Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

EFFECTS OF PORE STRUCTURE CHANGE AND MULTI-SCALE HETEROGENEITY ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AND REACTION RATE UPSCALING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project addressed the scaling of geochemical reactions to core and field scales, and the interrelationship between reaction rates and flow in porous media. We targeted reactive transport problems relevant to the Hanford site ? specifically the reaction of highly caustic, radioactive waste solutions with subsurface sediments, and the immobilization of 90Sr and 129I through mineral incorporation and passive flow blockage, respectively. We addressed the correlation of results for pore-scale fluid-soil interaction with field-scale fluid flow, with the specific goals of (i) predicting attenuation of radionuclide concentration; (ii) estimating changes in flow rates through changes of soil permeabilities; and (iii) estimating effective reaction rates. In supplemental work, we also simulated reactive transport systems relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. As a whole, this research generated a better understanding of reactive transport in porous media, and resulted in more accurate methods for reaction rate upscaling and improved prediction of permeability evolution. These scientific advancements will ultimately lead to better tools for management and remediation of DOE’s legacy waste problems. We established three key issues of reactive flow upscaling, and organized this project in three corresponding thrust areas. 1) Reactive flow experiments. The combination of mineral dissolution and precipitation alters pore network structure and the subsequent flow velocities, thereby creating a complex interaction between reaction and transport. To examine this phenomenon, we conducted controlled laboratory experimentation using reactive flow-through columns. ? Results and Key Findings: Four reactive column experiments (S1, S3, S4, S5) have been completed in which simulated tank waste leachage (STWL) was reacted with pure quartz sand, with and without Aluminum. The STWL is a caustic solution that dissolves quartz. Because Al is a necessary element in the formation of secondary mineral precipitates (cancrinite), conducting experiments under conditions with and without Al allowed us to experimentally separate the conditions that lead to quartz dissolution from the conditions that lead to quartz dissolution plus cancrinite precipitation. Consistent with our expectations, in the experiments without Al, there was a substantial reduction in volume of the solid matrix. With Al there was a net increase in the volume of the solid matrix. The rate and extent of reaction was found to increase with temperature. These results demonstrate a successful effort to identify conditions that lead to increases and conditions that lead to decreases in solid matrix volume due to reactions of caustic tank wastes with quartz sands. In addition, we have begun to work with slightly larger, intermediate-scale columns packed with Hanford natural sediments and quartz. Similar dissolution and precipitation were observed in these colums. The measurements are being interpreted with reactive transport modeling using STOMP; preliminary observations are reported here. 2) Multi-Scale Imaging and Analysis. Mineral dissolution and precipitation rates within a porous medium will be different in different pores due to natural heterogeneity and the heterogeneity that is created from the reactions themselves. We used a combination of X-ray computed microtomography, backscattered electron and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy combined with computational image analysis to quantify pore structure, mineral distribution, structure changes and fluid-air and fluid-grain interfaces. ? Results and Key Findings: Three of the columns from the reactive flow experiments at PNNL (S1, S3, S4) were imaged using 3D X-ray computed microtomography (XCMT) at BNL and analyzed using 3DMA-rock at SUNY Stony Brook. The imaging results support the mass balance findings reported by Dr. Um’s group, regarding the substantial dissolution of quartz in column S1. An important observation is that of grain movement accompanying dissolution in the unconsolidated media. The resultant movement

Lindquist, W. Brent; Jones, Keith W.; Um, Wooyong; Rockhold, mark; Peters, Catherine A.; Celia, Michael A.

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

EFFECTS OF PORE STRUCTURE CHANGE AND MULTI-SCALE HETEROGENEITY ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AND REACTION RATE UPSCALING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project addressed the scaling of geochemical reactions to core and field scales, and the interrelationship between reaction rates and flow in porous media. We targeted reactive transport problems relevant to the Hanford site specifically the reaction of highly caustic, radioactive waste solutions with subsurface sediments, and the immobilization of 90Sr and 129I through mineral incorporation and passive flow blockage, respectively. We addressed the correlation of results for pore-scale fluid-soil interaction with field-scale fluid flow, with the specific goals of (i) predicting attenuation of radionuclide concentration; (ii) estimating changes in flow rates through changes of soil permeabilities; and (iii) estimating effective reaction rates. In supplemental work, we also simulated reactive transport systems relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. As a whole, this research generated a better understanding of reactive transport in porous media, and resulted in more accurate methods for reaction rate upscaling and improved prediction of permeability evolution. These scientific advancements will ultimately lead to better tools for management and remediation of DOE legacy waste problems.

Peters, Catherine A [Princeton University] [Princeton University

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

STRUCTURAL REQUIREMENTS OF ORGANIC ANION TRANSPORTING POLYPEPTIDE MEDIATED TRANSPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The organic anion transporting polypeptides (human: OATP; other: Oatp) form a mammalian transporter superfamily that mediates the transport of structurally unrelated compounds across the cell membrane. Members in this ...

Weaver, Yi Miao

2010-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

4

act transportation rate: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

rates are calculated and compared. The ortho- isomer has a very small rate of transport. 1999 Ferreira, Mrcia M. C. 89 2008 James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy...

5

Longshore sediment transport rate calculated incorporating wave orbital velocity fluctuations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory experiments were performed to study and improve longshore sediment transport rate predictions. Measured total longshore transport in the laboratory was approximately three times greater for plunging breakers than spilling breakers. Three...

Smith, Ernest Ray

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

6

Quantum ratchet transport with minimal dispersion rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the performance of quantum ratchets by considering the dynamics of an initially localized wave packet loaded into a flashing periodic potential. The directed center-of-mass motion can be initiated by the uniform modulation of the potential height, provided that the modulation protocol breaks all relevant time- and spatial reflection symmetries. A poor performance of quantum ratchet transport is characterized by a slow net motion and a fast diffusive spreading of the wave packet, while the desirable optimal performance is the contrary. By invoking a quantum analog of the classical P\\'eclet number, namely the quotient of the group velocity and the dispersion of the propagating wave packet, we calibrate the transport properties of flashing quantum ratchets and discuss the mechanisms that yield low-dispersive directed transport.

Zhan, Fei; Ponomarev, A V; Hänggi, P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Quantum ratchet transport with minimal dispersion rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the performance of quantum ratchets by considering the dynamics of an initially localized wave packet loaded into a flashing periodic potential. The directed center-of-mass motion can be initiated by the uniform modulation of the potential height, provided that the modulation protocol breaks all relevant time- and spatial reflection symmetries. A poor performance of quantum ratchet transport is characterized by a slow net motion and a fast diffusive spreading of the wave packet, while the desirable optimal performance is the contrary. By invoking a quantum analog of the classical P\\'eclet number, namely the quotient of the group velocity and the dispersion of the propagating wave packet, we calibrate the transport properties of flashing quantum ratchets and discuss the mechanisms that yield low-dispersive directed transport.

Fei Zhan; S. Denisov; A. V. Ponomarev; P. Hänggi

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

8

Characteristics of spot-market rate indexes for truckload transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the truckload transportation industry in the United States, a number of indexes are published that attempt to measure changes in rates, but no single index has emerged as an industry standard. Industry participants, ...

Bignell, Andrew (Andrew Souglas)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Energy Policy Act transportation rate study: Interim report on coal transportation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this report is to examine changes in domestic coal distribution and railroad coal transportation rates since enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90). From 1988 through 1993, the demand for low-sulfur coal increased, as a the 1995 deadline for compliance with Phase 1 of CAAA90 approached. The shift toward low-sulfur coal came sooner than had been generally expected because many electric utilities switched early from high-sulfur coal to ``compliance`` (very low-sulfur) coal. They did so to accumulate emissions allowances that could be used to meet the stricter Phase 2 requirements. Thus, the demand for compliance coal increased the most. The report describes coal distribution and sulfur content, railroad coal transportation and transportation rates, and electric utility contract coal transportation trends from 1979 to 1993 including national trends, regional comparisons, distribution patterns and regional profiles. 14 figs., 76 tabs.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Molecular Structure and Free Energy Landscape for Electron Transport...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Free Energy Landscape for Electron Transport in the Deca-Heme Cytochrome MtrF. Molecular Structure and Free Energy Landscape for Electron Transport in the Deca-Heme Cytochrome...

11

Electronic Structure and Transport in Magnetic Multilayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ORNL assisted Seagate Recording Heads Operations in the development of CIPS pin Valves for application as read sensors in hard disk drives. Personnel at ORNL were W. H. Butler and Xiaoguang Zhang. Dr. Olle Heinonen from Seagate RHO also participated. ORNL provided codes and materials parameters that were used by Seagate to model CIP GMR in their heads. The objectives were to: (1) develop a linearized Boltzmann transport code for describing CIP GMR based on realistic models of the band structure and interfaces in materials in CIP spin valves in disk drive heads; (2) calculate the materials parameters needed as inputs to the Boltzmann code; and (3) transfer the technology to Seagate Recording Heads.

None

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

12

Structure-dynamics relationship in coherent transport through disordered systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum transport is strongly influenced by interference with phase relations that depend sensitively on the scattering medium. Since even small changes in the geometry of the medium can turn constructive interference to destructive, a clear relation between structure and fast, efficient transport is difficult to identify. Here we present a complex network analysis of quantum transport through disordered systems to elucidate the relationship between transport efficiency and structural organization. Evidence is provided for the emergence of structural classes with different geometries but similar high efficiency. Specifically, a structural motif characterised by pair sites which are not actively participating to the dynamics renders transport properties robust against perturbations. Our results pave the way for a systematic rationalization of the design principles behind highly efficient transport which is of paramount importance for technological applications as well as to address transport robustness in natural light harvesting complexes.

Stefano Mostarda; Federico Levi; Diego Prada-Gracia; Florian Mintert; Francesco Rao

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

13

Structures for Three Membrane Transport Proteins Yield Functional...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structures for Three Membrane Transport Proteins Yield Functional Insights Print Cells depend on contact with their outside environment in order to thrive. Two examples illustrate...

14

Rate allocation in a remote control structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measuzes. The quantized control problem, in general, has vector sources with weighted distortion measures. The rate allocation scheme of Goodman, must therefore be modified to allow for vector sources. Chapter 3 will specifically address the problem... of rate allocation given vector sources and weighted distortion measures' Equations will be derived for the case when the measurements and controls are assumed independent and when they are dependent. k + k P k (a) k/k-1 (b) Fig. 2. DPCM (a...

Meadow, Charles Joe

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Energy policy act transportation study: Interim report on natural gas flows and rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural Gas Flows and Rates, is the second in a series mandated by Title XIII, Section 1340, ``Establishment of Data Base and Study of Transportation Rates,`` of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102--486). The first report Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Availability of Data and Studies, was submitted to Congress in October 1993; it summarized data and studies that could be used to address the impact of legislative and regulatory actions on natural gas transportation rates and flow patterns. The current report presents an interim analysis of natural gas transportation rates and distribution patterns for the period from 1988 through 1994. A third and final report addressing the transportation rates and flows through 1997 is due to Congress in October 2000. This analysis relies on currently available data; no new data collection effort was undertaken. The need for the collection of additional data on transportation rates will be further addressed after this report, in consultation with the Congress, industry representatives, and in other public forums.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

16

Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid transport is, among other factors, affected by water content and flow rate. Our objective was to determine whether water content or flow rate is more important for colloid transport. We passed negatively charged polystyrene colloids (220 nm diameter) through unsaturated sand-filled columns under steady-state flow at different water contents (effective water saturations Se ranging from 0.1 to 1.0, with Se = (? – ?r)/(?s – ?r)) and flow rates (pore water velocities v of 5 and 10 cm/min). Water content was the dominant factor in our experiments. Colloid transport decreased with decreasing water content, and below a critical water content (Se < 0.1), colloid transport was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are interconnected. The flow rate affected retention of colloids in the secondary energy minimum, with less colloids being trapped when the flow rate increased. These results confirm the importance of both water content and flow rate for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media and highlight the dominant role of water content.

Thorsten Knappenberger; Markus Flury; Earl D. Mattson; James B. Harsh

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

The impact of lead time on truckload transportation rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this thesis was to analyze truckload shipment transactions in order to determine if rates are impacted by tender lead time, which is the amount of time between when a carrier is offered a load to when the ...

Caldwell, Erik R. (Erik Russell)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Electronic structure and transport in molecular and nanoscale electronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two approaches based on first-principles method are developed to qualitatively and quantitatively study electronic structure and phase-coherent transport in molecular and nanoscale electronics, where both quantum mechanical ...

Qian, Xiaofeng

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Investigation of two-phase transport phenomena in microchannels using a microfabricated experimental structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This work microfabricates experimental structures with distributed water injection as well as with heating of the distributed water injection decreases as the pressure drop increases. As the water injection rate is lower fails to keep up with its production and accumulation. Water transport also has an impact on the thermal

Hidrovo, Carlos H.

20

Study of the effect of rate of sediment transport on the stability of open channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF RATE OF SEDIMENT TRANSPORT ON THE STABILITY OF OPEN CHANNELS A Thesis By KHANDAKER MOHAMMAD ABDUR RAHMAN Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1963 Major Subject: Civil Engineering STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF RATE Of SEDIMENT TRANSPORT ON THE STABILITY Of OPEN CHANNELS A Thesis By KHANDAKER MOHAMMAD ABDUR RAHMAN Approved as to style...

Rahman, Khandaker Mohammad Abdur

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

DNA Transport in Hierarchically-Structured  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

porous metallic tubes.3 The fabrication of spherical, cylindri- cal, and hollow colloidal crystals using-dimensional periodic structures with micrometer-scale periods have been fabricated with nano- particle inks.8 Well definition, is a promising approach for the fabrication of complex micro- and nano- structures.15

New Mexico, University of

22

Tracer studies of pathways and rates of meltwater transport through Arctic summer sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tracer studies of pathways and rates of meltwater transport through Arctic summer sea ice H. Eicken) program's field site in the northern Chukchi Sea, snow and ice meltwater flow was found to have a strong impact on the heat and mass balance of sea ice during the summer of 1998. Pathways and rates of meltwater

Eicken, Hajo

23

Ratchet transport and periodic structures in parameter space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ratchet models are prominent candidates to describe the transport phenomenum in nature in the absence of external bias. This work analyzes the parameter space of a discrete ratchet model and gives direct connections between chaotic domains and a family of isoperiodic stable structures with the ratchet current. The isoperiodic structures appear along preferred direction in the parameter space giving a guide to follow the current, which usually increases inside the structures but is independent of the corresponding period. One of such structures has the shrimp-shaped form which is known to be an universal structure in the parameter space of dissipative systems. Currents in parameter space provide a direct measure of the momentum asymmetry of the multistable and chaotic attractors times the size of the corresponding basin of attraction. Transport structures are shown to exist in the parameter space of the Langevin equation with an external oscillating force.

Alan Celestino; Cesar Manchein; Holokx A. Albuquerque; Marcus W. Beims

2011-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

24

Crystal Structure of a Potassium Ion Transporter TrkH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TrkH/TrkG/KtrB proteins mediate K{sup +} uptake in bacteria and probably evolved from simple K{sup +} channels by multiple gene duplications or fusions. Here we present the crystal structure of a TrkH from Vibrio parahaemolyticus. TrkH is a homodimer, and each protomer contains an ion permeation pathway. A selectivity filter, similar in architecture to those of K{sup +} channels but significantly shorter, is lined by backbone and side-chain oxygen atoms. Functional studies showed that TrkH is selective for permeation of K{sup +} and Rb{sup +} over smaller ions such as Na{sup +} or Li{sup +}. Immediately intracellular to the selectivity filter are an intramembrane loop and an arginine residue, both highly conserved, which constrict the permeation pathway. Substituting the arginine with an alanine significantly increases the rate of K{sup +} flux. These results reveal the molecular basis of K{sup +} selectivity and suggest a novel gating mechanism for this large and important family of membrane transport proteins.

Y Cao; X Jin; H Huang; M Getahun Derebe; E Levin; V Kabaleeswaran; Y Pan; M Punta; J Love; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier3Rate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfPrograms Jump to:URIInformation Rate

26

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier5Rate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscotInformation Max Jump to: navigation, search This is aInformation Rate

27

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier6Rate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscotInformation Max Jump to: navigation, search This isInformation Rate Jump

28

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier1Rate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfPrograms Jump to:URI JumpEnergyInformation Rate

29

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier2Rate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfPrograms Jump to:URIInformation Rate Jump to:

30

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier4Rate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfPrograms Jump to:URIInformationInformation Rate

31

Generic Structures in Parameter Space and Ratchet Transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work reports the existence of Isoperiodic Stable Ratchet Transport Structures in the parameter spaces dissipation versus spatial asymmetry and versus phase of a ratchet model. Such structures were found [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 234101 (2011)] in the parameter space dissipation versus amplitude of the ratchet potential and they appear to have generic shapes and to align themselves along preferred directions in the parameter space. Since the ratchet current is usually larger inside these structures, this allows us to make general statements about the relevant parameters combination to obtain an efficient ratchet current. Results of the present work give further evidences of the suggested generic properties of the isoperiodic stable structures in the context of ratchet transport.

Alan Celestino; Cesar Manchein; Holokx A. Albuquerque; Marcus W. Beims

2011-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

32

Effect of Railroad Deregulation on Export - Grain Transportation Rate Structures.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

costs. A stratified ran dom sample of rail waybills drawn from the ICC Waybill Statistics show unit train use spread rapidly on the Plains region export routes in the early 1980s, especially be tween 1982 and 1984. In particular, in the 1981...

Fuller, Stephen; MacDonald, James; Bessler, David; Wohlgenant, Michael

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Dose Rate Analysis Capability for Actual Spent Fuel Transportation Cask Contents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The approved contents for a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensed spent nuclear fuel casks are typically based on bounding used nuclear fuel (UNF) characteristics. However, the contents of the UNF canisters currently in storage at independent spent fuel storage installations are considerably heterogeneous in terms of fuel assembly burnup, initial enrichment, decay time, cladding integrity, etc. Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation & Disposal Analysis Resource and Data System (UNF ST&DARDS) is an integrated data and analysis system that facilitates automated cask-specific safety analyses based on actual characteristics of the as-loaded UNF. The UNF-ST&DARDS analysis capabilities have been recently expanded to include dose rate analysis of as-loaded transportation packages. Realistic dose rate values based on actual canister contents may be used in place of bounding dose rate values to support development of repackaging operations procedures, evaluation of radiation-related transportation risks, and communication with stakeholders. This paper describes the UNF-ST&DARDS dose rate analysis methodology based on actual UNF canister contents and presents sample dose rate calculation results.

Radulescu, Georgeta [ORNL] [ORNL; Lefebvre, Robert A [ORNL] [ORNL; Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, Mark L [ORNL] [ORNL; Scaglione, John M [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Development of a structural health monitoring system for the life assessment of critical transportation infrastructure.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent structural failures such as the I-35W Mississippi River Bridge in Minnesota have underscored the urgent need for improved methods and procedures for evaluating our aging transportation infrastructure. This research seeks to develop a basis for a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system to provide quantitative information related to the structural integrity of metallic structures to make appropriate management decisions and ensuring public safety. This research employs advanced structural analysis and nondestructive testing (NDT) methods for an accurate fatigue analysis. Metal railroad bridges in New Mexico will be the focus since many of these structures are over 100 years old and classified as fracture-critical. The term fracture-critical indicates that failure of a single component may result in complete collapse of the structure such as the one experienced by the I-35W Bridge. Failure may originate from sources such as loss of section due to corrosion or cracking caused by fatigue loading. Because standard inspection practice is primarily visual, these types of defects can go undetected due to oversight, lack of access to critical areas, or, in riveted members, hidden defects that are beneath fasteners or connection angles. Another issue is that it is difficult to determine the fatigue damage that a structure has experienced and the rate at which damage is accumulating due to uncertain history and load distribution in supporting members. A SHM system has several advantages that can overcome these limitations. SHM allows critical areas of the structure to be monitored more quantitatively under actual loading. The research needed to apply SHM to metallic structures was performed and a case study was carried out to show the potential of SHM-driven fatigue evaluation to assess the condition of critical transportation infrastructure and to guide inspectors to potential problem areas. This project combines the expertise in transportation infrastructure at New Mexico State University with the expertise at Sandia National Laboratories in the emerging field of SHM.

Roach, Dennis Patrick; Jauregui, David Villegas (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Daumueller, Andrew Nicholas (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

E-Print Network 3.0 - abc transporter structure Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to the paradigmatic "two-times-six" - helices structure... superfamily. They contain the ATP-binding cassettes, hence the name ABC transporters. Many crystal structures... with the...

36

Charge carrier transport properties in layer structured hexagonal boron nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to its large in-plane thermal conductivity, high temperature and chemical stability, large energy band gap (~ 6.4 eV), hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has emerged as an important material for applications in deep ultraviolet photonic devices. Among the members of the III-nitride material system, hBN is the least studied and understood. The study of the electrical transport properties of hBN is of utmost importance with a view to realizing practical device applications. Wafer-scale hBN epilayers have been successfully synthesized by metal organic chemical deposition and their electrical transport properties have been probed by variable temperature Hall effect measurements. The results demonstrate that undoped hBN is a semiconductor exhibiting weak p-type at high temperatures (> 700?°K). The measured acceptor energy level is about 0.68 eV above the valence band. In contrast to the electrical transport properties of traditional III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors, the temperature dependence of the hole mobility in hBN can be described by the form of ? ? (T/T{sub 0}){sup ??} with ? = 3.02, satisfying the two-dimensional (2D) carrier transport limit dominated by the polar optical phonon scattering. This behavior is a direct consequence of the fact that hBN is a layer structured material. The optical phonon energy deduced from the temperature dependence of the hole mobility is ?? = 192 meV (or 1546 cm{sup -1}), which is consistent with values previously obtained using other techniques. The present results extend our understanding of the charge carrier transport properties beyond the traditional III-nitride semiconductors.

Doan, T. C.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X., E-mail: hx.jiang@ttu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Carbon Dioxide Sorption Isotherms and Matrix Transport Rates for Non-Powdered Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For enhanced coalbed methane/carbon dioxide sequestration field projects, carbon dioxide isotherms and the rate of diffusion of the carbon dioxide from the cleats into the matrix are important parameters for predicting how much carbon dioxide actually will be sequestered under various operating conditions. Manometric (or pressure swing) experiments on powdered coal provide a quick, simple, and relatively inexpensive method for measuring sorption isotherms. However, determination of the rate of transport from cleat into matrix from the rate of gas pressure drop is difficult, if not impossible. (The characteristic time constant for the transport depends on the cleat spacing as well as the rate of diffusion.) Manometric measurements often yield isotherms that are extremely problematic in the region of the carbon dioxide critical point; perhaps even worse, available data seem to indicate that the sorption isotherms measured for powders are much larger than the isotherms of coal cores. Measurements on centimeter-sized samples can take weeks or months to reach equilibrium; for such equilibration times gas leakage rates that would be of no significance in powdered-coal measurements can completely invalidate manometric measurements on coal cores. We have tested and used a simple, inexpensive method for measuring isotherms and carbon dioxide transport rates in coal cores. One or more cores are placed in a simple pressure vessel, and a constant pressure is maintained in the vessel by connecting it to a gas supply (which contains a very large amount of gas compared to amount that could leak over the course of the experiment). From time to time the gas supply is shut off, the sample is removed, and its weight is recorded at ambient pressure at frequent time intervals for a period of about one hour. The sample is then returned to the pressure vessel, the carbon dioxide pressure restored to its previous value, and the equilibration resumed until the next sample weighing. For a point on the isotherm, the process is repeated until the sample weight reaches a constant value (i.e., typically equilibration times of several weeks). The slope of a plot of sample weight vs. square root of elapsed desorption time gives a measurement for the rate of diffusion. In order to advance all three experimental methods, results from this “ambient-pressure gravimetry” method were compared with data obtained by conventional manometry and by computer tomography. The isotherm and “diffusion” rate measured for the core can be directly used in simulators for reservoir engineering studies of coalseam sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane production.

Smith, D.H.; Jikich, S.; Seshadri, K.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Rate Structures for Customers With Onsite Generation: Practice and Innovation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recognizing that innovation and good public policy do not always proclaim themselves, Synapse Energy Economics and the Regulatory Assistance Project, under a contract with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), undertook a survey of state policies on rates for partial-requirements customers with onsite distributed generation. The survey investigated a dozen or so states. These varied in geography and the structures of their electric industries. By reviewing regulatory proceedings, tariffs, publications, and interviews, the researchers identified a number of approaches to standby and associated rates--many promising but some that are perhaps not--that deserve policymakers' attention if they are to promote the deployment of cost-effective DG in their states.

Johnston, L.; Takahashi, K.; Weston, F.; Murray, C.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Prediction of net bedload transport rates obtained in oscillating water tunnels and applicability to real surf zone waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental studies of sediment transport rates due to near shore waves are often conducted in oscillating water tunnels (OWTs). In an OWT, the oscillatory motion produced by the piston propagates almost instantaneously ...

Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David

40

Vertical Structure of Neutrino Dominated Accretion Disks and Neutrino Transport in the disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the vertical structure of neutrino dominated accretion disks by self-consistently considering the detailed microphysics, such as the neutrino transport, vertical hydrostatic equilibrium, the conservation of lepton number, as well as the balance between neutrino cooling, advection cooling and viscosity heating. After obtaining the emitting spectra of neutrinos and antineutrinos by solving the one dimensional Boltzmann equation of neutrino and antineutrino transport in the disk, we calculate the neutrino/antineutrino luminosity and their annihilation luminosity. We find that the total neutrino and antineutrino luminosity is about $10^{54}$ ergs/s and their annihilation luminosity is about $5\\times10^{51}$ ergs/s with an extreme accretion rate $10 M_{\\rm {sun}}$/s and an alpha viscosity $\\alpha=0.1$. In addition, we find that the annihilation luminosity is sensitive to the accretion rate and will not exceed $10^{50}$ ergs/s which is not sufficient to power the most fireball of GRBs, if the accretion rate is lower than $1 M_{\\rm {sun}}$/s. Therefore, the effects of the spin of black hole or/and the magnetic field in the accretion flow might be introduced to power the central engine of GRBs.

Zhen Pan; Ye-Fei Yuan

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Coherent Structures and Larval Transport in the California Current System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the jet is transported downstream. Two questions emerge: (1)higher settlement downstream from headlands (Ebert andseen in modeling studies downstream from promontories (Kim

Harrison, Cheryl S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

The Structure of a Cyanobacterial Bicarbonate Transport Protein...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cyanobacterial Bicarbonate Transport Protein, CmpA. Abstract: Cyanobacteria, blue-green algae, are the most abundant autotrophs in aquatic environments and form the base of the...

43

Crystal structure of a concentrative nucleoside transporter from Vibrio cholerae at 2.4;#8201;Å  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nucleosides are required for DNA and RNA synthesis, and the nucleoside adenosine has a function in a variety of signalling processes. Transport of nucleosides across cell membranes provides the major source of nucleosides in many cell types and is also responsible for the termination of adenosine signalling. As a result of their hydrophilic nature, nucleosides require a specialized class of integral membrane proteins, known as nucleoside transporters (NTs), for specific transport across cell membranes. In addition to nucleosides, NTs are important determinants for the transport of nucleoside-derived drugs across cell membranes. A wide range of nucleoside-derived drugs, including anticancer drugs (such as Ara-C and gemcitabine) and antiviral drugs (such as zidovudine and ribavirin), have been shown to depend, at least in part, on NTs for transport across cell membranes. Concentrative nucleoside transporters, members of the solute carrier transporter superfamily SLC28, use an ion gradient in the active transport of both nucleosides and nucleoside-derived drugs against their chemical gradients. The structural basis for selective ion-coupled nucleoside transport by concentrative nucleoside transporters is unknown. Here we present the crystal structure of a concentrative nucleoside transporter from Vibrio cholerae in complex with uridine at 2.4 {angstrom}. Our functional data show that, like its human orthologues, the transporter uses a sodium-ion gradient for nucleoside transport. The structure reveals the overall architecture of this class of transporter, unravels the molecular determinants for nucleoside and sodium binding, and provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of nucleoside and nucleoside drug transport across cell membranes.

Johnson, Zachary Lee; Cheong, Cheom-Gil; Lee, Seok-Yong (Duke)

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

44

Short- and Long- Time Transport Structures in a Three Dimensional Time Dependent Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lagrangian transport structures for three-dimensional and time-dependent fluid flows are of great interest in numerous applications, particularly for geophysical or oceanic flows. In such flows, chaotic transport and mixing can play important environmental and ecological roles, for examples in pollution spills or plankton migration. In such flows, where simulations or observations are typically available only over a short time, understanding the difference between short-time and long-time transport structures is critical. In this paper, we use a set of classical (i.e. Poincar\\'e section, Lyapunov exponent) and alternative (i.e. finite time Lyapunov exponent, Lagrangian coherent structures) tools from dynamical systems theory that analyze chaotic transport both qualitatively and quantitatively. With this set of tools we are able to reveal, identify and highlight differences between short- and long-time transport structures inside a flow composed of a primary horizontal contra-rotating vortex chain, small later...

Chabreyrie, Rodolphe

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Effects of Nanoscale Structure on the Magnetism and Transport Properties of Chromium and Chromium-Aluminum Alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7 Magnetism in Cr 3 Al and 7.1 Introduction . . . . . . 7.2Structure on the Magnetism and Transport Properties ofStructure on the Magnetism and Transport Properties of

Boekelheide, Zoe Austin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Impact of Industrial Electric Rate Structure on Energy Conservation - A Utility Viewpiont  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As the price of energy rises, changes in industrial electric rates will have an impact on energy usage and conservation. Utilities interested in reducing system peak demands may reflect this need in the rate structure as an incentive...

Williams, M. M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Effect of sediment pulse grain size on sediment transport rates and bed mobility in gravel bed rivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of sediment pulse grain size on sediment transport rates and bed mobility in gravel bed] Sediment supply to gravel bed river channels often takes the form of episodic sediment pulses, and there is considerable interest in introducing sediment pulses in stream restorations to alter bed surface grain size

Venditti, Jeremy G.

48

*Deborah E. Eason, Garrett Ito, John M. Sinton Insights into melt and chemical transport rates in the mantle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

*Deborah E. Eason, Garrett Ito, John M. Sinton Insights into melt and chemical transport rates Greenland Ice-Core Project (NGRIP) Members (2004) Nature Sinton, J., Grönvold, K., Sæmundsson, K. (2005) G3. These data supplement existing fini- and post-glacial data [Sinton et al., 2005] to form a detailed eruptive

Geist, Dennis

49

Interaction between flow, transport and vegetation spatial structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper summarizes recent advances in vegetation hydrodynamics and uses the new concepts to explore not only how vegetation impacts flow and transport, but also how flow feedbacks can influence vegetation spatial ...

Luhar, Mitul

50

Optimal capital structure of deep sea foreign freight transportation companies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis aims to understand the optimal leverage range for shipping companies (maritime foreign freight transportation companies - SIC 4412), through data analysis. This study confirms that in a traditional industry ...

Georgiadis, Vasilis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Modeling electronic structure and transport properties of graphene with resonant scattering centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling electronic structure and transport properties of graphene with resonant scattering centers present a detailed numerical study of the electronic properties of single-layer graphene with resonant and transport properties of functionalized graphene in a broad range of concentration of impurities from

52

Structure, Magnetism, and Transport of CuCr2Se4 Thin Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structure, Magnetism, and Transport of CuCr 2 Se 4 Thindichroism shows that the magnetism persists to the surfacesuch as the nature of magnetism at surfaces and interfaces.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Experimental validation of the efficient robotic transportation algorithm for large-scale flexible space structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new large space structure transportation method proposed recently is modified and experimentally validated. The proposed method is to use space robots' manipulators to control the vibration, instead of their reaction ...

Ono, Masahiro, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Ferrocarriles nacionales de Mexico: the existing rate structure for grain/soybean shipments and likely effect on freight rates as a result of railroad privatization in Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's existing rate structure and, based on collected FNM Waybill data, regression models were estimated. Projected costs in the privatized railroad system were estimated to provide a lower bound estimate of rates. An upper bound estimate of rates was based...

Neyer, David McAlister

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier6Sell | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscotInformation Max Jump to: navigation, search This isInformation Rate

56

Ballistic electron transport in structured suspended semiconductor membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study ballistic electron transport in freely suspended AlAs/GaAs microstructures containing a high mobility two-dimensional electron gas with square lattice of antidots. We found that the magnetoresistance of the samples demonstrates commensurability oscillations both for the case of non-suspended and suspended devices. The temperature dependence of the commensurability oscillations is similar for both cases. However, the critical dc current, that suppresses these oscillations, in suspended samples is three times lower than in non-suspended ones. The observed phenomenon can be explained by peculiarities of the heat transport in membranes.

Pogosov, A. G.; Budantsev, M. V.; Zhdanov, E. Yu.; Pokhabov, D. A. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia and Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

57

Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation in ancient Egypt entailed the use of boats2007 Land transport in Roman Egypt: A study of economics andDieter 1991 Building in Egypt: Pharaonic stone masonry. New

Vinson, Steve

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier3Adjustment | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfPrograms Jump to:URIInformation Rate Jump to:Energy

59

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier3Max | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfPrograms Jump to:URIInformation Rate Jump

60

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier4Adjustment | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfPrograms Jump to:URIInformation RateEnergy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A Structure for Transportable, Dynamic Multimedia Documents Dick C.A. Bulterman (dcab@cwi.nl)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are those in which the synchronization of document components are not staticly defined as an integral partA Structure for Transportable, Dynamic Multimedia Documents Dick C.A. Bulterman (dcab@cwi.nl) Guido Kruislaan 413, 1098 SJ Amsterdam, The Netherlands Abstract This paper presents a document structure

Liere, Robert van

62

Relating reconnection rate, exhaust structure and effective resistivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The magnetic reconnection structure consists of a central diffusion region (CDR) and a cone or wedge shaped reconnection exhaust containing accelerated plasma flows and electromagnetic fluctuations. We predict here the relationship among the exhaust half-cone angle (?{sub e}), the half width (w) of the CDR, the outflow velocity V{sub o}, and the effective resistivity (?{sub eff}), which includes the effects of all the nonideal terms in the generalized Ohm's law. The effective resistivity is defined as the ratio of reconnection electric field E{sub rec} to the current density J{sub y} at the X point and it essentially represents the loss of momentum from the current-carrying plasma particles due to scattering by waves, their inertia or outflux from the CDR. The relation is checked against relevant results previously reported from laboratory experiments, space observations, and simulations, showing excellent agreement. The relation can be used for estimating the ad-hoc effective resistivity often used in magnetohydrodynamic modeling of reconnection.

Singh, Nagendra [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States)] [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Nanoscale structure and transport : from atoms to devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale structures present both unique physics and unique theoretical challenges. Atomic-scale simulations can find novel nanostructures with desirable properties, but the search can be difficult if the wide range of ...

Evans, Matthew Hiram

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Structures for Three Membrane Transport Proteins Yield Functional Insights  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystalline Gallium Oxide Thin Films. | EMSLStructures forStructures for

65

The Impact of Thermal Conductivity and Diffusion Rates on Water Vapor Transport through Gas Diffusion Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water management in a hydrogen polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is critical for performance. The impact of thermal conductivity and water vapor diffusion coefficients in a gas diffusion layer (GDL) has been studied by a mathematical model. The fraction of product water that is removed in the vapour phase through the GDL as a function of GDL properties and operating conditions has been calculated and discussed. Furthermore, the current model enables identification of conditions when condensation occurs in each GDL component and calculation of temperature gradient across the interface between different layers, providing insight into the overall mechanism of water transport in a given cell design. Water transport mode and condensation conditions in the GDL components depend on the combination of water vapor diffusion coefficients and thermal conductivities of the GDL components. Different types of GDL and water removal scenarios have been identified and related to experimentally-determined GDL proper...

Burlatsky, S F; Gummallaa, M; Condita, D; Liua, F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Short- and Long- Time Transport Structures in a Three Dimensional Time Dependent Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lagrangian transport structures for three-dimensional and time-dependent fluid flows are of great interest in numerous applications, particularly for geophysical or oceanic flows. In such flows, chaotic transport and mixing can play important environmental and ecological roles, for examples in pollution spills or plankton migration. In such flows, where simulations or observations are typically available only over a short time, understanding the difference between short-time and long-time transport structures is critical. In this paper, we use a set of classical (i.e. Poincar\\'e section, Lyapunov exponent) and alternative (i.e. finite time Lyapunov exponent, Lagrangian coherent structures) tools from dynamical systems theory that analyze chaotic transport both qualitatively and quantitatively. With this set of tools we are able to reveal, identify and highlight differences between short- and long-time transport structures inside a flow composed of a primary horizontal contra-rotating vortex chain, small lateral oscillations and a weak Ekman pumping. The difference is mainly the existence of regular or extremely slowly developing chaotic regions that are only present at short time.

Rodolphe Chabreyrie; Stefan G. Llewellyn Smith

2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

67

Transport and transfer rates in the waters of the continental shelf. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of govern project is to understand and quantify the processes that the transport and dispersal of energy-related pollutants introduced to the waters of the continental shelf and slope. The report is divided into sections dealing with processes associated with suspended solids; processes associated with sediments sinks for radionuclides and other pollutants; and spreading of water characteristics and species in solution. (ACR)

Biscaye, P.E.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Sequence-Based Prediction of Protein Folding Rates Using Contacts, Secondary Structures and Support Vector Machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sequence-Based Prediction of Protein Folding Rates Using Contacts, Secondary Structures and Support, Columbia, Missouri * Corresponding author: chengji@missouri.edu Abstract Predicting protein folding rate is useful for understanding protein folding process and guiding protein design. Here we developed a method

Cheng, Jianlin Jack

69

Structural Detuning of Pump Absorption Rate in Doped Fiber for the Enhancement of Power Conversion Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural Detuning of Pump Absorption Rate in Doped Fiber for the Enhancement of Power Conversion Doped Fiber Amplifier. With proper adjustments on doping profiles for the reduction of pump absorption rate, it becomes possible to optimize pump evolution map inside the doped fiber to get better power

Park, Namkyoo

70

Structural Change, the Real Exchange Rate, and the Balance of Payments in Mexico, 1960-2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural Change, the Real Exchange Rate, and the Balance of Payments in Mexico, 1960-2012 Carlos structural changes in the composition of Mexico's trade and the parameters that affect it across five-of-payments constraint may account for the post-liberalization slowdown in Mexico's growth only during certain subperiods

Lansky, Joshua

71

California PG&E E-19 Rate Structure -- demand charge structure...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

correctly? Do the upcoming schema changes address these issues? Thanks for your help. -Allan Groups: Utility Rate Login to post comments Allandaly's blog Comments Allandaly...

72

Effect of Saltstone Vault Roof Configuration on the Rate of Contaminant Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Savannah River Site, low-level radioactive decontaminated salt solution is mixed with slag, flyash, and cement to form a grout-like material called ``Saltstone``. The Saltstone is poured into concrete vaults constructed at the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The impact of SDF on groundwater has been studied in a radiological performance assessment (PA). Sophisticated groundwater models were used to predict the groundwater flow and contaminant transport problems. The modeling effort was divided into two parts: the unsaturated-zone model and the saturated zone model. One of the major performance objectives is to show that the impacted groundwater will be in compliance with the Safe Drinking Water Act.

Hsu, R.H.; Yu, A.D.; Lam, Poh-Sang

1994-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

73

Nano-Structured Li3V2(PO4)3 /Carbon Composite for High Rate Lithium...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nano-Structured Li3V2(PO4)3 Carbon Composite for High Rate Lithium Ion Batteries. Nano-Structured Li3V2(PO4)3 Carbon Composite for High Rate Lithium Ion Batteries. Abstract:...

74

Structure, transport and thermal properties of UCoGa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By means of neutron powder diffraction, we find that UCoGa crystallizes in the hexagonal ZrNiAl structure and orders ferromagnetically at low temperatures with magnetic moments stacked along the c axis. The magnetic-ordering temperature is reflected in anomalies in the temperature dependencies of the electrical resistivity and the specific heat at Tc = 47 K. Furthermore, the strong anisotropy in the electrical resistivity for i {parallel} c and i {perpendicular} c indicates a significant contribution of the magnetic anisotropy to the electrical resistivity.

Purwanto, A.; Robinson, R.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Prokes, K. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Van der Waals Lab.] [and others

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Structures for Three Membrane Transport Proteins Yield Functional Insights  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystalline Gallium Oxide Thin Films. | EMSLStructures for Three

76

Structures for Three Membrane Transport Proteins Yield Functional Insights  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystalline Gallium Oxide Thin Films. | EMSLStructures for

77

Structures for Three Membrane Transport Proteins Yield Functional Insights  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout » Staff125,849|Structures for Three Membrane

78

Electronic structure and quantum transport properties of trilayers formed from graphene and boron nitride  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electronic structure and quantum transport properties of trilayers formed from graphene and boron of a theoretical study of graphene/BN/graphene and BN/graphene/BN trilayers using the van systems formed from graphene and BN exhibit distinct stacking-dependent features in their ground state

Pandey, Ravi

79

Axonal Transport of Microtubule-Associated Protein 1B (MAP1B) in the Sciatic Nerve of Adult Rat: Distinct Transport Rates of Different  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transported with slow com- ponents a and b (SCa and SCb). In peripheral nerves, the transport velocity of SCa, which includes neurofilaments and tubulin, is 1­2 mm/d, whereas SCb, which includes actin, tu- bulin transport components SCa and SCb. Several other proteins were detected within the component that moved

Fischer, Itzhak

80

The Structure and Transport of Water and Hydrated Ions Within Hydrophobic, Nanoscale Channels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project includes an experimental and modeling investigation into water and hydrated ion structure and transport at nanomaterials interfaces. This is a topic relevant to understanding the function of many biological systems such as aquaporins that efficiently shuttle water and ion channels that permit selective transport of specific ions across cell membranes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are model nanoscale, hydrophobic channels that can be functionalized, making them artificial analogs for these biological channels. This project investigates the microscopic properties of water such as water density distributions and dynamics within CNTs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and the structure of hydrated ions at CNT interfaces via X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Another component of this work is molecular simulation, which can predict experimental measurables such as the proton relaxation times, chemical shifts, and can compute the electronic structure of CNTs. Some of the fundamental questions this work is addressing are: (1) what is the length scale below which nanoscale effects such as molecular ordering become important, (2) is there a relationship between molecular ordering and transport?, and (3) how do ions interact with CNT interfaces? These are questions of interest to the scientific community, but they also impact the future generation of sensors, filters, and other devices that operate on the nanometer length scale. To enable some of the proposed applications of CNTs as ion filtration media and electrolytic supercapacitors, a detailed knowledge of water and ion structure at CNT interfaces is critical.

Holt, J K; Herberg, J L; Wu, Y; Schwegler, E; Mehta, A

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButler TinaContact-Information-Transmission SignTransport

82

Structural Change, the Real Exchange Rate, and the Balance of Payments Constraint in Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural Change, the Real Exchange Rate, and the Balance of Payments Constraint in Mexico Carlos of a model of balance-of-payments-constrained growth for Mexico, with disaggregated exports (manufactured for the slowdown in Mexico's actual growth during the early phase of trade liberalization and macro stabilization

Lansky, Joshua

83

Circadian rhythms in electric waveform structure and rate in the electric fish Brachyhypopomus pinnicaudatus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Circadian rhythms in electric waveform structure and rate in the electric fish Brachyhypopomus in revised form 11 July 2006; accepted 15 August 2006 Abstract Weakly electric fish have long been known and neuroendocrine interactions, electric fish are excellent organisms for exploring the social and neuroendocrine

Stoddard, Philip

84

THE SPECIFIC ACCELERATION RATE IN LOOP-STRUCTURED SOLAR FLARES IMPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE SPECIFIC ACCELERATION RATE IN LOOP-STRUCTURED SOLAR FLARES ­ IMPLICATIONS FOR ELECTRON spectrum inside the acceleration region. The models are characterized by two parameters: the plasma density@dima.unige.it #12;­ 2 ­ 1. Introduction The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI, Lin et al. 2002

Piana, Michele

85

Structural Change, the Real Exchange Rate, and the Balance of Payments in Mexico, 1960-2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural Change, the Real Exchange Rate, and the Balance of Payments in Mexico, 1960-2012 Carlos in Mexico's growth only during certain subperiods of the post-liberalization era, and that the impact the recent crisis), Mexico stands out for having fully embraced trade liberalization and undergoing deep

Carlini, David

86

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for grid-connected, customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar will likely need to be competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report, we examine the impact of retail rate design on the economic value of commercial PV systems in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial customer retail rates currently offered in the state. We find that the specifics of the rate structure, combined with the characteristics of the customer’s underlying load and the size of the PV system, can have a substantial impact on the customer-economics of commercial PV systems.

87

First principles study of the structural, electronic, and transport properties of triarylamine-based nanowires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate with state of the art density functional theory the structural, electronic, and transport properties of a class of recently synthesized nanostructures based on triarylamine derivatives. First, we consider the single molecule precursors in the gas phase and calculate their static properties, namely (i) the geometrical structure of the neutral and cationic ions, (ii) the electronic structure of the frontier molecular orbitals, and (iii) the ionization potential, hole extraction potential, and internal reorganization energy. This initial study does not evidence any direct correlation between the properties of the individual molecules and their tendency to self-assembly. Subsequently, we investigate the charge transport characteristics of the triarylamine derivatives nanowires, by using Marcus theory. For one derivative we further construct an effective Hamiltonian including intermolecular vibrations and evaluate the mobility from the Kubo formula implemented with Monte Carlo sampling. These two methods, valid respectively in the sequential hopping and polaronic band limit, give us values for the room-temperature mobility in the range 0.1–12 cm{sup 2}/Vs. Such estimate confirms the superior transport properties of triarylamine-based nanowires, and make them an attracting materials platform for organic electronics.

Akande, Akinlolu, E-mail: akandea@tcd.ie; Bhattacharya, Sandip; Cathcart, Thomas; Sanvito, Stefano [School of Physics, AMBER and CRANN Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)] [School of Physics, AMBER and CRANN Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

88

The spin rate of pre-collapse stellar cores: wave driven angular momentum transport in massive stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The core rotation rates of massive stars have a substantial impact on the nature of core collapse supernovae and their compact remnants. We demonstrate that internal gravity waves (IGW), excited via envelope convection during a red supergiant phase or during vigorous late time burning phases, can have a significant impact on the rotation rate of the pre-SN core. In typical ($10 \\, M_\\odot \\lesssim M \\lesssim 20 \\, M_\\odot$) supernova progenitors, IGW may substantially spin down the core, leading to iron core rotation periods $P_{\\rm min,Fe} \\gtrsim 50 \\, {\\rm s}$. Angular momentum (AM) conservation during the supernova would entail minimum NS rotation periods of $P_{\\rm min,NS} \\gtrsim 3 \\, {\\rm ms}$. In most cases, the combined effects of magnetic torques and IGW AM transport likely lead to substantially longer rotation periods. However, the stochastic influx of AM delivered by IGW during shell burning phases inevitably spin up a slowly rotating stellar core, leading to a maximum possible core rotation perio...

Fuller, Jim; Lecoanet, Daniel; Quataert, Eliot

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when commercial PV systems represent a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

2008-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

90

The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-min interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05 to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when energy from commercial PV systems represents a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

91

Rail Coal Transportation Rates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30 2013 Macroeconomicper8,170Thousand2.442 3.028 3.803 3.971Feet)06Coal

92

Rail Coal Transportation Rates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousand Cubic Feet) OmanThousand36,610.05 KeroseneCoal Glossary

93

Rail Coal Transportation Rates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousand Cubic Feet) OmanThousand36,610.05 KeroseneCoal

94

Rail Coal Transportation Rates  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0,InformationU.S.Feet) Year Weekly77a.REVISIONreports

95

Structural transformation in supercooled water controls the crystallization rate of ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of water's unsolved puzzles is the question of what determines the lowest temperature to which it can be cooled before freezing to ice. The supercooled liquid has been probed experimentally to near the homogeneous nucleation temperature TH{\\approx}232 K, yet the mechanism of ice crystallization - including the size and structure of critical nuclei - has not yet been resolved. The heat capacity and compressibility of liquid water anomalously increase upon moving into the supercooled region according to a power law that would diverge at Ts{\\approx}225 K,(1,2) so there may be a link between water's thermodynamic anomalies and the crystallization rate of ice. But probing this link is challenging because fast crystallization prevents experimental studies of the liquid below TH. And while atomistic studies have captured water crystallization(3), the computational costs involved have so far prevented an assessment of the rates and mechanism involved. Here we report coarse-grained molecular simulations with the mW water model(4) in the supercooled regime around TH, which reveal that a sharp increase in the fraction of four-coordinated molecules in supercooled liquid water explains its anomalous thermodynamics and also controls the rate and mechanism of ice formation. The simulations reveal that the crystallization rate of water reaches a maximum around 225 K, below which ice nuclei form faster than liquid water can equilibrate. This implies a lower limit of metastability of liquid water just below TH and well above its glass transition temperature Tg{\\approx}136 K. By providing a relationship between the structural transformation in liquid water, its anomalous thermodynamics and its crystallization rate, this work provides a microscopic foundation to the experimental finding that the thermodynamics of water determines the rates of homogeneous nucleation of ice.(5)

Emily B. Moore; Valeria Molinero

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

96

Synthesis, transport properties, and electronic structure of Cu{sub 2}CdSnTe{sub 4}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new stannite phase was synthesized and its temperature dependent transport properties were investigated. Cu{sub 2}CdSnTe{sub 4} possesses strong p-type conduction, while the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity exhibits typical dielectric behavior. Electronic structure calculations allowed for a description of the transport characteristics in terms the energy band structure, density of states, and Fermi surface. The potential for thermoelectric applications is also discussed.

Dong, Yongkwan; Khabibullin, Artem R.; Wei, Kaya; Ge, Zhen-Hua; Woods, Lilia M., E-mail: lmwoods@usf.edu; Nolas, George S., E-mail: gnolas@usf.edu [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); Martin, Joshua [Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Salvador, James R. [Chemical and Materials Systems Laboratory, GM R and D Center, Warren, Michigan 48090 (United States)

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

97

Incentives for the use of depleted uranium alloys as transport cask containment structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive material transport casks use either lead or depleted uranium (DU) as gamma-ray shielding material. Stainless steel is conventionally used for structural containment. If a DU alloy had sufficient properties to guarantee resistance to failure during both nominal use and accident conditions to serve the dual-role of shielding and containment, the use of other structure materials (i.e., stainless steel) could be reduced. (It is recognized that lead can play no structural role.) Significant reductions in cask weight and dimensions could then be achieved perhaps allowing an increase in payload. The mechanical response of depleted uranium has previously not been included in calculations intended to show that DU-shielded transport casks will maintain their containment function during all conditions. This paper describesa two-part study of depleted uranium alloys: First, the mechanical behavior of DU alloys was determined in order to extend the limited set of mechanical properties reported in the literature. The mechanical properties measured include the tensile behavior the impact energy. Fracture toughness testing was also performed to determine the sensitivity of DU alloys to brittle fracture. Fracture toughness is the inherent material property which quantifies the fracmm resistance of a material. Tensile strength and ductility are significant in terms of other failure modes, however, as win be discussed. These mechanical properties were then input into finite element calculations of cask response to loading conditions to quantify the potential for claiming structural credit for DU. (The term structural credit'' describes whether a material has adequate properties to allow it to assume a positive role in withstanding structural loadings.)

McConnell, P [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Salzbrenner, R; Wellman, G W; Sorenson, K B [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

On a novel rate theory for transport in narrow ion channels and its application to the study of flux optimization via geometric effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On a novel rate theory for transport in narrow ion channels and its application to the study passage time to describe single-ion conduction in narrow, effectively one-dimensional membrane channels. DOI: 10.1063/1.3077205 I. INTRODUCTION Ion channels are membrane proteins which enable se- lected ions

Reingruber, Jürgen

99

The effects of strain rate and curvature on surface density function transport in turbulent premixed methane-air and hydrogen-air flames: A comparative study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of tangential strain rate and curvature on the surface density function (SDF) and on source terms within the SDF transport equation are studied for lean methane-air and hydrogen-air flames using two-dimensional direct numerical simulations with detailed chemistry. A positive correlation is observed between the SDF and the tangential strain rate, and this is explained in terms of the interaction between the local tangential strain rate and the dilatation rate due to heat release. Curvature is also seen to affect the SDF through the curvature response of both tangential strain rate and dilatation rate on a given flame isosurface. Strain rate and curvature are found to have an appreciable effect on several terms of the SDF transport equation. The SDF straining term in both methane and hydrogen flames is correlated positively with tangential strain rate, as expected, and is also correlated negatively with curvature. For methane flames, the SDF propagation term is found to correlate negatively with flame curvature toward the reactant side of the flame and positively toward the product side. By contrast, for hydrogen flames the SDF propagation term is negatively correlated with curvature throughout the flame brush. The variation of the SDF curvature term with local flame curvature for both methane and hydrogen flames is found to be nonlinear due to the additional stretch induced by the tangential diffusion component of the displacement speed. Physical explanations are provided for all of these effects, and the modeling implications are considered in detail. (author)

Chakraborty, N. [Engineering Department, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L69 3GH (United Kingdom); Hawkes, E.R. [School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Chen, J.H. [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Cant, R.S. [Engineering Department, Cambridge University, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

The impact of disorder on charge transport in three dimensional quantum dot resonant tunneling structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient iso-entropic energy filtering of electronic waves can be realized through nanostructures with three dimensional confinement, such as quantum dot resonant tunneling structures. Large-area deployment of such structures is useful for energy selective contacts but such configuration is susceptible to structural disorders. In this work, the transport properties of quantum-dot-based wide-area resonant tunneling structures, subject to realistic disorder mechanisms, are studied. Positional variations of the quantum dots are shown to reduce the resonant transmission peaks while size variations in the device are shown to reduce as well as broaden the peaks. Increased quantum dot size distribution also results in a peak shift to lower energy which is attributed to large dots dominating transmission. A decrease in barrier thickness reduces the relative peak height while the overall transmission increases dramatically due to lower “series resistance.” While any shift away from ideality can be intuitively expected to reduce the resonance peak, quantification allows better understanding of the tolerances required for fabricating structures based on resonant tunneling phenomena/.

Puthen-Veettil, B., E-mail: b.puthen-veettil@unsw.edu.au; Patterson, R.; König, D.; Conibeer, G.; Green, M. A. [Australian Centre for Advanced Photovoltaics, UNSW, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Stability, electronic structures and transport properties of armchair (10, 10) BN/C nanotubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the first-principle calculations, the stability and electronic properties of two novel types of four-segment armchair (10, 10) BN/C hybrid nanotubes ((BN){sub 5}C{sub 5}(BN){sub 5}C{sub 5}NT and (BN){sub 5}C{sub 5}(NB){sub 5}C{sub 5}NT) as well as two-segment armchair (10, 10) BN/C hybrid nanotubes ((BN{sub 20?n}C{sub n}NTs) are systematically investigated. When n increases from 1 to 4, the band gap of (BN){sub 20?n}C{sub n}NTs gradually decreases to a narrow one. When 4?n?17, the electronic structure of carbon segment in (BN){sub 20?n}C{sub n}NTs behaves as zigzag graphene nanoribbons whose band gap is modulated by an inherent electric field of the BN segment. ZGNR-like segments in (BN){sub 5}C{sub 5}(BN){sub 5}C{sub 5}NT and (BN){sub 5}C{sub 5}(NB){sub 5}C{sub 5}NT behave as narrow gap semiconductor and metal, respectively, due to their different chemical environment. Moreover, the (BN){sub 5}C{sub 5}(NB){sub 5}C{sub 5}NT can separate electron and hole carriers, indicating its potential application in solar cell materials. Obvious transport enhancement around the Fermi level is found in the four-segment nanotubes, especially a 6G{sub 0} transmission peak in the metallic (BN){sub 5}C{sub 5}(NB){sub 5}C{sub 5}NT. - Graphical abstract: Structural diagram of four-segment (BN){sub 5}C{sub 5}(NB){sub 5}C{sub 5}NT and its typical two-probe system. The band structures and transport spectra of (BN){sub 5}C{sub 5}(NB){sub 5}C{sub 5}NT are shown in upper and lower panels. Highlights: ? Transport properties of two types of four-segment BNC hybrid nanotubes are studied. ? Transport enhancements are realized in the four-segment BNC hybrid nanotubes. ? Electron and hole separation is found in four-segment BNC hybrid nanotubes.

Xiao, H.P.; He, Chaoyu; Zhang, C.X. [Department of Physics, Laboratory for Quantum Engineering and Micro-Nano Energy Technology, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105, Hunan (China); Sun, L.Z., E-mail: lzsun@xtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Laboratory for Quantum Engineering and Micro-Nano Energy Technology, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105, Hunan (China); Zhou, Pan [Department of Physics, Laboratory for Quantum Engineering and Micro-Nano Energy Technology, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105, Hunan (China); Zhong, Jianxin, E-mail: jxzhong@xtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Laboratory for Quantum Engineering and Micro-Nano Energy Technology, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105, Hunan (China)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Structural basis for solute transport, nucleotide regulation, and immunological recognition of Neisseria meningitidis PorB  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PorB is the second most prevalent outer membrane protein in Neisseria meningitidis. PorB is required for neisserial pathogenesis and can elicit a Toll-like receptor mediated host immune response. Here, the x-ray crystal structure of PorB has been determined to 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. Structural analysis and cocrystallization studies identify three putative solute translocation pathways through the channel pore: One pathway transports anions nonselectively, one transports cations nonselectively, and one facilitates the specific uptake of sugars. During infection, PorB likely binds host mitochondrial ATP, and cocrystallization with the ATP analog AMP-PNP suggests that binding of nucleotides regulates these translocation pathways both by partial occlusion of the pore and by restricting the motion of a putative voltage gating loop. PorB is located on the surface of N. meningitidis and can be recognized by receptors of the host innate immune system. Features of PorB suggest that Toll-like receptor mediated recognition outer membrane proteins may be initiated with a nonspecific electrostatic attraction.

Tanabe, Mikio; Nimigean, Crina M.; Iverson, T.M. (Weill-Med); (Vanderbilt)

2010-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

103

Utility Rate Structures and the Impact of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Projects  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012Nuclear Guide Remote Access toDeploymentRate Structures and

104

Synthesis and structural, magnetic, thermal, and transport properties of several transition metal oxides and aresnides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxide compounds containing the transition metal vanadium (V) have attracted a lot of attention in the field of condensed matter physics owing to their exhibition of interesting properties including metal-insulator transitons, structural transitions, ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic orderings, and heavy fermion behavior. Binary vanadium oxides V{sub n}O{sub 2n-1} where 2 {le} n {le} 9 have triclinic structures and exhibit metal-insulator and antiferromagnetic transitions. The only exception is V{sub 7}O{sub 13} which remains metallic down to 4 K. The ternary vanadium oxide LiV{sub 2}O{sub 4} has the normal spinel structure, is metallic, does not undergo magnetic ordering and exhibits heavy fermion behavior below 10 K. CaV{sub 2}O{sub 4} has an orthorhombic structure with the vanadium spins forming zigzag chains and has been suggested to be a model system to study the gapless chiral phase. These provide great motivation for further investigation of some known vanadium compounds as well as to explore new vanadium compounds in search of new physics. This thesis consists, in part, of experimental studies involving sample preparation and magnetic, transport, thermal, and x-ray measurements on some strongly correlated eletron systems containing the transition metal vanadium. The compounds studied are LiV{sub 2}O{sub 4}, YV{sub 4}O{sub 8}, and YbV{sub 4}O{sub 8}. The recent discovery of superconductivity in RFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub x} (R = La, Ce, Pr, Gd, Tb, Dy, Sm, and Nd), and AFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (A = Ba, Sr, Ca, and Eu) doped with K, Na, or Cs at the A site with relatively high T{sub c} has sparked tremendous activities in the condensed matter physics community and a renewed interest in the area of superconductivity as occurred following the discovery of the layered cuprate high T{sub c} superconductors in 1986. To discover more superconductors with hopefully higher T{sub c}'s, it is extremely important to investigate compounds having crystal structures related to the compounds showing high T{sub c} superconductivity. Along with the vanadium oxide compounds described before, this thesis describes our investigations of magnetic, structural, thermal and transport properties of EuPd{sub 2}Sb{sub 2} single crystals which have a crystal structure closely related to the AFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} compounds and also a study of the reaction kinetics of the formation of LaFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub x}.

Das, Supriyo

2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

105

The Integration of a Structural Water Gas Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is in response to a requirement for a system that combines water gas shift technology with separation technology for coal derived synthesis gas. The justification of such a system would be improved efficiency for the overall hydrogen production. By removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas stream, the water gas shift equilibrium would force more carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and maximize the total hydrogen produced. Additional benefit would derive from the reduction in capital cost of plant by the removal of one step in the process by integrating water gas shift with the membrane separation device. The answer turns out to be that the integration of hydrogen separation and water gas shift catalysis is possible and desirable. There are no significant roadblocks to that combination of technologies. The problem becomes one of design and selection of materials to optimize, or at least maximize performance of the two integrated steps. A goal of the project was to investigate the effects of alloying elements on the performance of vanadium membranes with respect to hydrogen flux and fabricability. Vanadium was chosen as a compromise between performance and cost. It is clear that the vanadium alloys for this application can be produced, but the approach is not simple and the results inconsistent. For any future contracts, large single batches of alloy would be obtained and rolled with larger facilities to produce the most consistent thin foils possible. Brazing was identified as a very likely choice for sealing the membranes to structural components. As alloying was beneficial to hydrogen transport, it became important to identify where those alloying elements might be detrimental to brazing. Cataloging positive and negative alloying effects was a significant portion of the initial project work on vanadium alloying. A water gas shift catalyst with ceramic like structural characteristics was the second large goal of the project. Alumina was added as a component of conventional high temperature water gas shift iron oxide based catalysts. The catalysts contained Fe-Al-Cr-Cu-O and were synthesized by co-precipitation. A series of catalysts were prepared with 5 to 50 wt% Al2O3, with 8 wt% Cr2O3, 4 wt% CuO, and the balance Fe2O3. All of the catalysts were compared to a reference WGS catalyst (88 wt% FeOx, 8 wt% Cr2O3, and 4 wt% CuO) with no alumina. Alumina addition to conventional high temperature water gas shift catalysts at concentrations of approximately 15 wt% increased CO conversion rates and increase thermal stability. A series of high temperature water gas shift catalysts containing iron, chromia, and copper oxides were prepared with small amounts of added ceria in the system Fe-Cr-Cu-Ce-O. The catalysts were also tested kinetically under WGS conditions. 2-4 wt% ceria addition (at the expense of the iron oxide content) resulted in increased reaction rates (from 22-32% higher) compared to the reference catalyst. The project goal of a 10,000 liter per day WGS-membrane reactor was achieved by a device operating on coal derived syngas containing significant amounts of carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide. The membrane flux was equivalent to 52 scfh/ft2 based on a 600 psi syngas inlet pressure and corresponded to membranes costing $191 per square foot. Over 40 hours of iv exposure time to syngas has been achieved for a double membrane reactor. Two modules of the Chart reactor were tested under coal syngas for over 75 hours with a single module tested for 50 hours. The permeance values for the Chart membranes were similar to the REB reactor though total flux was reduced due to significantly thicker membranes. Overall testing of membrane reactors on coal derived syngas was over 115 hours for all reactors tested. Testing of the REB double membrane device exceeded 40 hours. Performance of the double membrane reactor has been similar to the results for the single reactor with good maintenance of flux even after these long exposures to hydrogen sulfide. Of special interest is that the flux is highest at the start of each e

Barton, Thomas; Argyle, Morris; Popa, Tiberiu

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

3D Field-Scale Reactive Transport Modeling of In Situ Immobilization of Uranium in Structured Porous Media via Biostimulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A several-month-long ethanol injection experiment is being conducted to study the impacts of porous media structure (i.e., heterogeneity existing at multiple scales) on the effectiveness of metal/radionuclide bioremediation in a highly heterogeneous unconfined aquifer near Oak Ridge, TN, USA. We have constructed a 3D field-scale groundwater flow and multicomponent reactive transport model to simulate the experimental observations. The model incorporates a suite of abiotic reactions and microbially-mediated redox reactions for multiple terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs) including soluble oxygen, nitrate, U(VI) and sulfate and solid-phase electron acceptors. Different biomass populations are considered in the model. Growth of these populations is derived from the bioenergetics-based approach in which the partitioning of electron flow between energy generation and cell biomass production is dependent on the free energy of the corresponding TEAP. TEAP reaction rates were free energy constrained. The TEAP model and reaction system have been formulated and used to simulate laboratory batch experimental observations. We conducted the field-scale simulation starting with the reaction system and parameters obtained from the batch experiment and hydrologic parameters estimated from the results of pumping tests, water level monitoring and model interpretation of a tracer test conducted in August 2004. Reaction parameters were investigated to compare simulation results and field experiment observations.

Fang, Yilin; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Roden, Eirc E.; Kamolpornwijit, Wiwat; Brooks, Scott C.

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

107

Piping flow erosion in water retaining structures: inferring erosion rates from hole erosion tests and quantifying the failure time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Piping flow erosion in water retaining structures: inferring erosion rates from hole erosion tests-en-Provence Cedex 5, France E-mail: stephane.bonelli@cemagref.fr Abstract The piping flow erosion process, involving structures. Such a pipe can be imputed to roots or burrows. The coefficient of erosion must be known in order

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

108

Structures for attaching or sealing a space between components having different coefficients or rates of thermal expansion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A structure for attaching together or sealing a space between a first component and a second component that have different rates or amounts of dimensional change upon being exposed to temperatures other than ambient temperature. The structure comprises a first attachment structure associated with the first component that slidably engages a second attachment structure associated with the second component, thereby allowing for an independent floating movement of the second component relative to the first component. The structure can comprise split rings, laminar rings, or multiple split rings.

Corman, Gregory Scot; Dean, Anthony John; Tognarelli, Leonardo; Pecchioli, Mario

2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

109

Journal of Statistical Physics, Vol. 95, Nos. 12, 1999 Radiative Transport in a Periodic Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; final December 1, 1998 We derive radiative transport equations for solutions of a Schrodinger equation and the Bloch wave expansion. The streaming part of the radiative transport equations is determined entirely Radiative transport equations describe propagation of the phase space energy density of high frequency waves

Fannjiang, Albert

110

Dynamics of a vesicle as a cell mimic: Effects of interior structure, cross-membrane transport, and interaction with filaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics of a vesicle as a cell mimic: Effects of interior structure, cross-membrane transport, and interaction with filaments The biological membrane is, in essence, a thermodynamically-nonequilibrium lipid bilayer [6, 30, 34, 43, 47] with a variety of molecular motors, ion pumps, or channels residing within [19

Young, Yuan N.

111

Transportation Energy Efficiency Trends, 1972--1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US transportation sector, which remains 97% dependent on petroleum, used a record 22.8 quads of energy in 1993. Though growing much more slowly than the economy from 1975 to 1985, energy use for transportation is now growing at nearly the same rate as GDP. This report describes the analysis of trends in energy use and energy intensity in transportation into components due to, (1) growth in transportation activity, (2) changes in energy intensity, and (3) changes in the modal structure of transportation activities.

Greene, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Fan, Y. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

PUBLISHED VERSION Structure of micro-instabilities in tokamak plasmas: Stiff transport or plasma eruptions?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

eruptions? D. Dickinson, C. M. Roach, J. M. Skipp, and H. R. Wilson © 2013 UNITED KINGDOM ATOMIC ENERGY plasmas: Stiff transport or plasma eruptions? D. Dickinson, C. M. Roach, J. M. Skipp, and H. R. Wilson transport or plasma eruptions? D. Dickinson,1,2,a) C. M. Roach,2 J. M. Skipp,1 and H. R. Wilson1 1 York

113

Structure/property relations of aluminum under varying rates and stress states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work we analyze the plasticity, damage, and fracture characteristics of three different processed aluminum alloys (rolled 5083-H13, cast A356-T6, and extruded 6061-T6) under varying stress states (tension, compression, and torsion) and strain rates (0.001/, 1/s., and 1000/s). The stress state difference had more of a flow stress effect than the applied strain rates for those given in this study (0.001/sec up to 1000/sec). The stress state and strain rate also had a profound effect on the damage evolution of each aluminum alloy. Tension and torsional straining gave much greater damage nucleation rates than compression. Although the damage of all three alloys was found to be void nucleation dominated, the A356-T6 and 5083-H131 aluminum alloys incurred void damage via micron scale particles where the 6061-T6 aluminum alloy incurred void damage from two scales, micron-scale particles and nanoscale precipitates. Having two length scales of particles that participated in the damage evolution made the 6061-T6 incur a strain rate sensitive damage rate that was different than the other two aluminum alloys. Under tension, as the strain rate increased, the 6061-T6 aluminum alloy's void nucleation rate decreased, but the A356-T6 and 5083-H131 aluminum alloys void nucleation rate increased.

Tucker, Matthew T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Horstemeyer, Mark F [MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV; Whittington, Wilburn R [MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV; Solanki, Kiran N [MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV.

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

114

MINNESOTA ROAD FEE TEST MILEAGE BASED USER FEE RATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policy Center Oregon Road User Fee Pilot Program Other Interest: Nevada, Texas, Ohio, Idaho, etc. May Cellular Tower Data Warehouse May 24, 2012 6 #12;Determination of Mileage Fees · MBUF Rate StructureMINNESOTA ROAD FEE TEST MILEAGE BASED USER FEE RATE STRUCTURE CONCEPT 23rd Annual Transportation

Minnesota, University of

115

Structured Codes Improve the Bennett-Brassard-84 Quantum Key Rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A central goal in information theory and cryptography is finding simple characterizations of optimal communication rates subject to various restrictions and security requirements. Ideally, the optimal key rate for a quantum key distribution (QKD) protocol would be given by {\\em single-letter formula} involving a simple optimization over a single use of an effective channel. We explore the possibility of such a formula for one of the simplest and most widely used QKD protocols--Bennett-Brassard-84 (BB84) with one way classical post-processing. We show that a conjectured single-letter key-rate formula is false, uncovering a deep ignorance about asymptotically good private codes and pointing towards unfortunate complications in the theory of QKD. These complications are not without benefit--with added complexity comes better key rates than previously thought possible. We improve the threshold for secure key generation from a bit error rate of 0.124 to 0.129.

Graeme Smith; Joseph M. Renes; John A. Smolin

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

116

The Transport and Fate of Helium in Martensitic Steels at Fusion Relevant He/DPA Ratios and DPA Rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding, modeling and managing the effects of He and displacement damage on microstructural evolution and property changes are primary objectives of fusion materials research. We recently implemented an approach for producing controlled He-to-dpa ratios under neutron irradiation using a novel ?-implantation technique. Thin 1-4 µm NiAl coatings were deposited on Eurofer-97 TEM discs to produce a uniform He deposition zone of 6 to 8 µm. The test matrix is aimed at characterizing the transport, fate and consequences of He and He-to-dpa ratio variation on alloys with a wide range of starting microstructure. We explore the effect He-to-dpa ratio and temperature on the microstructure of conventionally processed Eurofer-97. Bubbles were found at all irradiation temperatures, with estimated maximum diameters of ~12, 6.9 and 1.4 nm at 500°C (~9 dpa and 372 appm He), 400°C (~3.9 dpa and 82 appm He) and 300°C (~3.9 dpa and 89 appm He), respectively.

Kurtz, Richard J.; Odette, George R.; Yamamoto, Takuya; Gelles, David S.; Miao, Pifeng; Oliver, Brian M.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Rate Effects for Mixed-Mode Fracture of Plastically Deforming, Adhesively-Bonded Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from a commercial adhesive and a dual-phase steel has been studied under different rates. Since mixed- mode fracture occurs along the interface between the steel and adhesive, the cohesive- parameters

Thouless, Michael

118

Lithium Diisopropylamide-Mediated Lithiations of Imines: Insights into Highly Structure-Dependent Rates and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

enolates, their reactivities are quite different. Imine lithiations are orders of magnitude slower than this point by foreshadowing results summarized in Chart 1 and Scheme 1. Chart 1 contains structurally related-carbon. Further investigation of LDA- mediated lithiations of the imines in Chart 1 reveals structure- reactivity

Collum, David B.

119

Transporting particulate material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

Aldred, Derek Leslie (North Hollywood, CA); Rader, Jeffrey A. (North Hollywood, CA); Saunders, Timothy W. (North Hollywood, CA)

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

120

Experimental Study of the Effect of Beam Loading on RF Breakdown Rate in CLIC High-Gradient Accelerating Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RF breakdown is a key issue for the multi-TeV highluminosity e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). Breakdowns in the high-gradient accelerator structures can deflect the beam and decrease the desired luminosity. The limitations of the accelerating structures due to breakdowns have been studied so far without a beam present in the structure. The presence of the beam modifies the distribution of the electrical and magnetic field distributions, which determine the breakdown rate. Therefore an experiment has been designed for high power testing a CLIC prototype accelerating structure with a beam present in the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3). A special beam line allows extracting a beam with nominal CLIC beam current and duration from the CTF3 linac. The paper describes the beam optics design for this experimental beam line and the commissioning of the experiment with beam.

Tecker, F; Kelisani, M; Doebert, S; Grudiev, A; Quirante, J; Riddone, G; Syratchev, I; Wuensch, W; Kononenko, O; Solodko, A; Lebet, S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Cooling rate and size effects on the medium-range structure of multicomponent oxide glasses simulated by molecular dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A set of molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the effect of cooling rate and system size on the medium-range structure of melt-derived multicomponent silicate glasses, represented by the quaternary 45S5 Bioglass composition. Given the significant impact of the glass degradation on applications of these materials in biomedicine and nuclear waste disposal, bulk structural features which directly affect the glass dissolution process are of particular interest. Connectivity of the silicate matrix, ion clustering and nanosegregation, distribution of ring and chain structural patterns represent critical features in this context, which can be directly extracted from the models. A key issue is represented by the effect of the computational approach on the corresponding glass models, especially in light of recent indications questioning the suitability of conventional MD approaches (that is, involving melt-and-quench of systems containing ?10{sup 3} atoms at cooling rates of 5-10 K/ps) when applied to model these glasses. The analysis presented here compares MD models obtained with conventional and nonconventional cooling rates and system sizes, highlighting the trend and range of convergence of specific structural features in the medium range. The present results show that time-consuming computational approaches involving much lower cooling rates and/or significantly larger system sizes are in most cases not necessary in order to obtain a reliable description of the medium-range structure of multicomponent glasses. We identify the convergence range for specific properties and use them to discuss models of several glass compositions for which a possible influence of cooling-rate or size effects had been previously hypothesized. The trends highlighted here represent an important reference to obtain reliable models of multicomponent glasses and extract converged medium-range structural features which affect the glass degradation and thus their application in different fields. In addition, as a first application of the present findings, the fully converged structure of the 45S5 glass was further analyzed to shed new light on several dissolution-related features whose interpretation has been rather controversial in the past.

Tilocca, Antonio [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)] [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

2013-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

122

Relating carrion breakdown rates to ambient resource level and community structure in four cave stream ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into ecosystems vary in quantity and quality (e.g., plant litter vs carrion). Variability in detrital quantity and quality potentially affects consumer biomass and rates of organic matter (OM) breakdown. We used cave streams to test 2 linked hypotheses regarding the influence of total detrital inputs on consumer biomass

Benstead, Jon

123

Improved Load Distribution for Load Rating of Low-Fill Box Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The distribution of live loads on the top slab of a box culvert plays a major role in determining the rating factor of the culvert. The current AASHTO guidelines do not consider the effects of pavements present above the fill while determining the load distribution...

Acharya, Raju

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

A quantitative study of the effect of structure on the saponification rates of aliphatic esters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of aliphatic ~sters&" (H? ST 'I'basis& The agricul- tural and Hechanicul dolls~", e of Texas, iugust, 1960) ~ J 6 6 11, '. 9. , t 9 ' ~tt ', 10, 41 (199&). APPENDIX 41 TABLE Ssponificstion of Ethyl Acetate st 35 Ca Run 1 Run 2 Time, Resistance Nin... Bennyl Propiona te 14. 55 5. 477 4+041 Oi9992 )o219 Z ~ 420 0. 4604 Oe04956 9i553 TABLE Seoond Order Rate Constants for n-Butyrates Ester h35 2 ~ 1 -1 li aole sino Nethyl n Sutyrate Ethyl a-Butyrate a Propyl n Sutyrate Isopropyl n...

Gonzalez, Federico P

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

THE SPECIFIC ACCELERATION RATE IN LOOP-STRUCTURED SOLAR FLARES-IMPLICATIONS FOR ELECTRON ACCELERATION MODELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze electron flux maps based on RHESSI hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy data for a number of extended coronal-loop flare events. For each event, we determine the variation of the characteristic loop length L with electron energy E, and we fit this observed behavior with models that incorporate an extended acceleration region and an exterior 'propagation' region, and which may include collisional modification of the accelerated electron spectrum inside the acceleration region. The models are characterized by two parameters: the plasma density n in, and the longitudinal extent L{sub 0} of, the acceleration region. Determination of the best-fit values of these parameters permits inference of the volume that encompasses the acceleration region and of the total number of particles within it. It is then straightforward to compute values for the emission filling factor and for the specific acceleration rate (electrons s{sup -1} per ambient electron above a chosen reference energy). For the 24 events studied, the range of inferred filling factors is consistent with a value of unity. The inferred mean value of the specific acceleration rate above E{sub 0} = 20 keV is {approx}10{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a 1{sigma} spread of about a half-order-of-magnitude above and below this value. We compare these values with the predictions of several models, including acceleration by large-scale, weak (sub-Dreicer) fields, by strong (super-Dreicer) electric fields in a reconnecting current sheet, and by stochastic acceleration processes.

Guo, Jingnan [Institut fuer Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, D-24118, Kiel (Germany)] [Institut fuer Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, D-24118, Kiel (Germany); Emslie, A. Gordon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Piana, Michele, E-mail: guo@physik-uni.kiel.de, E-mail: piana@dima.unige.it, E-mail: emslieg@wku.edu [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Genova, via Dodecaneso 35, I-16146 Genova (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Genova, via Dodecaneso 35, I-16146 Genova (Italy)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

126

The Coal Transportation Rate Database  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic4,630.2perSep-14Base22,667The Basics ofThe Coal

127

Structure and function of subsurface microbial communities affecting radionuclide transport and bio-immobilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to provide comparative information regarding the changes in clay structure that occur due to biotic or abiotic reduction, as probed by variable-temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy.

Stucki, Joseph William [University of Illinois

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

128

Rates and Mechanisms of Oil Shale Pyrolysis: A Chemical Structure Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three pristine Utah Green River oil shale samples were obtained and used for analysis by the combined research groups at the University of Utah and Brigham Young University. Oil shale samples were first demineralized and the separated kerogen and extracted bitumen samples were then studied by a host of techniques including high resolution liquid-state carbon-13 NMR, solid-state magic angle sample spinning 13C NMR, GC/MS, FTIR, and pyrolysis. Bitumen was extracted from the shale using methanol/dichloromethane and analyzed using high resolution 13C NMR liquid state spectroscopy, showing carbon aromaticities of 7 to 11%. The three parent shales and the demineralized kerogens were each analyzed with solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. Carbon aromaticity of the kerogen was 23-24%, with 10-12 aromatic carbons per cluster. Crushed samples of Green River oil shale and its kerogen extract were pyrolyzed at heating rates from 1 to 10 K/min at pressures of 1 and 40 bar and temperatures up to 1000?C. The transient pyrolysis data were fit with a first-order model and a Distributed Activation Energy Model (DAEM). The demineralized kerogen was pyrolyzed at 10 K/min in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure at temperatures up to 525?C, and the pyrolysis products (light gas, tar, and char) were analyzed using 13C NMR, GC/MS, and FTIR. Details of the kerogen pyrolysis have been modeled by a modified version of the chemical percolation devolatilization (CPD) model that has been widely used to model coal combustion/pyrolysis. This refined CPD model has been successful in predicting the char, tar, and gas yields of the three shale samples during pyrolysis. This set of experiments and associated modeling represents the most sophisticated and complete analysis available for a given set of oil shale samples.

Fletcher, Thomas; Pugmire, Ronald

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

The effect of flame structure on soot formation and transport in turbulent nonpremixed flames using direct numerical simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct numerical simulations of a two-dimensional, nonpremixed, sooting ethylene flame are performed to examine the effects of soot-flame interactions and transport in an unsteady configuration. A 15-step, 19-species (with 10 quasi-steady species) chemical mechanism was used for gas chemistry, with a two-moment, four-step, semiempirical soot model. Flame curvature is shown to result in flames that move, relative to the fluid, either toward or away from rich soot formation regions, resulting in soot being essentially convected into or away from the flame. This relative motion of flame and soot results in a wide spread of soot in the mixture fraction coordinate. In regions where the center of curvature of the flame is in the fuel stream, the flame motion is toward the fuel and soot is located near the flame at high temperature and hence has higher reaction rates and radiative heat fluxes. Soot-flame breakthrough is also observed in these regions. Fluid convection and flame displacement velocity relative to fluid convection are of similar magnitudes while thermophoretic diffusion is 5-10 times lower. These results emphasize the importance of both unsteady and multidimensional effects on soot formation and transport in turbulent flames. (author)

Lignell, David O. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84098 (United States); Reacting Flow Research Department, Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Chen, Jacqueline H. [Reacting Flow Research Department, Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Smith, Philip J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84098 (United States); Lu, Tianfeng; Law, Chung K. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Non-Equilbrium Chalcogen Concentrations in Silicon: Physical Structure, Electronic Transport, and Photovoltaic Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Photovoltaic Potential A thesis presented by Mark Thomas Winkler to The Department of Physics in partial, and Photovoltaic Potential Eric Mazur Mark Winkler Abstract This thesis explores the structure and properties presence of an impurity band and its relevance to photovoltaics. The investigations that we report here

Mazur, Eric

131

Peer review of the National Transportation Safety Board structural analysis of the I-35W bridge collapse.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Engineering Sciences Center at Sandia National Laboratories provided an independent peer review of the structural analysis supporting the National Transportation Safety Board investigation of the August 1, 2007 collapse of the I-35W Bridge in Minneapolis. The purpose of the review was to provide an impartial critique of the analysis approach, assumptions, solution techniques, and conclusions. Subsequent to reviewing numerous supporting documents, a SNL team of staff and management visited NTSB to participate in analysis briefings, discussions with investigators, and examination of critical elements of the bridge wreckage. This report summarizes the opinion of the review team that the NTSB analysis effort was appropriate and provides compelling supporting evidence for the NTSB probable cause conclusion.

Gwinn, Kenneth West; Redmond, James Michael; Wellman, Gerald William

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Polymer electrolyte membranes from fluorinated polyisoprene-block-sulfonated polystyrene: Membrane structure and transport properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With a view to optimizing morphology and ultimately properties, membranes have been cast from relatively inexpensive block copolymer ionomers of fluorinated polyisoprene-block-sulfonated polystyrene (FISS) with various sulfonation levels, in both the acid form and the cesium neutralized form. The morphology of these membranes was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and ultra-small angle X-ray scattering, as well as water uptake, proton conductivity and methanol permeability within the temperature range from 20 to 60 C. Random phase separated morphologies were obtained for all samples except the cesium sample with 50 mol% sulfonation. The transport properties increased with increasing degree of sulfonation and temperature for all samples. The acid form samples absorbed more water than the cesium samples with a maximum swelling of 595% recorded at 60 C for the acid sample having 50 mol% sulfonation. Methanol permeability for the latter sample was more than an order of magnitude less than for Nafion 112 but so was the proton conductivity within the plane of the membrane at 20 C. Across the plane of the membrane this sample had half the conductivity of Nafion 112 at 60 C.

Sodeye, Akinbode [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts; Huang, Tianzi [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Gido, Samuel [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Correlation between structure and electrical transport in ion-irradiated graphene grown on Cu foils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition and supported on SiO2 and sapphire substrates was studied following controlled introduction of defects induced by 35 keV carbon ion irradiation. Changes in Raman spectra following fluences ranging from 1012 cm-2 to 1015 cm-2 indicate that the structure of graphene evolves from a highly-ordered layer, to a patchwork of disordered domains, to an essentially amorphous film. These structural changes result in a dramatic decrease in the Hall mobility by orders of magnitude while, remarkably, the Hall concentration remains almost unchanged, suggesting that the Fermi level is pinned at a hole concentration near 1x1013 cm-2. A model for scattering by resonant scatterers is in good agreement with mobility measurements up to an ion fluence of 1x1014 cm-2.

Buchowicz, G.; Stone, P.R.; Robinson, J.T.; Cress, C.D.; Beeman, J.W.; Dubon, O.D.

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

134

STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF SUBSURFACE MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES AFFECTING RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AND BIOIMMOBILIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project were to: (1) isolate and characterize novel anaerobic prokaryotes from subsurface environments exposed to high levels of mixed contaminants (U(VI), nitrate, sulfate), (2) elucidate the diversity and distribution of metabolically active metal- and nitrate-reducing prokaryotes in subsurface sediments, and (3) determine the biotic and abiotic mechanisms linking electron transport processes (nitrate, Fe(III), and sulfate reduction) to radionuclide reduction and immobilization. Mechanisms of electron transport and U(VI) transformation were examined under near in situ conditions in sediment microcosms and in field investigations at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination predominated by uranium and nitrate. A total of 20 publications (16 published or 'in press' and 4 in review), 10 invited talks, and 43 contributed seminars/ meeting presentations were completed during the past four years of the project. PI Kostka served on one proposal review panel each year for the U.S. DOE Office of Science during the four year project period. The PI leveraged funds from the state of Florida to purchase new instrumentation that aided the project. Support was also leveraged by the PI from the Joint Genome Institute in the form of two successful proposals for genome sequencing. Draft genomes are now available for two novel species isolated during our studies and 5 more genomes are in the pipeline. We effectively addressed each of the three project objectives and research highlights are provided. Task I - Isolation and characterization of novel anaerobes: (1) A wide range of pure cultures of metal-reducing bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and denitrifying bacteria (32 strains) were isolated from subsurface sediments of the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination of uranium and nitrate. These isolates which are new to science all show high sequence identity to sequences retrieved from ORFRC subsurface. (2) Based on physiological and phylogenetic characterization, two new species of subsurface bacteria were described: the metal-reducer Geobacter daltonii, and the denitrifier Rhodanobacter denitrificans. (3) Strains isolated from the ORFRC show that Rhodanobacter species are well adapted to the contaminated subsurface. Strains 2APBS1 and 116-2 grow at high salt (3% NaCl), low pH (3.5) and tolerate high concentrations of nitrate (400mM) and nitrite (100mM). Strain 2APBS1 was demonstrated to grow at in situ acidic pHs down to 2.5. (4) R. denitrificans strain 2APBS1 is the first described Rhodanobacter species shown to denitrify. Nitrate is almost entirely converted to N2O, which may account for the large accumulation of N2O in the ORFRC subsurface. (5) G. daltonii, isolated from uranium- and hydrocarbon-contaminated subsurface sediments of the ORFRC, is the first organism from the subsurface clade of the genus Geobacter that is capable of growth on aromatic hydrocarbons. (6) High quality draft genome sequences and a complete eco-physiological description are completed for R. denitrificans strain 2APBS1 and G. daltonii strain FRC-32. (7) Given their demonstrated relevance to DOE remediation efforts and the availability of detailed genotypic/phenotypic characterization, Rhodanobacter denitrificans strain 2APBS1 and Geobacter daltonii strain FRC-32 represent ideal model organisms to provide a predictive understanding of subsurface microbial activity through metabolic modeling. Tasks II and III-Diversity and distribution of active anaerobes and Mechanisms linking electron transport and the fate of radionuclides: (1) Our study showed that members of genus Rhodanobacter and Geobacter are abundant and active in the uranium and nitrate contaminated subsurface. In the contaminant source zone of the Oak Ridge site, Rhodanobacter spp. are the predominant, active organisms detected (comprising 50% to 100% of rRNA detected). (2) We demonstrated for the first time that the function of micro

Joel E. Kostka; Lee Kerkhof; Kuk-Jeong Chin; Martin Keller; Joseph W. Stucki

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

The Structure of a Cyanobacterial Bicarbonate Transport Protein, CmpA. |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 andThe MolecularPlaceThe An APSEMSL The Structure

136

Crystal Structure of the EmrE Multidrug Transporter with a Substrate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3.WinterCrystal Structure of aConsequences.

137

Structure of ABC Transporter MsbA in Complex with ATP Vi and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategicOur MissionStructure and

138

Structure of a Putative Metal-Chelate Type ABC Transporter: An  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategicOurStructure of SynapticInward-facing

139

Structure and transport of aqueous electrolytes: From simple halides to radionuclide ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molecular simulations are used to compare the structure and dynamics of conventional and radioactive aqueous electrolytes: chloride solutions with sodium, potassium, cesium, calcium, and strontium. The study of Cs{sup +} and Sr{sup 2+} is important because these radioactive ions can be extremely harmful and are often confused by living organisms for K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}, respectively. Na{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, and Sr{sup 2+} are strongly bonded to their hydration shell because of their large charge density. We find that the water molecules in the first hydration shell around Na{sup +} form hydrogen bonds between each other, whereas molecules in the first hydration shell around Ca{sup 2+} and Sr{sup 2+} predominantly form hydrogen bonds with water molecules in the second shell. In contrast to these three ions, K{sup +} and Cs{sup +} have low charge densities so that they are weakly bonded to their hydration shell. Overall, the structural differences between Ca{sup 2+} and Sr{sup 2+} are small, but the difference between their coordination numbers relative to their surface areas could potentially be used to separate these ions. Moreover, the different decays of the velocity-autocorrelation functions corresponding to these ions indicates that the difference in mass could be used to separate these cations. In this work, we also propose a new definition of the pairing time that is easy to calculate and of physical significance regardless of the problem at hand.

Hartkamp, Remco, E-mail: hartkamp@mit.edu; Coasne, Benoit, E-mail: benoit.coasne@enscm.fr [Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier, CNRS (UMR 5253), Université Montpellier 2, ENSCM, 8 rue de l’Ecole Normale, 34296 Montpellier Cedex 05 (France); MultiScale Material Science for Energy and Environment, CNRS/MIT (UMI 3466), Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

140

Structure of micro-instabilities in tokamak plasmas: Stiff transport or plasma eruptions?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solutions to a model 2D eigenmode equation describing micro-instabilities in tokamak plasmas are presented that demonstrate a sensitivity of the mode structure and stability to plasma profiles. In narrow regions of parameter space, with special plasma profiles, a maximally unstable mode is found that balloons on the outboard side of the tokamak. This corresponds to the conventional picture of a ballooning mode. However, for most profiles, this mode cannot exist, and instead, a more stable mode is found that balloons closer to the top or bottom of the plasma. Good quantitative agreement with a 1D ballooning analysis is found, provided the constraints associated with higher order profile effects, often neglected, are taken into account. A sudden transition from this general mode to the more unstable ballooning mode can occur for a critical flow shear, providing a candidate model for why some experiments observe small plasma eruptions (Edge Localised Modes, or ELMs) in place of large Type I ELMs.

Dickinson, D., E-mail: dd502@york.ac.uk [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Roach, C. M. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)] [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Skipp, J. M.; Wilson, H. R. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)] [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Nano-sized structured layered positive electrode materials to enable high energy density and high rate capability lithium batteries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nano-sized structured dense and spherical layered positive active materials provide high energy density and high rate capability electrodes in lithium-ion batteries. Such materials are spherical second particles made from agglomerated primary particles that are Li.sub.1+.alpha.(Ni.sub.xCo.sub.yMn.sub.z).sub.1-tM.sub.tO.sub.2-dR.sub.d- , where M is selected from can be Al, Mg, Fe, Cu, Zn, Cr, Ag, Ca, Na, K, In, Ga, Ge, V, Mo, Nb, Si, Ti, Zr, or a mixture of any two or more thereof, R is selected from F, Cl, Br, I, H, S, N, or a mixture of any two or more thereof, and 0.ltoreq..alpha..ltoreq.0.50; 0

Deng, Haixia; Belharouak, Ilias; Amine, Khalil

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

142

Influence of heterogeneous ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the expression of nitrogen fixation and ammonium transporter genes during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the physiological status of Geobacter species during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater was evaluated. Ammonium concentrations varied by two orders of magnitude (<4 to 400 ?M) across the study site. Analysis of 16S rRNA sequences suggested that ammonium may have been one factor influencing the community composition prior to acetate amendment with Rhodoferax species predominating over Geobacter species with higher ammonium and Dechloromonas species dominating at the site with lowest ammonium. However, once acetate was added, and dissimilatory metal reduction was stimulated, Geobacter species became the predominant organisms at all locations. Rates of U(VI)-reduction appeared to be more related to acetate concentrations rather than ammonium levels. In situ mRNA transcript abundance of the nitrogen fixation gene, nifD, and the ammonium transporter gene, amtB, in Geobacter species indicated that ammonium was the primary source of nitrogen during uranium reduction. The abundance of amtB was inversely correlated to ammonium levels whereas nifD transcript levels were similar across all sites examined. These results suggest that nifD and amtB expression are closely regulated in response to ammonium availability to ensure an adequate supply of nitrogen while conserving cell resources. Thus, quantifying nifD and amtB transcript expression appears to be a useful approach for monitoring the nitrogen-related physiological status of subsurface Geobacter species and. This study also emphasizes the need for more detailed analysis of geochemical/physiological interactions at the field scale, in order to adequately model subsurface microbial processes during bioremediation.

Mouser, Paula; N'guessan, Lucie A.; Elifantz, H.; Holmes, Dawn; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Capping layer growth rate and the optical and structural properties of GaAsSbN-capped InAs/GaAs quantum dots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changing the growth rate during the heteroepitaxial capping of InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) with a 5?nm-thick GaAsSbN capping layer (CL) strongly modifies the QD structural and optical properties. A size and shape transition from taller pyramids to flatter lens-shaped QDs is observed when the CL growth rate is decreased from 1.5 to 0.5 ML/s. This indicates that the QD dissolution processes taking place during capping can be controlled to some extent by the GaAsSbN CL growth rate, with high growth rates allowing a complete preservation of the QDs. However, the dissolution processes are shown to have a leveling effect on the QD height, giving rise to a narrower size distribution for lower growth rates. Contrary to what could be expected, these effects are opposite to the strong blue-shift and improvement of the photoluminescence (PL) observed for higher growth rates. Nevertheless, the PL results can be understood in terms of the strong impact of the growth rate on the Sb and N incorporation into the CL, which results in lower Sb and N contents at higher growth rates. Besides the QD-CL band offsets and QD strain, the different CL composition alters the band alignment of the system, which can be transformed to type-II at low growth rates. These results show the key role of the alloyed CL growth parameters on the resulting QD properties and demonstrate an intricate correlation between the PL spectra and the sample morphology in complex QD-CL structures.

Ulloa, J. M., E-mail: jmulloa@isom.upm.es; Utrilla, A. D.; Guzman, A.; Hierro, A. [Institute for Systems based on Optoelectronics and Microtechnology (ISOM) and Dpto. Ingeniería Electrónica, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Reyes, D. F.; Ben, T.; González, D. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e IM y QI, Universidad de Cádiz, 11510 Puerto Real (Cádiz) (Spain)

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

144

Exploring the Localization of Transportation Planning: Essays on research and policy implications from shifting goals in transportation planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structure? Paper read at Transportation Research Board,Thomas Straatemeier. 2008. Urban transportation planning inDiversity and Design. Transportation Research -Part D 2

King, David Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Report on the 1961 TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH--------.. . -. .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ) ) Report on the 1961 TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH--------.. . -. . AND SERVICE ACTIVITIES IC C Negotiations with carriers ..·..... Resea rch activities ·...........·... Transportation Section staff resea rch . Transportation rate indexes .... Fish meal, scrap, and solublf's information

146

5th International Conference on Research in Air Transportation (ICRAT 2012) Design, Testing and Evaluation of a Pushback Rate Control Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

airports. This paper describes the implementation of a congestion control strategy at Boston Logan International Airport (BOS). The approach predicts the departure throughput in the next 15 minute interval International airport (ATH) [11]. In contrast to these approaches, the Pushback Rate Control strategy is a low

Gummadi, Ramakrishna

147

Electronic structure mechanism of spin-polarized electron transport in a NiC60Ni system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ATTN: AMSRD-ARL-WM, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 Abstract The nature of chemical bonding and its effect on spin-polarized electron transport in Ni­C60­Ni couple with metallic electrodes (e. g. Ni and Au), a key requirement for the Kondo effect

Pandey, Ravi

148

EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

J. Prouty

2006-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

149

Thermoelastic study of nanolayered structures using time-resolved X-ray diffraction at high repetition rate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the thermoelastic response of a nanolayered sample composed of a metallic SrRuO{sub 3} electrode sandwiched between a ferroelectric Pb(Zr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8})O{sub 3} film with negative thermal expansion and a SrTiO{sub 3} substrate. SrRuO{sub 3} is rapidly heated by fs-laser pulses with 208?kHz repetition rate. Diffraction of X-ray pulses derived from a synchrotron measures the transient out-of-plane lattice constant c of all three materials simultaneously from 120?ps to 5??s with a relative accuracy up to ?c/c?=?10{sup ?6}. The in-plane propagation of sound is essential for understanding the delayed out-of-plane compression of Pb(Zr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8})O{sub 3}.

Navirian, H. A.; Schick, D., E-mail: daniel.schick@uni-potsdam.de; Leitenberger, W.; Bargheer, M. [Institut für Physik und Astronomie, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Gaal, P.; Shayduk, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Wilhelm-Conrad-Röntgen Campus, BESSY II, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

150

DOE ER63951-3 Final Report: An Integrated Assessment of Geochemical and Community Structure Determinants of Metal Reduction Rates in Subsurface Sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to examine the importance of microbial community structure in influencing uranium reduction rates in subsurface sediments. If the redox state alone is the key to metal reduction, then any organisms that can utilize the oxygen and nitrate in the subsurface can change the geochemical conditions so metal reduction becomes an energetically favored reaction. Thus, community structure would not be critical in determining rates or extent of metal reduction unless community structure influenced the rate of change in redox. Alternatively, some microbes may directly catalyze metal reduction (e.g., specifically reduce U). In this case the composition of the community may be more important and specific types of electron donors may promote the production of communities that are more adept at U reduction. Our results helped determine if the type of electron donor or the preexisting community is important in the bioremediation of metal-contaminated environments subjected to biostimulation. In a series of experiments at the DOE FRC site in Oak Ridge we have consistently shown that all substrates promoted nitrate reduction, while glucose, ethanol, and acetate always promoted U reduction. Methanol only occasionally promoted extensive U reduction which is possibly due to community heterogeneity. There appeared to be limitations imposed on the community related to some substrates (e.g. methanol and pyruvate). Membrane lipid analyses (phospholipids and respiratory quinones) indicated different communities depending on electron donor used. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and clone libraries indicated distinct differences among communities even in treatments that promoted U reduction. Thus, there was enough metabolic diversity to accommodate many different electron donors resulting in the U bioimmobilization.

Susan Pfiffner

2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

151

Correlation of Structural Differences between Nafion/Polyaniline and Nafion/Polypyrrole Composite Membranes and Observed Transport Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polyaniline/Nafion and polypyrrole/Nafion composite membranes, prepared by chemical polymerization, are studied by infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Differences in vanadium ion diffusion through the membranes and in the membranes’ area specific resistance are linked to analytical observations that polyaniline and polypyrrole interact differently with Nafion. Polypyrrole, a weakly basic polymer, binds less strongly to the sulfonic acid groups of the Nafion membrane, and thus the hydrophobic polymer aggregates in the center of the Nafion channel rather than on the hydrophilic side chains of Nafion that contain sulfonic acid groups. This results in a drastically elevated membrane resistance and an only slightly decreased vanadium ion permeation compared to a Nafion membrane. Polyaniline on the other hand is a strongly basic polymer, which forms along the sidewalls of the Nafion pores and on the membrane surface, binding tightly to the sulfonic acid groups of Nafion. This leads to a more effective reduction in vanadium ion transport across the polyaniline/Nafion membranes and the increase in membrane resistance is less severe. The performance of selected polypyrrole/Nafion composite membranes is tested in a static vanadium redox cell. Increased coulombic efficiency, compared to a cell employing Nafion, further confirms the reduced vanadium ion transport through the composite membranes.

Schwenzer, Birgit; Kim, Soowhan; Vijayakumar, M.; Yang, Zhenguo; Liu, Jun

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Beyond the growth rate of cosmic structure: Testing modified gravity models with an extra degree of freedom  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 'modified' gravity the observed acceleration of the universe is explained by changing the gravitational force law or the number of degrees of freedom in the gravitational sector. Both possibilities can be tested by measurements of cosmological structure formation. In this paper we elaborate the details of such tests using the Galileon model as a case study. We pay attention to the possibility that each new degree of freedom may have stochastically independent initial conditions, generating different types of potential well in the early universe and breaking complete correlation between density and velocity power spectra. This 'stochastic bias' can confuse schemes to parametrize the predictions of modified gravity models, such as the use of the growth parameter f alone. Using data from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey we show that it will be possible to obtain constraints using information about the cosmological-scale force law embedded in the multipole power spectra of redshift-space distortions. As an examp...

Burrage, Clare; Seery, David

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Energy levels, oscillator strengths, radiative decay rates, and fine-structure collision strengths for the Zn-like ions Nb XII and Mo XIII  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy levels, line strengths, oscillator strengths, radiative decay rates, and fine-structure collision strengths are presented for the Zn-like ions Nb XII and Mo XIII. The atomic data are calculated with the AUTOSTRUCTURE code, where relativistic corrections are introduced according to the Breit–Pauli distorted wave approach. We present the calculations of atomic data for 110 fine-structure levels generated from fifteen configurations (1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6}3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6}3d{sup 10})4s{sup 2}, 4s4p, 4p{sup 2}, 4s4d, 4s4f, 4s5s, 4p4d, 4s5p, 4s5d, 4p4f, 4p5s, 4d{sup 2}, 4d4f, 4f{sup 2}, and 3d{sup 9}4s{sup 2}4p. Fine-structure collision strengths for transitions from the ground and the first four excited levels are presented at six electron energies (20, 50, 80, 110, 150, and 180 Ryd). Our atomic structure data are compared with the available experimental and theoretical results.

Liang, Liang, E-mail: liangll501@163.com; Liu, Xu-yang; Zhou, Chao

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Transportation Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transportation Services Transporting nuclear materials within the United States and throughout the world is a complicated and sometimes highly controversial effort requiring...

155

Local Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Local Transportation. Transportation from the Airport to Hotel. There are two types of taxi companies that operate at the airport: special and regular taxis (

156

Greening Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transportation Goal 2: Greening Transportation LANL supports and encourages employees to reduce their personal greenhouse gas emissions by offering various commuting and work...

157

Chamber transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

OLSON,CRAIG L.

2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

158

Physical features of small disperse coal dust fraction transportation and structurization processes in iodine air filters of absorption type in ventilation systems at nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The research on the physical features of transportation and structurization processes by the air-dust aerosol in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal adsorbent granules in an air filter of the adsorption type in the heating ventilation and cooling (HVAC) system at the nuclear power plant is completed. The physical origins of the coal dust masses distribution along the absorber with the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules during the air-dust aerosol intake process in the near the surface layer of absorber are researched. The quantitative technical characteristics of air filtering elements, which have to be considered during the optimization of air filters designs for the application in the ventilation systems at the nuclear power plants, are obtained.

Ledenyov, Oleg P; Poltinin, P Ya; Fedorova, L I

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Structure, magnetic, and transport properties of epitaxial ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} films: An experimental and first-principles study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the structure, magnetic, and transport properties of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (ZFO) by both experimental and first-principles study. The epitaxial ZFO films prepared with various oxygen partial pressures show clear semiconducting behavior and room-temperature ferrimagnetism. A large magnetoresistance of ?21.2% was observed at 75?K. The room-temperature ferrimagnetism is induced by the cation disordering. The calculated results indicate that under cation disordering, the ZFO with various oxygen vacancies is a half-metal semiconductor with both possible positive and negative signs of the spin polarization, while ZFO with no oxygen vacancies is an insulator and can be acted as the spin filter layer in spintronic devises.

Jin, Chao; Li, Peng; Mi, Wenbo; Bai, Haili, E-mail: baihaili@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials Physics and Preparing Technology, Institute of Advanced Materials Physics, Faculty of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

160

UNIVERSITY of HOUSTON Parking and Transportation Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY of HOUSTON Parking and Transportation Services Proposed FY14 and FY15 Parking Rates March ­ April Auxiliary Services Parking and Transportation Shared Governance Committee - Transportation of University of Houston parking and transportation programs. 2. To improve and maintain parking infrastructure

Bittner, Eric R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Thermoelectric transport in superlattices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermoelectric transport properties of superlattices have been studied using an exact solution of the Boltzmann equation. The role of heat transport along the barrier layers, of carrier tunneling through the barriers, of valley degeneracy and of the well width and energy dependences of the carrier-phonon scattering rates on the thermoelectric figure of merit are given. Calculations are given for Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and for PbTe, and the results of recent experiments are discussed.

Reinecke, T.L.; Broido, D.A.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Dynamic response of Cu4Zr54 metallic glass to high strain rate shock loading: plasticity, spall and atomic-level structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate dynamic response of Cu{sub 46}Zr{sub 54} metallic glass under adiabatic planar shock wave loading (one-dimensional strain) wjth molecular dynamics simulations, including Hugoniot (shock) states, shock-induced plasticity and spallation. The Hugoniot states are obtained up to 60 CPa along with the von Mises shear flow strengths, and the dynamic spall strength, at different strain rates and temperatures. The spall strengths likely represent the limiting values achievable in experiments such as laser ablation. For the steady shock states, a clear elastic-plastic transition is identified (e.g., in the shock velocity-particle velocity curve), and the shear strength shows strain-softening. However, the elastic-plastic transition across the shock front displays transient stress overshoot (hardening) above the Hugoniot elastic limit followed by a relatively sluggish relaxation to the steady shock state, and the plastic shock front steepens with increasing shock strength. The local von Mises shear strain analysis is used to characterize local deformation, and the Voronoi tessellation analysis, the corresponding short-range structures at various stages of shock, release, tension and spallation. The plasticity in this glass is manifested as localized shear transformation zones and of local structure rather than thermal origin, and void nucleation occurs preferentially at the highly shear-deformed regions. The Voronoi and shear strain analyses show that the atoms with different local structures are of different shear resistances that lead to shear localization (e.g., the atoms indexed with (0,0,12,0) are most shear-resistant, and those with (0,2,8,1) are highly prone to shear flow). The dynamic changes in local structures are consistent with the observed deformation dynamics.

Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arman, Bedri [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cagin, Tahir [TEXAS A& M UNIV

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Nuclear reaction analysis profiling as direct evidence for lithium ion mass transport in thin film rocking-chair'' structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A nuclear reaction analysis technique using the [ital p],[gamma] reaction, [sup 7]Li([ital p],[gamma])[sup 8]Be, occurring at approximately 440 keV, (half-width[approx]12 keV), has been utilized to determine the lithium concentration profiles in multilayer electrochromic window ( smart window'')/rechargeable battery cells when in their colored''/charged and bleached''/discharged states. The lithium profiles have been observed to shift according to the cells' states, thereby providing direct experimental evidence for the so-called rocking-chair model for such structures.

Goldner, R.B.; Haas, T.E.; Arntz, F.O.; Slaven, S.; Wong, K.K. (Electro-Optics Technology Center, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 02155 (United States)); Wilkens, B. (Bellcore, Red Bank, New Jersey 07001-7040 (United States)); Shepard, C.; Lanford, W. (Accelerator Laboratory, Physics Department, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York 12222 (United States))

1993-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

164

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, in situ neutron diffraction was used to characterize the chemical and structural properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} (here after as L2SF55T) specimen, which was subject to measurements of neutron diffraction from room temperature to 900 C. It was found that space group of R3c yielded a better refinement than a cubic structure of Pm3m. Oxygen occupancy was nearly 3 in the region from room temperature to 700 C, above which the occupancy decreased due to oxygen loss. Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were loaded to fracture at varying stress rates. Studies were done at room temperature in air and at 1000 C in a specified environment to evaluate slow crack growth behavior. The X-Ray data and fracture mechanisms points to non-equilibrium decomposition of the LSFCO OTM membrane. The non-equilibrium conditions could probably be due to the nature of the applied stress field (stressing rates) and leads to transition in crystal structures and increased kinetics of decomposition. The formations of a Brownmillerite or Sr2Fe2O5 type structures, which are orthorhombic are attributed to the ordering of oxygen vacancies. The cubic to orthorhombic transitions leads to 2.6% increase in strains and thus residual stresses generated could influence the fracture behavior of the OTM membrane. Continued investigations on the thermodynamic properties (stability and phase-separation behavior) and total conductivity of prototype membrane materials were carried out. The data are needed together with the kinetic information to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Previously characterization, stoichiometry and conductivity measurements for samples of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} were reported. In this report, measurements of the chemical and thermal expansion as a function of temperature and p{sub O2} are described.

S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Rate Schedules  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

One of the major responsibilities of Southeastern is to design, formulate, and justify rate schedules. Repayment studies prepared by the agency determine revenue requirements and appropriate rate...

166

Structural, electronic transport and magnetoresistance of a 142nm lead telluride nanowire synthesized using stress-induced growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, structurally uniform single crystalline PbTe nanowires (NWs) were synthesized using a stress-induced growth. Selected-area electron diffraction patterns show that the PbTe NWs were grown along the [100] direction. The electrical conductivity ? of a NW with 142 nm in diameter exhibited a semiconducting behavior at 50–300 K. An enhancement of electrical conductivity ? up to 2383 S m{sup ?1} at 300 K is much higher than ? [0.44–1526 S m{sup ?1}, Chen et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, p023115, (2013)] in previous studies. The room temperature magnetoresistance of the 142 nm NW was ?0.8% at B = 2 T, which is considerably higher than that [0.2% at B = 2 T, Ovsyannikov et al., Sol. State Comm. 126, 373, (2003)] of the PbTe bulk reported.

Dedi, E-mail: dediamada@phys.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: cheny2@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China) [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Nano Science and Technology Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Electronics and Telecommunication, Indonesian Institute of Sciences Bandung (Indonesia); Chien, Chia-Hua [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China) [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Nano Science and Technology Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Hsiung, Te-Chih [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Nano Science and Technology Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yu-Chieh; Huang, Yi-Cheng; Lee, Ping-Chung; Chen, Yang-Yuan, E-mail: dediamada@phys.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: cheny2@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chih-Hao [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Molecular Structure and Free Energy Landscape for Electron Transport in the Deca-Heme Cytochrome MtrF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The free energy profile for electron flow through the bacterial deca-heme cytochrome MtrF has been computed using thermodynamic integration and classical molecular dynamics. The extensive calculations on two versions of the structure help validate the method and results, because differences in the profiles can be related to differences in the charged amino acids local to specific heme groups. First estimates of reorganization free energies ? yield a range consistent with expectations for partially solvent exposed cofactors, and reveal an activation energy range surmountable for electron flow. Future work will aim at increasing the accuracy of ? with polarizable force field dynamics and quantum chemical energy gap calculations, as well as quantum chemical computation of electronic coupling matrix elements.

Breuer, Marian; Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Shi, Liang; Clarke, Thomas; Edwards, Marcus; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Blumberger, Jochen; Rosso, Kevin M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Neutron capture studies: 1, Multiple capture reactions and implications for calculated beta-delayed fission rates: 2, The nuclear level structure of 238Np  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Astrophysical r-process calculations of transbismuth elements are of interest because certain actinide pairs can be treated as chronometers in determining the duration of nucleosynthesis. For one such calculation where a particularly long galactic age was derived, 21 + 2 - 4 Gyr, we present evidence that the effect of beta-delayed fission appears to be seriously overestimated in uranium decay chains with A = 252 to 257. With this conclusion, it follows that this estimate of the galactic age must be considered more uncertain than if the calculated rates of beta-delayed fission were found to be acceptable. The nuclear level structure of 238Np has been investigated using the 237Np(n,..gamma..)238Np reaction and the alpha decay of 242mAm as experimental probes. Having established a level scheme for 238Np that includes 47 excited levels and 93 secondary transitions, we find a high degree of correspondence between the experimental band structure and that of a semi-empirical model developed to predict excitations in odd-odd deformed nuclei. 35 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Hoff, R.W.

1988-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

169

Variation in Mutation Rates Caused by RB69pol Fidelity Mutants Can Be Rationalized on the Basis of Their Kinetic Behavior and Crystal Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have previously observed that stepwise replacement of amino acid residues in the nascent base-pair binding pocket of RB69 DNA polymerase (RB69pol) with Ala or Gly expanded the space in this pocket, resulting in a progressive increase in misincorporation. However, in vivo results with similar RB69pol nascent base-pair binding pocket mutants showed that mutation rates, as determined by the T4 phage rI forward assay and rII reversion assay, were significantly lower for the RB69pol S565G/Y567A double mutant than for the Y567A single mutant, the opposite of what we would have predicted. To investigate the reasons for this unexpected result, we have determined the pre-steady-state kinetic parameters and crystal structures of relevant ternary complexes. We found that the S565G/Y567A mutant generally had greater base selectivity than the Y567A mutant and that the kinetic parameters for dNMP insertion, excision of the 3'-terminal nucleotide residue, and primer extension beyond a mispair differed not only between these two mutants but also between the two highly mutable sequences in the T4 rI complementary strand. Comparison of the crystal structures of these two mutants with correct and incorrect incoming dNTPs provides insight into the unexpected increase in the fidelity of the S565G/Y567A double mutant. Taken together, the kinetic and structural results provide a basis for integrating and interpreting in vivo and in vitro observations.

S Xia; M Wang; H Lee; A Sinha; G Blaha; T Christian; J Wang; W Konigsberg

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Structural, thermal, magnetic, and electronic transport properties of the LaNi?(Ge1-xPx)? system  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Polycrystalline samples of LaNi?(Ge1-xPx)? (x=0,0.25,0.50,0.75,1) were synthesized and their properties investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements at room temperature and by heat capacity Cp, magnetic susceptibility ?, and electrical resistivity ? measurements versus temperature T from 1.8 to 350 K. Rietveld refinements of powder XRD patterns confirm that these compounds crystallize in the body-centered-tetragonal ThCr?Si?-type structure (space group I4/mmm) with composition-dependent lattice parameters that slightly deviate from Vegard's law. The ?(T) measurements showed a positive temperature coefficient for all samples from 1.8 to 300 K, indicating that all compositions in this system are metallic. The low-T Cp measurements yield a rather large Sommerfeld electronic specific heat coefficient ?=12.4(2) mJ/mol K² for x=0, reflecting a large density of states at the Fermi energy that is comparable with the largest values found for the AFe?As? class of materials with the same crystal structure. The ? decreases approximately linearly with x to 7.4(1) mJ/mol K² for x=1. The ? measurements show nearly temperature-independent paramagnetic behavior across the entire range of compositions except for LaNi?Ge?, where a broad peak is observed at ?300 K from ?(T) measurements up to 1000 K that may arise from short-range antiferromagnetic correlations in a quasi-two-dimensional magnetic system. High-accuracy Padé approximants representing the Debye lattice heat capacity and Bloch-Grüneisen electron-phonon resistivity functions versus T are presented and are used to analyze our experimental Cp(T) and ?(T) data, respectively, for 1.8K?T?300 K. The T dependences of ? for all samples are well-described over this T range by the Bloch-Grüneisen model, although the observed ?(300 K) values are larger than calculated from this model. A significant T dependence of the Debye temperature determined from the Cp(T) data was observed for each composition. No clear evidence for bulk superconductivity or any other long-range phase transition was found for any of the LaNi?(Ge1-xPx)? compositions studied.

Goetsch, R. J.; Anand, V. K.; Pandey, Abhishek; Johnston, D. C.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Neutron structural characterization, inversion degree and transport properties of NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel prepared by the hydroxide route  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: A pure specimen has been synthesized by the hydroxide route. This spinel, studied by NPD, shows an important inversion degree, ? = 0.80. A bond-valence study shows that the tetrahedral Mn ions are divalent whereas the octahedral Mn and Ni are slightly oxidized from the expected 3+ and 2+ values, respectively. The mixed valence Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} accounts for a hopping mechanism between adjacent octahedral sites, leading to a significant conductivity. Highlights: ? A low-temperature hydroxide route allowed preparing almost pure specimens of NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}. ? NPD essential to determine inversion degree; contrasting Ni and Mn for neutrons. ? Bond valence establishes valence state of octahedral and tetrahedral Ni and Mn ions. ? Thermal analysis, transport measurements complement characterization of this oxide. ? A structure–properties relationship is established. -- Abstract: The title compound has been synthesized by the hydroxide route. The crystal structure has been investigated at room temperature from high-resolution neutron powder diffraction (NPD) data. It crystallizes in a cubic spinel structure, space group Fd3{sup ¯}m, Z = 8, with a = 8.3940(2) ? at 295 K. The crystallographic formula is (Ni{sub 0.202(1)}Mn{sub 0.798(1)}){sub 8a}(Ni{sub 0.790(1)}Mn{sub 1.210(1)}){sub 16d}O{sub 4} where 8a and 16d stand for the tetrahedral and octahedral sites of the spinel structure, respectively. There is a significant inversion degree of the spinel structure, ? = 0.80. In fact, the variable parameter for the oxygen position, u = 0.2636(4), is far from that expected (u = 0.25) for normal spinels. From a bond-valence study, it seems that the valence distribution in NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel is not as trivial as expected (Ni{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 3+}), but clearly the tetrahedral Mn ions are divalent whereas the octahedral Mn and Ni are slightly oxidized from the expected +3 and +2 values, respectively. The mixed valence observed at the octahedral sites provides the charge carriers that, by a hopping mechanism between Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} adjacent sites, leads to a significant conductivity, up to 0.85 S cm{sup ?1} at 800 °C in air.

Sagua, A.; Lescano, Gabriela M. [Departamento de Química, Laboratorio de Fisicoquímica Inorgánica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, INQUISUR, 8000 Bahía Blanca (Argentina)] [Departamento de Química, Laboratorio de Fisicoquímica Inorgánica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, INQUISUR, 8000 Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Alonso, J.A., E-mail: jaalonso@icmm.csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, C.S.I.C., Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Martínez-Coronado, R. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, C.S.I.C., Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, C.S.I.C., Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Fernández-Díaz, M.T. [Institut Laue Langevin, BP 156X, Grenoble F-38042 (France)] [Institut Laue Langevin, BP 156X, Grenoble F-38042 (France); Morán, E. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

J.D. Schreiber

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

173

F32AA4 The Structure of Stars 1. The nuclear reaction rate in a particular kind of star is proportional to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

notes from the ra­ diative transport equation for radiative stars.) #12; . For stars with 5M fi ? M s ? 2M fi , ffl is due to the CNO cycle with ffl = fflaeT 16 and energy transport is via radiation with Ÿ = Ÿ 0 aeT \\Gamma3 . Show that L s / M 5 s for these stars. Find the (M s ; R

Peletier, Reynier

174

Energy Rating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consistent, accurate, and uniform ratings based on a single statewide rating scale Reasonable estimates of potential utility bill savings and reliable recommendations on cost-effective measures to improve energy efficiency Training and certification procedures for home raters and quality assurance procedures to promote accurate ratings and to protect consumers Labeling procedures that will meet the needs of home buyers, homeowners, renters, the real estate industry, and mortgage lenders with an interest in home energy ratings

Cabec Conference; Rashid Mir P. E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Transportation Security  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Preliminary Draft - For Review Only 1 Transportation Security Draft Annotated Bibliography Review July 2007 Preliminary Draft - For Review Only 2 Work Plan Task * TEC STG Work...

176

Computational Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), in-vehicle computers, and computers in the transportation infrastructure are integrated ride- sharing, real-time multi-modal routing and navigation, to autonomous/assisted driving

Illinois at Chicago, University of

177

Electronic transport in nanoscale structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6861–6867, 2003. [47] J. B. Heng, A. Aksimentiev, C. Ho, V.10(3):5–22, 2005. [48] J. B. Heng, A. Aksimentiev, C. Ho, P.2] A. Aksimentiev, J. B. Heng, G. Timp, and K. Schulten.

Lagerqvist, Johan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

DISSERTATION Electronic structure and transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unterschrift #12; ``Gott wË?urfelt nicht!'' ``God does not throw dice!'' Albert Einstein, Solvay conference

Florian, Libisch

179

Regional Transportation Performance Measures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in place for maintenance of pavements and structures But only general goals for modernization Case for Performance-Based Funding: What Partners Say The Pew Center on the States' recently ranked Mobility Reliability Accessibility Livability 12 #12;Transportation Performance Measurement Concepts

Illinois at Chicago, University of

180

Transportation Market Distortions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Highways, Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Evaluating Criticism of Transportation Costing, VictoriaFrom Here: Evaluating Transportation Diversity, Victoria

Litman, Todd

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

AirTAP BriefingsA publication of the AirTAP program of the Center for Transportation Studies at the University of Minnesota Setting rates and charges can be one of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the University of Minnesota Setting rates and charges can be one of the most challenging tasks an airport services, and rates and charges can fluctu- ate depending on the types of services that are offered. Finally, if rates and charges are set too high at an airport, pilots can easily relocate their aircraft

Minnesota, University of

182

Isolation, folding and structural investigations of the amino...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

folding and structural investigations of the amino acid transporter OEP16. Isolation, folding and structural investigations of the amino acid transporter OEP16. Abstract: Membrane...

183

56113.Transport and integration 13.1 Transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be classified according to the hazard involved: · Mirror segments. The size of each segment allows transport by laser beams. This grid defines the X-Y-Z location of each node of the structure. Each node can several light cranes with a maximum payload of 3 tons. thereby allowing for redundancy. · The structural

Liske, Jochen

184

Influence of heterogeneous ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the expression of nitrogen fixation and ammonium transporter genes during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of ammonium availability on microbial community structure and the physiological status and activity of Geobacter species during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater was evaluated. Ammonium concentrations varied by as much as two orders of magnitude (<4 to 400 {micro}M) across the study site. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences suggested that ammonium influenced the composition of the microbial community prior to acetate addition with Rhodoferax species predominating over Geobacter species at the site with the highest ammonium, and Dechloromonas species dominating at sites with lowest ammonium. However, once acetate was added, and dissimilatory metal reduction was stimulated, Geobacter species became the predominant organisms at all locations. Rates of U(VI) reduction appeared to be more related to the concentration of acetate that was delivered to each location rather than the amount of ammonium available in the groundwater. In situ mRNA transcript abundance of the nitrogen fixation gene, nifD, and the ammonium importer gene, amtB, in Geobacter species indicated that ammonium was the primary source of nitrogen during in situ uranium reduction, and that the abundance of amtB transcripts was inversely correlated to ammonium levels across all sites examined. These results suggest that nifD and amtB expression by subsurface Geobacter species are closely regulated in response to ammonium availability to ensure an adequate supply of nitrogen while conserving cell resources. Thus, quantifying nifD and amtB expression appears to be a useful approach for monitoring the nitrogen-related physiological status of Geobacter species in subsurface environments during bioremediation. This study also emphasizes the need for more detailed analysis of geochemical/physiological interactions at the field scale, in order to adequately model subsurface microbial processes.

Mouser, P.J.; N'Guessan, A.L.; Elifantz, H.; Holmes, D.E.; Williams, K.H.; Wilkins, M.J.; Long, P.E.; Lovley, D.R.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Selective Monosaccharide Transport through Lipid Bilayers Using Boronic Acid Carriers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selective Monosaccharide Transport through Lipid Bilayers Using Boronic Acid Carriers Pamela R-one boronic acids were studied for their ability to transport saccharides in and out of liposomes. The rates transport. The order of transport selectivity was sorbitol > fructose > glucose. The disaccharides maltose

Smith, Bradley D.

186

Parallel Transports in Webs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For connected reductive linear algebraic structure groups it is proven that every web is holonomically isolated. The possible tuples of parallel transports in a web form a Lie subgroup of the corresponding power of the structure group. This Lie subgroup is explicitly calculated and turns out to be independent of the chosen local trivializations. Moreover, explicit necessary and sufficient criteria for the holonomical independence of webs are derived. The results above can even be sharpened: Given an arbitrary neighbourhood of the base points of a web, then this neighbourhood contains some segments of the web whose parameter intervals coincide, but do not include 0 (that corresponds to the base points of the web), and whose parallel transports already form the same Lie subgroup as those of the full web do.

Christian Fleischhack

2003-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

187

The effect of incarceration rates on mate availability and its effect on the formation and structure of the African American family: a theoretical and empirical analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A number of scholars have argued that declining mate availability for African American women has had important consequences for family formation and family structure in recent decades (Darity and Myers 1984; Dickson 1993; Guttentag and Secord 1983...

McGruder, Patricia Hollis

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Interim UFD Storage and Transportation - Transportation Working Group Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Transportation Task commenced in October 2010. As its first task, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) compiled a draft list of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) of transportation systems and their possible degradation mechanisms during very long term storage (VLTS). The list of SSCs and the associated degradation mechanisms [known as features, events, and processes (FEPs)] were based on the list of SSCs and degradation mechanisms developed by the UFD Storage Task (Stockman et al. 2010)

Maheras, Steven J.; Ross, Steven B.

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

Saturated Zone Colloid Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation. Radionuclides irreversibly sorbed onto this fraction of colloids also transport without retardation. The transport times for these radionuclides will be the same as those for nonsorbing radionuclides. The fraction of nonretarding colloids developed in this analysis report is used in the abstraction of SZ and UZ transport models in support of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This analysis report uses input from two Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) analysis reports. This analysis uses the assumption from ''Waste Form and In-Drift Colloids-Associated Radionuclide Concentrations: Abstraction and Summary'' that plutonium and americium are irreversibly sorbed to colloids generated by the waste degradation processes (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025]). In addition, interpretations from RELAP analyses from ''Saturated Zone In-Situ Testing'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170010]) are used to develop the retardation factor distributions in this analysis.

H. S. Viswanathan

2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

190

Neurotransmitter Transporters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at specialized synaptic junctions where electrical excitability in the form of an action potential is translated membrane of neurons and glial cells. Transporters harness electrochemical gradients to force the movement.els.net #12;The response produced when a transmitter interacts with its receptors, the synaptic potential

Bergles, Dwight

191

Rate schedule  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor. |INCIDENCET3PACI-T3Rate

192

E-Print Network 3.0 - adiabatic splitting transport Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by radiation Fifth equation to solve for a star's structure... : the radiative energy transport equation. Radiation and convection are the most important transport mechanisms......

193

The Fluid Interface Reactions Structures and Transport (FIRST) EFRC (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'The Fluid Interface Reactions Structures and Transport (FIRST) EFRC' was submitted by FIRST to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. FIRST, an EFRC directed by David J. Wesolowski at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from nine institutions: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (lead), Argonne National Laboratory, Drexel University, Georgia State University, Northwestern University, Pennsylvania State University, Suffolk University, Vanderbilt University, and University of Virginia. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport Center is 'to develop quantitative and predictive models of the unique nanoscale environment at fluid-solid interfaces that will enable transformational advances in electrical energy storage and heterogeneous catalysis for solar fuels.' Research topics are: catalysis (biomass, CO{sub 2}, water), electrocatalysis, photocatalysis, photoelectrocatalysis, solar fuels, solar electrodes, electrical energy storage, batteries, capacitors, battery electrodes, electrolytes, extreme environment, CO{sub 2} (convert), greenhouse gas, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), interfacial characterization, matter by design, novel materials synthesis, and charge transport.

Wesolowski, David J. (Director, FIRST - Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures, and Transport Center) [Director, FIRST - Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures, and Transport Center; FIRST Staff

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Fluid Interface Reactions Structures and Transport (FIRST) EFRC (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

'The Fluid Interface Reactions Structures and Transport (FIRST) EFRC' was submitted by FIRST to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. FIRST, an EFRC directed by David J. Wesolowski at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from nine institutions: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (lead), Argonne National Laboratory, Drexel University, Georgia State University, Northwestern University, Pennsylvania State University, Suffolk University, Vanderbilt University, and University of Virginia. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport Center is 'to develop quantitative and predictive models of the unique nanoscale environment at fluid-solid interfaces that will enable transformational advances in electrical energy storage and heterogeneous catalysis for solar fuels.' Research topics are: catalysis (biomass, CO{sub 2}, water), electrocatalysis, photocatalysis, photoelectrocatalysis, solar fuels, solar electrodes, electrical energy storage, batteries, capacitors, battery electrodes, electrolytes, extreme environment, CO{sub 2} (convert), greenhouse gas, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), interfacial characterization, matter by design, novel materials synthesis, and charge transport.

Wesolowski, David J. (Director, FIRST - Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures, and Transport Center); FIRST Staff

2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

195

NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Future of Sustainable Transportation This is the January 2015 issue of the Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter. Illustration of an electric vehicle Illustration of an...

196

Effect of current compliance and voltage sweep rate on the resistive switching of HfO{sub 2}/ITO/Invar structure as measured by conductive atomic force microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrical characterization of HfO{sub 2}/ITO/Invar resistive switching memory structure was studied using conductive atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a semiconductor parameter analyzer, Agilent 4156C. The metal alloy Invar was used as the metal substrate to ensure good ohmic contact with the substrate holder of the AFM. A conductive Pt/Ir AFM tip was placed in direct contact with the HfO{sub 2} surface, such that it acted as the top electrode. Nanoscale current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the HfO{sub 2}/ITO/Invar structure were measured by applying a ramp voltage through the conductive AFM tip at various current compliances and ramp voltage sweep rates. It was found that the resistance of the low resistance state (RLRS) decreased with increasing current compliance value, but resistance of high resistance state (RHRS) barely changed. However, both the RHRS and RLRS decreased as the voltage sweep rate increased. The reasons for this dependency on current compliance and voltage sweep rate are discussed.

Wu, You-Lin, E-mail: ylwu@ncnu.edu.tw; Liao, Chun-Wei [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Chi Nan University, Puli, Nantou, Taiwan (China); Ling, Jing-Jenn [Department of Applied Materials and Optoelectronic Engineering, National Chi Nan University, Puli, Nantou, Taiwan (China)

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

197

Star-formation rates from young-star counts and the structure of the ISM across the NGC346/N66 complex in the SMC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rate at which interstellar gas is converted into stars, and its dependence on environment, is one of the pillars on which our understanding of the visible Universe is build. We present a comparison of the surface density of young stars (Sigma_*) and dust surface density (Sigma_d) across NGC346 (N66) in 115 independent pixels of 6x6 pc^2. We find a correlation between Sigma_* and Sigma_d with a considerable scatter. A power law fit to the data yields a steep relation with an exponent of 2.6+-0.2. We convert Sigma_d to gas surface density (Sigma_g) and Sigma_* to star formation rate (SFR) surface densities (Sigma_SFR), using simple assumptions for the gas-to-dust mass ratio and the duration of star formation. The derived total SFR (4+-1 10^-3 M_sun/yr) is consistent with SFR estimated from the Ha emission integrated over the Ha nebula. On small scales the Sigma_SFR derived using Ha systematically underestimates the count-based Sigma_SFR, by up to a factor of 10. This is due to ionizing photons escaping the ...

Hony, S; Galliano, F; Galametz, M; Cormier, D; Chen, C -H R; Dib, S; Hughes, A; Klessen, R S; Roman-Duval, J; Smith, L; Bernard, J -P; Bot, C; Carlson, L; Gordon, K; Indebetouw, R; Lebouteiller, V; Lee, M -Y; Madden, S C; Meixner, M; Oliveira, J; Rubio, M; Sauvage, M; Wu, R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Calculation of Auger rates in a quantum well structure and its application to InGaAsP quantum well lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the possible intrinsic limitation on the temperature dependence of threshold current of long wavelength InGaAsP quantum well lasers caused by Auger recombination and intervalence band absorption. A model calculation of the various band-to-band Auger rates are presented. We find that the Auger rates increase with decreasing band gap and also with increasing temperature as in the case of bulk semiconductors. The temperature dependence and the band-gap dependence arises from the energy and momentum conservation (in the direction normal to the well) that the four particle states involved must satisfy. The estimated Auger coefficient is large enough to be important in single quantum well lasers. However, the Auger effect should be much smaller in a multiquantum well laser than for a single quantum well laser. This is because the carrier density at threshold is smaller (by a factor of 3 to 4) for multiquantum well lasers than for single quantum well lasers. The increased intervalence band absorption with increasing temperature in the active layer may not be responsible for increased threshold current of single quantum well lasers.

Dutta, N.K.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@ $50/kW and H2 storage @ $15/kWh) #12;8 CASE 2: ICEV EFFICIENCY · Currently available and projected11 Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug Methodology and Scenarios · Market Penetration Rates · Oil and CO2 Savings · Fuel, Fuel Cell, Battery

200

Environmental Aspects of Air Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Innovation Center #12;2 Aviation and Climate #12;3 Combustion Products Commercial jet fuel is essentially FOR AIR TRANSPORTATIONCENTER FOR AIR TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS RESEARCHSYSTEMS RESEARCH Metron Aviation GMU, and the process inside real engines is considerably more complex. Typical emission rates for jet aircraft (grams

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes Quarterly Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Reaction rates in Ion 21 Transport Membranes using Isotope Tracer and Transient Kinetic Techniques CONCLUSIONS 30Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes Quarterly Report January 2003 ­ March 2003 Principal Authors on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane

Eagar, Thomas W.

202

Fiscal decentralization and urban public transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Financing public transport through public funds is a common practice that can be justified on different grounds: equity, natural monopoly and, particularly with the increasing motorization rate, externalities produced by ...

Favero, Giorgia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Atomistic Study of Transport Properties at the Nanoscale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- being probed in graphene, graphene nano ribbons, carbon nanotubes, and fullerenes to determine their influence on transport; overall, these structures yield a large range of thermal transport, 10-2500 W/mK....

Haskins, Justin

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

204

Greening Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGetGraphene's 3D CounterpartDepartmentTransportation

205

Transportation Infrastructure  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012 Greenbuy3 Archive Transportation Fact of the Week

206

Home Energy Ratings and Building Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate as they affect the rating score of a proposed or completed structure. The rating is used to determine the most cost effective mechanical systems, building envelope design including window and door types, effect of various roofing materials...

Gardner, J.C.

207

2012 World Conference on Transport Research (WCTR) SIG-2, Antwerp, Belgium, May 21-22 Material flows and local economic structure: port-region linkages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flows and local economic structure: port-region linkages in Europe, Japan, and the United States César in the dereliction of port's local linkages, a systematic and comparative empirical analysis remains lacking. One of port-related hinterland flows as well as inadequacies between the volume and the value of freight

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

208

Surety applications in transportation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infrastructure surety can make a valuable contribution to the transportation engineering industry. The lessons learned at Sandia National Laboratories in developing surety principles and technologies for the nuclear weapons complex and the nuclear power industry hold direct applications to the safety, security, and reliability of the critical infrastructure. This presentation introduces the concepts of infrastructure surety, including identification of the normal, abnormal, and malevolent threats to the transportation infrastructure. National problems are identified and examples of failures and successes in response to environmental loads and other structural and systemic vulnerabilities are presented. The infrastructure surety principles developed at Sandia National Laboratories are described. Currently available technologies including (a) three-dimensional computer-assisted drawing packages interactively combined with virtual reality systems, (b) the complex calculational and computational modeling and code-coupling capabilities associated with the new generation of supercomputers, and (c) risk-management methodologies with application to solving the national problems associated with threats to the critical transportation infrastructure are discussed.

Matalucci, R.V.; Miyoshi, D.S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The economic effects of surface transport deregulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the past two decades, the deregulation of surface transport at both national and international levels has gathered momentum, particularly within the United States and European Union. The structural and performance ...

Li, Yong, 1974-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Transport of elliptic intense charged -particle beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transport theory of high-intensity elliptic charged-particle beams is presented. In particular, the halo formation and beam loss problem associated with the high space charge and small-aperture structure is addressed, ...

Zhou, J. (Jing), 1978-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the following tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints; Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability; Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres; Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures; Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability; and Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Transportation Security | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transportation Security SHARE Global Threat Reduction Initiative Transportation Security Cooperation Secure Transport Operations (STOP) Box Security of radioactive material while...

214

Final Report for DE-FG02-93ER14376,Ionic Transport in Electrochemical Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was a molecular dynamics study of the relevant issues associated with the structure and transport of lithium in polymer electrolytes such as polyethylene oxide(PEO). In close collaboration with quantum chemist Larry Curtiss and neutron scatterers David Lee Price and Marie-Louise Saboungi at Argonne, we used molecular dynamics to study the local structure and dynamics and ion transport in the polymer. The studies elucidated the mechanism of Li transport in PEO, revealing that the rate limiting step is extremely sensitive to the magnitude of the torsion forces in the backbone of the polymer. Because the torsion forces are difficult to manipulate chemically, this makes it easier to understand why improving the conductivity of PEO based electrolytes has proven to be very difficult. We studied the transport properties of cations in ionic liquids as possible additives to polymer membranes for batteries and fuel cells and found preliminary indications that the transport is enhanced near phase separation in acid-ionic liquid mixtures.

J. W. Halley

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

215

UFD Storage and Transportation - Transportation Working Group Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Transportation Task commenced in October 2010. As its first task, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) compiled a list of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) of transportation systems and their possible degradation mechanisms during extended storage. The list of SSCs and the associated degradation mechanisms [known as features, events, and processes (FEPs)] were based on the list of used nuclear fuel (UNF) storage system SSCs and degradation mechanisms developed by the UFD Storage Task (Hanson et al. 2011). Other sources of information surveyed to develop the list of SSCs and their degradation mechanisms included references such as Evaluation of the Technical Basis for Extended Dry Storage and Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel (NWTRB 2010), Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification, Revision 1 (OCRWM 2008), Data Needs for Long-Term Storage of LWR Fuel (EPRI 1998), Technical Bases for Extended Dry Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel (EPRI 2002), Used Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Extended Storage Collaboration Program (EPRI 2010a), Industry Spent Fuel Storage Handbook (EPRI 2010b), and Transportation of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel, Issues Resolution (EPRI 2010c). SSCs include items such as the fuel, cladding, fuel baskets, neutron poisons, metal canisters, etc. Potential degradation mechanisms (FEPs) included mechanical, thermal, radiation and chemical stressors, such as fuel fragmentation, embrittlement of cladding by hydrogen, oxidation of cladding, metal fatigue, corrosion, etc. These degradation mechanisms are discussed in Section 2 of this report. The degradation mechanisms have been evaluated to determine if they would be influenced by extended storage or high burnup, the need for additional data, and their importance to transportation. These categories were used to identify the most significant transportation degradation mechanisms. As expected, for the most part, the transportation importance was mirrored by the importance assigned by the UFD Storage Task. A few of the more significant differences are described in Section 3 of this report

Maheras, Steven J.; Ross, Steven B.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in a Silicon Micromodel...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(2-D) microscopic pore structures consisting of an array of cylindrical collectors, was studied and compared. Real time transport of oocysts in the micromodel was...

217

Sediment Transport in the Lower Guadalupe and San Antonio Rivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

collected; Very limited data indicated that the bedload transport rates are much smaller than the suspended load transport rates. The two largest sets of data were collected on the Guadalupe River at Victoria in April 1990 and on the San Antonio River...

Holley, Edward R.

218

Strategic Freight Transportation Contract Procurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based Procurement for Transportation Services, Journal ofCoia, A. , Evolving transportation exchanges, World trade,an Auction Based Transportation Marketplace, Transportation

Nandiraju, Srinivas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

"Educating transportation professionals."  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Educating transportation professionals." Michael Demetsky Henry L. Kinnier Professor mjd of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 434.924.7464 Transportation Engineering & Management Research Our group works closely with the Virginia Center for Transportation Innovation and Research (VCTIR), located

Acton, Scott

220

Temperature Resistant Optimal Ratchet Transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stable periodic structures containing optimal ratchet transport, recently found in the parameter space dissipation versus ratchet parameter [PRL 106, 234101 (2011)], are shown to be resistant to reasonable temperatures, reinforcing the expectation that they are essential to explain the optimal ratchet transport in nature. Critical temperatures for their destruction, valid from the overdamping to close to the conservative limits, are obtained numerically and shown to be connected to the current efficiency, given here analytically. Results are demonstrated for a discrete ratchet model and generalized to the Langevin equation with an additional external oscillating force.

Cesar Manchein; Alan Celestino; Marcus W Beims

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Transportation Efficiency Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Transportation efficiency reduces travel demand as measured by vehicle miles traveled (VMT). While transportation efficiency policies are often implemented under local governments, national and...

222

Chapter 12 Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2-1 November 2012 Words in bold and acronyms are defined in Chapter 32, Glossary and Acronyms. Chapter 12 Transportation This chapter describes existing transportation resources in...

223

Sustainability and Transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2005. Integrating Sustainability into the Trans- portationTHOUGHT PIECE Sustainability and Transport by Richardof the concept of sustainability to transport planning. In

Gilbert, Richard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Influence of Transport Variables on Isospin Transport Ratios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The symmetry energy in the nuclear equation of state affects many aspects of nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure, and nuclear reactions. Recent constraints from heavy ion collisions, including isospin diffusion observables, have started to put constraints on the symmetry energy below nuclear saturation density, but these constraints depend on the employed transport model and input physics other than the symmetry energy. To understand these dependencies, we study the influence of the symmetry energy, isoscaler mean field compressibility and momentum dependence, in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections, and light cluster production on isospin diffusion within the pBUU transport code. In addition to the symmetry energy, several uncertain issues strongly affect isospin diffusion, most notably the cross sections and cluster production. In addition, there is a difference in the calculated isospin transport ratios, depending upon whether they are computed using the isospin asymmetry of either the residue or of a...

Coupland, D D S; Tsang, M B; Danielewicz, P; Zhang, Yingxun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was carried out on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} to investigate oxygen deficiency ({delta}) of the sample. The TGA was performed in a controlled atmosphere using oxygen, argon, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with adjustable gas flow rates. In this experiment, the weight loss and gain of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} was directly measured by TGA. The weight change of the sample was evaluated at between 600 and 1250 C in air or 1000 C as a function of oxygen partial pressure. The oxygen deficiencies calculated from TGA data as a function of oxygen activity and temperature will be estimated and compared with that from neutron diffraction measurement in air. The LSFT and LSFT/CGO membranes were fabricated from the powder obtained from Praxair Specialty Ceramics. The sintered membranes were subjected to microstructure analysis and hardness analysis. The LSFT membrane is composed of fine grains with two kinds of grain morphology. The grain size distribution was characterized using image analysis. In LSFT/CGO membrane a lot of grain pullout was observed from the less dense, porous phase. The hardness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes were studied at various loads. The hardness values obtained from the cross section of the membranes were also compared to that of the values obtained from the surface. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. Measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} as a function of temperature an oxygen partial pressure are reported. Further analysis of the dilatometry data obtained previously is presented. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Innovative Rates Program. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Title II of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) as amended by the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) provided financial assistance to state utility regulatory commissions, nonregulated electric utilities, and the Tennessee Valley Authority through the Innovative Rates Program. The financial assistance was to be used to plan or carry out electric utility regulatory rate reform initiatives relating to innovative rate structures that encourage conservation of energy, electric utility efficiency and reduced costs, and equitable rates to consumers. The Federal and local objectives of the project are described. Activities planned and accomplishments are summarized for the following: project management, data collection, utility bill evaluation, billing enclosure/mailing evaluation, media program evaluation, display evaluation, rate study sessions evaluation, speakers bureau evaluation, and individual customer contacts. A timetable/milestone chart and financial information are included. (MHR)

Not Available

1982-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

227

Graduate Certificate in Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graduate Certificate in Transportation Nohad A. Toulan School of Urban Studies and Planning of Engineering and Computer Science integrated transportation systems. The Graduate Certificate in Transportation their capabilities. Students in the program can choose among a wide range of relevant courses in transportation

Bertini, Robert L.

228

TRANSPORTATION Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2003 CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION STUDIES Annual Report #12;Center for Transportation Studies University of Minnesota 200 Transportation and Safety Building 511 Washington Avenue S.E. Minneapolis, MN publication is a report of transportation research, education, and outreach activities for the period July

Minnesota, University of

229

Regional Transportation Coordination Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional Planning Commission Wanda Carter-Dyer Public Transportation Coordinator Texas Department of Transportation Councilperson Debra Martinez Briseno Cities in Calhoun County Laura G. Sanders Executive Director Golden Crescent Workforce... Regional Planning Commission Wanda Carter-Dyer Public Transportation Coordinator Texas Department of Transportation Councilperson Debra Martinez Briseno Cities in Calhoun County Laura G. Sanders Executive Director Golden Crescent Workforce...

Golden Crescent Regional Planning Commission

230

Chlorite Dissolution Rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

Carroll, Susan

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Chlorite Dissolution Rates  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

Carroll, Susan

232

The Interest Rate Conundrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flows and US Interest Rates,” NBER Working Paper No 12560. [Working Paper # 2008 -03 The Interest Rate Conundrum Roger

Craine, Roger; Martin, Vance L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

LEED for Homes Rating System affordablemarket rate multi-family  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Future Comfort Load Reduction 50% 60%20% 30% 40% Energy Savings Cost System Intensive Building Envelo pe;Rating System www.usgbc.org/leed/homes #12;LEED for Homes Project Checklist or Scorecard #12;LEED for Homes Project Checklist or Scorecard #12;How the Credit Structure Works Credit #2: Landscaping Intent

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

234

Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freig pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freig pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation ope

235

Graduate Studies Transportation Systems Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graduate Studies Transportation Systems Engineering TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS The transportation that transportation systems engineering can promote a thriving economy and a better quality of life by ensuring that transportation systems themselves affect the environment through operations, construction, and maintenance

Jacobs, Laurence J.

236

Introduction Transport in disordered graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Ballistic transport in disordered graphene P, Gornyi, Mirlin Ballistic transport in disordered graphene #12;Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Outline 1 Introduction Model Experimental motivation Transport in clean graphene 2

Fominov, Yakov

237

Minnesota's Transportation Economic Development (TED)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minnesota's Transportation Economic Development (TED) Pilot Program Center for Transportation Studies Transportation Research Conference May 24-25, 2011 #12;Transportation Role in Economic Development · Carefully targeted transportation infrastructure improvements will: ­ Stimulate new economic development

Minnesota, University of

238

Probability of spent fuel transportation accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transported volume of spent fuel, incident/accident experience and accident environment probabilities were reviewed in order to provide an estimate of spent fuel accident probabilities. In particular, the accident review assessed the accident experience for large casks of the type that could transport spent (irradiated) nuclear fuel. This review determined that since 1971, the beginning of official US Department of Transportation record keeping for accidents/incidents, there has been one spent fuel transportation accident. This information, coupled with estimated annual shipping volumes for spent fuel, indicated an estimated annual probability of a spent fuel transport accident of 5 x 10/sup -7/ spent fuel accidents per mile. This is consistent with ordinary truck accident rates. A comparison of accident environments and regulatory test environments suggests that the probability of truck accidents exceeding regulatory test for impact is approximately 10/sup -9//mile.

McClure, J. D.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Crystal structure and high temperature transport properties of Yb-filled p-type skutterudites Yb{sub x}Co{sub 2.5}Fe{sub 1.5}Sb{sub 12}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Partially Yb-filled Fe substituted polycrystalline p-type skutterudites with nominal compositions Yb{sub x}Co{sub 2.5}Fe{sub 1.5}Sb{sub 12}, with varying filler concentrations x, were synthesized by reacting the constituent elements and subsequent solid state annealing, followed by densification by hot-pressing. The compositions and filling fractions were confirmed with a combination of Rietveld refinement and elemental analysis. Their thermoelectric properties were evaluated from 300 to 800 K. The Seebeck coefficients for the specimens increase with increasing temperature and plateau at around 750 K. The thermal conductivity decreases with increasing Yb filling fraction, and bipolar conduction becomes evident and increases at elevated temperatures. A maximum ZT value of 0.8 was obtained at 750 K for Yb{sub 0.47}Co{sub 2.6}Fe{sub 1.4}Sb{sub 12}. The thermoelectric properties and potential for further optimization are discussed in light of our results. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Yb-filled Fe-substituted p-type CoSb{sub 3} skutterudites, Yb{sub x}Co{sub 2.5}Fe{sub 1.5}Sb{sub 12}, were structurally and physically characterized. • Both filling fraction and Co-to-Fe ratio affect the transport properties. • High ZT was obtained for the composition with ?50% Yb filling and a slightly lower than nominal Fe content.

Dong, Yongkwan [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States); Puneet, Pooja; Tritt, Terry M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Kinard Laboratory, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Nolas, George S., E-mail: gnolas@usf.edu [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Facile synthesized nanorod structured vanadium pentoxide for...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

synthesized nanorod structured vanadium pentoxide for high-rate lithium batteries. Facile synthesized nanorod structured vanadium pentoxide for high-rate lithium batteries....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Rail Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30 2013 Macroeconomicper8,170Thousand2.442 3.028 3.803 3.971Feet)06CoalRail

242

Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 46 47 62CarbonCubic

243

Substrate-induced changes in the structural properties of LacY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

speed   limit   for   protein   folding   measured   by  structure membrane protein folding membrane transport

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Transportation Baseline Schedule  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The “1999 National Transportation Program - Transportation Baseline Report” presents data that form a baseline to enable analysis and planning for future Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) waste/material transportation. The companion “1999 Transportation ‘Barriers’ Analysis” analyzes the data and identifies existing and potential problems that may prevent or delay transportation activities based on the data presented. The “1999 Transportation Baseline Schedule” (this report) uses the same data to provide an overview of the transportation activities of DOE EM waste/materials. This report can be used to identify areas where stakeholder interface is needed, and to communicate to stakeholders the quantity/schedule of shipments going through their area. Potential bottlenecks in the transportation system can be identified; the number of packages needed, and the capacity needed at receiving facilities can be planned. This report offers a visualization of baseline DOE EM transportation activities for the 11 major sites and the “Geologic Repository Disposal” site (GRD).

Fawcett, Ricky Lee; John, Mark Earl

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

TRANSPORT THROUGH CRACKED CONCRETE: LITERATURE REVIEW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concrete containment structures and cement-based fills and waste forms are used at the Savannah River Site to enhance the performance of shallow land disposal systems designed for containment of low-level radioactive waste. Understanding and measuring transport through cracked concrete is important for describing the initial condition of radioactive waste containment structures at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and for predicting performance of these structures over time. This report transmits the results of a literature review on transport through cracked concrete which was performed by Professor Jason Weiss, Purdue University per SRR0000678 (RFP-RQ00001029-WY). This review complements the NRC-sponsored literature review and assessment of factors relevant to performance of grouted systems for radioactive waste disposal. This review was performed by The Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX, and The University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen Scotland and was focused on tank closure. The objective of the literature review on transport through cracked concrete was to identify information in the open literature which can be applied to SRS transport models for cementitious containment structures, fills, and waste forms. In addition, the literature review was intended to: (1) Provide a framework for describing and classifying cracks in containment structures and cementitious materials used in radioactive waste disposal, (2) Document the state of knowledge and research related to transport through cracks in concrete for various exposure conditions, (3) Provide information or methodology for answering several specific questions related to cracking and transport in concrete, and (4) Provide information that can be used to design experiments on transport through cracked samples and actual structures.

Langton, C.

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

246

E-Print Network 3.0 - added transportation capacity Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transport Capacity and Spectral Efficiency of Large Wireless CDMA Ad Hoc Networks Yi Sun Department... As node density D , transport capacity converges to zero at rate O(1D)...

247

Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE...

248

Regulation of Tall Structures (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A permit from the Department of Transportation is required for the construction or alteration of any structure higher than 200 feet above ground level, or structures near airports, highways,...

249

Experimental validation of a transport-based imaging method in highly scattering environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wave propagation, radiative trans- port equation, inverse transport problems, incoherent-imaging 1 of the paper is structured as follows. After briefly introducing the radiative transport equation for wave density, which works in the presence of moderately scattering media, is radiative transport. A transport

Ren, Kui

250

Experimental validation of a transport-based imaging method in highly scattering environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wave propagation, radiative trans- port equation, inverse transport problems, incoherent-imaging, 1 of the paper is structured as follows. After briefly introducing the radiative transport equation for wave density, which works in the presence of moderately scattering media, is radiative transport. A transport

Bal, Guillaume

251

Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

Pomes, R.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Influence of Transport Variables on Isospin Transport Ratios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The symmetry energy in the nuclear equation of state affects many aspects of nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure, and nuclear reactions. Recent constraints from heavy ion collisions, including isospin diffusion observables, have started to put constraints on the symmetry energy below nuclear saturation density, but these constraints depend on the employed transport model and input physics other than the symmetry energy. To understand these dependencies, we study the influence of the symmetry energy, isoscaler mean field compressibility and momentum dependence, in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections, and light cluster production on isospin diffusion within the pBUU transport code. In addition to the symmetry energy, several uncertain issues strongly affect isospin diffusion, most notably the cross sections and cluster production. In addition, there is a difference in the calculated isospin transport ratios, depending upon whether they are computed using the isospin asymmetry of either the residue or of all forward moving fragments. Measurements that compare the isospin transport ratios of these two quantities would help place constraints on the input physics, such as the density dependence of the symmetry energy.

D. D. S. Coupland; W. G. Lynch; M. B. Tsang; P. Danielewicz; Yingxun Zhang

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

253

Multilevel transport solution of LWR reactor cores  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work presents a multilevel approach for the solution of the transport equation in typical LWR assemblies and core configurations. It is based on the second-order, even-parity formulation of the transport equation, which is solved within the framework provided by the finite element-spherical harmonics code EVENT. The performance of the new solver has been compared with that of the standard conjugate gradient solver for diffusion and transport problems on structured and unstruc-tured grids. Numerical results demonstrate the potential of the multilevel scheme for realistic reactor calculations.

Jose Ignacio Marquez Damian; Cassiano R.E. de Oliveira; HyeonKae Park

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Ion transport through cell membrane channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss various models of ion transport through cell membrane channels. Recent experimental data shows that sizes of ion channels are compared to those of ions and that only few ions may be simultaneously in any single channel. Theoretical description of ion transport in such channels should therefore take into account interactions between ions and between ions and channel proteins. This is not satisfied by macroscopic continuum models based on Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations. More realistic descriptions of ion transport are offered by microscopic Brownian and molecular dynamics. One should also take into account a dynamical character of the channel structure. This is not yet addressed in the literature

Jan Gomulkiewicz; Jacek Miekisz; Stanislaw Miekisz

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

255

Transportation Infrastructure and Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Better Forecasting Tool for Transportation Decision-making,” Mineta Transportation Institute, San Jose Stateat the 2008 meeting of the Transportation Research Board and

Boarnet, Marlon G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Transportation Analysis | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transportation Analysis SHARE Transportation Analysis Transportation Analysis efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory contribute to the efficient, safe, and free movement of...

257

The universal radiative transport equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE UNIVERSAL RADIATIVE TRANSPORT EQUATION Rudolph W.The Universal Radiative Transport Equation Rudolph W.The various radiative transport equations used in general

Preisendorfer, Rudolph W

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Transportation Management Research Collection /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Peterbilt Motors, and General Electric. He was a national panel member of the American Arbitration, Noise and Environmental Pollution, Transportation Co-ordination and Consolidation, Transportation -- Docket 8613 1957 Civil Aeronautics Board ­ General passenger fare investigation -- Docket 8008 et al

Handy, Todd C.

260

Packaging and Transportation Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials andor modal transport. Cancels DOE 1540.2 and DOE 5480.3

1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Packaging and Transportation Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Canceled by DOE 460.1A

1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

262

Packaging and Transportation Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1.

1996-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

263

Transportation Investment and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation Investment and Economic Development: Has the TIED turned? David Levinson University Transportation Investments was Historically Concomitant with Land and Economic Development #12;Canals Railways Surfaced Roads Crude Oil Pipelines Gas Pipelines Telegraph 1825 1985 Proportion of Maximum Extent Growth

Levinson, David M.

264

Effective Rate Period  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the FY Mid-Year Change 10012013 - 03312014 04012014 - 09302014 Power Rates Annual Revenue Requirement Rate Schedule Power Revenue Requirement 73,441,557...

265

Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosion Monitoring:Home| Visitors|Upcoming Events andWelcomeFIRST Center

266

Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI HomeTours, Programs and2 This flight2

267

Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI HomeTours, Programs and2 This flight2Research

268

Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI HomeTours, Programs and2 This

269

Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI HomeTours, Programs and2 ThisSteering Committee

270

Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI HomeTours, Programs and2 ThisSteering

271

Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI HomeTours, Programs and2 ThisSteeringProject

272

Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI HomeTours, Programs and2

273

Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI HomeTours, Programs and2FIRST Center Video Home

274

Lubbock Metropolitan Transportation Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Users (SAFETEA-LU) and its predecessors, the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21) and the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) of 1991, specified the transportation systems on which certain federal funds can... in Chapter 5 ? Streets and Highways; Chapter 6 ? Public Transportation; Chapter 7 ? Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan; Chapter 8 ? Lubbock International Airport and Chapter 9 ? Railroads and Trucking. Federally funded transit projects were developed...

Lubbock Metropolitan Planning Organization

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

275

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

subsidies on fossil transport fuels, subsidies on commutingC. , 2003: Subsidies that encourage fossil fuel use in

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Northwestern University Transportation Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Northwestern University Transportation Center 2011 Business Advisory Committee NUTC #12;#12;I have the pleasure of presenting our Business Advisory Committee members--a distinguished group of transportation industry lead- ers who have partnered with the Transportation Center in advancing the state of knowledge

Bustamante, Fabián E.

277

PalladianDigest Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PalladianDigest CONNECT. EMPOWER. GROW. Tackling Transportation Challenges Nebraska has been a vital link in the nation's transportation system since the days when carts, wagons to University of Nebraska­Lincoln research. That's fine with UNL transportation researchers, said Larry Rilett

Farritor, Shane

278

TRANSPORTATION: THE POTENTIAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERMODAL TRANSPORTATION: THE POTENTIAL AND THE CHALLENGE A Summary Report 2003 #12;June 2003 To the Reader This report summarizes the second James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology. Over two days, we explored the chal- lenges and opportunities in intermodal transportation, addressing

Minnesota, University of

279

Louisiana Transportation Research Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Louisiana Transportation Research Center LTRC www.ltrc.lsu.edu 2012-13 ANNUALREPORT #12;The Louisiana Transportation Research Center (LTRC) is a research, technology transfer, and training center administered jointly by the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (DOTD) and Louisiana State

Harms, Kyle E.

280

Introduction to Transportation Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction to Transportation Planning CMP 4710/6710 Fall 2012 3 Credit Hours Room: ARCH 229 on a Saturday night, transportation is not an objective in and of itself, but a means to carry out the functions of daily living (i.e., it's a "derived good"). As a consequence, the transportation systems we build

Tipple, Brett

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Rural Intelligent Transportation Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rural Intelligent Transportation Systems In a technical session at the 2011 NACE conference, Dennis Foderberg of SEH Inc. discussed intelligent transportation systems (ITS) developed by SEH in collaboration with Network Transportation Technologies, Inc. These systems address the problem of crashes on low-volume roads

Minnesota, University of

282

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier5Rate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfPrograms Jump

283

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier6Rate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfPrograms JumpEnergy InformationInformation

284

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier1Rate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfPrograms JumpEnergyDemandWindow

285

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier2Rate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfProgramsInformation

286

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier3Rate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfProgramsInformationInformation

287

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier4Rate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscotInformation Max Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of

288

Development of a Rating System for a Comparative Accelerated Test Standard (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation discusses methods of developing and structuring a useful rating system and communicating the results.

Kurtz, S.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Turbulent transport of energetic ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approaching ITER operation, the issue of anomalous transport of fast particles becomes more and more important. This is partly because the ITER heating and current drive system relies heavily on neutral beam injection. Moreover burning plasmas are heated by fast fusion {alpha} particles.Fusion {alpha} particles are characterised by a fixed energy and an isotropic velocity distribution. Therefore they have gyroradii one magnitude larger than the thermal ions. The dependency of the particle diffusion of {alpha} test particles on the Kubo number K = VExB{tau}c/{lambda}c (VExB mean E x B velocity, {tau}c, {lambda}c correlation time and length of the turbulent potential) is presented. For different turbulent regimes, different dependency of the diffusion on the gyroradius is found. For large Kubo numbers, the transport is found to remain constant for gyroradii up to the correlation length of the potential, whereas it is drastically reduced in the small Kubo number regime.In the second part, a model for beam ions injected along the equilibrium magnetic field is described. The beam ions are treated gyrokinetically in a self-consistent way with the equilibrium distribution function taken as a shifted Maxwellian. The implications of such a model for the Vlasov equation, the field equations, and the calculation of moments and fluxes are discussed. Linear and nonlinear results, obtained with the gyrokinetic flux tube code GENE show the existence of a new instability driven by fast beam ions. The instability has a maximum growth rate at perpendicular wave numbers of ky{rho}s {approx} 0.15 and depends mainly on the beam velocity and the density gradient of the beam ions. This instability leads to a replacement of bulk ion particle transport by fast ion particle transport, connected to a strongly enhanced heat flux. In the presence of this instability, the turbulent particle and heat transport is dominated by fast ions.

Dannert, Tilman; Hauff, Thilo; Jenko, Frank; Guenter, Sibylle [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

290

Crystal structure, magnetism and transport properties of Ce{sub 3}Ni{sub 25.75}Ru{sub 3.16}Al{sub 4.1}B{sub 10}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single crystals of Ce{sub 3}Ni{sub 25.75}Ru{sub 3.16}Al{sub 4.1}B{sub 10} were obtained from a process in which a polycrystalline sample of CeRu{sub 2}Al{sub 2}B was annealed in an excess of a Ni–In flux. The initial phase, CeRu{sub 2}Al{sub 2}B, does not recrystallize, instead, crystals of a new phase, Ce{sub 3}Ni{sub 25.75}Ru{sub 3.16}Al{sub 4.1}B{sub 10}, could be isolated once the flux was removed. The title compound crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4/nmm (No. 129) with a=1139.02(8), c=801.68(6) pm (c/a=0.70) in the Nd{sub 3}Ni{sub 29}Si{sub 4}B{sub 10} structure type. Electrical resistivity measurements reveal metallic behavior with a minimum of 700 µ? cm and a small residual resistivity ratio of RRR=1.4 indicating a large amount of disorder scattering. The cerium atoms are either in the 4+ or an intermediate valence state with a valence fluctuation temperature far above room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Single crystals of Ce{sub 3}Ni{sub 25.75}Ru{sub 3.16}A{sub l4.1}B{sub 10} were obtained using a process in which a polycrystalline sample of CeRu{sub 2}Al{sub 2}B was annealed in an excess of a Ni–In flux. Electrical resistivity measurements reveal metallic behavior with a minimum of 700 ?? cm and a small residual resistivity ratio of RRR=1.4 indicating a large amount of disorder scattering. The cerium atoms are either in the 4+ or an intermediate valence state with a valence fluctuation temperature far above room temperature. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Flux synthesis of high quality single crystals of Ce{sub 3}Ni{sub 25.75}Ru{sub 3.16}Al{sub 4.1}B{sub 10} is presented along with the crystal structure, magnetic and transport properties. • The compound is isostructural to Nd{sub 3}Ni{sub 29}Si{sub 4}B{sub 10} but is first of this structure type showing mixed occupancies of d-elements. • This is an intermetallic phase with Ce in either the 4+ or an intermediate valence state. • The fact that this structure with mixed occupied transition metal sites exists suggests that more compounds of this type should be accessible and the physical properties tuned.

Janka, Oliver [Department of Chemistry, University of California, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Baumbach, Ryan E.; Thompson, Joe D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bauer, Eric D., E-mail: edbauer@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Kauzlarich, Susan M., E-mail: smkauzlarich@ucdavis.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Transportation YOU 2013 DC Youth Summit WTS Transportation YOU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation YOU 2013 DC Youth Summit WTS Transportation YOU CTS Research Conference May 21, 2014 Lisa Rasmussen, WTS / Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc #12;Transportation YOU 2013 DC Youth SummitTransportation YOU 2013 DC Youth Summit Agenda What is Transportation YOU? Transportation YOU ­ WTS Local Chapter

Minnesota, University of

292

Theory of contributon transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A general discussion of the physics of contributon transport is presented. To facilitate this discussion, a Boltzmann-like transport equation for contributons is obtained, and special contributon cross sections are defined. However, the main goal of this study is to identify contributon transport equations and investigate possible deterministic solution techniques. Four approaches to the deterministic solution of the contributon transport problem are investigated. These approaches are an attempt to exploit certain attractive properties of the contributon flux, psi = phi phi/sup +/, where phi and phi/sup +/ are the solutions to the forward and adjoint Boltzmann transport equations.

Painter, J.W.; Gerstl, S.A.W.; Pomraning, G.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Salinity tolerance in plants: attempts to manipulate ion transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion transport is the major determining factor of salinity tolerance in plants. A simple scheme of a plant cell with ion fluxes provides basic understanding of ion transport and the corresponding changes of ion concentrations under salinity. The review describes in detail basic principles of ion transport for a plant cell, introduces set of transporters essential for sodium and potassium uptake and efflux, analyses driving forces of ion transport and compares ion fluxes measured by several techniques. Study of differences in ion transport between salt tolerant halophytes and salt-sensitive plants with an emphasis on transport of potassium and sodium via plasma membranes offers knowledge for increasing salinity tolerance. Effects of salt stress on ion transport properties of membranes show huge opportunities for manipulating ion transport. Several attempts to overexpress or knockout ion transporters for changing salinity tolerance are described. Future perspectives are questioned with more attention given to potential candidate ion channels and transporters for altered expression. The potential direction of increasing salinity tolerance by modifying ion channels and transporters is discussed and questioned. An alternative approach from synthetic biology is to modify the existing membrane transport proteins or create new ones with desired properties for transforming agricultural crops. The approach had not been widely used earlier and leads also to theoretical and pure scientific aspects of protein chemistry, structure-function relations of membrane proteins, systems biology and physiology of stress and ion homeostasis.

Vadim Volkov

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

294

Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Panagiotis Scarlatos, Ph.D., Director Transportation Safety and Security #12;Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Partners #12 evacuations · Tracking systems for hazardous materials Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety

Fernandez, Eduardo

295

Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City of Lakes Minneapolis Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study #12;Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City of Lakes Background: · Currently, funding

Minnesota, University of

296

Transportation System Requirements Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Transportation System Requirements Document (Trans-SRD) describes the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of this document is to define the system-level requirements for Transportation consistent with the CRWMS Requirement Document (CRD). These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presents an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. The interface identification and description are published in the CRWMS Interface Specification.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Transportation risk assessment for ethanol transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(California, Texas Gulf Coast, New England Atlantic Coast) will be of particular interest. The goal is to conduct a quantitative risk assessment on the pipeline, truck, and rail transportation modes to these areas. As a result of the quantitative risk...

Shelton Davis, Anecia Delaine

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels,...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced...

299

Energy for Cleaner Transportation Hydro-Quebec  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

W. Yu, X. Yang, P. Wang, and L. Meng 19 Rotating Rate Dependency of Methanol Oxidation on a Smooth and Methanol Transport in Direct Methanol Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells M. Lefebvre and D. Olmeijer 35 solution-based room temperature reduction technique whereby nanoscale iron powder is produced. This new

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

300

Composite oxygen ion transport element  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A composite oxygen ion transport element that has a layered structure formed by a dense layer to transport oxygen ions and electrons and a porous support layer to provide mechanical support. The dense layer can be formed of a mixture of a mixed conductor, an ionic conductor, and a metal. The porous support layer can be fabricated from an oxide dispersion strengthened metal, a metal-reinforced intermetallic alloy, a boron-doped Mo.sub.5Si.sub.3-based intermetallic alloy or combinations thereof. The support layer can be provided with a network of non-interconnected pores and each of said pores communicates between opposite surfaces of said support layer. Such a support layer can be advantageously employed to reduce diffusion resistance in any type of element, including those using a different material makeup than that outlined above.

Chen, Jack C. (Getzville, NY); Besecker, Charles J. (Batavia, IL); Chen, Hancun (Williamsville, NY); Robinson, Earil T. (Mentor, OH)

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Development of dense-phase pneumatic transport of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dense phase pneumatic transport system has been developed to reduce entrained particles as is seen in the belt conveyor system. High mass flow rate and dense phase (Loading ratio = 50--100kg-coal/kg-N{sub 2}) transport has been achieved by applying this plug flow system to pneumatic conveying of coal (Average particle diameter = 2.5 mm).

Horisaka, S.; Ikemiya, H.; Kajiwara, T. [Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Kashima, Ibaraki (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

302

A Transportation Risk Assessment Tool for Analyzing the Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste to the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Transportation Database was developed as a data management tool for assembling and integrating data from multiple sources to compile the potential transportation impacts presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada (DEIS). The database uses the results from existing models and codes such as RADTRAN, RISKIND, INTERLINE, and HIGHWAY to estimate transportation-related impacts of transporting spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from commercial reactors and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to Yucca Mountain. The source tables in the database are compendiums of information from many diverse sources including: radionuclide quantities for each waste type; route and route characteristics for rail, legal-weight truck, heavy haul. truck, and barge transport options; state-specific accident and fatality rates for routes selected for analysis; packaging and shipment data by waste type; unit risk factors; the complex behavior of the packaged waste forms in severe transport accidents; and the effects of exposure to radiation or the isotopic specific effects of radionclides should they be released in severe transportation accidents. The database works together with the codes RADTRAN (Neuhauser, et al, 1994) and RISKlND (Yuan, et al, 1995) to calculate incident-free dose and accident risk. For the incident-free transportation scenario, the database uses RADTRAN and RISKIND-generated data to calculate doses to offlink populations, onlink populations, people at stops, crews, inspectors, workers at intermodal transfer stations, guards at overnight stops, and escorts, as well as non-radioactive pollution health effects. For accident scenarios, the database uses RADTRAN-generated data to calculate dose risks based on ingestion, inhalation, resuspension, immersion (cloudshine), and groundshine as well as non-radioactive traffic fatalities. The Yucca Mountain EIS Transportation Database was developed using Microsoft Access 97{trademark} software and the Microsoft Windows NT{trademark} operating system. The database consists of tables for storing data, forms for selecting data for querying, and queries for retrieving the data in a predefined format. Database queries retrieve records based on input parameters and are used to calculate incident-free and accident doses using unit risk factors obtained from RADTRAN results. The next section briefly provides some background that led to the development of the database approach used in preparing the Yucca Mountain DEIS. Subsequent sections provide additional details on the database structure and types of impacts calculated using the database.

Ralph Best; T. Winnard; S. Ross; R. Best

2001-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

303

Association of automobile passenger transportation and economic growth in Japan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) (Nember) January 1969 ABSTRACT Association cf Automobile Passenger Transportation and Economic Growth in Japan. (January 1969) Teruhiko Boric, B. A. , &faseda University Directed by: Dr. ~felvin L. Greenhut In order to evaluate the growth... of Japanese post-war passenger transportation, a comparative study of the U. S. passenger transporta- ti. on development between 1910 and 1940 has been made. The growth rate of automobile ownership prior to the Great Depression is larger than the rate...

Horie, Teruhiko

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals. This project has the following 6 main tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Multi-fluid transport code modeling of time-dependent recycling in ELMy H-mode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simulations of a high-confinement-mode (H-mode) tokamak discharge with infrequent giant type-I ELMs are performed by the multi-fluid, multi-species, two-dimensional transport code UEDGE-MB, which incorporates the Macro-Blob approach for intermittent non-diffusive transport due to filamentary coherent structures observed during the Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and simple time-dependent multi-parametric models for cross-field plasma transport coefficients and working gas inventory in material surfaces. Temporal evolutions of pedestal plasma profiles, divertor recycling, and wall inventory in a sequence of ELMs are studied and compared to the experimental time-dependent data. Short- and long-time-scale variations of the pedestal and divertor plasmas where the ELM is described as a sequence of macro-blobs are discussed. It is shown that the ELM recovery includes the phase of relatively dense and cold post-ELM divertor plasma evolving on a several ms scale, which is set by the transport properties of H-mode barrier. The global gas balance in the discharge is also analyzed. The calculated rates of working gas deposition during each ELM and wall outgassing between ELMs are compared to the ELM particle losses from the pedestal and neutral-beam-injection fueling rate, correspondingly. A sensitivity study of the pedestal and divertor plasmas to model assumptions for gas deposition and release on material surfaces is presented. The performed simulations show that the dynamics of pedestal particle inventory is dominated by the transient intense gas deposition into the wall during each ELM followed by continuous gas release between ELMs at roughly a constant rate.

Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Hollmann, E. M. [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Rognlien, T. D.; Lasnier, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Unterberg, E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Multi-fluid transport code modeling of time-dependent recycling in ELMy H-mode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simulations of a high-confinement-mode (H-mode) tokamak discharge with infrequent giant type-I ELMs are performed by the multi-fluid, multi-species, two-dimensional transport code UEDGE-MB, which incorporates the Macro-Blob approach for intermittent non-diffusive transport due to filamentary coherent structures observed during the Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and simple time-dependent multi-parametric models for cross-field plasma transport coefficients and working gas inventory in material surfaces. Temporal evolutions of pedestal plasma profiles, divertor recycling, and wall inventory in a sequence of ELMs are studied and compared to the experimental time-dependent data. Short- and long-time-scale variations of the pedestal and divertor plasmas where the ELM is described as a sequence of macro-blobs are discussed. It is shown that the ELM recovery includes the phase of relatively dense and cold post-ELM divertor plasma evolving on a several ms scale, which is set by the transport properties of H-mode barrier. The global gas balance in the discharge is also analyzed. The calculated rates of working gas deposition during each ELM and wall outgassing between ELMs are compared to the ELM particle losses from the pedestal and neutral-beam-injection fueling rate, correspondingly. A sensitivity study of the pedestal and divertor plasmas to model assumptions for gas deposition and release on material surfaces is presented. The performed simulations show that the dynamics of pedestal particle inventory is dominated by the transient intense gas deposition into the wall during each ELM followed by continuous gas release between ELMs at roughly a constant rate.

Pigarov, A. Yu. [University of California, San Diego; Krasheninnikov, S. I. [University of California, La Jolla; Rognlien, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Hollmann, E. M. [University of California, San Diego; Lasnier, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Unterberg, Ezekial A [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Alternative Fuel Transportation Program  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets "Alternative Fuel Transportation Program" Dana O'Hara, DOE Ted Sears, NREL Vehicle Technologies Program June 20,...

308

Sustainable Transportation (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in transportation technologies, alternative fuels, and fuel cell technologies.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

UZ Colloid Transport Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

M. McGraw

2000-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

310

Energy Storage and Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage and Transportation INL Logo Search Skip Navigation Links Home Newsroom About INL Careers Research Programs Energy and Environment National and Homeland Security New Energy...

311

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Options for Liquid Biofuels Development in Ireland. SEI, 562006: Outlook for advanced biofuels. Energy Policy, 34(17),40 pp. IEA, 2004c: Biofuels for Transport: An International

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Radioactive Material Transportation Practices  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes standard transportation practices for Departmental programs to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials including radioactive waste. Does not cancel other directives.

2002-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

313

The role of space charge compensation for ion beam extraction and ion beam transport (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Depending on the specific type of ion source, the ion beam is extracted either from an electrode surface or from a plasma. There is always an interface between the (almost) space charge compensated ion source plasma, and the extraction region in which the full space charge is influencing the ion beam itself. After extraction, the ion beam is to be transported towards an accelerating structure in most cases. For lower intensities, this transport can be done without space charge compensation. However, if space charge is not negligible, the positive charge of the ion beam will attract electrons, which will compensate the space charge, at least partially. The final degree of Space Charge Compensation (SCC) will depend on different properties, like the ratio of generation rate of secondary particles and their loss rate, or the fact whether the ion beam is pulsed or continuous. In sections of the beam line, where the ion beam is drifting, a pure electrostatic plasma will develop, whereas in magnetic elements, these space charge compensating electrons become magnetized. The transport section will provide a series of different plasma conditions with different properties. Different measurement tools to investigate the degree of space charge compensation will be described, as well as computational methods for the simulation of ion beams with partial space charge compensation.

Spädtke, Peter, E-mail: p.spaedtke@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)] [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Sustainable Transportation Design In the United States: Background, Current Initiatives and Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the unsustainable nature of transportation projects. Some of these include sustainable rating systems similar to the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) rating system for buildings developed by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC). Most...

Schroer, Anne

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

315

Radiation dose rates from UF{sub 6} cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of many studies, both theoretical and experimental, which have been carried out by Urenco over the last 15 years into radiation dose rates from uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders. The contents of the cylinder, its history, and the geometry all affect the radiation dose rate. These factors are all examined in detail. Actual and predicted dose rates are compared with levels permitted by IAEA transport regulations.

Friend, P.J. [Urenco, Capenhurst (United Kingdom)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

2006 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2006 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2006 Transportation Tomorrow Survey Data Presentation #12;2006 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO City of Hamilton City of Kawartha Lakes City of Guelph City of Brantford

Toronto, University of

317

Modern Foundations of Light Transport Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a light transport equation naturally afforded by the Poisson bracket. With a fiber-wise radial symmetry optics is obtained using a non-canonical Legendre transform which yields the Hamiltonian structure provides the connection to classical radiometry and quantities such as radiance and vector irradiance

Desbrun, Mathieu

318

Molecular Squares as Molecular Sieves: Size-Selective Transport Through  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular Squares as Molecular Sieves: Size-Selective Transport Through Porous-Membrane squaresº: cyclic structures typically featuring metal-ion cor- ners and difunctional bridging ligands processes: size-selective molecular transport from a guest-containing solution to one initially free

319

Biofuels and Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biofuels and Transportation Impacts and Uncertainties Some Observations of a Reformed Ethanol and Logistics Symposium 3 Topics · Why Biofuels · Ethanol Economics · Ethanol Transportation Equipment Biofuels? · National Security · Reduce Imports of oil · Peak Oil · Replace Fossil Resources

Minnesota, University of

320

Packaging and Transportation Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE, including NNSA, offsite shipments and onsite transfers of radioactive and other hazardous materials and for modal transportation. Cancels DOE O 460.1B, 5-14-10

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Packaging and Transportation Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1A. Canceled by DOE O 460.1C.

2003-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

322

Northwestern University Transportation Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and challenges for our society. Energy and sustainability, economic growth and development, quality of life in the world to recognize transportation as an interdisciplinary field, the Transportation Center was founded, as the tradition lives on, and the Center continues to renew itself and engage faculty and students with new

MacIver, Malcolm A.

323

MAESTRAEN TRANSPORTE ESPECIALIZACINEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigaciones que permitan la comprensión de distintos componentes delsistema del transporte así como para Investigación de Operaciones y Redes de transporte Medidas y Administración del Tránsito Tecnologías de

Vásquez, Carlos

324

Hydrogen Energy Storage: Grid and Transportation Services Workshop...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Workshop Structure 1 02 Hydrogen Energy Storage: Grid and Transportation Services NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and...

325

New concepts in energy and mass transport within carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The unique structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) contributes to their distinguished properties, making them useful in nanotechnology. CNTs have been explored for energy transport in next-generation, such as light-emitting ...

Choi, Wonjoon, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Anisotropic transport properties of ferromagnetic-superconducting bilayers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the transport properties of vortex matter in a superconducting thin film separated by a thin insulator layer from a ferromagnetic layer. We assume an alternating stripe structure for both FM and superconducting (SC) layers as found in S...

Kayali, MA; Pokrovsky, Valery L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Development of an spFRET method to measure structure changes in ion exchange proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transporter, major facilitator superfamily, membrane transport, membrane transporter, OxlT, single molecule, spFRET, transport protein. Tightly coupled ion exchangers, such as the AE anion exchange systems only take place at an appreciable rate if a suitable substrate ion is bound to the transport site

Novotny, Lukas

328

INLAND PORT TRANSPORTATION EVALUATION GUIDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INLAND PORT TRANSPORTATION EVALUATION GUIDE by Robert Harrison, Center for Transportation Research Transportation Institute, The Texas A&M University System; and Jolanda Prozzi, Center for Transportation Research, The University of Texas at Austin CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH Bureau of Engineering Research

Texas at Austin, University of

329

http://tti.tamu.edu Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

http://tti.tamu.edu Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation >>> Transportation operat > Freight traffic > Commodities > Travel time > Travel demand > http

330

Transport characteristics across drum filter vents and polymer bags  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rate at which hydrogen (H {sub 2}) or a volatile organic compound (VOC) exits a layer of confinement in a vented waste drum is proportional to the concentration difference across the layer. The proportionality constant is the gas transport characteristic. A series of transport experiments were conducted to determine H{sub 2} and VOC transport characteristics across different drum filter vents and polymer bags. This report reviews the methods and results of past investigators in defining transport characteristics across filter vents and polymer bags, describes the apparatus and procedures used in these experiments, compares the reported and estimated transport characteristics with earlier results, and discusses the impact of changing the transport characteristic values used in model calculations.

Liekhus, K.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Electrokinetic transport in microchannels with random roughness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a numerical framework to model the electrokinetic transport in microchannels with random roughness. The three-dimensional microstructure of the rough channel is generated by a random generation-growth method with three statistical parameters to control the number density, the total volume fraction, and the anisotropy characteristics of roughness elements. The governing equations for the electrokinetic transport are solved by a high-efficiency lattice Poisson?Boltzmann method in complex geometries. The effects from the geometric characteristics of roughness on the electrokinetic transport in microchannels are therefore modeled and analyzed. For a given total roughness volume fraction, a higher number density leads to a lower fluctuation because of the random factors. The electroosmotic flow rate increases with the roughness number density nearly logarithmically for a given volume fraction of roughness but decreases with the volume fraction for a given roughness number density. When both the volume fraction and the number density of roughness are given, the electroosmotic flow rate is enhanced by the increase of the characteristic length along the external electric field direction but is reduced by that in the direction across the channel. For a given microstructure of the rough microchannel, the electroosmotic flow rate decreases with the Debye length. It is found that the shape resistance of roughness is responsible for the flow rate reduction in the rough channel compared to the smooth channel even for very thin double layers, and hence plays an important role in microchannel electroosmotic flows.

Wang, Moran [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kang, Qinjun [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

ab initio Electronic Transport Model with Explicit Solution to the Linearized Boltzmann Transport Equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accurate models of carrier transport are essential for describing the electronic properties of semiconductor materials. To the best of our knowledge, the current models following the framework of the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) either rely heavily on experimental data (i.e., semi-empirical), or utilize simplifying assumptions, such as the constant relaxation time approximation (BTE-cRTA). While these models offer valuable physical insights and accurate calculations of transport properties in some cases, they often lack sufficient accuracy -- particularly in capturing the correct trends with temperature and carrier concentration. We present here a general transport model for calculating low-field electrical drift mobility and Seebeck coefficient of n-type semiconductors, by explicitly considering all relevant physical phenomena (i.e. elastic and inelastic scattering mechanisms). We first rewrite expressions for the rates of elastic scattering mechanisms, in terms of ab initio properties, such as the ban...

Faghaninia, Alireza; Lo, Cynthia S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

NAC-1 cask dose rate calculations for LWR spent fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Nuclear Assurance Corporation nuclear fuel transport cask, NAC-1, is being considered as a transport and storage option for spent nuclear fuel located in the B-Cell of the 324 Building. The loaded casks will be shipped to the 200 East Area Interim Storage Area for dry interim storage. Several calculations were performed to assess the photon and neutron dose rates. This report describes the analytical methods, models, and results of this investigation.

CARLSON, A.B.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

334

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/ Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Existing facilities were modified for evaluation of environmental assisted slow crack growth and creep in flexural mode. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition were continued for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment. These studies in parallel to those on the LSFCO composition is expect to yield important information on questions such as the role of cation segregation and the stability of the perovskite structure on crack initiation vs. crack growth. Studies have been continued on the La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} composition using neutron diffraction and TGA studies. A transition from p-type to n-type of conductor was observed at relative low pO{sub 2}, at which the majority carriers changed from the holes to electrons because of the valence state decreases in Fe due to the further loss of oxygen. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Data obtained at 850 C show that the stoichiometry in La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x} vary from {approx}2.85 to 2.6 over the pressure range studied. From the stoichiometry a lower limit of 2.6 corresponding to the reduction of all Fe{sup 4+} to Fe{sup 3+} and no reduction of Cr{sup 3+} is expected.

S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana

2003-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

335

Heart Rate Artifact Suppression.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Motion artifact strongly corrupts heart rate measurements in current pulse oximetry systems. In many, almost any motion will greatly diminish the system’s ability to extract… (more)

Dickson, Christopher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Residential Solar Valuation Rates  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Residential Solar Valuation Rates Karl R. Rbago Rbago Energy LLC 1 The Ideal Residential Solar Tariff Fair to the utility and non-solar customers Fair compensation to...

337

Effective Rate Period  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

charges or credits associated with the creation, termination, or modification to any tariff, contract, or rate schedule accepted or approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory...

338

LCC Guidance Rates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Notepad text file provides the LCC guidance rates in a numbered format for the various regions throughout the U.S.

339

A comparative financial analysis of the automobile and public transportation in London  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automobile systems and public transportation are often organized separately within government structure inhibiting a comparative analysis between the two modes. Further complicating the comparison is that in public ...

Kothari, Tejus Jitendra

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study the local environmentals of LSFT with various level of oxygen deficiency. Ionic valence state, magnetic interaction and influence of Ti on superexchange are discussed Stable crack growth studies on Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were done at elevated temperature, pressure and elevated conditions. Post-fracture X-ray data of the OTM fractured at 1000 C in environment were refined by FullProf code and results indicate a distortion of the parent cubic perovskite to orthorhombic structure with reduced symmetry. TGA-DTA studies on the post-fracture samples also indicated residual effect arising from the thermal and stress history of the samples. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. The initial measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} are reported. Neutron diffraction measurements of the same composition are in agreement with both the stoichiometry and the kinetic behavior observed in coulometric titration measurements. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The COCO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Transportation activity analysis using smartphones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation activity surveys investigate when, where and how people travel in urban areas to provide information necessary for urban transportation planning. In Singapore, the Land Transport Authority (LTA) carries out ...

Xiao, Yu

342

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, in situ neutron diffraction was used to characterize the chemical and structural properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} (here after as L2SF55T) specimen, which was subject to measurements of neutron diffraction from room temperature to 900 C in N{sub 2}. Space group of R3c was found to result in a better refinement and is used in this study. The difference for crystal structure, lattice parameters and local crystal chemistry for LSFT nearly unchanged when gas environment switched from air to N{sub 2}. Stable crack growth studies on Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were done at room temperature in air. A bridge-compression fixture was fabricated to achieve stable pre-cracks from Vickers indents. Post fracture evaluation indicated stable crack growth from the indent and a regime of fast fracture. Post-fracture X-ray data of the OTM fractured at 1000 C in environment were refined by FullProf code and results indicate a distortion of the parent cubic perovskite to orthorhombic structure with reduced symmetry. TGA-DTA studies on the post-fracture samples also indicated residual effect arising from the thermal and stress history of the samples. The thermal and chemical expansion of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} were studied at 800 {le} T {le} 1000 C and at {approx} 1 x 10{sup -15} {le} pO{sub 2} {le} 0.21 atm. The thermal expansion coefficient of the sample was calculated from the dilatometric analysis in the temperature range between room temperature and 1200 C in air. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Adjustable shear stress erosion and transport flume  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for measuring the total erosion rate and downstream transport of suspended and bedload sediments using an adjustable shear stress erosion and transport (ASSET) flume with a variable-depth sediment core sample. Water is forced past a variable-depth sediment core sample in a closed channel, eroding sediments, and introducing suspended and bedload sediments into the flow stream. The core sample is continuously pushed into the flow stream, while keeping the surface level with the bottom of the channel. Eroded bedload sediments are transported downstream and then gravitationally separated from the flow stream into one or more quiescent traps. The captured bedload sediments (particles and aggregates) are weighed and compared to the total mass of sediment eroded, and also to the concentration of sediments suspended in the flow stream.

Roberts, Jesse D. (Carlsbad, NM); Jepsen, Richard A. (Carlsbad, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Previous Power Rates (rates/current)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home DesignPresentations Presentations SortConferences PreviousRates

345

Power Rate Cases (pbl/rates)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006PhotovoltaicSeptember 22,ReactorAbout Power > FinancialPowerRates

346

Power Rates Announcements (pbl/rates)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006PhotovoltaicSeptember 22,ReactorAbout Power > FinancialPowerRates

347

Rates Meetings and Workshops (pbl/rates)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor. |INCIDENCET3PACI-T3Rate

348

Transportation Economic Assistance Program (Wisconsin)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Transportation Economic Assistance Program provides state grants to private business and local governments to improve transportation to projects improving economic conditions and creating or...

349

Transportation risk assessment for ethanol transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the quantitative risks involved with an ethanol pipeline. Pipelines that run from the Midwest, where the vast majority of ethanol is produced, to the target areas where reformulated gasoline is required (California, Texas Gulf Coast, New England Atlantic Coast... Atlantic Coast because of the large volume. It is beneficial to look at these areas as opposed to the iv smaller areas because pipeline transportation requires very large volumes. In order to find a meaningful comparison between all three...

Shelton Davis, Anecia Delaine

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

350

ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be generated from coal and nuclear energy in contrast to 7%in the use of coal and nuclear energy for transportation andparticularly for coal and nuclear energy utilization, would

Cairns, Elton J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Managing Director Buildings, Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Site Development Will Terris Manager Gardening Maintenance Jim Gish Manager Landscape Specialty Tegwyn Maintenance and project Delivery Scott Sherwood Director Transportation Services Glenl Wear Director Grounds Supervisor Specialty Crews 17 Area supervisors Custodial Maintenance Charles Anderson Supervisor Activity

Seamons, Kent E.

352

Transportation Baseline Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Transportation Program 1999 Transportation Baseline Report presents data that form a baseline to enable analysis and planning for future Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) waste and materials transportation. In addition, this Report provides a summary overview of DOE’s projected quantities of waste and materials for transportation. Data presented in this report were gathered as a part of the IPABS Spring 1999 update of the EM Corporate Database and are current as of July 30, 1999. These data were input and compiled using the Analysis and Visualization System (AVS) which is used to update all stream-level components of the EM Corporate Database, as well as TSD System and programmatic risk (disposition barrier) information. Project (PBS) and site-level IPABS data are being collected through the Interim Data Management System (IDMS). The data are presented in appendices to this report.

Fawcett, Ricky Lee; Kramer, George Leroy Jr.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Transportation Energy and Alternatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Station in Indonesia Hydrogen refueling in Munich, Germany "You will never see widespread use of the fuel fuels" Potentially used for Transportation · Biogas (primarily for onsite electrical generation) LFG

Handy, Susan L.

354

Accident resistant transport container  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

Andersen, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Cole, James K. (Albuquerque, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Interactive Transportable Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportable architecture which embeds the means to communicate with real or imaginary digital information spaces in a natural fashion offers unprecedented opportunities to make multimedia experiences available to the public almost everywhere. This installation demonstrates an example of interactive transportable architecture which incorporates unencumebered real-time body tracking and gesture recognition to explore a 3-D cityscape and a brain-like web-based information space.

Oliver Irschitz; Priam Givord; Newyork Exit Newyork; Flavia Sparacino

356

Campus Village Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emmanuel Hernandez THE CAMPUS V ILLAGE : TRANSPORTATION Objective The Campus Village is a new community being constructed in northwest Lawrence with a intergenerational focus in mind. The site will be equipped with housing for students, athletes..., retirement community members, and families. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the city’s current transportation network and make recommendations on that network to better accommodate the needs of the new property. Specifically, the goal...

Hernandez, Emmanuel

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

357

Fluid transport container  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitting for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container. 13 figs.

DeRoos, B.G.; Downing, J.P. Jr.; Neal, M.P.

1995-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

358

Metropolitan Transportation Plan 2035  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adopted by the Tyler Area MPO Policy Committee December 4, 2009 METROPOLITAN TRANSPORTATION PLAN 2035 Revised April 22, 2010 Adopted by the Tyler Area MPO Policy Committee December 4, 2009 Amended/Revised April 22, 2010 Prepared by: Bucher..., Willis, and Ratliff Corporation 1828 East Southeast Loop 323, Suite 202 Tyler, Texas 75701 903.581.7844 This Document Serves as an Update to the Tyler Area Metropolitan Transportation Plan 2030. Portions of that Document were Unchanged and Appear...

Tyler Area Metropolitan Planning Organization

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

359

Particle transport in plasma reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SEMATECH and the Department of Energy have established a Contamination Free Manufacturing Research Center (CFMRC) located at Sandia National Laboratories. One of the programs underway at the CFMRC is directed towards defect reduction in semiconductor process reactors by the application of computational modeling. The goal is to use fluid, thermal, plasma, and particle transport models to identify process conditions and tool designs that reduce the deposition rate of particles on wafers. The program is directed toward defect reduction in specific manufacturing tools, although some model development is undertaken when needed. The need to produce quantifiable improvements in tool defect performance requires the close cooperation among Sandia, universities, SEMATECH, SEMATECH member companies, and equipment manufacturers. Currently, both plasma (e.g., etch, PECVD) and nonplasma tools (e.g., LPCVD, rinse tanks) are being worked on under this program. In this paper the authors summarize their recent efforts to reduce particle deposition on wafers during plasma-based semiconductor manufacturing.

Rader, D.J.; Geller, A.S.; Choi, Seung J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kushner, M.J. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Gas-phase transport of WF6 through annular nanopipes in TiN during chemical vapor deposition of W on TiN/Ti/SiO2 structures for integrated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas-phase transport of WF6 through annular nanopipes in TiN during chemical vapor deposition of W through the 106-nm-thick TiN film. W piles up at the TiN/Ti interface, while F rapidly saturates the TiN-sectional and scanning transmission electron microscopy analyses demonstrate that WF6 penetrates into the TiN layer

Allen, Leslie H.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Membrane Transport Chloride Transport Across Vesicle and Cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Membrane Transport Chloride Transport Across Vesicle and Cell Membranes by Steroid-Based Receptors-established that molecules which transport cations across cell membranes (cationophores) can have potent biological effects the formation of an ion pair.[4a­g] Anion transport by purely electroneutral systems is still quite rare.[4j

Smith, Bradley D.

362

B. TRANSPORTATION, CIRCULATION AND PARKING B. TRANSPORTATION, CIRCULATION AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B. TRANSPORTATION, CIRCULATION AND PARKING 231 B. TRANSPORTATION, CIRCULATION AND PARKING on transportation and connectivity issues common to UCSF as a whole. Please refer to Chapter 5, Plans for Existing characteristics specific to each individual UCSF site. DETERMINANTS OF THE 1996 LRDP The transportation

Mullins, Dyche

363

Solar Models and NACRE thermonuclear reaction rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the most recent updated physics, calibrated solar models have been computed with the new thermonuclear reaction rates of NACRE, the recently available European compilation. Comparisons with models computed with the reaction rates of Caughlan & Fowler (\\cite{cf88}) and of Adelberger et al. (\\cite{a98}) are made for global structure, expected neutrinos fluxes, chemical composition and sound speed profiles, helioseismological properties of p-modes and g-modes.

P. Morel; B. Pichon; J. Provost; G. Berthomieu

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

364

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and initial studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were loaded to fracture at varying stress rates. Studies were done at room temperature in air and at 1000 C in a specified environment to evaluate slow crack growth behavior. In addition, studies were also begun to obtain reliable estimates of fracture toughness and stable crack growth in specific environments. Newer composition of Ti doped LSF membranes were characterized by neutron diffraction analysis. Quench studies indicated an apparent correlation between the unit cell volume and oxygen occupancy. The studies however, indicated an anomaly of increasing Fe/Ti ratio with change in heat treatment. Ti doped LSF was also characterized for stoichiometry as a function of temp and pO{sub 2}. The non stoichiometry parameter {delta} was observed to increase almost linearly on lowering pO{sub 2} until a ideal stoichiometric composition of {delta} = 0.175 was approached.

S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; W.B. Yelon; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

PRECEDENTS FOR AUTHORIZATION OF CONTENTS USING DOSE RATE MEASUREMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the transportation of Radioactive Material (RAM) packages, the requirements for the maximum allowed dose rate at the package surface and in its vicinity are given in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 71.47. The regulations are based on the acceptable dose rates to which the public, workers, and the environment may be exposed. As such, the regulations specify dose rates, rather than quantity of radioactive isotopes and require monitoring to confirm the requirements are met. 10CFR71.47 requires that each package of radioactive materials offered for transportation must be designed and prepared for shipment so that under conditions normally incident to transportation the radiation level does not exceed 2 mSv/h (200 mrem/h) at any point on the external Surface of the package, and the transport index does not exceed 10. Before shipment, the dose rate of the package is determined by measurement, ensuring that it conforms to the regulatory limits, regardless of any analyses. This is the requirement for all certified packagings. This paper discusses the requirements for establishing the dose rates when shipping RAM packages and the precedents for meeting these requirements by measurement.

Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

366

Nanoscale Charge Transport in Excitonic Solar Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excitonic solar cells, including all-organic, hybrid organic-inorganic and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), offer strong potential for inexpensive and large-area solar energy conversion. Unlike traditional inorganic semiconductor solar cells, where all the charge generation and collection processes are well understood, these excitonic solar cells contain extremely disordered structures with complex interfaces which results in large variations in nanoscale electronic properties and has a strong influence on carrier generation, transport, dissociation and collection. Detailed understanding of these processes is important for fabrication of highly efficient solar cells. Efforts to improve efficiency are underway at a large number of research groups throughout the world focused on inorganic and organic semiconductors, photonics, photophysics, charge transport, nanoscience, ultrafast spectroscopy, photonics, semiconductor processing, device physics, device structures, interface structure etc. Rapid progress in this multidisciplinary area requires strong synergetic efforts among researchers from diverse backgrounds. Such effort can lead to novel methods for development of new materials with improved photon harvesting and interfacial treatments for improved carrier transport, process optimization to yield ordered nanoscale morphologies with well defined electronic structures.

Venkat Bommisetty, South Dakota State University

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

367

On Thermonuclear Reaction Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear reactions govern major aspects of the chemical evolution od galaxies and stars. Analytic study of the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals is attempted here. Exact expressions for the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals for nuclear reactions in the case of nonresonant, modified nonresonant, screened nonresonant and resonant cases are given. These are expressed in terms of H-functions, G-functions and in computable series forms. Computational aspects are also discussed.

H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

1996-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

368

Texas Transportation Poll Final report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas Transportation Poll Final report PRC 14-16-F #12;2 Texas Transportation Poll Texas A&M Transportation Institute PRC 14-16-F September 2014 Authors Chris Simek Tina Geiselbrecht #12;3 Table of Contents .......................................................................................................................... 8 Transportation Funding

369

Transportation Systems Engineering GRADUATE STUDIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation Systems Engineering GRADUATE STUDIES TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS are the building blocks and provides for an improved quality of life. However, transportation systems by their very nature also affect the environment through physical construction and operation of transportation facilities, and through the travel

Wang, Yuhang

370

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the initial studies on newer compositions and also includes newer approaches to address various materials issues such as in metal-ceramic sealing. The current quarter's research has also focused on developing a comprehensive reliability model for predicting the structural behavior of the membranes in realistic conditions. In parallel to industry provided compositions, models membranes have been evaluated in varying environment. Of importance is the behavior of flaws and generation of new flaws aiding in fracture. Fracture mechanics parameters such as crack tip stresses are generated to characterize the influence of environment. Room temperature slow crack growth studies have also been initiated in industry provided compositions. The electrical conductivity and defect chemistry of an A site deficient compound (La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}) was studied. A higher conductivity was observed for La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3} than that of La{sub 0.60}Sr{sub 0.40}FeO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.20}FeO{sub 3}. Defect chemistry analysis showed that it was primarily contributed by a higher carrier concentration in La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}. Moreover, the ability for oxygen vacancy generation is much higher in La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3} as well, which indicates a lower bonding strength between Fe-O and a possible higher catalytic activity for La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}. The program continued to investigate the thermodynamic properties (stability and phase separation behavior) and total conductivity of prototype membrane materials. The data are needed together with the kinetic information to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Previous report listed initial measurements on a sample of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-x} prepared in-house by Praxair. Subsequently, a second sample of powder from a larger batch of sample were characterized and compared with the results from the previous batch.

S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; Thomas W. Eagar; Harold R. Larson; Raymundo Arroyave; X.-D Zhou; Y.-W. Shin; H.U. Anderson; Nigel Browning; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrifica...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector...

372

Numerical Evidence for Robustness of Environment-Assisted Quantum Transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent theoretical studies show that decoherence process can enhance transport efficiency in quantum systems. This effect is known as environment-assisted quantum transport (ENAQT). The role of ENAQT in optimal quantum transport is well investigated, however, it is less known how robust ENAQT is with respect to variations in the system or its environment characteristic. Toward answering this question, we simulated excitonic energy transfer in Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) photosynthetic complex. We found that ENAQT is robust with respect to many relevant parameters of environmental interactions and Frenkel-exciton Hamiltonian including reorganization energy, bath frequency cutoff, temperature, and initial excitations, dissipation rate, trapping rate, disorders, and dipole moments orientations. Our study suggests that the ENAQT phenomenon can be exploited in robust design of highly efficient quantum transport systems.

A. Shabani; M. Mohseni; H. Rabitz.; S. Lloyd

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

373

NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation Secure Data Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet Test and Evaluation PhotoSystemsTransportation Secure

374

NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet Test and Evaluation PhotoSystemsTransportation

375

Director Position Center for Urban Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Director Position Center for Urban Transportation The Center for Urban Transportation Research for state policymakers, transportation agencies, transportation professionals and the public. CUTR conducts of Transportation's Federal Transit Administration and Federal Highway Administration, the Florida Department

Arslan, Hüseyin

376

Delaware Transportation Infrastructure Forum Problem Identification Statements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2013 Delaware Transportation Infrastructure Forum Problem Identification Statements Sponsored by The Delaware Center for Transportation and the Delaware Department of Transportation Delaware Center for Transportation Your main resource for transportation education and research Identifying Important Issues Related

Firestone, Jeremy

377

JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2001 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY of Transportation, Ontario Additions in 1996 Regional Municipalities of Niagara, Waterloo Counties of Peterborough not to participate) #12;JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2001 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY

Toronto, University of

378

Reverse Engineering of Proteasomal Translocation Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We address the problem of proteasomal protein translocation and introduce a new stochastic model of the proteasomal digestion (cleavage) of proteins. In this model we account for the protein translocation and the positioning of cleavage sites of a proteasome from first principles. We show by test examples and by processing experimental data that our model allows reconstruction of the translocation and cleavage rates from mass spectroscopy data on digestion patterns and can be used to investigate the properties of transport in different experimental set-ups. Detailed investigation with this model will enable theoretical quantitative prediction of the proteasomal activity.

D. S. Goldobin; M. Mishto; K. Textoris-Taube; P. M. Kloetzel; A. Zaikin

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

379

Basic Physics of Tokamak Transport Final Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this grant has been to study the basic physics of various sources of anomalous transport in tokamaks. Anomalous transport in tokamaks continues to be one of the major problems in magnetic fusion research. As a tokamak is not a physics device by design, direct experimental observation and identification of the instabilities responsible for transport, as well as physics studies of the transport in tokamaks, have been difficult and of limited value. It is noted that direct experimental observation, identification and physics study of microinstabilities including ITG, ETG, and trapped electron/ion modes in tokamaks has been very difficult and nearly impossible. The primary reasons are co-existence of many instabilities, their broadband fluctuation spectra, lack of flexibility for parameter scans and absence of good local diagnostics. This has motivated us to study the suspected tokamak instabilities and their transport consequences in a simpler, steady state Columbia Linear Machine (CLM) with collisionless plasma and the flexibility of wide parameter variations. Earlier work as part of this grant was focused on both ITG turbulence, widely believed to be a primary source of ion thermal transport in tokamaks, and the effects of isotope scaling on transport levels. Prior work from our research team has produced and definitively identified both the slab and toroidal branches of this instability and determined the physics criteria for their existence. All the experimentally observed linear physics corroborate well with theoretical predictions. However, one of the large areas of research dealt with turbulent transport results that indicate some significant differences between our experimental results and most theoretical predictions. Latter years of this proposal were focused on anomalous electron transport with a special focus on ETG. There are several advanced tokamak scenarios with internal transport barriers (ITB), when the ion transport is reduced to neoclassical values by combined mechanisms of ExB and diamagnetic flow shear suppression of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instabilities. However, even when the ion transport is strongly suppressed, the electron transport remains highly anomalous. The most plausible physics scenario for the anomalous electron transport is based on electron temperature gradient (ETG) instabilities. This instability is an electron analog of and nearly isomorphic to the ITG instability, which we had studied before extensively. However, this isomorphism is broken nonlinearily. It is noted that as the typical ETG mode growth rates are larger (in contrast to ITG modes) than ExB shearing rates in usual tokamaks, the flow shear suppression of ETG modes is highly unlikely. This motivated a broader range of investigations of other physics scenarios of nonlinear saturation and transport scaling of ETG modes.

Sen, Amiya K.

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

380

The Method of Characteristics for 2-D Multigroup and Pointwise Transport Calculations in SCALE/CENTRM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SCALE 6 computes problem-dependent multigroup (MG) cross sections through a combination of the conventional Bondarenko shielding-factor method and a deterministic pointwise (PW) transport calculation of the fine-structure spectra in the resolved resonance and thermal energy ranges. The PW calculation is performed by the CENTRM code using a 1-D cylindrical Wigner-Seitz model with the white boundary condition instead of the real rectangular cell shape to represent a lattice unit cell. The pointwise fluxes computed by CENTRM are not exact because a 1-D model is used for the transport calculation, which introduces discrepancies in the MG self-shielded cross sections, resulting in some deviation in the eigenvalue. In order to solve this problem, the method of characteristics (MOC) has been applied to enable the CENTRM PW transport calculation for a 2-D square pin cell. The computation results show that the new BONAMI/CENTRM-MOC procedure produces very precise self-shielded cross sections compared to MCNP reaction rates.

Kim, Kang Seog [ORNL; Williams, Mark L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Release and transport of fission product cesium in the TMI-2 accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 50% of the fission product cesium was released from the overheated UO/sub 2/ fuel in the TMI-2 accident. Steam that boiled away from a water pool in the bottom of the reactor vessel transported the released fission products throughout the reactor coolant system (RCS). Some fission products passed directly through a leaking valve with steam and water into the containment structure, but most deposited on dry surfaces inside of the RCS before being dissolved or resuspended when the RCS was refilled with water. A cesium transport model was developed that extended measured cesium in the RCS back to the first day of the accident. The model revealed that approx.62% of the released /sup 137/Cs deposited on dry surfaces inside of the RCS before being slowly leached and transported out of the RCS in leaked or letdown water. The leach rates from the model agreed reasonably well with those measured in the laboratory. The chemical behavior of cesium in the TMI-2 accident agreed with that observed in fission product release tests at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

Lorenz, R.A.; Collins, J.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operat and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operations pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian

383

The state-of-the-art in air transportation demand and systems analysis : a report on the proceedings of a workshop sponsored by the Civil Aeronautics Board, Department of Transportation, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (June 1975)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction and summary: Forecasting air transportation demand has indeed become a complex and risky business in recent years, especially in view of unpredictable fuel prices, high inflation rates, a declining rate of ...

Taneja, Nawal K.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geochemical reactions in deep subsurface environments are complicated by the consolidated nature and mineralogical complexity of sedimentary rocks. Understanding the kinetics of these reactions is critical to our ability to make long-term predictions about subsurface processes such as pH buffering, alteration in rock structure, permeability changes, and formation of secondary precipitates. In this project, we used a combination of experiments and numerical simulation to bridge the gap between our knowledge of these reactions at the lab scale and rates that are meaningful for modeling reactive transport at core scales. The focus is on acid-driven mineral dissolution, which is specifically relevant in the context of CO2-water-rock interactions in geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The project led to major findings in three areas. First, we modeled reactive transport in pore-network systems to investigate scaling effects in geochemical reaction rates. We found significant scaling effects when CO2 concentrations are high and reaction rates are fast. These findings indicate that the increased acidity associated with geological sequestration can generate conditions for which proper scaling tools are yet to be developed. Second, we used mathematical modeling to investigate the extent to which SO2, if co-injected with CO2, would acidify formation brines. We found that there exist realistic conditions in which the impact on brine acidity will be limited due to diffusion rate-limited SO2 dissolution from the CO2 phase, and the subsequent pH shift may also be limited by the lack of availability of oxidants to produce sulfuric acid. Third, for three Viking sandstones (Alberta sedimentary basin, Canada), we employed backscattered electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to statistically characterize mineral contact with pore space. We determined that for reactive minerals in sedimentary consolidated rocks, abundance alone is not a good predictor of mineral accessible surface area, and should not be used in reactive transport modeling. Our work showed that reaction rates would be overestimated by three to five times.

Peters, Catherine A

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

385

Efficient Transportation Decision Public Web Site: Bridging the Gap Between Transportation Planning and the Public  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for accomplishing transportation planning and projectprocess – the Efficient Transportation Decision Making (Process - is to make transportation decisions more quickly

Roaza, Ruth

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Transportation Institutional Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Institutional Plan is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 provides background information, discusses the purposes of the Plan and the policy guidance for establishing the transportation system, and describes the projected system and the plans for its integrated development. Chapter 2 discusses the major participants who must interact to build the system. Chapter 3 suggests mechanisms for interaction that will foster wide participation in program planning and implementation and provides a framework for managing and resolving the issues related to development and operation of the transportation system. A list of acronyms and a glossary are included for the reader's convenience. Also included in this Plan are four appendices. Of particular importance is Appendix A, which includes detailed discussion of specific transportation issues. Appendices B, C, and D provide supporting material to assist the reader in understanding the roles of the involved institutions.

Not Available

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Rates and Repayment Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor.Tariff Rates FY 2015 Rates

388

Experimental constraints on transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization of the cross-field energy transport in magnetic confinement experiments in a manner applicable to the accurate assessment of future machine performance continues to be a challenging goal. Experimental results from the DIII-D tokamak in the areas of dimensionless scaling and non-diffusive transport represent progress toward this goal. Dimensionless scaling shows how beneficial the increase in machine size and magnetic field is for future devices. The experiments on DIII-D are the first to determine separately the electron and ion scaling with normalized gyroradius {rho}{sub *}; the electrons scale as expected from gyro-Bohm class theories, while the ions scale consistent with the Goldston empirical scaling. This result predicts an increase in transport relative to Bohm diffusion as {rho}{sub *} decreases in future devices. The existence of distinct {rho}{sub *} scalings for ions and electrons cautions against a physical interpretation of one-fluid or global analysis. The second class of experiments reported here are the first to demonstrate the existence of non-diffusive energy transport. Electron cyclotron heating was applied at the half radius; the electron temperature profile remains substantially peaked. Power balance analysis indicates that heat must flow in the direction of increasing temperature, which is inconsistent with purely diffusive transport. The dynamics of electron temperature perturbations indicate the presence in the heat flux of a term dependent on temperature rather than its gradient. These two observations strongly constrain the types of models which can be applied to cross-field heat transport.

Luce, T.C.; Petty, K.H.; Burrell, K.H.; Forest, C.B.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R.J.; De Haas, J.C.M.; James, R.A.; Makowski, M.A.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Heat transport system, method and material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat transport system, method and composite material are disclosed in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure. 1 fig.

Musinski, D.L.

1987-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

390

Transporting Hazardous Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButlerTransportation From modeling and simulationTransporting

391

Smart vehicular transportation systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work builds upon established Sandia intelligent systems technology to develop a unique approach for the integration of intelligent system control into the US Highway and urban transportation systems. The Sandia developed concept of the COPILOT controller integrates a human driver with computer control to increase human performance while reducing reliance on detailed driver attention. This research extends Sandia expertise in sensor based, real-time control of robotics systems to high speed transportation systems. Knowledge in the form of maps and performance characteristics of vehicles provides the automatic decision making intelligence needed to plan optimum routes, maintain safe driving speeds and distances, avoid collisions, and conserve fuel.

Little, C.Q.; Wilson, C.W.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the previous research, the reference point of oxygen occupancy was determined and verified. In the current research, the oxygen occupancy was investigated at 1200 C as a function of oxygen activity and compared with that at 1000 C. The cause of bumps at about 200 C was also investigated by using different heating and cooling rates during TGA. The fracture toughness of LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature is an important mechanical property. Vicker's indentation method was used to evaluate this toughness. Through this technique, a K{sub Ic} (Mode-I Fracture Toughness) value is attained by means of semi-empirical correlations between the indentation load and the length of the cracks emanating from the corresponding Vickers indentation impression. In the present investigation, crack propagation behavior was extensively analyzed in order to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved in the non-transforming La based ceramic composites. Cracks were generated using Vicker's indenter and used to identify and evaluate the toughening mechanisms involved. Preliminary results of an electron microscopy study of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Modeling of the isotopic transients on operating membranes (LSCrF-2828 at 900 C) and a ''frozen'' isotope profile have been analyzed in conjunction with a 1-D model to reveal the gradient in oxygen diffusivity through the membrane under conditions of high chemical gradients.

S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

J. Am. Chem. SOC.1994,116, 11203-11204 11203 Selective Dopamine Transport Using a Crown  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with an ability to selectively transport catecholamines through a lipophilic membrane. In this report we describe ammonium ion^.^^^ With these systems, the order of observed transport rates has been primarily determinedJ. Am. Chem. SOC.1994,116, 11203-11204 11203 Selective Dopamine Transport Using a Crown Boronic

Smith, Bradley D.

394

Inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate in xenon clusters in the eikonal approximation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report inverse bremsstrahlung (IB) heating rates in the eikonal approximation (EA). The present analysis is performed using the plasma-screened Rogers and Debye potentials for Xe clusters with two different charge states (6 and 10). We compare the eikonal results with the first Born approximation (FBA) and classical-simulation (CL-sim) (Moll et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 033303 (2012)) calculations for clusters in infrared light. Calculations have been performed for the field strength of 2.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} V/cm. We find that compared to the FBA and CL-sim methods, the IB heating rate in the EA is less sensitive to the choice of the two potentials considered here. The present EA calculation shows that the influence of the inner structure of atomic ion on the heating rate is more prominent for the smaller ion charge (Xe{sup 6+}). In the case of low laser field approximation based on the elastic transport cross sections, it is seen that in contrast to the FBA and classical methods, the heating rate predicted by the EA does not deviate much all over the range of mean kinetic energy of electrons (20-500 eV) considered here for both the charge states of xenon (Xe{sup 6+} and Xe{sup 10+}). Furthermore, for the Rogers potential, EA is found to be in closer agreement with the classical method than the FBA. We also compare the results of the IB heating rate using the present and low-field approximation approaches to the above three methods and observe that the magnitudes of the IB heating rate calculated in the low field approximation are, in general, higher than the corresponding values predicted by the present approach for both the electron-ion potentials.

Dey, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Roy, A. C. [School of Mathematical Sciences, Ramakrishna Mission Vivekananda University, Belur Math, 711202 West Bengal (India)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the second quarterly progress report for Year-4 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between October 1, 2002 and December 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks. (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System, Task 4: Addition of a Pipe Rotation System. (b) New research project (Task 9b): ''Development of a Foam Generator/Viscometer for Elevated Pressure and Elevated Temperature (EPET) Conditions''. (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b). (f) New Research project (Task 13): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (g) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (h) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

396

Transportation Project Funding &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation Center William W. Hay Railroad Engineering Seminar March 14, 2014 #12;© 2013 Stephen E. Schlickman-off benefits Strengthen revenue generation through increased ridership Reduce maintenance expenses #12 © 2013 Stephen E. Schlickman 6 #12;Financing Risk issues Reliability of your revenue stream Community

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

397

21st Annual Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

would cost more than $40 billion over next 20 years ·! If used alone, state gas tax would need more than Investment Plan ·! Mn/DOT Statewide Transportation Plan #12;MHSIS goals ·! Develop a long range vision expansions ·!Fiscally-constrained approach #12;New investment strategy ·! Realistic ·! Innovative ·! Focuses

Minnesota, University of

398

Transport of Entanglement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the propagation of two-photon light in a random medium. We show that the Wigner distribution of the two-photon wave function obeys an equation that is analogous to the radiative transport equation for classical light. Using this result, we predict that the entanglement of a photon pair is destroyed with propagation.

Manabu Machida; Vadim A Markel; John C Schotland

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

399

Policy Research TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to attract businesses and jobs to Texas, as the state has become increasingly dependent on the efficient will continue to be an important part of the 21st century transportation model, more efficient use of available and innovation; and · Serve as an independent resource to the Texas Legislature, providing analyses of the state

400

Ionic (Proton) Transport Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environments - #12;Technology Options -- Ionic Transport Separation Systems Central, Semi-Central (coal/Semi-Central Systems Coal is the cheapest fuel, but requires the greatest pre-conditioning Clean-up of syngas requires Energy Systems ChevronTexaco SRI Consulting SAIC ChevronTexaco Technology Ventures #12;Performance

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Storing and transporting energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Among other things, hydrogen is released from water at a first location using energy from a first energy source; the released hydrogen is stored in a metal hydride slurry; and the metal hydride slurry is transported to a second location remote from the first location.

McClaine, Andrew W. (Lexington, MA); Brown, Kenneth (Reading, MA)

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

402

TRANSPORTATION Policy Research CENTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and describes conditions necessary for successful public-private transportation partnerships. The researchers found that effective P3 programs rely on these factors for their success: Enabling Legislation in the process is necessary. Economic Environment: Favorable economic conditions conducive to investment-- from

403

Artificial oxygen transport protein  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

Dutton, P. Leslie

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

VIM continuous energy Monte Carlo transport code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

VIM is a continuous energy neutron and photon transport code. VIM solves the steady-state neutron or photon transport problem in any detailed three-dimensional geometry using either continuous energy-dependent ENDF nuclear data or multigroup cross sections. Neutron transport is carried out in a criticality mode, or in a fixed source mode (optionally incorporating subcritical multiplication). Photon transport is simulated in the fixed source mode. The geometry options are infinite medium, combinatorial geometry, and hexagonal or rectangular lattices of combinatorial geometry unit cells, and rectangular lattices of cells of assembled plates. Boundary conditions include vacuum, specular and white reflection, and periodic boundaries for reactor cell calculations. VIM was developed primarily as a reactor criticality code. Its tally and edit features are very easy to use, and automatically provide fission, fission production, absorption, capture, elastic scattering, inelastic scattering, and (n,2n) reaction rates for each edit region, edit energy group, and isotope, as well as the corresponding macroscopic information, including group scalar fluxes. Microscopic and macroscopic cross sections, including microscopic P{sub N} group-to-group cross sections are also easily produced.

Blomquist, R.N. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

Oxygen Transport Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at < 600 C and depends on the concentration of Sr (acceptor dopant). Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the small polaron conduction mechanism. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to develop strategies to detect and characterize vacancy creation, dopant segregations and defect association in the oxygen conducting membrane material. The pO{sub 2} and temperature dependence of the conductivity, non-stoichiometry and thermal-expansion behavior of compositions with increasing complexity of substitution on the perovskite A and B sites were studied. Studies with the perovskite structure show anomalous behavior at low oxygen partial pressures (<10{sup -5} atm). The anomalies are due to non-equilibrium effects and can be avoided by using very strict criteria for the attainment of equilibrium. The slowness of the oxygen equilibration kinetics arises from two different mechanisms. In the first, a two phase region occurs between an oxygen vacancy ordered phase such as brownmillerite SrFeO{sub 2.5} and perovskite SrFeO{sub 3-x}. The slow kinetics is associated with crossing the two phase region. The width of the miscibility gap decreases with increasing temperature and consequently the effect is less pronounced at higher temperature. The preferred kinetic pathway to reduction of perovskite ferrites when the vacancy concentration corresponds to the formation of significant concentrations of Fe{sup 2+} is via the formation of a Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phases as clearly observed in the case of La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3-x} where LaSrFeO{sub 4} is found together with Fe. In more complex compositions, such as LSFTO, iron or iron rich phases are observed locally with no evidence for the presence of discrete RP phase. Fracture strength of tubular perovskite membranes was determined in air and in reducing atmospheric conditions. The strength of the membrane decreased with temperature and severity of reducing conditions although the strength distribution (Weibull parameter, m) was relatively unaltered. Surface and volume dominated the fracture origins and the overall fracture was purely transgranular. The dual phas

S. Bandopadhyay

2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

35 Alternative Transportation Fuels in California ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

35 Alternative Transportation Fuels in California Chapter 4 ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION FUELS IN CALIFORNIA INTRODUCTION The introduction of alternative fuels into California's transportation market has supply at low prices. But, with an uncertain long-term future for oil supplies and prices, alternative

407

Modeling Aeolian Transport of Contaminated Sediments at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 54, Area G: Sensitivities to Succession, Disturbance, and Future Climate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G disposal facility is used for the disposal of radioactive waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 2001) requires that radioactive waste be managed in a manner that protects public health and safety and the environment. In compliance with that requirement, DOE field sites must prepare and maintain site-specific radiological performance assessments for facilities that receive waste after September 26, 1988. Sites are also required to conduct composite analyses for facilities that receive waste after this date; these analyses account for the cumulative impacts of all waste that has been (and will be) disposed of at the facilities and other sources of radioactive material that may interact with these facilities. LANL issued Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis in 2008. In support of those analyses, vertical and horizontal sediment flux data were collected at two analog sites, each with different dominant vegetation characteristics, and used to estimate rates of vertical resuspension and wind erosion for Area G. The results of that investigation indicated that there was no net loss of soil at the disposal site due to wind erosion, and suggested minimal impacts of wind on the long-term performance of the facility. However, that study did not evaluate the potential for contaminant transport caused by the horizontal movement of soil particles over long time frames. Since that time, additional field data have been collected to estimate wind threshold velocities for initiating sediment transport due to saltation and rates of sediment transport once those thresholds are reached. Data such as these have been used in the development of the Vegetation Modified Transport (VMTran) model. This model is designed to estimate patterns and long-term rates of contaminant redistribution caused by winds at the site, taking into account the impacts of plant succession and environmental disturbance. Aeolian, or wind-driven, sediment transport drives soil erosion, affects biogeochemical cycles, and can lead to the transport of contaminants. Rates of aeolian sediment transport depend in large part on the type, amount, and spatial pattern of vegetation. In particular, the amount of cover from trees and shrubs, which act as roughness elements, alters rates of aeolian sediment transport. The degree to which the understory is disturbed and the associated spacing of bare soil gaps further influence sediment transport rates. Changes in vegetation structure and patterns over periods of years to centuries may have profound impacts on rates of wind-driven transport. For recently disturbed areas, succession is likely to occur through a series of vegetation communities. Area G currently exhibits a mosaic of vegetation cover, with patches of grass and forbs over closed disposal units, and bare ground in heavily used portions of the site. These areas are surrounded by less disturbed regions of shrubland and pinon-juniper woodland; some ponderosa pine forest is also visible in the canyon along the road. The successional trajectory for the disturbed portions of Area G is expected to proceed from grasses and forbs (which would be established during site closure), to shrubs such as chamisa, to a climax community of pinon-juniper woodland. Although unlikely under current conditions, a ponderosa pine forest could develop over the site if the future climate is wetter. In many ecosystems, substantial and often periodic disturbances such as fire or severe drought can rapidly alter vegetation patterns. Such disturbances are likely to increase in the southwestern US where projections call for a warmer and drier climate. With respect to Area G, the 3 most likely disturbance types are surface fire, crown fire, and drought-induced tree mortality. Each type of disturbance has a different frequency or likelihood of occurrence, but all 3 tend to reset the vegetation succession cycle to earlier stages. The Area G performance assessment and composite an

Whicker, Jeffrey J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kirchner, Thomas B. [New Mexico State University; Breshears, David D. [University of Arizona; Field, Jason P. [University of Arizona

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

408

Parametric study on maximum transportable distance and cost for thermal energy transportation using various coolants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation temperature of advanced nuclear reactors is generally higher than commercial light water reactors and thermal energy from advanced nuclear reactor can be used for various purposes such as district heating, desalination, hydrogen production and other process heat applications, etc. The process heat industry/facilities will be located outside the nuclear island due to safety measures. This thermal energy from the reactor has to be transported a fair distance. In this study, analytical analysis was conducted to identify the maximum distance that thermal energy could be transported using various coolants such as molten-salts, helium and water by varying the pipe diameter and mass flow rate. The cost required to transport each coolant was also analyzed. The coolants analyzed are molten salts (such as: KClMgCl2, LiF-NaF-KF (FLiNaK) and KF-ZrF4), helium and water. Fluoride salts are superior because of better heat transport characteristics but chloride salts are most economical for higher temperature transportation purposes. For lower temperature water is a possible alternative when compared with He, because low pressure He requires higher pumping power which makes the process very inefficient and economically not viable for both low and high temperature application.

Su-Jong Yoon; Piyush Sabharwall

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

The Chern-Simons diffusion rate from higher curvature gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An important transport coefficient in the study of non-Abelian plasmas is the Chern-Simons diffusion rate, which parameterizes the rate of transition among the degenerate vacua of a gauge theory. We compute this quantity at strong coupling, via holography, using two theories of gravity with higher curvature corrections, namely Gauss-Bonnet gravity and quasi-topological gravity. We find that these corrections may either increase or decrease the result obtained from Einstein's gravity, depending on the value of the couplings. The Chern-Simons diffusion rate for Gauss-Bonnet gravity decreases as the shear viscosity over entropy ratio is increased.

Viktor Jahnke; Anderson Seigo Misobuchi; Diego Trancanelli

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

410

Yucca MountainTransportation: Private Sector Perspective  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transportation: Private Sector "Lessons Learned" US Transport Council David Blee Executive Director dblee@ustransportcouncil.org DOE Transportation External Coordination (TEC)...

411

We're All Transportation Planners  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of facts that global warming is real, that transportationCalifornia Transportation Center, with help is a majorresearch on compelling transportation can both reduce the

Curry, Melanie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Essays on Transportation Safety, Economics, and Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2002. TCF, 2000, “Widening the Transportation Divide: HowGovernor Davis’ Transportation Plan Leaves Transit-People Stranded”, Transportation Choices Forum, 2000.

Scholl, Patricia Lynn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Integrated transportation system design optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traditionally, the design of a transportation system has focused on either the vehicle design or the network flow, assuming the other as given. However, to define a system level architecture for a transportation system, ...

Taylor, Christine P. (Christine Pia), 1979-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Transforming California's Freight Transport System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transforming California's Freight Transport System Policy Forum on the Role of Freight Transport Standard #12;2050 Vision- Key Conceptual Outcomes Technology Transformation Early Action Cleaner Combustion Multiple Strategies Federal Action Efficiency Gains Energy Transformation 9 #12;Further reduce localized

California at Davis, University of

415

Dynamics and structure of stretched flames  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program aims to gain fundamental understanding on the structure, geometry, and dynamics of laminar premixed flames, and relate these understanding to the practical issues of flame extinction and stabilization. The underlying fundamental interest here is the recent recognition that the response of premixed flames can be profoundly affected by flame stretch, as manifested by flow nonuniformity, flame curvature, and flame/flow unsteadiness. As such, many of the existing understanding on the behavior of premixed flames need to be qualitatively revised. The research program consists of three major thrusts: (1) detailed experimental and computational mapping of the structure of aerodynamically-strained planar flames, with emphasis on the effects of heat loss, nonequidiffusion, and finite residence time on the flame thickness, extent of incomplete reaction, and the state of extinction. (2) Analytical study of the geometry and dynamics of stretch-affected wrinkled flame sheets in simple configurations, as exemplified by the Bunsen flame and the spatially-periodic flame, with emphasis on the effects of nonlinear stretch, the phenomena of flame cusping, smoothing, and tip opening, and their implications on the structure and burning rate of turbulent flames. (3) Stabilization and blowoff of two-dimensional inverted premixed and stabilization and determining the criteria governing flame blowoff. The research is synergistically conducted through the use of laser-based diagnostics, computational simulation of the flame structure with detailed chemistry and transport, and mathematical analysis of the flame dynamics.

Law, C.K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The National Transport Data Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................................................................................ 14 NTDF PROTOTYPE ............................................................................................................................... 14 NTDF ARCHITECTURE... ................................................................................................................................. 27 RESOURCING .......................................................................................................................................... 27 ? The National Transport Data Framework March 2008 ? Page 2 SUSTAINABILITY...

Landshoff, Peter Vincent; Polak, John

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

417

Transporting export coal from Appalachia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication is part of a series titled Market Guide for Steam Coal Exports from Appalachia. It focuses on the transportation link in the steam-coal supply chain, enabling producers to further assess their transportation options and their ability to compete in the export-coal marketplace. Transportation alternatives and handling procedures are discussed, and information is provided on the costs associated with each element in the transportation network.

Not Available

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Graduate Kentucky Metropolitan Rate Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graduate Kentucky Metropolitan Rate Application REGISTRAR'S OFFICE University of Cincinnati PO Box Kentucky counties are able to attend UC at an established metropolitan tuition rate. Non Kentucky residency, these students are not eligible for the graduate metropolitan rate. Kentucky counties

Franco, John

419

6 Ion Transport, Osmoregulation, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

177 6 Ion Transport, Osmoregulation, and Acid­Base Balance W.S. Marshall and M. Grosell CONTENTS I)............................................................................182 5. Skin and Opercular Membrane..................................................................................................183 2. Sea-Water Transport Mode -- Na+,K+-ATPase and Na+,K+, 2Cl­ Co-transport

Grosell, Martin

420

Integrated Transportation System Design Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Transportation System Design Optimization by Christine Taylor B.S. Cornell University by . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Professor Jaime Peraire Chairman, Department Graduate Committee #12;2 #12;Integrated Transportation System Abstract Traditionally, the design of a transportation system has focused on either the vehicle design

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Council of University Transportation Centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Council of University Transportation Centers 13th Anniversary CUTC Awards Banquet January 9, 2010 Omni Shoreham Hotel Washington, D.C. #12;Council of University Transportation Centers 13th Anniversary Awards Banquet Saturday, January 9, 2010 Welcome Stephen Albert, CUTCVice-President WesternTransportation

Nagurney, Anna

422

Transportation Center Seminar........ Patrice Marcotte  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation Center Seminar........ Patrice Marcotte Professor and Acting Director Computer on a Transportation Network With Rigid Capacities" Abstract: Static network equilibrium is a well transportation network, taking into account that users behave selfishly, i.e., only travel on shortest paths

Bustamante, Fabián E.

423

Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Demonstration of Approach and Results of Used Fuel Performance Characterization Used...

424

Fuel cell water transport  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The moisture content and temperature of hydrogen and oxygen gases is regulated throughout traverse of the gases in a fuel cell incorporating a solid polymer membrane. At least one of the gases traverses a first flow field adjacent the solid polymer membrane, where chemical reactions occur to generate an electrical current. A second flow field is located sequential with the first flow field and incorporates a membrane for effective water transport. A control fluid is then circulated adjacent the second membrane on the face opposite the fuel cell gas wherein moisture is either transported from the control fluid to humidify a fuel gas, e.g., hydrogen, or to the control fluid to prevent excess water buildup in the oxidizer gas, e.g., oxygen. Evaporation of water into the control gas and the control gas temperature act to control the fuel cell gas temperatures throughout the traverse of the fuel cell by the gases.

Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Hedstrom, James C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Rates and Repayment Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1PrincipalRare Iron Oxide in AncientRates and

426

Rates and Repayment Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1PrincipalRare Iron Oxide in AncientRates

427

Rating Agency Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor.Tariff Rates FY 2015

428

BCP Annual Rate Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program CumulusA t i o nLiquids Reserve2015 BCP Annual Rate

429

Transportation | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButlerTransportation From modeling and simulation programs

430

Transportation | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButlerTransportation From modeling and simulation programs

431

Transporting Dry Ice  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButlerTransportation From modeling and simulation

432

Transporting with Dry Shippers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButlerTransportation From modeling and

433

Multiscale thermal transport.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A concurrent computational and experimental investigation of thermal transport is performed with the goal of improving understanding of, and predictive capability for, thermal transport in microdevices. The computational component involves Monte Carlo simulation of phonon transport. In these simulations, all acoustic modes are included and their properties are drawn from a realistic dispersion relation. Phonon-phonon and phonon-boundary scattering events are treated independently. A new set of phonon-phonon scattering coefficients are proposed that reflect the elimination of assumptions present in earlier analytical work from the simulation. The experimental component involves steady-state measurement of thermal conductivity on silicon films as thin as 340nm at a range of temperatures. Agreement between the experiment and simulation on single-crystal silicon thin films is excellent, Agreement for polycrystalline films is promising, but significant work remains to be done before predictions can be made confidently. Knowledge gained from these efforts was used to construct improved semiclassical models with the goal of representing microscale effects in existing macroscale codes in a computationally efficient manner.

Graham, Samuel Jr. (; .); Wong, C. C.; Piekos, Edward Stanley

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Transportation of medical isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Draft Technical Information Document (HNF-1855) is being prepared to evaluate proposed interim tritium and medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This assessment examines the potential health and safety impacts of transportation operations associated with the production of medical isotopes. Incident-free and accidental impacts are assessed using bounding source terms for the shipment of nonradiological target materials to the Hanford Site, the shipment of irradiated targets from the FFTF to the 325 Building, and the shipment of medical isotope products from the 325 Building to medical distributors. The health and safety consequences to workers and the public from the incident-free transportation of targets and isotope products would be within acceptable levels. For transportation accidents, risks to works and the public also would be within acceptable levels. This assessment is based on best information available at this time. As the medical isotope program matures, this analysis will be revised, if necessary, to support development of a final revision to the Technical Information Document.

Nielsen, D.L.

1997-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

435

Environmental Baseline File: National Transportation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Baseline File summarizes and consolidates information related to the national-level transportation of commercial spent nuclear fuel. Topics address include: shipmnents of commercial spent nuclear fuel based on mostly truck and mostly rail shipping scenarios; transportation routing for commercial spent nuclear fuel sites and DOE sites; radionuclide inventories for various shipping container capacities; transportation routing; populations along transportation routes; urbanized area population densities; the impacts of historical, reasonably foreseeable, and general transportation; state-level food transfer factors; Federal Guidance Report No. 11 and 12 radionuclide dose conversion factors; and national average atmospheric conditions.

NONE

1999-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

436

Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) driven modes with fishbone-like structure are observed during 1?MW tangential neutral-beam injection in a reversed field pinch (RFP) device. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of EP instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport. Density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving, inboard-outboard asymmetric spatial structure that peaks in the core where fast ions reside. The measured mode frequencies are close to the computed shear Alfvén frequency, a feature consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The frequency pattern of the dominant mode depends on the fast-ion species. Multiple frequencies occur with deuterium fast ions compared to single frequency for hydrogen fast ions. Furthermore, as the safety factor (q) decreases, the toroidal mode number of the dominant EP mode transits from n=5 to n=6 while retaining the same poloidal mode number m=1. The transition occurs when the m=1, n=5 wave-particle resonance condition cannot be satisfied as the fast-ion safety factor (q{sub fi}) decreases. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growth phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop when the EP modes peak, indicating that the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced with the onset of multiple EP modes.

Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Reusch, J.; Sarff, J. S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Liu, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Transportation Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (TAMS) Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (TAMS) Application Center for Transportation Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies T he Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) TAMS application is a web-based tool that supports

438

PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION STUDIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION STUDIES DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL & ENVIRONMENTAL Transportation System Performance Report December 27, 2005 #12;2Second Annual Portland Metropolitan Region Transportation System Performance Report Portland State University Center for Transportation Studies 2005

Bertini, Robert L.

439

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Cuttings Transport Study (ACTS) was a 5-year JIP project undertaken at the University of Tulsa (TU). The project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and JIP member companies. The objectives of the project were: (1) to develop and construct a new research facility that would allow three-phase (gas, liquid and cuttings) flow experiments under ambient and EPET (elevated pressure and temperature) conditions, and at different angle of inclinations and drill pipe rotation speeds; (2) to conduct experiments and develop a data base for the industry and academia; and (3) to develop mechanistic models for optimization of drilling hydraulics and cuttings transport. This project consisted of research studies, flow loop construction and instrumentation development. Following a one-year period for basic flow loop construction, a proposal was submitted by TU to the DOE for a five-year project that was organized in such a manner as to provide a logical progression of research experiments as well as additions to the basic flow loop. The flow loop additions and improvements included: (1) elevated temperature capability; (2) two-phase (gas and liquid, foam etc.) capability; (3) cuttings injection and removal system; (4) drill pipe rotation system; and (5) drilling section elevation system. In parallel with the flow loop construction, hydraulics and cuttings transport studies were preformed using drilling foams and aerated muds. In addition, hydraulics and rheology of synthetic drilling fluids were investigated. The studies were performed under ambient and EPET conditions. The effects of temperature and pressure on the hydraulics and cuttings transport were investigated. Mechanistic models were developed to predict frictional pressure loss and cuttings transport in horizontal and near-horizontal configurations. Model predictions were compared with the measured data. Predominantly, model predictions show satisfactory agreements with the measured data. As a part of this project, instrumentation was developed to monitor cuttings beds and characterize foams in the flow loop. An ultrasonic-based monitoring system was developed to measure cuttings bed thickness in the flow loop. Data acquisition software controls the system and processes the data. Two foam generating devices were designed and developed to produce foams with specified quality and texture. The devices are equipped with a bubble recognition system and an in-line viscometer to measure bubble size distribution and foam rheology, respectively. The 5-year project is completed. Future research activities will be under the umbrella of Tulsa University Drilling Research Projects. Currently the flow loop is being used for testing cuttings transport capacity of aqueous and polymer-based foams under elevated pressure and temperature conditions. Subsequently, the effect of viscous sweeps on cuttings transport under elevated pressure and temperature conditions will be investigated using the flow loop. Other projects will follow now that the ''steady state'' phase of the project has been achieved.

Stefan Miska; Troy Reed; Ergun Kuru

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

440

STACE: Source Term Analyses for Containment Evaluations of transport casks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the guidance of ANSI N14.5, the STACE methodology provides a technically defensible means for estimating maximum permissible leakage rates. These containment criteria attempt to reflect the true radiological hazard by performing a detailed examination of the spent fuel, CRUD, and residual contamination contributions to the releasable source term. The evaluation of the spent fuel contribution to the source term has been modeled fairly accurately using the STACE methodology. The structural model predicts the cask drop load history, the mechanical response of the fuel assembly, and the probability of cladding breach. These data are then used to predict the amount of fission gas, volatile species, and fuel fines that are releasable from the cask. There are some areas where data are sparse or lacking (e.g., the quantity and size distribution of fuel rod breaches) in which experimental validation is planned. The CRUD spallation fraction is the major area where no quantitative data has been found; therefore, this also requires experimental validation. In the interim, STACE conservatively assumes a 100% spallation fraction for computing the releasable activity. The source term methodology also conservatively assumes that there is 1 Ci of residual contamination available for release in the transport cask. However, residual contamination is still by far the smallest contributor to the source term activity.

Seager, K. D.; Gianoulakis, S. E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Barrett, P. R.; Rashid, Y. R. [ANATECH Research Corp., La Jolla, CA (United States); Reardon, P. C. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Transportation and Stationary Power Integration: Workshop Proceedings...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Integration: Workshop Proceedings Transportation and Stationary Power Integration: Workshop Proceedings Proceedings for the Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop...

442

Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrificati...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Transportation Sector Electrification Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrification 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies...

443

Sustainable Transportation Program | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program SHARE Sustainable Transportation Program Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Sustainable Transportation Program Office administratively facilitates the integration of...

444

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Presentation made by Kevin...

445

Texas Transportation Institute Energy Management and Conservation Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and continues to improve its in-house preventive maintenance program. #12;Texas Transportation Institute Energy efficiency, TTI maintains an in-house preventive maintenance program for all fleet vehicles. Preventive methods to improve its preventive maintenance program · Consideration of fuel efficiency rating when

446

Energy Management Through Innovative Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of energy efficiency in the industrial sector and specific rate design alternatives for doing so....

Williams, M. L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Fluctuation induced cross-field transport in Hall thrusters and tokamaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One area of fundamental plasma physics which remains poorly understood is the transport of particles across magnetic field lines at rates significantly higher than predicted by theory exclusively based on collisions. This ...

Garrett, Michael Lane

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Transportation Time In A Rural State Following Splenic Injury: Does Time Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: Failure rates remain high following attempted non-operative treatment of spleen injuries despite progress made in identifying risk factors. Over the past thirty years, transportation times were excluded from ...

Ward, Jeanette G.

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

Lagrangian transport in a microtidal coastal area: the Bay of Palma, island of Mallorca, Spain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coastal transport in the Bay of Palma, a small region in the island of Mallorca, Spain, is characterized in terms of Lagrangian descriptors. The data sets used for this study are the output for two months (one in autumn and one in summer) of a high resolution numerical model, ROMS, forced atmospherically and with a spatial resolution of 300 m. The two months were selected because its different wind regime, which is the main driver of the sea dynamics in this area. Finite-size Lyapunov Exponents (FSLEs) were used to locate semi-persistent Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) and to understand the different flow regimes in the Bay. The different wind directions and regularity in the two months have a clear impact on the surface Bay dynamics, whereas only topographic features appear clearly in the bottom structures. The fluid interchange between the Bay and the open ocean was tudied by computing particle trajectories and Residence Times (RT) maps. The escape rate of particles out of the Bay is qualitatively different, with a 32$%$ more of escape rate of particles to the ocean in October than in July, owing to the different geometric characteristics of the flow. We show that LCSs separate regions with different transport properties by displaying spatial distributions of residence times on synoptic Lagrangian maps together with the location of the LCSs. Correlations between the time-dependent behavior of FSLE and RT are also investigated, showing a negative dependence when the stirring characterized by FSLE values moves particles in the direction of escape.

Ismael Hernández-Carrasco; Cristóbal López; Alejandro Orfila; Emilio Hernández-García

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

450

Implementation of Benchmarking Transportation Logistics Practices and Future Benchmarking Organizations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) Logistics Benchmarking Project is to identify established government and industry practices for the safe transportation of hazardous materials which can serve as a yardstick for design and operation of OCRWM's national transportation system for shipping spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The project will present logistics and transportation practices and develop implementation recommendations for adaptation by the national transportation system. This paper will describe the process used to perform the initial benchmarking study, highlight interim findings, and explain how these findings are being implemented. It will also provide an overview of the next phase of benchmarking studies. The benchmarking effort will remain a high-priority activity throughout the planning and operational phases of the transportation system. The initial phase of the project focused on government transportation programs to identify those practices which are most clearly applicable to OCRWM. These Federal programs have decades of safe transportation experience, strive for excellence in operations, and implement effective stakeholder involvement, all of which parallel OCRWM's transportation mission and vision. The initial benchmarking project focused on four business processes that are critical to OCRWM's mission success, and can be incorporated into OCRWM planning and preparation in the near term. The processes examined were: transportation business model, contract management/out-sourcing, stakeholder relations, and contingency planning. More recently, OCRWM examined logistics operations of AREVA NC's Business Unit Logistics in France. The next phase of benchmarking will focus on integrated domestic and international commercial radioactive logistic operations. The prospective companies represent large scale shippers and have vast experience in safely and efficiently shipping spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive materials. Additional business processes may be examined in this phase. The findings of these benchmarking efforts will help determine the organizational structure and requirements of the national transportation system. (authors)

Thrower, A.W. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States); Patric, J. [Booz Allen Hamilton, Washington, DC (United States); Keister, M. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Quarter began with installing the new drill pipe, hooking up the new hydraulic power unit, completing the pipe rotation system (Task 4 has been completed), and making the SWACO choke operational. Detailed design and procurement work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. The prototype Foam Generator Cell has been completed by Temco and delivered. Work is currently underway to calibrate the system. Literature review and preliminary model development for cuttings transportation with polymer foam under EPET conditions are in progress. Preparations for preliminary cuttings transport experiments with polymer foam have been completed. Two nuclear densitometers were re-calibrated. Drill pipe rotation system was tested up to 250 RPM. Water flow tests were conducted while rotating the drill pipe up to 100 RPM. The accuracy of weight measurements for cuttings in the annulus was evaluated. Additional modifications of the cuttings collection system are being considered in order to obtain the desired accurate measurement of cuttings weight in the annular test section. Cutting transport experiments with aerated fluids are being conducted at EPET, and analyses of the collected data are in progress. The printed circuit board is functioning with acceptable noise level to measure cuttings concentration at static condition using ultrasonic method. We were able to conduct several tests using a standard low pass filter to eliminate high frequency noise. We tested to verify that we can distinguish between different depths of sand in a static bed of sand. We tested with water, air and a mix of the two mediums. Major modifications to the DTF have almost been completed. A stop-flow cell is being designed for the DTF, the ACTF and Foam Generator/Viscometer which will allow us to capture bubble images without the need for ultra fast shutter speeds or microsecond flash system.

Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mengjiao Yu; Ramadan Ahmed; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Aimee Washington; Crystal Redden

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

452

Transportation | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButlerTransportation From modeling and simulation programs to

453

Transportation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective:Toyo Aluminium KKCapitalTransportToolkitreturn

454

NREL: Sustainable NREL - Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData and Resources NREL resourceEnergyTransportation Photo of a

455

Transportation Storage Interface  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012 Greenbuy3 Archive Transportation Fact ofAT THE U.S.of

456

Perspective Ion Channels: From Conductance to Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

membrane is an essen- tially insurmountable barrier for the flow of ions; therefore, ion transport is carried out by membrane-embedded specialized proteins in the form of transporters and ion channels a purely electrical concept to a structural dynamics view of ions in- teracting with a membrane protein

Bezanilla, Francisco

457

Transportation Statistics Annual Report 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the fourth Transportation Statistics Annual Report (TSAR) prepared by the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) for the President and Congress. As in previous years, it reports on the state of U.S. transportation system at two levels. First, in Part I, it provides a statistical and interpretive survey of the system—its physical characteristics, its economic attributes, aspects of its use and performance, and the scale and severity of unintended consequences of transportation, such as fatalities and injuries, oil import dependency, and environment impacts. Part I also explores the state of transportation statistics, and new needs of the rapidly changing world of transportation. Second, Part II of the report, as in prior years, explores in detail the performance of the U.S. transportation system from the perspective of desired social outcomes or strategic goals. This year, the performance aspect of transportation chosen for thematic treatment is “Mobility and Access,” which complements past TSAR theme sections on “The Economic Performance of Transportation” (1995) and “Transportation and the Environment” (1996). Mobility and access are at the heart of the transportation system’s performance from the user’s perspective. In what ways and to what extent does the geographic freedom provided by transportation enhance personal fulfillment of the nation’s residents and contribute to economic advancement of people and businesses? This broad question underlies many of the topics examined in Part II: What is the current level of personal mobility in the United States, and how does it vary by sex, age, income level, urban or rural location, and over time? What factors explain variations? Has transportation helped improve people’s access to work, shopping, recreational facilities, and medical services, and in what ways and in what locations? How have barriers, such as age, disabilities, or lack of an automobile, affected these accessibility patterns? How are commodity flows and transportation services responding to global competition, deregulation, economic restructuring, and new information technologies? How do U.S. patterns of personal mobility and freight movement compare with other advanced industrialized countries, formerly centrally planned economies, and major newly industrializing countries? Finally, how is the rapid adoption of new information technologies influencing the patterns of transportation demand and the supply of new transportation services? Indeed, how are information technologies affecting the nature and organization of transportation services used by individuals and firms?

Fenn, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

National Utility Rate Database: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When modeling solar energy technologies and other distributed energy systems, using high-quality expansive electricity rates is essential. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a utility rate platform for entering, storing, updating, and accessing a large collection of utility rates from around the United States. This utility rate platform lives on the Open Energy Information (OpenEI) website, OpenEI.org, allowing the data to be programmatically accessed from a web browser, using an application programming interface (API). The semantic-based utility rate platform currently has record of 1,885 utility rates and covers over 85% of the electricity consumption in the United States.

Ong, S.; McKeel, R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

EFFECT OF TRANSPORTING SALTSTONE SAMPLES PRIOR TO SET  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Saltstone Sampling and Analyses Plan provides a basis for the quantity (and configuration) of saltstone grout samples required for conducting a study directed towards correlation of the Performance Assessment (PA) related properties of field-emplaced samples and samples processed and cured in the laboratory. The testing described in the saltstone sampling and analyses plan will be addressed in phases. The initial testing (Phase I) includes collecting samples from the process room in the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and transporting them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they will cure under a temperature profile that mimics the temperature in the Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) and then be analyzed. SRNL has previously recommended that after the samples of fresh (uncured) saltstone are obtained from the SPF process room, they are allowed to set prior to transporting them to SRNL for curing. The concern was that if the samples are transported before they are set, the vibrations during transport may cause artificial delay of structure development which could result in preferential settling or segregation of the saltstone slurry. However, the results of this testing showed there was no clear distinction between the densities of the cylinder sections for any of the transportation scenarios tested (1 day, 1 hour, and 0 minutes set time prefer to transportation) . The bottom section of each cylinder was the densest for each transportation scenario, which indicates some settling in all the samples. Triplicate hydraulic conductivity measurements on samples from each set of time and transportation scenarios indicated that those samples transported immediately after pouring had the highest hydraulic conductivity. Conversely, samples that were allowed to sit for an hour before being transported had the lowest hydraulic conductivity. However, the hydraulic conductivities of all three samples fell within an acceptable range. Based on the cured property analysis of the three samples, there is no clear conclusion about transporting the samples before they are set; however, experience with saltstone grout indicates the samples should sit and develop some structure before being transported to SRNL for curing.

Reigel, M.

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

460

Radiation transport in inhomogeneous media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculations of radiation transport in heated materials are greatly complicated by the presence of regions in which two or more materials are inhomogeneously mixed. This phenomenon is important in many systems, such as astrophysical systems where density clumps can be found in star-forming regions and molecular clouds. Laboratory experiments have been designed to test the modeling of radiation transport through inhomogeneous plasmas. A laser-heated hohlraum is used as a thermal source to drive radiation through polymer foam containing randomly distributed gold particles. Experimental measurements of radiation transport in foams with gold particle sizes ranging from 5-9 {mu}m to submicrometer diameters as well as the homogeneous foam case are presented. The simulation results of the radiation transport are compared to the experiment and show that an inhomogeneous transport model must be applied to explain radiation transport in foams loaded with 5 {mu}m diameter gold particles.

Keiter, Paul; Gunderson, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Foster, John; Rosen, Paula; Comley, Andrew; Taylor, Mark [AWE Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Perry, Ted [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Nanoengineered membranes for controlled transport  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nanoengineered membrane for controlling material transport (e.g., molecular transport) is disclosed. The membrane includes a substrate, a cover definining a material transport channel between the substrate and the cover, and a plurality of fibers positioned in the channel and connected to an extending away from a surface of the substrate. The fibers are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the substrate, and have a width of 100 nanometers or less. The diffusion limits for material transport are controlled by the separation of the fibers. In one embodiment, chemical derivitization of carbon fibers may be undertaken to further affect the diffusion limits or affect selective permeability or facilitated transport. For example, a coating can be applied to at least a portion of the fibers. In another embodiment, individually addressable carbon nanofibers can be integrated with the membrane to provide an electrical driving force for material transport.

Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; McKnight, Timothy E. (Greenback, TN) [Greenback, TN; Melechko, Anatoli V. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Lowndes, Douglas H. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael A. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Merkulov, Vladimir I. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

462

Spent fuel integrity during transportation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conditions of recent shipments of light water reactor spent fuel were surveyed. The radioactivity level of cask coolant was examined in an attempt to find the effects of transportation on LWR fuel assemblies. Discussion included potential cladding integrity loss mechanisms, canning requirements, changes of radioactivity levels, and comparison of transportation in wet or dry media. Although integrity loss or degradation has not been identified, radioactivity levels usually increase during transportation, especially for leaking assemblies.

Funk, C.W.; Jacobson, L.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Final Report - Ferrographic Tracking of Bacterial Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work performed during the past three years has been extremely productive. Ferrographic capture was utilized in analysis of several thousand field samples collected from arrays of multilevel samplers during three intensive field campaigns conducted at two shallow sandy aquifer sites in Oyster, VA. This work has shown resulted in three important conclusions: (1) Ferrographic capture provides unparalleled low quantitation limits for bacterial cell enumeration (Johnson et al., 2000). (2) The high-resolution analyses provided by ferrographic capture allowed observation of increased bacterial removal rates (from groundwater) that corresponded to increased populations of protozoa in the groundwater (Zhang et al., 2001). This novel data allowed determination of bacterial predation rates by protists in the field, a consideration that will be important for successful bioaugmentation strategies. (3) The high-resolution analyses provided by ferrographic capture allowed observation of detachment of indigenous cells in response to breakthrough of injected cells in groundwater (Johnson et al., 2001). The implication of this unique observation is that bacterial transport, specifically bacterial attachment and detachment, may be much more dynamic than has been indicated by short-term laboratory and field studies. Dynamic attachment and detachment of bacteria in groundwater may lead to greatly increased transport distances over long terms relative to what has been indicated by short-term laboratory and field studies.

William P. Johnson

2002-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

464

NREL: Transportation Research Home Page  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to heavy-duty freight trucks. Female researcher holding coin cell battery. NREL's transportation research spans from the materials to the systems level. Fuel cell electric sports...

465

Transportation External Coordination Working Group:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Study of DOE FY03 SNF Shipments Judith Holm National Transportation Program Albuquerque, New Mexico April 21, 2004 Background Benchmarking * The goal of...

466

Transportation External Coordination Working Group:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

External Coordination Working Group: Background and Process Judith Holm National Transportation Program Albuquerque, New Mexico April 21, 2004 TEC History * DOE's Office of...

467

Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Transportation of hazardous wastes into or through the State of Connecticut requires a permit. Some exceptions apply. The regulations provide information about obtaining permits and other permit...

468

OVERVIEW OF PROPOSED TRANSPORTATION ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...............................................................................10 METHODOLOGY OF LONG-TERM FUEL DEMAND FORECAST ......................... 12 Introduction.................................................................................................................................................12 Purpose of California Petroleum Demand Forecast.......................................................................................................................4 PROPOSED CALIFORNIA TRANSPORTATION FUEL PRICE FORECASTS......... 6 Summary

469

Transport and Induced Elastic Stress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Variational Approach in Studying the Mixture of the Fluids: Transport and Induced Elastic Stress Abstract: From the energetic point of view, most ...

470

Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a critical role in combustion processes just as chemicalparameters are essential for combustion modeling; molecularwith Application to Combustion. Transport Theor Stat 2003;

Brown, N.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels,...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Results of two Reports from the National Research Council...

472

TRANSPORT AND EMPLACEMENT EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective and the scope of this document are to list and briefly describe the major mobile equipment necessary for waste package (WP) Transport and Emplacement in the proposed subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Primary performance characteristics and some specialized design features of the equipment are explained and summarized in the individual subsections of this document. The Transport and Emplacement equipment described in this document consists of the following: (1) WP Transporter; (2) Reusable Rail Car; (3) Emplacement Gantry; (4) Gantry Carrier; and (5) Transport Locomotive.

NA

1997-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

473

Subsurface Flow and Transport | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and compare experimental and numerical results to address the nation's most challenging problems in the subsurface related to contaminant transport, carbon cycling, enhanced oil...

474

Relationship between transport properties and phase transformations in mixed-conducting oxides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To elucidate the relationship between transport properties and phase transformations in mixed-conducting oxides, Sr{sub 0.9}Ca{sub 0.1}Co{sub 0.89}Fe{sub 0.11}O{sub 3-} {sub {delta}} (SCCFO) and SrCoO{sub 3-} {sub {delta}} (SCO) were chosen as the model materials and have been investigated in detail. Oxygen permeation measurements verified that both oxides are well permeable to oxygen at elevated temperatures, e.g., at 900 deg. C during a cooling procedure, oxygen permeation rates as large as 1.5 and 2.0 mL/min/cm{sup 2} could be obtained with disk-shaped SCCFO and SCO membranes of thickness 1.5 mm, respectively. But when cooled to critical temperatures, the oxygen permeability of these kinds of oxides diminished sharply, which could be recovered by increasing the temperature again to certain values. Abrupt changes on electrical conductivity were also observed for both oxides around the same region of temperature as that of oxygen permeability. As indicated by high-temperature X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis, the SCCFO and SCO systems undergo phase transformation between a low-temperature orthorhombic brownmillerite structure (B) or a hexagonal 2H-type structure (H) and a high-temperature cubic perovskite structure (C), respectively. The present results suggest the observed abrupt changes in transport properties versus temperature are attributed to such phase transformation, which may be directly associated with the order-disorder transition of oxygen vacancies. Moreover, compared to the B/C transformation that mainly involves an order-disorder transition on the oxygen sublattice, the H/C one necessarily also involves the cooperative long-range reorganization on the cation sublattice. Therefore it occurs at a higher temperature and absorbs more heat quantity than those of B/C transformation.

Deng, Z.Q. [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)]. E-mail: dzqm@dicp.ac.cn; Yang, W.S. [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Liu, W. [Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials and Devices, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Chen, C.S. [Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials and Devices, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

475

Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 2 Climate and Transportation Solutions Chapter 3:Gas Emissions in the Transportation Sector by John Conti,Chase, and John Maples Transportation is the single largest

Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

2007 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules : 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This schedule is available for the contract purchase of Firm Power to be used within the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Priority Firm (PF) Power may be purchased by public bodies, cooperatives, and Federal agencies for resale to ultimate consumers, for direct consumption, and for Construction, Test and Start-Up, and Station Service. Rates in this schedule are in effect beginning October 1, 2006, and apply to purchases under requirements Firm Power sales contracts for a three-year period. The Slice Product is only available for public bodies and cooperatives who have signed Slice contracts for the FY 2002-2011 period. Utilities participating in the Residential Exchange Program (REP) under Section 5(c) of the Northwest Power Act may purchase Priority Firm Power pursuant to the Residential Exchange Program. Rates under contracts that contain charges that escalate based on BPA's Priority Firm Power rates shall be based on the three-year rates listed in this rate schedule in addition to applicable transmission charges. This rate schedule supersedes the PF-02 rate schedule, which went into effect October 1, 2001. Sales under the PF-07 rate schedule are subject to BPA's 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions (2007 GRSPs). Products available under this rate schedule are defined in the 2007 GRSPs. For sales under this rate schedule, bills shall be rendered and payments due pursuant to BPA's 2007 GRSPs and billing process.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

FUEL CELLS FOR TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................................................................... 34 E. Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stacks/Systems ­ Arthur D. Little, Inc. ......................................... 40 F. DFMA Cost Estimates of Fuel-Cell/Reformer Systems at Low/Medium/High Production Rates&D of a Novel Breadboard Device Suitable for Carbon Monoxide Remediation in an Automotive PEM Fuel Cell Power

478

Origin of electronic transport of lithium phthalocyanine iodine crystal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electronic structures of Lithium Phthalocyanine Iodine are investigated using density functional theory. Comparing the band structures of several model crystals, the metallic conductivity of highly doped LiPcI{sub x} can be explained by the band of doped iodine. These results reveal that there is a new mechanism for electronic transport of doped organic semiconductors that the dopant band plays the main role.

Koike, Noritake; Oda, Masato; Shinozuka, Yuzo [Department of Materials Science and Chemistry, Wakayama University, 930 Sakaedani, Wakayama (Japan)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

479

Analysis of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh/Taylor unstable flow using direct numerical simulation data  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Data from a 1152X760X1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) [N. J. Mueschke and O. Schilling, Phys. Fluids 21, 014106 (2009)] of a transitional Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer modeled after a small Atwood number water channel experiment is used to comprehensively investigate the structure of mean and turbulent transport and mixing. The simulation had physical parameters and initial conditions approximating those in the experiment. The budgets of the mean vertical momentum, heavy-fluid mass fraction, turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate, heavy-fluid mass fraction variance, and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance dissipation rate equations are constructed using Reynolds averaging applied to the DNS data. The relative importance of mean and turbulent production, turbulent dissipation and destruction, and turbulent transport are investigated as a function of Reynolds number and across the mixing layer to provide insight into the flow dynamics not presently available from experiments. The analysis of the budgets supports the assumption for small Atwood number, Rayleigh/Taylor driven flows that the principal transport mechanisms are buoyancy production, turbulent production, turbulent dissipation, and turbulent diffusion (shear and mean field production are negligible). As the Reynolds number increases, the turbulent production in the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate equation becomes the dominant production term, while the buoyancy production plateaus. Distinctions between momentum and scalar transport are also noted, where the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate both grow in time and are peaked near the center plane of the mixing layer, while the heavy-fluid mass fraction variance and its dissipation rate initially grow and then begin to decrease as mixing progresses and reduces density fluctuations. All terms in the transport equations generally grow or decay, with no qualitative change in their profile, except for the pressure flux contribution to the total turbulent kinetic energy flux, which changes sign early in time (a countergradient effect). The production-to-dissipation ratios corresponding to the turbulent kinetic energy and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance are large and vary strongly at small evolution times, decrease with time, and nearly asymptote as the flow enters a self-similar regime. The late-time turbulent kinetic energy production-to-dissipation ratio is larger than observed in shear-driven turbulent flows. The order of magnitude estimates of the terms in the transport equations are shown to be consistent with the DNS at late-time, and also confirms both the dominant terms and their evolutionary behavior. These results are useful for identifying the dynamically important terms requiring closure, and assessing the accuracy of the predictions of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and large-eddy simulation models of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh-Taylor instability-generated flow.

Schilling, Oleg [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mueschke, Nicholas J. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

480

Illite Dissolution Rates and Equation (100 to 280 dec C)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The objective of this suite of experiments was to develop a useful kinetic dissolution expression for illite applicable over an expanded range of solution pH and temperature conditions representative of subsurface conditions in natural and/or engineered geothermal reservoirs. Using our new data, the resulting rate equation is dependent on both pH and temperature and utilizes two specific dissolution mechanisms (a “neutral” and a “basic” mechanism). The form of this rate equation should be easily incorporated into most existing reactive transport codes for to predict rock-water interactions in EGS shear zones.

Carroll, Susan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation rate structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Illite Dissolution Rates and Equation (100 to 280 dec C)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this suite of experiments was to develop a useful kinetic dissolution expression for illite applicable over an expanded range of solution pH and temperature conditions representative of subsurface conditions in natural and/or engineered geothermal reservoirs. Using our new data, the resulting rate equation is dependent on both pH and temperature and utilizes two specific dissolution mechanisms (a “neutral” and a “basic” mechanism). The form of this rate equation should be easily incorporated into most existing reactive transport codes for to predict rock-water interactions in EGS shear zones.

Carroll, Susan

2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

482

Chemical factors affecting fission product transport in severe LMFBR accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was performed as a part of a larger evaluation effort on LMFBR accident, source-term estimation. Purpose was to provide basic chemical information regarding fission product, sodium coolant, and structural material interactions required to perform estimation of fission product transport under LMFBR accident conditions. Emphasis was placed on conditions within the reactor vessel; containment vessel conditions are discussed only briefly.

Wichner, R.P.; Jolley, R.L.; Gat, U.; Rodgers, B.R.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Electronic Signature of DNA Nucleotides via Transverse Transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electronic Signature of DNA Nucleotides via Transverse Transport Michael Zwolak Physics Department spatial width, each nucleotide carries a unique signature due to the different electronic and chemical structure of the four bases. This signature is independent of the nearest-neighbor nucleotides. Furthermore

Zwolak, Michael

484

Fractional derivatives and CTRWs: applications to plasma turbulent transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as an energy source: )(xS x n D xt n + = D L S W ext E 3 2 == #12;..but they do not seem to do the job Magnetic structure of a tokamak is like a set of nested tori. Transport of particles and energy occurs both input of energy and particles. Success of fusion requires a minimum energy confinement time : E

Martín-Solís, José Ramón

485

UniversityofHouston AlaskaUniversityTransportationCenter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UniversityofHouston AlaskaUniversityTransportationCenter Impact of Embedded Carbon Fiber Heating (LEAVE BLANK) 2. REPORT DATE December 2012 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Final Report (7/1/2011-12/31/2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Impact of Embedded Carbon Fiber Heating Panel on the Structural/ Mechanical

Hartman, Chris

486

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 88, 195409 (2013) Effects of disorder and contacts on transport through graphene nanoribbons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 88, 195409 (2013) Effects of disorder and contacts on transport through graphene; published 12 November 2013) We study the transport of charge carriers through finite graphene structures samples beyond the Dirac-cone approximation. Particularly we investigate disordered nanoribbons, normal-conductor/graphene

Fehske, Holger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

NEST Scientific Report 2007-2009 Transport phenomena in self-assembled nanowires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEST Scientific Report 2007-2009 Transport phenomena in self-assembled nanowires 21 S elf incompatible materials can be combined into advanced ­ in some cases unprecedented ­ nanostructures and charge transport in self-assembled structures as well as Josephson coupling in devices combining

Abbondandolo, Alberto

488

SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT AND FIELD-EMISSION PROPERTIES OF MULTI-WALL CARBON NANOTUBES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT AND FIELD-EMISSION PROPERTIES OF MULTI-WALL CARBON NANOTUBES Alexandre- emission properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes. The structure considered for the transport properties-saturation of the dangling bonds still improves the emission. I. INTRODUCTION Carbon nanotubes show interesting field-emission

Mayer, Alexandre

489

OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present quarter, oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.

Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment are begun. The studies are to be in parallel with LSFCO composition to characterize the segregation of cations and slow crack growth in environmental conditions. La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} has also been characterized for paramagnetic ordering at room temperature and the evolution of magnetic moments as a function of temperature are investigated. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport.

Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Hydrogen transport membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Composite hydrogen transport membranes, which are used for extraction of hydrogen from gas mixtures are provided. Methods are described for supporting metals and metal alloys which have high hydrogen permeability, but which are either too thin to be self supporting, too weak to resist differential pressures across the membrane, or which become embrittled by hydrogen. Support materials are chosen to be lattice matched to the metals and metal alloys. Preferred metals with high permeability for hydrogen include vanadium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, palladium, and alloys thereof. Hydrogen-permeable membranes include those in which the pores of a porous support matrix are blocked by hydrogen-permeable metals and metal alloys, those in which the pores of a porous metal matrix are blocked with materials which make the membrane impervious to gases other than hydrogen, and cermets fabricated by sintering powders of metals with powders of lattice-matched ceramic.

Mundschau, Michael V.

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

492

Transportation System Concept of Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, authorized the DOE to develop and manage a Federal system for the disposal of SNF and HLW. OCRWM was created to manage acceptance and disposal of SNF and HLW in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. This responsibility inclu