National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for transportation rate structure

  1. Effect of Railroad Deregulation on Export - Grain Transportation Rate Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Stephen; MacDonald, James; Bessler, David; Wohlgenant, Michael

    1988-01-01

    to this market. More effective transportation competiti01 would exist if the region depended on spatially separate markets that were linked to the supply region by several carriers. The Corn Belt, in contrast to the Plains, seems to be in a more competitive... Belt and the Plains regions. Predicting the outcome of deregulation is complicated by conflicting notions regarding the regulator's behavior during the pre-Staggers era. Historically, it was thought that the ICC tended to follow the value...

  2. Coal Transportation Rate Sensitivity Analysis

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    On December 21, 2004, the Surface Transportation Board (STB) requested that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) analyze the impact of changes in coal transportation rates on projected levels of electric power sector energy use and emissions. Specifically, the STB requested an analysis of changes in national and regional coal consumption and emissions resulting from adjustments in railroad transportation rates for Wyoming's Powder River Basin (PRB) coal using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). However, because NEMS operates at a relatively aggregate regional level and does not represent the costs of transporting coal over specific rail lines, this analysis reports on the impacts of interregional changes in transportation rates from those used in the Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO2005) reference case.

  3. Longshore sediment transport rate calculated incorporating wave orbital velocity fluctuations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Ernest Ray

    2006-10-30

    Laboratory experiments were performed to study and improve longshore sediment transport rate predictions. Measured total longshore transport in the laboratory was approximately three times greater for plunging breakers ...

  4. STRUCTURAL REQUIREMENTS OF ORGANIC ANION TRANSPORTING POLYPEPTIDE MEDIATED TRANSPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Yi Miao

    2010-04-12

    The organic anion transporting polypeptides (human: OATP; other: Oatp) form a mammalian transporter superfamily that mediates the transport of structurally unrelated compounds across the cell membrane. Members in this superfamily participate...

  5. Characteristics of spot-market rate indexes for truckload transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bignell, Andrew (Andrew Souglas)

    2013-01-01

    In the truckload transportation industry in the United States, a number of indexes are published that attempt to measure changes in rates, but no single index has emerged as an industry standard. Industry participants, ...

  6. Hamiltonian Maps and Transport in Structured Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey B. Weiss

    1993-11-20

    Structures such as waves, jets, and vortices have a dramatic impact on the transport properties of a flow. Passive tracer transport in incompressible two-dimensional flows is described by Hamiltonian dynamics, and, for idealized structures, the system is typically integrable. When such structures are perturbed, chaotic trajectories can result which can significantly change the transport properties. It is proposed that the transport due to the chaotic regions can be efficiently calculated using Hamiltonian mappings designed specifically for the structure of interest. As an example a new map is constructed, appropriate for studying transport by propagating isolated vortices. It is found that a perturbed vortex will trap fluid parcels for varying lengths of time, and that the distribution of such trapping times has slopes which are independent of the amplitudes of both the vortex and the perturbation.

  7. Molecular Structure and Ion Transport near Electrode-Electrolyte...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structure and Ion Transport near Electrode-Electrolyte Interfaces in Lithium-Ion Batteries Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Structure and Ion Transport...

  8. RADIONUCLIDE DISPERSION RATES BY AEOLIAN, FLUVIAL, AND POROUS MEDIA TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Walton; P. Goodell; C. Brashears; D. French; A. Kelts

    2005-07-11

    Radionuclide transport was measured from high grade uranium ore boulders near the Nopal I Site, Chihuahua, Mexico. High grade uranium ore boulders were left behind after removal of a uranium ore stockpile at the Prior High Grade Stockpile (PHGS). During the 25 years when the boulder was present, radionuclides were released and transported by sheetflow during precipitation events, wind blown resuspension, and infiltration into the unsaturated zone. In this study, one of the boulders was removed, followed by grid sampling of the surrounding area. Measured gamma radiation levels in three dimensions were used to derive separate dispersion rates by the three transport mechanisms.

  9. Lagrangian coherent structures and plasma transport processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falessi, M V; Schep, T J

    2015-01-01

    A dynamical system framework is used to describe transport processes in plasmas embedded in a magnetic field. For periodic systems with one degree of freedom the Poincar\\'e map provides a splitting of the phase space into regions where particles have different kinds of motion: periodic, quasi-periodic or chaotic. The boundaries of these regions are transport barriers; i.e., a trajectory cannot cross such boundaries during the whole evolution of the system. Lagrangian Coherent Structure (LCS) generalize this method to systems with the most general time dependence, splitting the phase space into regions with different qualitative behaviours. This leads to the definition of finite-time transport barriers, i.e. trajectories cannot cross the barrier for a finite amount of time. This methodology can be used to identify fast recirculating regions in the dynamical system and to characterize the transport between them.

  10. Rapid Measurement of Neutron Dose Rate for Transport Index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, R.L.

    2000-02-27

    A newly available neutron dose equivalent remmeter with improved sensitivity and energy response has been put into service at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). This instrument is being used to expedite measurement of the Transport Index and as an ALARA tool to identify locations where slightly elevated neutron dose equivalent rates exist. The meter is capable of measuring dose rates as low as 0.2 {mu}Sv per hour (20 {mu}rem per hour). Tests of the angular response and energy response of the instrument are reported. Calculations of the theoretical instrument response made using MCNP{trademark} are reported for materials typical of those being shipped.

  11. Rate allocation in a remote control structure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meadow, Charles Joe

    1984-01-01

    are linearly dependent upon the measurement estimates. Therefore, they can be considered as stationary and gaussian. To optimally encode a signal an arbitrary time delay is required which will produce a non-causal control solution. This is a non.... Jones (Head of Department) May 1984 ABSTRACT Rate Allocation in a Remote Control Structure (May 1984) Charles Joe Meadow, Jr. , B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Thomas R. Fischer A Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG...

  12. EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE FOR STATISTICAL SCALING AND INTERMITTENCY IN SEDIMENT TRANSPORT RATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE FOR STATISTICAL SCALING AND INTERMITTENCY IN SEDIMENT TRANSPORT RATES in sediment2 transport rates3 4 5 6 Arvind Singh1 , Kurt Fienberg1 , Douglas J. Jerolmack2 , Jeffrey Marr1 ,7 a rougher and more intermittent behavior in51 bedload sediment transport series at low discharge conditions

  13. Structures for Three Membrane Transport Proteins Yield Functional...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structures for Three Membrane Transport Proteins Yield Functional Insights Print Cells depend on contact with their outside environment in order to thrive. Two examples illustrate...

  14. Effect of Sand Supply on Transport Rates in a Gravel-Bed Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curran, Joanna C.

    Effect of Sand Supply on Transport Rates in a Gravel-Bed Channel Joanna C. Curran, A.M.ASCE,1 depth, and gravel feed rate, sand feed rates were varied from 0.16 to 6.1 times that of gravel. The bed slope decreased with increasing sand supply, indicating that the gravel could be transported at the same

  15. Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural Gas Flows and Rates

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1995-01-01

    This report, summarized data and studies that could be used to address the impact of legislative and regulatory actions on natural gas transportation rates and flow patterns.

  16. Structural analysis of the CDF transporter cart

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leininger, M.

    1982-11-17

    The transporter cart serves as a dolly to move the large toroids (539 tons) and the Roman arches (600 tons) which are part of the central detector. ANSYS has been used to compute deflections and stresses in this cart.

  17. Electronic structure and transport in molecular and nanoscale electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Xiaofeng

    2008-01-01

    Two approaches based on first-principles method are developed to qualitatively and quantitatively study electronic structure and phase-coherent transport in molecular and nanoscale electronics, where both quantum mechanical ...

  18. The impact of lead time on truckload transportation rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caldwell, Erik R. (Erik Russell)

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to analyze truckload shipment transactions in order to determine if rates are impacted by tender lead time, which is the amount of time between when a carrier is offered a load to when the ...

  19. Energy policy act transportation study: Interim report on natural gas flows and rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-17

    This report, Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural Gas Flows and Rates, is the second in a series mandated by Title XIII, Section 1340, ``Establishment of Data Base and Study of Transportation Rates,`` of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102--486). The first report Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Availability of Data and Studies, was submitted to Congress in October 1993; it summarized data and studies that could be used to address the impact of legislative and regulatory actions on natural gas transportation rates and flow patterns. The current report presents an interim analysis of natural gas transportation rates and distribution patterns for the period from 1988 through 1994. A third and final report addressing the transportation rates and flows through 1997 is due to Congress in October 2000. This analysis relies on currently available data; no new data collection effort was undertaken. The need for the collection of additional data on transportation rates will be further addressed after this report, in consultation with the Congress, industry representatives, and in other public forums.

  20. Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsten Knappenberger; Markus Flury; Earl D. Mattson; James B. Harsh

    2014-03-01

    Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid transport is, among other factors, affected by water content and flow rate. Our objective was to determine whether water content or flow rate is more important for colloid transport. We passed negatively charged polystyrene colloids (220 nm diameter) through unsaturated sand-filled columns under steady-state flow at different water contents (effective water saturations Se ranging from 0.1 to 1.0, with Se = (? – ?r)/(?s – ?r)) and flow rates (pore water velocities v of 5 and 10 cm/min). Water content was the dominant factor in our experiments. Colloid transport decreased with decreasing water content, and below a critical water content (Se < 0.1), colloid transport was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are interconnected. The flow rate affected retention of colloids in the secondary energy minimum, with less colloids being trapped when the flow rate increased. These results confirm the importance of both water content and flow rate for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media and highlight the dominant role of water content.

  1. Effects of electricity rates and rate structures on pump irrigation: an eastern Colorado case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, R.L.; Young, R.A.

    1984-11-01

    This article analyzes the effects of electricity rate policy on electricity demand (and the derived effect on irrigation water use) via a case study in eastern Colorado. Empirical demand curves for electricity for pump irrigation are estimated. Alternative rate structures are tested for their effect on electricity and water use patterns, farm income, and utility revenue. Particular attention is given to the problem of modeling a declining block structure. 11 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  2. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier4Rate | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 JumpPublicationDate Jump to:InformationEnergyInformation Rate Jump

  3. Generic Structures in Parameter Space and Ratchet Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alan Celestino; Cesar Manchein; Holokx A. Albuquerque; Marcus W. Beims

    2011-11-06

    This work reports the existence of Isoperiodic Stable Ratchet Transport Structures in the parameter spaces dissipation versus spatial asymmetry and versus phase of a ratchet model. Such structures were found [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 234101 (2011)] in the parameter space dissipation versus amplitude of the ratchet potential and they appear to have generic shapes and to align themselves along preferred directions in the parameter space. Since the ratchet current is usually larger inside these structures, this allows us to make general statements about the relevant parameters combination to obtain an efficient ratchet current. Results of the present work give further evidences of the suggested generic properties of the isoperiodic stable structures in the context of ratchet transport.

  4. Dependence of heat transport on the strength and shear rate of prescribed circulating flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emily S. C. Ching; K. M. Pang

    2001-11-28

    We study numerically the dependence of heat transport on the maximum velocity and shear rate of physical circulating flows, which are prescribed to have the key characteristics of the large-scale mean flow observed in turbulent convection. When the side-boundary thermal layer is thinner than the viscous boundary layer, the Nusselt number (Nu), which measures the heat transport, scales with the normalized shear rate to an exponent 1/3. On the other hand, when the side-boundary thermal layer is thicker, the dependence of Nu on the Peclet number, which measures the maximum velocity, or the normalized shear rate when the viscous boundary layer thickness is fixed, is generally not a power law. Scaling behavior is obtained only in an asymptotic regime. The relevance of our results to the problem of heat transport in turbulent convection is also discussed.

  5. Comparative Traffic Performance Analysis of Urban Transportation Network Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amini, Behnam; Mojarradi, Morteza; Derrible, Sybil

    2015-01-01

    The network structure of an urban transportation system has a significant impact on its traffic performance. This study uses network indicators along with several traffic performance measures including speed, trip length, travel time, and traffic volume, to compare a selection of seven transportation networks with a variety of structures and under different travel demand conditions. The selected network structures are: modified linear, branch, grid, 3-directional grid, 1-ring web, 2-ring web, and radial. For the analysis, a base origin-destination matrix is chosen, to which different growth factors are applied in order to simulate various travel demand conditions. Results show that overall the 2-ring web network offers the most efficient traffic performance, followed by the grid and the 1-ring networks. A policy application of this study is that the branch, 3-directional grid, and radial networks are mostly suited for small cities with uncongested traffic conditions. In contrast, the 2-ring web, grid, and 1-r...

  6. A new formula for the total longshore sediment transport rate Atilla Bayram a,, Magnus Larson b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    A new formula for the total longshore sediment transport rate Atilla Bayram a,, Magnus Larson b April 2007 Available online 7 June 2007 Abstract A new predictive formula for the total longshore employed to evaluate the predictive capability of the new formula. The main parameter of the formula (a

  7. Dose Rate Analysis Capability for Actual Spent Fuel Transportation Cask Contents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radulescu, Georgeta; Lefebvre, Robert A; Peplow, Douglas E.; Williams, Mark L; Scaglione, John M

    2014-01-01

    The approved contents for a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensed spent nuclear fuel casks are typically based on bounding used nuclear fuel (UNF) characteristics. However, the contents of the UNF canisters currently in storage at independent spent fuel storage installations are considerably heterogeneous in terms of fuel assembly burnup, initial enrichment, decay time, cladding integrity, etc. Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation & Disposal Analysis Resource and Data System (UNF ST&DARDS) is an integrated data and analysis system that facilitates automated cask-specific safety analyses based on actual characteristics of the as-loaded UNF. The UNF-ST&DARDS analysis capabilities have been recently expanded to include dose rate analysis of as-loaded transportation packages. Realistic dose rate values based on actual canister contents may be used in place of bounding dose rate values to support development of repackaging operations procedures, evaluation of radiation-related transportation risks, and communication with stakeholders. This paper describes the UNF-ST&DARDS dose rate analysis methodology based on actual UNF canister contents and presents sample dose rate calculation results.

  8. Development of a structural health monitoring system for the life assessment of critical transportation infrastructure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Jauregui, David Villegas; Daumueller, Andrew Nicholas

    2012-02-01

    Recent structural failures such as the I-35W Mississippi River Bridge in Minnesota have underscored the urgent need for improved methods and procedures for evaluating our aging transportation infrastructure. This research seeks to develop a basis for a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system to provide quantitative information related to the structural integrity of metallic structures to make appropriate management decisions and ensuring public safety. This research employs advanced structural analysis and nondestructive testing (NDT) methods for an accurate fatigue analysis. Metal railroad bridges in New Mexico will be the focus since many of these structures are over 100 years old and classified as fracture-critical. The term fracture-critical indicates that failure of a single component may result in complete collapse of the structure such as the one experienced by the I-35W Bridge. Failure may originate from sources such as loss of section due to corrosion or cracking caused by fatigue loading. Because standard inspection practice is primarily visual, these types of defects can go undetected due to oversight, lack of access to critical areas, or, in riveted members, hidden defects that are beneath fasteners or connection angles. Another issue is that it is difficult to determine the fatigue damage that a structure has experienced and the rate at which damage is accumulating due to uncertain history and load distribution in supporting members. A SHM system has several advantages that can overcome these limitations. SHM allows critical areas of the structure to be monitored more quantitatively under actual loading. The research needed to apply SHM to metallic structures was performed and a case study was carried out to show the potential of SHM-driven fatigue evaluation to assess the condition of critical transportation infrastructure and to guide inspectors to potential problem areas. This project combines the expertise in transportation infrastructure at New Mexico State University with the expertise at Sandia National Laboratories in the emerging field of SHM.

  9. Coherent Structures and Larval Transport in the California Current System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Cheryl S.

    2012-01-01

    eddies; ocean transport; California Current 1. Introductionand larval transport in the California Current system CherylEkman transport and pumping in the California Current based

  10. Energy Policy Act transportation rate study: Availability of data and studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-13

    Pursuant to Section 1340(c) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), this report presents the Secretary of Energy`s review of data collected by the Federal Government on rates for rail and pipeline transportation of domestic coal, oil, and gas for the years 1988 through 1997, and proposals to develop an adequate data base for each of the fuels, based on the data availability review. This report also presents the Energy Information Administration`s findings regarding the extent to which any Federal agency is studying the impacts of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) and other Federal policies on the transportation rates and distribution patterns of domestic coal, oil, and gas.

  11. Charge carrier transport properties in layer structured hexagonal boron nitride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doan, T. C.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X., E-mail: hx.jiang@ttu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Due to its large in-plane thermal conductivity, high temperature and chemical stability, large energy band gap (~ 6.4 eV), hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has emerged as an important material for applications in deep ultraviolet photonic devices. Among the members of the III-nitride material system, hBN is the least studied and understood. The study of the electrical transport properties of hBN is of utmost importance with a view to realizing practical device applications. Wafer-scale hBN epilayers have been successfully synthesized by metal organic chemical deposition and their electrical transport properties have been probed by variable temperature Hall effect measurements. The results demonstrate that undoped hBN is a semiconductor exhibiting weak p-type at high temperatures (> 700?°K). The measured acceptor energy level is about 0.68 eV above the valence band. In contrast to the electrical transport properties of traditional III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors, the temperature dependence of the hole mobility in hBN can be described by the form of ? ? (T/T{sub 0}){sup ??} with ? = 3.02, satisfying the two-dimensional (2D) carrier transport limit dominated by the polar optical phonon scattering. This behavior is a direct consequence of the fact that hBN is a layer structured material. The optical phonon energy deduced from the temperature dependence of the hole mobility is ?? = 192 meV (or 1546 cm{sup -1}), which is consistent with values previously obtained using other techniques. The present results extend our understanding of the charge carrier transport properties beyond the traditional III-nitride semiconductors.

  12. Rate Structures for Customers With Onsite Generation: Practice and Innovation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, L.; Takahashi, K.; Weston, F.; Murray, C.

    2005-12-01

    Recognizing that innovation and good public policy do not always proclaim themselves, Synapse Energy Economics and the Regulatory Assistance Project, under a contract with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), undertook a survey of state policies on rates for partial-requirements customers with onsite distributed generation. The survey investigated a dozen or so states. These varied in geography and the structures of their electric industries. By reviewing regulatory proceedings, tariffs, publications, and interviews, the researchers identified a number of approaches to standby and associated rates--many promising but some that are perhaps not--that deserve policymakers' attention if they are to promote the deployment of cost-effective DG in their states.

  13. Theory of Josephson transport through spintronics nano-structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiro Kawabata; Yasuhiro Asano; Yukio Tanaka; Satoshi Kashiwaya

    2010-04-06

    We study the Josephson transport through ferromagnetic insulators (FIs) by taking into account its band structure explicitly. In the case of the fully polarized FIs (FPFIs), we found the formation of a pi-junction and an atomic-scale 0-pi transition induced by increasing the FI thickness. More remarkably, in the Josephson junction through spin-filter materials such as Eu chalcogenides, the orbital hybridization between the conduction d and the localized f electron gives rise to the pi-junction behavior. Such FI-based pi-junctions can be used to implement highly-coherent solid-state quantum bits.

  14. Proton Transport in Imidazoles: Unraveling the Role of Supramolecular Structure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cosby, James T.; Holt, Adam P.; Griffin, Phillip; Wang, Yangyang; Sangoro, Joshua R.

    2015-09-18

    The impact of supramolecular hydrogen bonded networks on dynamics and charge transport in 2-ethyl-4-methylimidazole (2E4MIm), a model proton-conducting system, is investigated by broadband dielectric spectroscopy, depolarized dynamic light scattering, viscometry, and calorimetry. It is observed that the slow, Debye-like relaxation reflecting the supramolecular structure in neat 2E4MIm is eliminated upon the addition of minute amounts of levulinic acid. This is attributed to the dissociation of imidazole molecules and the breaking down of hydrogen-bonded chains, which leads to a 10-fold enhancement of ionic conductivity.

  15. Transport Properties through Double Barrier Structure in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed Jellal; El Bouazzaoui Choubabi; Hocine Bahlouli; Abdullah Aljaafari

    2012-02-12

    The mode-dependent transmission of relativistic ballistic massless Dirac fermion through a graphene based double barrier structure is being investigated for various barrier parameters. We compare our results with already published work and point out the relevance of these findings to a systematic study of the transport properties in double barrier structures. An interesting situation arises when we set the potential in the leads to zero, then our 2D problem reduces effectively to a 1D massive Dirac equation with an effective mass proportional to the quantized wave number along the transverse direction. Furthermore we have shown that the minimal conductivity and maximal Fano factor remain insensitive to the ratio between the two potentials V_2/V_1=\\alpha.

  16. Electricity Rate Structures and the Economics of Solar PV: Could Mandatory Time-of-Use Rates Undermine California’s Solar Photovoltaic Subsidies?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2007-01-01

    CSEM WP 172 Electricity Rate Structures and the Economics of94720-5180 www.ucei.org Electricity Rate Structures and thefuture of California electricity rate levels and rate design

  17. Utility Rate Structures and the Impact of Energy Efficiency and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FL Energy Efficiency Calculations * Rates: most common are energy only rates, or a demand rate (kVa or kW) * Demand Rate - Can't use the average cost per kWh for calculations -...

  18. Coherent Structures and Larval Transport in the California Current System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Cheryl S.

    2012-01-01

    behavior upwelling winds imply offshore transport and thatcoastal winds drive ocean surface transport offshore,respond to local wind forcing by moving offshore in complex

  19. Electrode films of porous agarose: The effects of physical structure on electron transport processes. [Impregnated with Nafion; immobilized electroactive species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, K.D.

    1988-02-01

    Potential use of chemically modified electrodes in electrocatalysis has stimulated interest in creation and characterization of electrode films for reagent immobilization. We have created two highly porous electrocatalyst support matrices, with high rates of electron transport. Both are based on immobilization of reagents in agarose gel. In one case, Nafion was impregnated into agarose gel films. Diffusion of methyl viologen in Nafionagarose matrices are higher than in Nafion. In Nafion, the diffusion coefficient decreases with increasing methyl viologen concentration, while in Nafionagarose, the opposite dependence is observed. The faster rate of electron transport in Nafionagarose films is related to the heterogeneous structure and the coupling of the diffusion pathways. In the second application of agarose gels as an electrode coating material, agarose hydroxyl groups were activated in 1,1'carbonyldiimidazole and subsequently reacted with amine derivatives of electroactive mediators. Electron transport between the electroactive sites in the gel is very rapid (on the order of 10/sup -7/ cm/sup 2/s. Interpreting the data in light of the Dahms-Ruff description of electron transport shows that the rate of electron transport through both ferrocene and viologen derivatized gels is limited by the rate of electron self-exchange of the species. 22 figs., 15 tabs

  20. Mass transport around comets and its impact on the seasonal differences in water production rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; Thomas, N.; Fougere, N.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V. M.; Le Roy, L.

    2014-06-20

    Comets are surrounded by a thin expanding atmosphere, and although the nucleus' gravity is small, some molecules and grains, possibly with the inclusion of ices, can get transported around the nucleus through scattering (atoms/molecules) and gravitational pull (grains). Based on the obliquity of the comet, it is also possible that volatile material and icy grains get trapped in regions, which are in shadow until the comet passes its equinox. When the Sun rises above the horizon and the surface starts to heat up, this condensed material starts to desorb and icy grains will sublimate off the surface, possibly increasing the comet's neutral gas production rate on the outbound path. In this paper we investigate the mass transport around the nucleus, and based on a simplified model, we derive the possible contribution to the asymmetry in the seasonal gas production rate that could arise from trapped material released from cold areas once they come into sunlight. We conclude that the total amount of volatiles retained by this effect can only contribute up to a few percent of the asymmetry observed in some comets.

  1. Coherent Structures and Larval Transport in the California Current System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Cheryl S.

    2012-01-01

    track Lagrangian coherent structures. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.A. Shchepetkin. Equilibrium structure and dynamics of thetracks Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) calculated from

  2. RATES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and PACI Final FRN for Rate Order No. WAPA-139 - Notice of Order Temporarily Extending Formula Rates for Power, Transmission and Ancillary Services (PDF - 49K) Final FRN for Rate...

  3. RATES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - 392K) Final FRN for Rate Order No. WAPA-139 - Notice of Order Temporarily Extending Formula Rates for Power, Transmission and Ancillary Services (PDF - 49K) Final FRN for Rate...

  4. Crystal structure of a concentrative nucleoside transporter from Vibrio cholerae at 2.4;#8201;Å

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Zachary Lee; Cheong, Cheom-Gil; Lee, Seok-Yong (Duke)

    2012-07-11

    Nucleosides are required for DNA and RNA synthesis, and the nucleoside adenosine has a function in a variety of signalling processes. Transport of nucleosides across cell membranes provides the major source of nucleosides in many cell types and is also responsible for the termination of adenosine signalling. As a result of their hydrophilic nature, nucleosides require a specialized class of integral membrane proteins, known as nucleoside transporters (NTs), for specific transport across cell membranes. In addition to nucleosides, NTs are important determinants for the transport of nucleoside-derived drugs across cell membranes. A wide range of nucleoside-derived drugs, including anticancer drugs (such as Ara-C and gemcitabine) and antiviral drugs (such as zidovudine and ribavirin), have been shown to depend, at least in part, on NTs for transport across cell membranes. Concentrative nucleoside transporters, members of the solute carrier transporter superfamily SLC28, use an ion gradient in the active transport of both nucleosides and nucleoside-derived drugs against their chemical gradients. The structural basis for selective ion-coupled nucleoside transport by concentrative nucleoside transporters is unknown. Here we present the crystal structure of a concentrative nucleoside transporter from Vibrio cholerae in complex with uridine at 2.4 {angstrom}. Our functional data show that, like its human orthologues, the transporter uses a sodium-ion gradient for nucleoside transport. The structure reveals the overall architecture of this class of transporter, unravels the molecular determinants for nucleoside and sodium binding, and provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of nucleoside and nucleoside drug transport across cell membranes.

  5. Impact of Industrial Electric Rate Structure on Energy Conservation - A Utility Viewpiont 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, M. M.

    1981-01-01

    As the price of energy rises, changes in industrial electric rates will have an impact on energy usage and conservation. Utilities interested in reducing system peak demands may reflect this need in the rate structure as an incentive...

  6. 2,3-Dihydroxypropyl methacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate hydrogels: gel structure and transport properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Julie P.

    and transport properties G. Gatesa , J.P. Harmona,*, J. Orsb , P. Benzb a University of South Florida, 4202 East) results suggest that departure from Fickian desorption kinetics coincides with the onset of non-freezing transport rate is greater in DMPMA containing hydrogels. q 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved

  7. HOUSEHOLD AND STRUCTURAL INSECTS Effect of Trap Design, Chemical Lure, Carbon Dioxide Release Rate,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Changlu

    HOUSEHOLD AND STRUCTURAL INSECTS Effect of Trap Design, Chemical Lure, Carbon Dioxide Release Rate passive monitor available in the market for bed bugs

  8. Interaction between flow, transport and vegetation spatial structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luhar, Mitul

    This paper summarizes recent advances in vegetation hydrodynamics and uses the new concepts to explore not only how vegetation impacts flow and transport, but also how flow feedbacks can influence vegetation spatial ...

  9. Using design structure matrices to improve decentralization urban transportation systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, Travis P

    2005-01-01

    Management of large, complex, urban transportation systems involves numerous stakeholders due to the decentralized ownership and operation of distinct pieces of the physical network. In order to deliver better service to ...

  10. Optimal capital structure of deep sea foreign freight transportation companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgiadis, Vasilis

    2014-01-01

    This thesis aims to understand the optimal leverage range for shipping companies (maritime foreign freight transportation companies - SIC 4412), through data analysis. This study confirms that in a traditional industry ...

  11. *Deborah E. Eason, Garrett Ito, John M. Sinton Insights into melt and chemical transport rates in the mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Dennis

    of glacial melting. Models of mantle decompression following ice sheet removal predict the greatest melt], we model melt migration in the mantle during and after ice sheet removal (glacial unloading*Deborah E. Eason, Garrett Ito, John M. Sinton Insights into melt and chemical transport rates

  12. Effect of sediment pulse grain size on sediment transport rates and bed mobility in gravel bed rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venditti, Jeremy G.

    Effect of sediment pulse grain size on sediment transport rates and bed mobility in gravel bed] Sediment supply to gravel bed river channels often takes the form of episodic sediment pulses, and there is considerable interest in introducing sediment pulses in stream restorations to alter bed surface grain size

  13. RATES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Washoe Project, Stampede Division FERC Order Approving Extension of Non-Firm Power Formula Rate - Rate Order No. WAPA-160 (Sept. 5, 2013) (PDF - 22K) Notice of Extension of...

  14. Fluid transport in branched structures with temporary closures: A model for quasistatic lung inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buldyrev, Sergey

    Fluid transport in branched structures with temporary closures: A model for quasistatic lung a model system relevant to the inflation of a mammalian lung, an asymmetric bifurcating structure description of the underlying branching structure of the lung, by analyzing experimental pressure-volume data

  15. Constraining mantle density structure using geological evidence of surface uplift rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritsema, Jeroen

    Constraining mantle density structure using geological evidence of surface uplift rates: The case is actively being uplifted by a large-scale, positively buoyant structure within the mid-lower mantle. Using a new formulation in which dynamic topography and uplift rate are jointly used, we place constraints

  16. Comparison of structural integrity of casks for spent-fuel transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eifert, E.J.; Burger, C.S.; Herger, A.S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ammerman, D.J.; McConnell, P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a series of finite element analyses comparing the structural integrity of two shipping casks for transportation of high-level waste (HLW). The objective of this project is to assess the advisability of utilizing ductile iron (DI) for type-B transport cask construction by investigating its structural response under severe loading conditions. This response is compared to that of a stainless steel (SS) cask under comparable loading conditions.

  17. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier5Adjustment | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 JumpPublicationDate Jump to:InformationEnergyInformation Rate

  18. Impacts of Commercial Electric Utility Rate Structure Elements on the Economics of Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Denholm, P.; Doris, E.

    2010-06-01

    This analysis uses simulated building data, simulated solar photovoltaic (PV) data, and actual electric utility tariff data from 25 cities to understand better the impacts of different commercial rate structures on the value of solar PV systems. By analyzing and comparing 55 unique rate structures across the United States, this study seeks to identify the rate components that have the greatest effect on the value of PV systems. Understanding the beneficial components of utility tariffs can both assist decision makers in choosing appropriate rate structures and influence the development of rates that favor the deployment of PV systems. Results from this analysis show that a PV system's value decreases with increasing demand charges. Findings also indicate that time-of-use rate structures with peaks coincident with PV production and wide ranges between on- and off-peak prices most benefit the types of buildings and PV systems simulated. By analyzing a broad set of rate structures from across the United States, this analysis provides an insight into the range of impacts that current U.S. rate structures have on PV systems.

  19. 2 eme Atelier International \\Formation et Migration des Dunes", Nouakchott, 7 -13 f evrier 2001 On the rate of aeolian sand transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sørensen, Michael

    2001 On the rate of aeolian sand transport Michael S#31;RENSEN #3; #3; Department of Statistics. Abstract: An analytic formula for for rate of aeolian sand transport is derived by introducing a few reasonable approximations in the equations of motion of the sand grains and in the model for the modi#12

  20. Structures for Three Membrane Transport Proteins Yield Functional Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect PhotovoltaicsStructure and Receptorsurvivor 8 StructureStructures

  1. Nanoscale structure and transport : from atoms to devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Matthew Hiram

    2005-01-01

    Nanoscale structures present both unique physics and unique theoretical challenges. Atomic-scale simulations can find novel nanostructures with desirable properties, but the search can be difficult if the wide range of ...

  2. Molecular Structure and Transport Dynamics in Perfluoro Sulfonyl Imide Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idupulapati, Nagesh B.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Dupuis, Michel

    2011-05-25

    We report a detailed and comprehensive analysis of the nanostructure, transport dynamics of water and hydronium and water percolation in hydrated perfluoro sulfonyl imides (PFSI), a polymer considered for proton transport in PEM fuel cells, using classical molecular dynamics simulations. The dynamical changes are related to the changes in the membrane nanostructure. Water network percolation threshold, the level at which a consistent spanning water network starts to develop in the membrane, lies between hydration level (?) 6 and 7. The higher acidity of the sulfonyl imide acid group of PFSI compared to Nafion reported in our earlier ab initio study, translates into more free hydronium ions at low hydration levels. Nevertheless, the calculated diffusion coefficients of the H3O+ ions and H2O molecules as a function the hydration level were observed to be almost the same as that of Nafion, indicating similar conductivity and consistent with the experimental observations. This research was performed in part using the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national scientific user facility located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  3. Structures for Three Membrane Transport Proteins Yield Functional Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveAprilPhotonStructure of DNA-BoundFinanceStructures for

  4. Structures for Three Membrane Transport Proteins Yield Functional Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect PhotovoltaicsStructure and Receptorsurvivor 8Structures for Three

  5. Structures for Three Membrane Transport Proteins Yield Functional Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect PhotovoltaicsStructure and Receptorsurvivor 8Structures for

  6. Structural Detuning of Pump Absorption Rate in Doped Fiber for the Enhancement of Power Conversion Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Namkyoo

    Structural Detuning of Pump Absorption Rate in Doped Fiber for the Enhancement of Power Conversion Doped Fiber Amplifier. With proper adjustments on doping profiles for the reduction of pump absorption rate, it becomes possible to optimize pump evolution map inside the doped fiber to get better power

  7. Sequence-Based Prediction of Protein Folding Rates Using Contacts, Secondary Structures and Support Vector Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Jianlin Jack

    Sequence-Based Prediction of Protein Folding Rates Using Contacts, Secondary Structures and Support, Columbia, Missouri * Corresponding author: chengji@missouri.edu Abstract Predicting protein folding rate is useful for understanding protein folding process and guiding protein design. Here we developed a method

  8. Short- and Long- Time Transport Structures in a Three Dimensional Time Dependent Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodolphe Chabreyrie; Stefan G. Llewellyn Smith

    2014-05-08

    Lagrangian transport structures for three-dimensional and time-dependent fluid flows are of great interest in numerous applications, particularly for geophysical or oceanic flows. In such flows, chaotic transport and mixing can play important environmental and ecological roles, for examples in pollution spills or plankton migration. In such flows, where simulations or observations are typically available only over a short time, understanding the difference between short-time and long-time transport structures is critical. In this paper, we use a set of classical (i.e. Poincar\\'e section, Lyapunov exponent) and alternative (i.e. finite time Lyapunov exponent, Lagrangian coherent structures) tools from dynamical systems theory that analyze chaotic transport both qualitatively and quantitatively. With this set of tools we are able to reveal, identify and highlight differences between short- and long-time transport structures inside a flow composed of a primary horizontal contra-rotating vortex chain, small lateral oscillations and a weak Ekman pumping. The difference is mainly the existence of regular or extremely slowly developing chaotic regions that are only present at short time.

  9. Structural Change, the Real Exchange Rate, and the Balance of Payments in Mexico, 1960-2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lansky, Joshua

    Structural Change, the Real Exchange Rate, and the Balance of Payments in Mexico, 1960-2012 Carlos structural changes in the composition of Mexico's trade and the parameters that affect it across five-of-payments constraint may account for the post-liberalization slowdown in Mexico's growth only during certain subperiods

  10. Structures for Three Membrane Transport Proteins Yield Functional Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect PhotovoltaicsStructure and Receptorsurvivor 8

  11. Structure, transport and thermal properties of UCoGa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purwanto, A.; Robinson, R.A.; Prokes, K.

    1994-04-01

    By means of neutron powder diffraction, we find that UCoGa crystallizes in the hexagonal ZrNiAl structure and orders ferromagnetically at low temperatures with magnetic moments stacked along the c axis. The magnetic-ordering temperature is reflected in anomalies in the temperature dependencies of the electrical resistivity and the specific heat at Tc = 47 K. Furthermore, the strong anisotropy in the electrical resistivity for i {parallel} c and i {perpendicular} c indicates a significant contribution of the magnetic anisotropy to the electrical resistivity.

  12. Structural, magnetic, and transport properties of Permalloy for spintronic experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nahrwold, Gesche; Scholtyssek, Jan M.; Motl-Ziegler, Sandra; Albrecht, Ole; Merkt, Ulrich; Meier, Guido

    2010-07-15

    Permalloy (Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}) is broadly used to prepare magnetic nanostructures for high-frequency experiments where the magnetization is either excited by electrical currents or magnetic fields. Detailed knowledge of the material properties is mandatory for thorough understanding its magnetization dynamics. In this work, thin Permalloy films are grown by dc-magnetron sputtering on heated substrates and by thermal evaporation with subsequent annealing. The specific resistance is determined by van der Pauw methods. Point-contact Andreev reflection is employed to determine the spin polarization of the films. The topography is imaged by atomic-force microscopy, and the magnetic microstructure by magnetic-force microscopy. Transmission-electron microscopy and transmission-electron diffraction are performed to determine atomic composition, crystal structure, and morphology. From ferromagnetic resonance absorption spectra the saturation magnetization, the anisotropy, and the Gilbert damping parameter are determined. Coercive fields and anisotropy are measured by magneto-optical Kerr magnetometry. The sum of the findings enables optimization of Permalloy for spintronic experiments.

  13. California PG&E E-19 Rate Structure -- demand charge structure...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    were rendered based on the above inconsistency between the 's in the time of use matrix and the of structures, and when we sent a human agent to fix the technical error,...

  14. Crystal structures of the CusA efflux pump suggest methionine-mediated metal transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Feng; Su, Chih-Chia; Zimmermann, Michael T.; Boyken, Scott E.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Jernigan, Robert L.; Yu, Edward W. (Cornell); (Iowa State)

    2010-09-23

    Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, frequently use tripartite efflux complexes in the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) family to expel various toxic compounds from the cell. The efflux system CusCBA is responsible for extruding biocidal Cu(I) and Ag(I) ions. No previous structural information was available for the heavy-metal efflux (HME) subfamily of the RND efflux pumps. Here we describe the crystal structures of the inner-membrane transporter CusA in the absence and presence of bound Cu(I) or Ag(I). These CusA structures provide new structural information about the HME subfamily of RND efflux pumps. The structures suggest that the metal-binding sites, formed by a three-methionine cluster, are located within the cleft region of the periplasmic domain. This cleft is closed in the apo-CusA form but open in the CusA-Cu(I) and CusA-Ag(I) structures, which directly suggests a plausible pathway for ion export. Binding of Cu(I) and Ag(I) triggers significant conformational changes in both the periplasmic and transmembrane domains. The crystal structure indicates that CusA has, in addition to the three-methionine metal-binding site, four methionine pairs - three located in the transmembrane region and one in the periplasmic domain. Genetic analysis and transport assays suggest that CusA is capable of actively picking up metal ions from the cytosol, using these methionine pairs or clusters to bind and export metal ions. These structures suggest a stepwise shuttle mechanism for transport between these sites.

  15. Study of the effect of rate of sediment transport on the stability of open channels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, Khandaker Mohammad Abdur

    1963-01-01

    Doab canal system in the Punjab, Kennedy initiated the development of the regime theory as an explanation for the channel stability I14). The regime theory states that, for any given rate of flow?an open cl-. ar. nel cr river will establish its own... published two papers based on the regime theory (17, 18). He formulated several relationships cor- relating discharge, channel slope, and the particle size of the sediment forming the beds. The Lacey equations were accepted as correct by the Central...

  16. Circadian rhythms in electric waveform structure and rate in the electric fish Brachyhypopomus pinnicaudatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoddard, Philip

    and that save energy during the day when the fish are quiescent [1­4]. At the behavioral level, the dayCircadian rhythms in electric waveform structure and rate in the electric fish Brachyhypopomus in revised form 11 July 2006; accepted 15 August 2006 Abstract Weakly electric fish have long been known

  17. Structural Change, the Real Exchange Rate, and the Balance of Payments in Mexico, 1960-2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlini, David

    Structural Change, the Real Exchange Rate, and the Balance of Payments in Mexico, 1960-2012 Carlos in Mexico's growth only during certain subperiods of the post-liberalization era, and that the impact the recent crisis), Mexico stands out for having fully embraced trade liberalization and undergoing deep

  18. Structural Change, the Real Exchange Rate, and the Balance of Payments Constraint in Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lansky, Joshua

    Structural Change, the Real Exchange Rate, and the Balance of Payments Constraint in Mexico Carlos of a model of balance-of-payments-constrained growth for Mexico, with disaggregated exports (manufactured for the slowdown in Mexico's actual growth during the early phase of trade liberalization and macro stabilization

  19. Bursty Traffic over CDMA: Predictive MAI Temporal Structure, Rate Control and Admission Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    's capacity laws [30]. Hence, in the wireless environment, one has to very carefully engineer the network the predictive MAI structure to construct a multiple time-scale interference predictor. Rate adaptation perspective based on marginal distributions). This approach cuts across the physical layer, medium access

  20. The Structure and Transport of Water and Hydrated Ions Within Hydrophobic, Nanoscale Channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, J K; Herberg, J L; Wu, Y; Schwegler, E; Mehta, A

    2009-06-15

    The purpose of this project includes an experimental and modeling investigation into water and hydrated ion structure and transport at nanomaterials interfaces. This is a topic relevant to understanding the function of many biological systems such as aquaporins that efficiently shuttle water and ion channels that permit selective transport of specific ions across cell membranes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are model nanoscale, hydrophobic channels that can be functionalized, making them artificial analogs for these biological channels. This project investigates the microscopic properties of water such as water density distributions and dynamics within CNTs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and the structure of hydrated ions at CNT interfaces via X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Another component of this work is molecular simulation, which can predict experimental measurables such as the proton relaxation times, chemical shifts, and can compute the electronic structure of CNTs. Some of the fundamental questions this work is addressing are: (1) what is the length scale below which nanoscale effects such as molecular ordering become important, (2) is there a relationship between molecular ordering and transport?, and (3) how do ions interact with CNT interfaces? These are questions of interest to the scientific community, but they also impact the future generation of sensors, filters, and other devices that operate on the nanometer length scale. To enable some of the proposed applications of CNTs as ion filtration media and electrolytic supercapacitors, a detailed knowledge of water and ion structure at CNT interfaces is critical.

  1. Crystal structure of the Alcanivorax borkumensis YdaH transporter reveals an unusual topology

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bolla, Jani Reddy; Su, Chih-Chia; Delmar, Jared A.; Radhakrishnan, Abhijith; Kumar, Nitin; Chou, Tsung-Han; Long, Feng; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Yu, Edward W.

    2015-04-20

    The potential of the folic acid biosynthesis pathway as a target for the development of antibiotics has been clinically validated. However, many pathogens have developed resistance to these antibiotics, prompting a re-evaluation of potential drug targets within the pathway. The ydaH gene of Alcanivorax borkumensis encodes an integral membrane protein of the AbgT family of transporters for which no structural information was available. Here we report the crystal structure of A. borkumensis YdaH, revealing a dimeric molecule with an architecture distinct from other families of transporters. YdaH is a bowl-shaped dimer with a solvent-filled basin extending from the cytoplasm tomore »halfway across the membrane bilayer. Each subunit of the transporter contains nine transmembrane helices and two hairpins that suggest a plausible pathway for substrate transport. Further analyses also suggest that YdaH could act as an antibiotic efflux pump and mediate bacterial resistance to sulfonamide antimetabolite drugs.« less

  2. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for grid-connected, customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar will likely need to be competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report, we examine the impact of retail rate design on the economic value of commercial PV systems in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial customer retail rates currently offered in the state. We find that the specifics of the rate structure, combined with the characteristics of the customer’s underlying load and the size of the PV system, can have a substantial impact on the customer-economics of commercial PV systems.

  3. Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout / Transforming Y-12Capacity-Forum Sign InTransportation

  4. Structure and transport properties of a porous magnetic gel via x-ray microtomography M. D. Rintoul,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    of experimental techniques. Such techniques include transmission microscopy 11 , scanning tunneling electron transport properties, such as the fluid permeability and trapping rate, of the gel. S1063-651X 96 06408

  5. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-05-11

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when commercial PV systems represent a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  6. The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-06-24

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-min interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05 to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when energy from commercial PV systems represents a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  7. Quantum ground state effect on fluctuation rates in nano-patterned superconducting structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eftekharian, Amin; Jafari Salim, Amir; University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 ; Atikian, Haig; Akhlaghi, Mohsen K.; Hamed Majedi, A.

    2013-12-09

    In this Letter, we present a theoretical model with experimental verifications to describe the abnormal behaviors of the measured fluctuation rates occurring in nano-patterned superconducting structures below the critical temperature. In the majority of previous works, it is common to describe the fluctuation rate by defining a fixed ground state or initial state level for the singularities (vortex or vortex-antivortex pairs), and then employing the well-known rate equations to calculate the liberation rates. Although this approach gives an acceptable qualitative picture, without utilizing free parameters, all the models have been inadequate in describing the temperature dependence of the rate for a fixed width or the width dependence of the rate for a fixed temperature. Here, we will show that by defining a current-controlled ground state level for both the vortex and vortex-antivortex liberation mechanisms, the dynamics of these singularities are described for a wide range of temperatures and widths. According to this study, for a typical strip width, not only is the vortex-antivortex liberation higher than the predicted rate, but also quantum tunneling is significant in certain conditions and can not be neglected.

  8. First principles study of the structural, electronic, and transport properties of triarylamine-based nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akande, Akinlolu, E-mail: akandea@tcd.ie; Bhattacharya, Sandip; Cathcart, Thomas; Sanvito, Stefano [School of Physics, AMBER and CRANN Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)] [School of Physics, AMBER and CRANN Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2014-02-21

    We investigate with state of the art density functional theory the structural, electronic, and transport properties of a class of recently synthesized nanostructures based on triarylamine derivatives. First, we consider the single molecule precursors in the gas phase and calculate their static properties, namely (i) the geometrical structure of the neutral and cationic ions, (ii) the electronic structure of the frontier molecular orbitals, and (iii) the ionization potential, hole extraction potential, and internal reorganization energy. This initial study does not evidence any direct correlation between the properties of the individual molecules and their tendency to self-assembly. Subsequently, we investigate the charge transport characteristics of the triarylamine derivatives nanowires, by using Marcus theory. For one derivative we further construct an effective Hamiltonian including intermolecular vibrations and evaluate the mobility from the Kubo formula implemented with Monte Carlo sampling. These two methods, valid respectively in the sequential hopping and polaronic band limit, give us values for the room-temperature mobility in the range 0.1–12 cm{sup 2}/Vs. Such estimate confirms the superior transport properties of triarylamine-based nanowires, and make them an attracting materials platform for organic electronics.

  9. Structural transformation in supercooled water controls the crystallization rate of ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emily B. Moore; Valeria Molinero

    2011-09-27

    One of water's unsolved puzzles is the question of what determines the lowest temperature to which it can be cooled before freezing to ice. The supercooled liquid has been probed experimentally to near the homogeneous nucleation temperature TH{\\approx}232 K, yet the mechanism of ice crystallization - including the size and structure of critical nuclei - has not yet been resolved. The heat capacity and compressibility of liquid water anomalously increase upon moving into the supercooled region according to a power law that would diverge at Ts{\\approx}225 K,(1,2) so there may be a link between water's thermodynamic anomalies and the crystallization rate of ice. But probing this link is challenging because fast crystallization prevents experimental studies of the liquid below TH. And while atomistic studies have captured water crystallization(3), the computational costs involved have so far prevented an assessment of the rates and mechanism involved. Here we report coarse-grained molecular simulations with the mW water model(4) in the supercooled regime around TH, which reveal that a sharp increase in the fraction of four-coordinated molecules in supercooled liquid water explains its anomalous thermodynamics and also controls the rate and mechanism of ice formation. The simulations reveal that the crystallization rate of water reaches a maximum around 225 K, below which ice nuclei form faster than liquid water can equilibrate. This implies a lower limit of metastability of liquid water just below TH and well above its glass transition temperature Tg{\\approx}136 K. By providing a relationship between the structural transformation in liquid water, its anomalous thermodynamics and its crystallization rate, this work provides a microscopic foundation to the experimental finding that the thermodynamics of water determines the rates of homogeneous nucleation of ice.(5)

  10. Comparison of structure and transport properties of concentrated hard and soft sphere fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erik Lange; Jose B. Caballero; Antonio M. Puertas; Matthias Fuchs

    2009-01-16

    Using Newtonian and Brownian dynamics simulations, the structural and transport properties of hard and soft spheres have been studied. The soft spheres were modeled using inverse power potentials ($V\\sim r^{-n}$, with $1/n$ the potential softness). Although the pressure, diffusion coefficient and viscosity depend at constant density on the particle softness up to extremely high values of $n$, we show that scaling the density with the freezing point for every system effectively collapses these parameters for $n\\geq 18$ (including hard spheres), for large densities. At the freezing points, the long range structure of all systems is identical, when the distance is measured in units of the interparticle distance, but differences appear at short distances (due to the different shape of the interaction potential). This translates into differences at short times in the velocity and stress autocorrelation functions, although they concur to give the same value of the corresponding transport coefficient (for the same density to freezing ratio); the microscopic dynamics also affects the short time behaviour of the correlation functions and absolute values of the transport coefficients, but the same scaling with the freezing density works for Newtonian or Brownian dynamics. For hard spheres, the short time behaviour of the stress autocorrelation function has been studied in detail, confirming quantitatively the theoretical forms derived for it.

  11. www.rtands.com Railway Track & Structures March 2009 37 s rail transport continues to grow in popularity, so does

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    www.rtands.com Railway Track & Structures March 2009 37 A s rail transport continues to grow is protected from debris, rain and freezing temperatures, the more smoothly it flows." Barr cites the findings

  12. Rail Coal Transportation Rates

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Recurring Reserves Stocks All reports Browse by Tag Alphabetical Frequency Tag Cloud Data For: 2001 Next Release Date: October 2003 U. S. Coal-Producing Districts...

  13. Rail Coal Transportation Rates

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan FebCubicFracking,MichiganThousand47,959.15 KeroseneCoal Glossary

  14. Rail Coal Transportation Rates

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan FebCubicFracking,MichiganThousand47,959.15 KeroseneCoal

  15. Rail Coal Transportation Rates

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand Cubic Feet)698 1.873 -Coal

  16. Rail Coal Transportation Rates

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets160Product:7a. Space Heatingreports Coal

  17. Solar San Diego: The Impact of Binomial Rate Structures on Real PV Systems; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanGeet, O.; Brown, E.; Blair, T.; McAllister, A.

    2008-05-01

    There is confusion in the marketplace regarding the impact of solar photovoltaics (PV) on the user's actual electricity bill under California Net Energy Metering, particularly with binomial tariffs (those that include both demand and energy charges) and time-of-use (TOU) rate structures. The City of San Diego has extensive real-time electrical metering on most of its buildings and PV systems, with interval data for overall consumption and PV electrical production available for multiple years. This paper uses 2007 PV-system data from two city facilities to illustrate the impacts of binomial rate designs. The analysis will determine the energy and demand savings that the PV systems are achieving relative to the absence of systems. A financial analysis of PV-system performance under various rate structures is presented. The data revealed that actual demand and energy use benefits of binomial tariffs increase in summer months, when solar resources allow for maximized electricity production. In a binomial tariff system, varying on- and semi-peak times can result in approximately $1,100 change in demand charges per month over not having a PV system in place, an approximate 30% cost savings. The PV systems are also shown to have a 30%-50% reduction in facility energy charges in 2007.

  18. The impact of disorder on charge transport in three dimensional quantum dot resonant tunneling structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puthen-Veettil, B. Patterson, R.; König, D.; Conibeer, G.; Green, M. A.

    2014-10-28

    Efficient iso-entropic energy filtering of electronic waves can be realized through nanostructures with three dimensional confinement, such as quantum dot resonant tunneling structures. Large-area deployment of such structures is useful for energy selective contacts but such configuration is susceptible to structural disorders. In this work, the transport properties of quantum-dot-based wide-area resonant tunneling structures, subject to realistic disorder mechanisms, are studied. Positional variations of the quantum dots are shown to reduce the resonant transmission peaks while size variations in the device are shown to reduce as well as broaden the peaks. Increased quantum dot size distribution also results in a peak shift to lower energy which is attributed to large dots dominating transmission. A decrease in barrier thickness reduces the relative peak height while the overall transmission increases dramatically due to lower “series resistance.” While any shift away from ideality can be intuitively expected to reduce the resonance peak, quantification allows better understanding of the tolerances required for fabricating structures based on resonant tunneling phenomena/.

  19. Investigation of structure, magnetic, and transport properties of Mn-doped SiC films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Xianke [School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300172 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory for Photoelectric Materials and Devices, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Guo Ruisong [School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300172 (China); An Yukai [Tianjin Key Laboratory for Photoelectric Materials and Devices, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Liu Jiwen [School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300172 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory for Photoelectric Materials and Devices, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China)

    2013-07-15

    Mn-doped SiC films were fabricated by radio frequency magnetron sputtering technique. The structure, composition, and magnetic and transport properties of the films were investigated. The results show the films have the 3C-SiC crystal structure and the doped Mn atoms in the form of Mn{sup 2+} ions substitute for C sites in SiC lattice. All the films are ferromagnetic at 300 K, and the ferromagnetism in films arises from the doped Mn atoms and some extended defects. In addition, the saturation magnetization increases with the Mn-doped concentration increasing. The Mn doping does not change the semiconductor characteristics of the SiC films.

  20. Communication: Unusual structure and transport in ionic liquid-hexane mixtures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liang, Min [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology; Khatun, Sufia [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology; Castner, Edward W. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    2015-03-28

    Ionic liquids having a sufficiently amphiphilic cation can dissolve large volume fractions of alkanes, leading to mixtures with intriguing properties on molecular length scales. The trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium cation paired with the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide anion provides an ionic liquid that can dissolve large mole fractions of hexane. We present experimental results on mixtures of n-C6D14 with this ionic liquid. High- energy X-ray scattering studies reveal a persistence of the characteristic features of ionic liquid structure even for 80% dilution with n-C6D14. NMR self-diffusion results reveal decidedly non-hydrodynamic behavior where the self-diffusion of the neutral, non-polar n-C6D14 is on average a factor of 21 times faster than for the cation. Exploitation of the unique structural and transport properties of these mixtures may lead to new opportunities for designer solvents for enhanced chemical reactivity and interface science.

  1. Thermoelectric-transport in metal/graphene/metal hetero-structure This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    Thermoelectric-transport in metal/graphene/metal hetero-structure This article has been downloaded. B Vol. 19, No. 3 (2010) 037202 Thermoelectric-transport in metal/graphene/metal hetero-structure Hu 27 October 2009) We investigate the thermoelectric-transport properties of metal

  2. Synthesis and structural, magnetic, thermal, and transport properties of several transition metal oxides and aresnides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Supriyo

    2010-05-16

    Oxide compounds containing the transition metal vanadium (V) have attracted a lot of attention in the field of condensed matter physics owing to their exhibition of interesting properties including metal-insulator transitons, structural transitions, ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic orderings, and heavy fermion behavior. Binary vanadium oxides V{sub n}O{sub 2n-1} where 2 {le} n {le} 9 have triclinic structures and exhibit metal-insulator and antiferromagnetic transitions. The only exception is V{sub 7}O{sub 13} which remains metallic down to 4 K. The ternary vanadium oxide LiV{sub 2}O{sub 4} has the normal spinel structure, is metallic, does not undergo magnetic ordering and exhibits heavy fermion behavior below 10 K. CaV{sub 2}O{sub 4} has an orthorhombic structure with the vanadium spins forming zigzag chains and has been suggested to be a model system to study the gapless chiral phase. These provide great motivation for further investigation of some known vanadium compounds as well as to explore new vanadium compounds in search of new physics. This thesis consists, in part, of experimental studies involving sample preparation and magnetic, transport, thermal, and x-ray measurements on some strongly correlated eletron systems containing the transition metal vanadium. The compounds studied are LiV{sub 2}O{sub 4}, YV{sub 4}O{sub 8}, and YbV{sub 4}O{sub 8}. The recent discovery of superconductivity in RFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub x} (R = La, Ce, Pr, Gd, Tb, Dy, Sm, and Nd), and AFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (A = Ba, Sr, Ca, and Eu) doped with K, Na, or Cs at the A site with relatively high T{sub c} has sparked tremendous activities in the condensed matter physics community and a renewed interest in the area of superconductivity as occurred following the discovery of the layered cuprate high T{sub c} superconductors in 1986. To discover more superconductors with hopefully higher T{sub c}'s, it is extremely important to investigate compounds having crystal structures related to the compounds showing high T{sub c} superconductivity. Along with the vanadium oxide compounds described before, this thesis describes our investigations of magnetic, structural, thermal and transport properties of EuPd{sub 2}Sb{sub 2} single crystals which have a crystal structure closely related to the AFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} compounds and also a study of the reaction kinetics of the formation of LaFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub x}.

  3. The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economiccustomer retail electricity rates currently offered in thethe design of retail electricity rates, particularly for

  4. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economiccustomer retail electricity rates currently offered in thethe design of retail electricity rates, particularly for

  5. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2007-01-01

    competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report,the design of retail electricity rates, particularly forand industrial electricity rates currently offered by the

  6. Effects of structure formation on the expansion rate of the Universe: An estimate from numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Xinghai; Mathews, Grant J.

    2011-01-15

    General relativistic corrections to the expansion rate of the Universe arise when the Einstein equations are averaged over a spatial volume in a locally inhomogeneous cosmology. It has been suggested that they may contribute to the observed cosmic acceleration. In this paper, we propose a new scheme that utilizes numerical simulations to make a realistic estimate of the magnitude of these corrections for general inhomogeneities in (3+1) spacetime. We then quantitatively calculate the volume averaged expansion rate using N-body large-scale structure simulations and compare it with the expansion rate in a standard FRW cosmology. We find that in the weak gravitational field limit, the converged corrections are slightly larger than the previous claimed 10{sup -5} level, but not large enough nor even of the correct sign to drive the current cosmic acceleration. Nevertheless, the question of whether the cumulative effect can significantly change the expansion history of the Universe needs to be further investigated with strong-field relativity.

  7. The Integration of a Structural Water Gas Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, Thomas; Argyle, Morris; Popa, Tiberiu

    2009-06-30

    This project is in response to a requirement for a system that combines water gas shift technology with separation technology for coal derived synthesis gas. The justification of such a system would be improved efficiency for the overall hydrogen production. By removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas stream, the water gas shift equilibrium would force more carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and maximize the total hydrogen produced. Additional benefit would derive from the reduction in capital cost of plant by the removal of one step in the process by integrating water gas shift with the membrane separation device. The answer turns out to be that the integration of hydrogen separation and water gas shift catalysis is possible and desirable. There are no significant roadblocks to that combination of technologies. The problem becomes one of design and selection of materials to optimize, or at least maximize performance of the two integrated steps. A goal of the project was to investigate the effects of alloying elements on the performance of vanadium membranes with respect to hydrogen flux and fabricability. Vanadium was chosen as a compromise between performance and cost. It is clear that the vanadium alloys for this application can be produced, but the approach is not simple and the results inconsistent. For any future contracts, large single batches of alloy would be obtained and rolled with larger facilities to produce the most consistent thin foils possible. Brazing was identified as a very likely choice for sealing the membranes to structural components. As alloying was beneficial to hydrogen transport, it became important to identify where those alloying elements might be detrimental to brazing. Cataloging positive and negative alloying effects was a significant portion of the initial project work on vanadium alloying. A water gas shift catalyst with ceramic like structural characteristics was the second large goal of the project. Alumina was added as a component of conventional high temperature water gas shift iron oxide based catalysts. The catalysts contained Fe-Al-Cr-Cu-O and were synthesized by co-precipitation. A series of catalysts were prepared with 5 to 50 wt% Al2O3, with 8 wt% Cr2O3, 4 wt% CuO, and the balance Fe2O3. All of the catalysts were compared to a reference WGS catalyst (88 wt% FeOx, 8 wt% Cr2O3, and 4 wt% CuO) with no alumina. Alumina addition to conventional high temperature water gas shift catalysts at concentrations of approximately 15 wt% increased CO conversion rates and increase thermal stability. A series of high temperature water gas shift catalysts containing iron, chromia, and copper oxides were prepared with small amounts of added ceria in the system Fe-Cr-Cu-Ce-O. The catalysts were also tested kinetically under WGS conditions. 2-4 wt% ceria addition (at the expense of the iron oxide content) resulted in increased reaction rates (from 22-32% higher) compared to the reference catalyst. The project goal of a 10,000 liter per day WGS-membrane reactor was achieved by a device operating on coal derived syngas containing significant amounts of carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide. The membrane flux was equivalent to 52 scfh/ft2 based on a 600 psi syngas inlet pressure and corresponded to membranes costing $191 per square foot. Over 40 hours of iv exposure time to syngas has been achieved for a double membrane reactor. Two modules of the Chart reactor were tested under coal syngas for over 75 hours with a single module tested for 50 hours. The permeance values for the Chart membranes were similar to the REB reactor though total flux was reduced due to significantly thicker membranes. Overall testing of membrane reactors on coal derived syngas was over 115 hours for all reactors tested. Testing of the REB double membrane device exceeded 40 hours. Performance of the double membrane reactor has been similar to the results for the single reactor with good maintenance of flux even after these long exposures to hydrogen sulfide. Of special interest is that the flux is highest at the start of each e

  8. Recent progress in III-V based ferromagnetic semiconductors: Band structure, Fermi level, and tunneling transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ohya, Shinobu Nam Hai, Pham

    2014-03-15

    Spin-based electronics or spintronics is an emerging field, in which we try to utilize spin degrees of freedom as well as charge transport in materials and devices. While metal-based spin-devices, such as magnetic-field sensors and magnetoresistive random access memory using giant magnetoresistance and tunneling magnetoresistance, are already put to practical use, semiconductor-based spintronics has greater potential for expansion because of good compatibility with existing semiconductor technology. Many semiconductor-based spintronics devices with useful functionalities have been proposed and explored so far. To realize those devices and functionalities, we definitely need appropriate materials which have both the properties of semiconductors and ferromagnets. Ferromagnetic semiconductors (FMSs), which are alloy semiconductors containing magnetic atoms such as Mn and Fe, are one of the most promising classes of materials for this purpose and thus have been intensively studied for the past two decades. Here, we review the recent progress in the studies of the most prototypical III-V based FMS, p-type (GaMn)As and its heterostructures with focus on tunneling transport, Fermi level, and bandstructure. Furthermore, we cover the properties of a new n-type FMS, (In,Fe)As, which shows electron-induced ferromagnetism. These FMS materials having zinc-blende crystal structure show excellent compatibility with well-developed III-V heterostructures and devices.

  9. Piloted methane/air jet flames : transport effects and aspects of scalar structure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpetis, Adionos N. (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Chen, J. Y. (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Barlow, Robert S.; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2005-02-01

    Previously unpublished results from multiscalar point measurements in the series of piloted CH{sub 4}/air jet flames [R.S. Barlow, J.H. Frank, Proc. Combust. Inst. 27 (1998) 1087-1095] are presented and analyzed. The emphasis is on features of the data that reveal the relative importance of molecular diffusion and turbulent transport in these flames. The complete series A-F is considered. This includes laminar, transitional, and turbulent flames spanning a range in Reynolds number from 1100 to 44,800. Results on conditional means of species mass fractions, the differential diffusion parameter, and the state of the water-gas shift reaction all show that there is an evolution in these flames from a scalar structure dominated by molecular diffusion to one dominated by turbulent transport. Long records of 6000 single-point samples at each of several selected locations in flame D are used to quantify the cross-stream (radial) dependence of conditional statistics of measured scalars. The cross-stream dependence of the conditional scalar dissipation is determined from 6000-shot, line-imaging measurements at selected locations. The cross-stream dependence of reactive scalars, which is most significant in the near field of the jet flame, is attributed to radial differences in both convective and local time scales of the flow. Results illustrate some potential limitations of common modeling assumptions when applied to laboratory-scale flames and, thus, provide a more complete context for interpretation of comparisons between experiments and model calculations.

  10. Piloted methane/air jet flames: Transport effects and aspects of scalar structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barlow, R.S.; Frank, J.H. [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551-0969 (United States); Karpetis, A.N. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 778453-3141 (United States); Chen, J.-Y. [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Previously unpublished results from multiscalar point measurements in the series of piloted CH{sub 4}/air jet flames [R.S. Barlow, J.H. Frank, Proc. Combust. Inst. 27 (1998) 1087-1095] are presented and analyzed. The emphasis is on features of the data that reveal the relative importance of molecular diffusion and turbulent transport in these flames. The complete series A-F is considered. This includes laminar, transitional, and turbulent flames spanning a range in Reynolds number from 1100 to 44,800. Results on conditional means of species mass fractions, the differential diffusion parameter, and the state of the water-gas shift reaction all show that there is an evolution in these flames from a scalar structure dominated by molecular diffusion to one dominated by turbulent transport. Long records of 6000 single-point samples at each of several selected locations in flame D are used to quantify the cross-stream (radial) dependence of conditional statistics of measured scalars. The cross-stream dependence of the conditional scalar dissipation is determined from 6000-shot, line-imaging measurements at selected locations. The cross-stream dependence of reactive scalars, which is most significant in the near field of the jet flame, is attributed to radial differences in both convective and local time scales of the flow. Results illustrate some potential limitations of common modeling assumptions when applied to laboratory-scale flames and, thus, provide a more complete context for interpretation of comparisons between experiments and model calculations.

  11. Structures for attaching or sealing a space between components having different coefficients or rates of thermal expansion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corman, Gregory Scot; Dean, Anthony John; Tognarelli, Leonardo; Pecchioli, Mario

    2005-06-28

    A structure for attaching together or sealing a space between a first component and a second component that have different rates or amounts of dimensional change upon being exposed to temperatures other than ambient temperature. The structure comprises a first attachment structure associated with the first component that slidably engages a second attachment structure associated with the second component, thereby allowing for an independent floating movement of the second component relative to the first component. The structure can comprise split rings, laminar rings, or multiple split rings.

  12. Beta (?) tungsten thin films: Structure, electron transport, and giant spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Qiang; Chen, Wenzhe; Xiao, Gang

    2015-05-04

    We use a simple magnetron sputtering process to fabricate beta (?) tungsten thin films, which are capable of generating giant spin Hall effect. As-deposited thin films are always in the metastable ?-W phase from 3.0 to 26.7?nm. The ?-W phase remains intact below a critical thickness of 22.1?nm even after magnetic thermal annealing at 280?°C, which is required to induce perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in a layered structure of ?-W/Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}B{sub 20}/MgO. Intensive annealing transforms the thicker films (>22.1?nm) into the stable ?-W phase. We analyze the structure and grain size of both ?- and ?-W thin films. Electron transport in terms of resistivity and normal Hall effect is studied over a broad temperature range of 10?K to at least 300?K on all samples. Very low switching current densities are achieved in ?-W/Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}B{sub 20}/MgO with PMA. These basic properties reveal useful behaviors in ?-W thin films, making them technologically promising for spintronic magnetic random access memories and spin-logic devices.

  13. Communication: Unusual structure and transport in ionic liquid-hexane mixtures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liang, Min; Khatun, Sufia; Castner, Edward W.

    2015-03-28

    Ionic liquids having a sufficiently amphiphilic cation can dissolve large volume fractions of alkanes, leading to mixtures with intriguing properties on molecular length scales. The trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium cation paired with the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide anion provides an ionic liquid that can dissolve large mole fractions of hexane. We present experimental results on mixtures of n-C6D14 with this ionic liquid. High- energy X-ray scattering studies reveal a persistence of the characteristic features of ionic liquid structure even for 80% dilution with n-C6D14. NMR self-diffusion results reveal decidedly non-hydrodynamic behavior where the self-diffusion of the neutral, non-polar n-C6D14 is on average a factor of 21more »times faster than for the cation. Exploitation of the unique structural and transport properties of these mixtures may lead to new opportunities for designer solvents for enhanced chemical reactivity and interface science.« less

  14. Structural analysis in support of the waterborne transport of radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.J.

    1996-08-01

    The safety of the transportation of radioactive materials by road and rail has been well studied and documented. However, the safety of waterborne transportation has received much less attention. Recent highly visible waterborne transportation campaigns have led to DOE and IAEA to focus attention on the safety of this transportation mode. In response, Sandia National Laboratories is conducting a program to establish a method to determine the safety of these shipments. As part of that program the mechanics involved in ship-to-ship collisions are being evaluated to determine the loadings imparted to radioactive material transportation packages during these collisions. This paper will report on the results of these evaluations.

  15. Reactive sputter deposition of pyrite structure transition metal disulfide thin films: Microstructure, transport, and magnetism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baruth, A.; Manno, M.; Narasimhan, D.; Shankar, A.; Zhang, X.; Johnson, M.; Aydil, E. S.; Leighton, C. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Transition metal disulfides crystallizing in the pyrite structure (e.g., TMS{sub 2}, with TM = Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu) are a class of materials that display a remarkably diverse array of functional properties. These properties include highly spin-polarized ferromagnetism (in Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}S{sub 2}), superconductivity (in CuS{sub 2}), an antiferromagnetic Mott insulating ground state (in NiS{sub 2}), and semiconduction with close to optimal parameters for solar absorber applications (in FeS{sub 2}). Exploitation of these properties in heterostructured devices requires the development of reliable and reproducible methods for the deposition of high quality pyrite structure thin films. In this manuscript, we report on the suitability of reactive sputter deposition from metallic targets in an Ar/H{sub 2}S environment as a method to achieve exactly this. Optimization of deposition temperature, Ar/H{sub 2}S pressure ratio, and total working gas pressure, assisted by plasma optical emission spectroscopy, reveals significant windows over which deposition of single-phase, polycrystalline, low roughness pyrite films can be achieved. This is illustrated for the test cases of the ferromagnetic metal CoS{sub 2} and the diamagnetic semiconductor FeS{sub 2}, for which detailed magnetic and transport characterization are provided. The results indicate significant improvements over alternative deposition techniques such as ex situ sulfidation of metal films, opening up exciting possibilities for all-sulfide heterostructured devices. In particular, in the FeS{sub 2} case it is suggested that fine-tuning of the sputtering conditions provides a potential means to manipulate doping levels and conduction mechanisms, critical issues in solar cell applications. Parenthetically, we note that conditions for synthesis of phase-pure monosulfides and thiospinels are also identified.

  16. Structural fluctuations and quantum transport through DNA molecular wires: a combined molecular dynamics and model Hamiltonian approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Gutierrez; R. Caetano; P. B. Woiczikowski; T. Kubar; M. Elstner; G. Cuniberti

    2009-10-02

    Charge transport through a short DNA oligomer (Dickerson dodecamer) in presence of structural fluctuations is investigated using a hybrid computational methodology based on a combination of quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations and classical molecular dynamics simulations with a model Hamiltonian approach. Based on a fragment orbital description, the DNA electronic structure can be coarse-grained in a very efficient way. The influence of dynamical fluctuations arising either from the solvent fluctuations or from base-pair vibrational modes can be taken into account in a straightforward way through time series of the effective DNA electronic parameters, evaluated at snapshots along the MD trajectory. We show that charge transport can be promoted through the coupling to solvent fluctuations, which gate the onsite energies along the DNA wire.

  17. The dynamical structure of the MEO region: long-term stability, chaos, and transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daquin, Jerome; Deleflie, Florent; Alessi, Elisa Maria; Valsecchi, Giovanni B; Rossi, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    It has long been suspected that the Global Navigation Satellite Systems exist in a background of complex resonances and chaotic motion; yet, the precise dynamical character of these phenomena remains elusive. Recent studies have shown that the occurrence and nature of the resonances driving these dynamics depend chiefly on the frequencies of nodal and apsidal precession and the rate of regression of the Moon's nodes. Woven throughout the inclination and eccentricity phase space is an exceedingly complicated web-like structure of lunisolar secular resonances, which become particularly dense near the inclinations of the navigation satellite orbits. A clear picture of the physical significance of these resonances is of considerable practical interest for the design of disposal strategies for the four constellations. Here we present analytical and semi-analytical models that accurately reflect the true nature of the resonant interactions, and trace the topological organization of the manifolds on which the chaoti...

  18. Influence of substrate temperature and deposition rate on the structure of erbium films deposited on glass and a -C substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savaloni, H.; Player, M.A.; Gu, E.; Marr, G.V. )

    1992-01-01

    The structure of erbium films of 600 nm thickness deposited onto carbon ({ital a}-C) and glass substrates at 0.55 and 2.5 nm/s deposition rates for varying substrate temperatures is investigated. The cross section and surface structures are examined by electron microscope. Energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction is utilized for the structure analysis of these films. Results are compared with the results presented in H. Savaloni, M. A. Player, E. Gu, and G. V. Marr (to be published), for erbium films on molybdenum substrates. It is found that to produce films with strong preferred orientation on glass substrates low deposition rate (0.55 nm/s) is favorable. This is opposite to erbium on molybdenum substrates. The grain size of erbium films produced at higher deposition rate is much larger than those at lower deposition rate. The structure of thin films has implications for performance of multilayer reflectors, and preferred orientation may have other applications to x-ray instrumentation.

  19. Structure-function Studies of Nucleocytoplasmic Transport of Retroviral Genomic RNA by mRNA Export Factor TAP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Teplova; L Wohlbold; N Khin; E Izaurralde; D Patel

    2011-12-31

    mRNA export is mediated by the TAP-p15 heterodimer, which belongs to the family of NTF2-like export receptors. TAP-p15 heterodimers also bind to the constitutive transport element (CTE) present in simian type D retroviral RNAs, and they mediate the export of viral unspliced RNAs to the host cytoplasm. We have solved the crystal structure of the RNA recognition and leucine-rich repeat motifs of TAP bound to one symmetrical half of the CTE RNA. L-shaped conformations of protein and RNA are involved in a mutual molecular embrace on complex formation. We have monitored the impact of structure-guided mutations on binding affinities in vitro and transport assays in vivo. Our studies define the principles by which CTE RNA subverts the mRNA export receptor TAP, thereby facilitating the nuclear export of viral genomic RNAs, and, more generally, provide insights on cargo RNA recognition by mRNA export receptors.

  20. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 91, 205203 (2015) Composition-dependent structural and transport properties of amorphous transparent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medvedeva, Julia E.

    2015-01-01

    , USA 2 Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois correlations in the formation of amorphous oxides and their transport properties. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.91

  1. Rate Effects for Mixed-Mode Fracture of Plastically Deforming, Adhesively-Bonded Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thouless, Michael

    from a commercial adhesive and a dual-phase steel has been studied under different rates. Since mixed- mode fracture occurs along the interface between the steel and adhesive, the cohesive- parameters

  2. The development of a high speed solution for the evaluation of track structure Monte Carlo electron transport problems using field programmable gate arrays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasciak, Alexander Samuel

    2009-05-15

    There are two principal techniques for performing Monte Carlo electron transport computations. The first, and least common, is the full track-structure method. This method individually models all physical electron interactions ...

  3. Transporting particulate material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldred, Derek Leslie (North Hollywood, CA); Rader, Jeffrey A. (North Hollywood, CA); Saunders, Timothy W. (North Hollywood, CA)

    2011-08-30

    A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

  4. Ocean heat transport in a Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA): structure, mechanisms, and impacts on climate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yangxing

    2009-05-15

    Channel????????????????????????......... 112 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Importance of Ocean Heat Transport It has long been known that the sun distributes energy unequaly over the globe. Absorbed incoming shortwave radiation... stream_source_info ZHENG-DISSERTATION.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 190115 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ZHENG-DISSERTATION.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 OCEAN...

  5. Cosmic ray transport in heliospheric magnetic structures. I. Modeling background solar wind using the CRONOS magnetohydrodynamic code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiengarten, T.; Kleimann, J.; Fichtner, H.; Kühl, P.; Kopp, A.; Heber, B.; Kissmann, R.

    2014-06-10

    The transport of energetic particles such as cosmic rays is governed by the properties of the plasma being traversed. While these properties are rather poorly known for galactic and interstellar plasmas due to the lack of in situ measurements, the heliospheric plasma environment has been probed by spacecraft for decades and provides a unique opportunity for testing transport theories. Of particular interest for the three-dimensional (3D) heliospheric transport of energetic particles are structures such as corotating interaction regions, which, due to strongly enhanced magnetic field strengths, turbulence, and associated shocks, can act as diffusion barriers on the one hand, but also as accelerators of low energy CRs on the other hand as well. In a two-fold series of papers, we investigate these effects by modeling inner-heliospheric solar wind conditions with a numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) setup (this paper), which will serve as an input to a transport code employing a stochastic differential equation approach (second paper). In this first paper, we present results from 3D MHD simulations with our code CRONOS: for validation purposes we use analytic boundary conditions and compare with similar work by Pizzo. For a more realistic modeling of solar wind conditions, boundary conditions derived from synoptic magnetograms via the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model are utilized, where the potential field modeling is performed with a finite-difference approach in contrast to the traditional spherical harmonics expansion often utilized in the WSA model. Our results are validated by comparing with multi-spacecraft data for ecliptical (STEREO-A/B) and out-of-ecliptic (Ulysses) regions.

  6. The Nuclear Structure and Associated Electron Capture Rates on Odd-Z Nucleus $^{51}$V in Stellar Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muneeb-Ur Rahman; Jameel-Un Nabi

    2014-08-20

    The Gamow-Teller strength distribution function, B(GT), for the odd Z parent $^{51}$V, $N-Z$ =5, up to 30 MeV of excitation energy in the daughter $^{51}$Ti is calculated in the domain of proton-neutron Quasiparticle Random Phase Approximation (pn-QRPA) theory. The pn-QRPA results are compared against other theoretical calculations, (n, p) and high resolution (d, $^{2}$He) reaction experiments. For the case of (d, $^{2}$He) reaction the calibration was performed for $0\\leq E_{j} \\leq 5.0$ MeV, where the authors stressed that within this excitation energy range the $\\Delta L = 0$ transition strength can be extracted with high accuracy for $^{51}$V. Within this energy range the current pn-QRPA total B(GT) strength 0.75 is in good agreement with the (d, $^{2}$He) experiment's total strength of 0.9 $\\pm$ 0.1. The pn-QRPA calculated Gamow-Teller centroid at 4.20 MeV in daughter $^{51}$Ti is also in good agreement with high resolution (d, $^{2}$He) experiment which placed the Gamow-Teller centroid at 4.1 $\\pm$ 0.4 MeV in daughter $^{51}$Ti. The low energy detailed Gamow-Teller structure and Gamow-Teller centroid play a sumptuous role in associated weak decay rates and consequently affect the stellar dynamics. The stellar weak rates are sensitive to the location and structure of these low-lying states in daughter $^{51}$Ti. The calculated electron capture rates on $^{51}$V in stellar matter are also in good agreement with the large scale shell model rates.

  7. The effect of in-situ noble metal chemical addition on crack growth rate behavior of structural materials in 288 C water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andresen, P.L.; Angeliu, T.

    1996-10-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC), especially in existing boiling water reactor (BVM) components, is most effectively accomplished by reducing the corrosion potential. This was successfully demonstrated by adding hydrogen to BNM water, which reduced oxidant concentration and corrosion potential by recombining with the radiolytically formed oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. However, reduction in the corrosion potential for some vessel internals is difficult, and others require high hydrogen addition rates, which results in an increase in the main steam radiation level from volatile N{sup 16}. Noble metal electrocatalysis provides a unique opportunity to efficiently achieve a dramatic reduction in corrosion potential and SCC in BWRs, by catalytically reacting all oxidants that diffuse to a (catalytic) metal surface with hydrogen. There are many techniques for creating catalytic surfaces, including alloying with noble metals or applying noble metal alloy powders to existing BWR components by thermal spraying or weld cladding. A novel system-wide approach for producing catalytic surfaces on all wetted components has been developed which employs the reactor coolant water as the medium of transport. This approach is termed in-situ noble metal chemical addition (NMCA), and has been successfully used in extensive laboratory tests to coat a wide range of pre-oxidized structural materials. In turn, these specimens have maintained catalytic response in long term, cyclic exposures to extremes in dissolved gases, impurity levels, pH, flow rate, temperature, straining, etc. With stoichiometric excess H{sub 2}, the corrosion potential drops dramatically and crack initiation and growth are greatly reduced, even at high O{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels. Without excess H{sub 2} (i.e., in normal BWR water chemistry), noble metals do not increase the corrosion potential or SCC.

  8. Exploring a new interaction between dark matter and dark energy using the growth rate of structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richarte, Martín G

    2015-01-01

    We present a phenomenological interaction with a scale factor power law form which leads to the appearance of two kinds of perturbed terms, a scale factor spatial variation along with perturbed Hubble expansion rate. We study both the background and the perturbation evolution within the parametrized post-Friedmann scheme, obtaining that the exchange of energy-momentum can flow from dark energy to dark matter in order to keep dark energy and dark matter densities well defined at all times. We combine several measures of the cosmic microwave background (WMAP9+Planck) data, baryon acoustic oscillation measurements, redshift-space distortion data, JLA sample of supernovae, and Hubble constant for constraining the coupling constant and the exponent provided both parametrized the interaction itself. The joint analysis of ${\\rm Planck+WMAP9+BAO}$ ${\\rm +RSD+JLA+HST}$ data seems to favor large coupling constant, $\\xi_c = 0.34403427_{- 0.18907353}^{+ 0.14430125}$ at 1 $\\sigma$ level, and prefers a power law interactio...

  9. The influence of selected containment structures on debris dispersal and transport following high pressure melt ejection from the reactor vessel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilch, M.; Tarbell, W.W.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1988-09-01

    High pressure expulsion of molten core debris from the reactor pressure vessel may result in dispersal of the debris from the reactor cavity. In most plants, the cavity exits into the containment such that the debris impinges on structures. Retention of the debris on the structures may affect the further transport of the debris throughout the containment. Two tests were done with scaled structural shapes placed at the exit of 1:10 linear scale models of the Zion cavity. The results show that the debris does not adhere significantly to structures. The lack of retention is attributed to splashing from the surface and reentrainment in the gas flowing over the surface. These processes are shown to be applicable to reactor scale. A third experiment was done to simulate the annular gap between the reactor vessel and cavity wall. Debris collection showed that the fraction of debris exiting through the gap was greater than the gap-to-total flow area ratio. Film records indicate that dispersal was primarily by entrainment of the molten debris in the cavity. 29 refs., 36 figs., 11 tabs.

  10. Structure and function of subsurface microbial communities affecting radionuclide transport and bio-immobilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stucki, Joseph William

    2013-05-13

    The purpose of this study was to provide comparative information regarding the changes in clay structure that occur due to biotic or abiotic reduction, as probed by variable-temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  11. The Coal Transportation Rate Database

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan3 November18.5 385.5Dry Production (Million CubicThe Coal

  12. Rates and Mechanisms of Oil Shale Pyrolysis: A Chemical Structure Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, Thomas; Pugmire, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Three pristine Utah Green River oil shale samples were obtained and used for analysis by the combined research groups at the University of Utah and Brigham Young University. Oil shale samples were first demineralized and the separated kerogen and extracted bitumen samples were then studied by a host of techniques including high resolution liquid-state carbon-13 NMR, solid-state magic angle sample spinning 13C NMR, GC/MS, FTIR, and pyrolysis. Bitumen was extracted from the shale using methanol/dichloromethane and analyzed using high resolution 13C NMR liquid state spectroscopy, showing carbon aromaticities of 7 to 11%. The three parent shales and the demineralized kerogens were each analyzed with solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. Carbon aromaticity of the kerogen was 23-24%, with 10-12 aromatic carbons per cluster. Crushed samples of Green River oil shale and its kerogen extract were pyrolyzed at heating rates from 1 to 10 K/min at pressures of 1 and 40 bar and temperatures up to 1000°C. The transient pyrolysis data were fit with a first-order model and a Distributed Activation Energy Model (DAEM). The demineralized kerogen was pyrolyzed at 10 K/min in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure at temperatures up to 525°C, and the pyrolysis products (light gas, tar, and char) were analyzed using 13C NMR, GC/MS, and FTIR. Details of the kerogen pyrolysis have been modeled by a modified version of the chemical percolation devolatilization (CPD) model that has been widely used to model coal combustion/pyrolysis. This refined CPD model has been successful in predicting the char, tar, and gas yields of the three shale samples during pyrolysis. This set of experiments and associated modeling represents the most sophisticated and complete analysis available for a given set of oil shale samples.

  13. Exploring a new interaction between dark matter and dark energy using the growth rate of structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín G. Richarte; Lixin Xu

    2015-06-08

    We present a phenomenological interaction with a scale factor power law form which leads to the appearance of two kinds of perturbed terms, a scale factor spatial variation along with perturbed Hubble expansion rate. We study both the background and the perturbation evolution within the parametrized post-Friedmann scheme, obtaining that the exchange of energy-momentum can flow from dark energy to dark matter in order to keep dark energy and dark matter densities well defined at all times. We combine several measures of the cosmic microwave background (WMAP9+Planck) data, baryon acoustic oscillation measurements, redshift-space distortion data, JLA sample of supernovae, and Hubble constant for constraining the coupling constant and the exponent provided both parametrized the interaction itself. The joint analysis of ${\\rm Planck+WMAP9+BAO}$ ${\\rm +RSD+JLA+HST}$ data seems to favor large coupling constant, $\\xi_c = 0.34403427_{- 0.18907353}^{+ 0.14430125}$ at 1 $\\sigma$ level, and prefers a power law interaction with a negative exponent, thus $\\beta= -0.50863232_{- 0.40923857}^{+ 0.48424166}$ at 1 $\\sigma$ level. The CMB temperature power spectrum indicates that a large coupling constant produces a shift of the acoustic peaks and affects their amplitudes at lower multipoles. In addition, a larger $\\beta$ exponent generates a shift of the acoustic peaks, pointing a clear deviation with respect to the concordance model. The matter power spectrum are sensitive to the variation of the coupling constant and the $\\beta$ exponent. In this context, the interaction alters the scale of matter and radiation equality and pushes it away from the present era, which in turn generates a shift of the turnover point toward to smaller scale.

  14. Electricity Rate Structures and the Economics of Solar PV: Could Mandatory Time-of-Use Rates Undermine California’s Solar Photovoltaic Subsidies?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2007-01-01

    paper presented at the American Solar Energy Society 2004and the Economics of Solar PV: Could Mandatory Time-of-Rates Undermine California’s Solar Photovoltaic Subsidies?

  15. Transport Equations Thomas Hillen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hillen, Thomas

    Transport Equations Thomas Hillen supported by NSERC University of Alberta, Edmonton Transport V , V compact and symmetric. Transport Equations ­ p.2/33 #12;Directed Movement The equation pt(t, x of v. Transport Equations ­ p.3/33 #12;With Directional Changes µ: turning rate. T(v, v ): probability

  16. Decoupling charge transport from the structural dynamics in room temperature ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, Phillip; Agapov, Alexander L; Kisliuk, Alexander; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng; Novikov, Vladimir; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2011-01-01

    Light scattering and dielectric spectroscopy measurements were performed on the room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) [C4mim][NTf2] in a broad temperature and frequency range. Ionic conductivity was used to estimate self-diffusion of ions, while light scattering was used to study structural relaxation. We demonstrate that the ionic diffusion decouples from the structural relaxation process as the temperature of the sample decreases toward Tg. The strength of the decoupling appears to be significantly lower than that expected for a supercooled liquid of similar fragility. The structural relaxation process in the RTIL follows well the high-temperature mode coupling theory (MCT) scenario. Using the MCT analysis we estimated the dynamic crossover temperature in [C4mim][NTf2] to be Tc 225 5 K. However, our analysis reveals no sign of the dynamic crossover in the ionic diffusion process.

  17. Non-Equilbrium Chalcogen Concentrations in Silicon: Physical Structure, Electronic Transport, and Photovoltaic Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazur, Eric

    , and Photovoltaic Potential A thesis presented by Mark Thomas Winkler to The Department of Physics in partial, and Photovoltaic Potential Eric Mazur Mark Winkler Abstract This thesis explores the structure and properties presence of an impurity band and its relevance to photovoltaics. The investigations that we report here

  18. Effects of confinement on water structure and dynamics and on proton transport: a molecular simulation study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirunsit, Pussana

    2009-05-15

    constant at 1g/cc. Results at 298 K show the formation of a well-ordered structure constituted by water layers parallel to the graphite surfaces. The water molecules in the layers in contact with the surface have a tendency to orient their dipole parallel...

  19. Transportation Conference Speakers - 4 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Laboratory experiments were performed to study and improve longshore sediment transport rate predictions. Measured total longshore transport in the laboratory was approximately three times greater for plunging breakers than spilling breakers. Three...

  20. Ferrocarriles nacionales de Mexico: the existing rate structure for grain/soybean shipments and likely effect on freight rates as a result of railroad privatization in Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neyer, David McAlister

    1994-01-01

    The government owned railway monopoly in Mexico, Ferrocarriles Nacionales de Mexico (FNM), is undergoing a series of reforms designed to create a market orientated railroad company. Railroad freight rates are being deregulated ...

  1. The effect of cooling rate during rapid solidification on the structure and texture of NiTi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedraza, A.J.; Godbole, M.J.; Kenik, E.A.; Pedraza, D.F.; Lowndes, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been conducted on the effects of increasing cooling rate during rapid solidification of NiTi upon the phases that are produced. The hammer and anvil rapid solidification technique and laser melting with a nanosecond excimer laser were used, which allow the cooling rate to be varied by three to four orders of magnitude. Although 1/3 (110) superlattice reflections are seen in the selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns of the splat quenched (SQ) specimens, x-ray diffraction analyses show the presence of only B2 phase and martensite. On the other hand, laser treatment (LT) of the specimens produces a layer that has a Ll/sub 0/ structure with a slight monoclinic distortion. This phase can be envisaged as a small distortion of a B2 unit cell with a volume per atom approx.3.3% lower than the equilibrium B2 phase. Also martensite is present in the layer. SQ alloys exhibited a marked (200) texture due to columnar growth opposite to the direction of heat extraction, while LT produces epitaxial regrowth of the melted layer. No substantial disordering is obtained in NiTi rapidly solidified alloys.

  2. Isolation, folding and structural investigations of the amino acid transporter OEP16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, Da Qun; Zook, James; Klewer, Douglas A.; Nieman, Ronald A.; Soll, J.; Fromme, Petra

    2011-12-01

    Membrane proteins compose more than 30% of all proteins in the living cell. However, many membrane proteins have low abundance in the cell and cannot be isolated from natural sources in concentrations suitable for structure analysis. The overexpression, reconstitution, and stabilization of membrane proteins are complex and remain a formidable challenge in membrane protein characterization. Here we describe a novel, in vitro folding procedure for a cation-selective channel protein, the outer envelope membrane protein 16 (OEP16) of pea chloroplast, overexpressed in Escherichia coli in the form of inclusion bodies. The protein is purified and then folded with detergent on a Ni-NTA affinity column. Final concentrations of reconstituted OEP16 of up to 24 mg/ml have been achieved, which provides samples that are sufficient for structural studies by NMR and crystallography. Reconstitution of OEP16 in detergent micelles was monitored by circular dichroism, fluorescence, and NMR spectroscopy. Tryptophan fluorescence spectra of heterologous expressed OEP16 in micelles are similar to spectra of functionally active OEP16 in liposomes, which indicates folding of the membrane protein in detergent micelles. CD spectroscopy studies demonstrate a folded protein consisting primarily of a-helices. 15N-HSQC NMR spectra also provide evidence for a folded protein. We present here a convenient, effective and quantitative method to screen large numbers of conditions for optimal protein stability by using microdialysis chambers in combination with fluorescence spectroscopy. Recent collection of multidimensional NMR data at 500, 600 and 800 MHz demonstrated that the protein is suitable for structure determination by NMR and stable for weeks during data collection.

  3. Structure of ABC Transporter MsbA in Complex with ATP Vi and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect PhotovoltaicsStructure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian

  4. Structure of a Putative Metal-Chelate Type ABC Transporter: An

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect PhotovoltaicsStructure and Receptor Specificity ofHumanInward-facing

  5. Structure and transport of aqueous electrolytes: From simple halides to radionuclide ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartkamp, Remco, E-mail: hartkamp@mit.edu; Coasne, Benoit, E-mail: benoit.coasne@enscm.fr [Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier, CNRS (UMR 5253), Université Montpellier 2, ENSCM, 8 rue de l’Ecole Normale, 34296 Montpellier Cedex 05 (France); MultiScale Material Science for Energy and Environment, CNRS/MIT (UMI 3466), Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-09-28

    Molecular simulations are used to compare the structure and dynamics of conventional and radioactive aqueous electrolytes: chloride solutions with sodium, potassium, cesium, calcium, and strontium. The study of Cs{sup +} and Sr{sup 2+} is important because these radioactive ions can be extremely harmful and are often confused by living organisms for K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}, respectively. Na{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, and Sr{sup 2+} are strongly bonded to their hydration shell because of their large charge density. We find that the water molecules in the first hydration shell around Na{sup +} form hydrogen bonds between each other, whereas molecules in the first hydration shell around Ca{sup 2+} and Sr{sup 2+} predominantly form hydrogen bonds with water molecules in the second shell. In contrast to these three ions, K{sup +} and Cs{sup +} have low charge densities so that they are weakly bonded to their hydration shell. Overall, the structural differences between Ca{sup 2+} and Sr{sup 2+} are small, but the difference between their coordination numbers relative to their surface areas could potentially be used to separate these ions. Moreover, the different decays of the velocity-autocorrelation functions corresponding to these ions indicates that the difference in mass could be used to separate these cations. In this work, we also propose a new definition of the pairing time that is easy to calculate and of physical significance regardless of the problem at hand.

  6. Structural and transport properties of Nafion in hydrobromic-acid solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusoglu, A; Cho, KT; Prato, RA; Weber, AZ

    2013-12-01

    Proton-exchange membranes are key solid-state ion carriers in many relevant energy technologies including flow batteries, fuel cells, and solar-fuel generators. In many of these systems, the membranes are in contact with electrolyte solutions. In this paper, we focus on the impact of different HBr, a flow-battery and exemplary acid electrolyte, external concentrations on the conductivity of Nafion, a perfluorosulfonic acid membrane that is commonly used in many energy-related applications. The peak and then decrease in conductivity is correlated with measured changes in the water and HBr content within the membrane. In addition, small-angle x-ray scattering is used to probe the nanostructure to correlate how the interactions of the bromide ion with the fixed sulfonic-acid sites impact conductivity and hydrophilic domain distance. It is also shown that membrane pretreatment has a large impact on the underlying structure/function relationship. The obtained data and results are useful for delineation of optimal operating regimes for flow batteries and similar technologies as well as in understanding underlying structure/function relationships of ionomers in electrolyte solutions. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Structure of Micro-instabilities in Tokamak Plasmas: Stiff Transport or Plasma Eruptions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickinson, D; Skipp, J M; Wilson, H R

    2014-01-01

    Solutions to a model 2D eigenmode equation describing micro-instabilities in tokamak plasmas are presented that demonstrate a sensitivity of the mode structure and stability to plasma profiles. In narrow regions of parameter space, with special plasma profiles, a maximally unstable mode is found that balloons on the outboard side of the tokamak. This corresponds to the conventional picture of a ballooning mode. However, for most profiles this mode cannot exist and instead a more stable mode is found that balloons closer to the top or bottom of the plasma. Good quantitative agreement with a 1D ballooning analysis is found provided the constraints associated with higher order profile effects, often neglected, are taken into account. A sudden transition from this general mode to the more unstable ballooning mode can occur for a critical flow shear, providing a candidate model for why some experiments observe small plasma eruptions (Edge Localised Modes, or ELMs) in place of large Type I ELMs.

  8. Electricity Rate Structures and the Economics of Solar PV: Could Mandatory Time-of-Use Rates Undermine California’s Solar Photovoltaic Subsidies?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2007-01-01

    residential customers in California are on ?at-rate tari?s that charge the same price for electricityelectricity prices that PG&E’s larger residential users face are well out of the norm both nationwide and historically in California.

  9. Effects of q-profile structure on turbulence spreading: A fluctuation intensity transport analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, S.; Kwon, J. M.; Diamond, P. H.; Hahm, T. S.

    2014-09-15

    This paper studies effects of q-profile structure on turbulence spreading. It reports results of numerical experiments using global gyrokinetic simulations. We examine propagation of turbulence, triggered by an identical linear instability in a source region, into an adjacent, linearly stable region with variable q-profile. The numerical experiments are designed so as to separate the physics of turbulence spreading from that of linear stability. The strength of turbulence spreading is measured by the penetration depth of turbulence. Dynamics of spreading are elucidated by fluctuation intensity balance analysis, using a model intensity evolution equation which retains nonlinear diffusion and damping, and linear growth. It is found that turbulence spreading is strongly affected by magnetic shear s, but is hardly altered by the safety factor q itself. There is an optimal range of modest magnetic shear which maximizes turbulence spreading. For high to modest shear values, the spreading is enhanced by the increase of the mode correlation length with decreasing magnetic shear. However, the efficiency of spreading drops for sufficiently low magnetic shear even though the mode correlation length is comparable to that for the case of optimal magnetic shear. The reduction of spreading is attributed to the increase in time required for the requisite nonlinear mode-mode interactions. The effect of increased interaction time dominates that of increased mode correlation length. Our findings of the reduction of spreading and the increase in interaction time at weak magnetic shear are consistent with the well-known benefit of weak or reversed magnetic shear for core confinement enhancement. Weak shear is shown to promote locality, as well as stability.

  10. Exact analytical solution of the linear structure growth rate in {Lambda}CDM cosmology and its cosmological applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Pengjie [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Science, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai, China, 200030 (China)

    2011-03-15

    We derive the exact analytical solution of the linear structure growth rate in {Lambda}CDM cosmology with flat or curved geometry, under the Newtonian gauge. Unlike the well known solution under the Newtonian limit [D. J. Heath, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 179, 351 (1977)], our solution takes all general relativistic corrections into account and is hence valid at both the sub- and superhorizon scales. With this exact solution, we evaluate cosmological impacts induced by these relativistic corrections. (1) General relativistic corrections alter the density growth from z=100 to z=0 by 10% at k=0.01 h/Mpc and the impact becomes stronger toward larger scales. We caution the readers that the overdensity is not gauge invariant and the above statement is restrained to the Newtonian gauge. (2) Relativistic corrections introduce a k{sup -2} scale dependence in the density fluctuation. It mimics a primordial non-Gaussianity of the local type with f{sub NL}{sup local{approx}}1. This systematical error may become non-negligible for future all sky deep galaxy surveys. (3) Cosmological simulations with box size greater than 1 Gpc are also affected by these relativistic corrections. We provide a postprocessing recipe to correct for these effects. (4) These relativistic corrections affect the redshift distortion. However, at redshifts and scales relevant to redshift distortion measurements, such effect is negligible.

  11. Nano-sized structured layered positive electrode materials to enable high energy density and high rate capability lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deng, Haixia; Belharouak, Ilias; Amine, Khalil

    2012-10-02

    Nano-sized structured dense and spherical layered positive active materials provide high energy density and high rate capability electrodes in lithium-ion batteries. Such materials are spherical second particles made from agglomerated primary particles that are Li.sub.1+.alpha.(Ni.sub.xCo.sub.yMn.sub.z).sub.1-tM.sub.tO.sub.2-dR.sub.d- , where M is selected from can be Al, Mg, Fe, Cu, Zn, Cr, Ag, Ca, Na, K, In, Ga, Ge, V, Mo, Nb, Si, Ti, Zr, or a mixture of any two or more thereof, R is selected from F, Cl, Br, I, H, S, N, or a mixture of any two or more thereof, and 0.ltoreq..alpha..ltoreq.0.50; 0

  12. Structural features and enhanced high-temperature oxygen ion transport in SrFe{sub 1-x}Ta{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markov, Alexey A.; Shalaeva, Elizaveta V.; Tyutyunnik, Alexander P.; Kuchin, Vasily V.; Patrakeev, Mikhail V.; Leonidov, Ilya A.; Kozhevnikov, Victor L.

    2013-01-15

    Structural features, oxygen non-stoichiometry and transport properties are studied in the oxide series SrFe{sub 1-x}Ta{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where x=0.2, 0.3 and 0.4. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy data evidence formation of the inhomogeneous materials at x=0.3 and 0.4, which include phase constituents with a cubic perovskite and a double perovskite structure types. The composition, the amount and the typical grain size of the phase inhomogeneities are shown to depend both on doping and oxygen content. The increased oxygen-ion conductivity is observed in oxygen depleted materials, which is explained by the increase in the amount of cubic perovskite-like phase and development of interfacial pathways favorable for enhanced oxygen ion transport. - Graphical abstract: The structural studies, oxygen content and conductivity measurements suggest that oxygen depletion from the double perovskite phase constituent of SrFe{sub 1-x}Ta{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}} for x>0.2 is accompanied by formation of pathways for fast ion transport. Black-Small-Square Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The double perovskite type regions are shown to exist in SrFe{sub 1-x}Ta{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The oxygen depletion is accompanied with phase separation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phase separation favors formation of pathways for enhanced oxygen ion transport.

  13. Conflicting structural and geochronological data from the Ibituruna quartz-syenite (SE Brazil): Effect of protracted "hot" orogeny and slow cooling rate?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cattin, Rodolphe

    Conflicting structural and geochronological data from the Ibituruna quartz-syenite (SE Brazil-Pb and 40Ar-39Ar geochronology Slow cooling rate SE-Brazil neoproterozoic orogeny The Ibituruna quartz-rock. Unexpectedly, geochronological data suggest a rather different conclusion. LA-ICP-MS and SHRIMP ages of zircons

  14. Removing Structural Disorder from Oriented TiO2 Nanotube Arrays: Reducing the Dimensionality of Transport and Recombination in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, K.; Vinzant, T. B.; Neale, N. R.; Frank, A. J.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the influence of morphological disorder, arising from bundling of nanotubes (NTs) and microcracks in films of oriented TiO{sub 2} NT arrays, on charge transport and recombination in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Capillary stress created during evaporation of liquids from the mesopores of dense TiO{sub 2} NT arrays was of sufficient magnitude to induce bundling and microcrack formation. The average lateral deflection of the NTs in the bundles increased with the surface tension of the liquids and with the film thicknesses. The supercritical CO{sub 2} drying technique was used to produce bundle-free and crack-free NT films. Charge transport and recombination properties of sensitized films were studied by frequency-resolved modulated photocurrent/photovoltage spectroscopies. Transport became significantly faster with decreased clustering of the NTs, indicating that bundling creates additional pathways via intertube contacts. Removing such contacts alters the transport mechanism from a combination of one and three dimensions to the expected one dimension and shortens the electron-transport pathway. Reducing intertube contacts also resulted in a lower density of surface recombination centers by minimizing distortion-induced surface defects in bundled NTs. A causal connection between transport and recombination is observed. The dye coverage was greater in the more aligned NT arrays, suggesting that reducing intertube contacts increases the internal surface area of the films accessible to dye molecules. The solar conversion efficiency and photocurrent density were highest for DSSCs incorporating films with more aligned NT arrays owing to an enhanced light-harvesting efficiency. Removing structural disorder from other materials and devices consisting of nominally one-dimensional architectures (e.g., nanowire arrays) should produce similar effects.

  15. Disorder-assisted quantum transport in suboptimal decoherence regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo Novo; Masoud Mohseni; Yasser Omar

    2015-03-27

    We investigate quantum transport in binary tree structures and in hypercubes for the disordered Frenkel-exciton Hamiltonian under pure dephasing noise. We compute the energy transport efficiency as a function of disorder and dephasing rates. We demonstrate that dephasing improves transport efficiency not only in the disordered case, but also in the ordered one. The maximal transport efficiency is obtained when the dephasing timescale matches the hopping timescale, which represent new examples of the Goldilocks principle at the quantum scale. Remarkably, we find that in weak dephasing regimes, away from optimal levels of environmental fluctuations, the average effect of increasing disorder is to improve the transport efficiency until an optimal value for disorder is reached. Our results suggest that rational design of the site energies statistical distributions could lead to better performances in transport systems at nanoscale when their natural environments are far from the optimal dephasing regime.

  16. The Structures of Distant Galaxies I: Galaxy Structures and the Merger Rate to z~3 in the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice; Sheena Rajgor; Robert Myers

    2007-11-15

    This paper begins a series in which we examine the structures of distant galaxies to directly determine the history of their formation modes. We start this series by examining the structures of z_F850LP structure using this image. These include: (1) The agreement of visual eye-ball classifications and non-parametric quantitative (CAS, Gini/M_20) methods; (2) How distant galaxy quantitative structures can vary as a function of rest-frame wavelength; and (3) The evolution of distant galaxy structures up to z~3. One of our major conclusions is that the majority of galaxies with z_850 10^10 M_0 undergo 4.3_+0.8^-0.8 major galaxy mergers at z 1.

  17. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, Harold E.

    2013-04-01

    Under current U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulation, it is not sufficient for used nuclear fuel (UNF) to simply maintain its integrity during the storage period, it must maintain its integrity in such a way that it can withstand the physical forces of handling and transportation associated with restaging the fuel and moving it to treatment or recycling facilities, or a geologic repository. Hence it is necessary to understand the performance characteristics of aged UNF cladding and ancillary components under loadings stemming from transport initiatives. Researchers would like to demonstrate that enough information, including experimental support and modeling and simulation capabilities, exists to establish a preliminary determination of UNF structural performance under normal conditions of transport (NCT). This research, development and demonstration (RD&D) plan describes a methodology, including development and use of analytical models, to evaluate loading and associated mechanical responses of UNF rods and key structural components. This methodology will be used to provide a preliminary assessment of the performance characteristics of UNF cladding and ancillary components under rail-related NCT loading. The methodology couples modeling and simulation and experimental efforts currently under way within the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC). The methodology will involve limited uncertainty quantification in the form of sensitivity evaluations focused around available fuel and ancillary fuel structure properties exclusively. The work includes collecting information via literature review, soliciting input/guidance from subject matter experts, performing computational analyses, planning experimental measurement and possible execution (depending on timing), and preparing a variety of supporting documents that will feed into and provide the basis for future initiatives. The methodology demonstration will focus on structural performance evaluation of Westinghouse WE 17×17 pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies with a discharge burnup range of 30-58 GWd/MTU (assembly average), loaded in a representative high-capacity (?32 fuel rod assemblies) transportation package. Evaluations will be performed for representative normal conditions of rail transport involving a rail conveyance capable of meeting the Association of American Railroads (AAR) S-2043 specification. UNF modeling is anticipated to be defined to the pellet-cladding level and take in to account influences associated with spacer grids, intermediate fluid mixers, and control components. The influence of common degradation issues such as ductile-to-brittle-transition will also be accounted for. All model development and analysis will be performed with commercially available software packages exclusively. Inputs and analyses will be completely documented, all supporting information will be traceable, and bases will be defendable so as to be most useful to the U.S. Department of Energy community and mission. The expected completion date is the end of fiscal year (FY) 2013.

  18. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics ofCustomer-Sited PV: A Study of Commercial Installations inCalifornia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2007-06-01

    We analyze the impact of retail rate design on the economics of grid-connected commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems in California. The analysis is based on 15-minute interval building load and PV production data for 24 commercial PV installations in California, spanning a diverse set of building load shapes and geographic locations. We derive the annual bill savings per kWh generated for each PV system, under each of 21 distinct retail rates currently offered by the five largest utilities in California. We identify and explain variation in the value of bill savings attributable to differences in the structure of demand and energy charges across rates, as well as variation attributable to other factors, such as the size of the PV system relative to building load, the specific shape of the PV production profile, and the customer load profile. We also identify the optimal rate for each customer, among those rates offered as alternatives to one another, and show how the decision is driven in large measure by the size of the PV system relative to building load. The findings reported here may be of value to regulators and utilities responsible for designing retail rates, as well as to customers and PV retailers who have a need to estimate the prospective bill savings of PV systems.

  19. co2-transport | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transport Cost Model FENETL CO2 Transport Cost Model About the model: This model was developed to estimate the cost of transporting a user-specified mass rate of CO2 by pipeline...

  20. Sustainable Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, Melvin

    2006-01-01

    THOUGHT PIECE Sustainable Transport by Melvin M. Webberwant to sustain any mode of transport only if we judge it todraconian in rejecting transport modes that have failed in

  1. The eects of spermine and spermidine on the structure of photosystem II proteins in relation to inhibition of electron transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpentier, Robert

    ) conjugated with small molecules such as phenolic acids, and (c) bound to various macromolecules cycle, chlorophyll degradation, and the rate of photosynthetic oxygen evolution [6^10]. While

  2. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 89, 032810 (2014) Density-based and transport-based core-periphery structures in networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Mason A.

    2014-01-01

    , United Kingdom (Received 31 October 2013; published 20 March 2014) Networks often possess mesoscale community structure, but numerous other types of mesoscale structures also exist. In this paper, we examine and edges), but it is now common to consider "mesoscale" structures such as communities [2]. Indeed

  3. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE THE TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .Sc. Center for Sustainable Mobility, Virginia Tech Transportation Institute 3500 Transportation ResearchD. Center for Sustainable Mobility, Virginia Tech Transportation Institute 3500 Transportation Research) NOx Emissions Testing Expanding MOBILE6 Rates to Accommodate High Speeds Sponsored By Houston Advanced

  4. Jet energy scale setting with "photon+Jet" events at LHC energies. Event rates, Pt structure of jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Bandourin; V. F. Konoplianikov; N. B. Skachkov

    2000-12-15

    In this paper the study of "photon+Jet" events is continued, aimed at jet energy scale setting and hadron calorimeter calibration at LHC energies. The event number distribution over Pt and pseudorapidity eta in the barrel region of the photon is presented. The features of "photon+Jet" events in CMS detector |eta|<1.4 are exposed. Pt structure of the region in the eta-phi space inside and beyond jet is also shown.

  5. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

  6. Thermoelastic study of nanolayered structures using time-resolved X-ray diffraction at high repetition rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navirian, H. A.; Schick, D. Leitenberger, W.; Bargheer, M.; Gaal, P.; Shayduk, R.

    2014-01-13

    We investigate the thermoelastic response of a nanolayered sample composed of a metallic SrRuO{sub 3} electrode sandwiched between a ferroelectric Pb(Zr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8})O{sub 3} film with negative thermal expansion and a SrTiO{sub 3} substrate. SrRuO{sub 3} is rapidly heated by fs-laser pulses with 208?kHz repetition rate. Diffraction of X-ray pulses derived from a synchrotron measures the transient out-of-plane lattice constant c of all three materials simultaneously from 120?ps to 5??s with a relative accuracy up to ?c/c?=?10{sup ?6}. The in-plane propagation of sound is essential for understanding the delayed out-of-plane compression of Pb(Zr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8})O{sub 3}.

  7. Think positively : the structural basis of cation-binding and coupling of the multidrug and toxic-compound Extrusion (MATE) transporter family

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Xiao

    2010-01-01

    plant homolog Nt- JAT1 transporting secondary metaboliteSecondary transport as an efficient membrane transport mechanism for plant secondary metabolites.of secondary metabolites. Curr. Opin. Plant Biol. 8, 301-

  8. ON THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL STRUCTURE OF THE MASS, METALLICITY, AND STAR FORMATION RATE SPACE FOR STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lara-Lopez, Maritza A.; Lopez-Sanchez, Angel R.; Hopkins, Andrew M., E-mail: mlopez@aao.gov.au [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia)

    2013-02-20

    We demonstrate that the space formed by the star formation rate (SFR), gas-phase metallicity (Z), and stellar mass (M {sub *}) can be reduced to a plane, as first proposed by Lara-Lopez et al. We study three different approaches to find the best representation of this 3D space, using a principal component analysis (PCA), a regression fit, and binning of the data. The PCA shows that this 3D space can be adequately represented in only two dimensions, i.e., a plane. We find that the plane that minimizes the {chi}{sup 2} for all variables, and hence provides the best representation of the data, corresponds to a regression fit to the stellar mass as a function of SFR and Z, M {sub *}= f(Z, SFR). We find that the distribution resulting from the median values in bins for our data gives the highest {chi}{sup 2}. We also show that the empirical calibrations to the oxygen abundance used to derive the Fundamental Metallicity Relation have important limitations, which contribute to the apparent inconsistencies. The main problem is that these empirical calibrations do not consider the ionization degree of the gas. Furthermore, the use of the N2 index to estimate oxygen abundances cannot be applied for 12 + log(O/H) {approx}> 8.8 because of the saturation of the [N II] {lambda}6584 line in the high-metallicity regime. Finally, we provide an update of the Fundamental Plane derived by Lara-Lopez et al.

  9. Structure, magnetic, and transport properties of epitaxial ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} films: An experimental and first-principles study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Chao; Li, Peng; Mi, Wenbo; Bai, Haili

    2014-06-07

    We investigated the structure, magnetic, and transport properties of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (ZFO) by both experimental and first-principles study. The epitaxial ZFO films prepared with various oxygen partial pressures show clear semiconducting behavior and room-temperature ferrimagnetism. A large magnetoresistance of ?21.2% was observed at 75?K. The room-temperature ferrimagnetism is induced by the cation disordering. The calculated results indicate that under cation disordering, the ZFO with various oxygen vacancies is a half-metal semiconductor with both possible positive and negative signs of the spin polarization, while ZFO with no oxygen vacancies is an insulator and can be acted as the spin filter layer in spintronic devises.

  10. Physical features of small disperse coal dust fraction transportation and structurization processes in iodine air filters of absorption type in ventilation systems at nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledenyov, Oleg P; Poltinin, P Ya; Fedorova, L I

    2012-01-01

    The research on the physical features of transportation and structurization processes by the air-dust aerosol in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal adsorbent granules in an air filter of the adsorption type in the heating ventilation and cooling (HVAC) system at the nuclear power plant is completed. The physical origins of the coal dust masses distribution along the absorber with the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules during the air-dust aerosol intake process in the near the surface layer of absorber are researched. The quantitative technical characteristics of air filtering elements, which have to be considered during the optimization of air filters designs for the application in the ventilation systems at the nuclear power plants, are obtained.

  11. Pulsed laser-induced oxygen deficiency at TiO{sub 2} surface: Anomalous structure and electrical transport properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakajima, Tomohiko; Tsuchiya, Tetsuo; Kumagai, Toshiya

    2009-09-15

    We have studied pulsed laser-induced oxygen deficiencies at rutile TiO{sub 2} surfaces. The crystal surface was successfully reduced by excimer laser irradiation, and an oxygen-deficient TiO{sub 2-{delta}} layer with 160 nm thickness was formed by means of ArF laser irradiation at 140 mJ/cm{sup 2} for 2000 pulses. The TiO{sub 2-{delta}} layer fundamentally maintained a rutile structure, though this structure was distorted by many stacking faults caused by the large oxygen deficiency. The electrical resistivity of the obtained TiO{sub 2-{delta}} layer exhibited unconventional metallic behavior with hysteresis. A metal-insulator transition occurred at 42 K, and the electrical resistivity exceeded 10{sup 4} OMEGA cm below 42 K. This metal-insulator transition could be caused by bipolaronic ordering derived from Ti-Ti pairings that formed along the stacking faults. The constant magnetization behavior observed below 42 K is consistent with the bipolaronic scenario that has been observed previously for Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}. These peculiar electrical properties are strongly linked to the oxygen-deficient crystal structure, which contains many stacking faults formed by instantaneous heating during excimer laser irradiation. - Graphical abstract: A pulsed laser-irradiated TiO{sub 2-{delta}} substrate showed an unconventional metallic phase, with hysteresis over a wide range of temperatures and a metal-insulator transition at 42 K.

  12. Dynamic response of Cu4Zr54 metallic glass to high strain rate shock loading: plasticity, spall and atomic-level structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Shengnian; Arman, Bedri; Germann, Timothy C; Cagin, Tahir

    2009-01-01

    We investigate dynamic response of Cu{sub 46}Zr{sub 54} metallic glass under adiabatic planar shock wave loading (one-dimensional strain) wjth molecular dynamics simulations, including Hugoniot (shock) states, shock-induced plasticity and spallation. The Hugoniot states are obtained up to 60 CPa along with the von Mises shear flow strengths, and the dynamic spall strength, at different strain rates and temperatures. The spall strengths likely represent the limiting values achievable in experiments such as laser ablation. For the steady shock states, a clear elastic-plastic transition is identified (e.g., in the shock velocity-particle velocity curve), and the shear strength shows strain-softening. However, the elastic-plastic transition across the shock front displays transient stress overshoot (hardening) above the Hugoniot elastic limit followed by a relatively sluggish relaxation to the steady shock state, and the plastic shock front steepens with increasing shock strength. The local von Mises shear strain analysis is used to characterize local deformation, and the Voronoi tessellation analysis, the corresponding short-range structures at various stages of shock, release, tension and spallation. The plasticity in this glass is manifested as localized shear transformation zones and of local structure rather than thermal origin, and void nucleation occurs preferentially at the highly shear-deformed regions. The Voronoi and shear strain analyses show that the atoms with different local structures are of different shear resistances that lead to shear localization (e.g., the atoms indexed with (0,0,12,0) are most shear-resistant, and those with (0,2,8,1) are highly prone to shear flow). The dynamic changes in local structures are consistent with the observed deformation dynamics.

  13. Transport in Dynamical Astronomy and Multibody Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koon, Wang Sang

    Transport in Dynamical Astronomy and Multibody Problems Michael Dellnitz, Oliver Junge, Wang Sang key dynamical features, including almost invariant sets, resonance regions as well as transport rates of these different numerical tools and their applicability. In particular, we compute transport rates between two

  14. Structural, electronic transport and magnetoresistance of a 142nm lead telluride nanowire synthesized using stress-induced growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dedi, E-mail: dediamada@phys.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: cheny2@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China) [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Nano Science and Technology Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Electronics and Telecommunication, Indonesian Institute of Sciences Bandung (Indonesia); Chien, Chia-Hua [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China) [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Nano Science and Technology Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Hsiung, Te-Chih [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Nano Science and Technology Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yu-Chieh; Huang, Yi-Cheng; Lee, Ping-Chung; Chen, Yang-Yuan, E-mail: dediamada@phys.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: cheny2@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chih-Hao [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-15

    In this study, structurally uniform single crystalline PbTe nanowires (NWs) were synthesized using a stress-induced growth. Selected-area electron diffraction patterns show that the PbTe NWs were grown along the [100] direction. The electrical conductivity ? of a NW with 142 nm in diameter exhibited a semiconducting behavior at 50–300 K. An enhancement of electrical conductivity ? up to 2383 S m{sup ?1} at 300 K is much higher than ? [0.44–1526 S m{sup ?1}, Chen et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, p023115, (2013)] in previous studies. The room temperature magnetoresistance of the 142 nm NW was ?0.8% at B = 2 T, which is considerably higher than that [0.2% at B = 2 T, Ovsyannikov et al., Sol. State Comm. 126, 373, (2003)] of the PbTe bulk reported.

  15. Rate Schedules

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    One of the major responsibilities of Southeastern is to design, formulate, and justify rate schedules. Repayment studies prepared by the agency determine revenue requirements and appropriate rate...

  16. Tuning the band structure, magnetic and transport properties of the zigzag graphene nanoribbons/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures by transverse electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilyasov, V. V. E-mail: chuongnguyen11@gmail.com; Meshi, B. C.; Nguyen, V. C. E-mail: chuongnguyen11@gmail.com; Ershov, I. V.; Nguyen, D. C.

    2014-07-07

    The paper presents the results of ab initio study of the opportunities for tuning the band structure, magnetic and transport properties of zigzag graphene nanoribbon (8-ZGNR) on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN(0001)) semiconductor heterostructure by transverse electric field (E{sub ext}). This study was performed within the framework of the density functional theory (DFT) using Grimme's (DFT-D2) scheme. We established the critical values of E{sub ext} for the 8-ZGNR/h-BN(0001) heterostructure, thereby providing for semiconductor-halfmetal transition in one of electron spin configurations. This study also showed that the degeneration in energy of the localized edge states is removed when E{sub ext} is applied. In ZGNR/h-BN (0001) heterostructure, value of the splitting energy was higher than one in ZGNRs without substrate. We determined the effect of low E{sub ext} applied to the 8-ZGNR/h-BN (0001) semiconductor heterostructure on the preserved local magnetic moment (LMM) (0.3?{sub B}) of edge carbon atoms. The transport properties of the 8-ZGNR/h-BN(0001) semiconductor heterostructure can be controlled using E{sub ext}. In particular, at a critical value of the positive potential, the electron mobility can increase to 7× 10{sup 5} cm{sup 2}/V?s or remain at zero in the spin-up and spin-down electron subsystems, respectively. We established that magnetic moments (MMs), band gaps, and carrier mobility can be altered using E{sub ext}. These abilities enable the use of 8-ZGNR/h-BN(0001) semiconductor heterostructure in spintronics.

  17. Structural, thermal, magnetic, and electronic transport properties of the LaNi?(Ge1-xPx)? system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Goetsch, R. J.; Anand, V. K.; Pandey, Abhishek; Johnston, D. C.

    2012-02-29

    Polycrystalline samples of LaNi?(Ge1-xPx)? (x=0,0.25,0.50,0.75,1) were synthesized and their properties investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements at room temperature and by heat capacity Cp, magnetic susceptibility ?, and electrical resistivity ? measurements versus temperature T from 1.8 to 350 K. Rietveld refinements of powder XRD patterns confirm that these compounds crystallize in the body-centered-tetragonal ThCr?Si?-type structure (space group I4/mmm) with composition-dependent lattice parameters that slightly deviate from Vegard's law. The ?(T) measurements showed a positive temperature coefficient for all samples from 1.8 to 300 K, indicating that all compositions in this system are metallic. The low-T Cp measurements yield amore »rather large Sommerfeld electronic specific heat coefficient ?=12.4(2) mJ/mol K² for x=0, reflecting a large density of states at the Fermi energy that is comparable with the largest values found for the AFe?As? class of materials with the same crystal structure. The ? decreases approximately linearly with x to 7.4(1) mJ/mol K² for x=1. The ? measurements show nearly temperature-independent paramagnetic behavior across the entire range of compositions except for LaNi?Ge?, where a broad peak is observed at ?300 K from ?(T) measurements up to 1000 K that may arise from short-range antiferromagnetic correlations in a quasi-two-dimensional magnetic system. High-accuracy Padé approximants representing the Debye lattice heat capacity and Bloch-Grüneisen electron-phonon resistivity functions versus T are presented and are used to analyze our experimental Cp(T) and ?(T) data, respectively, for 1.8K?T?300 K. The T dependences of ? for all samples are well-described over this T range by the Bloch-Grüneisen model, although the observed ?(300 K) values are larger than calculated from this model. A significant T dependence of the Debye temperature determined from the Cp(T) data was observed for each composition. No clear evidence for bulk superconductivity or any other long-range phase transition was found for any of the LaNi?(Ge1-xPx)? compositions studied.« less

  18. WASTE PACKAGE TRANSPORTER DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.C. Weddle; R. Novotny; J. Cron

    1998-09-23

    The purpose of this Design Analysis is to develop preliminary design of the waste package transporter used for waste package (WP) transport and related functions in the subsurface repository. This analysis refines the conceptual design that was started in Phase I of the Viability Assessment. This analysis supports the development of a reliable emplacement concept and a retrieval concept for license application design. The scope of this analysis includes the following activities: (1) Assess features of the transporter design and evaluate alternative design solutions for mechanical components. (2) Develop mechanical equipment details for the transporter. (3) Prepare a preliminary structural evaluation for the transporter. (4) Identify and recommend the equipment design for waste package transport and related functions. (5) Investigate transport equipment interface tolerances. This analysis supports the development of the waste package transporter for the transport, emplacement, and retrieval of packaged radioactive waste forms in the subsurface repository. Once the waste containers are closed and accepted, the packaged radioactive waste forms are termed waste packages (WP). This terminology was finalized as this analysis neared completion; therefore, the term disposal container is used in several references (i.e., the System Description Document (SDD)) (Ref. 5.6). In this analysis and the applicable reference documents, the term ''disposal container'' is synonymous with ''waste package''.

  19. Neutron structural characterization, inversion degree and transport properties of NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel prepared by the hydroxide route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sagua, A.; Lescano, Gabriela M.; Alonso, J.A.; Martínez-Coronado, R.; Fernández-Díaz, M.T.; Morán, E.

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: A pure specimen has been synthesized by the hydroxide route. This spinel, studied by NPD, shows an important inversion degree, ? = 0.80. A bond-valence study shows that the tetrahedral Mn ions are divalent whereas the octahedral Mn and Ni are slightly oxidized from the expected 3+ and 2+ values, respectively. The mixed valence Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} accounts for a hopping mechanism between adjacent octahedral sites, leading to a significant conductivity. Highlights: ? A low-temperature hydroxide route allowed preparing almost pure specimens of NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}. ? NPD essential to determine inversion degree; contrasting Ni and Mn for neutrons. ? Bond valence establishes valence state of octahedral and tetrahedral Ni and Mn ions. ? Thermal analysis, transport measurements complement characterization of this oxide. ? A structure–properties relationship is established. -- Abstract: The title compound has been synthesized by the hydroxide route. The crystal structure has been investigated at room temperature from high-resolution neutron powder diffraction (NPD) data. It crystallizes in a cubic spinel structure, space group Fd3{sup ¯}m, Z = 8, with a = 8.3940(2) ? at 295 K. The crystallographic formula is (Ni{sub 0.202(1)}Mn{sub 0.798(1)}){sub 8a}(Ni{sub 0.790(1)}Mn{sub 1.210(1)}){sub 16d}O{sub 4} where 8a and 16d stand for the tetrahedral and octahedral sites of the spinel structure, respectively. There is a significant inversion degree of the spinel structure, ? = 0.80. In fact, the variable parameter for the oxygen position, u = 0.2636(4), is far from that expected (u = 0.25) for normal spinels. From a bond-valence study, it seems that the valence distribution in NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel is not as trivial as expected (Ni{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 3+}), but clearly the tetrahedral Mn ions are divalent whereas the octahedral Mn and Ni are slightly oxidized from the expected +3 and +2 values, respectively. The mixed valence observed at the octahedral sites provides the charge carriers that, by a hopping mechanism between Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} adjacent sites, leads to a significant conductivity, up to 0.85 S cm{sup ?1} at 800 °C in air.

  20. Non-Tracial Free Transport and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Brent Andrew

    2015-01-01

    tracial transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .the transport element . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Free Transport . . . . . . . . . . . .

  1. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

  2. Decision Models for Bulk Energy Transportation Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    & pipelines · Coal mines & rail/barges · Storage · Electricity market · Electric gen & trans · Costs ... ... Primary Energy Supplies Gas Coal Railroad, Barge ... ... Storage & Transportation Systems Energy Transportation Networks #12;Structural Model: Energy Flows GAS COAL ELECTRIC Case A: 2002

  3. Structure and Dynamics of Fuel Jets Injected into a High-Temperature Subsonic Crossflow: High-Data-Rate Laser Diagnostic Investigation under Steady and Oscillatory Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucht, Robert; Anderson, William

    2015-01-23

    An investigation of subsonic transverse jet injection into a subsonic vitiated crossflow is discussed. The reacting jet in crossflow (RJIC) system investigated as a means of secondary injection of fuel in a staged combustion system. The measurements were performed in test rigs featuring (a) a steady, swirling crossflow and (b) a crossflow with low swirl but significant oscillation in the pressure field and in the axial velocity. The rigs are referred to as the steady state rig and the instability rig. Rapid mixing and chemical reaction in the near field of the jet injection is desirable in this application. Temporally resolved velocity measurements within the wake of the reactive jets using 2D-PIV and OH-PLIF at a repetition rate of 5 kHz were performed on the RJIC flow field in a steady state water-cooled test rig. The reactive jets were injected through an extended nozzle into the crossflow which is located in the downstream of a low swirl burner (LSB) that produced the swirled, vitiated crossflow. Both H2/N2 and natural gas (NG)/air jets were investigated. OH-PLIF measurements along the jet trajectory show that the auto-ignition starts on the leeward side within the wake region of the jet flame. The measurements show that jet flame is stabilized in the wake of the jet and wake vortices play a significant role in this process. PIV and OH–PLIF measurements were performed at five measurement planes along the cross- section of the jet. The time resolved measurements provided significant information on the evolution of complex flow structures and highly transient features like, local extinction, re-ignition, vortex-flame interaction prevalent in a turbulent reacting flow. Nanosecond-laser-based, single-laser-shot coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) measurements of temperature and H2 concentraiton were also performed. The structure and dynamics of a reacting transverse jet injected into a vitiated oscillatory crossflow presents a unique opportunity for applying advanced experimental diagnostic techniques with increasing fidelity for the purposes of computational validation and model development. Numerical simulation of the reacting jet in crossflow is challenging because of the complex vortical structures in the flowfield and compounded by an unsteady crossflow. The resulting benchmark quality data set will include comprehensive, accurate measurements of mean and fluctuating components of velocity, pressure, and flame front location at high pressure and with crossflow conditions more representative of modern gas turbine engines. A proven means for producing combustion dynamics is used for the performing combustion instability experimental study on a reacting jet in crossflow configuration. The method used to provide an unsteady flowfield into which the transverse jet is injected is a unique and novel approach that permits elevated temperature and pressure conditions. A model dump combustor is used to generate and sustain an acoustically oscillating vitiated flow that serves as the crossflow for transverse jet injection studies. A fully optically accessible combustor test section affords full access surrounding the point of jet injection. High speed 10 kHz planar measurements OH PLIF and high frequency 180 kHz wall pressure measurements are performed on the injected reacting transverse jet and surrounding flowfield, respectively, under simulated unstable conditions. The overlay of the jet velocity flowfield and the flame front will be investigated using simultaneous 10 kHz OH PLIF and PIV in experiments to be performed in the near future.

  4. Sustainable Transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in transportation technologies, alternative fuels, and fuel cell technologies.

  5. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No. 2378, Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    to develop trip generation rates for a variety of truck types and land use categories. This research confirms22 Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No. 2378, Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, D.C., 2013, pp. 22­31. DOI: 10

  6. New Methods to Transport Fluids in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Hugh

    New Methods to Transport Fluids in Micro-Sized Devices Shaun Berry and Jakub Kedzierski control and transport fluid in micro-sized structures presents its own unique set of challenges fluidic operations that are essential to the functionality of the system-- such as fluid transport, mixing

  7. Transportation Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boreo, Andrea; Li, Wei; Wunnenbuger, Douglas; Giusti, Cecilia; Cooper, John T.; Masterson, Jaimie

    2015-01-01

    Mobility throughout a community ensures freedom of movement and enhances quality of life. Traffic congestion, pollution, urban sprawl, social exclusion, safety and health can decrease mobility and should be a part of a sustainable transportation...

  8. electrifyingthefuture transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    programme of electrification and the potential introduction of diesel hybrids. The Department for Transport vehicles Wind turbine systems Industrial equipment The lab has full ethernet capability which will enable

  9. Rail transportation update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-01-15

    Record western coal shipments and lucrative export traffic lead America's railroad to their fourth most profitable year in history. But with the coal boom going bust, higher rates, and a new administration and congress, what sort of transportation year can coal mines and shippers expect in 2009? The article gives the opinions of company executives and discusses findings of the recent so-called Christenson Report which investigated growing railroad market power. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  10. Phase-space jets drive transport and anomalous resistivity (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    transport and anomalous resistivity In the presence of wave dissipation, phase-space structures spontaneously emerge in nonlinear Vlasov dynamics. These structures include not only...

  11. A study of the relationship between lithium ion transport and structure and dynamic behavior in polyethylene oxide-melt/LiClO4 battery electrolytes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selser, James C

    2009-07-07

    An experimental study of the canonical SPE (“solid” polymer electrolyte) for rechargeable “rocking chair” lithium/polymer batteries, viz. LiClO4 dissolved in molten poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), was carried out under DOE grant FG02-04ER15573. In this study, an improved understanding was obtained of the relationship between lithium ion transport and polymer behavior in these SPEs. Among other applications, these sturdy temperature-tolerant and powerful light-weight batteries would be used in electric and electric-hybrid vehicles to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, to store unused electrical energy for peak demand loads and as compact, light-weight energy sources for aircraft and spacecraft. During the period of the grant, the American/Canadian partnership company “Avestor” fabricated and successfully demonstrated a telecommunications application of shoe-box sized batteries and representatives from Avestor visited our research lab at UNLV. They found our results interesting and relevant to their work and invited us to visit Avestor and present a talk about our efforts at UNLV. Unfortunately Avestor (who was scheduled to build a battery production facility in Apex, Nevada just North of Las Vegas) folded before the visit could be made. In the grant work, two well characterized PEO samples having molar masses distinctly below and distinctly above the melt entanglement molar mass were used and three laser light scattering techniques employed as the principal noninvasive methods of investigating liquid poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)/LiClO4 SPEs. These investigations considered the effects of temperature, dissolved salt concentration and scattering wavevector on SPE behavior. Classical or “static” light scattering and the dynamic light scattering techniques of photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and Fabry-Perot interferometry (FPI) were used to study SPE static, low frequency and high frequency dynamic behaviors, respectively. Static measurements provided information about system structure while low frequency results provided information about slower (0.1-10s) more global behavior and high frequency results provided information about faster (~10-11s) more local behavior. In addition, viscometry, rheometry and thermal analysis provided vital complementary results. It was found that liquid PEO/lithium salt solutions for both PEO molar masses are random transient physical networks with measureable network and intra-network relaxation times using PCS and FPI. Thus novel and informative results addressing both large scale and small scale behavior were obtained. For example, the high sensitivity of liquid PEO electrolytes to the presence of presumably undesirable trace amounts of residual water and/or methanol was clearly evident in PCS measurements. In “unentangled” melts the activation energies for diffusive relaxation in liquid PEO/lithium salt electrolytes measured using PCS and the activation energies for viscous flow in these systems determined by viscometry were identical while thermal analyses detected no phase transitions for these systems. These results reinforced an earlier assumption that the liquid PEO/LiClO4 system is a liquid polymer “bimorph” (to our knowledge the first of its kind to be reported) with the network comprising one form of the polymer while the second form corresponds to that of a viscous damping liquid. At a given temperature, FPI characteristic relaxation times for local, between-chain motions were consistent with PCS results so that increases with increasing salt concentration were accompanied by increases in the elastic modulus and corresponding increases in system stiffness. Note that corresponding decreases in polymer segmental mobility are accompanied by reduced ion diffusivity. For entangled melts, PCS network relaxations were again observed and these systems were also considered to be bimorphs even though diffusion activation energies were distinctly larger than viscous flow activation energies - a difference attributed to the effects of entanglement. Moreover, SLS measurement

  12. The impact of monolayer coverage, barrier thickness and growth rate on the thermal stability of photoluminescence of coupled InAs/GaAs quantum dot hetero-structure with quaternary capping of InAlGaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandal, A.; Verma, U.; Halder, N.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2012-03-15

    Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coupled InAs/GaAs MQDs with (In{sub 0.21}Al{sub 0.21}Ga{sub 0.58}As + GaAs) caps are considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Monolayer coverage, barrier thickness and growth rate of the dots are the factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL peaks for the samples are within 1.1-1.3 {mu}m; significant for IBSCs and lasers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NPTP (non-resonant multi-phonon assisted tunneling process) effect on FWHM of PL. -- Abstract: The self-assembled InAs/GaAs MQDs are widely investigated for their potential application in optoelectronic devices like lasers and photovoltaics. We have explored the effect of QD growth rate and structural parameters like capping layer thickness on the morphology and optical properties of the MQD heterostructures overgrown with a combination capping of InAlGaAs and GaAs. The growth rate of the seed layers in the MQD samples is also varied to investigate its effect in the vertical stacking of the islands. The change in the morphology and the optical properties of the samples due to variation in growth and structural parameters are explained by the presence of strain in the QD structures, which arises due to lattice mismatch.

  13. STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION AND STRUCTURAL INTEGRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hingers, Robert H.

    1976-01-01

    of businesses and marriages, and (2) failure rates of variously structured intentional communities. Both tests support the hypothesis that communal organizations, which permit structural freewheeling, are more stable than formal organizations, which donot....

  14. Parallel Transports in Webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Fleischhack

    2003-07-17

    For connected reductive linear algebraic structure groups it is proven that every web is holonomically isolated. The possible tuples of parallel transports in a web form a Lie subgroup of the corresponding power of the structure group. This Lie subgroup is explicitly calculated and turns out to be independent of the chosen local trivializations. Moreover, explicit necessary and sufficient criteria for the holonomical independence of webs are derived. The results above can even be sharpened: Given an arbitrary neighbourhood of the base points of a web, then this neighbourhood contains some segments of the web whose parameter intervals coincide, but do not include 0 (that corresponds to the base points of the web), and whose parallel transports already form the same Lie subgroup as those of the full web do.

  15. No energy transport without discord

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seth Lloyd; Vazrik Chiloyan; Yongjie Hu; Samuel Huberman; Zi-Wen Liu; Gang Chen

    2015-10-16

    Quantum systems can be correlated in ways that classical systems can not. A wide variety of non-classical forms of correlation exist: amongst the best known are entanglement and discord. Quantum correlations can be used to enhance measurement accuracy and energy transport. This paper shows that quantum correlations -- in the form of discord -- are mandatory for any energy transport. Without discord, energy transport cannot occur. Moreover, we show that the initial rate of heat transfer between two systems prepared at different temperatures is directly proportional to the rate of increase in diagonal/energetic discord between the systems. We measured the increase of energetic discord induced by nanoscale heat flow across an aluminum-sapphire interface. The rate of increase of discord is measured to be 4.28*10^24 bits m^{-2} K^{-1} s^{-1}.

  16. Decision Models for Bulk Energy Transportation Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    ... ... Primary Energy Supplies Gas Coal Railroad, Barge ... ... Storage & Transportation Systems Energy Transportation Networks #12;Structural Model: Energy Flows GAS COAL ELECTRIC Case A: 2002, and the amount of electricity generated #12;Structural Model: Effects of Katrina Average natural gas nodal price

  17. Successful Reproduction Requires the Function of Arabidopsis YELLOW STRIPE-LIKE1 and YELLOW STRIPE-LIKE3 Metal-Nicotianamine Transporters in Both Vegetative and Reproductive Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, H.; Chiecko, J; Punshon, T; Lanzirotti, A; Lahner, B; Salt, D; Walker, E

    2010-01-01

    Several members of the Yellow Stripe-Like (YSL) family of proteins are transporters of metals that are bound to the metal chelator nicotianamine or the related set of mugineic acid family chelators known as phytosiderophores. Here, we examine the physiological functions of three closely related Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) YSL family members, AtYSL1, AtYSL2, and AtYSL3, to elucidate their role(s) in the allocation of metals into various organs of Arabidopsis. We show that AtYSL3 and AtYSL1 are localized to the plasma membrane and function as iron transporters in yeast functional complementation assays. By using inflorescence grafting, we show that AtYSL1 and AtYSL3 have dual roles in reproduction: their activity in the leaves is required for normal fertility and normal seed development, while activity in the inflorescences themselves is required for proper loading of metals into the seeds. We further demonstrate that the AtYSL1 and AtYSL2 proteins, when expressed from the AtYSL3 promoter, can only partially rescue the phenotypes of a ysl1ysl3 double mutant, suggesting that although these three YSL transporters are closely related and have similar patterns of expression, they have distinct activities in planta. In particular, neither AtYSL1 nor AtYSL2 is able to functionally complement the reproductive defects exhibited by ysl1ysl3 double mutant plants.

  18. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation. Radionuclides irreversibly sorbed onto this fraction of colloids also transport without retardation. The transport times for these radionuclides will be the same as those for nonsorbing radionuclides. The fraction of nonretarding colloids developed in this analysis report is used in the abstraction of SZ and UZ transport models in support of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This analysis report uses input from two Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) analysis reports. This analysis uses the assumption from ''Waste Form and In-Drift Colloids-Associated Radionuclide Concentrations: Abstraction and Summary'' that plutonium and americium are irreversibly sorbed to colloids generated by the waste degradation processes (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025]). In addition, interpretations from RELAP analyses from ''Saturated Zone In-Situ Testing'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170010]) are used to develop the retardation factor distributions in this analysis.

  19. Correlation between the electronic and atomic structure, transport properties, and oxygen vacancies on La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubio-Zuazo, J. Onandia, L.; Castro, G. R.

    2014-01-13

    We present a study of the role of oxygen vacancies on the atomic and electronic structure and transport properties on a 20?nm thick La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} film grown by the pulsed laser deposition method on a SrTiO{sub 3} (001) substrate. The results show that oxygen vacancies induce an atomic structure modification characterized by the movement of the La/Ca cations to the perovskite regular position, by the reduction of the MnO{sub 6} basal plane rotation, and by a cooperative tilting of the octahedra along the out-of-plane direction. The out-of-plane lattice parameter increases due to the reduction of the Mn valence upon oxygen vacancies creation. As a consequence, a shift of the Metal-to-Insulator transition to lower temperatures is found to occur. We discuss the influence of the competitive phenomena of manganese valence and Mn-O-Mn bond distortion on the transport properties of manganite thin films.

  20. The Fluid Interface Reactions Structures and Transport (FIRST) EFRC (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wesolowski, David J. (Director, FIRST - Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures, and Transport Center); FIRST Staff

    2011-11-02

    'The Fluid Interface Reactions Structures and Transport (FIRST) EFRC' was submitted by FIRST to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. FIRST, an EFRC directed by David J. Wesolowski at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from nine institutions: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (lead), Argonne National Laboratory, Drexel University, Georgia State University, Northwestern University, Pennsylvania State University, Suffolk University, Vanderbilt University, and University of Virginia. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport Center is 'to develop quantitative and predictive models of the unique nanoscale environment at fluid-solid interfaces that will enable transformational advances in electrical energy storage and heterogeneous catalysis for solar fuels.' Research topics are: catalysis (biomass, CO{sub 2}, water), electrocatalysis, photocatalysis, photoelectrocatalysis, solar fuels, solar electrodes, electrical energy storage, batteries, capacitors, battery electrodes, electrolytes, extreme environment, CO{sub 2} (convert), greenhouse gas, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), interfacial characterization, matter by design, novel materials synthesis, and charge transport.

  1. The Fluid Interface Reactions Structures and Transport (FIRST) EFRC (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesolowski, David J. (Director, FIRST - Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures, and Transport Center) [Director, FIRST - Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures, and Transport Center; FIRST Staff

    2011-05-01

    'The Fluid Interface Reactions Structures and Transport (FIRST) EFRC' was submitted by FIRST to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. FIRST, an EFRC directed by David J. Wesolowski at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from nine institutions: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (lead), Argonne National Laboratory, Drexel University, Georgia State University, Northwestern University, Pennsylvania State University, Suffolk University, Vanderbilt University, and University of Virginia. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport Center is 'to develop quantitative and predictive models of the unique nanoscale environment at fluid-solid interfaces that will enable transformational advances in electrical energy storage and heterogeneous catalysis for solar fuels.' Research topics are: catalysis (biomass, CO{sub 2}, water), electrocatalysis, photocatalysis, photoelectrocatalysis, solar fuels, solar electrodes, electrical energy storage, batteries, capacitors, battery electrodes, electrolytes, extreme environment, CO{sub 2} (convert), greenhouse gas, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), interfacial characterization, matter by design, novel materials synthesis, and charge transport.

  2. Effect of current compliance and voltage sweep rate on the resistive switching of HfO{sub 2}/ITO/Invar structure as measured by conductive atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, You-Lin Liao, Chun-Wei; Ling, Jing-Jenn

    2014-06-16

    The electrical characterization of HfO{sub 2}/ITO/Invar resistive switching memory structure was studied using conductive atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a semiconductor parameter analyzer, Agilent 4156C. The metal alloy Invar was used as the metal substrate to ensure good ohmic contact with the substrate holder of the AFM. A conductive Pt/Ir AFM tip was placed in direct contact with the HfO{sub 2} surface, such that it acted as the top electrode. Nanoscale current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the HfO{sub 2}/ITO/Invar structure were measured by applying a ramp voltage through the conductive AFM tip at various current compliances and ramp voltage sweep rates. It was found that the resistance of the low resistance state (RLRS) decreased with increasing current compliance value, but resistance of high resistance state (RHRS) barely changed. However, both the RHRS and RLRS decreased as the voltage sweep rate increased. The reasons for this dependency on current compliance and voltage sweep rate are discussed.

  3. Environment-Assisted Quantum Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Rebentrost; Masoud Mohseni; Ivan Kassal; Seth Lloyd; Alán Aspuru-Guzik

    2009-02-10

    Transport phenomena at the nanoscale are of interest due to the presence of both quantum and classical behavior. In this work, we demonstrate that quantum transport efficiency can be enhanced by a dynamical interplay of the system Hamiltonian with pure dephasing induced by a fluctuating environment. This is in contrast to fully coherent hopping that leads to localization in disordered systems, and to highly incoherent transfer that is eventually suppressed by the quantum Zeno effect. We study these phenomena in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein complex as a prototype for larger photosynthetic energy transfer systems. We also show that disordered binary tree structures exhibit enhanced transport in the presence of dephasing.

  4. Development of load and resistance factor design for FRP strengthening of reinforced concrete structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atadero, Rebecca Anne

    2006-01-01

    Geotechnical and Structural Design; Transportation ResearchClarke, J.L. , Ed. Structural Design of Polymer Composites,Structural Design.

  5. Preface: Nonclassical Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolshov, L.

    2010-01-01

    models of solute transport in highly heterogeneous geologicSemenov. 2008b. Nonclassical transport processes in geologicand L. Matveev. 2008. Transport regimes and concentration

  6. Intelligent Transport Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deakin, Elizabeth; Frick, Karen Trapenberg; Skabardonis, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    in Sustainable Urban Transport: City Interview Synthesis (of Leeds, Institute for Transport Studies, forthcoming.I NTELLIGENT TRANSPORT SYSTEMS LINKING TECHNOLOGY AND

  7. Sustainability and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Gilbert is a Toronto-based transport and energy consultantof the forthcoming book Transport Revolutions: Making theand substantial transition to transport systems based on

  8. Sandia Energy - Transportation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Safety Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Nuclear Energy Safety Technologies Risk and Safety Assessment Transportation Safety Transportation SafetyTara...

  9. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport- Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Fuel Performance Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, Harold; Geelhood, Ken; Koeppel, Brian; Coleman, Justin; Bignell, John; Flores, Gregg; Wang, Jy-An; Sanborn, Scott; Spears, Robert; Klymyshyn, Nick

    2013-09-30

    This document addresses Oak Ridge National Laboratory milestone M2FT-13OR0822015 Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Nuclear Fuel Performance Characterization. This report provides results of the initial demonstration of the modeling capability developed to perform preliminary deterministic evaluations of moderate-to-high burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) mechanical performance under normal conditions of storage (NCS) and normal conditions of transport (NCT) conditions. This report also provides results from the sensitivity studies that have been performed. Finally, discussion on the long-term goals and objectives of this initiative are provided.

  10. Transporting Information and Energy Simultaneously

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Vivek K

    Transporting Information and Energy Simultaneously Lav R. Varshney Laboratory for Information--The fundamental tradeoff between the rates at which energy and reliable information can be transmitted over received energy. A capacity-energy function is defined and a coding theorem is given. The capacity-energy

  11. SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan Ogden and Lorraine Anderson #12;SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS #12;SUSTAINABLE;6 SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS #12;1 SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS

  12. Correlation Between Bands Structure and Magneto-Transport Properties in n-type HgTe/CdTe Superlattice with Relatively Thin CdTe Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braigue, M.; Nafidi, A.; Chaib, H.; Tirbiyine, A.; Hemine, J.; Idbaha, A.; Boulkassim, A.; El Gouti, T.; Massaq, M. [Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics and Nanomaterials for Renewable Energy, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, BP 8106 Hay Dakhla (Morocco); University Ibn Zohr, 80000 Agadir (Morocco); Talwar, Devki N. [Physics Department, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 975 Oakland Avenue, Indiana, PA 15705 (United States); SrinivasaVinod, M. [Mechanical Engineering Department, RV College of Engineering, Bangalore - 560 059 (India)

    2011-12-26

    Theoretical calculations of the electronic properties of n-type HgTe/CdTe superlattices (SLs) in the envelope function formalism have provided a reasonable agreement with the experimental data on the magneto-transport behavior. Numerical results of the band energies E(d{sub 2}), E(k{sub z}) and E(k{sub p}) in the direction of growth and in plane of the SLs predict that the system retains semiconductor characteristics for d{sub 1}/d{sub 2} = 2.69 and d{sub 2}<10 nm. For d{sub 2} = 3.2 nm the calculated effective band gap (E{sub g}({Gamma},4.2 K) = 48 meV) suggests that the material sample is a two-dimensional modulated nanostructure and a potential candidate to be used for the far infrared detection applications.

  13. Full-f Neoclassical Simulations toward a Predictive Model for H-mode Pedestal Ion Energy, Particle and Momentum Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battaglia, D. J.; Boedo, J. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Chang, C. S.; Canik, J. M.; deGrassie, J. S.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Grierson, B. A.; Groebner, R. J.; Maingi, Rajesh; Smith, S. P.

    2014-09-01

    Energy and particle transport rates are decoupled in the H-mode edge since the ion thermal transport rate is primarily set by the neoclassical transport of the deuterium ions in the tail of the thermal energy distribution, while the net particle transport rate is set by anomalous transport of the colder bulk ions. Ion orbit loss drives the energy distributions away from Maxwellian, and describes the anisotropy, poloidal asymmetry and local minimum near the separatrix observed in the Ti profile. Non-Maxwellian distributions also drive large intrinsic edge flows, and the interaction of turbulence at the top of the pedestal with the intrinsic edge flow can generate an intrinsic core torque. The primary driver of the radial electric field (Er) in the pedestal and scrapeoff layer (SOL) are kinetic neoclassical effects, such as ion orbit loss of tail ions and parallel electron loss to the divertor. This paper describes the first multi-species kinetic neoclassical transport calculations for ELM-free H-mode pedestal and scrape-off layer on DIII-D using XGC0, a 5D full-f particle-in-cell drift-kinetic solver with self-consistent neutral recycling and sheath potentials. Quantitative agreement between the flux-driven simulation and the experimental electron density, impurity density and orthogonal measurements of impurity temperature and flow profiles is achieved by adding random-walk particle diffusion to the guiding-center drift motion. This interpretative technique quantifies the role of neoclassical, anomalous and neutral transport to the overall pedestal structure, and consequently illustrates the importance of including kinetic effects self-consistently in transport calculations around transport barriers.

  14. Beam Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara McClintockSecurityBeam Transport Beam

  15. Stochastic Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3X-rays3 Prepared by:'!Transport in PPCD Discharges by

  16. Greening Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSC GettingGraphene's 3DGreenGreenTransportation

  17. Home Energy Ratings and Building Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    climate as they affect the rating score of a proposed or completed structure. The rating is used to determine the most cost effective mechanical systems, building envelope design including window and door types, effect of various roofing materials...

  18. An investigation of the effect of pore scale flow on average geochemical reaction rates using direct numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafa, S. Molins; Trebotich, D.; Steefel, C. I.; Shen, C.

    2012-02-01

    The scale-dependence of geochemical reaction rates hinders their use in continuum scale models intended for the interpretation and prediction of chemical fate and transport in subsurface environments such as those considered for geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Processes that take place at the pore scale, especially those involving mass transport limitations to reactive surfaces, may contribute to the discrepancy commonly observed between laboratory-determined and continuum-scale or field rates. Here, the dependence of mineral dissolution rates on the pore structure of the porous media is investigated by means of pore scale modeling of flow and multicomponent reactive transport. The pore scale model is comprised of high performance simulation tools and algorithms for incompressible flow and conservative transport combined with a general-purpose multicomponent geochemical reaction code. The model performs direct numerical simulation of reactive transport based on an operator-splitting approach to coupling transport and reactions. The approach is validated with a Poiseuille flow single-pore experiment and verified with an equivalent 1D continuum-scale model of a capillary tube packed with calcite spheres. Using the case of calcite dissolution as an example, the high resolution model is used to demonstrate that non-uniformity in the flow field at the pore scale has the effect of decreasing the overall reactivity of the system, even when systems with identical reactive surface area are considered. The effect becomes more pronounced as the heterogeneity of the reactive grain packing increases, particularly where the flow slows sufficiently such that the solution approaches equilibrium locally and the average rate becomes transport-limited.

  19. Memory effects in turbulent transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Hubbard; Axel Brandenburg

    2009-11-13

    In the mean-field theory of magnetic fields, turbulent transport, i.e. the turbulent electromotive force, is described by a combination of the alpha effect and turbulent magnetic diffusion, which are usually assumed to be proportional respectively to the mean field and its spatial derivatives. For a passive scalar there is just turbulent diffusion, where the mean flux of concentration depends on the gradient of the mean concentration. However, these proportionalities are approximations that are valid only if the mean field or the mean concentration vary slowly in time. Examples are presented where turbulent transport possesses memory, i.e. where it depends crucially on the past history of the mean field. Such effects are captured by replacing turbulent transport coefficients with time integral kernels, resulting in transport coefficients that depend effectively on the frequency or the growth rate of the mean field itself. In this paper we perform numerical experiments to find the characteristic timescale (or memory length) of this effect as well as simple analytical models of the integral kernels in the case of passive scalar concentrations and kinematic dynamos. The integral kernels can then be used to find self-consistent growth or decay rates of the mean fields. In mean-field dynamos the growth rates and cycle periods based on steady state values of alpha effect and turbulent diffusivity can be quite different from the actual values.

  20. Semiclassical Transport Models for Semiconductor Spintronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saikin, Semion

    Semiclassical Transport Models for Semiconductor Spintronics Yuriy V. Pershin,1,2 Semion Saikin1 spintronic device modeling. These include drift-diffusion models, kinetic transport equations and Monte Carlo in semiconductor structures have moved the state of the art closer to the realiza- tion of novel spintronic devices

  1. Semiclassical Transport Models for Semiconductor Spintronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Privman, Vladimir

    Semiclassical Transport Models for Semiconductor Spintronics Yuriy V. Pershin,1,2 Semion Saikin1 spintronic device modeling. These include drift-diffusion models, kinetic transport equations and Monte Carlo in semiconductor structures have moved the state of the art closer to the realization of novel spintronic devices

  2. The economic effects of surface transport deregulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yong, 1974-

    2002-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the deregulation of surface transport at both national and international levels has gathered momentum, particularly within the United States and European Union. The structural and performance ...

  3. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  4. Transportation Data Programs:Transportation Energy Data Book...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Data Programs:Transportation Energy Data Book,Vehicle Technologies Market Report, and VT Fact of the Week Transportation Data Programs:Transportation Energy Data...

  5. Final Report for DE-FG02-93ER14376,Ionic Transport in Electrochemical Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. W. Halley

    2009-05-20

    This project was a molecular dynamics study of the relevant issues associated with the structure and transport of lithium in polymer electrolytes such as polyethylene oxide(PEO). In close collaboration with quantum chemist Larry Curtiss and neutron scatterers David Lee Price and Marie-Louise Saboungi at Argonne, we used molecular dynamics to study the local structure and dynamics and ion transport in the polymer. The studies elucidated the mechanism of Li transport in PEO, revealing that the rate limiting step is extremely sensitive to the magnitude of the torsion forces in the backbone of the polymer. Because the torsion forces are difficult to manipulate chemically, this makes it easier to understand why improving the conductivity of PEO based electrolytes has proven to be very difficult. We studied the transport properties of cations in ionic liquids as possible additives to polymer membranes for batteries and fuel cells and found preliminary indications that the transport is enhanced near phase separation in acid-ionic liquid mixtures.

  6. UFD Storage and Transportation - Transportation Working Group Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maheras, Steven J.; Ross, Steven B.

    2011-08-01

    The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Transportation Task commenced in October 2010. As its first task, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) compiled a list of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) of transportation systems and their possible degradation mechanisms during extended storage. The list of SSCs and the associated degradation mechanisms [known as features, events, and processes (FEPs)] were based on the list of used nuclear fuel (UNF) storage system SSCs and degradation mechanisms developed by the UFD Storage Task (Hanson et al. 2011). Other sources of information surveyed to develop the list of SSCs and their degradation mechanisms included references such as Evaluation of the Technical Basis for Extended Dry Storage and Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel (NWTRB 2010), Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification, Revision 1 (OCRWM 2008), Data Needs for Long-Term Storage of LWR Fuel (EPRI 1998), Technical Bases for Extended Dry Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel (EPRI 2002), Used Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Extended Storage Collaboration Program (EPRI 2010a), Industry Spent Fuel Storage Handbook (EPRI 2010b), and Transportation of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel, Issues Resolution (EPRI 2010c). SSCs include items such as the fuel, cladding, fuel baskets, neutron poisons, metal canisters, etc. Potential degradation mechanisms (FEPs) included mechanical, thermal, radiation and chemical stressors, such as fuel fragmentation, embrittlement of cladding by hydrogen, oxidation of cladding, metal fatigue, corrosion, etc. These degradation mechanisms are discussed in Section 2 of this report. The degradation mechanisms have been evaluated to determine if they would be influenced by extended storage or high burnup, the need for additional data, and their importance to transportation. These categories were used to identify the most significant transportation degradation mechanisms. As expected, for the most part, the transportation importance was mirrored by the importance assigned by the UFD Storage Task. A few of the more significant differences are described in Section 3 of this report

  7. Optimized Structures for Low-Profile Phase Change Thermal Spreaders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharratt, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    F. , 1998, “Micro Heat Pipes,” Microscale Energy Transport,M, 2011, “Multi-Artery Heat Pipe Spreader: Lateral Liquidand Mass Transport in Heat Pipe Wick Structures,” Journal of

  8. Erosion and Optimal Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birnir, Bjorn; Rowlett, Julie

    2010-01-01

    383 pp. EROSION AND OPTIMAL TRANSPORT [23] I. Ekeland and T.and D. Simons, Sediment transport capacity of overland ?ow,measure spaces via optimal transport, Ann. of Math. (2),

  9. FRN and Rate Schedules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Doing Business Skip navigation links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-16 Rate Case OS-14 Rate Case FRN...

  10. FRN & Rate Schedules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Doing Business Skip navigation links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-16 Rate Case OS-14 Rate Case FRN...

  11. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Biodegradation Rates: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Catherine A.

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Biodegradation Rates: A Structure-Based Study K R I S T I N E H . W structure in determining the biodegradation rates of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Laboratory. Introduction Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a class of organic pollutants that are commonly found

  12. Transporting Hazardous Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transporting Hazardous Materials The procedures given below apply to all materials that are considered to be hazardous by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Consult your...

  13. Sustainability and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard

    2006-01-01

    2005. Integrating Sustainability into the Trans- portationTHOUGHT PIECE Sustainability and Transport by Richardof the concept of sustainability to transport planning. In

  14. Innovative Rates Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-21

    Title II of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) as amended by the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) provided financial assistance to state utility regulatory commissions, nonregulated electric utilities, and the Tennessee Valley Authority through the Innovative Rates Program. The financial assistance was to be used to plan or carry out electric utility regulatory rate reform initiatives relating to innovative rate structures that encourage conservation of energy, electric utility efficiency and reduced costs, and equitable rates to consumers. The Federal and local objectives of the project are described. Activities planned and accomplishments are summarized for the following: project management, data collection, utility bill evaluation, billing enclosure/mailing evaluation, media program evaluation, display evaluation, rate study sessions evaluation, speakers bureau evaluation, and individual customer contacts. A timetable/milestone chart and financial information are included. (MHR)

  15. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira; Neelima Godugu

    2000-07-30

    ACTS flow loop is now operational under elevated pressure and temperature. Currently, experiments with synthetic based drilling fluids under pressure and temperature are being conducted. Based on the analysis of Fann 70 data, empirical correlations defining the shear stress as a function of temperature, pressure and the shear rate have been developed for Petrobras synthetic drilling fluids. PVT equipment has been modified for testing Synthetic oil base drilling fluids. PVT tests with Petrobras Synthetic base mud have been conducted and results are being analyzed Foam flow experiments have been conducted and the analysis of the data has been carried out to characterize the rheology of the foam. Comparison of pressure loss prediction from the available foam hydraulic models and the test results has been made. Cuttings transport experiments in horizontal annulus section have been conducted using air, water and cuttings. Currently, cuttings transport tests in inclined test section are being conducted. Foam PVT analysis tests have been conducted. Foam stability experiments have also been conducted. Effects of salt and oil concentration on the foam stability have been investigated. Design of ACTS flow loop modification for foam and aerated mud flow has been completed. A flow loop operation procedure for conducting foam flow experiments under EPET conditions has been prepared Design of the lab-scale flow loop for dynamic foam characterization and cuttings monitoring instrumentation tests has been completed. The construction of the test loop is underway. As part of the technology transport efforts, Advisory Board Meeting with ACTS-JIP industry members has been organized on May 13, 2000.

  16. Water Transport Exploratory Studies Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - transportation) · Develop a better understanding of the effects of freeze/thaw cycles and operation ­ Help guideWater Transport Exploratory Studies Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure understanding of water transport in PEM Fuel Cells (non-design-specific) · Evaluate structural and surface

  17. Drains Debubbler Transport Liq. Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    Drains Debubbler Transport Liq. Flow (LiF) aq. Anion Cation Waste Vacuum Pump LiF H2 O Pure H2 O 1 Denuders Cyclon 16 L/min 2.5 µm cut Sample Tubing ColourFlow, mL/minTubing green/green-1 green/green-2, and Liquid Flow Rates Are Possible Cation: metrosep 2100B-100x4.0mm Eluent: 0.250g/L Dipicolinic acid 1000 u

  18. Chlorite Dissolution Rates

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Carroll, Susan

    2013-07-01

    Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

  19. Chlorite Dissolution Rates

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Carroll, Susan

    Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

  20. Cavity enhanced transport of excitons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannes Schachenmayer; Claudiu Genes; Edoardo Tignone; Guido Pupillo

    2015-05-20

    We show that exciton-type transport in certain materials can be dramatically modified by their inclusion in an optical cavity: the modification of the electromagnetic vacuum mode structure introduced by the cavity leads to transport via delocalized polariton modes rather than through tunneling processes in the material itself. This can help overcome exponential suppression of transmission properties as a function of the system size in the case of disorder and other imperfections. We exemplify massive improvement of transmission for excitonic wave-packets through a cavity, as well as enhancement of steady-state exciton currents under incoherent pumping. These results may have implications for experiments of exciton transport in disordered organic materials. We propose that the basic phenomena can be observed in quantum simulators made of Rydberg atoms, cold molecules in optical lattices, as well as in experiments with trapped ions.

  1. Motor Transport Co. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    METROPOLITAN TRANSPORTATION PLAN Prepared by: The Longview Metropolitan Planning Organization In cooperation with: o City of Longview o City of White Oak o Gregg County o Harrison County o Texas Department of Transportation o U.S. Department... of Transportation o Federal Highway Administration o Federal Transit Administration Adopted November 12, 2009 TRANSPORTATION 2035 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION...

  2. Introduction Transport in disordered graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Ballistic transport in disordered graphene P, Gornyi, Mirlin Ballistic transport in disordered graphene #12;Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Outline 1 Introduction Model Experimental motivation Transport in clean graphene 2

  3. Paleophysical Oceanography with an Emphasis on Transport Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    Paleophysical oceanography is the study of the behavior of the fluid ocean of the past, with a specific emphasis on its climate implications, leading to a focus on the general circulation. Even if the circulation is not ...

  4. Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are...

  5. NREL: Awards and Honors - High-Rate Vapor Transport Deposition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy Laboratory; Dr. Rick Powell and Dr. Peter Myers, First Solar, LLD A module per minute. First Solar's automated, non-stop, continuous-feed production line can...

  6. Rail Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand Cubic Feet)698 1.873 -CoalRail

  7. Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948CaliforniaFeet) (Million

  8. TRANSPORT THROUGH CRACKED CONCRETE: LITERATURE REVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.

    2012-05-11

    Concrete containment structures and cement-based fills and waste forms are used at the Savannah River Site to enhance the performance of shallow land disposal systems designed for containment of low-level radioactive waste. Understanding and measuring transport through cracked concrete is important for describing the initial condition of radioactive waste containment structures at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and for predicting performance of these structures over time. This report transmits the results of a literature review on transport through cracked concrete which was performed by Professor Jason Weiss, Purdue University per SRR0000678 (RFP-RQ00001029-WY). This review complements the NRC-sponsored literature review and assessment of factors relevant to performance of grouted systems for radioactive waste disposal. This review was performed by The Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX, and The University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen Scotland and was focused on tank closure. The objective of the literature review on transport through cracked concrete was to identify information in the open literature which can be applied to SRS transport models for cementitious containment structures, fills, and waste forms. In addition, the literature review was intended to: (1) Provide a framework for describing and classifying cracks in containment structures and cementitious materials used in radioactive waste disposal, (2) Document the state of knowledge and research related to transport through cracks in concrete for various exposure conditions, (3) Provide information or methodology for answering several specific questions related to cracking and transport in concrete, and (4) Provide information that can be used to design experiments on transport through cracked samples and actual structures.

  9. Computationally efficient description of relativistic electron beam transport in collisionless plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    Computationally efficient description of relativistic electron beam transport in collisionless and relativistic electron beam transport in collisionless background plasma is developed. Beam electrons saturation of a low-current electron beam is presented. Using the present approach, linear growth rates

  10. Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutron Sciences Energy Advanced Materials Supercomputing Catalysis A. J. Drexel Nanotechnology Institute Argonne National Laboratory logo UC Davis University of California logo...

  11. Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find whatGasEnergyfeature photoTheory05 Target 1

  12. Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find whatGasEnergyfeature photoTheory05 Target 1Research

  13. Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find whatGasEnergyfeature photoTheory05 Target 1ResearchResearch

  14. Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find whatGasEnergyfeature photoTheory05 Target

  15. Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find whatGasEnergyfeature photoTheory05 TargetExternal Advisory

  16. Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find whatGasEnergyfeature photoTheory05 TargetExternal

  17. Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find whatGasEnergyfeature photoTheory05 TargetExternalOverview

  18. Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find whatGasEnergyfeature photoTheory05

  19. Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaonforsupernovae model (Journal About DOE ButtonFSO Homefeature CS

  20. Secure Transportation Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, P. W.

    2014-10-15

    Secure Transport Management Course (STMC) course provides managers with information related to procedures and equipment used to successfully transport special nuclear material. This workshop outlines these procedures and reinforces the information presented with the aid of numerous practical examples. The course focuses on understanding the regulatory framework for secure transportation of special nuclear materials, identifying the insider and outsider threat(s) to secure transportation, organization of a secure transportation unit, management and supervision of secure transportation units, equipment and facilities required, training and qualification needed.

  1. 2004 Rate Adjustments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Transmission and Ancillary Services Federal Register Notice -- Rate Order WAPA-141: Notice of Extension of Formula Rates for Transmission and Ancillary Services If you have any...

  2. Rate Schedule CPP-2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    points established by contract, in accordance with approved policies and procedures. Formula Rate: The formula rate for CPP includes three components: Component 1: The customer...

  3. Development of a Rating System for a Comparative Accelerated Test Standard (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.

    2013-06-01

    This presentation discusses methods of developing and structuring a useful rating system and communicating the results.

  4. Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE...

  5. Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomes, R.

    1998-09-01

    Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

  6. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier1Rate | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 JumpPublicationDate Jump to:Information Tier1Max Jump to:

  7. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier2Rate | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 JumpPublicationDate Jump to:Information Tier1Max JumpInformation

  8. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier3Rate | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 JumpPublicationDate Jump to:Information

  9. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier5Rate | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 JumpPublicationDate Jump

  10. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier6Rate | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 JumpPublicationDate JumpEnergy Information Tier6Adjustment

  11. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier2Rate | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 JumpPublicationDate JumpEnergyInformation Sell Jump

  12. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier3Rate | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 JumpPublicationDate JumpEnergyInformation SellInformation Max

  13. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier4Rate | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 JumpPublicationDate JumpEnergyInformationInformation

  14. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier5Rate | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 JumpPublicationDateInformation Max Jump to: navigation, search This

  15. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier6Rate | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 JumpPublicationDateInformation Max Jump to: navigation,Information

  16. Influence of Transport Variables on Isospin Transport Ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. D. S. Coupland; W. G. Lynch; M. B. Tsang; P. Danielewicz; Yingxun Zhang

    2011-07-19

    The symmetry energy in the nuclear equation of state affects many aspects of nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure, and nuclear reactions. Recent constraints from heavy ion collisions, including isospin diffusion observables, have started to put constraints on the symmetry energy below nuclear saturation density, but these constraints depend on the employed transport model and input physics other than the symmetry energy. To understand these dependencies, we study the influence of the symmetry energy, isoscaler mean field compressibility and momentum dependence, in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections, and light cluster production on isospin diffusion within the pBUU transport code. In addition to the symmetry energy, several uncertain issues strongly affect isospin diffusion, most notably the cross sections and cluster production. In addition, there is a difference in the calculated isospin transport ratios, depending upon whether they are computed using the isospin asymmetry of either the residue or of all forward moving fragments. Measurements that compare the isospin transport ratios of these two quantities would help place constraints on the input physics, such as the density dependence of the symmetry energy.

  17. Dependence of Up-scaled Reaction Rate on Flow Rate in Porous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    to inherent heterogeneities in structure, mineral placement and fluid velocity in rock, bulk reaction rates1 Dependence of Up-scaled Reaction Rate on Flow Rate in Porous Media D. Kim · W. B. Lindquist model simulations of anorthite and kaolinite reactions in two sandstone pore networks under acidic

  18. Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation...

  19. Ion transport through cell membrane channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Gomulkiewicz; Jacek Miekisz; Stanislaw Miekisz

    2007-06-05

    We discuss various models of ion transport through cell membrane channels. Recent experimental data shows that sizes of ion channels are compared to those of ions and that only few ions may be simultaneously in any single channel. Theoretical description of ion transport in such channels should therefore take into account interactions between ions and between ions and channel proteins. This is not satisfied by macroscopic continuum models based on Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations. More realistic descriptions of ion transport are offered by microscopic Brownian and molecular dynamics. One should also take into account a dynamical character of the channel structure. This is not yet addressed in the literature

  20. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-27

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Canceled by DOE 460.1A

  1. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-05-14

    The order establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE, including NNSA, offsite shipments and onsite transfers of radioactive and other hazardous materials and for modal transportation. Supersedes DOE O 460.1B.

  2. Sustainability and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard

    2006-01-01

    also known there as sustainable mobility. This de?nition wasfor De?ning Sustainable Transport and Mobility. [cited 13Sustainable transporta- tion is de?ned as a means to satisfy current transport and mobility

  3. Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification.

  4. Linear Motor Powered Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Richard D.

    This special issue on linear-motor powered transportation covers both supporting technologies and innovative transport systems in various parts of the World, as this technology moves from the lab to commercial operations. ...

  5. Transportation Energy Futures Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Transportation accounts for 71% of total U.S. petroleum consumption and 33% of total greenhouse gas emissions. The Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) study examines underexplored oil-savings and...

  6. Transportation Market Distortions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litman, Todd

    2006-01-01

    roads and parking facilities is exempt from rent and taxes,road transport relative to rail (which pays rent and taxesroad tolls, parking fees, and Litman, Transportation Market Distortions higher fuel taxes

  7. Introduction to Transportation Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Introduction to Transportation Planning CMP 4710/6710 Fall 2012 3 Credit Hours Room: ARCH 229 of City & Metropolitan Planning; Associate Dean, College of Architecture + Planning; former associate, social equity, fiscal health, and public health. Unfortunately, most transportation planning processes

  8. Transportation Conference Speakers - 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Thiamin transport in Escherichia coli is a model system to establish the tolerance of derivatives for transport into the cell. Since little is known about what types of thiamin derivatives may be successfully taken into the cell through...

  9. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-27

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials andor modal transport. Cancels DOE 1540.2 and DOE 5480.3

  10. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-10-02

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1.

  11. Biofuels and Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Biofuels and Transportation Impacts and Uncertainties Some Observations of a Reformed Ethanol and Logistics Symposium 3 Topics · Why Biofuels · Ethanol Economics · Ethanol Transportation Equipment Biofuels? · National Security · Reduce Imports of oil · Peak Oil · Replace Fossil Resources

  12. Crystal structure, magnetism and transport properties of Ce{sub 3}Ni{sub 25.75}Ru{sub 3.16}Al{sub 4.1}B{sub 10}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janka, Oliver; Baumbach, Ryan E.; Thompson, Joe D.; Bauer, Eric D.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2013-09-15

    Single crystals of Ce{sub 3}Ni{sub 25.75}Ru{sub 3.16}Al{sub 4.1}B{sub 10} were obtained from a process in which a polycrystalline sample of CeRu{sub 2}Al{sub 2}B was annealed in an excess of a Ni–In flux. The initial phase, CeRu{sub 2}Al{sub 2}B, does not recrystallize, instead, crystals of a new phase, Ce{sub 3}Ni{sub 25.75}Ru{sub 3.16}Al{sub 4.1}B{sub 10}, could be isolated once the flux was removed. The title compound crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4/nmm (No. 129) with a=1139.02(8), c=801.68(6) pm (c/a=0.70) in the Nd{sub 3}Ni{sub 29}Si{sub 4}B{sub 10} structure type. Electrical resistivity measurements reveal metallic behavior with a minimum of 700 µ? cm and a small residual resistivity ratio of RRR=1.4 indicating a large amount of disorder scattering. The cerium atoms are either in the 4+ or an intermediate valence state with a valence fluctuation temperature far above room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Single crystals of Ce{sub 3}Ni{sub 25.75}Ru{sub 3.16}A{sub l4.1}B{sub 10} were obtained using a process in which a polycrystalline sample of CeRu{sub 2}Al{sub 2}B was annealed in an excess of a Ni–In flux. Electrical resistivity measurements reveal metallic behavior with a minimum of 700 ?? cm and a small residual resistivity ratio of RRR=1.4 indicating a large amount of disorder scattering. The cerium atoms are either in the 4+ or an intermediate valence state with a valence fluctuation temperature far above room temperature. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Flux synthesis of high quality single crystals of Ce{sub 3}Ni{sub 25.75}Ru{sub 3.16}Al{sub 4.1}B{sub 10} is presented along with the crystal structure, magnetic and transport properties. • The compound is isostructural to Nd{sub 3}Ni{sub 29}Si{sub 4}B{sub 10} but is first of this structure type showing mixed occupancies of d-elements. • This is an intermetallic phase with Ce in either the 4+ or an intermediate valence state. • The fact that this structure with mixed occupied transition metal sites exists suggests that more compounds of this type should be accessible and the physical properties tuned.

  13. Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-12-01

    Fact sheet describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's evaluation of Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation's (IndyGo's) hybrid electric buses.

  14. The past, present, and future of littoral transport processes along the Illinois coast of Lake Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrzastowski, M.J.; Trask, C.B. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-04-01

    The 101-km Illinois coast of Lake Michigan incorporates diverse settings, ranging from the most intensely engineered shoreline along the Great lakes to a natural shoreline along a well-developed beach-ridge plain. The estimated rate of littoral transport along the Illinois coast, prior to any coastal engineering, was approximately 80,000 cubic m/year. No obstructions interrupted the continuous net southerly transport to a drift terminus along the Indiana coast. Jetties built in the 1830s to defend the mouth of the Chicago River formed the first barriers to littoral transport, and substantial downdrift erosion resulted. Additional coastal structures that form both total and partial barriers to littoral transport have segmented the original single littoral-transport cell into a series of 6 primary cells (bounded by total barriers) and 18 secondary cells (bounded by partial barriers). As a result, the supply of littoral sediment from the Illinois coast that once nourished the Indiana coast has been eliminated. Future management of sand resources along the Illinois coast should recognize and be compatible with the segmentation of the littoral-transport system into separate cells. Rather than viewing littoral-drift nourishment from the standpoint of the entire coastline, sand volumes within the cells should be conserved. Under this approach, sediment nourishment would be used to maintain sediment volumes within cells at some desired level; updrift backpassing of sand among subcells would recycle most littoral sediment within each cell. Artificial bypassing of the total barriers between cells in an attempt to reestablish the preengineered littoral-transport system is unrealistic.

  15. Parking & Transportation Services Sustainability &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    : 2011 #12;As a long-time leader in the areas of waste abatement, pollution reduction, energy management Metro Commuter Services Infinity Award ­ in recognition of alternative transportation programs. · 1996 to maintaining impressive and viable alternative transportation programs. TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM DESIGNS

  16. Role of Water States on Water Uptake and Proton Transport in Nafion using Molecular Simulations and Bimodal Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Gi Suk

    2013-01-01

    of novel sulfonated polyimides from 2,2’-bis(4-aminophenoxy)structure of sul- fonated polyimide membranes on transport

  17. Top transport in electroweak baryogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Fromme; Stephan J. Huber

    2006-05-09

    In non-supersymmetric models of electroweak baryogenesis the top quark plays a crucial role. Its CP-violating source term can be calculated in the WKB approximation. We point out how to resolve certain discrepancies between computations starting from the Dirac equation and the Schwinger--Keldysh formalism. We also improve on the transport equations, keeping the W-scatterings at finite rate. We apply these results to a model with one Higgs doublet, augmented by dimension-6 operators, where our refinements lead to an increase in the baryon asymmetry by a factor of up to about 5.

  18. Department of Transportation I. Internal Scan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Department of Transportation I. Internal Scan The number of older drivers in the United States-driver basis, older adults are among the safest. The average annual number of crashes in the United States million vehicle miles traveled (MVMT), drivers over the age of 75 have a fatality rate of 3.7 deaths per

  19. Transportation Center Seminar Series presents..... Jeroen Struben

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    Transportation Fuels and Vehicles ABSTRACT: With increasingly volatile oil prices, unprecedented US dependence under a variety of scenarios. In particular, we identify and explore an ambivalent effect of higher oil prices on the rate of plugin electric vehicle adoption. The talk concludes with a discussion

  20. Salinity tolerance in plants: attempts to manipulate ion transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vadim Volkov

    2014-11-06

    Ion transport is the major determining factor of salinity tolerance in plants. A simple scheme of a plant cell with ion fluxes provides basic understanding of ion transport and the corresponding changes of ion concentrations under salinity. The review describes in detail basic principles of ion transport for a plant cell, introduces set of transporters essential for sodium and potassium uptake and efflux, analyses driving forces of ion transport and compares ion fluxes measured by several techniques. Study of differences in ion transport between salt tolerant halophytes and salt-sensitive plants with an emphasis on transport of potassium and sodium via plasma membranes offers knowledge for increasing salinity tolerance. Effects of salt stress on ion transport properties of membranes show huge opportunities for manipulating ion transport. Several attempts to overexpress or knockout ion transporters for changing salinity tolerance are described. Future perspectives are questioned with more attention given to potential candidate ion channels and transporters for altered expression. The potential direction of increasing salinity tolerance by modifying ion channels and transporters is discussed and questioned. An alternative approach from synthetic biology is to modify the existing membrane transport proteins or create new ones with desired properties for transforming agricultural crops. The approach had not been widely used earlier and leads also to theoretical and pure scientific aspects of protein chemistry, structure-function relations of membrane proteins, systems biology and physiology of stress and ion homeostasis.

  1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    year over the next 40 years, resulting in a 300 percent increase in emissions by 2050 (IEA 2008b). The projected growth rate of global marine transportation emissions is more...

  2. A numerical model simulation of longshore transport for Galveston Island 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbreath, Stephen Alexander

    1995-01-01

    The shoreline changes, deposition patterns, and longshore transport rates were calculated for the coast of Galveston Island using a numerical model simulation. The model only simulated changes due to waves creating longshore currents. East Beach...

  3. Modeling of Transport in Lithium Ion Battery Electrodes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Michael

    2012-07-16

    and time consuming prototypical experiments. Of the numerous processes occurring in these systems, solid state transport in particular has drawn a large amount of attention from the research community, as it tends to be one of the rate limiting steps...

  4. Heat transport through ion crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahuel Freitas; Esteban Martinez; Juan Pablo Paz

    2014-12-09

    We study the thermodynamical properties of crystals of trapped ions which are laser cooled to two different temperatures in two separate regions. We show that these properties strongly depend on the structure of the ion crystal. Such structure can be changed by varying the trap parameters and undergoes a series of phase transitions from linear to zig-zag or helicoidal configurations. Thus, we show that these systems are ideal candidates to observe and control the transition from anomalous to normal heat transport. All structures behave as `heat superconductors', with a thermal conductivity increasing linearly with system size and a vanishing thermal gradient inside the system. However, zig-zag and helicoidal crystals turn out to be hyper sensitive to disorder having a linear temperature profile and a length independent conductivity. Interestingly, disordered 2D ion crystals are heat insulators. Sensitivity to disorder is much smaller in the 1D case.

  5. Understanding the Relationship between Osmotic Membrane Structure and Separation Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Mavis C.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Review of Transport through Osmotic Membranes. , J. Membr.and solution chemistry on osmotic structure and performance.relationship between osmotic membrane structure, chemistry,

  6. Development of dense-phase pneumatic transport of coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horisaka, S.; Ikemiya, H.; Kajiwara, T. [Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Kashima, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Dense phase pneumatic transport system has been developed to reduce entrained particles as is seen in the belt conveyor system. High mass flow rate and dense phase (Loading ratio = 50--100kg-coal/kg-N{sub 2}) transport has been achieved by applying this plug flow system to pneumatic conveying of coal (Average particle diameter = 2.5 mm).

  7. Vibration-enhanced quantum transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. L. Semião; K. Furuya; G. J. Milburn

    2010-08-17

    In this paper, we study the role of collective vibrational motion in the phenomenon of electronic energy transfer (EET) along a chain of coupled electronic dipoles with varying excitation frequencies. Previous experimental work on EET in conjugated polymer samples has suggested that the common structural framework of the macromolecule introduces correlations in the energy gap fluctuations which cause coherent EET. Inspired by these results, we present a simple model in which a driven nanomechanical resonator mode modulates the excitation energy of coupled quantum dots and find that this can indeed lead to an enhancement in the transport of excitations across the quantum network. Disorder of the on-site energies is a key requirement for this to occur. We also show that in this solid state system phase information is partially retained in the transfer process, as experimentally demonstrated in conjugated polymer samples. Consequently, this mechanism of vibration enhanced quantum transport might find applications in quantum information transfer of qubit states or entanglement.

  8. Irradiation of commercial, high-Tc superconducting tape for potential fusion applications: electromagnetic transport properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aytug, Tolga [ORNL; Gapud, Albert A. [University of South Alabama, Mobile; List III, Frederick Alyious [ORNL; Leonard, Keith J [ORNL; Rupich, Marty [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Greenwood, N T [University of South Alabama, Mobile; Alexander, J A [University of South Alabama, Mobile; Khan, A [University of South Alabama, Mobile

    2015-01-01

    Effects of low dose irradiation on the electrical transport current properties of commercially available high-temperature superconducting, coated-conductor tapes were investigated, in view of potential applications in the irradiative environment of fusion reactors. Three different tapes, each with unique as-grown flux-pinning structures, were irradiated with Au and Ni ions at energies that provide a range of damage effects, with accumulated damage levels near that expected for conductors in a fusion reactor environment. Measurements using transport current determined the pre- and post-irradiation resistivity, critical current density, and pinning force density, yielding critical temperatures, irreversibility lines, and inferred vortex creep rates. Results show that at the irradiation damage levels tested, any detriment to as-grown pre-irradiation properties is modest; indeed in one case already-superior pinning forces are enhanced, leading to higher critical currents.

  9. A Transportation Risk Assessment Tool for Analyzing the Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste to the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ralph Best; T. Winnard; S. Ross; R. Best

    2001-08-17

    The Yucca Mountain Transportation Database was developed as a data management tool for assembling and integrating data from multiple sources to compile the potential transportation impacts presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada (DEIS). The database uses the results from existing models and codes such as RADTRAN, RISKIND, INTERLINE, and HIGHWAY to estimate transportation-related impacts of transporting spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from commercial reactors and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to Yucca Mountain. The source tables in the database are compendiums of information from many diverse sources including: radionuclide quantities for each waste type; route and route characteristics for rail, legal-weight truck, heavy haul. truck, and barge transport options; state-specific accident and fatality rates for routes selected for analysis; packaging and shipment data by waste type; unit risk factors; the complex behavior of the packaged waste forms in severe transport accidents; and the effects of exposure to radiation or the isotopic specific effects of radionclides should they be released in severe transportation accidents. The database works together with the codes RADTRAN (Neuhauser, et al, 1994) and RISKlND (Yuan, et al, 1995) to calculate incident-free dose and accident risk. For the incident-free transportation scenario, the database uses RADTRAN and RISKIND-generated data to calculate doses to offlink populations, onlink populations, people at stops, crews, inspectors, workers at intermodal transfer stations, guards at overnight stops, and escorts, as well as non-radioactive pollution health effects. For accident scenarios, the database uses RADTRAN-generated data to calculate dose risks based on ingestion, inhalation, resuspension, immersion (cloudshine), and groundshine as well as non-radioactive traffic fatalities. The Yucca Mountain EIS Transportation Database was developed using Microsoft Access 97{trademark} software and the Microsoft Windows NT{trademark} operating system. The database consists of tables for storing data, forms for selecting data for querying, and queries for retrieving the data in a predefined format. Database queries retrieve records based on input parameters and are used to calculate incident-free and accident doses using unit risk factors obtained from RADTRAN results. The next section briefly provides some background that led to the development of the database approach used in preparing the Yucca Mountain DEIS. Subsequent sections provide additional details on the database structure and types of impacts calculated using the database.

  10. Histologic Comparison of Regenerate Bone Produced from Dentate Versus Edentulous Transport Discs in Bone Transport Distraction Osteogenesis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sevilla Gaitan, Carlos

    2013-12-10

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to quantify the number of blood vessels and nerves and mineral apposition rate (MAR) in native bone and compare it to the regenerate bone produced by bone transport distraction osteogenesis (BTDO...

  11. Lesson 22 Related Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-10-11

    Oct 11, 2013 ... A spherical weather balloon is being inflated with helium at a rate of 82 cubic meters per minute. Find the rate at which its radius is increasing.

  12. Naughton's related rates problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dominic

    2013-02-25

    Related rates (1). (1) Oil spills from a rupture container in a circular pattern whose radius increases at a rate of 2 ft/s. How fast is the area of the oil spill increasing ...

  13. Parallel transport quantum logic gates with trapped ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Clercq, Ludwig; Marinelli, Matteo; Nadlinger, David; Oswald, Robin; Negnevitsky, Vlad; Kienzler, Daniel; Keitch, Ben; Home, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    Quantum information processing will require combinations of gate operations and communication, with each applied in parallel to large numbers of quantum systems. These tasks are often performed sequentially, with gates implemented by pulsed fields and information transported either by moving the physical qubits or using photonic links. For trapped ions, an alternative approach is to implement quantum logic gates by transporting the ions through static laser beams, combining qubit operations with transport. This has significant advantages for scalability since the voltage waveforms required for transport can potentially be generated using micro-electronics integrated into the trap structure itself, while both optical and microwave control elements are significantly more bulky. Using a multi-zone ion trap, we demonstrate transport gates on a qubit encoded in the hyperfine structure of a beryllium ion. We show the ability to perform sequences of operations, and to perform parallel gates on two ions transported t...

  14. Multi-fluid transport code modeling of time-dependent recycling in ELMy H-mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Hollmann, E. M.; Rognlien, T. D.; Lasnier, C. J.; Unterberg, E.

    2014-06-15

    Simulations of a high-confinement-mode (H-mode) tokamak discharge with infrequent giant type-I ELMs are performed by the multi-fluid, multi-species, two-dimensional transport code UEDGE-MB, which incorporates the Macro-Blob approach for intermittent non-diffusive transport due to filamentary coherent structures observed during the Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and simple time-dependent multi-parametric models for cross-field plasma transport coefficients and working gas inventory in material surfaces. Temporal evolutions of pedestal plasma profiles, divertor recycling, and wall inventory in a sequence of ELMs are studied and compared to the experimental time-dependent data. Short- and long-time-scale variations of the pedestal and divertor plasmas where the ELM is described as a sequence of macro-blobs are discussed. It is shown that the ELM recovery includes the phase of relatively dense and cold post-ELM divertor plasma evolving on a several ms scale, which is set by the transport properties of H-mode barrier. The global gas balance in the discharge is also analyzed. The calculated rates of working gas deposition during each ELM and wall outgassing between ELMs are compared to the ELM particle losses from the pedestal and neutral-beam-injection fueling rate, correspondingly. A sensitivity study of the pedestal and divertor plasmas to model assumptions for gas deposition and release on material surfaces is presented. The performed simulations show that the dynamics of pedestal particle inventory is dominated by the transient intense gas deposition into the wall during each ELM followed by continuous gas release between ELMs at roughly a constant rate.

  15. Multi-fluid transport code modeling of time-dependent recycling in ELMy H-mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Rognlien, T. D.; Hollmann, E. M.; Lasnier, C. J.; Unterberg, Ezekial A

    2014-01-01

    Simulations of a high-confinement-mode (H-mode) tokamak discharge with infrequent giant type-I ELMs are performed by the multi-fluid, multi-species, two-dimensional transport code UEDGE-MB, which incorporates the Macro-Blob approach for intermittent non-diffusive transport due to filamentary coherent structures observed during the Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and simple time-dependent multi-parametric models for cross-field plasma transport coefficients and working gas inventory in material surfaces. Temporal evolutions of pedestal plasma profiles, divertor recycling, and wall inventory in a sequence of ELMs are studied and compared to the experimental time-dependent data. Short- and long-time-scale variations of the pedestal and divertor plasmas where the ELM is described as a sequence of macro-blobs are discussed. It is shown that the ELM recovery includes the phase of relatively dense and cold post-ELM divertor plasma evolving on a several ms scale, which is set by the transport properties of H-mode barrier. The global gas balance in the discharge is also analyzed. The calculated rates of working gas deposition during each ELM and wall outgassing between ELMs are compared to the ELM particle losses from the pedestal and neutral-beam-injection fueling rate, correspondingly. A sensitivity study of the pedestal and divertor plasmas to model assumptions for gas deposition and release on material surfaces is presented. The performed simulations show that the dynamics of pedestal particle inventory is dominated by the transient intense gas deposition into the wall during each ELM followed by continuous gas release between ELMs at roughly a constant rate.

  16. Diffusion and transport coefficients in synthetic opals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sofo, J. O.; Mahan, G. D.; Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1200

    2000-07-15

    Opals are structures composed of close-packed spheres in the size range of nano to micrometers. They are sintered to create small necks at the points of contact. We have solved the diffusion problem in such structures. The relation between the diffusion coefficient and the thermal and electrical conductivity is used to estimate the transport coefficients of opal structures as a function of the neck size and the mean free path of the carriers. The theory presented is also applicable to the diffusion problem in other periodic structures. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  17. Analysis of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh/Taylor unstable flow using direct numerical simulation data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schilling, Oleg; Mueschke, Nicholas J.

    2010-10-18

    Data from a 1152X760X1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a transitional Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer modeled after a small Atwood number water channel experiment is used to comprehensively investigate the structure of mean and turbulent transport and mixing. The simulation had physical parameters and initial conditions approximating those in the experiment. The budgets of the mean vertical momentum, heavy-fluid mass fraction, turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate, heavy-fluid mass fraction variance, and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance dissipation rate equations are constructed using Reynolds averaging applied to the DNS data. The relative importance of mean and turbulent production, turbulent dissipationmore »and destruction, and turbulent transport are investigated as a function of Reynolds number and across the mixing layer to provide insight into the flow dynamics not presently available from experiments. The analysis of the budgets supports the assumption for small Atwood number, Rayleigh/Taylor driven flows that the principal transport mechanisms are buoyancy production, turbulent production, turbulent dissipation, and turbulent diffusion (shear and mean field production are negligible). As the Reynolds number increases, the turbulent production in the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate equation becomes the dominant production term, while the buoyancy production plateaus. Distinctions between momentum and scalar transport are also noted, where the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate both grow in time and are peaked near the center plane of the mixing layer, while the heavy-fluid mass fraction variance and its dissipation rate initially grow and then begin to decrease as mixing progresses and reduces density fluctuations. All terms in the transport equations generally grow or decay, with no qualitative change in their profile, except for the pressure flux contribution to the total turbulent kinetic energy flux, which changes sign early in time (a countergradient effect). The production-to-dissipation ratios corresponding to the turbulent kinetic energy and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance are large and vary strongly at small evolution times, decrease with time, and nearly asymptote as the flow enters a self-similar regime. The late-time turbulent kinetic energy production-to-dissipation ratio is larger than observed in shear-driven turbulent flows. The order of magnitude estimates of the terms in the transport equations are shown to be consistent with the DNS at late-time, and also confirms both the dominant terms and their evolutionary behavior. These results are useful for identifying the dynamically important terms requiring closure, and assessing the accuracy of the predictions of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and large-eddy simulation models of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh-Taylor instability-generated flow.« less

  18. Analysis of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh/Taylor unstable flow using direct numerical simulation data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schilling, Oleg [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mueschke, Nicholas J. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Data from a 1152X760X1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a transitional Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer modeled after a small Atwood number water channel experiment is used to comprehensively investigate the structure of mean and turbulent transport and mixing. The simulation had physical parameters and initial conditions approximating those in the experiment. The budgets of the mean vertical momentum, heavy-fluid mass fraction, turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate, heavy-fluid mass fraction variance, and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance dissipation rate equations are constructed using Reynolds averaging applied to the DNS data. The relative importance of mean and turbulent production, turbulent dissipation and destruction, and turbulent transport are investigated as a function of Reynolds number and across the mixing layer to provide insight into the flow dynamics not presently available from experiments. The analysis of the budgets supports the assumption for small Atwood number, Rayleigh/Taylor driven flows that the principal transport mechanisms are buoyancy production, turbulent production, turbulent dissipation, and turbulent diffusion (shear and mean field production are negligible). As the Reynolds number increases, the turbulent production in the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate equation becomes the dominant production term, while the buoyancy production plateaus. Distinctions between momentum and scalar transport are also noted, where the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate both grow in time and are peaked near the center plane of the mixing layer, while the heavy-fluid mass fraction variance and its dissipation rate initially grow and then begin to decrease as mixing progresses and reduces density fluctuations. All terms in the transport equations generally grow or decay, with no qualitative change in their profile, except for the pressure flux contribution to the total turbulent kinetic energy flux, which changes sign early in time (a countergradient effect). The production-to-dissipation ratios corresponding to the turbulent kinetic energy and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance are large and vary strongly at small evolution times, decrease with time, and nearly asymptote as the flow enters a self-similar regime. The late-time turbulent kinetic energy production-to-dissipation ratio is larger than observed in shear-driven turbulent flows. The order of magnitude estimates of the terms in the transport equations are shown to be consistent with the DNS at late-time, and also confirms both the dominant terms and their evolutionary behavior. These results are useful for identifying the dynamically important terms requiring closure, and assessing the accuracy of the predictions of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and large-eddy simulation models of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh-Taylor instability-generated flow.

  19. Analysis of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh–Taylor unstable flow using direct numerical simulation data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schilling, Oleg; Mueschke, Nicholas J.

    2010-10-18

    Data from a 1152X760X1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a transitional Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer modeled after a small Atwood number water channel experiment is used to comprehensively investigate the structure of mean and turbulent transport and mixing. The simulation had physical parameters and initial conditions approximating those in the experiment. The budgets of the mean vertical momentum, heavy-fluid mass fraction, turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate, heavy-fluid mass fraction variance, and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance dissipation rate equations are constructed using Reynolds averaging applied to the DNS data. The relative importance of mean and turbulent production, turbulent dissipationmore »and destruction, and turbulent transport are investigated as a function of Reynolds number and across the mixing layer to provide insight into the flow dynamics not presently available from experiments. The analysis of the budgets supports the assumption for small Atwood number, Rayleigh/Taylor driven flows that the principal transport mechanisms are buoyancy production, turbulent production, turbulent dissipation, and turbulent diffusion (shear and mean field production are negligible). As the Reynolds number increases, the turbulent production in the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate equation becomes the dominant production term, while the buoyancy production plateaus. Distinctions between momentum and scalar transport are also noted, where the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate both grow in time and are peaked near the center plane of the mixing layer, while the heavy-fluid mass fraction variance and its dissipation rate initially grow and then begin to decrease as mixing progresses and reduces density fluctuations. All terms in the transport equations generally grow or decay, with no qualitative change in their profile, except for the pressure flux contribution to the total turbulent kinetic energy flux, which changes sign early in time (a countergradient effect). The production-to-dissipation ratios corresponding to the turbulent kinetic energy and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance are large and vary strongly at small evolution times, decrease with time, and nearly asymptote as the flow enters a self-similar regime. The late-time turbulent kinetic energy production-to-dissipation ratio is larger than observed in shear-driven turbulent flows. The order of magnitude estimates of the terms in the transport equations are shown to be consistent with the DNS at late-time, and also confirms both the dominant terms and their evolutionary behavior. Thus, these results are useful for identifying the dynamically important terms requiring closure, and assessing the accuracy of the predictions of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and large-eddy simulation models of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh-Taylor instability-generated flow.« less

  20. MSIV leakage airborne iodine transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cline, J.E. (Cline Associates Inc., Rockville, MD (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Gaseous iodine deposits on surfaces exposed to vapors. Basic chemical and physical principles predict this behavior, and several laboratory and in-plant measurements demonstrate the characteristic. An empirical model was developed that describes the deposition, resuspension, and transformation of airborne radioiodine molecular species as a stream containing these forms moves along its pathway. The model uses a data base of measured values of deposition and resuspension rates in its application and describes the conversion of the more reactive inorganic iodine species I[sub 2] to the less reactive organic species CH[sub 3]I as the iodine deposits and resuspends along the path. It also considers radioactive decay and chemical surface bonding during residence on surfaces. For the 8-day [sup 131]I, decay during the airborne portion of the transport is negligible. Verification of the model included measurement tests of long gaseous-activity sampling lines of different diameters, operated at different flow rates and stream temperatures. The model was applied to the streams at a boiling water reactor nuclear power plant to describe the transport through leaking main steam isolation valves (MSIVs), following a loss-of-coolant accident.

  1. Transport mechanisms in nanopores and nanochannels: Can we mimic nature?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Szleifer, Igal

    2014-11-03

    The last few years have witnessed major advancements in the synthesis, modification, characterization and modeling of nanometer-size solid-state channels and pores. Future applications in sensing, energy conversion and purification technologies will critically rely on qualitative improvements in the control over the selectivity, directionality and responsiveness of these nanochannels and nanopores. It is not surprising, therefore, that researchers in the field seek inspiration in biological ion channels and ion pumps, paradigmatic examples of transport selectivity. This work reviews our current fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of transport of ions and larger cargoes through nanopores and nanochannels by examining recent experimental andmore »theoretical work. It is argued that that structure and transport in biological channels and polyelectrolyte-modified synthetic nanopores are strongly coupled: the structure dictates transport and transport affects the structure. We compare synthetic and biological systems throughout this review to conclude that while they present interesting similarities, they also have striking differences.« less

  2. Transport mechanisms in nanopores and nanochannels: Can we mimic nature?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tagliazucchi, Mario [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Szleifer, Igal [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2014-11-03

    The last few years have witnessed major advancements in the synthesis, modification, characterization and modeling of nanometer-size solid-state channels and pores. Future applications in sensing, energy conversion and purification technologies will critically rely on qualitative improvements in the control over the selectivity, directionality and responsiveness of these nanochannels and nanopores. It is not surprising, therefore, that researchers in the field seek inspiration in biological ion channels and ion pumps, paradigmatic examples of transport selectivity. This work reviews our current fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of transport of ions and larger cargoes through nanopores and nanochannels by examining recent experimental and theoretical work. It is argued that that structure and transport in biological channels and polyelectrolyte-modified synthetic nanopores are strongly coupled: the structure dictates transport and transport affects the structure. We compare synthetic and biological systems throughout this review to conclude that while they present interesting similarities, they also have striking differences.

  3. Regional Transportation Coordination Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden Crescent Regional Planning Commission

    2006-01-01

    stream_source_info Golden Crescent Regional Transportation Coordination Study.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 357268 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Golden Crescent Regional Transportation Coordination... Study.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Golden Crescent Regional Transit i Regional Transportation Coordination Study: 7-County Golden Crescent Region Regional...

  4. FUEL CELLS FOR TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Fuel Cells for Transportation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation............................................................................................. 101 A. R&D of a 50-kW, High-Efficiency, High-Power-Density, CO-Tolerant PEM Fuel Cell Stack SystemFUEL CELLS FOR TRANSPORTATION 2 0 0 1 A N N U A L P R O G R E S S R E P O R T U.S. Department

  5. Radiation dose rates from UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friend, P.J. [Urenco, Capenhurst (United Kingdom)

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes the results of many studies, both theoretical and experimental, which have been carried out by Urenco over the last 15 years into radiation dose rates from uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders. The contents of the cylinder, its history, and the geometry all affect the radiation dose rate. These factors are all examined in detail. Actual and predicted dose rates are compared with levels permitted by IAEA transport regulations.

  6. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2012-01-01

    of the Fuel Cell in Transportation Applications Workshop,practical fuel cell for commercial or consumer applicationfuel cell system engineer- ing is made, vehicle applications

  7. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Fuel Grand BC and High-Level Radioactive Waste - Jeff Williams, Director, Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Planning Project, DOEOffice of Nuclear Energy National...

  8. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-09-23

    Establishes standard transportation practices for Departmental programs to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials including radioactive waste. Does not cancel other directives.

  9. Transportation Energy Futures Snapshot

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This snapshot is a summary of the EERE reports that provide a detailed analysis of opportunities and challenges along the path to a more sustainable transportation energy future.

  10. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    gas vehicles Annual road tax differentiated by vintageand charges for road transport Tax/pricing measure Optimalannual circulation taxes, tolls and road charges and parking

  11. Transportation Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    TRANSPORTATION ment of Oil Shale Technology. Washing- ton,interest and investments in oil shale, ethanol, coal liquidsbiomass materials, coal, oil shale, tar sands, natural gas,

  12. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. McGraw

    2000-04-13

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

  13. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    of reduction options/ AERO. Ministry of Transport, Publicfrom aviation with the AERO modeling system Part I.from aviation with the AERO modeling system. Montreal,

  14. Natural Gas Transportation Resiliency

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Transportation Resiliency Anders Johnson Director Pipeline System Design April 29, 2014 Confidential and Illustrative for discussion purposes only. The views expressed in this...

  15. Transportation Energy Futures Snapshot

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    modes, manage the demand for transportation, and shift the fuel mix to more sustainable sources necessary to reach these significant outcomes. Coordinating a...

  16. Sustainable Transportation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in transportation technologies, alternative fuels, and fuel cell technologies.

  17. Heat transport system, method and material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Musinski, Donald L. (Saline, MI)

    1987-01-01

    A heat transport system, method and composite material in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure.

  18. FLUKA: A Multi-Particle Transport Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrari, A.; Sala, P.R.; /CERN /INFN, Milan; Fasso, A.; /SLAC; Ranft, J.; /Siegen U.

    2005-12-14

    This report describes the 2005 version of the Fluka particle transport code. The first part introduces the basic notions, describes the modular structure of the system, and contains an installation and beginner's guide. The second part complements this initial information with details about the various components of Fluka and how to use them. It concludes with a detailed history and bibliography.

  19. Channel bed evolution and sediment transport under declining sand inputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    Channel bed evolution and sediment transport under declining sand inputs Karen B. Gran,1,2 David R structure development and sediment transport as sand inputs decline. On the Pasig-Potrero River, we investigated channel recovery following emplacement of sand-rich pyroclastic deposits in the 1991 eruption

  20. CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES UNIVERSITY Investigator CCIT Research Report UCB-ITS-CWP-2011-2 The California Center for Innovative Transportation works;CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

  1. Ion heat flux and energy transport near the magnetotail neutral sheet Richard L. Kaufmann1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufmann, Richard L.

    Ion heat flux and energy transport near the magnetotail neutral sheet Richard L. Kaufmann1; published 10 May 2008. [1] Ten-year averages of energy transport rates near the neutral sheet showed (2008), Ion heat flux and energy transport near the magnetotail neutral sheet, J. Geophys. Res., 113, A

  2. Resonant thermonuclear reaction rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haubold, H.J.; Mathai, A.M.

    1986-08-01

    Basic physical principles for the resonant and nonresonant thermonuclear reaction rates are applied to find their standard representations for nuclear astrophysics. Closed-form representations for the resonant reaction rate are derived in terms of Meijer's G-italic-function. Analytic representations of the resonant and nonresonant nuclear reaction rates are compared and the appearance of Meijer's G-italic-function is discussed in physical terms.

  3. Anisotropic transport properties of ferromagnetic-superconducting bilayers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kayali, MA; Pokrovsky, Valery L.

    2004-01-01

    We study the transport properties of vortex matter in a superconducting thin film separated by a thin insulator layer from a ferromagnetic layer. We assume an alternating stripe structure for both FM and superconducting (SC) layers as found in S...

  4. New concepts in energy and mass transport within carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Wonjoon, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    The unique structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) contributes to their distinguished properties, making them useful in nanotechnology. CNTs have been explored for energy transport in next-generation, such as light-emitting ...

  5. Transportation Todd Litman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    consumer cost savings. #12;11 Per Capita Transport EnergyPer Capita Transport Energy 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 D Problem? · Traffic congestion? · Road construction costs? · Parking congestion or costs? · Excessive costs to consumers? · Government costs? · Traffic crashes? · Lack of mobility for non-drivers? · Poor freight

  6. Expert systems in transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, K.P.

    1988-01-01

    The 5 papers in the report deal with the following areas: Knowledge representation and software selection for expert-systems design; Expert-system architecture for retaining-wall design; Development of expert-systems technology in the California Department of Transportation; Development of an expert system to assist in the interactive graphic transit system design process; Expert systems development for contingency transportation planing.

  7. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-04-04

    To establish safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1A. Canceled by DOE O 460.1C.

  8. Transport Layer Cornell University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Transport Layer Ao Tang Cornell University Ithaca, NY 14853 Lachlan L. H. Andrew California. Low California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91125 I. INTRODUCTION The Internet has evolved of the physical layer, the link layer, the network layer, the transport layer and the application layer1 . See

  9. TRANSPORTATION ENERGY RESEARCH PIER Transportation Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The project also tested a Caterpillar C15 engine certified to 2007 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.energy.ca.gov/research/ transportation/ January 2011 Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions and Fuel Consumption Improvement Illustration of a heavy-duty tractor-trailer modified to meet the SmartWayTM Equipment Standards for lower fuel

  10. LCC Guidance Rates

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Notepad text file provides the LCC guidance rates in a numbered format for the various regions throughout the U.S.

  11. Electrokinetic transport in microchannels with random roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Moran [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kang, Qinjun [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We present a numerical framework to model the electrokinetic transport in microchannels with random roughness. The three-dimensional microstructure of the rough channel is generated by a random generation-growth method with three statistical parameters to control the number density, the total volume fraction, and the anisotropy characteristics of roughness elements. The governing equations for the electrokinetic transport are solved by a high-efficiency lattice Poisson?Boltzmann method in complex geometries. The effects from the geometric characteristics of roughness on the electrokinetic transport in microchannels are therefore modeled and analyzed. For a given total roughness volume fraction, a higher number density leads to a lower fluctuation because of the random factors. The electroosmotic flow rate increases with the roughness number density nearly logarithmically for a given volume fraction of roughness but decreases with the volume fraction for a given roughness number density. When both the volume fraction and the number density of roughness are given, the electroosmotic flow rate is enhanced by the increase of the characteristic length along the external electric field direction but is reduced by that in the direction across the channel. For a given microstructure of the rough microchannel, the electroosmotic flow rate decreases with the Debye length. It is found that the shape resistance of roughness is responsible for the flow rate reduction in the rough channel compared to the smooth channel even for very thin double layers, and hence plays an important role in microchannel electroosmotic flows.

  12. Essays on Urban Transportation and Transportation Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chun Kon

    2008-01-01

    and Transportation Energy Policy Chun Kon Kim University of California,California Goyang, KOREA viii P???????????? ??? W?????? P????? The Impacts of Transportation EnergyCalifornia Transportation Center (UCTC) Regents’ Dissertation Fellowship University of California, Irvine California Energy

  13. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana

    2003-08-07

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/ Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Existing facilities were modified for evaluation of environmental assisted slow crack growth and creep in flexural mode. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition were continued for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment. These studies in parallel to those on the LSFCO composition is expect to yield important information on questions such as the role of cation segregation and the stability of the perovskite structure on crack initiation vs. crack growth. Studies have been continued on the La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} composition using neutron diffraction and TGA studies. A transition from p-type to n-type of conductor was observed at relative low pO{sub 2}, at which the majority carriers changed from the holes to electrons because of the valence state decreases in Fe due to the further loss of oxygen. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Data obtained at 850 C show that the stoichiometry in La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x} vary from {approx}2.85 to 2.6 over the pressure range studied. From the stoichiometry a lower limit of 2.6 corresponding to the reduction of all Fe{sup 4+} to Fe{sup 3+} and no reduction of Cr{sup 3+} is expected.

  14. Turbulence and Transport The Secrets of Magnetic Confinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenwald, Martin

    better analogy for fusion energy: Heating a building E Total stored energy Joules Heating rate WattsTurbulence and Transport The Secrets of Magnetic Confinement Martin Greenwald - MIT Plasma Science: (sec) ( ) ( / sec) Volume of water gallons Source rate gallons #12;ENERGY CONFINEMENT A slightly

  15. Transportation CPS Safety Challenges Philip Koopman Michael Wagner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koopman, Philip

    in the context of normal human experience. In more everyday units, a 10-9 /hr failure rate is one 1 Permissible. To that end, transportation systems typically have an allowable catastrophic failure rate in the neighborhood a mishap involving the death of many people (e.g., airplane crash with hull loss; major train derailment

  16. ab initio Electronic Transport Model with Explicit Solution to the Linearized Boltzmann Transport Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faghaninia, Alireza; Lo, Cynthia S

    2015-01-01

    Accurate models of carrier transport are essential for describing the electronic properties of semiconductor materials. To the best of our knowledge, the current models following the framework of the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) either rely heavily on experimental data (i.e., semi-empirical), or utilize simplifying assumptions, such as the constant relaxation time approximation (BTE-cRTA). While these models offer valuable physical insights and accurate calculations of transport properties in some cases, they often lack sufficient accuracy -- particularly in capturing the correct trends with temperature and carrier concentration. We present here a general transport model for calculating low-field electrical drift mobility and Seebeck coefficient of n-type semiconductors, by explicitly considering all relevant physical phenomena (i.e. elastic and inelastic scattering mechanisms). We first rewrite expressions for the rates of elastic scattering mechanisms, in terms of ab initio properties, such as the ban...

  17. A MAC-aware Energy Efficient Reliable Transport Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahoo, Anirudha

    A MAC-aware Energy Efficient Reliable Transport Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks Sandip Dalvi in WSN such as battery power and memory. In this paper, we propose a transport protocol which provides based on their residual energies and average MAC layer data rate. The event rate distribution happens

  18. A comparative financial analysis of the automobile and public transportation in London

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kothari, Tejus Jitendra

    2007-01-01

    Automobile systems and public transportation are often organized separately within government structure inhibiting a comparative analysis between the two modes. Further complicating the comparison is that in public ...

  19. Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies More...

  20. Transportation Storage Interface | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Storage Interface Transportation Storage Interface Regulation of Future Extended Storage and Transportation. Transportation Storage Interface More Documents & Publications Gap...

  1. Automated Transportation Logistics and Analysis System (ATLAS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Packaging and Transportation Automated Transportation Logistics and Analysis System (ATLAS) Automated Transportation Logistics and Analysis System (ATLAS) The Department of...

  2. Power Rate Cases (pbl/rates)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgram Guidelines This document w w w.pv - te ch.orgPower PlantRates >

  3. Power Rates Announcements (pbl/rates)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgram Guidelines This document w w w.pv - te ch.orgPower PlantRates >

  4. Rates Meetings and Workshops (pbl/rates)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel2RateCaseElements Sign In About | FY

  5. Previous Power Rates (rates/current)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal PlumesPress1,Previous EventsRates

  6. Transport Services (TAPS) BOF plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welzl, Michael

    Transport Services (TAPS) BOF plan T. Moncaster, M. Welzl, D. Ros: dra5-moncaster-tsvwg-transport-services-00 h Reducing Internet Transport Latency Michael Welzl, with help from (alphabe/cal): Anna

  7. Hydraulic fracturing slurry transport in horizontal pipes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, S.N.; Lord, D.L. (Halliburton Services (US))

    1990-09-01

    Horizontal-well activity has increased throughout the industry in the past few years. To design a successful hydraulic fracturing treatment for horizontal wells, accurate information on the transport properties of slurry in horizontal pipe is required. Limited information exists that can be used to estimate critical deposition and resuspension velocities when proppants are transported in horizontal wells with non-Newtonian fracturing gels. This paper presents a study of transport properties of various hydraulic fracturing slurries in horizontal pipes. Flow data are gathered in three transparent horizontal pipes with different diameters. Linear and crosslinked fracturing gels were studied, and the effects of variables--e.g., pipe size; polymer-gelling-agent concentration; fluid rheological properties; crosslinking effects; proppant size, density, and concentrations; fluid density; and slurry pump rate--on critical deposition and resuspension velocities were investigated. Also, equations to estimate the critical deposition and resuspension velocities of fracturing gels are provided.

  8. Adjustable shear stress erosion and transport flume

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, Jesse D. (Carlsbad, NM); Jepsen, Richard A. (Carlsbad, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring the total erosion rate and downstream transport of suspended and bedload sediments using an adjustable shear stress erosion and transport (ASSET) flume with a variable-depth sediment core sample. Water is forced past a variable-depth sediment core sample in a closed channel, eroding sediments, and introducing suspended and bedload sediments into the flow stream. The core sample is continuously pushed into the flow stream, while keeping the surface level with the bottom of the channel. Eroded bedload sediments are transported downstream and then gravitationally separated from the flow stream into one or more quiescent traps. The captured bedload sediments (particles and aggregates) are weighed and compared to the total mass of sediment eroded, and also to the concentration of sediments suspended in the flow stream.

  9. Improving Efficiency and Equity in Transportation Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Fueling Transportation Finance. ” Ian W. H. Parry andFueling Transportation Finance. ” Transportation ResearchFueling Transportation Finance: A Primer on the Gas Tax •

  10. Superconnections and Parallel Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumitrescu, Florin

    2007-01-01

    This note addresses the construction of a notion of parallel transport along superpaths arising from the concept of a superconnection on a vector bundle over a manifold $M$. A superpath in $M$ is, loosely speaking, a path in $M$ together with an odd vector field in $M$ along the path. We also develop a notion of parallel transport associated with a connection (a.k.a. covariant derivative) on a vector bundle over a \\emph{supermanifold} which is a direct generalization of the classical notion of parallel transport for connections over manifolds.

  11. Solar Models and NACRE thermonuclear reaction rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Morel; B. Pichon; J. Provost; G. Berthomieu

    1999-07-27

    Using the most recent updated physics, calibrated solar models have been computed with the new thermonuclear reaction rates of NACRE, the recently available European compilation. Comparisons with models computed with the reaction rates of Caughlan & Fowler (\\cite{cf88}) and of Adelberger et al. (\\cite{a98}) are made for global structure, expected neutrinos fluxes, chemical composition and sound speed profiles, helioseismological properties of p-modes and g-modes.

  12. Rate constants from the reaction path Hamiltonian. I. Reactive flux simulations for dynamically correct rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Alexis T.

    As ab initio electronic structure calculations become more accurate, inherent sources of error, facilitate reactive flux calculations. As an example we compute the dynamically corrected rate constant on which the reaction occurs. A large number of electronic structure theo- ries are available

  13. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01

    natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas have continued to make small contributions to transportation,transportation actions include electric power sector actions, eg coal to natural gas

  14. Office of Secure Transportation Activities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6th, 2012 WIPP Knoxville, TN OFFICE OF SECURE TRANSPORTATION Agency Integration Briefing Our Mission To provide safe and secure ground and air transportation of nuclear weapons,...

  15. Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment (SFTRA) Draft NUREG-2125 Overview for National Transportation Stakeholders Forum John Cook Division of Spent Fuel Storage and...

  16. SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT AND FIELD-EMISSION PROPERTIES OF MULTI-WALL CARBON NANOTUBES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Alexandre

    of the Electrochemical Society - Cold Cathodes II) We present three-dimensional simulations of transport and fieldSIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT AND FIELD-EMISSION PROPERTIES OF MULTI-WALL CARBON NANOTUBES Alexandre- emission properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes. The structure considered for the transport properties

  17. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    IEA personnel (WBCSD, 2004b), the WEO 2004 and Mobility 2030are quite similar. The WEO 2006 (IEA, 2006b) includes higherwhile the IEA’s more recent WEO 2006 projects transport

  18. Optimization of Maritime Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    and Technology Management Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway Enterprise and D. Ronen (2007). Maritime transportation. Handbooks in Operations Research and Management Science (consolidation in the manufacturing sector, increasing competition, profit margins reduced, mergers and pooling

  19. Accident resistant transport container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andersen, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Cole, James K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  20. Transportation Baseline Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fawcett, Ricky Lee; Kramer, George Leroy Jr.

    1999-12-01

    The National Transportation Program 1999 Transportation Baseline Report presents data that form a baseline to enable analysis and planning for future Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) waste and materials transportation. In addition, this Report provides a summary overview of DOE’s projected quantities of waste and materials for transportation. Data presented in this report were gathered as a part of the IPABS Spring 1999 update of the EM Corporate Database and are current as of July 30, 1999. These data were input and compiled using the Analysis and Visualization System (AVS) which is used to update all stream-level components of the EM Corporate Database, as well as TSD System and programmatic risk (disposition barrier) information. Project (PBS) and site-level IPABS data are being collected through the Interim Data Management System (IDMS). The data are presented in appendices to this report.

  1. Atmospheric Transport of Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, T.V.

    2003-03-03

    The purpose of atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations is to provide estimates of concentration and surface deposition from routine and accidental releases of pollutants to the atmosphere. This paper discusses this topic.

  2. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    next webinar is scheduled to occur in June 2013 TRIBAL NATIONS CAUCUS UPDATE WIKI AND NTSF WEB SITES ntsf.wikidot.com www.em.doe.govPagesNationalTransportationForum.aspx...

  3. Transport in granular systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wendell, Dawn M. (Dawn Marie), 1983-

    2011-01-01

    There are many situations in which a continuum view of granular systems does not fully capture the relevant mechanics. In order for engineers to be able to design systems for transporting granular materials, there needs ...

  4. Transportation Storage Interface

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in above- ground bunkers, each of which is about the size of a one-car garage. Spent Fuel Storage: Dual Purpose Cask Systems 8 Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation: Framework...

  5. PBA Transportation Websites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PBA Transportation Websites presented to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

  6. The optimization topography of exciton transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torsten Scholak; Thomas Wellens; Andreas Buchleitner

    2011-08-26

    Stunningly large exciton transfer rates in the light harvesting complex of photosynthesis, together with recent experimental 2D spectroscopic data, have spurred a vivid debate on the possible quantum origin of such efficiency. Here we show that configurations of a random molecular network that optimize constructive quantum interference from input to output site yield systematically shorter transfer times than classical transport induced by ambient dephasing noise.

  7. Effective Rate Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regulation and Frequency Response DollarsKW-month 4.56 CV-RFS4 Spinning Reserve The formula rate for spinning reserve service is the price consistent with the California...

  8. Effective Rate Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Frequency Response DollarsKW-month 3.98 4.17 CV-RFS4 Spinning Reserve The formula rate for spinning reserve service is the price consistent with the California...

  9. Effective Rate Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Frequency Response DollarsKW-month 4.17 4.56 CV-RFS4 Spinning Reserve The formula rate for spinning reserve service is the price consistent with the California...

  10. 2012 Transmission Rate Schedules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for HLH and LLH. 2. OTHER RATE PROVISIONS a. BPA Incremental Cost BPA's incremental cost will be based on an hourly energy index in the Pacific Northwest. If no adequate...

  11. Fluid transport container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeRoos, B.G.; Downing, J.P. Jr.; Neal, M.P.

    1995-11-14

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitting for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container. 13 figs.

  12. Transportation fuels from wood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.; Stevens, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    The various methods of producing transportation fuels from wood are evaluated in this paper. These methods include direct liquefaction schemes such as hydrolysis/fermentation, pyrolysis, and thermochemical liquefaction. Indirect liquefaction techniques involve gasification followed by liquid fuels synthesis such as methanol synthesis or the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The cost of transportation fuels produced by the various methods are compared. In addition, three ongoing programs at Pacific Northwest Laboratory dealing with liquid fuels from wood are described.

  13. Direct Internal Reformation and Mass Transport in the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode: A Pore-Scale Lattice Boltzmann Study with Detailed Reaction Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grew, Kyle N.; Joshi, Abhijit S.; Chiu, W. K. S.

    2010-11-30

    The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) allows the conversion of chemical energy that is stored in a given fuel, including light hydrocarbons, to electrical power. Hydrocarbon fuels, such as methane, are logistically favourable and provide high energy densities. However, the use of these fuels often results in a decreased efficiency and life. An improved understanding of the reactive flow in the SOFC anode can help address these issues. In this study, the transport and heterogeneous internal reformation of a methane based fuel is addressed. The effect of the SOFC anode's complex structure on transport and reactions is shown to exhibit a complicated interplay between the local molar concentrations and the anode structure. Strong coupling between the phenomenological microstructures and local reformation reaction rates are recognised in this study, suggesting the extension to actual microstructures may provide new insights into the reformation processes.

  14. On Thermonuclear Reaction Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    1996-12-02

    Nuclear reactions govern major aspects of the chemical evolution od galaxies and stars. Analytic study of the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals is attempted here. Exact expressions for the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals for nuclear reactions in the case of nonresonant, modified nonresonant, screened nonresonant and resonant cases are given. These are expressed in terms of H-functions, G-functions and in computable series forms. Computational aspects are also discussed.

  15. PRECEDENTS FOR AUTHORIZATION OF CONTENTS USING DOSE RATE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.

    2012-06-05

    For the transportation of Radioactive Material (RAM) packages, the requirements for the maximum allowed dose rate at the package surface and in its vicinity are given in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 71.47. The regulations are based on the acceptable dose rates to which the public, workers, and the environment may be exposed. As such, the regulations specify dose rates, rather than quantity of radioactive isotopes and require monitoring to confirm the requirements are met. 10CFR71.47 requires that each package of radioactive materials offered for transportation must be designed and prepared for shipment so that under conditions normally incident to transportation the radiation level does not exceed 2 mSv/h (200 mrem/h) at any point on the external Surface of the package, and the transport index does not exceed 10. Before shipment, the dose rate of the package is determined by measurement, ensuring that it conforms to the regulatory limits, regardless of any analyses. This is the requirement for all certified packagings. This paper discusses the requirements for establishing the dose rates when shipping RAM packages and the precedents for meeting these requirements by measurement.

  16. Membrane Transport Chloride Transport Across Vesicle and Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Bradley D.

    Membrane Transport Chloride Transport Across Vesicle and Cell Membranes by Steroid-Based Receptors-established that molecules which transport cations across cell membranes (cationophores) can have potent biological effects of biological activity. Indeed, chloride transporters have direct medical potential as treatments for cystic

  17. Parking and Transport Policy Page 1 Parking and Transport Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mucina, Ladislav

    Parking and Transport Policy Page 1 Parking and Transport Policy Category: Facilities, Campus Life 1. PURPOSE To standardise and manage parking and transport on the Curtin Bentley campus including that support both State Government and University objectives in a manner that encourages public transport use

  18. CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES UNIVERSITY-ITS-CWP-2010-4 This work was performed by the California Center for Innovative Transportation, a research group at the University of California, Berkeley, in cooperation with the State of California Business, Transportation

  19. CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES UNIVERSITY-ITS-CWP-2011-6 ISSN 1557-2269 The California Center for Innovative Transportation works with researchers that improve the efficiency, safety, and security of the transportation system. #12;#12;CALIFORNIA CENTER

  20. ITER Generic Diagnostic Upper Port Plug Nuclear Heating and Personnel Dose Rate Assesment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell E. Feder and Mahmoud Z. Youssef

    2009-01-28

    Neutronics analysis to find nuclear heating rates and personnel dose rates were conducted in support of the integration of diagnostics in to the ITER Upper Port Plugs. Simplified shielding models of the Visible-Infrared diagnostic and of a large aperture diagnostic were incorporated in to the ITER global CAD model. Results for these systems are representative of typical designs with maximum shielding and a small aperture (Vis-IR) and minimal shielding with a large aperture. The neutronics discrete-ordinates code ATTILA® and SEVERIAN® (the ATTILA parallel processing version) was used. Material properties and the 500 MW D-T volume source were taken from the ITER “Brand Model” MCNP benchmark model. A biased quadrature set equivelant to Sn=32 and a scattering degree of Pn=3 were used along with a 46-neutron and 21-gamma FENDL energy subgrouping. Total nuclear heating (neutron plug gamma heating) in the upper port plugs ranged between 380 and 350 kW for the Vis-IR and Large Aperture cases. The Large Aperture model exhibited lower total heating but much higher peak volumetric heating on the upper port plug structure. Personnel dose rates are calculated in a three step process involving a neutron-only transport calculation, the generation of activation volume sources at pre-defined time steps and finally gamma transport analyses are run for selected time steps. ANSI-ANS 6.1.1 1977 Flux-to-Dose conversion factors were used. Dose rates were evaluated for 1 full year of 500 MW DT operation which is comprised of 3000 1800-second pulses. After one year the machine is shut down for maintenance and personnel are permitted to access the diagnostic interspace after 2-weeks if dose rates are below 100 ?Sv/hr. Dose rates in the Visible-IR diagnostic model after one day of shutdown were 130 ?Sv/hr but fell below the limit to 90 ?Sv/hr 2-weeks later. The Large Aperture style shielding model exhibited higher and more persistent dose rates. After 1-day the dose rate was 230 ?Sv/hr but was still at 120 ?Sv/hr 4-weeks later.

  1. A Dual Regime Reactive Transport Model for Simulation of High Level Waste Tank Closure Scenarios - 13375

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, Sohini; Kosson, David S.; Brown, Kevin; Garrabrants, Andrew C.; Meeussen, Hans; Van der Sloot, Hans

    2013-07-01

    A numerical simulation framework is presented in this paper for estimating evolution of pH and release of major species from grout within high-level waste tanks after closure. This model was developed as part of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership. The reactive transport model consists of two parts - (1) transport of species, and (2) chemical reactions. The closure grout can be assumed to have varying extents of cracking and composition for performance assessment purposes. The partially or completely degraded grouted tank is idealized as a dual regime system comprising of a mobile region having solid materials with cracks and macro-pores, and an immobile/stagnant region having solid matrix with micropores. The transport profiles of the species are calculated by incorporating advection of species through the mobile region, diffusion of species through the immobile/stagnant region, and exchange of species between the mobile and immobile regions. A geochemical speciation code in conjunction with the pH dependent test data for a grout material is used to obtain a mineral set that best describes the trends in the test data of the major species. The dual regime reactive transport model predictions are compared with the release data from an up-flow column percolation test. The coupled model is then used to assess effects of crack state of the structure, rate and composition of the infiltrating water on the pH evolution at the grout-waste interface. The coupled reactive transport model developed in this work can be used as part of the performance assessment process for evaluating potential risks from leaching of a cracked tank containing elements of human health and environmental concern. (authors)

  2. Controlling fast transport of cold trapped ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Walther; Frank Ziesel; Thomas Ruster; Sam T. Dawkins; Konstantin Ott; Max Hettrich; Kilian Singer; Ferdinand Schmidt-Kaler; Ulrich Poschinger

    2012-06-02

    We realize fast transport of ions in a segmented micro-structured Paul trap. The ion is shuttled over a distance of more than 10^4 times its groundstate wavefunction size during only 5 motional cycles of the trap (280 micro meter in 3.6 micro seconds). Starting from a ground-state-cooled ion, we find an optimized transport such that the energy increase is as low as 0.10 $\\pm$ 0.01 motional quanta. In addition, we demonstrate that quantum information stored in a spin-motion entangled state is preserved throughout the transport. Shuttling operations are concatenated, as a proof-of-principle for the shuttling-based architecture to scalable ion trap quantum computing.

  3. Nanoscale Charge Transport in Excitonic Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkat Bommisetty, South Dakota State University

    2011-06-23

    Excitonic solar cells, including all-organic, hybrid organic-inorganic and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), offer strong potential for inexpensive and large-area solar energy conversion. Unlike traditional inorganic semiconductor solar cells, where all the charge generation and collection processes are well understood, these excitonic solar cells contain extremely disordered structures with complex interfaces which results in large variations in nanoscale electronic properties and has a strong influence on carrier generation, transport, dissociation and collection. Detailed understanding of these processes is important for fabrication of highly efficient solar cells. Efforts to improve efficiency are underway at a large number of research groups throughout the world focused on inorganic and organic semiconductors, photonics, photophysics, charge transport, nanoscience, ultrafast spectroscopy, photonics, semiconductor processing, device physics, device structures, interface structure etc. Rapid progress in this multidisciplinary area requires strong synergetic efforts among researchers from diverse backgrounds. Such effort can lead to novel methods for development of new materials with improved photon harvesting and interfacial treatments for improved carrier transport, process optimization to yield ordered nanoscale morphologies with well defined electronic structures.

  4. Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darghouth, Naim Richard

    2013-01-01

    Borenstein, S. , 2007. Electricity Rate Structures and theEnvironmentally-Sound Electricity Rates for the Twenty-FirstCap-and-Trade for Electricity Rate Design, with Examples

  5. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation Deployment Support

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTSWorking WithSuccess StoriesTransportation

  6. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation Secure Data Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTSWorking WithSuccessTransportation Secure Data

  7. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTSWorking WithSuccessTransportation Secure

  8. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTSWorking WithSuccessTransportation

  9. Thermal and Electrical Transport in Oxide Heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravichandran, Jayakanth

    2011-01-01

    of thermal conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.4 Thermal transport in2.3.2 Thermal transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  10. Transport in Transitory Dynamical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. A. Mosovsky; J. D. Meiss

    2010-08-10

    We introduce the concept of a "transitory" dynamical system---one whose time-dependence is confined to a compact interval---and show how to quantify transport between two-dimensional Lagrangian coherent structures for the Hamiltonian case. This requires knowing only the "action" of relevant heteroclinic orbits at the intersection of invariant manifolds of "forward" and "backward" hyperbolic orbits. These manifolds can be easily computed by leveraging the autonomous nature of the vector fields on either side of the time-dependent transition. As illustrative examples we consider a two-dimensional fluid flow in a rotating double-gyre configuration and a simple one-and-a-half degree of freedom model of a resonant particle accelerator. We compare our results to those obtained using finite-time Lyapunov exponents and to adiabatic theory, discussing the benefits and limitations of each method.

  11. Structure and function of Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrF illuminates a class of antimetabolite efflux pumps

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Su, Chih -Chia; Bolla, Jani  Reddy; Kumar, Nitin; Radhakrishnan, Abhijith; Long, Feng; Delmar, Jared  A.; Chou, Tsung -Han; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta  R.; Shafer, William  M.; Yu, Edward  W.

    2015-04-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an obligate human pathogen and the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea. The control of this disease has been compromised by the increasing proportion of infections due to antibiotic-resistant strains, which are growing at an alarming rate. N. gonorrhoeae MtrF is an integral membrane protein that belongs to the AbgT family of transporters for which no structural information is available. Here, we describe the crystal structure of MtrF, revealing a dimeric molecule with architecture distinct from all other families of transporters. MtrF is a bowl-shaped dimer with a solvent-filled basin extending from the cytoplasm tomore »halfway across the membrane bilayer. Each subunit of the transporter contains nine transmembrane helices and two hairpins, posing a plausible pathway for substrate transport. A combination of the crystal structure and biochemical functional assays suggests that MtrF is an antibiotic efflux pump mediating bacterial resistance to sulfonamide antimetabolite drugs.« less

  12. Reverse Engineering of Proteasomal Translocation Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. S. Goldobin; M. Mishto; K. Textoris-Taube; P. M. Kloetzel; A. Zaikin

    2008-07-28

    We address the problem of proteasomal protein translocation and introduce a new stochastic model of the proteasomal digestion (cleavage) of proteins. In this model we account for the protein translocation and the positioning of cleavage sites of a proteasome from first principles. We show by test examples and by processing experimental data that our model allows reconstruction of the translocation and cleavage rates from mass spectroscopy data on digestion patterns and can be used to investigate the properties of transport in different experimental set-ups. Detailed investigation with this model will enable theoretical quantitative prediction of the proteasomal activity.

  13. Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Catherine A

    2013-02-28

    Geochemical reactions in deep subsurface environments are complicated by the consolidated nature and mineralogical complexity of sedimentary rocks. Understanding the kinetics of these reactions is critical to our ability to make long-term predictions about subsurface processes such as pH buffering, alteration in rock structure, permeability changes, and formation of secondary precipitates. In this project, we used a combination of experiments and numerical simulation to bridge the gap between our knowledge of these reactions at the lab scale and rates that are meaningful for modeling reactive transport at core scales. The focus is on acid-driven mineral dissolution, which is specifically relevant in the context of CO2-water-rock interactions in geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The project led to major findings in three areas. First, we modeled reactive transport in pore-network systems to investigate scaling effects in geochemical reaction rates. We found significant scaling effects when CO2 concentrations are high and reaction rates are fast. These findings indicate that the increased acidity associated with geological sequestration can generate conditions for which proper scaling tools are yet to be developed. Second, we used mathematical modeling to investigate the extent to which SO2, if co-injected with CO2, would acidify formation brines. We found that there exist realistic conditions in which the impact on brine acidity will be limited due to diffusion rate-limited SO2 dissolution from the CO2 phase, and the subsequent pH shift may also be limited by the lack of availability of oxidants to produce sulfuric acid. Third, for three Viking sandstones (Alberta sedimentary basin, Canada), we employed backscattered electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to statistically characterize mineral contact with pore space. We determined that for reactive minerals in sedimentary consolidated rocks, abundance alone is not a good predictor of mineral accessible surface area, and should not be used in reactive transport modeling. Our work showed that reaction rates would be overestimated by three to five times.

  14. The state-of-the-art in air transportation demand and systems analysis : a report on the proceedings of a workshop sponsored by the Civil Aeronautics Board, Department of Transportation, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (June 1975)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taneja, Nawal K.

    1975-01-01

    Introduction and summary: Forecasting air transportation demand has indeed become a complex and risky business in recent years, especially in view of unpredictable fuel prices, high inflation rates, a declining rate of ...

  15. Basic Physics of Tokamak Transport Final Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen, Amiya K.

    2014-05-12

    The goal of this grant has been to study the basic physics of various sources of anomalous transport in tokamaks. Anomalous transport in tokamaks continues to be one of the major problems in magnetic fusion research. As a tokamak is not a physics device by design, direct experimental observation and identification of the instabilities responsible for transport, as well as physics studies of the transport in tokamaks, have been difficult and of limited value. It is noted that direct experimental observation, identification and physics study of microinstabilities including ITG, ETG, and trapped electron/ion modes in tokamaks has been very difficult and nearly impossible. The primary reasons are co-existence of many instabilities, their broadband fluctuation spectra, lack of flexibility for parameter scans and absence of good local diagnostics. This has motivated us to study the suspected tokamak instabilities and their transport consequences in a simpler, steady state Columbia Linear Machine (CLM) with collisionless plasma and the flexibility of wide parameter variations. Earlier work as part of this grant was focused on both ITG turbulence, widely believed to be a primary source of ion thermal transport in tokamaks, and the effects of isotope scaling on transport levels. Prior work from our research team has produced and definitively identified both the slab and toroidal branches of this instability and determined the physics criteria for their existence. All the experimentally observed linear physics corroborate well with theoretical predictions. However, one of the large areas of research dealt with turbulent transport results that indicate some significant differences between our experimental results and most theoretical predictions. Latter years of this proposal were focused on anomalous electron transport with a special focus on ETG. There are several advanced tokamak scenarios with internal transport barriers (ITB), when the ion transport is reduced to neoclassical values by combined mechanisms of ExB and diamagnetic flow shear suppression of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instabilities. However, even when the ion transport is strongly suppressed, the electron transport remains highly anomalous. The most plausible physics scenario for the anomalous electron transport is based on electron temperature gradient (ETG) instabilities. This instability is an electron analog of and nearly isomorphic to the ITG instability, which we had studied before extensively. However, this isomorphism is broken nonlinearily. It is noted that as the typical ETG mode growth rates are larger (in contrast to ITG modes) than ExB shearing rates in usual tokamaks, the flow shear suppression of ETG modes is highly unlikely. This motivated a broader range of investigations of other physics scenarios of nonlinear saturation and transport scaling of ETG modes.

  16. Attoheat transport phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marciak-Kozlowska; M. Pelc; M. A. Kozlowski

    2009-06-09

    Fascinating developments in optical pulse engineering over the last 20 years lead to the generation of laser pulses as short as few femtosecond, providing a unique tool for high resolution time domain spectroscopy. However, a number of the processes in nature evolve with characteristic times of the order of 1 fs or even shorter. Time domain studies of such processes require at first place sub-fs resolution, offered by pulse depicting attosecond localization. The generation, characterization and proof of principle applications of such pulses is the target of the attoscience. In the paper the thermal processes on the attosecond scale are described. The Klein-Gordon and Proca equations are developed. The relativistic effects in the heat transport on nanoscale are discussed. It is shown that the standard Fourier equation can not be valid for the transport phenomena induced by attosecond laser pulses. The heat transport in nanoparticles and nanotubules is investigated.

  17. Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operat and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operations pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian

  18. Heat transport system, method and material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Musinski, D.L.

    1987-04-28

    A heat transport system, method and composite material are disclosed in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure. 1 fig.

  19. Heavy-flavor transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Beraudo

    2015-10-29

    The formation of a hot deconfined medium (Quark-Gluon Plasma) in high-energy nuclear collisions affects heavy-flavor observables. In the low/moderate-pT range transport calculations allow one to simulate the propagation of heavy quarks in the plasma and to evaluate the effect of the medium on the final hadronic spectra: results obtained with transport coefficients arising from different theoretical approaches can be compared to experimental data. Finally, a discussion of possible effects on heavy-flavor observables due to the possible formation of a hot-medium in small systems (like in p-A collisions) is presented.

  20. Analytical mesoscale modeling of aeolian sand transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Lämmel; Anne Meiwald; Klaus Kroy

    2014-05-03

    We analyze the mesoscale structure of aeolian sand transport, based on a recently developed two-species continuum model. The calculated sand flux and important average characteristics of the grain trajectories are found to be in remarkable agreement with field and wind-tunnel data. We conclude that the essential mesoscale physics is insensitive to unresolved details on smaller scales and well captured by the coarse-grained analytical model, thus providing a sound basis for precise and numerically efficient mesoscale modeling of aeolian structure formation.

  1. Mass Transport within Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-03-01

    Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

  2. UCSB Transportation Services Vehicle Rentals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    times the daily rate. 2 Monthly rate is 20 times the daily rate. 3 Mileage rate includes gasoline quarterly depending on changes in cost of gasoline. 4 Unlimited mileage rate does not include gasoline

  3. Dynamics and structure of stretched flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, C.K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program aims to gain fundamental understanding on the structure, geometry, and dynamics of laminar premixed flames, and relate these understanding to the practical issues of flame extinction and stabilization. The underlying fundamental interest here is the recent recognition that the response of premixed flames can be profoundly affected by flame stretch, as manifested by flow nonuniformity, flame curvature, and flame/flow unsteadiness. As such, many of the existing understanding on the behavior of premixed flames need to be qualitatively revised. The research program consists of three major thrusts: (1) detailed experimental and computational mapping of the structure of aerodynamically-strained planar flames, with emphasis on the effects of heat loss, nonequidiffusion, and finite residence time on the flame thickness, extent of incomplete reaction, and the state of extinction. (2) Analytical study of the geometry and dynamics of stretch-affected wrinkled flame sheets in simple configurations, as exemplified by the Bunsen flame and the spatially-periodic flame, with emphasis on the effects of nonlinear stretch, the phenomena of flame cusping, smoothing, and tip opening, and their implications on the structure and burning rate of turbulent flames. (3) Stabilization and blowoff of two-dimensional inverted premixed and stabilization and determining the criteria governing flame blowoff. The research is synergistically conducted through the use of laser-based diagnostics, computational simulation of the flame structure with detailed chemistry and transport, and mathematical analysis of the flame dynamics.

  4. TRANSPORT OF WATER BY THE GILLS AND RESPIRATION ~Tl'l\\llSpoTt of watel'_____ ____ ___ ____ _ _____ _ _ 185

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER IX TRANSPORT OF WATER BY THE GILLS AND RESPIRATION ~Tl'l\\llSpoTt of watel Reduction of water transport.______ 196 Dls80lved organic aubstances and rate of water transpor- tion, respiratory current, and feeding. When "feeding" is used in reference to the transport of water

  5. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    rate. Reserve a room at Embassy Suites Albuquerque About the NTSF The NTSF is the mechanism through which the DOE communicates with states and tribal nations about DOE's...

  6. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira

    2000-10-30

    This is the first quarterly progress report for Year 2 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in Flow Loop development and research during the period of time between July 14, 2000 and September 30, 2000. This report presents information on the following specific tasks: (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development (Task 2), (b) Progress on research project (Task 8): ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress on research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress on research project (Task 7): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress on research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Initiate research on project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (g) Progress on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution (Tasks 11), and Foam properties (Task 12), (h) Initiate a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. Since the previous Task 1 has been completed, we will now designate this new task as: (Task 1S). (i) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  7. Spin Transport Shingo Katsumoto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iye, Yasuhiro

    -1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581, Japan According to DARPA's definition, "Spintronics"[1] means "Spin Transport Electronics". The issue "Spin Trans- port" thus covers all the fields of spintronics and one devices. In semiconductor spintronics devices, we therefore utilize the differences in n, , m for up

  8. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).

  9. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  10. Storing and transporting energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClaine, Andrew W. (Lexington, MA); Brown, Kenneth (Reading, MA)

    2010-09-07

    Among other things, hydrogen is released from water at a first location using energy from a first energy source; the released hydrogen is stored in a metal hydride slurry; and the metal hydride slurry is transported to a second location remote from the first location.

  11. "Educating transportation professionals."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    @virginia.edu http://cts.virginia.edu/Demetsky.htm Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 434.924.7464 Transportation Engineering & Management Research Our group works and Operations The mobility of freight is vital to the national economy. The growth in demand for freight

  12. Ionic (Proton) Transport Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environments - #12;Technology Options -- Ionic Transport Separation Systems Central, Semi-Central (coal/Semi-Central Systems Coal is the cheapest fuel, but requires the greatest pre-conditioning Clean-up of syngas requires Energy Systems ChevronTexaco SRI Consulting SAIC ChevronTexaco Technology Ventures #12;Performance

  13. Climate Change and Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    1 Climate Change and Transportation Addressing Climate Change in the Absence of Federal Guidelines;6 WSDOT Efforts · Climate Change Team · Project Level GHG Approach · Planning Level GHG Approach · Alternative Fuels Corridor · Recent legislation and research #12;7 WSDOT Efforts: Climate Change Team

  14. A Transport Synthetic Acceleration method for transport iterations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramone, Gilles Lionel

    1996-01-01

    We present a family of Transport Synthetic Acceleration (TSA) methods to iteratively solve within-group scattering problems. A single iteration in these schemes consists of a transport sweep followed by a low-order calculation ...

  15. Rotational rate sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Steven L. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A rate sensor for angular/rotational acceleration includes a housing defining a fluid cavity essentially completely filled with an electrolyte fluid. Within the housing, such as a toroid, ions in the fluid are swept during movement from an excitation electrode toward one of two output electrodes to provide a signal for directional rotation. One or more ground electrodes within the housing serve to neutralize ions, thus preventing any effect at the other output electrode.

  16. Modeling Aeolian Transport of Contaminated Sediments at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 54, Area G: Sensitivities to Succession, Disturbance, and Future Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J.; Kirchner, Thomas B.; Breshears, David D.; Field, Jason P.

    2012-03-27

    The Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G disposal facility is used for the disposal of radioactive waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 2001) requires that radioactive waste be managed in a manner that protects public health and safety and the environment. In compliance with that requirement, DOE field sites must prepare and maintain site-specific radiological performance assessments for facilities that receive waste after September 26, 1988. Sites are also required to conduct composite analyses for facilities that receive waste after this date; these analyses account for the cumulative impacts of all waste that has been (and will be) disposed of at the facilities and other sources of radioactive material that may interact with these facilities. LANL issued Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis in 2008. In support of those analyses, vertical and horizontal sediment flux data were collected at two analog sites, each with different dominant vegetation characteristics, and used to estimate rates of vertical resuspension and wind erosion for Area G. The results of that investigation indicated that there was no net loss of soil at the disposal site due to wind erosion, and suggested minimal impacts of wind on the long-term performance of the facility. However, that study did not evaluate the potential for contaminant transport caused by the horizontal movement of soil particles over long time frames. Since that time, additional field data have been collected to estimate wind threshold velocities for initiating sediment transport due to saltation and rates of sediment transport once those thresholds are reached. Data such as these have been used in the development of the Vegetation Modified Transport (VMTran) model. This model is designed to estimate patterns and long-term rates of contaminant redistribution caused by winds at the site, taking into account the impacts of plant succession and environmental disturbance. Aeolian, or wind-driven, sediment transport drives soil erosion, affects biogeochemical cycles, and can lead to the transport of contaminants. Rates of aeolian sediment transport depend in large part on the type, amount, and spatial pattern of vegetation. In particular, the amount of cover from trees and shrubs, which act as roughness elements, alters rates of aeolian sediment transport. The degree to which the understory is disturbed and the associated spacing of bare soil gaps further influence sediment transport rates. Changes in vegetation structure and patterns over periods of years to centuries may have profound impacts on rates of wind-driven transport. For recently disturbed areas, succession is likely to occur through a series of vegetation communities. Area G currently exhibits a mosaic of vegetation cover, with patches of grass and forbs over closed disposal units, and bare ground in heavily used portions of the site. These areas are surrounded by less disturbed regions of shrubland and pinon-juniper woodland; some ponderosa pine forest is also visible in the canyon along the road. The successional trajectory for the disturbed portions of Area G is expected to proceed from grasses and forbs (which would be established during site closure), to shrubs such as chamisa, to a climax community of pinon-juniper woodland. Although unlikely under current conditions, a ponderosa pine forest could develop over the site if the future climate is wetter. In many ecosystems, substantial and often periodic disturbances such as fire or severe drought can rapidly alter vegetation patterns. Such disturbances are likely to increase in the southwestern US where projections call for a warmer and drier climate. With respect to Area G, the 3 most likely disturbance types are surface fire, crown fire, and drought-induced tree mortality. Each type of disturbance has a different frequency or likelihood of occurrence, but all 3 tend to reset the vegetation succession cycle to earlier stages. The Area G performance assessment and composite an

  17. Microfluidic device for the assembly and transport of microparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    James, Conrad D. (Albuquerque, NM); Kumar, Anil (Framingham, MA); Khusid, Boris (New Providence, NJ); Acrivos, Andreas (Stanford, CA)

    2010-06-29

    A microfluidic device comprising independently addressable arrays of interdigitated electrodes can be used to assembly and transport large-scale microparticle structures. The device and method uses collective phenomena in a negatively polarized suspension exposed to a high-gradient strong ac electric field to assemble the particles into predetermined locations and then transport them collectively to a work area for final assembly by sequentially energizing the electrode arrays.

  18. Computation of radiative heat transport across a nanoscale vacuum gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budaev, Bair V. Bogy, David B.

    2014-02-10

    Radiation heat transport across a vacuum gap between two half-spaces is studied. By consistently applying only the fundamental laws of physics, we obtain an algebraic equation that connects the temperatures of the half-spaces and the heat flux between them. The heat transport coefficient generated by this equation for such structures matches available experimental data for nanoscale and larger gaps without appealing to any additional specific mechanisms of energy transfer.

  19. 35 Alternative Transportation Fuels in California ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    potential means for diversifying an energy resource base for the transportation sector. Largely as a result, there is a potential for the entrance of an estimated one million alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) into the California35 Alternative Transportation Fuels in California Chapter 4 ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION FUELS

  20. Mass Transport and Turbulence in Gravitationally Unstable Disk Galaxies. I: The Case of Pure Self-Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldbaum, Nathan J; Forbes, John C

    2015-01-01

    The role of gravitational instability-driven turbulence in determining the structure and evolution of disk galaxies, and the extent to which gravity rather than feedback can explain galaxy properties, remains an open question. To address it, we present high resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of Milky Way-like isolated disk galaxies, including realistic heating and cooling rates and a physically motivated prescription for star formation, but no form of star formation feedback. After an initial transient, our galaxies reach a state of fully-nonlinear gravitational instability. In this state, gravity drives turbulence and radial inflow. Despite the lack of feedback, the gas in our galaxy models shows substantial turbulent velocity dispersions, indicating that gravitational instability alone may be able to power the velocity dispersions observed in nearby disk galaxies on 100 pc scales. Moreover, the rate of mass transport produced by this turbulence approaches $\\sim 1$ $M_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ for Milky ...

  1. Moving beyond the limits of mass transport in liquid absorbent microfilms through the implementation of surface-induced vortices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigham, S; Yu, DZ; Chugh, D; Moghaddam, S

    2014-02-01

    The slow diffusion of an absorbate molecule into an absorbent often makes the absorption process a rate-limiting step in many applications. In cases involving an absorbate with a high heat of phase change, such as water absorption into a LiBr (lithium bromide) solution, the absorption rate is further slowed due to significant heating of the absorbent. Recently, it has been demonstrated that constraining a LiBr solution film by a hydrophobic porous structure enables manipulation of the solution flow thermohydraulic characteristics. Here, it is shown that mass transport mode in a constrained laminar solution flow can be changed from diffusive to advective. This change in mode is accomplished through stretching and folding the laminar streamlines within the solution film via the implementation of micro-scale features on the flow channel surface. The process induces vortices within the solution film, which continuously bring concentrated solution from the bottom and middle of the solution channel to its interface with the vapor phase, thus leading to a significant enhancement in the absorption rate. The detailed physics of the involved transport processes is elucidated using the LBM (Lattice Boltzmann Method). Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Lagrangian transport through surfaces in volume-preserving flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Karrasch

    2015-07-24

    Advective transport of scalar quantities through surfaces is of fundamental importance in many scientific applications. From the Eulerian perspective of the surface it can be quantified by the well-known integral of the flux density. The recent development of highly accurate semi-Lagrangian methods for solving scalar conservation laws and of Lagrangian approaches to coherent structures in turbulent (geophysical) fluid flows necessitate a new approach to transport from the (Lagrangian) material perspective. We present a Lagrangian framework for calculating transport of conserved quantities through a given surface in $n$-dimensional, fully aperiodic, volume-preserving flows. Our approach does not involve any dynamical assumptions on the surface or its boundary.

  3. Parametric study on maximum transportable distance and cost for thermal energy transportation using various coolants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su-Jong Yoon; Piyush Sabharwall

    2014-07-01

    The operation temperature of advanced nuclear reactors is generally higher than commercial light water reactors and thermal energy from advanced nuclear reactor can be used for various purposes such as district heating, desalination, hydrogen production and other process heat applications, etc. The process heat industry/facilities will be located outside the nuclear island due to safety measures. This thermal energy from the reactor has to be transported a fair distance. In this study, analytical analysis was conducted to identify the maximum distance that thermal energy could be transported using various coolants such as molten-salts, helium and water by varying the pipe diameter and mass flow rate. The cost required to transport each coolant was also analyzed. The coolants analyzed are molten salts (such as: KClMgCl2, LiF-NaF-KF (FLiNaK) and KF-ZrF4), helium and water. Fluoride salts are superior because of better heat transport characteristics but chloride salts are most economical for higher temperature transportation purposes. For lower temperature water is a possible alternative when compared with He, because low pressure He requires higher pumping power which makes the process very inefficient and economically not viable for both low and high temperature application.

  4. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan Used Nuclear Fuel Loading...

  5. Integrated transportation system design optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Christine P. (Christine Pia), 1979-

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, the design of a transportation system has focused on either the vehicle design or the network flow, assuming the other as given. However, to define a system level architecture for a transportation system, ...

  6. Structural and electrical transport properties of La{sub 0.8}Sm{sub 0.05}K{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} manganites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaikh, M. W.; Mansuri, I.; Varshney, Dinesh

    2014-04-24

    Polycrystalline sample of single-phase La{sub 0.8}Sm{sub 0.05}K{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} perovskite compound have been synthesized by solid-state reaction route. X-ray diffraction patterns accompanied by Rietveld–refined crystal structure parameters reveal the rhombohedral structure with space group R 3C. Electrical resistivity infers transition from metallic to insulator phase at 537 K. The application of magnetic field of 8 T, suppresses the resistivity. The metallic resistivity is retraced by considering electron–phonon, electron–electron and electron-spin-fluctuation interactions while insulating behaviour is analysed with small polaron conduction model.

  7. Transport Properties of Bilayer Graphene Nanoribbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Minsheng

    2013-01-01

    Electrical spin injection and transport in germanium”. Phys.P. , Temperature- Dependent Transport in Suspended Graphene.Y. M. , Quantum Transport: Introduction to Nanoscience.

  8. Contaminant Transport in the Southern California Bight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Idica, Eileen Y.

    2010-01-01

    1987). The California Current transports Pacific Subarctic1987). The California Current transports Pacific Subarcticthe dynamics and transport of Southern California stormwater

  9. Current Power Rates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding in ActinideRail betweenProtectionCurrentJobPower-Rates

  10. Rate Case Elements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel2RateCaseElements Sign In About | Careers |

  11. Rate Design and Renewables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel2RateCaseElements Sign In About | Careers

  12. Transforming California's Freight Transport System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Transforming California's Freight Transport System Policy Forum on the Role of Freight Transport in Achieving Clean Air, Climate Goals, Economic Growth and Healthy Communities in California Jack Kitowski April 19, 2013 1 #12;Freight Impacts at Many Levels 2 #12;Freight Transport Today: Contribution

  13. Fuel cell water transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Hedstrom, James C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    The moisture content and temperature of hydrogen and oxygen gases is regulated throughout traverse of the gases in a fuel cell incorporating a solid polymer membrane. At least one of the gases traverses a first flow field adjacent the solid polymer membrane, where chemical reactions occur to generate an electrical current. A second flow field is located sequential with the first flow field and incorporates a membrane for effective water transport. A control fluid is then circulated adjacent the second membrane on the face opposite the fuel cell gas wherein moisture is either transported from the control fluid to humidify a fuel gas, e.g., hydrogen, or to the control fluid to prevent excess water buildup in the oxidizer gas, e.g., oxygen. Evaporation of water into the control gas and the control gas temperature act to control the fuel cell gas temperatures throughout the traverse of the fuel cell by the gases.

  14. Multiscale thermal transport.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Samuel Jr. (; .); Wong, C. C.; Piekos, Edward Stanley

    2004-02-01

    A concurrent computational and experimental investigation of thermal transport is performed with the goal of improving understanding of, and predictive capability for, thermal transport in microdevices. The computational component involves Monte Carlo simulation of phonon transport. In these simulations, all acoustic modes are included and their properties are drawn from a realistic dispersion relation. Phonon-phonon and phonon-boundary scattering events are treated independently. A new set of phonon-phonon scattering coefficients are proposed that reflect the elimination of assumptions present in earlier analytical work from the simulation. The experimental component involves steady-state measurement of thermal conductivity on silicon films as thin as 340nm at a range of temperatures. Agreement between the experiment and simulation on single-crystal silicon thin films is excellent, Agreement for polycrystalline films is promising, but significant work remains to be done before predictions can be made confidently. Knowledge gained from these efforts was used to construct improved semiclassical models with the goal of representing microscale effects in existing macroscale codes in a computationally efficient manner.

  15. Transportation of medical isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, D.L.

    1997-11-19

    A Draft Technical Information Document (HNF-1855) is being prepared to evaluate proposed interim tritium and medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This assessment examines the potential health and safety impacts of transportation operations associated with the production of medical isotopes. Incident-free and accidental impacts are assessed using bounding source terms for the shipment of nonradiological target materials to the Hanford Site, the shipment of irradiated targets from the FFTF to the 325 Building, and the shipment of medical isotope products from the 325 Building to medical distributors. The health and safety consequences to workers and the public from the incident-free transportation of targets and isotope products would be within acceptable levels. For transportation accidents, risks to works and the public also would be within acceptable levels. This assessment is based on best information available at this time. As the medical isotope program matures, this analysis will be revised, if necessary, to support development of a final revision to the Technical Information Document.

  16. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Reusch, J.; Sarff, J. S.; Liu, D.

    2014-05-15

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) driven modes with fishbone-like structure are observed during 1?MW tangential neutral-beam injection in a reversed field pinch (RFP) device. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of EP instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport. Density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving, inboard-outboard asymmetric spatial structure that peaks in the core where fast ions reside. The measured mode frequencies are close to the computed shear Alfvén frequency, a feature consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The frequency pattern of the dominant mode depends on the fast-ion species. Multiple frequencies occur with deuterium fast ions compared to single frequency for hydrogen fast ions. Furthermore, as the safety factor (q) decreases, the toroidal mode number of the dominant EP mode transits from n=5 to n=6 while retaining the same poloidal mode number m=1. The transition occurs when the m=1, n=5 wave-particle resonance condition cannot be satisfied as the fast-ion safety factor (q{sub fi}) decreases. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growth phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop when the EP modes peak, indicating that the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced with the onset of multiple EP modes.

  17. Modeling of diffusive mass transport in micropores in cement based materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaguchi, Tetsuji, E-mail: yamaguchi.tetsuji@jaea.go.j [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Negishi, Kumi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Taiheiyo Consultant Company Limited, 2-4-2, Osaku, Sakura, Chiba 285-8655 (Japan); Hoshino, Seiichi; Tanaka, Tadao [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    In order to predict long-term leaching behavior of cement constituents for safety assessments of radioactive waste disposal, we modeled diffusive mass transport in micropores in cement based materials. Based on available knowledge on the pore structure, we developed a transport porosity model that enables us to estimate effective porosity available for diffusion (transport porosity) in cement based materials. We microscopically examined the pore structure of hardened cement pastes to partially verify the model. Effective diffusivities of tritiated water in hardened cement pastes were also obtained experimentally, and were shown to be proportional to the estimated transport porosity.

  18. Energy Management Through Innovative Rates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    of energy efficiency in the industrial sector and specific rate design alternatives for doing so....

  19. Transportation Energy Futures Analysis Snapshot

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transportation currently accounts for 71% of total U.S. petroleum use and 33% of the nation's total carbon emissions. The TEF project explores how combining multiple strategies could reduce GHG emissions and petroleum use by 80%. Researchers examined four key areas – lightduty vehicles, non-light-duty vehicles, fuels, and transportation demand – in the context of the marketplace, consumer behavior, industry capabilities, technology and the energy and transportation infrastructure. The TEF reports support DOE long-term planning. The reports provide analysis to inform decisions about transportation energy research investments, as well as the role of advanced transportation energy technologies and systems in the development of new physical, strategic, and policy alternatives.

  20. Transport of active ellipsoidal particles in ratchet potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao-quan Ai; Jian-chun Wu

    2015-05-10

    Rectified transport of active ellipsoidal particles is numerically investigated in a two-dimensional asymmetric potential. The out-of-equilibrium condition for the active particle is an intrinsic property, which can break thermodynamical equilibrium and induce the directed transport. It is found that the perfect sphere particle can facilitate the rectification, while the needlelike particle destroys the directed transport. There exist optimized values of the parameters (the self-propelled velocity, the torque acting on the body) at which the average velocity takes its maximal value. For the ellipsoidal particle with not large asymmetric parameter, the average velocity decreases with increasing the rotational diffusion rate, while for the needlelike particle (very large asymmetric parameter), the average velocity is a peaked function of the rotational diffusion rate. By introducing a finite load, particles with different shapes (or different self-propelled velocities) will move to the opposite directions, which is able to separate particles of different shapes (or different self-propelled velocities).

  1. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan Miska; Troy Reed; Ergun Kuru

    2004-09-30

    The Advanced Cuttings Transport Study (ACTS) was a 5-year JIP project undertaken at the University of Tulsa (TU). The project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and JIP member companies. The objectives of the project were: (1) to develop and construct a new research facility that would allow three-phase (gas, liquid and cuttings) flow experiments under ambient and EPET (elevated pressure and temperature) conditions, and at different angle of inclinations and drill pipe rotation speeds; (2) to conduct experiments and develop a data base for the industry and academia; and (3) to develop mechanistic models for optimization of drilling hydraulics and cuttings transport. This project consisted of research studies, flow loop construction and instrumentation development. Following a one-year period for basic flow loop construction, a proposal was submitted by TU to the DOE for a five-year project that was organized in such a manner as to provide a logical progression of research experiments as well as additions to the basic flow loop. The flow loop additions and improvements included: (1) elevated temperature capability; (2) two-phase (gas and liquid, foam etc.) capability; (3) cuttings injection and removal system; (4) drill pipe rotation system; and (5) drilling section elevation system. In parallel with the flow loop construction, hydraulics and cuttings transport studies were preformed using drilling foams and aerated muds. In addition, hydraulics and rheology of synthetic drilling fluids were investigated. The studies were performed under ambient and EPET conditions. The effects of temperature and pressure on the hydraulics and cuttings transport were investigated. Mechanistic models were developed to predict frictional pressure loss and cuttings transport in horizontal and near-horizontal configurations. Model predictions were compared with the measured data. Predominantly, model predictions show satisfactory agreements with the measured data. As a part of this project, instrumentation was developed to monitor cuttings beds and characterize foams in the flow loop. An ultrasonic-based monitoring system was developed to measure cuttings bed thickness in the flow loop. Data acquisition software controls the system and processes the data. Two foam generating devices were designed and developed to produce foams with specified quality and texture. The devices are equipped with a bubble recognition system and an in-line viscometer to measure bubble size distribution and foam rheology, respectively. The 5-year project is completed. Future research activities will be under the umbrella of Tulsa University Drilling Research Projects. Currently the flow loop is being used for testing cuttings transport capacity of aqueous and polymer-based foams under elevated pressure and temperature conditions. Subsequently, the effect of viscous sweeps on cuttings transport under elevated pressure and temperature conditions will be investigated using the flow loop. Other projects will follow now that the ''steady state'' phase of the project has been achieved.

  2. Victoria Transport Policy Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) JumpGTZUtility RatesComercioElectric CoopTechTransport

  3. Transport optimization in stellaratorsa... H. E. Mynickb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mynick, Harry E.

    Transport optimization in stellaratorsa... H. E. Mynickb Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton transport in stellarators is presented. A primary deficiency of stellarators has been elevated transport this difficulty, developing a range of techniques for reducing transport, both neoclassical and, more recently

  4. Transport by molecular motors in the presence of static defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan Chai; Reinhard Lipowsky; Stefan Klumpp

    2009-05-07

    The transport by molecular motors along cytoskeletal filaments is studied theoretically in the presence of static defects. The movements of single motors are described as biased random walks along the filament as well as binding to and unbinding from the filament. Three basic types of defects are distinguished, which differ from normal filament sites only in one of the motors' transition probabilities. Both stepping defects with a reduced probability for forward steps and unbinding defects with an increased probability for motor unbinding strongly reduce the velocities and the run lengths of the motors with increasing defect density. For transport by single motors, binding defects with a reduced probability for motor binding have a relatively small effect on the transport properties. For cargo transport by motors teams, binding defects also change the effective unbinding rate of the cargo particles and are expected to have a stronger effect.

  5. Fluctuation induced cross-field transport in Hall thrusters and tokamaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrett, Michael Lane

    2013-01-01

    One area of fundamental plasma physics which remains poorly understood is the transport of particles across magnetic field lines at rates significantly higher than predicted by theory exclusively based on collisions. This ...

  6. Transportation Time In A Rural State Following Splenic Injury: Does Time Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Jeanette G.

    2014-05-31

    Background: Failure rates remain high following attempted non-operative treatment of spleen injuries despite progress made in identifying risk factors. Over the past thirty years, transportation times were excluded from predictive models although...

  7. Importance of wet precipitation as a removal and transport process for atmospheric water soluble carbonyls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsunaga, SN; Guenther, AB; Izawa, Y; Wiedinmyer, C; Greenberg, JP; Kawamura, K

    2007-01-01

    et al. , 2001). Wet precipitation samples contain almost alldeposition rate due to the precipitation Yield mg C m 2 h 1Importance of wet precipitation as a removal and transport

  8. Relative and Absolute Mobility Rates in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, L. Keith

    1971-01-01

    the actual normative structure allows little else than inheritance. Thus whether one is comparing the same country at different times or different countries at the same time, the absolute mobility rates may not reveal the actual normative structures. Relative... of jobs which will obtain if present trends in the distribution continue until a stable state is reached. This stable state is easily determined by means of simple Markov theorems. 3 Relative and Absolute Mobility Rates Table 2. The Rigidity of U...

  9. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segal, Dvira

    2015-01-01

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects, are factors that interplay to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good) and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques which incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with...

  10. Hopping charge transport in organic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novikov, S V

    2013-01-01

    General properties of the transport of charge carriers (electrons and holes) in disordered organic materials are discussed. It was demonstrated that the dominant part of the total energetic disorder in organic material is usually provided by the electrostatic disorder, generated by randomly located and oriented dipoles and quadrupoles. For this reason this disorder is strongly spatially correlated. Spatial correlation directly governs the field dependence of the carrier drift mobility. Shape of the current transients, which is of primary importance for a correct determination of the carrier mobility, is considered. A notable feature of the electrostatic disorder is its modification in the vicinity of the electrode, and this modification takes place without modification of the structure of the material. It is shown how this phenomenon affects characteristics of the charge injection. We consider also effect of inter-charge interaction on charge transport.

  11. Robust light transport in non-Hermitian photonic lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Longhi; Davide Gatti; Giuseppe Della Valle

    2015-07-24

    Combating the effects of disorder on light transport in micro- and nano-integrated photonic devices is of major importance from both fundamental and applied viewpoints. In ordinary waveguides, imperfections and disorder cause unwanted back-reflections, which hinder large-scale optical integration. Topological photonic structures, a new class of optical systems inspired by quantum Hall effect and topological insulators, can realize robust transport via topologically-protected unidirectional edge modes. Such waveguides are realized by the introduction of synthetic gauge fields for photons in a two-dimensional structure, which break time reversal symmetry and enable one-way guiding at the edge of the medium. Here we suggest a different route toward robust transport of light in lower-dimensional (1D) photonic lattices, in which time reversal symmetry is broken because of the {\\it non-Hermitian} nature of transport. While a forward propagating mode in the lattice is amplified, the corresponding backward propagating mode is damped, thus resulting in an asymmetric transport that is rather insensitive to disorder or imperfections in the structure. Non-Hermitian transport in two lattice models is considered: a tight-binding lattice with an imaginary gauge field (Hatano-Nelson model), and a non-Hermitian driven binary lattice. In the former case transport in spite of disorder is ensured by a mobility edge that arises because of a non-Hermitian delocalization transition. The possibility to observe non-Hermitian delocalization induced by a synthetic 'imaginary' gauge field is suggested using an engineered coupled-resonator optical waveguide (CROW) structure.

  12. Update on EM Transportation Program Activities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Organizations * DOE Orders, Policy, Guidance Transportation Risk Reduction * Motor Carrier Evaluations * Physical Protection * Transportation Compliance Reviews * Safety...

  13. Supertruck - Improving Transportation Efficiency through Integrated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improving Transportation Efficiency through Integrated Vehicle, Engine and Powertrain Research Supertruck - Improving Transportation Efficiency through Integrated Vehicle, Engine...

  14. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities...

  15. Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and Management Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Africa's Transport Infrastructure...

  16. Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Session...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Agenda, October 27, 2008, Phoenix, Arizonia Transportation and Stationary Power Integration: Workshop Proceedings...

  17. Enhancing Transportation Energy Security through Advanced Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Energy Security through Advanced Combustion and Fuels Technologies Enhancing Transportation Energy Security through Advanced Combustion and Fuels Technologies 2005...

  18. Hydrogen Peroxide Formation Rates in a PEMFC Anode and Cathode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sethuraman, Vijay A.

    Hydrogen Peroxide Formation Rates in a PEMFC Anode and Cathode Effect of Humidity and Temperature Hydrogen peroxide H2O2 formation rates in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell PEMFC anode and cathode were, has the capability to be the structural and fundamental unit of an impending hydrogen economy. Two

  19. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mengjiao Yu; Ramadan Ahmed; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Aimee Washington; Crystal Redden

    2003-09-30

    The Quarter began with installing the new drill pipe, hooking up the new hydraulic power unit, completing the pipe rotation system (Task 4 has been completed), and making the SWACO choke operational. Detailed design and procurement work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. The prototype Foam Generator Cell has been completed by Temco and delivered. Work is currently underway to calibrate the system. Literature review and preliminary model development for cuttings transportation with polymer foam under EPET conditions are in progress. Preparations for preliminary cuttings transport experiments with polymer foam have been completed. Two nuclear densitometers were re-calibrated. Drill pipe rotation system was tested up to 250 RPM. Water flow tests were conducted while rotating the drill pipe up to 100 RPM. The accuracy of weight measurements for cuttings in the annulus was evaluated. Additional modifications of the cuttings collection system are being considered in order to obtain the desired accurate measurement of cuttings weight in the annular test section. Cutting transport experiments with aerated fluids are being conducted at EPET, and analyses of the collected data are in progress. The printed circuit board is functioning with acceptable noise level to measure cuttings concentration at static condition using ultrasonic method. We were able to conduct several tests using a standard low pass filter to eliminate high frequency noise. We tested to verify that we can distinguish between different depths of sand in a static bed of sand. We tested with water, air and a mix of the two mediums. Major modifications to the DTF have almost been completed. A stop-flow cell is being designed for the DTF, the ACTF and Foam Generator/Viscometer which will allow us to capture bubble images without the need for ultra fast shutter speeds or microsecond flash system.

  20. Resolving the mystery of transport within internal transport barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staebler, G. M.; Belli, E. A.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.; Greenfield, C. M.; Lao, L. L.; Smith, S. P.; Kinsey, J. E.; Grierson, B. A.; Chrystal, C.

    2014-05-15

    The Trapped Gyro-Landau Fluid (TGLF) quasi-linear model [G. M. Staebler, et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 102508 (2005)], which is calibrated to nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations, is now able to predict the electron density, electron and ion temperatures, and ion toroidal rotation simultaneously for internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges. This is a strong validation of gyrokinetic theory of ITBs, requiring multiple instabilities responsible for transport in different channels at different scales. The mystery of transport inside the ITB is that momentum and particle transport is far above the predicted neoclassical levels in apparent contradiction with the expectation from the theory of suppression of turbulence by E×B velocity shear. The success of TGLF in predicting ITB transport is due to the inclusion of ion gyro-radius scale modes that become dominant at high E×B velocity shear and to improvements to TGLF that allow momentum transport from gyrokinetic turbulence to be faithfully modeled.

  1. Transportation | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout / Transforming Y-12Capacity-ForumTransportation

  2. Transportation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown ofTransportToolkit Prototype Jump

  3. Transportation Fuel Supply | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >Transportation currently accounts for

  4. Transportation Representation | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >Transportation currently

  5. Transportation and Parking

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >Transportation

  6. Electron Heat Transport Measured

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear ProfileMultiferroicAward |Electron CorrelationHeat Transport

  7. Sandia Energy - Transportation Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel MagnetizationTransportation Energy Home Analysis Final

  8. Sandia Energy - Transportation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel MagnetizationTransportation Energy Home

  9. National Utility Rate Database: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; McKeel, R.

    2012-08-01

    When modeling solar energy technologies and other distributed energy systems, using high-quality expansive electricity rates is essential. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a utility rate platform for entering, storing, updating, and accessing a large collection of utility rates from around the United States. This utility rate platform lives on the Open Energy Information (OpenEI) website, OpenEI.org, allowing the data to be programmatically accessed from a web browser, using an application programming interface (API). The semantic-based utility rate platform currently has record of 1,885 utility rates and covers over 85% of the electricity consumption in the United States.

  10. Nonuniform reaction rate distribution for the generalized Fisher equation: Ignition ahead of the reaction front

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedotov, Sergei

    equation involving diffusion transport with a finite velocity and a spatially nonuniform reaction rate. WeNonuniform reaction rate distribution for the generalized Fisher equation: Ignition ahead of the reaction front Sergei Fedotov* Department of Mathematics, UMIST, Manchester M60 1QD, United Kingdom

  11. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairns, Elton J.; Hietbrink, Earl H.

    1981-01-01

    This section includes some historical background of the rise and fall and subsequent rebirth of the electric vehicle; and a brief discussion of current transportation needs, and environmental and energy utilization issues that resulted in the renewed interest in applying electrochemical energy conversion technology to electric vehicle applications. Although energy utilization has evolved to be the most significant and important issue, the environmental issue will be discussed first in this section only because of its chronological occurrence. The next part of the chapter is a review of passenger and commercial electric vehicle technology with emphasis on vehicle design and demonstrated performance of vehicles with candidate power sources being developed. This is followed by a discussion of electrochemical power source requirements associated with future electric vehicles that can play a role in meeting modern transportation needs. The last part of the chapter includes first a discussion of how to identify candidate electrochemical systems that might be of interest in meeting electric vehicle power source requirements. This is then followed by a review of the current technological status of these systems and a discussion of the most significant problems that must be resolved before each candidate system can be a viable power source.

  12. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

    2003-07-30

    This Quarter has been divided between running experiments and the installation of the drill-pipe rotation system. In addition, valves and piping were relocated, and three viewports were installed. Detailed design work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. Design of the first prototype version of a Foam Generator has been finalized, and fabrication is underway. This will be used to determine the relationship between surface roughness and ''slip'' of foams at solid boundaries. Additional cups and rotors are being machined with different surface roughness. Some experiments on cuttings transport with aerated fluids have been conducted at EPET. Theoretical modeling of cuttings transport with aerated fluids is proceeding. The development of theoretical models to predict frictional pressure losses of flowing foam is in progress. The new board design for instrumentation to measure cuttings concentration is now functioning with an acceptable noise level. The ultrasonic sensors are stable up to 190 F. Static tests with sand in an annulus indicate that the system is able to distinguish between different sand concentrations. Viscometer tests with foam, generated by the Dynamic Test Facility (DTF), are continuing.

  13. Transportation Statistics Annual Report 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenn, M.

    1997-01-01

    This document is the fourth Transportation Statistics Annual Report (TSAR) prepared by the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) for the President and Congress. As in previous years, it reports on the state of U.S. transportation system at two levels. First, in Part I, it provides a statistical and interpretive survey of the system—its physical characteristics, its economic attributes, aspects of its use and performance, and the scale and severity of unintended consequences of transportation, such as fatalities and injuries, oil import dependency, and environment impacts. Part I also explores the state of transportation statistics, and new needs of the rapidly changing world of transportation. Second, Part II of the report, as in prior years, explores in detail the performance of the U.S. transportation system from the perspective of desired social outcomes or strategic goals. This year, the performance aspect of transportation chosen for thematic treatment is “Mobility and Access,” which complements past TSAR theme sections on “The Economic Performance of Transportation” (1995) and “Transportation and the Environment” (1996). Mobility and access are at the heart of the transportation system’s performance from the user’s perspective. In what ways and to what extent does the geographic freedom provided by transportation enhance personal fulfillment of the nation’s residents and contribute to economic advancement of people and businesses? This broad question underlies many of the topics examined in Part II: What is the current level of personal mobility in the United States, and how does it vary by sex, age, income level, urban or rural location, and over time? What factors explain variations? Has transportation helped improve people’s access to work, shopping, recreational facilities, and medical services, and in what ways and in what locations? How have barriers, such as age, disabilities, or lack of an automobile, affected these accessibility patterns? How are commodity flows and transportation services responding to global competition, deregulation, economic restructuring, and new information technologies? How do U.S. patterns of personal mobility and freight movement compare with other advanced industrialized countries, formerly centrally planned economies, and major newly industrializing countries? Finally, how is the rapid adoption of new information technologies influencing the patterns of transportation demand and the supply of new transportation services? Indeed, how are information technologies affecting the nature and organization of transportation services used by individuals and firms?

  14. The transport of cosmic rays across magnetic fieldlines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desiati, Paolo [Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center (WIPAC) and Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 222 West Washington Avenue, Madison, WI 53703 (United States); Zweibel, Ellen G., E-mail: desiati@wipac.wisc.edu, E-mail: zweibel@astro.wisc.edu [Departments of Astronomy and Physics, Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    The long residence times and small anisotropies of cosmic rays suggest that they are well confined and well scattered by the Galactic magnetic field. Due to the disk-like shape of the confinement volume, transport in the vertical direction, which is perpendicular to the mean Galactic magnetic field, is key to cosmic ray escape. It has long been recognized that this vertical transport depends both on the vertical component of the field lines themselves and on the extent to which the cosmic rays are tied to the field lines. In this paper, we use magnetic fields with very simple spatial and temporal structures to isolate some important features of cross field line transport. We show that even simple magnetic nonuniformities combined with pitch angle scattering can enhance cross field line transport by several orders of magnitude, while pitch angle scattering is unnecessary for enhanced transport if the field is chaotic. Nevertheless, perpendicular transport is much less than parallel transport in all the cases we study. We apply the results to confinement of cosmic rays in the Fermi bubbles.

  15. Transport properties in semiconducting NbS{sub 2} nanoflakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Y. H.; Chen, R. S., E-mail: rsc@mail.ntust.edu.tw; Ho, C. H. [Graduate Institute of Applied Science and Technology, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Peng, C. C.; Huang, Y. S. [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-01

    The electronic transport properties in individual niobium disulphide (NbS{sub 2}) nanoflakes mechanically exfoliated from the bulk crystal with three rhombohedral (3R) structure grown by chemical vapor transport were investigated. It is found that the conductivity values of the single-crystalline nanoflakes are approximately two orders of magnitude lower than that of their bulk counterparts. Temperature-dependent conductivity measurements show that the 3R-NbS{sub 2} nanoflakes exhibit semiconducting transport behavior, which is also different from the metallic character in the bulk crystals. In addition, the noncontinuous conductivity variations were observed at the temperature below 180?K for both the nanoflakes and the bulks, which is attributed to the probable charge density wave transition. The photoconductivities in the semiconducting nanoflakes were also observed under the excitation at 532?nm wavelength. The probable mechanisms resulting in the different transport behaviors between the NbS{sub 2} nanostructure and bulk were discussed.

  16. Photon-mediated electron transport in hybrid circuit-QED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neill Lambert; Christian Flindt; Franco Nori

    2013-07-25

    We investigate photon-mediated transport processes in a hybrid circuit-QED structure consisting of two double quantum dots coupled to a common microwave cavity. Under suitable resonance conditions, electron transport in one double quantum dot is facilitated by the transport in the other dot via photon-mediated processes through the cavity. We calculate the average current in the quantum dots, the mean cavity photon occupation, and the current cross-correlations with both a full numerical simulation and a recursive perturbation scheme that allows us to include the influence of the cavity order-by-order in the couplings between the cavity and the quantum dot systems. We can then clearly identify the photon-mediated transport processes.

  17. Bubble growth rates in boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, P.

    1956-01-01

    The conditions determining the growth rate of a bubble on a surface in boiling are considered and a mathematical model framed in the light of these conditions. The growth rate is then calculated for bubbles growing under ...

  18. Nanoengineered membranes for controlled transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; McKnight, Timothy E. (Greenback, TN) [Greenback, TN; Melechko, Anatoli V. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Lowndes, Douglas H. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael A. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Merkulov, Vladimir I. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-01-05

    A nanoengineered membrane for controlling material transport (e.g., molecular transport) is disclosed. The membrane includes a substrate, a cover definining a material transport channel between the substrate and the cover, and a plurality of fibers positioned in the channel and connected to an extending away from a surface of the substrate. The fibers are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the substrate, and have a width of 100 nanometers or less. The diffusion limits for material transport are controlled by the separation of the fibers. In one embodiment, chemical derivitization of carbon fibers may be undertaken to further affect the diffusion limits or affect selective permeability or facilitated transport. For example, a coating can be applied to at least a portion of the fibers. In another embodiment, individually addressable carbon nanofibers can be integrated with the membrane to provide an electrical driving force for material transport.

  19. EFFECT OF TRANSPORTING SALTSTONE SAMPLES PRIOR TO SET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.

    2013-05-21

    The Saltstone Sampling and Analyses Plan provides a basis for the quantity (and configuration) of saltstone grout samples required for conducting a study directed towards correlation of the Performance Assessment (PA) related properties of field-emplaced samples and samples processed and cured in the laboratory. The testing described in the saltstone sampling and analyses plan will be addressed in phases. The initial testing (Phase I) includes collecting samples from the process room in the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and transporting them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they will cure under a temperature profile that mimics the temperature in the Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) and then be analyzed. SRNL has previously recommended that after the samples of fresh (uncured) saltstone are obtained from the SPF process room, they are allowed to set prior to transporting them to SRNL for curing. The concern was that if the samples are transported before they are set, the vibrations during transport may cause artificial delay of structure development which could result in preferential settling or segregation of the saltstone slurry. However, the results of this testing showed there was no clear distinction between the densities of the cylinder sections for any of the transportation scenarios tested (1 day, 1 hour, and 0 minutes set time prefer to transportation) . The bottom section of each cylinder was the densest for each transportation scenario, which indicates some settling in all the samples. Triplicate hydraulic conductivity measurements on samples from each set of time and transportation scenarios indicated that those samples transported immediately after pouring had the highest hydraulic conductivity. Conversely, samples that were allowed to sit for an hour before being transported had the lowest hydraulic conductivity. However, the hydraulic conductivities of all three samples fell within an acceptable range. Based on the cured property analysis of the three samples, there is no clear conclusion about transporting the samples before they are set; however, experience with saltstone grout indicates the samples should sit and develop some structure before being transported to SRNL for curing.

  20. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules : 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-11-01

    This schedule is available for the contract purchase of Firm Power to be used within the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Priority Firm (PF) Power may be purchased by public bodies, cooperatives, and Federal agencies for resale to ultimate consumers, for direct consumption, and for Construction, Test and Start-Up, and Station Service. Rates in this schedule are in effect beginning October 1, 2006, and apply to purchases under requirements Firm Power sales contracts for a three-year period. The Slice Product is only available for public bodies and cooperatives who have signed Slice contracts for the FY 2002-2011 period. Utilities participating in the Residential Exchange Program (REP) under Section 5(c) of the Northwest Power Act may purchase Priority Firm Power pursuant to the Residential Exchange Program. Rates under contracts that contain charges that escalate based on BPA's Priority Firm Power rates shall be based on the three-year rates listed in this rate schedule in addition to applicable transmission charges. This rate schedule supersedes the PF-02 rate schedule, which went into effect October 1, 2001. Sales under the PF-07 rate schedule are subject to BPA's 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions (2007 GRSPs). Products available under this rate schedule are defined in the 2007 GRSPs. For sales under this rate schedule, bills shall be rendered and payments due pursuant to BPA's 2007 GRSPs and billing process.