics (OFMD), as well as in the intermediate warm dense matter regime with both methods. Our liquid metal results for viscosity are about 40% lower than measured experimentally, whereas a previous calculation using an empirical interatomic potential (modified embedded-atom method) obtained results 3-4 times larger than the experiment. The QMD and OFMD results agree well at the intermediate temperatures. The calculations in the dense-plasma regime for temperatures from 50 to 5000 eV and densities about 1-5 times ambient are compared with the one-component plasma (OCP) model, using effective charges given by the average-atom code inferno. The inferno-OCP model results agree with the OFMD to within about a factor of 2, except for the viscosity at temperatures less than about 100 eV, where the disagreement is greater. A Stokes-Einstein relationship of the viscosities and diffusion coefficients is found to hold fairly well separately in both the liquid and dense-plasma regimes.

  8. Emissions of Transport Refrigeration Units with CARB Diesel, Gas-to-Liquid Diesel, and Emissions Control Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnitt, R. A.; Chernich, D.; Burnitzki, M.; Oshinuga, A.; Miyasato, M.; Lucht, E.; van der Merwe, D.; Schaberg, P.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel in situ method was used to measure emissions and fuel consumption of transport refrigeration units (TRUs). The test matrix included two fuels, two exhaust configurations, and two TRU engine operating speeds. Test fuels were California ultra low sulfur diesel and gas-to-liquid (GTL) diesel. Exhaust configurations were a stock muffler and a Thermo King pDPF diesel particulate filter. The TRU engine operating speeds were high and low, controlled by the TRU user interface. Results indicate that GTL diesel fuel reduces all regulated emissions at high and low engine speeds. Application of a Thermo King pDPF reduced regulated emissions, sometimes almost entirely. The application of both GTL diesel and a Thermo King pDPF reduced regulated emissions at high engine speed, but showed an increase in oxides of nitrogen at low engine speed.

  9. Evolutionary mix-and-match with MFS transporters II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madej, MG; Kaback, HR

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by liquid scintillation spectrometry. Active Transport. Theby liquid scintillation spectrometry. Control experiments

  10. Functional architecture of MFS D-glucose transporters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madej, MG; Sun, L; Yan, N; Kaback, HR

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by liquid scintillation spectrometry. Active Transport. Theby liquid scintillation spectrometry. Control experiments

  11. Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinson, Steve

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation in ancient Egypt entailed the use of boats2007 Land transport in Roman Egypt: A study of economics andDieter 1991 Building in Egypt: Pharaonic stone masonry. New

  12. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas have continued to make small contributions to transportation,transportation actions include electric power sector actions, eg coal to natural gas

  13. Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 2 Climate and Transportation Solutions Chapter 3:Gas Emissions in the Transportation Sector by John Conti,Chase, and John Maples Transportation is the single largest

  14. Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Sonia; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J; Sanstad, Alan; Weyant, John

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    leg/leginx.asp 4. EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with22, (4), 10. EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projectionsto the Annual Energy Outlook 2007. Transportation Demand

  15. (Ionization in liquids)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes charge transport following ionization of model liquids and how this process may be important in carcinogenesis. 15 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs. (MHB)

  16. Transportation fuels from biomass via fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2013-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass is a renewable source of carbon, which could provide a means to reduce the greenhouse gas impact from fossil fuels in the transportation sector. Biomass is the only renewable source of liquid fuels, which could displace petroleum-derived products. Fast pyrolysis is a method of direct thermochemical conversion (non-bioconversion) of biomass to a liquid product. Although the direct conversion product, called bio-oil, is liquid; it is not compatible with the fuel handling systems currently used for transportation. Upgrading the product via catalytic processing with hydrogen gas, hydroprocessing, is a means that has been demonstrated in the laboratory. By this processing the bio-oil can be deoxygenated to hydrocarbons, which can be useful replacements of the hydrocarbon distillates in petroleum. While the fast pyrolysis of biomass is presently commercial, the upgrading of the liquid product by hydroprocessing remains in development, although it is moving out of the laboratory into scaled-up process demonstration systems.

  17. Distributed Reforming of Renewable Liquids via Water Splitting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Liquids via Water Splitting using Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) (Presentation) Distributed Reforming of Renewable Liquids via Water Splitting using Oxygen Transport...

  18. The Future of Low Carbon Transportation Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    " Nuclear" Oil resources" Unconventional:" oil shale liquid, " oil sands" Coal resources" Transport! Elec

  19. An Assessment of Energy and Environmental Issues Related to the Use of Gas-to-Liquid Fuels in Transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent technological advances in processes for converting natural gas into liquid fuels, combined with a growing need for cleaner, low-sulfur distillate fuel to mitigate the environmental impacts of diesel engines have raised the possibility of a substantial global gas-to-liquids (G-T-L) industry. This report examines the implications of G-T-L supply for U.S. energy security and the environment. It appears that a G-T-L industry would increase competitiveness in world liquid fuels markets, even if OPEC states are major producers of G-T-L's. Cleaner G-T-L distillates would help reduce air pollution from diesel engines. Implications for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions could be positive or negative, depending on the sources of natural gas, their alternative uses, and the degree of sequestration that can be achieved for CO2 emissions produced during the conversion process.

  20. An assessment of energy and environmental issues related to the use of gas-to-liquid fuels in transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent technological advances in processes for converting natural gas into liquid fuels, combined with a growing need for cleaner, low-sulfur distillate fuel to mitigate the environmental impacts of diesel engines have raised the possibility of a substantial global gas-to-liquids (G-T-L) industry. This report examines the implications of G-T-L supply for U.S. energy security and the environment. It appears that a G-T-L industry would increase competitiveness in world liquid fuels markets, even if OPEC states are major producers of G-T-L's. Cleaner G-T-L distillates would help reduce air pollution from diesel engines. Implications for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions could be positive or negative, depending on the sources of natural gas, their alternative uses, and the degree of sequestration that can be achieved for CO{sub 2} emissions produced during the conversion process.

  1. Biofuel Feedstock Inter-Island Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuel Feedstock Inter-Island Transportation Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office ........................................................................... 11 Options for liquid biofuel feedstock transport ............................................................................. agency thereof. #12;A Comparison of Hawaii's Inter-Island Maritime Transportation of Solid Versus Liquid

  2. Engineering Development of Ceramic Membrane Reactor System for Converting Natural Gas to Hydrogen and Synthesis Gas for Liquid Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Air Products and Chemicals

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An Air Products-led team successfully developed ITM Syngas technology from the concept stage to a stage where a small-scale engineering prototype was about to be built. This technology produces syngas, a gas containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen, by reacting feed gas, primarily methane and steam, with oxygen that is supplied through an ion transport membrane. An ion transport membrane operates at high temperature and oxygen ions are transported through the dense membrane's crystal lattice when an oxygen partial pressure driving force is applied. This development effort solved many significant technical challenges and successfully scaled-up key aspects of the technology to prototype scale. Throughout the project life, the technology showed significant economic benefits over conventional technologies. While there are still on-going technical challenges to overcome, the progress made under the DOE-funded development project proved that the technology was viable and continued development post the DOE agreement would be warranted.

  3. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides phyllosilicate-polymer compositions which are useful as liquid crystalline composites. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while at the same time be transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles liquid crystalline composite, liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  4. Momentum, Heat, and Neutral Mass Transport in Convective Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Liquid Systems and Implications for Aqueous Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, Alexander; Slikboer, Elmar; Shannon, Steven; Graves, David

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a growing interest in the study of plasma-liquid interactions with application to biomedicine, chemical disinfection, agriculture, and other fields. This work models the momentum, heat, and neutral species mass transfer between gas and aqueous phases in the context of a streamer discharge; the qualitative conclusions are generally applicable to plasma-liquid systems. The problem domain is discretized using the finite element method. The most interesting and relevant model result for application purposes is the steep gradients in reactive species at the interface. At the center of where the reactive gas stream impinges on the water surface, the aqueous concentrations of OH and ONOOH decrease by roughly 9 and 4 orders of magnitude respectively within 50 $\\mu$m of the interface. Recognizing the limited penetration of reactive plasma species into the aqueous phase is critical to discussions about the therapeutic mechanisms for direct plasma treatment of biological solutions. Other interesting results fro...

  5. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    OilLiquids On This Page Transportation uses... Biofuels and natural... U.S. crude oil... U.S. oil production... Imports of liquid... Renewable fuels... Future refinery... Oil...

  6. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Options for Liquid Biofuels Development in Ireland. SEI, 562006: Outlook for advanced biofuels. Energy Policy, 34(17),40 pp. IEA, 2004c: Biofuels for Transport: An International

  7. Electrical, thermal, and species transport properties of liquid eutectic Ga-In and Ga-In-Sn from first principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Seungho; Kaviany, Massoud, E-mail: kaviany@umich.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Using ab initio molecular dynamics, the atomic structure and transport properties of eutectic Ga-In and Ga-In-Sn are investigated. The Kubo-Greenwood (K-G) and the Ziman-Faber (Z-F) formulations and the Wiedemann-Franz (W-F) law are used for the electrical and electronic thermal conductivity. The species diffusivity and the viscosity are also predicted using the mean square displacement and the Stokes-Einstein (S-E) relation. Alloying Ga causes more disordered structure, i.e., broadening the atomic distance near the In and Sn atoms, which reduces the transport properties and the melting temperature. The K-G treatment shows excellent agreement with the experimental results while Z-F treatment formula slightly overestimates the electrical conductivity. The predicted thermal conductivity also shows good agreement with the experiments. The species diffusivity and the viscosity are slightly reduced by the alloying of Ga with In and Sn atoms. Good agreements are found with available experimental results and new predicted transport-property results are provided.

  8. Liquid natural gas as a transportation fuel in the heavy trucking industry. Final technical report, May 10, 1994--December 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, W.H.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report encompasses the first year of a proposed three year project with emphasis focused on LNG research issues in Use of Liquid Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel in the Heavy Trucking Industry. These issues may be categorized as (i) direct diesel replacement with LNG fuel, and (ii) long term storage/utilization of LNG vent gases produced by tank storage and fueling/handling operation. Since this work was for fundamental research in a number of related areas to the use of LNG as a transportation fuel for long haul trucking, many of those results have appeared in numerous refereed journal and conference papers, and significant graduate training experiences (including at least one M.S. thesis and one Ph.D. dissertation) in the first year of this project. In addition, a potential new utilization of LNG fuel has been found, as a part of this work on the fundamental nature of adsorption of LNG vent gases in higher hydrocarbons; follow on research for this and other related applications and transfer of technology are proceeding at this time.

  9. Sector 30 - useful links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Useful Links Sector 30 Printing from your laptop at the beamline Data retrival onsite from ftp:ftp.xray.aps.anl.govpubsector30 Sector Orientation Form HERIX experiment header...

  10. Fuel Cells for Transportation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE R&D Activities Fuel Cells for Transportation Fuel Cells for Transportation Photo of Ford Focus fuel cell car in front of windmills The transportation sector is the single...

  11. NORIA-SP: A finite element computer program for analyzing liquid water transport in porous media; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, P.L.; Eaton, R.R.; Bixler, N.E.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A family of finite element computer programs has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) most recently, NORIA-SP. The original NORIA code solves a total of four transport equations simultaneously: liquid water, water vapor, air, and energy. Consequently, use of NORIA is computer-intensive. Since many of the applications for which NORIA is used are isothermal, we decided to ``strip`` the original four-equation version, leaving only the liquid water equation. This single-phase version is NORIA-SP. The primary intent of this document is to provide the user of NORIA-SP an accurate user`s manual. Consequently, the reader should refer to the NORIA manual if additional detail is required regarding the equation development and finite element methods used. The single-equation version of the NORIA code (NORIA-SP) has been used most frequently for analyzing various hydrological scenarios for the potential underground nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain in western Nevada. These analyses are generally performed assuming a composite model to represent the fractured geologic media. In this model the material characteristics of the matrix and the fractures are area weighted to obtain equivalent material properties. Pressure equilibrium between the matrix and fractures is assumed so a single conservation equation can be solved. NORIA-SP is structured to accommodate the composite model. The equations for water velocities in both the rock matrix and the fractures are presented. To use the code for problems involving a single, nonfractured porous material, the user can simply set the area of the fractures to zero.

  12. SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    the total CO2 -equivalent GHG emissions from the entire transportation sector on a full fuel-cycle basis

  13. Indonesia-Facility for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and developing nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMAs) in the transport sector. A handbook entitled Navigating Transport NAMAs, which is tailored to each target...

  14. Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  15. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Transportation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for) Electricity Export 1 Combustion Emissions (MMT CO 2 e Million Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide Equivalent) Total Emissions Offsite Emissions + Onsite Emissions Energy...

  16. Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentations Workshop Agenda Workshop Goals, Objectives, and Desired Outcomes, Reuben Sarkar, DOE Federal Perspective on Opportunities for Hydrogen and Natural Gas for...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office: Transitioning the Transportation Sector -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: SinceDevelopment | Department of EnergyEnergyVehicle Data|ReportandofVehicle

  18. Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrification |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 AAcceleratedDepartmentDepartment ofBenchmarkControlWasteDepartment

  19. Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 AAcceleratedDepartmentDepartment ofBenchmarkControlWasteDepartment|

  20. Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 AAcceleratedDepartmentDepartment

  1. Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agency (IEA), 2004c. CO2 emissions from fuel combustion,12. Global Energy-Related CO2 Emissions by End-Use Sector,2030. Energy-Related CO2 Emissions (GtC) Transport Buildings

  2. Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of Provider","All Sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Green Mountain Power Corp","Investor-Owned",2477751,835602,896610,745539,0 2,"Central...

  3. Promoting Public Transportation for Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    allows societies to meet their present needs without compromising the environment for future generations, this report will analyze the United States' transportation systems. Trends in the US transportation sector from the US transportation sector amount to 5% of the global carbon emissions. That amounts to more

  4. Liquid-Liquid Extraction Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fair, J. R.; Humphrey, J. L.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid-liquid extraction is the separation of one or more components of a liquid solution by contact with a second immiscible liquid called the solvent. If the components in the original liquid solution distribute themselves differently between...

  5. Fundamentals of public-private partnerships in the transportation sector : international methodologies of highway public-private partnerships and a framework to increase the probability of success and allocate risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Ryan, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2009 the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) gave the US infrastructure sector a grade D, based on the current and future needs of the nation's infrastructure and estimates that by year 2020, the US surface ...

  6. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko; David J. (Naperville, IL)

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides barrier films having reduced gas permeability for use in packaging and coating applications. The barrier films comprise an anisotropic liquid crystalline composite layer formed from phyllosilicate-polymer compositions. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while remaining transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles in the liquid crystalline composite, barrier films comprising liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  7. Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral Approach AgencyCompany Organization: GTZ...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Transportation Energy Systems Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection of Biofuels and Electric Vehicles (October 5, 2010) Next Generation Biofuels and Advanced Engines for...

  9. Mixing in a liquid metal electrode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Douglas H.

    Fluid mixing has first-order importance for many engineering problems in mass transport, including design and optimization of liquid-phase energy storage devices. Liquid metal batteries are currently being commercialized ...

  10. Future of Liquid Biofuels for APEC Economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initiated by APEC Energy Working Group (EWG) to maximize the energy sector's contribution to the region's economic and social well-being through activities in five areas of strategic importance including liquid biofuels production and development.

  11. Hazardous Liquid Pipelines and Storage Facilities (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute regulates the permitting, construction, monitoring, and operation of pipelines transporting hazardous liquids, including petroleum products and coal slurries. The definition used in...

  12. Modeling regional transportation demand in China and the impacts of a national carbon constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kishimoto, Paul

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate and energy policy in China will have important and uneven impacts on the country’s regionally heterogeneous transport system. In order to simulate these impacts, transport sector detail is added to a multi-sector, ...

  13. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    17.59 Net petroleum import share of liquids supplied (percent) 44 37 -- -- -- -- 33 Biofuel production 0.97 1.08 -- -- -- -- 1.18 Transportation product prices (2011 dollars per...

  14. Hepp and Speer Sectors within Modern Strategies of Sector Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Smirnov; V. A. Smirnov

    2008-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Hepp and Speer sectors were successfully used in the sixties and seventies for proving mathematical theorems on analytically or/and dimensionally regularized and renormalized Feynman integrals at Euclidean external momenta. We describe them within recently developed strategies of introducing iterative sector decompositions. We show that Speer sectors are reproduced within one of the existing strategies.

  15. Estimated United States Transportation Energy Use 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

    2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow chart depicting energy flow in the transportation sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 31,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of energy were used throughout the United States in transportation activities. Vehicles used in these activities include automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, buses, airplanes, rail, and ships. The transportation sector is powered primarily by petroleum-derived fuels (gasoline, diesel and jet fuel). Biomass-derived fuels, electricity and natural gas-derived fuels are also used. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the transportation sector.

  16. Transportation Policy Analysis and Systems Planning Fall 2009/2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Jaswinder Pal

    SYLLABUS WWS 527a Transportation Policy Analysis and Systems Planning Fall 2009/2010 Course Description Part 1. Perspective on the Transportation Sector of the Economy: Its Function, Its Players, Its of Course Elements of the transportation sector of the economy, the player, the technologies

  17. Mainstreaming Transport Co-benefits Approach: A Guide to Evaluating...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guide to Evaluating Transport Projects AgencyCompany Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies Focus Area: Multi-sector Impact Evaluation Topics: Best Practices...

  18. Technology Mapping of the Renewable Energy, Buildings and Transport...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Mapping of the Renewable Energy, Buildings and Transport Sectors: Policy Drivers and International Trade Aspects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL...

  19. Energy Department Awards $45 Million to Deploy Advanced Transportation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    is helping to build a strong 21st century transportation sector that cuts harmful pollution, creates jobs and leads to a more sustainable energy future," said Energy Secretary...

  20. Multi-Sector

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.SolarUS Dept ofActing Chiefof Inks andmulti-sector

  1. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DRAFT FOR PUBLIC COMMENT SEPTEMBER, 2014 ENERGY SECTOR CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance Table of...

  2. Cross-Sector Impact Analysis of Industrial Efficiency Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrow, William [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); CreskoEngineering, Joe [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE); Carpenter, Alberta [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)] [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Masanet, Eric [Northwestern University, Evanston] [Northwestern University, Evanston; Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL] [ORNL; Shehabi, Arman [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The industrial or manufacturing sector is a foundational component to all economic activity. In addition to being a large direct consumer of energy, the manufacturing sector also produces materials, products, and technologies that influence the energy use of other economic sectors. For example, the manufacturing of a lighter-weight vehicle component affects the energy required to ship that component as well as the fuel efficiency of the assembled vehicle. Many energy efficiency opportunities exist to improve manufacturing energy consumption, however comparisons of manufacturing sector energy efficiency investment opportunities tend to exclude any impacts that occur once the product leaves the factory. Expanding the scope of analysis to include energy impacts across different stages of product life-cycle can highlight less obvious opportunities and inform actions that create the greatest economy-wide benefits. We present a methodology and associated analysis tool (LIGHTEnUP Lifecycle Industry GHgas, Technology and Energy through the Use Phase) that aims to capture both the manufacturing sector energy consumption and product life-cycle energy consumption implications of manufacturing innovation measures. The tool architecture incorporates U.S. national energy use data associated with manufacturing, building operations, and transportation. Inputs for technology assessment, both direct energy saving to the manufacturing sector, and indirect energy impacts to additional sectors are estimated through extensive literature review and engineering methods. The result is a transparent and uniform system of comparing manufacturing and use-phase impacts of technologies.

  3. Fact #792: August 12, 2013 Energy Consumption by Sector and Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    In the last 30 years, overall energy consumption has grown by about 22 quadrillion Btu. The share of energy consumption by the transportation sector has seen modest growth in that...

  4. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector. Technical report twelve: Economic analysis of alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Altemative Fuels Assessment, the Department of Energy (DOE) is studying the use of derivatives of natural gas, including compressed natural gas and methanol, as altemative transportation fuels. A critical part of this effort is determining potential sources of natural gas and the economics of those sources. Previous studies in this series characterized the economics of unutilized gas within the lower 48 United States, comparing its value for methanol production against its value as a pipelined fuel (US Department of Energy 1991), and analyzed the costs of developing undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves in several countries (US Department of Energy 1992c). This report extends those analyses to include Alaskan North Slope natural gas that either is not being produced or is being reinjected. The report includes the following: A description of discovered and potential (undiscovered) quantities of natural gas on the Alaskan North Slope. A discussion of proposed altemative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. A comparison of the economics of the proposed alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the costs of transporting Alaskan North Slope gas to markets in the lower 48 States as pipeline gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), or methanol. It is not intended to recommend one alternative over another or to evaluate the relative economics or timing of using North Slope gas in new tertiary oil recovery projects. The information is supplied in sufficient detail to allow incorporation of relevant economic relationships (for example, wellhead gas prices and transportation costs) into the Altemative Fuels Trade Model, the analytical framework DOE is using to evaluate various policy options.

  5. Energy Sector Market Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arent, D.; Benioff, R.; Mosey, G.; Bird, L.; Brown, J.; Brown, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Aabakken, J.; Parks, K.; Lapsa, M.; Davis, S.; Olszewski, M.; Cox, D.; McElhaney, K.; Hadley, S.; Hostick, D.; Nicholls, A.; McDonald, S.; Holloman, B.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of energy market analysis sponsored by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Weatherization and International Program (WIP) within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The analysis was conducted by a team of DOE laboratory experts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with additional input from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The analysis was structured to identify those markets and niches where government can create the biggest impact by informing management decisions in the private and public sectors. The analysis identifies those markets and niches where opportunities exist for increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy use.

  6. Public Sector Electric Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) Bureau of Energy and Recycling administers the public sector energy efficiency programs required by the Illinois Energy...

  7. Climate Action Plans and Long-Range Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Climate Action Plans and Long-Range Transportation Plans in the Pacific Northwest: A Review Climate Change and Impacts Mitigation versus Adaptation Impacts of Climate Change: Nation & the Pacific Northwest Climate Change Planning Efforts Transportation Sector Response - Survey Recommendations Continued

  8. Quantitative analysis of alternative transportation under environmental constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandoval López, Reynaldo

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the transportation sector and its role in emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and conventional pollutant emissions. Specifically, it analyzes the potential for hydrogen based transportation, introducing ...

  9. Liquid filtration simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corey, I.; Bergman, W.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have a developed a computer code that simulates 3-D filtration of suspended particles in fluids in realistic filter structures. This code, being the most advanced filtration simulation package developed to date, provides LLNL and DOE with new capabilities to address problems in cleaning liquid wastes, medical fluid cleaning, and recycling liquids. The code is an integrated system of commercially available and LLNL-developed software; the most critical are the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver and the particle transport program. For the CFD solver, we used a commercial package based on Navier-Stokes equations and a LLNL-developed package based on Boltzman-lattice gas equations. For the particle transport program, we developed a cod based on the 3-D Langevin equation of motion and the DLVO theory of electrical interactions. A number of additional supporting packages were purchased or developed to integrate the simulation tasks and to provide visualization output.

  10. aqueous liquid waste: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Majda 2005-01-01 18 Momentum, Heat, and Neutral Mass Transport in Convective Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Liquid Systems and Implications for Aqueous Targets CERN Preprints...

  11. Sandia Energy - "Bionic" Liquids from Lignin: Joint BioEnergy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liquids from Lignin: Joint BioEnergy Institute Results Pave the Way for Closed-Loop Biofuel Refineries Home Renewable Energy Energy Transportation Energy Biofuels Facilities...

  12. Liquid Fuels and Natural Gas in the Americas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials) D 6751. Biofuels: Liquid fuels and blending components produced from biomass feedstocks, used primarily for transportation. Bitumen: A naturally occurring viscous...

  13. ORNL/TM-2009/222 Center for Transportation Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . ESTIMATION OF GASOLINE CONSUMPTION BY PUBLIC SECTOR..............41 5.1 Federal Civilian Motor/Commercial Sectors..............................................29 4.3 Off-highway Gasoline Consumption by EquipmentORNL/TM-2009/222 Center for Transportation Analysis Energy and Transportation Science Division OFF

  14. CEC-500-2010-FS-002 Assess New Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 The Issue California's transportation sector is the single largest contributor of greenhouse gas change. California must find strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. Research addressing additional land-use measures, shifts to less carbon emitting modes, and new policies

  15. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neutralization on heavy-ion fusion chamber transport,” totechniques for heavy ion fusion chamber transport,” Nucl.liquid heavy-ion fusion target chambers,” Fusion Technol.

  16. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    JANUARY 2015 ENERGY SECTOR CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY Energy Sector...

  17. Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What's Working and Why Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What's Working and Why Presentation by...

  18. Coal sector profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal is our largest domestic energy resource with recoverable reserves estimated at 268 billion short tons or 5.896 quads Btu equivalent. This is approximately 95 percent of US fossil energy resources. It is relatively inexpensive to mine, and on a per Btu basis it is generally much less costly to produce than other energy sources. Its chief drawbacks are the environmental, health and safety concerns that must be addressed in its production and consumption. Historically, coal has played a major role in US energy markets. Coal fueled the railroads, heated the homes, powered the factories. and provided the raw materials for steel-making. In 1920, coal supplied over three times the amount of energy of oil, gas, and hydro combined. From 1920 until the mid 1970s, coal production remained fairly constant at 400 to 600 million short tons a year. Rapid increases in overall energy demands, which began during and after World War II were mostly met by oil and gas. By the mid 1940s, coal represented only half of total energy consumption in the US. In fact, post-war coal production, which had risen in support of the war effort and the postwar Marshall plan, decreased approximately 25 percent between 1945 and 1960. Coal demand in the post-war era up until the 1970s was characterized by increasing coal use by the electric utilities but decreasing coal use in many other markets (e.g., rail transportation). The oil price shocks of the 1970s, combined with natural gas shortages and problems with nuclear power, returned coal to a position of prominence. The greatly expanded use of coal was seen as a key building block in US energy strategies of the 1970s. Coal production increased from 613 million short tons per year in 1970 to 950 million short tons in 1988, up over 50 percent.

  19. DOE studies on coal-to-liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory has issued reports that examine the feasibility of coal-to-liquids (CTL) facilities, both general and site specific, which are available at www.netl.gov/energy-analyses/ref-shelf.html. The US Department of Defence has been investigating use of Fischer-Tropsch fuels. Congress is considering various CTL proposals while the private sector is building pilot plants and performing feasibility studies for proposed plants. The article includes a table listing 14 coal-to-liquids plants under consideration. The private sector has formed the coal-to-liquids coalition (www.futurecoalfuels.org). The article mentions other CTL projects in South Africa, China, Indonesia, the Philippines and New Zealand. 1 tab.

  20. Overview of US Liquid Metal Blanket R&D ActivitiesR&D Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Overview of US Liquid Metal Blanket R&D ActivitiesR&D Activities Mohamed A. Abdou and the US FNST 2324, 2010 Madrid, Spain Thursday, September 23y, p S1I3 Mohamed Abdou: "Overview of US Liquid Metal Transport inCorrosion/Deposition and Tritium Transport in LiquidMetal Blankets" S7I2 C. Wong/M. Abdou

  1. COSMIC-RAY DIFFUSION IN A SECTORED MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE DISTANT HELIOSHEATH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Florinski, V. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Alouani-Bibi, F.; Guo, X. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Kota, J. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Very high intensities of galactic cosmic rays measured by Voyager 1 in the heliosheath appear to be incompatible with the presence of a modulation 'wall' near the heliopause produced by a pile up of the heliospheric magnetic field. We propose that the modulation wall is a structure permeable to cosmic rays as a result of a sectored magnetic field topology compressed by plasma slowdown on approach to the heliopause and stretched to high latitudes by latitudinal flows in the heliosheath. The tightly folded warped current sheet permits efficient cosmic-ray transport in the radial direction via a drift-like mechanism. We show that when stochastic variations in the sector widths are taken into account, particle transport becomes predominantly diffusive both along and across the magnetic sectors. Using a test-particle model for cosmic rays in the heliosheath we investigate the dependence of the diffusion coefficients on the properties of the sector structure and on particle energy.

  2. Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologi...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    economic growth and reduce petroleum use in Utah by increasing the number of CNG, LNG, Hybrid, and biodiesel vehicles on the road, creating an I-15 corridor for alternative...

  3. FY 2016 EERE Budget Webinar-Sustainable Transportation Sector...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3, 2015 2:30PM to 3:30PM EST Online The Energy Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) hosted a webinar series featuring our deputy assistant...

  4. Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologi...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. DOE HYDROGEN and FUEL CELLS PROGRAM and VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM ANNUAL MERIT REVIEW AND PEER EVALUATION MEETING MAY 14-18, 2012 This presentation does not contain any...

  5. Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million Cubic 1.Year Jan Feb Mar‹ See

  6. Rail Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source:Additions to Capacity onThousand(Dollars2009Rail Coal

  7. Table E13. Transportation Sector Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2012

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a(STEO)U.S. CoalInputsTotal Stocks

  8. Table E6. Transportation Sector Energy Price Estimates, 2012

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a(STEO)U.S. CoalInputsTotal Stocks4. ElectricE4.E5.E6.

  9. Copenhagen Accord NAMA Submissions Implications for the Transport Sector |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationinConcentratingEnergyCoosa Valley Electric Coop Inc Jump to:Open

  10. Post-2012 Climate Instruments in the transport sector | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: EnergyPiratiniEdwards,Posey County, Indiana: EnergyPositive

  11. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Modeling updates in the Transportation sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy IDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2CubicElectricity Analysis Team1 st

  12. Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector Electrification

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Site EnvironmentalEnergySafely Delivering DOE'sEnergy3 SGIG ProgramtheConfidential,

  13. Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02 TUE 08:59 FAXFact SheetConditionsOwnersUsing10Program |

  14. Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02 TUE 08:59 FAXFact SheetConditionsOwnersUsing10Program

  15. Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02 TUE 08:59 FAXFact

  16. Energy Outlook for the Transport Sector | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard |in STEMEnergyI.ofTrack 1shouldJune 20,

  17. Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartmentTest for PumpingThe|ofTransforming aMelissa Howell |

  18. Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKorea PartsLLNLLaizhouLand O Lakes Inc Jump

  19. Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheastern ILSunseekerTallahatchie Valley ETaurusInformation for

  20. Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, searchRay

  1. Sector 1 Frequently Asked Questions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Sector 1 Safety Plan (pdf) Useful X-Ray Related Numbers Si a0 5.4308 Angstrom CeO2 a05.411 Angstrom Cd-109 gamma 88.036 keV X-ray energywavelength conversion...

  2. Assessment of coal liquids as refinery feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, P.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The R D of direct coal liquefaction has reached such a stage that current two-stage processes can produce coal liquids with high yields and improved quality at a reasonable cost. To fully realize the potential value, these coal liquids should be refined into high-value liquid transportation fuels. The purpose of this study is to assess coal liquids as feedstocks to be processed by modern petroleum refining technologies. After the introduction, Section 2.0 summarizes ASTM specifications for major transportation fuels: gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel fuel, which serve as a target for coal-liquid refining. A concise description of modern refining processes follows with an emphasis on the requirements for the raw materials. These provide criteria to judge the quality of coal liquids as a refinery feedstock for the production of marketable liquid fuels. Section 3.0 surveys the properties of coal liquids produced by various liquefaction processes. Compared with typical petroleum oils, the current two-stage coal liquids are: Light in boiling range and free of resids and metals; very low in sulfur but relatively high in oxygen; relatively low in hydrogen and high in cyclics content; and essentially toxicologically inactive when end point is lower than 650[degrees]F, particularly after hydroprocessing. Despite these characteristics, the coal liquids are basically similar to petroleum. The modern refining technology is capable of processing coal liquids into transportation fuels meeting all specifications, and hydroprocessinq is obviously the major tool. The important point is the determination of a reasonable product slate and an appropriate refining scheme.

  3. Assessment of coal liquids as refinery feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, P.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The R&D of direct coal liquefaction has reached such a stage that current two-stage processes can produce coal liquids with high yields and improved quality at a reasonable cost. To fully realize the potential value, these coal liquids should be refined into high-value liquid transportation fuels. The purpose of this study is to assess coal liquids as feedstocks to be processed by modern petroleum refining technologies. After the introduction, Section 2.0 summarizes ASTM specifications for major transportation fuels: gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel fuel, which serve as a target for coal-liquid refining. A concise description of modern refining processes follows with an emphasis on the requirements for the raw materials. These provide criteria to judge the quality of coal liquids as a refinery feedstock for the production of marketable liquid fuels. Section 3.0 surveys the properties of coal liquids produced by various liquefaction processes. Compared with typical petroleum oils, the current two-stage coal liquids are: Light in boiling range and free of resids and metals; very low in sulfur but relatively high in oxygen; relatively low in hydrogen and high in cyclics content; and essentially toxicologically inactive when end point is lower than 650{degrees}F, particularly after hydroprocessing. Despite these characteristics, the coal liquids are basically similar to petroleum. The modern refining technology is capable of processing coal liquids into transportation fuels meeting all specifications, and hydroprocessinq is obviously the major tool. The important point is the determination of a reasonable product slate and an appropriate refining scheme.

  4. Essays on the Effect of Climate Change on Agriculture and Agricultural Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attavanich, Witsanu

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    climate change impacts on grain transportation flows, this study employs two modeling systems, a U.S. agricultural sector model and an international grain transportation model, with linked inputs/outputs. The main findings are that under climate change: 1...

  5. Methods of producing transportation fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Cherrillo, Ralph Anthony (Houston, TX); Bauldreay, Joanna M. (Chester, GB)

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing transportation fuel is described herein. The method for producing transportation fuel may include providing formation fluid having a boiling range distribution between -5.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process to a subsurface treatment facility. A liquid stream may be separated from the formation fluid. The separated liquid stream may be hydrotreated and then distilled to produce a distilled stream having a boiling range distribution between 150.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. The distilled liquid stream may be combined with one or more additives to produce transportation fuel.

  6. Transportation Energy Efficiency Trends, 1972--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Fan, Y. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (United States)

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US transportation sector, which remains 97% dependent on petroleum, used a record 22.8 quads of energy in 1993. Though growing much more slowly than the economy from 1975 to 1985, energy use for transportation is now growing at nearly the same rate as GDP. This report describes the analysis of trends in energy use and energy intensity in transportation into components due to, (1) growth in transportation activity, (2) changes in energy intensity, and (3) changes in the modal structure of transportation activities.

  7. Simulation, integration, and economic analysis of gas-to-liquid processes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao, Buping

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas-to-liquid (GTL) process involves the chemical conversion of natural gas (or other gas sources) into synthetic crude that can be upgraded and separated into different useful hydrocarbon fractions including liquid transportation fuels. A leading...

  8. Water Impacts of the Electricity Sector (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, J.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses the water impacts of the electricity sector. Nationally, the electricity sector is a major end-user of water. Water issues affect power plants throughout the nation.

  9. Biomass Resources for the Federal Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass Resources for the Federal Sector is a fact sheet that explains how biomass resources can be incorporated into the federal sector, and also how they can provide opportunities to meet federal renewable energy goals.

  10. Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Building Sector Electricity Consumption parameterin Building Sector Electricity Consumption Appendix 1. WorldElectricity in Building Sector Electricity Consumption iii

  11. Power Politics: The Political Economy of Russia's Electricity Sector Liberalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wengle, Susanne Alice

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Private Participation in the Electricity Sector World BankTelecommunications and Electricity Sectors." Governance 19,41 with journalist covering electricity sector, Vladivostok,

  12. Sector trends and driving forces of global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: focus in industry and buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disaggregation of sectoral energy use and greenhouse gas emissions trends reveals striking differences between sectors and regions of the world. Understanding key driving forces in the energy end-use sectors provides insights for development of projections of future greenhouse gas emissions. This report examines global and regional historical trends in energy use and carbon emissions in the industrial, buildings, transport, and agriculture sectors, with a more detailed focus on industry and buildings. Activity and economic drivers as well as trends in energy and carbon intensity are evaluated. The authors show that macro-economic indicators, such as GDP, are insufficient for comprehending trends and driving forces at the sectoral level. These indicators need to be supplemented with sector-specific information for a more complete understanding of future energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

  13. Energy-economy interactions revisited within a comprehensive sectoral model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, D. A.; Laitner, J. A.

    2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model with considerable sector and technology detail, the ``All Modular Industry Growth Assessment'' Model (AMIGA). It is argued that a detailed model is important to capture and understand the several rolls that energy plays within the economy. Fundamental consumer and industrial demands are for the services from energy; hence, energy demand is a derived demand based on the need for heating, cooling mechanical, electrical, and transportation services. Technologies that provide energy-services more efficiently (on a life cycle basis), when adopted, result in increased future output of the economy and higher paths of household consumption. The AMIGA model can examine the effects on energy use and economic output of increases in energy prices (e.g., a carbon charge) and other incentive-based policies or energy-efficiency programs. Energy sectors and sub-sector activities included in the model involve energy extraction conversion and transportation. There are business opportunities to produce energy-efficient goods (i.e., appliances, control systems, buildings, automobiles, clean electricity). These activities are represented in the model by characterizing their likely production processes (e.g., lighter weight motor vehicles). Also, multiple industrial processes can produce the same output but with different technologies and inputs. Secondary recovery, i.e., recycling processes, are examples of these multiple processes. Combined heat and power (CHP) is also represented for energy-intensive industries. Other modules represent residential and commercial building technologies to supply energy services. All sectors of the economy command real resources (capital services and labor).

  14. Liquid electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dropping electrolyte electrode for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions.

  15. Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave | 1 Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politčcnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave | 1 Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave INFORME para la Sostenibilidad Energética y Ambiental, FUNSEAM. #12;Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave eléctrica y los diferentes sectores que forman la smart grid. 6 Figura 2. Evolución y previsión de

  16. Financial Sector Ups and Downs and the Real Sector: Up by the Stairs and Down by the Parachute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aizenman, Joshua; Pinto, Brian; Sushko, Vladyslav

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    May 2012 Financial Sector Ups and Downs and the Real Sector:to reclassifying financial sector ups and downs as turning

  17. The Changing US Electric Sector Business Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliff, G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Changing US Electric Sector Business Model CATEE 2013 Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference San Antonio, Texas December 17, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-57 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16...-18 Copyright © 2013 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved. • Fundamentals of the US Electric Sector Business Model • Today’s Challenges Faced by U.S. Electric Sector • The Math Does Not Lie: A Look into the Sector’s Future • Disruption to Today...

  18. Local Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Local Transportation. Transportation from the Airport to Hotel. There are two types of taxi companies that operate at the airport: special and regular taxis (

  19. Greening Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Goal 2: Greening Transportation LANL supports and encourages employees to reduce their personal greenhouse gas emissions by offering various commuting and work...

  20. The role of natural gas as a vehicle transportation fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Paul Jarod

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis analyzes pathways to directly use natural gas, as compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied natural gas (LNG), in the transportation sector. The thesis focuses on identifying opportunities to reduce market ...

  1. Chamber transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  2. Planning of feeding station installment for elec-tric urban public mass-transportation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierlaire, Michel

    especially in the transportation sector, a key and viable approach is to use renewable energy such as wind 13th Swiss Transport Research Conference Monte Veritŕ / Ascona, April 24 ­ 26, 2013 #12;Planning-based transportation infrastructure has led to renewed interest in electric transportation infrastructure, especially

  3. Shear Viscosity of Two-Dimensional Yukawa Systems in the Liquid State Bin Liu and J. Goree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goree, John

    with liquids, including liquids near freezing, composed of molecules or particles that interact with a Yukawa a few reports of transport coef- ficients computed for 2D liquids using molecular dynamics (MD simulation uses an equilibrium method to calculate . Under equilibrium conditions, momentum transport arises

  4. Cross-sector Demand Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 Department of EnergyCross-Sector Sign In About |

  5. Liquid electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1994-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A dropping electrolyte electrode is described for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions. 2 figures.

  6. Power Politics: The Political Economy of Russia's Electricity Sector Liberalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wengle, Susanne Alice

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity Sector in Russia: Regional Aspects " In Economics EducationElectricity Sector in Russia: Regional Aspects " in Economics Education

  7. Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes for Gas Separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, C.R.; Ilconich, J.B.; Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionic liquids have been rapidly gaining attention for various applications including solvent separation and gas capture. These substances are noted for extremely low vapor pressure and high CO2 solubility making them ideal as transport or capture media for CO2 abatement in power generation applications. Ionic liquids, combined with various supports to form membranes, have been proven selective in CO2 separation. Several ionic liquids and a variety of polymer supports have been studied over a temperature range from 37°C to 300°C and have been optimized for stability. The membranes have demonstrated high permeability and high selectivity since the supported ionic liquid membranes incorporate functionality capable of chemically complexing CO2. A study aimed at improving supported ionic liquid membranes will examine their durability with greater transmembrane pressures and the effects on CO2 permeance, CO2/H2 selectivity and thermal stability.

  8. Macroscopic theory of dark sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boris E. Meierovich

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple Lagrangian with squared covariant divergence of a vector field as a kinetic term turned out an adequate tool for macroscopic description of the dark sector. The zero-mass field acts as the dark energy. Its energy-momentum tensor is a simple additive to the cosmological constant. Massive fields {\\phi}_{I} with {\\phi}^{K}{\\phi}_{K}0 describe two different forms of dark matter. The space-like ({\\phi}^{K}{\\phi}_{K}0) massive field displays repulsive elasticity. In balance with dark energy and ordinary matter it provides a four parametric diversity of regular solutions of the Einstein equations describing different possible cosmological and oscillating non-singular scenarios of evolution of the universe. In particular, the singular big bang turns into a regular inflation-like transition from contraction to expansion with the accelerate expansion at late times. The fine-tuned Friedman-Robertson-Walker singular solution is a particular limiting case at the boundary of existence of regular oscillating solutions in the absence of vector fields. The simplicity of the general covariant expression for the energy-momentum tensor allows to display the main properties of the dark sector analytically and avoid unnecessary model assumptions.

  9. Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in a study to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids is reported.

  10. Public Sector New Construction and Retrofit Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) Bureau of Energy and Recycling administers the public sector energy efficiency programs required by the Illinois Energy...

  11. Public Sector Energy Efficiency Aggregation Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) administers the Illinois Energy Now programs, including the Public Sector Energy Efficiency Aggregation Program. The program will...

  12. Accelerating Investments in the Geothermal Sector, Indonesia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the Geothermal Sector, Indonesia (Presentation) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Accelerating Investments in the Geothermal...

  13. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology (NIST) released a Cybersecurity Framework. DOE has collaborated with private sector stakeholders through the Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) and the...

  14. Draft Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology (NIST) released a Cybersecurity Framework. DOE has collaborated with private sector stakeholders through the Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) and the...

  15. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Electric Power

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Letters of IntentAgreements The electric power sector participates in the Climate VISION program through the Electric Power Industry Climate Initiative (EPICI) and its Power...

  16. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Business Roundtable...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Results Every Sector, One RESOLVE: A Progress Report on Business Roundtable's Climate RESOLVE Program, September 2004 (PDF 1.8 MB) Download Acrobat Reader...

  17. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    various sources describing the energy consumption of the industrial sector and the carbon emissions in particular. Below is an estimate of the emissions expressed in million...

  18. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Automobile Manufacturers...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    various sources describing the energy consumption of the industrial sector and the carbon emissions in particular. Below is an estimate of the million metric tons of carbon...

  19. Structure and magnetic behavior of transition metal based ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Sesto, Rico E [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Mccleskey, T [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Burrell, Anthony K [ORNL; Baker, Gary A [ORNL; Thompson, Joe D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Scott, Brian L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wilkes, John S [United States Air Force Academy (USAFA), Colorado; Williams, Peg [United States Air Force Academy (USAFA), Colorado

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of ionic liquids containing different paramagnetic anions have been prepared and all show paramagnetic behavior with potential applications for magnetic and electrochromic switching as well as novel magnetic transport; also, the tetraalkylphosphonium-based ionic liquids reveal anomalous magnetic behavior.

  20. Liquid foams of graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alcazar Jorba, Daniel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid foams are dispersions of bubbles in a liquid. Bubbles are stabilized by foaming agents that position at the interface between the gas and the liquid. Most foaming agents, such as the commonly used sodium dodecylsulfate, ...

  1. Guam Transportation Petroleum-Use Reduction Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The island of Guam has set a goal to reduce petroleum use 20% by 2020. Because transportation is responsible for one-third of on-island petroleum use, the Guam Energy Task Force (GETF), a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy and numerous Guam-based agencies and organizations, devised a specific plan by which to meet the 20% goal within the transportation sector. This report lays out GETF's plan.

  2. 202-328-5000 www.rff.orgSector Effects of the Shale Gas Revolution in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This paper reviews the impact of the shale gas revolution on the sectors of electricity generation, transportation, and manufacturing in the United States. Natural gas is being substituted for other fuels, particularly coal, in electricity generation, resulting in lower greenhouse gas emissions from this sector. The use of natural gas in the transportation sector is currently negligible but is projected to increase with investments in refueling infrastructure and natural gas vehicle technologies. Petrochemical and other manufacturing industries have responded to lower natural gas prices by investing in domestically located manufacturing projects. This paper also speculates on the impact of a possible shale gas boom in China. Key Words: shale gas, electricity, transportation, and manufacturing JEL Classification Numbers: L71, L9, Q4 © 2013 Resources for the Future. All rights reserved. No portion of this paper may be reproduced without permission of the authors. Discussion papers are research materials circulated by their authors for purposes of information and discussion.

  3. National Electric Sector Cybersecurity Organization Resource (NESCOR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the National Electric Sector Cybersecurity Organization Resource (NESCOR) project was to address cyber security issues for the electric sector, particularly in the near and mid-term. The following table identifies the strategies from the DOE Roadmap to Achieve Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity published in September 2011 that are applicable to the NESCOR project.

  4. Institute of Public Sector Accounting Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    THE STATE" New Public Sector Seminar, Edinburgh, 6-7th November 2014 Co-Chairs: Liisa Kurunmaki, Irvine and consultants depend on in the management of public service organisations, and what is the statusInstitute of Public Sector Accounting Research I·P·S·A·R In Government, Public Services

  5. Managing Technical Risk: Understanding Private Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    action. Our study seeks to inform the decisions of both government managers and private entrepreneursApril 2000 Managing Technical Risk: Understanding Private Sector Decision Making on Early Stage 00-787 Managing Technical Risk Understanding Private Sector Decision Making on Early Stage Technology

  6. Stuck with the bill, but why? : an analysis of the Portuguese public finance system with respect to surface transportation policy and investments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Joshua S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite decentralization progress in other sectors, the Portuguese central government maintains significant administrative and fiscal power over national and sub-national surface transportation operations and infrastructure. ...

  7. Flow Patterns, Void Fraction and Pressure Drop in Gas-Liquid Two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghajar, Afshin J.

    and simultaneous transportation of oil and natural gas from remote extraction locations to the processing units#12;Chapter 4 Flow Patterns, Void Fraction and Pressure Drop in Gas-Liquid Two Phase Flow in gas-liquid two phase flow. The flow structure of different flow patterns observed in gas-liquid two

  8. Safetygram #9- Liquid Hydrogen

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen is colorless as a liquid. Its vapors are colorless, odorless, tasteless, and highly flammable.

  9. Hindered diffusion of coal liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsotsis, T.T.; Sahimi, M. (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Webster, I.A. (Unocal Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The molecules comprising coal liquids can range from less than 10 to several hundred [angstrom] in diameter. Their size is, therefore, comparable to the average pore size of most hydroprocessing catalysts. Thus, during processing, transport of these molecules into the catalyst occurs mainly by configurational'' or hindered diffusion,'' which is the result of two phenomena occurring in the pores; the distribution of solute molecules in the pores is affected by the pores and the solute molecules experience an increased hydrodynamic drag. The field of hindered diffusion has been reviewed by Deen [16]. The earliest studies in the filed were by Renkin et al. [17].

  10. Methods of making transportation fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Mo, Weijian (Sugar Land, TX); Muylle, Michel Serge Marie (Houston, TX); Mandema, Remco Hugo (Houston, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing alkylated hydrocarbons is disclosed. Formation fluid is produced from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. The liquid stream is fractionated to produce at least a second gas stream including hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3. The first gas stream and the second gas stream are introduced into an alkylation unit to produce alkylated hydrocarbons. At least a portion of the olefins in the first gas stream enhance alkylation. The alkylated hydrocarbons may be blended with one or more components to produce transportation fuel.

  11. Spatial Relationships of Sector-Specific Fossil-fuel CO2 Emissions in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Gurney, Kevin R.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantification of the spatial distribution of sector-specific fossil fuel CO2 emissions provides strategic information to public and private decision-makers on climate change mitigation options and can provide critical constraints to carbon budget studies being performed at the national to urban scales. This study analyzes the spatial distribution and spatial drivers of total and sectoral fossil fuel CO2 emissions at the state and county levels in the United States. The spatial patterns of absolute versus per capita fossil fuel CO2 emissions differ substantially and these differences are sector-specific. Area-based sources such as those in the residential and commercial sectors are driven by a combination of population and surface temperature with per capita emissions largest in the northern latitudes and continental interior. Emission sources associated with large individual manufacturing or electricity producing facilities are heterogeneously distributed in both absolute and per capita metrics. The relationship between surface temperature and sectoral emissions suggests that the increased electricity consumption due to space cooling requirements under a warmer climate may outweigh the savings generated by lessened space heating. Spatial cluster analysis of fossil fuel CO2 emissions confirms that counties with high (low) CO2 emissions tend to be clustered close to other counties with high (low) CO2 emissions and some of the spatial clustering extends to multi-state spatial domains. This is particularly true for the residential and transportation sectors, suggesting that emissions mitigation policy might best be approached from the regional or multi-state perspective. Our findings underscore the potential for geographically focused, sector-specific emissions mitigation strategies and the importance of accurate spatial distribution of emitting sources when combined with atmospheric monitoring via aircraft, satellite and in situ measurements. Keywords: Fossil-fuel; Carbon dioxide emissions; Sectoral; Spatial cluster; Emissions mitigation policy

  12. On the Road to Transportation Efficiency (Video)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reducing emissions and oil consumption are crucial worldwide goals. Reducing transportation emissions, in particular, is key to reducing overall emissions. Electric vehicles driving on electrified roadways could be a significant part of the solution. E-roadways offer a variety of benefits: reduce petroleum consumption (electricity is used instead of gasoline), decrease vehicular operating costs (from about 12 cents per mile to 4 cents per mile), and extend the operational range of electric vehicles. Plus, e-roadway power can come from renewable sources. This animation was sponsored by the Clean Transportation Sector Initiative, and interagency effort between the U.S. Department of Transportation and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. Computational Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    ), in-vehicle computers, and computers in the transportation infrastructure are integrated ride- sharing, real-time multi-modal routing and navigation, to autonomous/assisted driving

  14. Electricity sector restructuring and competition : lessons learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We now have over a decade of experience with the privatization, restructuring, regulatory reform, and wholesale and retail competition in electricity sectors around the world. The objectives and design attributes of these ...

  15. Top partner probes of extended Higgs sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearney, John

    Natural theories of the weak scale often include fermionic partners of the top quark. If the electroweak symmetry breaking sector contains scalars beyond a single Higgs doublet, then top partners can have sizable branching ...

  16. Private Sector Rates (FY 2015) Instrument Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashir, Rashid

    Source Laser $150 $175 Nanophoton Raman 11 Raman Spectroscopy $150 $175 Newport Solar Simulator Solar Rates for the Material Research Laboratory Facilities Rates for Private Sector companies and researchers

  17. Numerical simulation of large amplitude liquid sloshing in a rigid rectangular tank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bridges, Thomas J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oscillations, harbor oscillations, tank trucks on highways, liquid fuel in space craft, and sloshing of liquid cargo in oceangoing vessels. Throughout recent history, investigators have used various methods to mathematically represent. liquid sloshing... loads in cargo tanks is not restricted to LNG carriers since similar problems have been experienced in other types of liquid transport ships such as bulk oil carriers. However, several factors make slosh loads more important with regard to LNG ship...

  18. Activities to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Activities to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector Activities to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector Presentation-given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working...

  19. Power Politics: The Political Economy of Russia's Electricity Sector Liberalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wengle, Susanne Alice

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Private Participation in the Electricity Sector World BankTelecommunications and Electricity Sectors." Governance 19,Power Struggle: Reforming the Electricity Industry." In The

  20. Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size and Expectations for Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and market assessment Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size2008. “The Size of the U.S. Energy Efficiency Market. Reportmarket spending Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size

  1. EIA Energy Efficiency-Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities: 1992- 2003 Released Date: December 2004 Page Last Revised: August 2009 These tables...

  2. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    11 Calibration of the Energy Consumption Data forSectoral energy consumption data are available in publishedof the sectoral energy consumption data in the statistics

  3. Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Sector Electricity Consumption parameter logisticin Building Sector Electricity Consumption iii iv Sectoralsome water with electricity consumption, it is not possible

  4. Energy Department Announces New Private Sector Partnership to...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Department Announces New Private Sector Partnership to Accelerate Renewable Energy Projects Energy Department Announces New Private Sector Partnership to Accelerate...

  5. Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sector - New SEE Action Publication March 24, 2014 - 12:56pm Addthis Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector provides...

  6. Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and Mitigation Options Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and Mitigation Options 2003 DEER Conference...

  7. The Economics of Public Sector Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Rufus

    result in incentives for over-investment in quality and capacity improvements because, by over-investing, the PSIH stimulates demand and obtains a larger subsidy. In terms of responsiveness an organization operating a more ‘commercial’ pricing policy (e... area (building especially), or keeping up to date with the decisions of their elected representatives. While much data is supplied from outside the public sector, compared to many other areas of the economy, the public sector plays an unusually...

  8. Development of Practical Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes: A Systematic Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luebke, D.R.; Ilconich, J.B.; Myers, C.R.; Pennline, H.W.

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supported liquid membranes (SLMs) are a class of materials that allow the researcher to utilize the wealth of knowledge available on liquid properties to optimize membrane performance. These membranes also have the advantage of liquid phase diffusivities, which are higher than those observed in polymers and grant proportionally greater permeabilities. The primary shortcoming of the supported liquid membranes demonstrated in past research has been the lack of stability caused by volatilization of the transport liquid. Ionic liquids, which may possess high CO2 solubility relative to light gases such as H2, are excellent candidates for this type of membrane since they are stable at elevated temperatures and have negligible vapor pressure. A study has been conducted evaluating the use of a variety of ionic liquids in supported ionic liquid membranes for the capture of CO2 from streams containing H2. In a joint project, researchers at the University of Notre Dame synthesized and characterized ionic liquids, and researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory incorporated candidate ionic liquids into supports and evaluated membrane performance for the resulting materials. Several steps have been taken in the development of practical supported ionic liquid membranes. Proof-of-concept was established by showing that ionic liquids could be used as the transport media in SLMs. Results showed that ionic liquids are suitable media for gas transport, but the preferred polymeric supports were not stable at temperatures above 135oC. The use of cross-linked nylon66 supports was found to produce membranes mechanically stable at temperatures exceeding 300oC but CO2/H2 selectivity was poor. An ionic liquid whose selectivity does not decrease with increasing temperature was needed, and a functionalized ionic liquid that complexes with CO2 was used. An increase in CO2/H2 selectivity with increasing temperature over the range of 37 to 85oC was observed and the dominance of a facilitated transport mechanism established. The presentation will detail membrane development, the effect of increasing transmembrane pressure, and preliminary results dealing with other gas pairs and contaminants.

  9. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishimoto, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REFERENCES Figure 5: Liquid hydrogen absorber and test6: Cooling time of liquid hydrogen absorber. Eight CernoxLIQUID HYDROGEN ABSORBER FOR MICE S. Ishimoto, S. Suzuki, M.

  10. Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gasemissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Sinton, Jonathan; Worrell, Ernst; Zhou, Nan; Sathaye, Jayant; Levine, Mark

    2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2000, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published a new set of baseline greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions scenarios in the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) (Nakicenovic et al., 2000). The SRES team defined four narrative storylines (A1, A2, B1 and B2) describing the relationships between the forces driving GHG and aerosol emissions and their evolution during the 21st century. The SRES reports emissions for each of these storylines by type of GHG and by fuel type to 2100 globally and for four world regions (OECD countries as of 1990, countries undergoing economic reform, developing countries in Asia, rest of world). Specific assumptions about the quantification of scenario drivers, such as population and economic growth, technological change, resource availability, land-use changes, and local and regional environmental policies, are also provided. End-use sector-level results for buildings, industry, or transportation or information regarding adoption of particular technologies and policies are not provided in the SRES. The goal of this report is to provide more detailed information on the SRES scenarios at the end use level including historical time series data and a decomposition of energy consumption to understand the forecast implications in terms of end use efficiency to 2030. This report focuses on the A1 (A1B) and B2 marker scenarios since they represent distinctly contrasting futures. The A1 storyline describes a future of very rapid economic growth, low population growth, and the rapid introduction of new and more efficient technologies. Major underlying themes are convergence among regions, capacity building, and increased cultural and social interactions, with a substantial reduction in regional differences in per capita income. The B2 storyline describes a world with an emphasis on economic, social, and environmental sustainability, especially at the local and regional levels. It is a world with moderate population growth, intermediate levels of economic development, and less rapid and more diverse technological change (Nakicenovic et al., 2000). Data were obtained from the SRES modeling teams that provide more detail than that reported in the SRES. For the A1 marker scenario, the modeling team provided final energy demand and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions by fuel for industry, buildings, and transportation for nine world regions. Final energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions for three sectors (industry, transport, buildings) for the four SRES world regions were provided for the B2 marker scenario. This report describes the results of a disaggregation of the SRES projected energy use and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions for the industrial, transport, and buildings sectors for 10 world regions (see Appendix 1) to 2030. An example of further disaggregation of the two SRES scenarios for the residential buildings sector in China is provided, illustrating how such aggregate scenarios can be interpreted at the end use level.

  11. ImSET: Impact of Sector Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roop, Joseph M.; Scott, Michael J.; Schultz, Robert W.

    2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This version of the Impact of Sector Energy Technologies (ImSET) model represents the ''next generation'' of the previously developed Visual Basic model (ImBUILD 2.0) that was developed in 2003 to estimate the macroeconomic impacts of energy-efficient technology in buildings. More specifically, a special-purpose version of the 1997 benchmark national Input-Output (I-O) model was designed specifically to estimate the national employment and income effects of the deployment of Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) -developed energy-saving technologies. In comparison with the previous versions of the model, this version allows for more complete and automated analysis of the essential features of energy efficiency investments in buildings, industry, transportation, and the electric power sectors. This version also incorporates improvements in the treatment of operations and maintenance costs, and improves the treatment of financing of investment options. ImSET is also easier to use than extant macroeconomic simulation models and incorporates information developed by each of the EERE offices as part of the requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act.

  12. Life Cycle Assessment Comparing the Use of Jatropha Biodiesel in the Indian Road and Rail Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitaker, M.; Heath, G.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This life cycle assessment of Jatropha biodiesel production and use evaluates the net greenhouse gas (GHG) emission (not considering land-use change), net energy value (NEV), and net petroleum consumption impacts of substituting Jatropha biodiesel for conventional petroleum diesel in India. Several blends of biodiesel with petroleum diesel are evaluated for the rail freight, rail passenger, road freight, and road-passenger transport sectors that currently rely heavily on petroleum diesel. For the base case, Jatropha cultivation, processing, and use conditions that were analyzed, the use of B20 results in a net reduction in GHG emissions and petroleum consumption of 14% and 17%, respectively, and a NEV increase of 58% compared with the use of 100% petroleum diesel. While the road-passenger transport sector provides the greatest sustainability benefits per 1000 gross tonne kilometers, the road freight sector eventually provides the greatest absolute benefits owing to substantially higher projected utilization by year 2020. Nevertheless, introduction of biodiesel to the rail sector might present the fewest logistic and capital expenditure challenges in the near term. Sensitivity analyses confirmed that the sustainability benefits are maintained under multiple plausible cultivation, processing, and distribution scenarios. However, the sustainability of any individual Jatropha plantation will depend on site-specific conditions.

  13. Transportation Market Distortions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litman, Todd

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Highways, Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Evaluating Criticism of Transportation Costing, VictoriaFrom Here: Evaluating Transportation Diversity, Victoria

  14. Equation for liquid density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaws, C.L.; Yang, H.C.; Hopper, J.R.; Cawley, W.A. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (US))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Saturated liquid densities for organic chemicals are given as functions of temperature using a modified Rackett equation.

  15. Damping of liquid sloshing by foams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alban Sauret; François Boulogne; Jean Cappello; Emilie Dressaire; Howard A. Stone

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When a container is set in motion, the free surface of the liquid starts to oscillate or slosh. Such effects can be observed when a glass of water is handled carelessly and the fluid sloshes or even spills over the rims of the container. However, beer does not slosh as readily as water, which suggests that foam could be used to damp sloshing. In this work, we study experimentally the effect on sloshing of a liquid foam placed on top of a liquid bath. We generate a monodisperse two-dimensional liquid foam in a rectangular container and track the motion of the foam. The influence of the foam on the sloshing dynamics is experimentally characterized: only a few layers of bubbles are sufficient to significantly damp the oscillations. We rationalize our experimental findings with a model that describes the foam contribution to the damping coefficient through viscous dissipation on the walls of the container. Then we extend our study to confined three-dimensional liquid foam and observe that the behavior of 2D and confined 3D systems are very similar. Thus we conclude that only the bubbles close to the walls have a significant impact on the dissipation of energy. The possibility to damp liquid sloshing using foam is promising in numerous industrial applications such as the transport of liquefied gas in tankers or for propellants in rocket engines.

  16. Liquid detection circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Regan, Thomas O. (North Aurora, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Herein is a circuit which is capable of detecting the presence of liquids, especially cryogenic liquids, and whose sensor will not overheat in a vacuum. The circuit parameters, however, can be adjusted to work with any liquid over a wide range of temperatures.

  17. The climate impacts of high-speed rail and air transportation : a global comparative analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clewlow, Regina Ruby Lee

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Growing concerns about the energy use and climate impacts of the transportation sector have prompted policymakers to consider a variety of options to meet the future mobility needs of the world's population, while ...

  18. Integrating regional strategic transportation planning and supply chain management : along the path to sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sgouridis, Sgouris P

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systems perspective for regional strategic transportation planning (RSTP) for freight movements involves an understanding of Supply Chain Management (SCM). This thesis argues that private sector freight shippers and ...

  19. An assessment of the video analytics technology gap for transportation facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Jason R.

    We conduct an assessment of existing video analytic technology as applied to critical infrastructure protection, particularly in the transportation sector. Based on discussions with security personnel at multiple facilities, ...

  20. Experimental characterization of adsorption and transport properties for advanced thermo-adsorptive batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyunho, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal energy storage has received significant interest for delivering heating and cooling in both transportation and building sectors. It can minimize the use of on-board electric batteries for heating, ventilation and ...

  1. Live Webinar on Better Buildings Challenge: Public-Sector Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Better Buildings Challenge: Public-Sector Update."

  2. Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. Commercial Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    residential and commercial sector installations, for a total of 9 GW. Clearly, commercial DG with CHP

  3. Issues and design concepts for high-activity liquid packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinert, N.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Riley, D. [Walla Walla College of Engineering, Walla Walla, WA (United States); Wells, A.H. [Nuclear Assurance Corp., Norcross, GA (United States)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tank waste pretreatment process involves the separation of low-level and high-level constituents. The liquid high-level defense production waste will be vitrified into thousands of glass logs at the US DOE sites and then transported to a high-level repository for final disposal. Pretreatment and vitrification technology will need to be developed and tested to assess cost-effectiveness. The appropriate pretreatment strategy for complex high-activity liquid will depend on proving a competent process. As technology development matures, actual liquid will be substituted for simulants, and pilot scale plants will replace laboratory scale process demonstrations. Development of this strategy depends on tank waste sample analyses and a high-activity liquid supply for process testing. However, high-activity liquid transportation beyond DOE site boundaries is limited to Type B quantities in volumes less than 50 mL; no licensed packaging exists for greater than 50 mL quantities. The following paper summarizes the need for a high-activity liquid packaging, and identifies the agencies effecting packaging design and transportation. The high-activity liquid packaging concept retrofits licensed spent fuel casks by replacing the spent fuel basket with a sturdy containment vessel appropriate for the chemical nature of the liquid. A Nuclear Packaging (Pacific Nuclear`s NuPat{trademark} 125-B) spent fuel cask was hypothetically retrofitted with a containment vessel filled with liquid source term, the radionuclide inventory contained in the liquid. The structural, thermal, dose rate, and criticality consequences of retrofitting the cask body were evaluated based on data in the 125-B Cask Safety Analysis Report for Packaging. In addition, future packaging development work is discussed.

  4. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  5. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, James E. (Los Alamos, NM); Bolton, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  6. electrifyingthefuture transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    electrifyingthefuture transportation The UK Government's carbon reduction strategy vehicles and the new Birmingham Science City Energy Systems Integration Laboratory (ESIL) will further enhance this work. The laboratory - unique within the UK and world leading - brings together cutting edge

  7. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  8. Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taheri, Bahman; Bodnar, Volodymyr

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy consumption by private and commercial sectors in the U.S. has steadily grown over the last decade. The uncertainty in future availability of imported oil, on which the energy consumption relies strongly, resulted in a dramatic increase in the cost of energy. About 20% of this consumption are used to heat and cool houses and commercial buildings. To reduce dependence on the foreign oil and cut down emission of greenhouse gases, it is necessary to eliminate losses and reduce total energy consumption by buildings. To achieve this goal it is necessary to redefine the role of the conventional windows. At a minimum, windows should stop being a source for energy loss. Ideally, windows should become a source of energy, providing net gain to reduce energy used to heat and cool homes. It is possible to have a net energy gain from a window if its light transmission can be dynamically altered, ideally electronically without the need of operator assistance, providing optimal control of the solar gain that varies with season and climate in the U.S. In addition, the window must not require power from the building for operation. Resolution of this problem is a societal challenge and of national interest and will have a broad global impact. For this purpose, the year-round, allclimate window solution to provide an electronically variable solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) with a wide dynamic range is needed. AlphaMicron, Inc. (AMI) developed and manufactured 1ft × 1ft prototype panels for the world’s first auto-adjusting Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows (ALCWs) that can operate from sunlight without the need for external power source and demonstrate an electronically adjustable SHGC. This novel windows are based on AlphaMicron’s patented e-Tint® technology, a guesthost liquid crystal system implemented on flexible, optically clear plastic films. This technology is suitable both for OEM and aftermarket (retro-fitting) lamination to new and existing windows. Low level of power consumption by ALCWs allows for on-board power electronics for automatic matching of transmission through windows to varying climate conditions without drawing the power from the power grid. ALCWs are capable of transmitting more sunlight in winters to assist in heating and less sunlight in summers to minimize overheating. As such, they can change the window from being a source of energy loss to a source of energy gain. In addition, the scalable AMI’s roll-to-roll process, proved by making 1ft × 1ftALCW prototype panels, allows for cost-effective production of large-scale window panels along with capability to change easily their color and shape. In addition to architectural glazing in houses and commercial buildings, ALCWs can be used in other applications where control of sunlight is needed, such as green houses, used by commercial produce growers and botanical gardens, cars, aircrafts, etc.

  9. Biomass Energy for Transport and Electricity: Large scale utilization under low CO2 concentration scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

    2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the potential role of large scale, dedicated commercial biomass energy systems under global climate policies designed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO2 at 400ppm and 450ppm. We use an integrated assessment model of energy and agriculture systems to show that, given a climate policy in which terrestrial carbon is appropriately valued equally with carbon emitted from the energy system, biomass energy has the potential to be a major component of achieving these low concentration targets. The costs of processing and transporting biomass energy at much larger scales than current experience are also incorporated into the modeling. From the scenario results, 120-160 EJ/year of biomass energy is produced by midcentury and 200-250 EJ/year by the end of this century. In the first half of the century, much of this biomass is from agricultural and forest residues, but after 2050 dedicated cellulosic biomass crops become the dominant source. A key finding of this paper is the role that carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies coupled with commercial biomass energy can play in meeting stringent emissions targets. Despite the higher technology costs of CCS, the resulting negative emissions used in combination with biomass are a very important tool in controlling the cost of meeting a target, offsetting the venting of CO2 from sectors of the energy system that may be more expensive to mitigate, such as oil use in transportation. The paper also discusses the role of cellulosic ethanol and Fischer-Tropsch biomass derived transportation fuels and shows that both technologies are important contributors to liquid fuels production, with unique costs and emissions characteristics. Through application of the GCAM integrated assessment model, it becomes clear that, given CCS availability, bioenergy will be used both in electricity and transportation.

  10. Liquid Metal Transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clar...

  11. Parameterization of GDL Liquid Water Front Propagation and Channel Accumulation for Anode Purge Scheduling in Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Parameterization of GDL Liquid Water Front Propagation and Channel Accumulation for Anode Purge, and (2) accumulation and transport of liquid water in the Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) originally presented experimentally iden- tified parameter to match the rate of liquid water accumulation in the anode channel

  12. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Mining: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    process on the most significant and timely issues that impact our ability to locate, permit, mine, process, transport, and utilize the nation's vast coal and mineral resources...

  13. Conceptualising Inventory Prepositioning in the Humanitarian Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Conceptualising Inventory Prepositioning in the Humanitarian Sector Delia Richardson, Sander de chain to reduce delivery time of relief inventory improves responsiveness. This is the essence of inventory pre-positioning (IPP). IPP is yet to be clearly defined; and the main factors affecting IPP

  14. WATER AND ENERGY SECTOR VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATER AND ENERGY SECTOR VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE WARMING IN THE SIERRA NEVADA: Water Year explores the sensitivity of water indexing methods to climate change scenarios to better understand how water management decisions and allocations will be affected by climate change. Many water management

  15. NATURAL GAS ADVISORY COMMITTEE Name Affiliation Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NATURAL GAS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 2011-2013 Name Affiliation Sector Dernovsek, David Bonneville Power Defenbach, Byron Intermountain Gas Distribution Dragoon, Ken NWPCC Council Friedman, Randy NW Natural Gas Distribution Gopal, Jairam Southern CA Edison Electric Utility Hamilton, Linda Shell Trading Gas & Power

  16. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tshishiku, Eugene M. (Augusta, GA)

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

  17. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan Miska; Troy Reed; Ergun Kuru

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Cuttings Transport Study (ACTS) was a 5-year JIP project undertaken at the University of Tulsa (TU). The project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and JIP member companies. The objectives of the project were: (1) to develop and construct a new research facility that would allow three-phase (gas, liquid and cuttings) flow experiments under ambient and EPET (elevated pressure and temperature) conditions, and at different angle of inclinations and drill pipe rotation speeds; (2) to conduct experiments and develop a data base for the industry and academia; and (3) to develop mechanistic models for optimization of drilling hydraulics and cuttings transport. This project consisted of research studies, flow loop construction and instrumentation development. Following a one-year period for basic flow loop construction, a proposal was submitted by TU to the DOE for a five-year project that was organized in such a manner as to provide a logical progression of research experiments as well as additions to the basic flow loop. The flow loop additions and improvements included: (1) elevated temperature capability; (2) two-phase (gas and liquid, foam etc.) capability; (3) cuttings injection and removal system; (4) drill pipe rotation system; and (5) drilling section elevation system. In parallel with the flow loop construction, hydraulics and cuttings transport studies were preformed using drilling foams and aerated muds. In addition, hydraulics and rheology of synthetic drilling fluids were investigated. The studies were performed under ambient and EPET conditions. The effects of temperature and pressure on the hydraulics and cuttings transport were investigated. Mechanistic models were developed to predict frictional pressure loss and cuttings transport in horizontal and near-horizontal configurations. Model predictions were compared with the measured data. Predominantly, model predictions show satisfactory agreements with the measured data. As a part of this project, instrumentation was developed to monitor cuttings beds and characterize foams in the flow loop. An ultrasonic-based monitoring system was developed to measure cuttings bed thickness in the flow loop. Data acquisition software controls the system and processes the data. Two foam generating devices were designed and developed to produce foams with specified quality and texture. The devices are equipped with a bubble recognition system and an in-line viscometer to measure bubble size distribution and foam rheology, respectively. The 5-year project is completed. Future research activities will be under the umbrella of Tulsa University Drilling Research Projects. Currently the flow loop is being used for testing cuttings transport capacity of aqueous and polymer-based foams under elevated pressure and temperature conditions. Subsequently, the effect of viscous sweeps on cuttings transport under elevated pressure and temperature conditions will be investigated using the flow loop. Other projects will follow now that the ''steady state'' phase of the project has been achieved.

  18. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotz, Dennis M. (North Augusta, SC); Hinz, William R. (Augusta, GA)

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  19. Liquid Metal Transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei Sheng; Jie Zhang; Jing Liu

    2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clarified. Such events are hard to achieve otherwise on rigid metal or conventional liquid spheres. This finding has both fundamental and practical significances which suggest a generalized way of making smart soft machine, collecting discrete metal fluids, as well as flexibly manipulating liquid metal objects including accompanying devices.

  20. Liquid Crystal Optofluidics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Cuennet, J. G.; Psaltis, D.

    2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    By employing anisotropic fluids and namely liquid crystals, fluid flow becomes an additional degree of freedom in designing optofluidic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate optofluidic liquid crystal devices based on the direct flow of nematic liquid crystals in microfluidic channels. Contrary to previous reports, in the present embodiment we employ the effective phase delay acquired by light travelling through flowing liquid crystal, without analysing the polarisation state of the transmitted light. With this method, we demonstrate the variation in the diffraction pattern of an array of microfluidic channels acting as a grating. We also discuss our recent activities in integrating mechanical oscillators for on-chip peristaltic pumping.

  1. Theoretical Investigations on Nanoporpus Materials and Ionic Liquids for Energy Storage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mani Biswas, Mousumi

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . Hydrogen storage in carbon nanotube scaffold. 2. Mechanical property and stability of various nanoporous Metal Organic Frameworks. 3. Thermodynamic and transport properties of [BMIM][BF4] ionic liquid in bulk, in Li Salt mixture, on graphite surface...

  2. Sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is disclosed. The combustor includes several separately removable combustion chambers each having an annular sectoral cross section and a double-walled construction permitting separation of stresses due to pressure forces and stresses due to thermal effects. Arrangements are described for air-cooling each combustion chamber using countercurrent convective cooling flow between an outer shell wall and an inner liner wall and using film cooling flow through liner panel grooves and along the inner liner wall surface, and for admitting all coolant flow to the gas path within the inner liner wall. Also described are systems for supplying coal gas, combustion air, and dilution air to the combustion zone, and a liquid fuel nozzle for use during low-load operation. The disclosed combustor is fully air-cooled, requires no transition section to interface with a turbine nozzle, and is operable at firing temperatures of up to 3000.degree. F. or within approximately 300.degree. F. of the adiabatic stoichiometric limit of the coal gas used as fuel.

  3. Plasmas in Multiphase Media: Bubble Enhanced Discharges in Liquids and Plasma/Liquid Phase Boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kushner, Mark Jay [University of Michigan] [University of Michigan

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this research project, the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas with multi-phase media was computationally investigated. Multi-phase media includes liquids, particles, complex materials and porous surfaces. Although this investigation addressed fundamental plasma transport and chemical processes, the outcomes directly and beneficially affected applications including biotechnology, medicine and environmental remediation (e.g., water purification). During this project, we made advances in our understanding of the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas in the form of dielectric barrier discharges and plasma jets with organic materials and liquids. We also made advances in our ability to use computer modeling to represent these complex processes. We determined the method that atmospheric pressure plasmas flow along solid and liquid surfaces, and through endoscopic like tubes, deliver optical and high energy ion activation energy to organic and liquid surfaces, and produce reactivity in thin liquid layers, as might cover a wound. We determined the mechanisms whereby plasmas can deliver activation energy to the inside of liquids by sustaining plasmas in bubbles. These findings are important to the advancement of new technology areas such as plasma medicine

  4. Scalability of mass transfer in liquid-liquid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woitalka, A.

    We address liquid–liquid mass transfer between immiscible liquids using the system 1-butanol and water, with succinic acid as the mass transfer component. Using this system we evaluate the influence of two-phase flow ...

  5. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    40 pp. IEA, 2004c: Biofuels for Transport: An Internationalthe ACT Map scenario, transport biofuels production reachesestimates that biofuels’ share of transport fuel could

  6. Slovak Nuclear Regulatory Body Position in the Transport of Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homola, J.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes safety requirements for transport of radioactive waste in Slovakia and the role of regulatory body in the transport licensing and assessment processes. Importance of radioactive waste shipments have been increased since 1999 by starting of NPP A-1 decommissioning and operation of near surface disposal facility. Also some information from history of shipment as well as future activities are given. Legal basis for radioactive waste transport is resulting from IAEA recommendations in this area. Different types of transport equipment were approved by regulatory body for both liquid and solid waste and transportation permits were issued to their shipment. Regulatory body attention during evaluation of transport safety is focused mainly on ability of individual packages to withstand different transport conditions and on safety analyses performed for transport equipment for liquid waste with high frequency of shipments. During past three years no event was occurred in connection with radioactive waste transport in Slovakia.

  7. INEEL Liquid Effluent Inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Major, C.A.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INEEL contractors and their associated facilities are required to identify all liquid effluent discharges that may impact the environment at the INEEL. This liquid effluent information is then placed in the Liquid Effluent Inventory (LEI) database, which is maintained by the INEEL prime contractor. The purpose of the LEI is to identify and maintain a current listing of all liquid effluent discharge points and to identify which discharges are subject to federal, state, or local permitting or reporting requirements and DOE order requirements. Initial characterization, which represents most of the INEEL liquid effluents, has been performed, and additional characterization may be required in the future to meet regulations. LEI information is made available to persons responsible for or concerned with INEEL compliance with liquid effluent permitting or reporting requirements, such as the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, Wastewater Land Application, Storm Water Pollution Prevention, Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures, and Industrial Wastewater Pretreatment. The State of Idaho Environmental Oversight and Monitoring Program also needs the information for tracking liquid effluent discharges at the INEEL. The information provides a baseline from which future liquid discharges can be identified, characterized, and regulated, if appropriate. The review covered new and removed buildings/structures, buildings/structures which most likely had new, relocated, or removed LEI discharge points, and at least 10% of the remaining discharge points.

  8. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Luo, Huimin [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic liqand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  9. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Luo, Huimin (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic ligand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  10. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  11. Laser experiments explore the hidden sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ahlers; H. Gies; J. Jaeckel; J. Redondo; A. Ringwald

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, the laser experiments BMV and GammeV, searching for light shining through walls, have published data and calculated new limits on the allowed masses and couplings for axion-like particles. In this note we point out that these experiments can serve to constrain a much wider variety of hidden-sector particles such as, e.g., minicharged particles and hidden-sector photons. The new experiments improve the existing bounds from the older BFRT experiment by a factor of two. Moreover, we use the new PVLAS constraints on a possible rotation and ellipticity of light after it has passed through a strong magnetic field to constrain pure minicharged particle models. For masses <~0.05 eV, the charge is now restricted to be less than (3-4)x10^(-7) times the electron electric charge. This is the best laboratory bound and comparable to bounds inferred from the energy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background.

  12. The Lepton Sector of a Fourth Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustavo Burdman; Leandro Da Rold; Ricardo D. Matheus

    2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In extensions of the standard model with a heavy fourth generation one important question is what makes the fourth-generation lepton sector, particularly the neutrinos, so different from the lighter three generations. We study this question in the context of models of electroweak symmetry breaking in warped extra dimensions, where the flavor hierarchy is generated by the localization of the zero-mode fermions in the extra dimension. In this setup the Higgs sector is localized near the infrared brane, whereas the Majorana mass term is localized at the ultraviolet brane. As a result, light neutrinos are almost entirely Majorana particles, whereas the fourth generation neutrino is mostly a Dirac fermion. We show that it is possible to obtain heavy fourth-generation leptons in regions of parameter space where the light neutrino masses and mixings are compatible with observation. We study the impact of these bounds, as well as the ones from lepton flavor violation, on the phenomenology of these models.

  13. Constraining Dark Sectors with Monojets and Dijets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chala, Mikael; McCullough, Matthew; Nardini, Germano; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider dark sector particles (DSPs) that obtain sizeable interactions with Standard Model fermions from a new mediator. While these particles can avoid observation in direct detection experiments, they are strongly constrained by LHC measurements. We demonstrate that there is an important complementarity between searches for DSP production and searches for the mediator itself, in particular bounds on (broad) dijet resonances. This observation is crucial not only in the case where the DSP is all of the dark matter but whenever - precisely due to its sizeable interactions with the visible sector - the DSP annihilates away so efficiently that it only forms a dark matter subcomponent. To highlight the different roles of DSP direct detection and LHC monojet and dijet searches, as well as perturbativity constraints, we first analyse the exemplary case of an axial-vector mediator and then generalise our results. We find important implications for the interpretation of LHC dark matter searches in terms of simpli...

  14. Advanced metering techniques in the federal sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szydlowski, R.F.; Chvala, W.D. Jr.; Halverson, M.A.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lack of utility metering in the federal sector has hampered introduction of direct billing of individual activities at most military installations. Direct billing will produce accountability for the amount of energy used and is a positive step toward self-directed energy conservation. For many installations, automatic meter reading (AMR) is a cost-effective way to increase the number of meters while reducing labor requirements and providing energy conservation analysis capabilities. The communications technology used by some of the AMR systems provides other demand-side management (DSM) capabilities. This paper summarizes the characteristics and relative merits of several AMR/DSM technologies that may be appropriate for the federal sector. A case study of an AMR system being installed at Fort Irwin, California, describes a cost-effective two-way radio communication system used for meter reading and load control.

  15. The Changing US Electric Sector Business Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliff, G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Changing US Electric Sector Business Model CATEE 2013 Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference San Antonio, Texas December 17, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-57 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16... Electricity Business Model • Observations on the Future and Conclusions Presentation overview 2 ESL-KT-13-12-57 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Copyright © 2013 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights...

  16. Viable textures for the fermion sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Cárcamo Hernández; I. de Medeiros Varzielas

    2015-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a modification of the Fukuyama-Nishiura texture and compare it to the precision quark flavour data, finding that it fits the data very well but at the cost of accidental cancelations between parameters. We then propose different viable textures for quarks, where only the Cabibbo mixing arises from the down sector, and extend to the charged leptons while constructing a complementary neutrino structure that leads to viable lepton masses and mixing.

  17. Climate Change Mitigation in the Energy and Forestry Sectors...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Forestry Topics: Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Resource...

  18. DOE Encourages Utility Sector Nominations to the Federal Communication...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Federal Communications Commission's Communications, Security, Reliability, and Interoperability Council DOE Encourages Utility Sector Nominations to the Federal Communications...

  19. Three-Dimensional Simulations of Liquid Feed Direct Methanol Wenpeng Liu*,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Three-Dimensional Simulations of Liquid Feed Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Wenpeng Liu*,a and Chao that performance and design of a liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell DMFC is controlled not only by electrochemical kinetics and methanol crossover but also by water transport and by their complex interactions

  20. Faraday Discuss., 1997, 106, 205217 First principles calculations on crystalline and liquid iron at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vocadlo, Lidunka

    Hauptstrasse 8-10/136, A-1040 V ienna, Austria Ab initio electronic structure calculations, based upon density on liquid iron and we present the Đrst ab initio quantum molecular dynamics calculations on the structure and transport properties of liquid iron under core conditions. Our calculations show that the structure

  1. Energy efficiency in building sector in India through Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    electricity consumption in India (2012) #12;Growth in electricity consumption by building sector At a conservative 9 % growth rate electricity consumption of building sector by 2020 will be more than 2 times ( Source: DB Research) #12;Electricity Consumption Pattern in Residential Sector (Source: BEE, Figure taken

  2. WHEN DOES FINANCIAL SECTOR (IN)STABILITY INDUCE FINANCIAL REFORMS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    WHEN DOES FINANCIAL SECTOR (IN)STABILITY INDUCE FINANCIAL REFORMS? Susie LEE Ingmar SCHUMACHER (in)stability induce financial reforms? Susie Lee1 Ingmar Schumacher2 October 26, 2011 Abstract The article studies whether financial sector (in)stability had an effect on reforms in the fi- nancial sector

  3. Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Volume 1: Part 1, Electricity supply sector; Part 2, Residential and commercial buildings sector; Part 3, Industrial sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE encourages you to report your achievements in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and sequestering carbon under this program. Global climate change is increasingly being recognized as a threat that individuals and organizations can take action against. If you are among those taking action, reporting your projects may lead to recognition for you, motivation for others, and synergistic learning for the global community. This report discusses the reporting process for the voluntary detailed guidance in the sectoral supporting documents for electricity supply, residential and commercial buildings, industry, transportation, forestry, and agriculture. You may have reportable projects in several sectors; you may report them separately or capture and report the total effects on an entity-wide report.

  4. DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, MIchael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management (DSM) in the Electricity Sector: Urgent Need forĽrcan, 2007, Electricity and natural gas sectors in Korea: aand commercial sub-sectors, electricity use is distributed

  5. Interactions between Electric-drive Vehicles and the Power Sector in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rates from the electricity sector to assumed values inrates from the electricity sector to assumed values intend to underestimate electricity sector emissions, and it

  6. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency Scenario (non-residential sector only) – AssumesIndia: Industry and Non Residential Sectors Jayant Sathaye,and support. The Non Residential sector analysis benefited

  7. Country Review of Energy-Efficiency Financial Incentives in the Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Can, Stephane de la Rue du

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Financial Incentives in the Residential Sector Stephane deFinancial Incentives in the Residential Sector Stephane desavings achieved in the residential sector. In contrast,

  8. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Future of Sustainable Transportation This is the January 2015 issue of the Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter. Illustration of an electric vehicle Illustration of an...

  9. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    energy On This Page Non-OECD nations account... U.S. reliance on imported... Oil price cases depict... Liquids demand in developing... Unconventional liquids gain......

  10. II. Properties of Water 1. Ice and Liquid water structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Terry

    Heat Capacity 4. Solvent Properties 5. Dissociation: Acids & Bases / pH II. Organic Chemistry A transport in plants #12;Water has a high specific heat capacity specific heat capacity = amount of energyII. Properties of Water 1. Ice and Liquid water structure 2. Cohesion / Surface Tension 3. High

  11. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  12. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, Loren L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  13. Carbon Dioxide Separation with Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luebke, D.R.; Ilconich, J.B.; Myers, C.R.; Pennline, H.W.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supported liquid membranes are a class of materials that allow the researcher to utilize the wealth of knowledge available on liquid properties as a direct guide in the development of a capture technology. These membranes also have the advantage of liquid phase diffusivities higher than those observed in polymeric membranes which grant proportionally greater permeabilities. The primary shortcoming of the supported liquid membranes demonstrated in past research has been the lack of stability caused by volatilization of the transport liquid. Ionic liquids, which possess high carbon dioxide solubility relative to light gases such as hydrogen, are an excellent candidate for this type of membrane since they have negligible vapor pressure and are not susceptible to evaporation. A study has been conducted evaluating the use of several ionic liquids, including 1-hexyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifuoromethylsulfonyl)imide, 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium nitrate, and 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium sulfate in supported ionic liquid membranes for the capture of carbon dioxide from streams containing hydrogen. In a joint project, researchers at the University of Notre Dame lent expertise in ionic liquid synthesis and characterization, and researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory incorporated candidate ionic liquids into supports and evaluated the resulting materials for membrane performance. Initial results have been very promising with carbon dioxide permeabilities as high as 950 barrers and significant improvements in carbon dioxide/hydrogen selectivity over conventional polymers at 37C and at elevated temperatures. Results include a comparison of the performance of several ionic liquids and a number of supports as well as a discussion of innovative fabrication techniques currently under development.

  14. A high integrity transportable supercompactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sims, J.; Schmidt, G.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Current transportable equipment produced to utilize high force compaction to reduce the overall volume of drums containing solid radioactive material prior to disposal, were originally designed to standards which will eventually become obsolete. At the time these machines were produced, they were state-of-the-art, but are now indicating their weaknesses in operational and safety aspects. This paper formulates a concept for a Transportable Supercompactor for handling alpha and beta/gamma bearing wastes, low operator dose uptake, contamination and radiation control systems, liquids collection, the maintenance demands of a contained press, etc., taking into account the latest technical and safety considerations. The possibility of using the concept as a skid mounted fixed Supercompactor is also reviewed in this paper.

  15. Electrically Deformable Liquid Marbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward Bormashenko; Roman Pogreb; Tamir Stein; Gene Whyman; Marcelo Schiffer; Doron Aurbach

    2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid marbles, which are droplets coated with a hydrophobic powder, were exposed to a uniform electric field. It was established that a threshold value of the electric field, 15 cgse, should be surmounted for deformation of liquid marbles. The shape of the marbles was described as a prolate spheroid. The semi-quantitative theory describing deformation of liquid marbles in a uniform electric field is presented. The scaling law relating the radius of the contact area of the marble to the applied electric field shows a satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  16. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, J.P.; Andraka, C.E.; Lukens, L.L.; Moreno, J.B.

    1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other. 3 figs.

  17. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other.

  18. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel Oil Natural Gas Electricity Total Transportation FuelHeavy Oil Natural Gas Electricity Heat Total Transportation

  19. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReportTransmissionResearchNewsTransportation News

  20. Liquid Phase Heating Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mordt, E. H.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature Water (HTW) central district heating systems are far superior to steam systems in large, spread out installations such as airports, universities and office complexes. Water, pressurized to keep it in the liquid state, is distributed at 400o...

  1. Liquidity facilities and signaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arregui, Nicolás

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation studies the role of signaling concerns in discouraging access to liquidity facilities like the IMF contingent credit lines (CCL) and the Discount Window (DW). In Chapter 1, I analyze the introduction of ...

  2. Decoupled Sectors and Wolf-Rayet Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willy Fischler; Jimmy Lorshbough; Dustin Lorshbough

    2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The universe may contain several decoupled matter sectors which primarily couple through gravity to the Standard Model degrees of freedom. We focus here on the description of astrophysical environments that allow for comparable densities and spatial distributions of visible matter and decoupled dark matter. We discuss four Wolf-Rayet galaxies (NGC 1614, NGC 3367, NGC 4216 and NGC 5430) which should contain comparable amounts of decoupled dark and visible matter in the star forming regions. This could lead to the observation of Gamma Ray Burst events with physics modified by jets of dark matter radiation.

  3. Property:ProgramSector | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind projectProperty

  4. Property:DeploymentSector | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,PillarPublicationType JumpDOEInvolve Jump to:DeploymentSector Jump to: navigation,

  5. Property:Sector | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to:ID8/Organization RAPID/Contact/ID8/PositionmaterialSector Jump to:

  6. Extraordinarily Efficient Conduction in a Redox-Active Ionic Liquid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verner K. Thorsmřlle; Guido Rothenberger; Daniel Topgaard; Jan C. Brauer; Dai-Bin Kuang; Shaik M. Zakeeruddin; Björn Lindman; Michael Grätzel; Jacques-E. Moser

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Iodine added to iodide-based ionic liquids leads to extraordinarily efficient charge transport, vastly exceeding that expected for such viscous systems. Using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, in conjunction with dc conductivity, diffusivity and viscosity measurements we unravel the conductivity pathways in 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide melts. This study presents evidence of the Grotthuss mechanism as a significant contributor to the conductivity, and provides new insights into ion pairing processes as well as the formation of polyiodides. The terahertz and transport results are reunited in a model providing a quantitative description of the conduction by physical diffusion and the Grotthuss bond-exchange process. These novel results are important for the fundamental understanding of conduction in molten salts and for applications where ionic liquids are used as charge-transporting media such as in batteries and dye-sensitized solar cells.

  7. Liquid mixing device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, R. P.

    1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixing device for mixing at least two liquids to produce a homogenous mixture. The device includes an elongated chamber in which a vertically oriented elongated mixing cavity is located. The cavity is sealed at its lower end and it is open at its upper end and in communication with the interior of the chamber. An elongated conduit extends the length of the cavity and is adapted to receive liquids to be mixed. The conduit includes a plurality of ports located at longitudinally spaced positions therealong and which ports are directed in different directions. The ports create plural streams of liquid which interact and mix with one another within the cavity. The mixed liquids overflow the cavity and out its top end into the chamber 24. The chamber 24 includes an outlet from which the mixed liquids are withdrawn. In accordance with the preferred embodiment gas eductor means are provided in the inlet to the conduit to introduce gas bubbles within the cavity. Gas vent means are also provided in the device to vent any introduced gases from the device so that only the mixed liquids flow out the outlet.

  8. Liquid membrane coated ion-exchange column solids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barkey, Dale P. (Berkeley, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method for improving the performance of liquid embrane separations by coating a liquid membrane onto solid ion-exchange resin beads in a fixed bed. Ion-exchange beads fabricated from an ion-exchange resin are swelled with water and are coated with a liquid membrane material that forms a film over the beads. The beads constitute a fixed bed ion-exchange column. Fluid being treated that contains the desired ion to be trapped by the ion-exchange particle is passed through the column. A carrier molecule, contained in the liquid membrane ion-exchange material, is selected for the desired ion in the fluid. The carrier molecule forms a complex with the desired ion, transporting it through the membrane and thus separating it from the other ions. The solution is fed continuously until breakthrough occurs at which time the ion is recovered, and the bed is regenerated.

  9. Liquid membrane coated ion-exchange column solids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barkey, Dale P. (Berkeley, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method for improving the performance of liquid membrane separations by coating a liquid membrane onto solid ion-exchange resin beads in a fixed bed. Ion-exchange beads fabricated from an ion-exchange resin are swelled with water and are coated with a liquid membrane material that forms a film over the beads. The beads constitute a fixed bed ion-exchange column. Fluid being treated that contains the desired ion to be trapped by the ion-exchange particle is passed through the column. A carrier molecule, contained in the liquid membrane ion-exchange material, is selective for the desired ion in the fluid. The carrier molecule forms a complex with the desired ion, transporting it through the membrane and thus separating it from the other ions. The solution is fed continuously until breakthrough occurs at which time the ion is recovered, and the bed is regenerated.

  10. Transportation Research Record: J. of the TRB, No. 2242, p. 55-63. Doi 10.3141/2242-07 FRAMEWORK FOR ASSESSING INDICATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Transportation Research Record: J. of the TRB, No. 2242, p. 55-63. Doi 10.3141/2242-07 FRAMEWORK FOR ASSESSING INDICATORS OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS IN THE TRANSPORT SECTOR Robert Joumard 1 , Henrik Gudmundsson 2 and Lennart Folkeson 3 1 IFSTTAR (French Institute of Science and Technology for Transport

  11. Liquid Propane Injection Applications | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy and EmissionsDepartment of EnergyLiquid propane

  12. Lepton sector of a fourth generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdman, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Da Rold, L. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Bariloche (Argentina); Matheus, R. D. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In extensions of the standard model with a heavy fourth generation, one important question is what makes the fourth-generation lepton sector, particularly the neutrinos, so different from the lighter three generations. We study this question in the context of models of electroweak symmetry breaking in warped extra dimensions, where the flavor hierarchy is generated by choosing the localization of the zero-mode fermions in the extra dimension. In this setup the Higgs sector is localized near the infrared brane, whereas the Majorana mass term is localized at the ultraviolet brane. As a result, light neutrinos are almost entirely Majorana particles, whereas the fourth-generation neutrino is mostly a Dirac fermion. We show that it is possible to obtain heavy fourth-generation leptons in regions of parameter space where the light neutrino masses and mixings are compatible with observation. We study the impact of these bounds, as well as the ones from lepton flavor violation, on the phenomenology of these models.

  13. Membranes for nanometer-scale mass fast transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bakajin, Olgica (San Leandro, CA); Holt, Jason (Berkeley, CA); Noy, Aleksandr (Belmont, CA); Park, Hyung Gyu (Oakland, CA)

    2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material were fabricated for fluid mechanics and mass transfer studies on the nanometer scale and commercial applications. Average pore size can be 2 nm to 20 nm, or seven nm or less, or two nanometers or less. The membrane can be free of large voids spanning the membrane such that transport of material such as gas or liquid occurs exclusively through the tubes. Fast fluid, vapor, and liquid transport are observed. Versatile micromachining methods can be used for membrane fabrication. A single chip can comprise multiple membranes. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  14. Solid fuel applications to transportation engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The utilization of solid fuels as alternatives to liquid fuels for future transportation engines is reviewed. Alternative liquid fuels will not be addressed nor will petroleum/solid fuel blends except for the case of diesel engines. With respect to diesel engines, coal/oil mixtures will be addressed because of the high interest in this specific application as a result of the large number of diesel engines currently in transportation use. Final assessments refer to solid fuels only for diesel engines. The technical assessments of solid fuels utilization for transportation engines is summarized: solid fuel combustion in transportation engines is in a non-developed state; highway transportation is not amenable to solid fuels utilization due to severe environmental, packaging, control, and disposal problems; diesel and open-cycle gas turbines do not appear worthy of further development, although coal/oil mixtures for slow speed diesels may offer some promise as a transition technology; closed-cycle gas turbines show some promise for solid fuels utilization for limited applications as does the Stirling engine for use of cleaner solid fuels; Rankine cycle engines show good potential for limited applications, such as for locomotives and ships; and any development program will require large resources and sophisticated equipment in order to advance the state-of-the-art.

  15. Carbon Dioxide Separation with Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luebke, D.R.; Ilconich, J.B.; Pennline, H.W.; Myers, C.R.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A practical form of CO2 capture at water-gas shift conditions in the IGCC process could serve the dual function of producing a pure CO2 stream for sequestration and forcing the equilibrium-limited shift reaction to completion enriching the stream in H2. The shift temperatures, ranging from the low temperature shift condition of 260°C to the gasification condition of 900°C, limit capture options by diminishing associative interactions which favor removal of CO2 from the gas stream. Certain sorption interactions, such as carbonate formation, remain available but generally involve exceptionally high sorbent regeneration energies that contribute heavily to parasitic power losses. Carbon dioxide selective membranes need only establish an equilibrium between the gas phase and sorption states in order to transport CO2, giving them a potential energetic advantage over other technologies. Supported liquid membranes take advantage of high, liquid phase diffusivities and a solution diffusion mechanism similar to that observed in polymeric membranes to achieve superior permeabilities and selectivites. The primary shortcoming of the supported liquid membranes demonstrated in past research has been the lack of stability caused by volatilization of the transport liquid. Ionic liquids, which possess high CO2 solubility relative to light gases such as H2, are excellent candidates for this type of membrane since they have negligible vapor pressure and are not susceptible to evaporation. A study has been conducted evaluating the use of ionic liquids including 1-hexyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifuoromethylsulfonyl)imide in supported ionic liquid membranes for the capture of CO2 from streams containing H2. In a joint project, researchers at the University of Notre Dame synthesized and characterized ionic liquids, and researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory incorporated candidate ionic liquids into supports and evaluated the resulting materials for membrane performance. Improvements to the ionic liquid and support have allowed testing of these supported ionic liquid membranes at temperatures up to 300°C without loss of support mechanical stability or degradation of the ionic liquid. Substantial improvements in selectivity have also been observed at elevated temperature with the best membrane currently achieving optimum performance at 75°C.

  16. Transporting particulate material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldred, Derek Leslie (North Hollywood, CA); Rader, Jeffrey A. (North Hollywood, CA); Saunders, Timothy W. (North Hollywood, CA)

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

  17. SEAPORT LIQUID NATURAL GAS STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    COOK,Z.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Seaport Liquid Natural Gas Study has attempted to evaluate the potential for using LNG in a variety of heavy-duty vehicle and equipment applications at the Ports of Los Angeles and Oakland. Specifically, this analysis has focused on the handling and transport of containerized cargo to, from and within these two facilities. In terms of containerized cargo throughput, Los Angeles and Oakland are the second and sixth busiest ports in the US, respectively, and together handle nearly 4.5 million TEUs per year. At present, the landside handling and transportation of containerized cargo is heavily dependent on diesel-powered, heavy-duty vehicles and equipment, the utilization of which contributes significantly to the overall emissions impact of port-related activities. Emissions from diesel units have been the subject of increasing scrutiny and regulatory action, particularly in California. In the past two years alone, particulate matter from diesel exhaust has been listed as a toxic air contaminant by CAM, and major lawsuits have been filed against several of California's largest supermarket chains, alleging violation of Proposition 65 statutes in connection with diesel emissions from their distribution facilities. CARE3 has also indicated that it may take further regulatory action relating to the TAC listing. In spite of these developments and the very large diesel emissions associated with port operations, there has been little AFV penetration in these applications. Nearly all port operators interviewed by CALSTART expressed an awareness of the issues surrounding diesel use; however, none appeared to be taking proactive steps to address them. Furthermore, while a less controversial issue than emissions, the dominance of diesel fuel use in heavy-duty vehicles contributes to a continued reliance on imported fuels. The increasing concern regarding diesel use, and the concurrent lack of alternative fuel use and vigorous emissions reduction activity at the Ports provide both the backdrop and the impetus for this study.

  18. Transportation Security | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Security SHARE Global Threat Reduction Initiative Transportation Security Cooperation Secure Transport Operations (STOP) Box Security of radioactive material while...

  19. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.; Fridley, David; Lin, Jiang; Price,Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Sathaye, Jayant; Levine, Mark

    2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis ofenergy consumption in China. It recalibrates official Chinese governmentstatistics by reallocating primary energy into categories more commonlyused in international comparisons. It also provides an analysis of trendsin sectoral energy consumption over the past decades. Finally, itassesses the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020,based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity,availability of energy services, and energy intensities. The followingare some highlights of the study's findings: * A reallocation of sectorenergy consumption from the 2000 official Chinese government statisticsfinds that: * Buildings account for 25 percent of primary energy, insteadof 19 percent * Industry accounts for 61 percent of energy instead of 69percent * Industrial energy made a large and unexpected leap between2000-2005, growing by an astonishing 50 percent in the 3 years between2002 and 2005. * Energy consumption in the iron and steel industry was 40percent higher than predicted * Energy consumption in the cement industrywas 54 percent higher than predicted * Overall energy intensity in theindustrial sector grew between 2000 and 2003. This is largely due tointernal shifts towards the most energy-intensive sub-sectors, an effectwhich more than counterbalances the impact of efficiency increases. *Industry accounted for 63 percent of total primary energy consumption in2005 - it is expected to continue to dominate energy consumption through2020, dropping only to 60 percent by that year. * Even assuming thatgrowth rates in 2005-2020 will return to the levels of 2000-2003,industrial energy will grow from 42 EJ in 2005 to 72 EJ in 2020. * Thepercentage of transport energy used to carry passengers (instead offreight) will double from 37 percent to 52 percent between 2000 to 2020,.Much of this increase is due to private car ownership, which willincrease by a factor of 15 from 5.1 million in 2000 to 77 million in2020. * Residential appliance ownership will show signs of saturation inurban households. The increase in residential energy consumption will belargely driven by urbanization, since rural homes will continue to havelow consumption levels. In urban households, the size of appliances willincrease, but its effect will be moderated by efficiency improvements,partially driven by government standards. * Commercial energy increaseswill be driven both by increases in floor space and by increases inpenetration of major end uses such as heating and cooling. Theseincreases will be moderated somewhat, however, by technology changes,such as increased use of heat pumps. * China's Medium- and Long-TermDevelopment plan drafted by the central government and published in 2004calls for a quadrupling of GDP in the period from 2000-2020 with only adoubling in energy consumption during the same period. A bottom-upanalysis with likely efficiency improvements finds that energyconsumption will likely exceed the goal by 26.12 EJ, or 28 percent.Achievements of these goals will there fore require a more aggressivepolicy of encouraging energy efficiency.

  20. Solar Photovoltaic Financing: Residential Sector Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, J.; Cory, K.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the information that homeowners and policy makers need to facilitate PV financing at the residential level. The full range of cash payments, bill savings, and tax incentives is covered, as well as potentially available solar attribute payments. Traditional financing is also compared to innovative solutions, many of which are borrowed from the commercial sector. Together, these mechanisms are critical for making the economic case for a residential PV installation, given its high upfront costs. Unfortunately, these programs are presently limited to select locations around the country. By calling attention to these innovative initiatives, this report aims to help policy makers consider greater adoption of these models to benefit homeowners interested installing a residential PV system.

  1. Utility Sector Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a new approach to estimating the marginal utility sector impacts associated with electricity demand reductions. The method uses publicly available data and provides results in the form of time series of impact factors. The input data are taken from the Energy Information Agency's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections of how the electric system might evolve in the reference case, and in a number of side cases that incorporate different effciency and other policy assumptions. The data published with the AEO are used to define quantitative relationships between demand-side electricity reductions by end use and supply-side changes to capacity by plant type, generation by fuel type and emissions of CO2, Hg, NOx and SO2. The impact factors define the change in each of these quantities per unit reduction in site electricity demand. We find that the relative variation in these impacts by end use is small, but the time variation can be significant.

  2. Electroweak Baryogenesis with a Supersymmetric Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ran Huo

    2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a model with an exotic new sector strongly coupled to the Higgs boson, in which supersymmetry is introduced to protect the quartic coupling from a large running and avoid potential vacuum stability problem. The fermionic components present vector like mass terms, through which the Higgs diphoton decay branching ratio can be tuned. The bosonic components trigger a strongly first order electroweak phase transition. We find a large parameter region of effective Yukawa coupling $y\\gtrsim2$ and mass parameters $m_f\\sim m_s$ of a few hundred GeV, that can simultaneously accommodate the diphoton excess and electroweak baryogenesis, without vacuum stability and electroweak precision measurement problems.

  3. Novel Fluctuations at a Constrained Liquid-Solid Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhishek Chaudhuri; Debasish Chaudhuri; Surajit Sengupta

    2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the interface between a solid trapped within a bath of liquid by a suitably shaped non-uniform external potential. Such a potential may be constructed using lasers, external electric or magnetic fields or a surface template. We study a two dimensional case where a thin strip of solid, created in this way, is surrounded on either side by a bath of liquid with which it can easily exchange particles. Since height fluctuations of the interface cost energy, this interface is constrained to remain flat at all length scales. However, when such a solid is stressed by altering the depth of the potential; beyond a certain limit, it responds by relieving stress by novel interfacial fluctuations which involve addition or deletion of entire lattice layers of the crystal. This ``layering'' transition is a generic feature of the system regardless of the details of the interaction potential. We show how such interfacial fluctuations influence mass, momentum and energy transport across the interface. Tiny momentum impulses produce weak shock waves which travel through the interface and cause the spallation of crystal layers into the liquid. Kinetic and energetic constraints prevent spallation of partial layers from the crystal, a fact which may be of some practical use. We also study heat transport through the liquid-solid interface and obtain the resistances in liquid, solid and interfacial regions (Kapitza resistance) as the solid undergoes such layering transitions. Heat conduction, which shows strong signatures of the structural transformations, can be understood using a free volume calculation.

  4. Notice of Public Comment on Electricity Sector Cybersecurity...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The guideline describes a risk management process that is targeted to the specific needs of electricity sector organizations and adds to the body of resources that help refine...

  5. Climate Change: Risks and Opportunities for the Finance Sector...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change: Risks and Opportunities for the Finance Sector Online Course Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change: Risks and Opportunities for...

  6. DOE has published the revised 2010 Energy Sector Specific Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy announces the publication of the Energy Sector-Specific Plan: An Annex to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan 2010.

  7. Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size and Expectations for Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Statistics. Energy Efficiency Services Sector: WorkforceCouncil for an Energy Efficient Economy. Energy InformationCouncil for an Energy-Efficient Economy. Eto, J. , R. Prahl

  8. Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size and Expectations for Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Labor Statistics. Energy Efficiency Services Sector:Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency: Economic Drivers forStatewide Long Term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. ” San

  9. Regional Power Sector Integration: Lessons from Global Case Studies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Integration: Lessons from Global Case Studies and a Literature Review Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Regional Power Sector Integration: Lessons from...

  10. Mexico Sectoral Study on Climate and Refrigeration Technology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Identifying Reduction Potential and Implementing NAMAs Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-Sectoral Study on Climate and Refrigeration Technology in Developing Countries and...

  11. Private Sector Outreach and Partnerships | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    that have been created over years of collaborations with companies from all parts the sector, including electricity, oil, and natural gas. Specific mission areas, such as risk...

  12. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Minerals: GHG Work...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    major areas of activity - Emissions Measurement and Reporting, Opportunities for GHG Inventory Protocols Reduction of GHGs, Cross-Sector Projects, and Research & Development and...

  13. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    of incandescent bulbs with more efficient compact fluorescent lighting and light-emitting diode (LED) lamps. Among electric end-use services in the residential sector,...

  14. Making Africa's Power Sector Sustainable: An Analysis of Power...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Africa sustainable. Furthermore, it proposes options that could enhance the sustainability of the power sector. The study adds value to the limited but growing literature on...

  15. Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size and Expectations for Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Labor Statistics. Energy Efficiency Services Sector:Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable EnergyDepartment of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  16. Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenzel, T.P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1987b). 2.1. Unit Energy Consumptions Data on end-use unitresidential sector energy consumption data, and typicallyNational Interim Energy Consumption Survey Data, prepared

  17. EIA Energy Efficiency-Residential Sector Energy Intensities,...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2009 These tables provide estimates of residential sector energy consumption and energy intensities for 1978 -1984, 1987, 1990, 1993, 1997, 2001 and 2005 based on the...

  18. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Commercial Sector Energy Demand On This Page End-use efficiency... Growth in electricity use... Core technologies... Improved interconnection... End-use efficiency improvements...

  19. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Industrial sector energy demand On This Page Heat and power energy... Industrial fuel mix changes... Iron and steel... Delivered energy use... Chemical industry use of fuels......

  20. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Industrial sector energy demand Manufacturing heat and power energy consumption increases modestly figure data Despite a 49-percent increase in industrial shipments, industrial...

  1. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Industrial sector energy demand Growth in industrial energy consumption is slower than growth in shipments figure data Despite a 76-percent increase in industrial shipments,...

  2. Controlling Methane Emissions in the Natural Gas Sector: A Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Controlling Methane Emissions in the Natural Gas Sector: A Review of Federal & State Regulatory Frameworks Governing Production, Processing, Transmission, and Distribution...

  3. Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size and Expectations for Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Statistics. Energy Efficiency Services Sector: WorkforceRenewable Energy and Energy Efficiency: Economic Drivers forStatewide Long Term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. ” San

  4. Session 6 - Environmentally Concerned Public Sector Panel Discussion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "The Light-Duty Diesel In America?" Session 6 - Environmentally Concerned Public Sector Panel Discussion "The Light-Duty Diesel In America?" 2003 DEER Conference...

  5. australian public sector: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 1 Change management strategy and values. Six case studies from the Australian Public Sector CiteSeer Summary: Change is a ubiquitous theme in management literature, but...

  6. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Iron and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006)...

  7. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    7. Key assumptions for the commercial sector in the AEO2012 integrated demand technology cases Assumptions Integrated 2011 Deand Technology Integraged High Demand Technologya...

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6. Key assumptions for the residential sector in the AEO2012 integrated demand technology cases Assumptions Integrated 2011 Deand Technology Integraged High Demand Technologya...

  9. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: GHG Inventory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gas Protocol enhances and expands for the aluminum sector the World Business Council for Sustainable DevelopmentWorld Resources Institute greenhouse gas corporate accounting and...

  10. Modeling diffusion of electrical appliances in the residential sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency Standards in the Residential Electricity Sector.France. USDOE (2001). Residential Energy Consumption Survey,long-term response of residential cooling energy demand to

  11. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Mining: GHG Information

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    various sources describing the energy consumption of the industrial sector and the carbon emissions in particular. Below is an estimate of the million metric tons of carbon...

  12. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    patterns of energy consumption, trends in saturation andand how the energy consumption trend could be changed in athe sectoral energy consumption trends in China in detail,

  13. Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to better interpret energy consumption trends over time. Thetrends and policy options for reducing energy consumption orConsumption iii iv Sectoral Trends in Global Energy Use and

  14. DOE Encourages Utility Sector Nominations to Commerce Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commerce Department's Spectrum Advisory Committee DOE Encourages Utility Sector Nominations to Commerce Department's Spectrum Advisory Committee December 14, 2010 - 5:40pm Addthis...

  15. BUILDINGS SECTOR DEMAND-SIDE EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY SUMMARIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBL-33887 UC-000 BUILDINGS SECTOR DEMAND-SIDE EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY SUMMARIES Jonathan G. Koomey ............................................................................................... 2 Demand-Side Efficiency Technologies I. Energy Management Systems (EMSs

  16. Ion Transport in Nanostructured Block Copolymer/Ionic Liquid Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoarfrost, Megan Lane

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    14-18 fuel cells, 19-26 dye-sensitized solar cells, 27, 28batteries or dye-sensitized solar cells. 57, 58 PVdF-co-PHFP

  17. Ion Transport in Nanostructured Block Copolymer/Ionic Liquid Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoarfrost, Megan Lane

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    corrected with the post-ion chamber intensity using Nikawas corrected with the post-ion chamber intensity using Nikacorrected with the post-ion chamber intensity using Nika

  18. Ion Transport in Nanostructured Block Copolymer/Ionic Liquid Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoarfrost, Megan Lane

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    which the corona is small relative to the core, FCC and BCCin which the corona layer is large relative to the core, 14,

  19. Ion Transport in Nanostructured Block Copolymer/Ionic Liquid Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoarfrost, Megan Lane

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. Journal of Chemical and Engineering Data 2002, 47, (6),Review of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Vol 1 2010,Review of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 2010, 1,

  20. Ion Transport in Nanostructured Block Copolymer/Ionic Liquid Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoarfrost, Megan Lane

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Hydrogen, Fuel Cell, and Infrastructure Technologies ofof Hydrogen, Fuel Cell, and Infrastructure Technologies ofof Hydrogen, Fuel Cell, and Infrastructure Technologies of

  1. THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF SODIUM LIQUID AND VAPOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.1 Enthalpy and Heat Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1.1.2 Heat Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Heat Capacity at Constant Pressure, CP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Heat

  2. "Educating transportation professionals."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    "Educating transportation professionals." Michael Demetsky Henry L. Kinnier Professor mjd of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 434.924.7464 Transportation Engineering & Management Research Our group works closely with the Virginia Center for Transportation Innovation and Research (VCTIR), located

  3. Sustainable Energy Future in China's Building Sector 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    policies; this will generate significantly benefits given the fast- growing urbanization process and the number of buildings that will be constructed in the next 20 years in Chinese cities. ENERGY USE HISTORY AND OUTLOOK IN CHINA China...://www.energy.gov/ EIA. International Energy Outlook.2006. DOE, Washington. 2006. ERI. 2003. China’s Sustainable Energy Future. European Commission Directorate General for Energy and Transport. 2001. Information and Communication. Fisher-Vanden et al...

  4. Not planning a sustainable transport system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finnveden, Göran, E-mail: goran.finnveden@abe.kth.se; Ĺkerman, Jonas

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the Swedish transport policy is to ensure the economically efficient and sustainable provision of transport services for people and business throughout the country. More specifically, the transport sector shall, among other things, contribute to the achievement of environmental quality objectives in which the development of the transport system plays an important role in the achievement of the objectives. The aim of this study is to analyse if current transport planning supports this policy. This is done by analysing two recent cases: the National Infrastructure Plan 2010–2021, and the planning of Bypass Stockholm, a major road investment. Our results show that the plans are in conflict with several of the environmental quality objectives. Another interesting aspect of the planning processes is that the long-term climate goals are not included in the planning processes, neither as a clear goal nor as factor that will influence future transport systems. In this way, the long-term sustainability aspects are not present in the planning. We conclude that the two cases do not contribute to a sustainable transport system. Thus, several changes must be made in the processes, including putting up clear targets for emissions. Also, the methodology for the environmental assessments needs to be further developed and discussed. - Highlights: • Two cases are studied to analyse if current planning supports a sustainable transport system. • Results show that the plans are in conflict with several of the environmental quality objectives. • Long-term climate goals are not included in the planning processes. • Current practices do not contribute to a sustainable planning processes. • Methodology and process for environmental assessments must be further developed and discussed.

  5. Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael; Zhou, Nan; Sathaye, Jayant

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main contribution of this report is to characterize the underlying residential and transport sector end use energy consumption in India. Each sector was analyzed in detail. End-use sector-level information regarding adoption of particular technologies was used as a key input in a bottom-up modeling approach. The report looks at energy used over the period 1990 to 2005 and develops a baseline scenario to 2020. Moreover, the intent of this report is also to highlight available sources of data in India for the residential and transport sectors. The analysis as performed in this way reveals several interesting features of energy use in India. In the residential sector, an analysis of patterns of energy use and particular end uses shows that biomass (wood), which has traditionally been the main source of primary energy used in households, will stabilize in absolute terms. Meanwhile, due to the forces of urbanization and increased use of commercial fuels, the relative significance of biomass will be greatly diminished by 2020. At the same time, per household residential electricity consumption will likely quadruple in the 20 years between 2000 and 2020. In fact, primary electricity use will increase more rapidly than any other major fuel -- even more than oil, in spite of the fact that transport is the most rapidly growing sector. The growth in electricity demand implies that chronic outages are to be expected unless drastic improvements are made both to the efficiency of the power infrastructure and to electric end uses and industrial processes. In the transport sector, the rapid growth in personal vehicle sales indicates strong energy growth in that area. Energy use by cars is expected to grow at an annual growth rate of 11percent, increasing demand for oil considerably. In addition, oil consumption used for freight transport will also continue to increase .

  6. Sustainability and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005. Integrating Sustainability into the Trans- portationTHOUGHT PIECE Sustainability and Transport by Richardof the concept of sustainability to transport planning. In

  7. Chapter 12 Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2-1 November 2012 Words in bold and acronyms are defined in Chapter 32, Glossary and Acronyms. Chapter 12 Transportation This chapter describes existing transportation resources in...

  8. Transportation | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation From modeling and simulation programs to advanced electric powertrains, engines, biofuels, lubricants, and batteries, Argonne's transportation research is vital to...

  9. Transporting Hazardous Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transporting Hazardous Materials The procedures given below apply to all materials that are considered to be hazardous by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Consult your...

  10. Electron-Transport in La100-Xalx Metallic Glasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DELGADO, R.; ARMBRUSTER, H.; Naugle, Donald G.; TSAI, CL; JOHNSON, WL; WILLIAMS, A.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of an understanding of electron transport in liquid and amorphous transition-metal alloys. The recent review article by Naugle' discusses the most popular scattering mechanisms which have been proposed to ex- plain the systematic trends in the transport... coefficients. Gallagher and Greig had noted that the sign of the ther- mopower for a large number of amorphous transition metal alloys could be explained in terms of the Mott s d- model in which the sign of the thermopower should be the same...

  11. liquid nberwp.tex Liquidity Constraints and Precautionary Saving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niebur, Ernst

    liquid nberwp.tex Liquidity Constraints and Precautionary Saving Christopher D. Carroll ccarroll to the optimal consumption/saving problem under uncertainty have long known that there are quantitatively important in- teractions between liquidity constraints and precautionary saving behavior. This paper

  12. Mathematical Modeling of Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Fuel Z. H. Wang* and C. Y. Wang*,z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathematical Modeling of Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Z. H. Wang* and C. Y. Wang for liquid-feed direct methanol fuel cells DMFC . In addition to the anode and cathode electrochemical electronically March 4, 2003. Fuel cells promise to replace the internal combustion engine in transportation due

  13. Liquids that form due to dynamics of the molecules that depend on the local density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard P. Sear

    2015-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    RNA molecules in living cells form what look like liquid droplets formed by liquid/liquid phase separation. But unlike the molecules in conventional phase separating mixtures, RNA molecules are transported by molecular motors that consume energy and so are out of equilibrium. Motivated by this we consider what sort of simple rules for the dynamics of model mRNA molecules lead to liquid/liquid phase separation. We find that dynamics that slow as the local density of molecules increases, drive the formation of liquids. We also look at the analogous separation of the two blocks of a block copolymer, in which the monomers of one block have dynamics that depend on the local density of monomers of that block. We find that this block condenses and separates from the monomers of the other block. This is a simple model of the out-of-equilibrium domain formation found in the chromatin in the nucleus of cells.

  14. Properties of Liquid Plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freibert, Franz J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Jeremy N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schwartz, Daniel S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saleh, Tarik A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Migliori, Albert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Unalloyed polycrystalline Pu displays extreme thermal expansion behavior, i.e., {alpha} {yields} {beta} {yields} {gamma} {yields} {delta} increases by 25% in volume and {delta} {yields} {var_epsilon} {yields} liquid decreases by 4.5% in volume. Thus, making it difficult to measure density into the liquid state. Dilatometer outfitted with CaF molten metal cell offers a proven capability to measure thermal expansion in molten metals, but has yet to be proven for Pu. Historic data from the liquid nuclear fuels program will prove extremely useful as a guide to future measurements. 3.3at% Ga changes Pu molten metal properties: 50% increase in viscosity and {approx}3% decrease in density. Fe may decrease the density by a small amount assuming an averaging of densities for Pu-Ga and Pu-Fe liquids. More recent Boivineau (2009) work needs some interpretation, but technique is being employed in (U,Pu)O{sub 2} nuclear fuels program (Pu Futures, 2012).

  15. Breakup of Liquid Filaments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso A.; Castrejon-Pita, J.R.; Hutchings, I.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , including the dispersion of liquid drugs into res- pirable droplets, microfluidics, crop- and paint-spraying, and ink-jet printing [2–4]. There are also biological sys- tems in which either long filaments remain intact, or many droplets are formed [5, 6...

  16. Imaging Liquids Using Microfluidic Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemistry occurring in the liquid and liquid surface is important in many applications. Chemical imaging of liquids using vacuum based analytical techniques is challenging due to the difficulty in working with liquids with high volatility. Recent development in microfluidics enabled and increased our capabilities to study liquid in situ using surface sensitive techniques such as electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Due to its small size, low cost, and flexibility in design, liquid cells based on microfluidics have been increasingly used in studying and imaging complex phenomena involving liquids. This paper presents a review of microfluidic cells that were developed to adapt to electron microscopes and various spectrometers for in situ chemical analysis and imaging of liquids. The following topics will be covered including cell designs, fabrication techniques, unique technical features for vacuum compatible cells, and imaging with electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Challenges are summarized and recommendations for future development priority are proposed.

  17. Contaminated identities: Mercury and marginalization in Ghana's artisanal mining sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singha, Kamini

    mining; Political ecology; Ecohealth; Environmental justice; Ghana 1. Introduction Artisanal and smallContaminated identities: Mercury and marginalization in Ghana's artisanal mining sector Petra and multifaceted policy problem that underlies the current conflictual aspects in the small-scale mining sector

  18. ISSN 1745-9648 Electricity Sector Reform in Greece

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    ISSN 1745-9648 Electricity Sector Reform in Greece by Ekaterini Iliadou Lawyer - Legal Department of the electricity market reform in Greece which started in 2001 and is still developing slowly. This is related to the persisting dominance of the incumbent company and the specificities of the electricity sector of Greece

  19. Foreign direct investment in the electricity sector: the Indian perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, A.K.; Vohra, Ekta

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    So far, India is losing out in the competition against other emerging economies to attract more foreign direct investment to its electricity sector. This is in large part because the Indian approach towards power sector reforms is more haphazard than the more orderly and sensitive growth model of Singapore and Latin American economies. (author)

  20. Analytic study on backreacting holographic superconductors with dark matter sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukasz Nakonieczny; Marek Rogatko

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The variational method for Sturm-Liouville eigenvalue problem was employed to study analytically properties of the holographic superconductor with dark matter sector, in which a coupling between Maxwell field and another U(1)-gauge field was considered. The backreaction of the dark matter sector on gravitational background in question was also examined.

  1. Liberalization in the Water Sector: Three leading models.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and the pervasive changes in other infrastructure sectors, one must note the remarkably slow pace of reform in the water sector. Moreover, the most systematic reforms until now have been implemented in developed . By reform, we mean substantial changes in decision rights, changes that modify the governance and in many

  2. SECTORAL EFFECTS OF TAX REFORMS IN AN OPEN ECONOMY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    SECTORAL EFFECTS OF TAX REFORMS IN AN OPEN ECONOMY Olivier CARDI Romain RESTOUT December, 2010 REFORMS IN AN OPEN ECONOMY Olivier CARDI Universit´e Panth´eon-Assas ERMES Ecole Polytechnique Romain with traded and non traded goods to in- vestigate the sectoral effects of three tax reforms: i) two revenue

  3. Sectoral targets for developing countries: Combining "Common but differentiated responsibilities"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , as also is the impact on the electricity price. Keywords Sectoral approach, sectoral target, developing-type absolute commitments, whilst developing countries adopt an emission trading system limited to electricity are auctioned by the government, which distributes its revenues lump-sum to households. In a second scenario

  4. Bridging the Gap Between Transportation and Stationary Power: Hydrogen Energy Stations and their Implications for the Transportation Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy; Unnasch, Stephen

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts,E 2 Four Potential Types of Hydrogen Energy Stations VehicleOperational Toronto Hydrogen Energy Station Stationary PEMFC

  5. Bridging the Gap Between Transportation and Stationary Power: Hydrogen Energy Stations and their Implications for the Transportation Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy; Unnasch, Stephen

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature PEMFC, which can load-follow the building andelectrolyzers are able to load follow more than reformers,

  6. VAPOR SPACE AND LIQUID/AIR INTERFACECORROSION TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zapp, P.; Hoffman, E.

    2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The phenomena of vapor space corrosion and liquid/air interface corrosion of carbon steel in simulated liquid waste environments have been investigated. Initial experiments have explored the hypothesis that vapor space corrosion may be accelerated by the formation of a corrosive electrolyte on the tank wall by a process of evaporation of relatively warmer waste and condensation of the vapor on the relatively cooler tank wall. Results from initial testing do not support the hypothesis of electrolyte transport by evaporation and condensation. The analysis of the condensate collected by a steel specimen suspended over a 40 C simulated waste solution showed no measurable concentrations of the constituents of the simulated solution and a decrease in pH from 14 in the simulant to 5.3 in the condensate. Liquid/air interface corrosion was studied as a galvanic corrosion system, where steel at the interface undergoes accelerated corrosion while steel in contact with bulk waste is protected. The zero-resistance-ammeter technique was used to measure the current flow between steel specimens immersed in solutions simulating (1) the high-pH bulk liquid waste and (2) the expected low-pH meniscus liquid at the liquid/air interface. Open-circuit potential measurements of the steel specimens were not significantly different in the two solutions, with the result that (1) no consistent galvanic current flow occurred and (2) both the meniscus specimen and bulk specimen were subject to pitting corrosion.

  7. Photorefractivity in polymer-stabilized nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiederrecht, G.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.; Wasielewski, M.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.]|[Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer-stabilized liquid crystals, consisting of low concentrations of a polymeric electron acceptor, are shown to exhibit significantly enhanced photorefractive properties. The charge generation and transport properties of these composite systems are strongly modified from nematic liquid crystals doped with electron donors and acceptors. The new composites are produced by polymerizing a small quantity of a 1,4:5,8-naphthalenediimide electron acceptor functionalized with an acrylate group in an aligned nematic liquid crystal. Photopolymerization creates an anisotropic gel-like medium in which the liquid crystal is free to reorient in the presence of a space charge field, while maintaining charge trapping sites in the polymerized regions of the material. The presence of these trapping sites results in the observation of longer lived, higher resolution holographic gratings in the polymer-stabilized liquid crystals than observed in nematic liquid crystals alone. These gratings display Bragg regime diffraction. Asymmetric beam coupling, photo-conductivity, and four-wave mixing experiments are performed to characterize the photophysics of these novel materials.

  8. High temperature liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A length of metal sheathed metal oxide cable is perforated to permit liquid access to the insulation about a pair of conductors spaced close to one another. Changes in resistance across the conductors will be a function of liquid level, since the wetted insulation will have greater electrical conductivity than that of the dry insulation above the liquid elevation.

  9. Ionic Liquid Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, C.R.; Ilconich, J.B.; Luebke, D.R.; Pennline, H.W.

    2008-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent scientific studies are rapidly advancing novel technological improvements and engineering developments that demonstrate the ability to minimize, eliminate, or facilitate the removal of various contaminants and green house gas emissions in power generation. The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) shows promise for carbon dioxide mitigation not only because of its higher efficiency as compared to conventional coal firing plants, but also due to a higher driving force in the form of high partial pressure. One of the novel technological concepts currently being developed and investigated is membranes for carbon dioxide (CO2) separation, due to simplicity and ease of scaling. A challenge in using membranes for CO2 capture in IGCC is the possibility of failure at elevated temperatures or pressures. Our earlier research studies examined the use of ionic liquids on various supports for CO2 separation over the temperature range, 37°C-300°C. The ionic liquid, 1-hexyl-3methylimidazolium Bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, ([hmim][Tf2N]), was chosen for our initial studies with the following supports: polysulfone (PSF), poly(ether sulfone) (PES), and cross-linked nylon. The PSF and PES supports had similar performance at room temperature, but increasing temperature caused the supported membranes to fail. The ionic liquid with the PES support greatly affected the glass transition temperature, while with the PSF, the glass transition temperature was only slightly depressed. The cross-linked nylon support maintained performance without degradation over the temperature range 37-300°C with respect to its permeability and selectivity. However, while the cross-linked nylon support was able to withstand temperatures, the permeability continued to increase and the selectivity decreased with increasing temperature. Our studies indicated that further testing should examine the use of other ionic liquids, including those that form chemical complexes with CO2 based on amine interactions. The hypothesis is that the performance at the elevated temperatures could be improved by allowing a facilitated transport mechanism to become dominant. Several amine-based ionic liquids were tested on the cross-linked nylon support. It was found that using the amine-based ionic liquid did improve selectivity and permeability at higher temperature. The hypothesis was confirmed, and it was determined that the type of amine used also played a role in facilitated transport. Given the appropriate aminated ionic liquid with the cross-linked nylon support, it is possible to have a membrane capable of separating CO2 at IGCC conditions. With this being the case, the research has expanded to include separation of other constituents besides CO2 (CO, H2S, etc.) and if they play a role in membrane poisoning or degradation. This communication will discuss the operation of the recently fabricated ionic liquid membranes and the impact of gaseous components other than CO2 on their performance and stability.

  10. Simulations of NSTX with a Liquid Lithium Divertor Module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. P. Stotler, R. Maingi, H.W. Kugel, A. Yu. Pigarov, T.D. Rognlien, V.A. Soukhanovskii

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The UEDGE edge plasma transport code is used to model the effect of the reduced recycling provided by the Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) module that will be installed in NSTX. UEDGE's transport coefficients are calibrated against an existing NSTX shot using midplane and divertor diagnostic data. The LLD is then incorporated into the simulations as a reduction in the recycling coefficient over the outer divertor. Heat transfer calculations performed using the resulting heat flux profiles indicate that lithium evaporation will be negligible for pulse lengths < 2 s at low (? 2 MW) input power. At high input power (? 7 MW), the pulse length may have to be restricted.

  11. Scenario development in China's electricity sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steenhof, P.A.; Fulton, W. [Carleton University, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Dept. of Geography & Environmental Studies

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The continuing growth of China's electricity sector will affect global environmental and economic sustainability due to its impacts on greenhouse gas emissions and global resource depletion. In 2005, the generation of electricity in China resulted in the emissions of 2290 million metric tonnes of carbon dioxide (approximately 53% of the nation's total) and required 779 million metric tonnes of coal (approximately 50% of China's total coal consumption). These figures are expected to increase with China's economic growth. In order to gauge the range in which fuel consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions could grow a scenario-based conceptual model has been developed by the authors (published in this journal). The application and analysis of this shows that under a business as usual (BAU) scenario, electricity generation could contribute upwards of 56% of China's energy related greenhouse gas emissions by 2020. Meanwhile, consumption of coal will also increase, growing to nearly 60% of total national demand by 2020. However, variations in a number of key drivers could produce significant deviation from the BAU scenario. With accelerated economic output, even with greater technological advances and greater potential to bring natural gas on stream, carbon dioxide emissions would rise 10% above the BAU. Alternatively, in a scenario where China's economy grows at a tempered pace, less investment would be available for advanced technologies, developing natural gas infrastructure, or nuclear energy. In this scenario, reduced economic growth and electricity demand would thereby be countered by reduced efficiency and a higher contribution of coal.

  12. Antineutrino Oscillations in the Atmospheric Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Himmel, Alexander I.; /Caltech

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents measurements of the oscillations of muon antineutrinos in the atmospheric sector, where world knowledge of antineutrino oscillations lags well behind the knowledge of neutrinos, as well as a search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} transitions. Differences between neutrino and antineutrino oscillations could be a sign of physics beyond the Standard Model, including non-standard matter interactions or the violation of CPT symmetry. These measurements leverage the sign-selecting capabilities of the magnetized steel-scintillator MINOS detectors to analyze antineutrinos from the NuMI beam, both when it is in neutrino-mode and when it is in antineutrino-mode. Antineutrino oscillations are observed at |{Delta}{bar m}{sub atm}{sup 2}| = (3.36{sub -0.40}{sup +0.46}(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst)) x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2}(2{bar {theta}}{sub 23}) = 0.860{sub -0.12}{sup +0.11}(stat) {+-} 0.01(syst). The oscillation parameters measured for antineutrinos and those measured by MINOS for neutrinos differ by a large enough margin that the chance of obtaining two values as discrepant as those observed is only 2%, assuming the two measurements arise from the same underlying mechanism, with the same parameter values. No evidence is seen for neutrino-to-antineutrino transitions.

  13. Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operat

  14. Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freig pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freig pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation ope

  15. Graduate Certificate in Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Graduate Certificate in Transportation Nohad A. Toulan School of Urban Studies and Planning of Engineering and Computer Science integrated transportation systems. The Graduate Certificate in Transportation their capabilities. Students in the program can choose among a wide range of relevant courses in transportation

  16. TRANSPORTATION Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    2003 CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION STUDIES Annual Report #12;Center for Transportation Studies University of Minnesota 200 Transportation and Safety Building 511 Washington Avenue S.E. Minneapolis, MN publication is a report of transportation research, education, and outreach activities for the period July

  17. Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission electron microscopy. Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission electron microscopy. Abstract:...

  18. Analysis & Simulation of Dynamics in Supercooled Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmatad, Yael Sarah

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Moreover, the heat capacity of that liquid is also higherthe intensive heat capacities of the liquid and the crystal,

  19. Producing liquid fuels from coal: prospects and policy issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James T. Bartis; Frank Camm; David S. Ortiz

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increase in world oil prices since 2003 has prompted renewed interest in producing and using liquid fuels from unconventional resources, such as biomass, oil shale, and coal. This book focuses on issues and options associated with establishing a commercial coal-to-liquids (CTL) industry within the United States. It describes the technical status, costs, and performance of methods that are available for producing liquids from coal; the key energy and environmental policy issues associated with CTL development; the impediments to early commercial experience; and the efficacy of alternative federal incentives in promoting early commercial experience. Because coal is not the only near-term option for meeting liquid-fuel needs, this book also briefly reviews the benefits and limitations of other approaches, including the development of oil shale resources, the further development of biomass resources, and increasing dependence on imported petroleum. A companion document provides a detailed description of incentive packages that the federal government could offer to encourage private-sector investors to pursue early CTL production experience while reducing the probability of bad outcomes and limiting the costs that might be required to motivate those investors. (See Rand Technical Report TR586, Camm, Bartis, and Bushman, 2008.) 114 refs., 2 figs., 16 tabs., 3 apps.

  20. Minnesota's Transportation Economic Development (TED)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Minnesota's Transportation Economic Development (TED) Pilot Program Center for Transportation Studies Transportation Research Conference May 24-25, 2011 #12;Transportation Role in Economic Development · Carefully targeted transportation infrastructure improvements will: ­ Stimulate new economic development

  1. Introduction Transport in disordered graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Ballistic transport in disordered graphene P, Gornyi, Mirlin Ballistic transport in disordered graphene #12;Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Outline 1 Introduction Model Experimental motivation Transport in clean graphene 2

  2. Modeling Liquid-Liquid Equilibrium of Ionic Liquid Systems with NRTL, Electrolyte-NRTL, and UNIQUAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadtherr, Mark A.

    Modeling Liquid-Liquid Equilibrium of Ionic Liquid Systems with NRTL, Electrolyte-NRTL, and UNIQUAC different excess Gibbs free energy models are evaluated: the NRTL, UNIQUAC and electrolyte- NRTL (eNRTL) models. In the case of eNRTL, a new formulation of the model is used, based on a symmetric reference

  3. Help cut pollution with vapor/liquid and liquid/liquid separators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woinsky, S.G.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor/liquid and liquid/liquid separators are common in chemical process industries plants. In addition to separating phases, these devices can aid in reducing pollution in the plant. Two-phase separators achieve pollution prevention via recycling of intermediates and final products. It is doubtful that most vapor/liquid and liquid/liquid separators are used specifically for pollution prevention projects. They may have another purpose yet provide pollution prevention as a bonus. The first step in achieving pollution prevention by design is for operating companies to be aware of vapor/liquid and liquid/liquid separators as potential pollution prevention devices. Then, likely applications need to be investigated. Since the quantities of material recovered are relatively small, higher value products are the most likely targets, especially for liquid/liquid separators. However, for vapor/liquid separators, the costs involved are usually relatively low since only the cost of a separator pad is normally involved, and more moderately valued products can be targets.

  4. Power Politics: The Political Economy of Russia's Electricity Sector Liberalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wengle, Susanne Alice

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of domestic gas distribution pipelines. These domesticand gas extraction, transport and distribution pipelines, to

  5. IMPACT OF BEAM TRANSPORT METHOD ON CHAMBER AND DRIVER DESIGN FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPACT OF BEAM TRANSPORT METHOD ON CHAMBER AND DRIVER DESIGN FOR HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY D propagate in thick-liquid-wall, wetted-wall, and dry-wall chambers. KEYWORDS: heavy ion fusion, ion beam transport, reactor chamber design I. INTRODUCTION The U.S. heavy ion fusion ~HIF! program is working toward

  6. THERMAL EFFECTS ON DROPLET TRANSPORT IN DIGITIAL MICROFLUIDICS WITH APPLICATIONS TO CHIP COOLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    THERMAL EFFECTS ON DROPLET TRANSPORT IN DIGITIAL MICROFLUIDICS WITH APPLICATIONS TO CHIP COOLING, on a platform we call "digital microfluidics," where nanoliter-sized discrete liquid droplets immersed in oil-dependent system parameters on droplet transport in this digital microfluidic platform. We demonstrate

  7. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Winkelman; Tim Hargrave; Christine Vanderlan

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors conclude in this report that an upstream system would ensure complete regulatory coverage of transportation sector emissions in an efficient and feasible manner, and as such represents a key component of a national least-cost GHG emissions abatement strategy. The broad coverage provided by an upstream system recommends this approach over vehicle-maker based approaches, which would not cover emissions from heavy-duty vehicles and the aviation, marine and off-road sub-sectors. The on-road fleet approach unfairly and inefficiently burdens vehicle manufacturers with responsibility for emissions that they cannot control. A new vehicles approach would exclude emissions from vehicles on the road prior to program inception. The hybrid approach faces significant technical and political complications, and it is not clear that the approach would actually change behavior among vehicle makers and users, which is its main purpose. They also note that a trading system would fail to encourage many land use and infrastructure measures that affect VMT growth and GHG emissions. They recommend that this market failure be addressed by complementing the trading system with a program specifically targeting land use- and infrastructure-related activities. A key issue that must be addressed in designing a national GHG control strategy is whether or not it is necessary to guarantee GHG reductions from the transport sector. Neither an upstream system nor a downstream approach would do so, since both would direct capital to the least-cost abatement opportunities wherever they were found. They review two reasons why it may be desirable to force transportation sector reductions: first, that the long-term response to climate change will require reductions in all sectors; and second, the many ancillary benefits associated with transportation-related, and especially VMT-related, emissions reduction activities. If policy makers find it desirable to establish transportation-specific policies, they recommend (in addition to the land use policies mentioned above), that they combine an upstream trading system with a carbon efficiency standard similar to the current CAFE standard. Under this approach a fuel price signal would be complemented by incentives for manufacturers to produce more carbon efficient vehicles. To prevent vehicle manufacturers from being forced to pay more than other sectors for reducing GHG emissions, they recommend that the vehicle makers be allowed to pay a cash penalty equal to the market price of allowances in lieu of meeting carbon efficiency requirements.

  8. Distributed Reforming of Renewable Liquids via Water Splitting using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    circuitry/power supply Non-galvanic Single material (no electrodes) Ethanol/NG Steam O2- 1/2 O2 + 2e- 1/2 O.C2H5OH + 1/2 O2 2CO + 3H2 Predominant products of ethanol reforming: H2, CO, CO2, CH4, H2O #12Distributed Reforming of Renewable Liquids via Water Splitting using Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM

  9. Effect of bubble volume fraction on the shear and extensional rheology of bubbly liquids based on guar gum (a Giesekus fluid) as continuous phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres, M. D.; Hallmark, B.; Wilson, D. I.

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    al., 2012). Bubbly liquids are also 57 encountered in nature in the form of magmas (Manga and Loewenberg, 2001; Gonnermann and 58 Manga, 2007) and in other industrial sectors in the form of foamed cement (Ahmed et al., 2009), 59 extracted crude oil... , retarding coalescence and creaming. In 52 the food sector, the bubble phase is usually air and aerated liquid foods are ubiquitous, from 53 beverages to baked products, ice creams, dairy systems and confectionery, e.g. van Aken (2001). 54 Aeration yields...

  10. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    crops Full HEV (regenerative braking, battery-electricidle-off and limited regenerative braking Closing/covering

  11. Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Appendix consists of two unpublished reports produced by Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., under contract to Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These two reports formed the basis for the subsequent development of the Fuel Economy Model described in Volume 1. They are included in order to document more completely the efforts undertaken to construct a comprehensive model of automobile fuel economy. The supplemental reports are as follows: Supplement 1--Documentation Attributes of Technologies to Improve Automotive Fuel Economy; Supplement 2--Analysis of the Fuel Economy Boundary for 2010 and Comparison to Prototypes.

  12. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ethanol (with the remaining 15% gasoline). Up to now, few of these E85-ethanol’s somewhat lower energy content per volume. Increasingly so-called “flex-fuel” E85E85 vehicles would otherwise face. The reference case forecasts for the US include increases in ethanol

  13. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000. U.S.EIA), 2005. Annual Energy Outlook 2005: With Projections toU.S. EIA), 2007. Annual Energy Outlook 2007. U.S. Department

  14. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shift future projected coal generation increases to naturalthe reference of pulverized coal generation is applied, thusthrough 2040. All new coal generation was to be with one of

  15. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    existing power plants (30-40 years), the transition to lower-GHG technologiesnatural gas technologies. Existing fossil fuel plants are

  16. Radiative forcing due to changes in ozone and methane caused by the transport sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    one Climate Chemistry Model (CCM) have been used to simulatedescription of the CTMs and CCM used in this study. A moreresolution and 31 vertical CCM nudged to meteorological data

  17. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and developing emissions trading mechanisms to connect andand development of emissions trading or cap-and-tradesector market-based emissions trading system in the Western

  18. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    large conventional hydroelectric power, municipal solidconventional large hydroelectric power in the percentage).large conventional hydroelectric power is not included (this

  19. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas-powered combined cycle power plants. The most recent federal energy legislation, the Energy Independence and Security

  20. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    110 Table 26. Landfill gas GHG reductionlandfills to utilize the landfill gas generally includes acollection system. Landfill gas from throughout landfills

  1. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information Administration (U.S. EIA), 2000. Assumptions to2000. U.S. Department of Energy. DOE/EIA-0554(2000). U.S.Administration (U.S. EIA), 2005. Annual Energy Outlook 2005:

  2. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    forecasts small expansions in nuclear and renewable sources, with the vast majority of new generation coming from coal and natural gas.and natural gas will be key feedstocks for decades to come; the U.S. EIA forecast (

  3. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2003; Meier et al. , 2005; IEA/NEA, 2005; Williams, 2001et al. , 2005; Weissner 2007; IEA/NEA, 2005 Meier et al. ,2005; IEA/NEA, 2005; Beurskens et al. , 2005; Awerbuch et

  4. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GHG rate and average cost-per-kWh of generation of thatas the incremental cost-per-kWh of the low-GHG technology (

  5. Environmental implications of trade liberalization on North American transport services: the case of the trucking sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Linda

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005). NAFTA/Mexican Truck Emissions Overview, Sacramento,helped the ICF calculate truck emissions factors to indicateJ. (2005). Mexican truck idling emissions at the El Paso-

  6. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    truck GHG emissions25. Commercial truck GHG emissions with emission-reductionCost effectiveness curve for truck GHG emission reduction

  7. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies. Resources fortechnologies such as integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) coal plants, carbon capturecarbon capture and sequestration. These low-GHG electricity technologies,

  8. Global Climate Change, Developing Countries and Transport Sector Options in South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    South Africa (MSA) Action Agenda (May 1999) 36 Main policy thrusts .36 Key strategic issues..37 Key initiatives38 White Paper on Energy Policy (

  9. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology Support Unit (ETSU), 1994. "An Appraisal of UKNRC, 1992; IPCC, 1999; ETSU, 1994; CAEP, 1995; DCAD, 1997;Baseline NRC, 1992 IPCC, 1999 ETSU, 1994 (low) ETSU, 1994 (

  10. Environmental implications of trade liberalization on North American transport services: the case of the trucking sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Linda

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mexico Border Port of Laredo Concentration year pollution,air pollution. In Table 2, for NO x on the US–Mexico border,

  11. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2003. Cooling, Heating, and Power for Industry: A MarketMarket Assessment for Condensing Boilers in Commercial Heatingefficiency heating technology options. In the market for a

  12. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    improved efficiency heating technology options. In theare several technology options that provide heating andOne technology that can effectively provide heating and

  13. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    area are Minnesota’s 20% ethanol fuel standard for gasolinearea are Minnesota’s 20% ethanol fuel standard for gasolinewith increased cellulosic ethanol Fuel carbon content (g

  14. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heaters avoid the water heater tank altogether by quicklywater heater, with it use of a vapor compression refrigeration cycle, is more efficient than conventional tank

  15. Environmental implications of trade liberalization on North American transport services: the case of the trucking sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Linda

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    requires the use of ultra low-sulfur diesel, now required inthe shift toward ultra low-sulfur fuel. The nationwide plan

  16. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Mineral Production The extraction, production, and processing of metals and minerals result in both process-

  17. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shipley, and E. Brown, 2003. CHP Five Years Later: Federaland Paper Industries by Applying CHP Technologies. Lawrence112 Table 27. Potential GHG mitigation from CHP

  18. Towards a low carbon transport sector: electricity or hydrogen?y y g

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    emission - electric 40 45 [Mton CO2 (W-t-W)] Other innovations 30 35 Other innovations (e.g. biofu-30% biofuels and some energy saving innovations 12 #12;Hydrogen Well-to-Wheel CO2 emission - hydrogen 40 45 or RES! 13 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 #12;Electricity Well-to-Wheel CO2

  19. Environmental implications of trade liberalization on North American transport services: the case of the trucking sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Linda

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    drayage ?eet is older. Line-haul trucks in the US and Mexicoacross the border. Line-haul trucks then pick up theand older than line-haul trucks and tend to produce higher

  20. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heavy- duty long-haul Class 8 trucks getting approximately 6which the trucks are sold from long-haul freight companiesof these trucks commonly involves initial use in long-haul

  1. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    >50,000 sf buildings) Residential micro-CHP using Stirlingand micro- turbines. Residential micro-CHP systems are less

  2. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    included. As technologies to produce biodiesel from varyinginitial technology and lifetime operating costs Biodiesel (biodiesel usage through 2020 reveals a relatively small biofuel content in future diesel trucks, there are policy and technology

  3. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inc. (EEA). 2001. Technology and Cost of Future Fuel Economyproduction leads to lower technology costs. In the case ofpollution control technology costs. As a result, the cost-

  4. Session 5: ÂŤRenewable Energy in the Transportation and Power SectorsÂŽ

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard ErrorsSeptember 24, 2014 MEMORANDUM7,5:

  5. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehilce Sector

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003Toolsearch keywordsclear searchCOMMERCIAL

  6. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of a heat pump water heater, with it use of a vaporResidential heat pump water heaters Walk-in refrigerators

  7. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    $/tonne CO2 eq) Greenhouse gas emission reduction in 2030 ($/tonne CO2 eq) Greenhouse gas emission reduction in 2030 ($/tonne CO2 eq) Greenhouse gas emission reduction in 2030 (

  8. The Practice of Cost Benefit Analysis in the Transport Sector a Mexican

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLC Jump to:Uncertainty of1801 -Plains,The

  9. GIZ Sourcebook Module 5d: The CDM in the Transport Sector | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°, -86.0529604°Wisconsin:FyreStorm IncLSE COMPOpenInformation

  10. Transportation Sector Energy Use by Mode from EIA AEO 2011 Early Release -

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, Indiana (Utility Company)LibraryDatasets - OpenEI Datasets

  11. Transportation Sector Energy Use by Type from EIA AEO 2011 Early Release -

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, Indiana (Utility Company)LibraryDatasets - OpenEI

  12. Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's Transportation Sector: Methods and

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwiki HomeASN PowerApplications | Open Energy

  13. Quantification of Liquid Water Saturation in a PEM Fuel Cell Diffusion Medium Using X-ray Microtomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , at shutdown, may freeze under subzero tem- peratures and makes cold start of a PEM fuel cell difficult conditions. MRI is used to visualize the transport of liquid water across a polymer electrolyte membrane opportunities for imaging pore-scale flow and multiphase transport in porous me- dia. In recent years, X

  14. Schrodinger Fermi Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Juven

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a class of strongly interacting many-body fermionic systems in 2+1D non-relativistic conformal field theory via holography. The 5D charged black hole with asymptotic Schrodinger isometry in the bulk gravity side introduces parameters of background density and finite particle number into the boundary field theory. We propose the holographic dictionary, and realize a quantum phase transition of this fermionic liquid with fixed particle number by tuning the background density $\\beta$ at zero temperature. On the larger $\\beta$ side, we find the signal of a sharp quasiparticle pole on the spectral function A(k,w), indicating a well-defined Fermi surface. On the smaller $\\beta$ side, we find only a hump with no sharp peak for A(k,w), indicating the disappearance of Fermi surface. The dynamical exponent $z$ of quasiparticle dispersion goes from being Fermi-liquid-like $z\\simeq1$ scaling at larger $\\beta$ to a non-Fermi-liquid scaling $z\\simeq 3/2$ at smaller $\\beta$. By comparing the structure of Green's fu...

  15. Possible Pathways for Increasing Natural Gas Use for Transportation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zigler, B.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A collaborative partnership of DOE National Laboratories is working with DOE to identify critical RD&D needs to significantly increase the speed and breadth of NG uptake into the transportation sector. Drivers for increased utilization of natural gas for transportation are discussed. Key needs in research, development, and deployment are proposed, as well as possible pathways to address those needs. This presentation is intended to serve as a catalyst to solicit input from stakeholders regarding what technical areas they deem the most important.

  16. U.S. Virgin Islands Transportation Petroleum Reduction Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This NREL technical report determines a way for USVI to meet its petroleum reduction goal in the transportation sector. It does so first by estimating current petroleum use and key statistics and characteristics of USVI transportation. It then breaks the goal down into subordinate goals and estimates the petroleum impacts of these goals with a wedge analysis. These goals focus on reducing vehicle miles, improving fuel economy, improving traffic flow, using electric vehicles, using biodiesel and renewable diesel, and using 10% ethanol in gasoline. The final section of the report suggests specific projects to achieve the goals, and ranks the projects according to cost, petroleum reduction, time frame, and popularity.

  17. Examination of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for high efficiency power conversion and energy transport systems is increasing as world energy use continues to increase, petroleum supplies decrease, and global warming concerns become more prevalent. There are few heat transport fluids capable of operating above about 600oC that do not require operation at extremely high pressures. Liquid fluoride salts are an exception to that limitation. Fluoride salts have very high boiling points, can operate at high temperatures and low pressures and have very good heat transfer properties. They have been proposed as coolants for next generation fission reactor systems, as coolants for fusion reactor blankets, and as thermal storage media for solar power systems. In each case, these salts are used to either extract or deliver heat through heat exchange equipment, and in order to design this equipment, liquid salt heat transfer must be predicted. This paper discusses the heat transfer characteristics of liquid fluoride salts. Historically, heat transfer in fluoride salts has been assumed to be consistent with that of conventional fluids (air, water, etc.), and correlations used for predicting heat transfer performance of all fluoride salts have been the same or similar to those used for water conventional fluids an, water, etc). A review of existing liquid salt heat transfer data is presented, summarized, and evaluated on a consistent basis. Less than 10 experimental data sets have been found in the literature, with varying degrees of experimental detail and measured parameters provided. The data has been digitized and a limited database has been assembled and compared to existing heat transfer correlations. Results vary as well, with some data sets following traditional correlations; in others the comparisons are less conclusive. This is especially the case for less common salt/materials combinations, and suggests that additional heat transfer data may be needed when using specific salt eutectics in heat transfer equipment designs. All of the data discussed above were taken under forced convective conditions (both laminar and turbulent). Some recent data taken at ORNL under free convection conditions are also presented and results discussed. This data was taken using a simple crucible experiment with an instrumented nickel heater inserted in the salt to induce natural circulation within the crucible. The data was taken over a temperature range of 550oC to 650oC in FLiNaK salt. This data covers both laminar and turbulent natural convection conditions, and is compared to existing forms of natural circulation correlations.

  18. Sharing the burden of climate change stabilization: An energy sector perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Fabian; Sathaye, Jayant

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy demand in the electricity sector and demand in all2070 when in the electricity sector coal is largely replaceddemand both in the electricity sector and the non-electric

  19. Multi-project baselines for potential clean development mechanism projects in the electricity sector in South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkler, H.; Spalding-Fecher, R.; Sathaye, J.; Price, L.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    projects in the electricity sector in South Africa. JournalMechanism projects in the electricity sector in South AfricaCDM projects in the electricity sector References UNFCCC,

  20. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuels used in the refinery sector were also collected fromof the emissions from the refinery sector are included incommitment of 44% and the refinery and food sectors