Sample records for transportation mode including

  1. MHD Instabilities Occurring Near/AT the Transport Barrier, Including Loss of Confinement in H-Modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. L. Lao

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In configurations with transport barriers the improved edge and core confinement leads to large pressure gradient and large edge bootstrap current density which often drive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities terminating the discharge or reducing the discharge performance. The edge and the core transport barriers deteriorate or are completely lost. In this presentation, recent experimental and theoretical developments concerning MHD instabilities occurring near/at the edge and the core transport barriers are summarized emphasizing the dominant instabilities and the comparison with theory.

  2. Psychological Insights on Transportation Mode Choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    transportation modes such as bicycles, car sharing, and mass transit. Case studies were conducted with currentAlternatives to single occupancy vehicles:occupancy vehicles: Bicycles Buses Light rail Car sharing Car pooling Photo a car..." (TriMet Journal, March 6, 2006) He had been waiting for the train at the MAX platform (at 6 PM

  3. Transportation Mode Detection using Mobile Phones and GIS Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfson, Ouri E.

    Transportation Mode Detection using Mobile Phones and GIS Information Leon Stenneth, Ouri Wolfson, Chicago, IL 60607-7053 {lstennet, wolfson, psyu, boxu} @cs.uic.edu ABSTRACT The transportation mode. In this paper, we propose an approach to inferring a user's mode of transportation based on the GPS sensor

  4. Baseline projections of transportation energy consumption by mode: 1981 update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millar, M; Bunch, J; Vyas, A; Kaplan, M; Knorr, R; Mendiratta, V; Saricks, C

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive set of activity and energy-demand projections for each of the major transportation modes and submodes is presented. Projections are developed for a business-as-usual scenario, which provides a benchmark for assessing the effects of potential conservation strategies. This baseline scenario assumes a continuation of present trends, including fuel-efficiency improvements likely to result from current efforts of vehicle manufacturers. Because of anticipated changes in fuel efficiency, fuel price, modal shifts, and a lower-than-historic rate of economic growth, projected growth rates in transportation activity and energy consumption depart from historic patterns. The text discusses the factors responsible for this departure, documents the assumptions and methodologies used to develop the modal projections, and compares the projections with other efforts.

  5. Tungsten Transport in JET H-mode Plasmas in Hybrid Scenario, Experimental Observations and Modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tungsten Transport in JET H-mode Plasmas in Hybrid Scenario, Experimental Observations and Modelling

  6. Fast ion transport induced by saturated infernal mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchenko, V. S., E-mail: march@kinr.kiev.ua [Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Tokamak discharges with extended weak-shear central core are known to suffer from infernal modes when the core safety factor approaches the mode ratio. These modes can cause an outward convection of the well-passing energetic ions deposited in the core by fusion reactions and/or neutral beam injection. Convection mechanism consists in collisional slowing down of energetic ions trapped in the Doppler-precession resonance with a finite-amplitude infernal mode. Convection velocity can reach a few m/s in modern spherical tori. Possible relation of this transport with the enhanced fast ion losses in the presence of “long lived modes” in the MAST tokamak [I. T. Chapman et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 045007 (2010)] is discussed.

  7. SHIFTING MODES? TRANSPORTATION AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PATTERNS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    & saving energy in transport via mode shifts? Prospects for the future #12;I - Factors affecting travel% 100% #12;Trends in VMT 1970-2010 0 500000 1000000 1500000 2000000 2500000 3000000 3500000 3 billion miles a mo Flattening out last few years: recession, prices, aging population, ....???? Transit

  8. Dual Feedback Controlled High Performance Ar Seeded ELMy H-mode Discharges in JET including Trace Tritium Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dual Feedback Controlled High Performance Ar Seeded ELMy H-mode Discharges in JET including Trace Tritium Experiments

  9. Allocating city space to multiple transportation modes: A new modeling approach consistent with the physics of transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Allocating city space to multiple transportation modes: A new modeling approach consistent with the physics of transport Eric J. Gonzales, Nikolas Geroliminis, Michael J. Cassidy and Carlos F. Daganzo WORKING PAPER UCB-ITS-VWP-2008-1 March 2008 #12;Allocating city space to multiple transportation modes

  10. Application of canonical profiles transport model to the H-mode shots in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dnestrovskij, Yu. N.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Danilov, A. V.; Lysenko, S. E.; Cherkasov, S. V. [Institute of Tokamak Physics, Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Gerasimov, S. N.; Hender, T. C.; Voitsekhovitch, I. A.; Roach, C. M.; Walsh, M. J. [Culham Science Centre, EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The linear and nonlinear versions of the Canonical Profiles Transport Model (CPTM), which includes both heat and particle transport equations, are used to simulate core and pedestal plasma for JET, and MAST H-mode shots. Simulations by the nonlinear version show reasonable agreement with experiment for both ELMy and ELM-free shots. RMS deviations of calculated results from the experimental ones are on the level 10-12% in main. The calculated ion and electron temperature profiles are very insensitive to the change of the deposited peaked power profiles. The calculated pedestal temperature rapidly increases with plasma current; density profile peaking increases at low collisionalities.

  11. Transportation of Dangerous Goods Anyone involved with the Transportation of Dangerous Goods must be trained. This includes shipping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TDG Transportation of Dangerous Goods Anyone involved with the Transportation of Dangerous Goods must be trained. This includes shipping and receiving. All receiving of Dangerous Goods for the Science in Departmental Offices or labs. How do you know if the package is a dangerous goods shipment? Parcels containing

  12. Transportation Sector Energy Use by Mode from EIA AEO 2011 Early...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This dataset is an excerpt from the spreadsheet Supplemental Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011, isolating Transportation Sector energy use by Mode. Data and Resources...

  13. Multi-fluid transport code modeling of time-dependent recycling in ELMy H-mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Hollmann, E. M. [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Rognlien, T. D.; Lasnier, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Unterberg, E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations of a high-confinement-mode (H-mode) tokamak discharge with infrequent giant type-I ELMs are performed by the multi-fluid, multi-species, two-dimensional transport code UEDGE-MB, which incorporates the Macro-Blob approach for intermittent non-diffusive transport due to filamentary coherent structures observed during the Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and simple time-dependent multi-parametric models for cross-field plasma transport coefficients and working gas inventory in material surfaces. Temporal evolutions of pedestal plasma profiles, divertor recycling, and wall inventory in a sequence of ELMs are studied and compared to the experimental time-dependent data. Short- and long-time-scale variations of the pedestal and divertor plasmas where the ELM is described as a sequence of macro-blobs are discussed. It is shown that the ELM recovery includes the phase of relatively dense and cold post-ELM divertor plasma evolving on a several ms scale, which is set by the transport properties of H-mode barrier. The global gas balance in the discharge is also analyzed. The calculated rates of working gas deposition during each ELM and wall outgassing between ELMs are compared to the ELM particle losses from the pedestal and neutral-beam-injection fueling rate, correspondingly. A sensitivity study of the pedestal and divertor plasmas to model assumptions for gas deposition and release on material surfaces is presented. The performed simulations show that the dynamics of pedestal particle inventory is dominated by the transient intense gas deposition into the wall during each ELM followed by continuous gas release between ELMs at roughly a constant rate.

  14. Multi-fluid transport code modeling of time-dependent recycling in ELMy H-mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigarov, A. Yu. [University of California, San Diego; Krasheninnikov, S. I. [University of California, La Jolla; Rognlien, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Hollmann, E. M. [University of California, San Diego; Lasnier, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Unterberg, Ezekial A [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations of a high-confinement-mode (H-mode) tokamak discharge with infrequent giant type-I ELMs are performed by the multi-fluid, multi-species, two-dimensional transport code UEDGE-MB, which incorporates the Macro-Blob approach for intermittent non-diffusive transport due to filamentary coherent structures observed during the Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and simple time-dependent multi-parametric models for cross-field plasma transport coefficients and working gas inventory in material surfaces. Temporal evolutions of pedestal plasma profiles, divertor recycling, and wall inventory in a sequence of ELMs are studied and compared to the experimental time-dependent data. Short- and long-time-scale variations of the pedestal and divertor plasmas where the ELM is described as a sequence of macro-blobs are discussed. It is shown that the ELM recovery includes the phase of relatively dense and cold post-ELM divertor plasma evolving on a several ms scale, which is set by the transport properties of H-mode barrier. The global gas balance in the discharge is also analyzed. The calculated rates of working gas deposition during each ELM and wall outgassing between ELMs are compared to the ELM particle losses from the pedestal and neutral-beam-injection fueling rate, correspondingly. A sensitivity study of the pedestal and divertor plasmas to model assumptions for gas deposition and release on material surfaces is presented. The performed simulations show that the dynamics of pedestal particle inventory is dominated by the transient intense gas deposition into the wall during each ELM followed by continuous gas release between ELMs at roughly a constant rate.

  15. A non-isothermal PEM fuel cell model including two water transport mechanisms in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Münster, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität

    A non-isothermal PEM fuel cell model including two water transport mechanisms in the membrane K Freiburg Germany A dynamic two-phase flow model for proton exchange mem- brane (PEM) fuel cells and the species concentrations. In order to describe the charge transport in the fuel cell the Poisson equations

  16. Conversion from interchange-type modes to tearing modes: an explanation of tokamak anomalous transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Atsushi

    Conversion from interchange-type modes to tearing modes: an explanation of tokamak anomalous of non-classical tearing mode exists in tokamaks: viz., current interchange tearing modes (CITMs). CITMs type (e.g., interchange/ballooning modes, drift waves, etc.) due to resistivity gradient in tokamaks

  17. Spin diffusive modes and thermal transport in neutron star crusts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sedrakian, Armen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this contribution we first review a method for obtaining the collective modes of pair-correlated neutron matter as found in a neutron star inner crust. We discuss two classes of modes corresponding to density and spin perturbations with energy spectra $\\omega = \\omega_0 + \\alpha q^2$, where $\\omega_0 = 2\\Delta$ is the threshold frequency and $\\Delta$ is the gap in the neutron fluid spectrum. For characteristic values of Landau parameters in neutron star crusts the exitonic density modes have $\\alpha 0$ and they exist above $\\omega_0$ which implies that these modes are damped. As an application of these findings we compute the thermal conductivity due to spin diffusive modes and show that it scales as $T^{1/2} \\exp(-2\\omega_0/T)$ in the case where their two-by-two scattering cross-section is weakly dependent on temperature.

  18. #include #include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Andrew T.

    process #12;#include #include pid_t pid = fork(); if (pid () failed */ } else if (pid == 0) { /* parent process */ } else { /* child process */ } #12;thread #12

  19. A comparison of the cost of urban transportation modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatchell, William Jack

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the fi &ed way an? the operatin cost of the passenger vuhicle. co ' t ? f ectivene: s ana' ye is is conducted us i &g the capital a. . d op ra!. ing costs of each of the six modes. '!he modes are cam- per d on the basis of their seating capacity... of the oass n:ar v& h? Le sre ccmbined to offer a cost rou&parison for peak- !'cur & ause?ger vc lumes ranging from 4, 000 to 24, 000 passengers per ! ?ul' Thc author wishes to express his appreciation to Dr. Vergil G. Stover, Cojemi ttee i...

  20. Impacts of urban transportation mode split on CO{sub 2} emissions in Jinan, China.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, D.; Meng, F.; Wang, M.; He, K. (Energy Systems); (Energy Foundation); (Tsinghua Univ.)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the world's largest developing country, China currently is undergoing rapid urbanization and motorization, which will result in far-reaching impacts on energy and the environment. According to estimates, energy use and carbon emissions in the transportation sector will comprise roughly 30% of total emissions by 2030. Since the late 1990s, transportation-related issues such as energy, consumption, and carbon emissions have become a policy focus in China. To date, most research and policies have centered on vehicle technologies that promote vehicle efficiency and reduced emissions. Limited research exists on the control of greenhouse gases through mode shifts in urban transportation - in particular, through the promotion of public transit. The purpose of this study is to establish a methodology to analyze carbon emissions from the urban transportation sector at the Chinese city level. By using Jinan, the capital of China's Shandong Province, as an example, we have developed an analytical model to simulate energy consumption and carbon emissions based on the number of trips, the transportation mode split, and the trip distance. This model has enabled us to assess the impacts of the transportation mode split on energy consumption and carbon emissions. Furthermore, this paper reviews a set of methods for data collection, estimation, and processing for situations where statistical data are scarce in China. This paper also describes the simulation of three transportation system development scenarios. The results of this study illustrate that if no policy intervention is implemented for the transportation mode split (the business-as-usual (BAU) case), then emissions from Chinese urban transportation systems will quadruple by 2030. However, a dense, mixed land-use pattern, as well as transportation policies that encourage public transportation, would result in the elimination of 1.93 million tons of carbon emissions - approximately 50% of the BAU scenario emissions.

  1. Full-f Neoclassical Simulations toward a Predictive Model for H-mode Pedestal Ion Energy, Particle and Momentum Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battaglia, D. J. [PPPL; Boedo, J. A. [University of California San Diego; Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics; Chang, C. S. [PPPL; Canik, J. M. [ORNL; deGrassie, J. S. [General Atomics; Gerhardt, S. P. [PPPL; Grierson, B. A. [General Atomics; Groebner, R. J. [General Atomics; Maingi, Rajesh [PPPL; Smith, S. P. [General Atomics

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy and particle transport rates are decoupled in the H-mode edge since the ion thermal transport rate is primarily set by the neoclassical transport of the deuterium ions in the tail of the thermal energy distribution, while the net particle transport rate is set by anomalous transport of the colder bulk ions. Ion orbit loss drives the energy distributions away from Maxwellian, and describes the anisotropy, poloidal asymmetry and local minimum near the separatrix observed in the Ti profile. Non-Maxwellian distributions also drive large intrinsic edge flows, and the interaction of turbulence at the top of the pedestal with the intrinsic edge flow can generate an intrinsic core torque. The primary driver of the radial electric field (Er) in the pedestal and scrapeoff layer (SOL) are kinetic neoclassical effects, such as ion orbit loss of tail ions and parallel electron loss to the divertor. This paper describes the first multi-species kinetic neoclassical transport calculations for ELM-free H-mode pedestal and scrape-off layer on DIII-D using XGC0, a 5D full-f particle-in-cell drift-kinetic solver with self-consistent neutral recycling and sheath potentials. Quantitative agreement between the flux-driven simulation and the experimental electron density, impurity density and orthogonal measurements of impurity temperature and flow profiles is achieved by adding random-walk particle diffusion to the guiding-center drift motion. This interpretative technique quantifies the role of neoclassical, anomalous and neutral transport to the overall pedestal structure, and consequently illustrates the importance of including kinetic effects self-consistently in transport calculations around transport barriers.

  2. #include #include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poinsot, Laurent

    #include #include //Rappels : "getpid()" permet d'obtenir son propre pid // "getppid()" renvoie le pid du père d'un processus int main (void) { pid_t pid_fils; pid_fils = fork(); if(pid_fils==-1) { printf("Erreur de création du processus fils\

  3. Accepted, Nuclear Fusion, 1999 Turbulent Transport and Turbulence in Radiative I-Mode Plasmas in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Accepted, Nuclear Fusion, 1999 Turbulent Transport and Turbulence in Radiative I-Mode Plasmas vs. radiated fraction suggests a common underlying suppression mechanism. #12;Accepted, Nuclear of Physics University of Alberta Edmonton, Alberta Canada, T6G 2J1 1/4/00 17:25 PM #12;Accepted, Nuclear

  4. Freight mode choice : air transport versus ocean transport in the 1990's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Dale B.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Value density is often considered when considering the choice whether to ship cargo by air or by water. However, although cargo value is directly linked to the overall cost of shipment, it is the deciding factor in mode ...

  5. Transportation R and D included in thermal and mechanical sciences program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory is a multiprogram research and development laboratory operated by The University of Chicago for the US Department of Energy. At Argonne, applied research in thermal and mechanical sciences is performed within the Thermal and Mechanical Sciences Section of the Energy Technology Division. Current program areas include compact evaporators and condensers for the process and transportation industries, ice slurries for district cooling, advanced fluids for improved heat transfer and reduced pressure drop, flow-induced vibration and flow distribution in shell-and-tube heat exchangers, and dynamics and control of maglev systems. In general, the objective of the research is to extend the technology base in each of these areas and to facilitate its application in solving problems of importance to US industries and utilities. This is accomplished by developing validated design correlations and predictive methods. The staff of the Thermal and Mechanical Sciences Section have extensive experimental and analytical experience in heat transfer, multiphase flow, structural dynamics and control, fluid-structure interaction, transient flow and mixing, thermally driven flows, and flow visualization using ultra-high-speed video. Large, general-purpose test facilities and smaller, single-purpose test apparatuses are available for experiments and component design evaluation. A world-class capability in the study of flow-induced vibrations exists within the Section. Individual fact sheets, describing currently active research program areas, related facilities, and listing, as a contact, the principal investigator, are included.

  6. Helium transport and exhaust studies of H-mode discharges in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillis, D.L.; Wade, M.R.; Hogan, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A collaborative program has been initiated to measure helium (He) transport and exhaust on DIII-D in L-mode, ELM-free H-mode, and ELMing H-mode. These diverted plasmas operating in enhanced confinement regimes should provide valuable information for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). To simulate the presence of He ash in DIII-D, a 50 ms He puff is injected into a DIII-D plasma, resulting in a He concentration of {approximately} 15%. The time dependence of the He density profiles in the plasma core is measured with charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy and the He spatial distribution on the diverter floor is studied with an impurity monitor array. The dependence of core transport diffusivities as a function of ELM frequency have been studied and the first demonstration made of He exhaust from an H-mode plasma in a diverted tokamak. The exhaust rate of He from these ELMing H-mode plasmas appears to be within the acceptable range for a fusion reactor, like ITER, based on a measured value of {tau}*{sub He}/{tau}E {approx}14.

  7. Radial transport of energetic ions in the presence of trapped electron mode turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, J.; Wang, W.; Ethier, S.; Manickam, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Ganesh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of transport of hot ions is studied in the presence of microturbulence generated by the trapped electron mode in a Tokamak using massively parallel, first principle based global nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation, and with the help of a passive tracer method. Passing and trapped hot ions are observed to exhibit inverse and inverse square scaling with energy, while those with isotropic pitch distribution are found to exhibit inverse dependence on energy. For all types of hot ions, namely, isotropic, passing, and trapped, the radial transport appears to be subdiffusive for the parameters considered.

  8. Pellet injection into H-mode ITER plasma with the presence of internal transport barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leekhaphan, P. [Thammasat University, School of Bio-Chemical Engineering and Technology, Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology (Thailand); Onjun, T. [Thammasat University, School of Manufacturing Systems and Mechanical Engineering, Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology (Thailand)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The impacts of pellet injection into ITER type-1 ELMy H-mode plasma with the presence of internal transport barriers (ITBs) are investigated using self-consistent core-edge simulations of 1.5D BALDUR integrated predictive modeling code. In these simulations, the plasma core transport is predicted using a combination of a semi-empirical Mixed B/gB anomalous transport model, which can self-consistently predict the formation of ITBs, and the NCLASS neoclassical model. For simplicity, it is assumed that toroidal velocity for {omega}{sub E Multiplication-Sign B} calculation is proportional to local ion temperature. In addition, the boundary conditions are predicted using the pedestal temperature model based on magnetic and flow shear stabilization width scaling; while the density of each plasma species, including both hydrogenic and impurity species, at the boundary are assumed to be a large fraction of its line averaged density. For the pellet's behaviors in the hot plasma, the Neutral Gas Shielding (NGS) model by Milora-Foster is used. It was found that the injection of pellet could result in further improvement of fusion performance from that of the formation of ITB. However, the impact of pellet injection is quite complicated. It is also found that the pellets cannot penetrate into a deep core of the plasma. The injection of the pellet results in a formation of density peak in the region close to the plasma edge. The injection of pellet can result in an improved nuclear fusion performance depending on the properties of pellet (i.e., increase up to 5% with a speed of 1 km/s and radius of 2 mm). A sensitivity analysis is carried out to determine the impact of pellet parameters, which are: the pellet radius, the pellet velocity, and the frequency of injection. The increase in the pellet radius and frequency were found to greatly improve the performance and effectiveness of fuelling. However, changing the velocity is observed to exert small impact.

  9. Experimental evidence for the suitability of ELMing H-mode operation in ITER with regard to core transport of helium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, M.R.; Hillis, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Burrell, K.H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies have been conducted in DIII-D to assess the viability of the ITER design with regard to helium ash removal, including both global helium exhaust studies and detailed helium transport studies. With respect to helium ash accumulation, the results are encouraging for successful operation of ITER in ELMing H-mode plasmas with conventional high-recycling divertor operation. Helium can be removed from the plasma core with a characteristic time constant of {approximately} 8 energy confinement times, even with a central source of helium. Furthermore, the exhaust rate is limited by the pumping efficiency of the system and not by transport of helium within the plasma core. Helium transport studies have shown that D{sub He}/X{sub eff} {approximately} 1 in all confinement regimes studied to date and there is little dependence of D{sub He}/X{sub eff} on normalized gyroradius in dimensionless scaling studies, suggesting that D{sub He}/X{sub eff} will be {approximately} 1 in ITER. These observations suggest that helium transport within the plasma core should be sufficient to prevent unacceptable fuel dilution in ITER. However, helium exhaust is also strongly dependent on many factors (e.g., divertor plasma conditions, plasma and baffling geometry, flux amplification, pumping speed, etc.) that are difficult to extrapolate. Studies have revealed the helium diffusivity decreases as the plasma density increases, which is unfavorable to ITER`s extremely high density operation.

  10. Kinetic Alfven Waves at the Magnetopause--Mode Conversion, Transport and Formation of LLBL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay R. Johnson; C.Z. Cheng

    2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    At the magnetopause, large amplitude, low-frequency (ULF), transverse MHD waves are nearly always observed. These waves likely result from mode conversion of compressional MHD waves observed in the magnetosheath to kinetic Alfven waves at the magnetopause where there is a steep gradient in the Alfven velocity [Johnson and Cheng, Geophys. Res. Lett. 24 (1997) 1423]. The mode-conversion process can explain the following wave observations typically found during satellite crossings of the magnetopause: (1) a dramatic change in wave polarization from compressional in the magnetosheath to transverse at the magnetopause, (2) an amplification of wave amplitude at the magnetopause, (3) a change in Poynting flux from cross-field in the magnetosheath to field-aligned at the magnetopause, and (4) a steepening in the wave power spectrum at the magnetopause. We examine magnetic field data from a set of ISEE1, ISEE2, and WIND magnetopause crossings and compare with the predictions of theoretical wave solutions based on the kinetic-fluid model with particular attention to the role of magnetic field rotation across the magnetopause. The results of the study suggest a good qualitative agreement between the observations and the theory of mode conversion to kinetic Alfven waves. Because mode-converted kinetic Alfven waves readily decouple particles from the magnetic field lines, efficient quasilinear transport (D {approx} 109m2/s) can occur. Moreover, if the wave amplitude is sufficiently large (Bwave/B0 > 0.2) stochastic particle transport also occurs. This wave-induced transport can lead to significant heating and particle entry into the low latitude boundary layer across closed field lines.At the magnetopause, large amplitude, low-frequency (ULF), transverse MHD waves are nearly always observed. These waves likely result from mode conversion of compressional MHD waves observed in the magnetosheath to kinetic Alfven waves at the magnetopause where there is a steep gradient in the Alfven velocity [Johnson and Cheng, Geophys. Res. Lett. 24 (1997) 1423]. The mode-conversion process can explain the following wave observations typically found during satellite crossings of the magnetopause: (1) a dramatic change in wave polarization from compressional in the magnetosheath to transverse at the magnetopause, (2) an amplification of wave amplitude at the magnetopause, (3) a change in Poynting flux from cross-field in the magnetosheath to field-aligned at the magnetopause, and (4) a steepening in the wave power spectrum at the magnetopause. We examine magnetic field data from a set of ISEE1, ISEE2, and WIND magnetopause crossings and compare with the predictions of theoretical wave solutions based on the kinetic-fluid model with particular attention to the role of magnetic field rotation across the magnetopause. The results of the study suggest a good qualitative agreement between the observations and the theory of mode conversion to kinetic Alfven waves. Because mode-converted kinetic Alfven waves readily decouple particles from the magnetic field lines, efficient quasilinear transport (D {approx} 10{sup 9}m{sup 2}/s) can occur. Moreover, if the wave amplitude is sufficiently large (B{sub wave}/B{sub 0} > 0.2) stochastic particle transport also occurs. This wave-induced transport can lead to significant heating and particle entry into the low latitude boundary layer across closed field lines.

  11. Mode-selective vibrational control of charge transport in $?$-conjugated molecular materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artem A. Bakulin; Robert Lovrin?i?; Yu Xi; Oleg Selig; Huib J. Bakker; Yves L. A. Rezus; Pabitra K. Nayak; Alexandr Fonari; Veaceslav Coropceanu; Jean-Luc Brédas; David Cahen

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The soft character of organic materials leads to strong coupling between molecular nuclear and electronic dynamics. This coupling opens the way to control charge transport in organic electronic devices by inducing molecular vibrational motions. However, despite encouraging theoretical predictions, experimental realization of such control has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate experimentally that photoconductivity in a model organic optoelectronic device can be controlled by the selective excitation of molecular vibrations. Using an ultrafast infrared laser source to create a coherent superposition of vibrational motions in a pentacene/C60 photoresistor, we observe that excitation of certain modes in the 1500-1700 cm$^{-1}$ region leads to photocurrent enhancement. Excited vibrations affect predominantly trapped carriers. The effect depends on the nature of the vibration and its mode-specific character can be well described by the vibrational modulation of intermolecular electronic couplings. Vibrational control thus presents a new tool for studying electron-phonon coupling and charge dynamics in (bio)molecular materials.

  12. Fluctuation characteristics and transport properties of collisionless trapped electron mode turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao Yong; Holod, Ihor; Zhang Wenlu; Lin Zhihong [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Klasky, Scott [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The collisionless trapped electron mode turbulence is investigated by global gyrokinetic particle simulation. The zonal flow dominated by low frequency and short wavelength acts as a very important saturation mechanism. The turbulent eddies are mostly microscopic, but with a significant portion in the mesoscale. The ion heat transport is found to be diffusive and follows the local radial profile of the turbulence intensity. However, the electron heat transport demonstrates some nondiffusive features and only follows the global profile of the turbulence intensity. The nondiffusive features of the electron heat transport is further confirmed by nonlognormal statistics of the flux-surface-averaged electron heat flux. The radial and time correlation functions are calculated to obtain the radial correlation length and autocorrelation time. Characteristic time scale analysis shows that the zonal flow shearing time and eddy turnover time are very close to the effective decorrelation time, which suggests that the trapped electrons move with the fluid eddies. The fluidlike behaviors of the trapped electrons and the persistence of the mesoscale eddies contribute to the transition of the electron turbulent transport from gyro-Bohm scaling to Bohm scaling when the device size decreases.

  13. Dynamic transport simulation code including plasma rotation and radial electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honda, M. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: honda.mitsuru@jaea.go.jp; Fukuyama, A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2008-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A new one-dimensional transport code named TASK/TX, which is able to describe dynamic behavior of tokamak plasmas, has been developed. It solves simultaneously a set of flux-surface averaged equations composed of Maxwell's equations, continuity equations, equations of motion, heat transport equations, fast-particle slowing-down equations and two-group neutral diffusion equations. The set of equations describes plasma rotations in both toroidal and poloidal directions through momentum transfer and evaluates the radial electric field self-consistently. The finite element method with a piecewise linear interpolation function is employed with a fine radial mesh near the plasma surface. The Streamline Upwind Petrov-Galerkin method is also used for robust calculation. We have confirmed that the neoclassical properties are well described by the poloidal neoclassical viscous force. The modification of density profile during neutral beam injection is presented. In the presence of ion orbit loss, the generation of the inward radial electric field and torque due to radial current is self-consistently calculated.

  14. Investigation of the transport shortfall in Alcator C-Mod L-mode plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, N. T.; White, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Walk, J. [MIT-Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Holland, C. [University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Candy, J. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Goerler, T. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A so-called 'transport shortfall,' where ion and electron heat fluxes and turbulence are underpredicted by gyrokinetic codes, has been robustly identified in DIII-D L-mode plasmas for {rho}>0.55[T. L. Rhodes et al., Nucl. Fusion 51(6), 063022 (2011); and C. Holland et al., Phys. Plasmas 16(5), 052301 (2009)]. To probe the existence of a transport shortfall across different tokamaks, a dedicated scan of auxiliary heated L-mode discharges in Alcator C-Mod are studied in detail with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations for the first time. Two discharges, only differing by the amount of auxiliary heating are investigated using both linear and nonlinear simulation of the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. Nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation of the low and high input power discharges reveals a discrepancy between simulation and experiment in only the electron heat flux channel of the low input power discharge. However, both discharges demonstrate excellent agreement in the ion heat flux channel, and the high input power discharge demonstrates simultaneous agreement with experiment in both the electron and ion heat flux channels. A summary of linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic results and a discussion of possible explanations for the agreement/disagreement in each heat flux channel is presented.

  15. Nuclear winter: Three-dimensional simulations including interactive transport, scavenging, and solar heating of smoke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, R.C.; Auer, L.H.; Glatzmaier, G.A.; Wood, M.C.; Toon, O.B.

    1986-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We reexamine the ''nuclear winter'' hypothesis with a three-dimensional global model modified to allow for localized injection of smoke, its transport by the simulated winds, its absorption of sunlight, and its removal by model-simulated precipitation. Smoke injected into the troposphere is driven upward by solar heating. The tropopause, initially above the smoke, reforms below the heated smoke layer and separates it from precipitation below. Although much smoke is scavenged while the thermal structure is being altered, the residence time of the remaining smoke is greatly increased. We find, particularly for July conditions, a longer-lasting ''nuclear winter'' effect than was found in earlier modeling studies in which normal tropospheric residence times were assumed. In January the smaller solar flux in the northern hemisphere allows faster removal of smoke than in July. Significant cooling of the northern hemisphere continents is predicted; its dependence on season and injected smoke mass is described.

  16. Dependence of helium transport on plasma current and ELM frequency in H-mode discharges in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, M.R. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Hillis, D.L.; Hogan, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Finkenthal, D.F. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); West, W.P.; Burrell, K.H.; Seraydarian, R.P. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The removal of helium (He) ash from the plasma core with high efficiency to prevent dilution of the D-T fuel mixture is of utmost importance for future fusion devices, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). A variety of measurements in L-mode conditions have shown that the intrinsic level of helium transport from the core to the edge may be sufficient to prevent sufficient dilution (i.e., {tau}{sub He} /{tau}{sub E} < 5). Preliminary measurements in biased-induced, limited H-mode discharges in TEXTOR suggest that the intrinsic helium transport properties may not be as favorable. If this trend is shown also in diverted H-mode plasmas, then scenarios based on ELMing H-modes would be less desirable. To further establish the database on helium transport in H-mode conditions, recent studies on the DIII-D tokamak have focused on determining helium transport properties in H-mode conditions and the dependence of these properties on plasma current and ELM frequency.

  17. ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT BY ACOUSTIC MODES GENERATED IN THE BOUNDARY LAYER. II. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R.; Stone, James M., E-mail: rrr@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform global unstratified three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of an astrophysical boundary layer (BL)-an interface region between an accretion disk and a weakly magnetized accreting object such as a white dwarf-with the goal of understanding the effects of magnetic field on the BL. We use cylindrical coordinates with an isothermal equation of state and investigate a number of initial field geometries including toroidal, vertical, and vertical with zero net flux. Our initial setup consists of a Keplerian disk attached to a non-rotating star. In a previous work, we found that in hydrodynamical simulations, sound waves excited by shear in the BL were able to efficiently transport angular momentum and drive mass accretion onto the star. Here we confirm that in MHD simulations, waves serve as an efficient means of angular momentum transport in the vicinity of the BL, despite the magnetorotational instability (MRI) operating in the disk. In particular, the angular momentum current due to waves is at times larger than the angular momentum current due to MRI. Our results suggest that angular momentum transport in the BL and its vicinity is a global phenomenon occurring through dissipation of waves and shocks. This point of view is quite different from the standard picture of transport by a local anomalous turbulent viscosity. In addition to angular momentum transport, we also study magnetic field amplification within the BL. We find that the field is indeed amplified in the BL, but only by a factor of a few, and remains subthermal.

  18. DIVIMP Tungsten Erosion and Transport Simulations of an ELM Cycle in a JET Type-I ELMy H-mode Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIVIMP Tungsten Erosion and Transport Simulations of an ELM Cycle in a JET Type-I ELMy H-mode Plasma

  19. Simulation of L-mode Tokamak Discharges and ITER Performance with Energy Transport Coefficients of Bohm and Gyro-Bohm Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simulation of L-mode Tokamak Discharges and ITER Performance with Energy Transport Coefficients of Bohm and Gyro-Bohm Type

  20. A Description of ELM-Free H-modes in Terms of a Neoclassical Edge Barrier and a ‘Mixed’ Model for Energy and Particle Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Description of ELM-Free H-modes in Terms of a Neoclassical Edge Barrier and a ‘Mixed’ Model for Energy and Particle Transport

  1. Chamber transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  2. Long-Range Atmospheric Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: A Global 3-D Model Analysis Including Evaluation of Arctic Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Carey

    We use the global 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem to simulate long-range atmospheric transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). To evaluate the model’s ability to simulate PAHs with different volatilities, ...

  3. Bus Rapid Transit (BRT): An Efficient and Competitive Mode of Public Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervero, Robert

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Towards  a  smart  future  for  cities:  urban  transport  Despite  compact-­?city  and  smart-­?growth  initiatives,  

  4. Mode-dependent phonon transport analysis of silicon crystal by molecular dynamics method Takuma HORI*4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Mode Projection(NMP)(17,18,20,21) Spectral Energy Density (SED)(22) LDeMDu u'MDu' 1 Fig. 1 Flow chart[(8)] 22 0 )( 1 )( f (8) k(22) Fig. 3 Flow chart of the lattice dynamics method. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 methods using normal mode projection and spectral energy density. By performing the calculations

  5. Transport mode and network architecture : carbon footprint as a new decision metric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrieu, Nelly

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the tradeoffs between carbon footprint, cost, time and risk across three case studies of United States' perishable or consumer packaged goods firms and their transportation partners. Building upon ...

  6. Singapore's public and private transport modes : an economic comparison and policy implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Chin Ning

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Frequently, public decisions on transportation are based on cost benefit analyses that do not take into account the costs that private individuals are eventually led to spend in order to use these systems, even though these ...

  7. Effect of entropy on anomalous transport in electron-temperature-gradient-modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaqub Khan, M., E-mail: myaqubsultani@gmail.com [Department of Basic Sciences, Riphah International University, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Iqbal, J. [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Ul Haq, A. [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Physics, Riphah International University, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the interconnection of entropy with temperature and density of plasma, it would be interesting to investigate plasma related phenomena with respect to entropy. By employing Braginskii transport equations, it is proved that entropy is proportional to a function of potential and distribution function of entropy is re-defined, ?S–drift in obtained. New dispersion relation is derived; it is found that the anomalous transport depends on the gradient of the entropy.

  8. Characteristics of the TFTR limiter H-mode: The transition, ELMs, transport and confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, C.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Bretz, N.; Nazikian, R.; Stratton, B.C.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G. Budny, R.; Ramsey, A.T.; Scott, S.D.; Bell, M.; Bell, R.; Biglari, H.; Bitter, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Efthimion, P.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Hill, K.; Hsuan, H.; Kilpatrick, S.; McGuire, K.M.; Manos, D.; Mansfield, D.; Medley, S.S.; Mueller, D.; Park, H.; Paul, S.; Sabbagh, S.; Schivell, J.; Thompson, M.; Town

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H-Modes obtained through transitions from the supershot regime have been studied on TFTR. The characteristics of these H-modes are similar to those found on other tokamaks with one main exception, the density prof:des can be highly peaked. In the best cases the enhanced confinement in the core of the initial supershot is retained in the H-mode phase, while the confinement in a broad edge region is enhanced. Thus in TFTR, all of the important physics of H-modes such as transitions, enhanced edge confinement, ELMs and other phenomena are studied in a large circular limiter tokamak with the added feature of centrally peaked density profiles and the advantage of an extensive set of diagnostics. The threshold power for the transition is found to be a linear function of plasma current. Transitions and ELMs are affected by the mix of co-and counter-neutral beam injection (NBI) and by perturbations introduced by pellet injection, gas puffing, and current ramping before and during NBI. Fluctuations near both transition and ELM events have been characterized. High frequency magnetic fluctuations in the range [ge] 100--250 kHz usually decrease during the transition. Microwave scattering spectra of density fluctuations in the plasma edge show a feature at high frequency during the H-mode, which is not observed in the plasma core and which is consistent with an edge poloidal rotation velocity, V[sub [theta

  9. Characteristics of the TFTR limiter H-mode: The transition, ELMs, transport and confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, C.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bretz, N.; Nazikian, R.; Stratton, B.C.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G. Budny, R.; Ramsey, A.T.; Scott, S.D.; Bell, M.; Bell, R.; Biglari, H.; Bitter, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Efthimion, P.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Hill, K.; Hsuan, H.; Kilpatrick, S.; McGuire, K.M.; Manos, D.; Mansfield, D.; Medley, S.S.; Mueller, D.; Park, H.; Paul, S.; Sabbagh, S.; Schivell, J.; Thompson, M.; Towner, H.H.; Wieland, R.M.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Zweben, S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Fonck, R. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Nagayama, Y. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H-Modes obtained through transitions from the supershot regime have been studied on TFTR. The characteristics of these H-modes are similar to those found on other tokamaks with one main exception, the density prof:des can be highly peaked. In the best cases the enhanced confinement in the core of the initial supershot is retained in the H-mode phase, while the confinement in a broad edge region is enhanced. Thus in TFTR, all of the important physics of H-modes such as transitions, enhanced edge confinement, ELMs and other phenomena are studied in a large circular limiter tokamak with the added feature of centrally peaked density profiles and the advantage of an extensive set of diagnostics. The threshold power for the transition is found to be a linear function of plasma current. Transitions and ELMs are affected by the mix of co-and counter-neutral beam injection (NBI) and by perturbations introduced by pellet injection, gas puffing, and current ramping before and during NBI. Fluctuations near both transition and ELM events have been characterized. High frequency magnetic fluctuations in the range {ge} 100--250 kHz usually decrease during the transition. Microwave scattering spectra of density fluctuations in the plasma edge show a feature at high frequency during the H-mode, which is not observed in the plasma core and which is consistent with an edge poloidal rotation velocity, V{sub {theta}}, of {approximately} 10{sup 4} m/s. The fluctuations begin at the transition, propagate in the direction of electron diamagnetic drift, and have modulation correlated with ELMs. Several TFTR H-modes showed a modest improvement in confinement over that of the supershots from which they originated, and an understanding of these may eventually lead to a plasma with the combined advantages of both the supershot and the H-mode. The characteristics and physics of the TFTR H-modes are considered relative to other tokamaks and in light of various theoretical studies.

  10. Federal Perspective on Opportunities for Hydrogen and Natural Gas for Transportation„Including a Hydrogen Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartmentEnergyEnergyDepartment ofof

  11. Severity of injuries in different modes of transport, expressed with disability-adjusted life years (DALYs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tainio, Marko; Olkowicz, Dorota; Teresi?ski, Grzegorz; de Nazelle, Audrey; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.

    2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    ; STRADA: Swedish traffic accident data acquisition; YLD: Years lost due to disability; YLL: Years of life lost. Warsaw. TAPAS is a four year project (partly) funded by the Coca-Cola greenhouse-gas emissions: urban land transport. Lancet 2009, Mendez M...

  12. Federal Perspective on Opportunities for Hydrogen and Natural Gas for Transportation„Including a Natural Gas Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartmentEnergyEnergyDepartment ofofFederal Perspective on

  13. Agenda of critical issues: coal price and availability. Final report. [Includes effect of legislation, sulfur content and rail transport costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennican, M.L.; Wayland, R.E.; Weinstein, D.M.

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Temple, Barker, and Sloane, Inc. developed an agenda of critical issues regarding future coal prices and coal availability for EPRI. TBS interviewed nearly 50 utility, coal company, and railroad officials, academic experts, and coal consultants; held a one-day participatory workshop; and conducted a literature review and follow-up interviews with selected utilities. TBS found four causes of uncertainty in the utility industry over future coal prices. First, the acid deposition proposals in Congress vary in terms of the structure of the legislation, the costs of compliance, and the impact on coal prices; in turn these uncertainties impede utility fuel planning and decision making. Second, powerplant-specific factors will have a major impact on whether utilities switch or scrub in response to acid deposition legislation; existing analyses do not capture these factors. The most important powerplant-specific factors are matching unit characteristics with coal specifications, retrofit scrubber costs, and differing state regulatory environments. Third, TBS found that utility fuel managers have great uncertainty over the availability and future cost of compliance coal. TBS estimated that the existing production capacity of eastern compliance coal is at least twice as high as current production. Fourth, TBS concluded that uncertainty over future coal transportation rates was a major reason for utilities' uncertainty over future delivered prices of coal. Critical transportation-related issues are the strategic and tactical response of eastern coal producers to the Staggers Act; the impact on rail rates of the sale of Conrail, of possible transcontinental mergers, and of multi-modal mergers; and the future pricing policies that eastern railroads will adopt in response to imports of Colombian coal. 21 references.

  14. Fact #636: August 16, 2010 Transportation Energy Use by Mode | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartment of EnergyEnergy 5:Department ofDepartment ofof

  15. Fact #699: October 31, 2011 Transportation Energy Use by Mode and Fuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartment ofDepartment of Energy 0:|SelectedVehicle

  16. Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive Committee Getting to Berkeley...

  17. Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Print Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive Committee Getting to...

  18. Edge-localized-modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, A. W. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Edge-localized-modes (ELMs) are a ubiquitous feature of H-mode in tokamaks. When gradients in the H-mode transport barrier grow to exceed the MHD stability limit the ELM instability grows explosively, rapidly transporting energy and particles onto open field lines and material surfaces. Though ELMs provide additional particle and impurity transport through the H-mode transport barrier, enabling steady operation, the resulting heat flux transients to plasma facing surfaces project to large amplitude in future low collisionality burning plasma tokamaks. Measurements of the ELM heat flux deposition onto material surfaces in the divertor and main chamber indicate significant broadening compared to inter-ELM heat flux, with a timescale for energy deposition that is consistent with sonic ion flow and numerical simulation. Comprehensive ELM simulation is highlighting the important physics processes of ELM transport including parallel transport due to magnetic reconnection and turbulence resulting from collapse of the H-mode transport barrier. Encouraging prospects for ELM control and/or suppression in future tokamaks include intrinsic modes of ELM free operation, ELM triggering with frequent small pellet injection and the application of 3D magnetic fields.

  19. Thanks go to Mumtaz Hussain and Dilip Parajuli for excellent research assistance.1 The limited amount of empirical work on transport costs include Sampson and Yeats (1976) and Pace2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    amount of empirical work on transport costs include Sampson and Yeats (1976) and Pace2 (1979) on OECD of labor was likely to develop first along sea coasts and navigable rivers, where transport costs were determinants of a country's development prospects? Though interest in transport costs has recently risen

  20. Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinson, Steve

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation in ancient Egypt entailed the use of boats2007 Land transport in Roman Egypt: A study of economics andDieter 1991 Building in Egypt: Pharaonic stone masonry. New

  1. Observation of coupled plasmon-polariton modes of plasmon waveguides for electromagnetic energy transport below the diffraction limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Observation of coupled plasmon-polariton modes of plasmon waveguides for electromagnetic energy the influence of optical near-field interactions on the dipole surface plasmon resonance of Au nanoparticles, the resonance energies of the collective plasmon-polariton modes are determined for longitudinal and transverse

  2. Critical Parameters for Turbulent Transport in the SOL: Mechanism for the L-H Transition and its impact on the H-mode Power Threshold and Density Limit in ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Critical Parameters for Turbulent Transport in the SOL: Mechanism for the L-H Transition and its impact on the H-mode Power Threshold and Density Limit in ITER

  3. A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by crediting against full fuel cycle emissions from theuse” process fuel -- is the full fuel cycle emission factor,where the full fuel cycle includes emissions from

  4. LATTICE/hor ellipsis/a beam transport program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staples, J.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LATTICE is a computer program that calculates the first order characteristics of synchrotrons and beam transport systems. The program uses matrix algebra to calculate the propagation of the betatron (Twiss) parameters along a beam line. The program draws on ideas from several older programs, notably Transport and Synch, adds many new ones and incorporates them into an interactive, user-friendly program. LATTICE will calculate the matched functions of a synchrotron lattice and display them in a number of ways, including a high resolution Tektronix graphics display. An optimizer is included to adjust selected element parameters so the beam meets a set of constraints. LATTICE is a first order program, but the effect of sextupoles on the chromaticity of a synchrotron lattice is included, and the optimizer will set the sextupole strengths for zero chromaticity. The program will also calculate the characteristics of beam transport systems. In this mode, the beam parameters, defined at the start of the transport line, are propagated through to the end. LATTICE has two distinct modes: the lattice mode which finds the matched functions of a synchrotron, and the transport mode which propagates a predefined beam through a beam line. However, each mode can be used for either type of problem: the transport mode may be used to calculate an insertion for a synchrotron lattice, and the lattice mode may be used to calculate the characteristics of a long periodic beam transport system.

  5. Transportation energy data book: edition 16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McFarlin, D.N. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 16 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares U.S. transportation data with data from other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet vehicles, federal standards, fuel economies, and high- occupancy vehicle lane data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. Chapter 6 covers the major nonhighway modes: air, water, and rail. The last chapter, Chapter 7, presents data on environmental issues relating to transportation.

  6. Coal Transportation Issues (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the coal delivered to U.S. consumers is transported by railroads, which accounted for 64% of total domestic coal shipments in 2004. Trucks transported approximately 12% of the coal consumed in the United States in 2004, mainly in short hauls from mines in the East to nearby coal-fired electricity and industrial plants. A number of minemouth power plants in the West also use trucks to haul coal from adjacent mining operations. Other significant modes of coal transportation in 2004 included conveyor belt and slurry pipeline (12%) and water transport on inland waterways, the Great Lakes, and tidewater areas (9%).

  7. Transportation energy data book: Edition 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.; Morris, M.D.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 12 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes--highway, air, water, rail, pipeline--is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares US transportation data with data from seven other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet automobiles, federal standards, fuel economies, and vehicle emission data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternatively-fueled vehicles. The last chapter, Chapter 6, covers each of the nonhighway modes: air, water, pipeline, and rail, respectively.

  8. Transportation energy data book: Edition 13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.; Strang, S.G.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 13 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes - highway, air, water, rail, pipeline - is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares US transportation data with data from seven other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet automobiles, federal standards, fuel economies, and vehicle emission data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternatively-fueled vehicles. The last chapter, Chapter 6, covers each of the nonhighway modes: air, water, pipeline, and rail, respectively.

  9. Transportation energy data book: Edition 13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.; Strang, S.G.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 13 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes -- highway, air, water, rail, pipeline -- is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares US transportation data with data from seven other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet automobiles, federal standards, fuel economies, and vehicle emission data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternatively-fueled vehicles. The last chapter, Chapter 6, covers each of the nonhighway modes: air, water, pipeline, and rail, respectively.

  10. Transportation energy data book: Edition 15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 15 is a statistical compendium. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. Purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter I compares US transportation data with data from other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet vehicles, federal standards, fuel economies, and high-occupancy vehicle lane data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. Chapter 6 covers the major nonhighway modes: air, water, and rail. The last chapter, Chapter 7, presents data environmental issues relating to transportation.

  11. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares US transportation data with data from other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet vehicles, federal standards, fuel economies, and high-occupancy vehicle lane data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternatively-fueled vehicles. Chapter 6 covers the major nonhighway modes: air, water, and rail. The last chapter, Chapter 7, presents data environmental issues relating to transportation.

  12. Zero-mode waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levene, Michael J.; Korlach, Jonas; Turner, Stephen W.; Craighead, Harold G.; Webb, Watt W.

    2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a method and an apparatus for analysis of an analyte. The method involves providing a zero-mode waveguide which includes a cladding surrounding a core where the cladding is configured to preclude propagation of electromagnetic energy of a frequency less than a cutoff frequency longitudinally through the core of the zero-mode waveguide. The analyte is positioned in the core of the zero-mode waveguide and is then subjected, in the core of the zero-mode waveguide, to activating electromagnetic radiation of a frequency less than the cut-off frequency under conditions effective to permit analysis of the analyte in an effective observation volume which is more compact than if the analysis were carried out in the absence of the zero-mode waveguide.

  13. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 32, from the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Davis, Stacy C.; Diegel, Susan W.; Boundy, Robert G. [Roltek, Inc.

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 32 is a statistical compendium designed for use as a reference. The data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 on energy; Chapter 3 0n highway vehicles; Chapter 4 on light vehicles; Chapter 5 on heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 on alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7on fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 on household vehicles; and Chapter 9 on nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 on transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 on greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 on criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also appendices which include detailed source information for various tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions.

  14. Basic Physics of Tokamak Transport Final Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen, Amiya K.

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this grant has been to study the basic physics of various sources of anomalous transport in tokamaks. Anomalous transport in tokamaks continues to be one of the major problems in magnetic fusion research. As a tokamak is not a physics device by design, direct experimental observation and identification of the instabilities responsible for transport, as well as physics studies of the transport in tokamaks, have been difficult and of limited value. It is noted that direct experimental observation, identification and physics study of microinstabilities including ITG, ETG, and trapped electron/ion modes in tokamaks has been very difficult and nearly impossible. The primary reasons are co-existence of many instabilities, their broadband fluctuation spectra, lack of flexibility for parameter scans and absence of good local diagnostics. This has motivated us to study the suspected tokamak instabilities and their transport consequences in a simpler, steady state Columbia Linear Machine (CLM) with collisionless plasma and the flexibility of wide parameter variations. Earlier work as part of this grant was focused on both ITG turbulence, widely believed to be a primary source of ion thermal transport in tokamaks, and the effects of isotope scaling on transport levels. Prior work from our research team has produced and definitively identified both the slab and toroidal branches of this instability and determined the physics criteria for their existence. All the experimentally observed linear physics corroborate well with theoretical predictions. However, one of the large areas of research dealt with turbulent transport results that indicate some significant differences between our experimental results and most theoretical predictions. Latter years of this proposal were focused on anomalous electron transport with a special focus on ETG. There are several advanced tokamak scenarios with internal transport barriers (ITB), when the ion transport is reduced to neoclassical values by combined mechanisms of ExB and diamagnetic flow shear suppression of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instabilities. However, even when the ion transport is strongly suppressed, the electron transport remains highly anomalous. The most plausible physics scenario for the anomalous electron transport is based on electron temperature gradient (ETG) instabilities. This instability is an electron analog of and nearly isomorphic to the ITG instability, which we had studied before extensively. However, this isomorphism is broken nonlinearily. It is noted that as the typical ETG mode growth rates are larger (in contrast to ITG modes) than ExB shearing rates in usual tokamaks, the flow shear suppression of ETG modes is highly unlikely. This motivated a broader range of investigations of other physics scenarios of nonlinear saturation and transport scaling of ETG modes.

  15. Transporting particulate material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldred, Derek Leslie (North Hollywood, CA); Rader, Jeffrey A. (North Hollywood, CA); Saunders, Timothy W. (North Hollywood, CA)

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

  16. Multiscale thermal transport.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Samuel Jr. (; .); Wong, C. C.; Piekos, Edward Stanley

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A concurrent computational and experimental investigation of thermal transport is performed with the goal of improving understanding of, and predictive capability for, thermal transport in microdevices. The computational component involves Monte Carlo simulation of phonon transport. In these simulations, all acoustic modes are included and their properties are drawn from a realistic dispersion relation. Phonon-phonon and phonon-boundary scattering events are treated independently. A new set of phonon-phonon scattering coefficients are proposed that reflect the elimination of assumptions present in earlier analytical work from the simulation. The experimental component involves steady-state measurement of thermal conductivity on silicon films as thin as 340nm at a range of temperatures. Agreement between the experiment and simulation on single-crystal silicon thin films is excellent, Agreement for polycrystalline films is promising, but significant work remains to be done before predictions can be made confidently. Knowledge gained from these efforts was used to construct improved semiclassical models with the goal of representing microscale effects in existing macroscale codes in a computationally efficient manner.

  17. Mode transition of a Hall thruster discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hara, Kentaro, E-mail: kenhara@umich.edu; Sekerak, Michael J., E-mail: msekerak@umich.edu; Boyd, Iain D.; Gallimore, Alec D. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A Hall thruster is a cross-field plasma device used for spacecraft propulsion. An important unresolved issue in the development of Hall thrusters concerns the effect of discharge oscillations in the range of 10–30?kHz on their performance. The use of a high speed Langmuir probe system and ultra-fast imaging of the discharge plasma of a Hall thruster suggests that the discharge oscillation mode, often called the breathing mode, is strongly correlated to an axial global ionization mode. Stabilization of the global oscillation mode is achieved as the magnetic field is increased and azimuthally rotating spokes are observed. A hybrid-direct kinetic simulation that takes into account the transport of electronically excited atoms is used to model the discharge plasma of a Hall thruster. The predicted mode transition agrees with experiments in terms of the mean discharge current, the amplitude of discharge current oscillation, and the breathing mode frequency. It is observed that the stabilization of the global oscillation mode is associated with reduced electron transport that suppresses the ionization process inside the channel. As the Joule heating balances the other loss terms including the effects of wall loss and inelastic collisions, the ionization oscillation is damped, and the discharge oscillation stabilizes. A wide range of the stable operation is supported by the formation of a space charge saturated sheath that stabilizes the electron axial drift and balances the Joule heating as the magnetic field increases. Finally, it is indicated from the numerical results that there is a strong correlation between the emitted light intensity and the discharge current.

  18. Inward particle transport at high collisionality in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, G. Q.; Ma, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China) [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Centre for Magnetic Fusion Theory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Weiland, J.; Zang, Q. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)] [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have made the first drift wave study of particle transport in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (Wan et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104011 (2009)). The results reveal that collisions make the particle flux more inward in the high collisionality regime. This can be traced back to effects that are quadratic in the collision frequency. The particle pinch is due to electron trapping which is not very efficient in the high collisionality regime so the approach to equilibrium is slow. We have included also the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode to give the right electron temperature gradient, since the Trapped Electron Mode (TE mode) is weak in this regime. However, at the ETG mode number ions are Boltzmann distributed so the ETG mode does not give particle transport.

  19. RECENT EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF EDGE AND INTERNAL TRANSPORT BARRIERS IN THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. GOHIL; L.R. BAYLOR; K.H. BURRELL; T.A. CASPER; E.J. DOYLE; C.M. GREENFIELD; T.C. JERNIGAN; J.E. KINSEY; C.J LASNIER; R.A. MOYER; M. MURAKAMI; T.L. RHODES; D.L. RUDAKOV; G.M. STAEBLER; G. WANG; J.G. WATKINS; W.P. WEST; L.ZENG

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have revealed many important details on transport barriers at the plasma edge and in the plasma core. These experiments include: (a) the formation of the H-mode edge barrier directly by pellet injection; (b) the formation of a quiescent H-mode edge barrier (QH-mode) which is free from edge localized modes (ELMs), but which still exhibits good density and radiative power control; (c) the formation of multiple transport barriers, such as the quiescent double barrier (QDB) which combines a internal transport barrier with the quiescent H-mode edge barrier. Results from the pellet-induced H-mode experiments indicate that: (a) the edge temperature (electron or ion) is not a critical parameter for the formation of the H-mode barrier, (b) pellet injection leads to an increased gradient in the radial electric field, E{sub r}, at the plasma edge; (c) the experimentally determined edge parameters at barrier transition are well below the predictions of several theories on the formation of the H-mode barrier, (d) pellet injection can lower the threshold power required to form the H-mode barrier. The quiescent H-mode barrier exhibits good density control as the result of continuous magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity at the plasma edge called the edge harmonic oscillation (EHO). The EHO enhances the edge particle transport while maintaining a good energy transport barrier. The ability to produce multiple barriers in the QDB regime has led to long duration, high performance plasmas with {beta}{sub NH{sub 89}} values of 7 for up to 10 times the confinement time. Density profile control in the plasma core of QDB plasmas has been demonstrated using on-axis ECH.

  20. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas have continued to make small contributions to transportation,transportation actions include electric power sector actions, eg coal to natural gas

  1. Internship Contract (Includes Practicum)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Internship Contract (Includes Practicum) Student's name-mail: _________________________________________ Internship Agency Contact Agency Name: ____________________________________ Address-mail: __________________________________________ Location of Internship, if different from Agency: ________________________________________________ Copies

  2. Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification.

  3. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  4. Living Expenses (includes approximately

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    & engineering programs All other programs Graduate: MBA/INFSY at Erie & Harrisburg (12 credits) Business Guarantee 3 (Does not include Dependents Costs4 ) Altoona, Berks, Erie, and Harrisburg 12-Month Estimated

  5. Alternative energy sources for non-highway transportation: technical section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eighteen different alternative fuels were considered in the preliminary screening, from three basic resource bases. Coal can be used to provide 13 of the fuels; oil shale was the source for three of the fuels; and biomass provided the resource base for two fuels not provided from coal. In the case of biomass, six different fuels were considered. Nuclear power and direct solar radiation were also considered. The eight prime movers that were considered in the preliminary screening are boiler/steam turbine; open and closed cycle gas turbines; low and medium speed diesels; spark ignited and stratified charge Otto cycles; electric motor; Stirling engine; free piston; and fuel cell/electric motor. Modes of transport considered are pipeline, marine, railroad, and aircraft. Section 2 gives the overall summary and conclusions, the future outlook for each mode of transportation, and the R and D suggestions by mode of transportation. Section 3 covers the preliminary screening phase and includes a summary of the data base used. Section 4 presents the methodology used to select the fuels and prime movers for the detailed study. Sections 5 through 8 cover the detailed evaluation of the pipeline, marine, railroad, and aircraft modes of transportation. Section 9 covers the demand related issues.

  6. Texas Feedgrain Flows and Transportation Modes, 1974.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Stephen W.; Knudson, L. Bruce

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of storage capacity. The largest storage facilities (1,000,001-2,000,000 bushels) had a turnover ratio of 0.6; this ratio corresponds closely to that of grain elevators in this size category. The ratio of fed cattle marketed to one-time feedyard capacity...,616 34,534 48.2 0.8 875,752 5,641,112 303,004 43,056 34.6 0.8 809,264 5,573,320 319,780 39,560 39.5 0.7 930,012 5,646,806 417,000 60,800 44.8 1.1 629,222 4,663,631 312,000 73,600 49.6 1.6 758,454 5,766,991 37 4, 409 113,300 49.4 2.0 ricultural...

  7. Texas Wheat Flows and Transportation Modes, 1975.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Stephen; Paggi, Mechel; Engler, Dwayne

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 4 SOUTHERN HIGH PLAINS .. PECOS i>LATEAU .. Crop Reporting District 1-S Crop Reporting Districts 6 and 7 Crop Reporting 0 istricts _ 10-N and 10-S ROLLING PLAINS Crop Reporting Districts l 2-N, 2-S and 3 Crop Reporting Districts 4, 5...- State Capacity High High Plains Texas Coast Grande Plateau Average Plains Plains Plains (bushels) ------------ - - ----------------------- ~ 500,000 2.39 2.77 2.66 2.18 2.02 1. 91 4.07 2.34 500,001-1,000,000 1. 75 1. 55 0.64 1.64 1.?40 2.24 bl 1...

  8. Edge-localized mode avoidance and pedestal structure in I-mode plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, A. E.

    I-mode is a high-performance tokamak regime characterized by the formation of a temperature pedestal and enhanced energy confinement, without an accompanying density pedestal or drop in particle and impurity transport. ...

  9. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes standard transportation practices for Departmental programs to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials including radioactive waste. Does not cancel other directives.

  10. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 26

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 26 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Planning, Budget Formulation, and Analysis, under the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 - energy; Chapter 3 - highway vehicles; Chapter 4 - light vehicles; Chapter 5 - heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 - alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 - fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 - household vehicles; and Chapter 9- nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 - transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 - greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 - criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

  11. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 29

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL; Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 29 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the Data Book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest edition of the Data Book is available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the reader s convenience.

  12. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 24

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The ''Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 24'' is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Planning, Budget Formulation, and Analysis, under the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2--energy; Chapter 3--highway vehicles; Chapter 4--light vehicles; Chapter 5--heavy vehicles; Chapter 6--alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7--fleet vehicles; Chapter 8--household vehicles; and Chapter 9--nonhighway modes; Chapter 10--transportation and the economy; Chapter 11--greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12--criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

  13. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 25

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 25 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Planning, Budget Formulation, and Analysis, under the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 - energy; Chapter 3 - highway vehicles; Chapter 4 - light vehicles; Chapter 5 - heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 - alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 - fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 - household vehicles; and Chapter 9- nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 - transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 - greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 - criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

  14. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 23

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.

    2003-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The ''Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 23'' is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Planning, Budget Formulation, and Analysis, under the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (www-cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2--energy; Chapter 3--highway vehicles; Chapter 4--light vehicles; Chapter 5--heavy vehicles; Chapter 6--alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7--fleet vehicles; Chapter 8--household vehicles; and Chapter 9--nonhighway modes; Chapter 10--transportation and the economy; Chapter 11--greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12--criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

  15. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 28

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL; Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 28 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with U.S Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program and the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest edition of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; and Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

  16. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 27

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL; Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 27 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Planning, Budget Formulation, and Analysis, under the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; and Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

  17. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 30

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL; Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 30 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the Data Book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest edition of the Data Book is available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the reader s convenience.

  18. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 32

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL; Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 32 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the Data Book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest edition of the Data Book is available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the reader s convenience.

  19. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 31

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL; Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 31 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the Data Book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest edition of the Data Book is available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the reader s convenience.

  20. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Reusch, J.; Sarff, J. S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Liu, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) driven modes with fishbone-like structure are observed during 1?MW tangential neutral-beam injection in a reversed field pinch (RFP) device. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of EP instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport. Density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving, inboard-outboard asymmetric spatial structure that peaks in the core where fast ions reside. The measured mode frequencies are close to the computed shear Alfvén frequency, a feature consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The frequency pattern of the dominant mode depends on the fast-ion species. Multiple frequencies occur with deuterium fast ions compared to single frequency for hydrogen fast ions. Furthermore, as the safety factor (q) decreases, the toroidal mode number of the dominant EP mode transits from n=5 to n=6 while retaining the same poloidal mode number m=1. The transition occurs when the m=1, n=5 wave-particle resonance condition cannot be satisfied as the fast-ion safety factor (q{sub fi}) decreases. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growth phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop when the EP modes peak, indicating that the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced with the onset of multiple EP modes.

  1. Multimodal Transportation in California: Connecting Planes, Trains and Automobiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanafani, Adib

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    feature of California transportation decision making. ? A Cto expand the capacity of the transportation system,including intercity transportation. If historic trends are

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: MODE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MODE Sandia and EMCORE: Solar Photovoltaics, Fiber Optics, MODE, and Energy Efficiency On March 29, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Partnership, Photovoltaic, Renewable...

  3. End use energy consumption data base: transportation sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooker, J.N.; Rose, A.B.; Greene, D.L.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transportation fuel and energy use estimates developed a Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the End Use Energy Consumption Data Base are documented. The total data base contains estimates of energy use in the United States broken down into many categories within all sectors of the economy: agriculture, mining, construction, manufacturing, commerce, the household, electric utilities, and transportation. The transportation data provided by ORNL generally cover each of the 10 years from 1967 through 1976 (occasionally 1977 and 1978), with omissions in some models. The estimtes are broken down by mode of transport, fuel, region and State, sector of the economy providing transportation, and by the use to which it is put, and, in the case of automobile and bus travel, by the income of the traveler. Fuel types include natural gas, motor and aviation gasoline, residual and diesel oil, liuqefied propane, liquefied butane, and naphtha- and kerosene-type jet engine fuels. Electricity use is also estimated. The mode, fuel, sector, and use categories themselves subsume one, two, or three levels of subcategories, resulting in a very detailed categorization and definitive accounting.

  4. Limiter H-mode experiments on TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, C.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Bretz, N.L.; Fredrickson, E.D.; McGuire, K.M.; Nazikian, R.; Park, H.K.; Schivell, J.; Taylor, G.; Bitter, M.; Budny, R.; Cohen, S.A.; Kilpatrick, S.J.; LeBlanc, B.; Manos, D.M.; Meade, D.; Paul, S.F.; Scott, S.D.; Stratton, B.C.; Synakowski, E.J.; Towner, H.H.; Wieland, R.M.; Arunasalam, V.; Bateman, G.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.; Boivin, R.; Cavallo, A.; Cheng, C.Z.; Chu, T.K.; Co

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Limiter H-modes with centrally peaked density profiles have been obtained in TFTR using a highly conditioned graphite limiter. The transition to these centrally peaked H-modes takes place from the supershot to the H-mode rather than the usual L- to H-mode transition observed on other tokamaks. Bidirectional beam heating is required to induce the transition. Density peaking factors, n{sub e}(0)/, greater than 2.3 are obtained and at the same time the H-mode characteristics are similar to those of limiter H-modes on other tokamaks, while the global confinement, {tau}{sub E}, can be >2.5 times L-mode scaling. The transport analysis of the data shows that transport in these H-modes is similar to that of supershots within the inner 0.6 m core of the plasma, but the stored electron energy (calculated using measured values of T{sub e} and n{sub e}) is higher for the H-mode at the plasma edge. Microwave scattering data for the edge plasma shows broad spectra at k = 5.5 cm{sup {minus}1} which begin at the drop in D{sub {alpha}} radiation and are strongly shifted in the electron diamagnetic drift direction. At the same time, beam emission spectroscopy (BES) shows a coherent mode near the boundary which propagates in the ion direction with m = 15--20 at 20--30 kHz. During the ELM event these apparent rotations cease and Mirnov fluctuations in the frequency range of 50--500 kHz increase in intensity. 16 refs., 8 figs.

  5. List mode multichannel analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Daniel E. (Livermore, CA); Luke, S. John (Pleasanton, CA); Mauger, G. Joseph (Livermore, CA); Riot, Vincent J. (Berkeley, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A digital list mode multichannel analyzer (MCA) built around a programmable FPGA device for onboard data analysis and on-the-fly modification of system detection/operating parameters, and capable of collecting and processing data in very small time bins (<1 millisecond) when used in histogramming mode, or in list mode as a list mode MCA.

  6. Anomalous transport through porous and fractured media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Peter Kyungchul

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anomalous transport, understood as the nonlinear scaling with time of the mean square displacement of transported particles, is observed in many physical processes, including contaminant transport through porous and fractured ...

  7. Midwestern High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Project. Highway infrastructure report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sattler, L.R.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to arranging for storage and disposal of radioactive waste, the US Department of Energy (DOE) must develop a safe and efficient transportation system in order to deliver the material that has accumulated at various sites throughout the country. The ability to transport radioactive waste safely has been demonstrated during the past 20 years: DOE has made over 2,000 shipments of spent fuel and other wastes without any fatalities or environmental damage related to the radioactive nature of the cargo. To guarantee the efficiency of the transportation system, DOE must determine the optimal combination of rail transport (which allows greater payloads but requires special facilities) and truck transport Utilizing trucks, in turn, calls for decisions as to when to use legal weight trucks or, if feasible, overweight trucks for fewer but larger shipments. As part of the transportation system, the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) study contributes to DOE`s development of transportation plans for specific facilities. This study evaluates the ability of different facilities to receive, load and ship the special casks in which radioactive materials will be housed during transport In addition, the DOE`s Near-Site Transportation Infrastructure (NSTI) study (forthcoming) will evaluate the rail, road and barge access to 76 reactor sites from which DOE is obligated to begin accepting spent fuel in 1998. The NSTI study will also assess the existing capabilities of each transportation mode and route, including the potential for upgrade.

  8. Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model. The NEMS Transportation Model comprises a series of semi-independent models which address different aspects of the transportation sector. The primary purpose of this model is to provide mid-term forecasts of transportation energy demand by fuel type including, but not limited to, motor gasoline, distillate, jet fuel, and alternative fuels (such as CNG) not commonly associated with transportation. The current NEMS forecast horizon extends to the year 2010 and uses 1990 as the base year. Forecasts are generated through the separate consideration of energy consumption within the various modes of transport, including: private and fleet light-duty vehicles; aircraft; marine, rail, and truck freight; and various modes with minor overall impacts, such as mass transit and recreational boating. This approach is useful in assessing the impacts of policy initiatives, legislative mandates which affect individual modes of travel, and technological developments. The model also provides forecasts of selected intermediate values which are generated in order to determine energy consumption. These elements include estimates of passenger travel demand by automobile, air, or mass transit; estimates of the efficiency with which that demand is met; projections of vehicle stocks and the penetration of new technologies; and estimates of the demand for freight transport which are linked to forecasts of industrial output. Following the estimation of energy demand, TRAN produces forecasts of vehicular emissions of the following pollutants by source: oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, total carbon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds.

  9. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE, including NNSA, offsite shipments and onsite transfers of radioactive and other hazardous materials and for modal transportation. Cancels DOE O 460.1B, 5-14-10

  10. Excitation of Kaluza-Klein gravitational mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunihito Uzawa; Yoshiyuki Morisawa; Shinji Mukohyama

    2000-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate excitation of Kaluza-Klein modes due to the parametric resonance caused by oscillation of radius of compactification. We consider a gravitational perturbation around a D-dimensional spacetime, which we compactify on a (D-4)-sphere to obtain a 4-dimensional theory. The perturbation includes the so-called Kaluza-Klein modes, which are massive in 4-dimension, as well as zero modes, which is massless in 4-dimension. These modes appear as scalar, vector and second-rank symmetric tensor fields in the 4-dimensional theory. Since Kaluza-Klein modes are troublesome in cosmology, quanta of these Kaluza-Klein modes should not be excited abundantly. However, if radius of compactification oscillates, then masses of Kaluza-Klein modes also oscillate and, thus, parametric resonance of Kaluza-Klein modes may occur to excite their quanta. In this paper we consider part of Kaluza-Klein modes which correspond to massive scalar fields in 4-dimension and investigate whether quanta of these modes are excited or not in the so called narrow resonance regime of the parametric resonance. We conclude that at least in the narrow resonance regime quanta of these modes are not excited so catastrophically.

  11. Local Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Local Transportation. Transportation from the Airport to Hotel. There are two types of taxi companies that operate at the airport: special and regular taxis (

  12. Greening Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Goal 2: Greening Transportation LANL supports and encourages employees to reduce their personal greenhouse gas emissions by offering various commuting and work...

  13. Transportation and Stationary Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) is small. Previous feedback from industry has indicated that existing transportation fuel providers (oil for multiple fuel cell applications, including material handling equipment, backup power, and light- or heavy

  14. Hot Particle and Turbulent Transport Effects on Resistive Instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, Dylan P.

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project included two main thrusts; energetic particle effects on resistive MHD modes in tokamaks, and turbulence interactions with tearing modes in simplified geometry.

  15. Storage Ring Operation Modes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Longitudinal bunch profile and Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Source Parameter Table Storage Ring Operation Modes Standard Operating Mode, top-up Fill pattern: 102 mA in...

  16. Introduction to Scanning Microwave Microscopy Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    Wenhai Han Introduction to Scanning Microwave Microscopy Mode Application Note Introduction Mapping through" and meanwhile achieve sufficient sensitivity and resolution. With the invention of scanning been developed to probe materials properties. These include scanning near-field to scanning microwave

  17. Modes of log gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Rosseel, Jan [Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Hohm, Olaf [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Townsend, Paul K. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical modes of a recently proposed D-dimensional 'critical gravity', linearized about its anti-de Sitter vacuum, are investigated. All 'log mode' solutions, which we categorize as 'spin-2' or 'Proca', arise as limits of the massive spin-2 modes of the noncritical theory. The linearized Einstein tensor of a spin-2 log mode is itself a 'nongauge' solution of the linearized Einstein equations whereas the linearized Einstein tensor of a Proca mode takes the form of a linearized general coordinate transformation. Our results suggest the existence of a holographically dual logarithmic conformal field theory.

  18. Diagnostic for two-mode variable valve activation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fedewa, Andrew M

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for diagnosing a multi-mode valve train device which selectively provides high lift and low lift to a combustion valve of an internal combustion engine having a camshaft phaser actuated by an electric motor. The method includes applying a variable electric current to the electric motor to achieve a desired camshaft phaser operational mode and commanding the multi-mode valve train device to a desired valve train device operational mode selected from a high lift mode and a low lift mode. The method also includes monitoring the variable electric current and calculating a first characteristic of the parameter. The method also includes comparing the calculated first characteristic against a predetermined value of the first characteristic measured when the multi-mode valve train device is known to be in the desired valve train device operational mode.

  19. Transportation costs for new fuel forms produced from low rank US coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newcombe, R.J.; McKelvey, D.G. (TMS, Inc., Germantown, MD (USA)); Ruether, J.A. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation costs are examined for four types of new fuel forms (solid, syncrude, methanol, and slurry) produced from low rank coals found in the lower 48 states of the USA. Nine low rank coal deposits are considered as possible feedstocks for mine mouth processing plants. Transportation modes analyzed include ship/barge, pipelines, rail, and truck. The largest potential market for the new fuel forms is coal-fired utility boilers without emission controls. Lowest cost routes from each of the nine source regions to supply this market are determined. 12 figs.

  20. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

  1. Optimization to reduce fuel consumption in charge depleting mode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roos, Bryan Nathaniel; Martini, Ryan D.

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A powertrain includes an internal combustion engine, a motor utilizing electrical energy from an energy storage device, and a plug-in connection. A Method for controlling the powertrain includes monitoring a fuel cut mode, ceasing a fuel flow to the engine based upon the fuel cut mode, and through a period of operation including acceleration of the powertrain, providing an entirety of propelling torque to the powertrain with the electrical energy from the energy storage device based upon the fuel cut mode.

  2. Disordered Optical Modes for Photon Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vynck, Kevin; Riboli, Francesco; Wiersma, Diederik S

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave transport in disordered systems is a vast research topic, ranging from electrons in semiconductors, to light in random dielectrics, to cold atoms in laser speckles. In optics, light transport is conveyed by random electromagnetic modes and the wave can be localized about a point or extended throughout the system, depending on disorder strength, structural correlations and dimensionality of the system. Light localization phenomena are more dominantly present in two-dimensional systems than in three-dimensional ones and their optical modes can be tailored to a greater extent. Here, we show that it is possible to make use of the properties of lower-dimensional disordered structures to obtain photon management in three-dimensional space. More particularly, we argue that two-dimensional disorder and wave interferences can be exploited to improve the performance of light absorbers or emitters. Our findings have direct applications for enhancing the absorption efficiency of third-generation solar cells in a rel...

  3. Mixed-mode cooling.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brager, Gail

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ASHRAE’s permission. Mixed-Mode Cooling Photo Credit: Paulnatural ventilation for cooling. Buildings typically had1950s of large-scale mechanical cooling, along with other

  4. Assessment of Historic Trend in Mobility and Energy Use in India Transportation Sector Using Bottom-up Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation mobility in India has increased significantly in the past decades. From 1970 to 2000, motorized mobility (passenger-km) has risen by 888%, compared with an 88% population growth (Singh,2006). This contributed to many energy and environmental issues, and an energy strategy incorporates efficiency improvement and other measures needs to be designed. Unfortunately, existing energy data do not provide information on driving forces behind energy use and sometime show large inconsistencies. Many previous studies address only a single transportation mode such as passenger road travel; did not include comprehensive data collection or analysis has yet been done, or lack detail on energy demand by each mode and fuel mix. The current study will fill a considerable gap in current efforts, develop a data base on all transport modes including passenger air and water, and freight in order to facilitate the development of energy scenarios and assess significance of technology potential in a global climate change model. An extensive literature review and data collection has been done to establish the database with breakdown of mobility, intensity, distance, and fuel mix of all transportation modes. Energy consumption was estimated and compared with aggregated transport consumption reported in IEA India transportation energy data. Different scenarios were estimated based on different assumptions on freight road mobility. Based on the bottom-up analysis, we estimated that the energy consumption from 1990 to 2000 increased at an annual growth rate of 7% for the mid-range road freight growth case and 12% for the high road freight growth case corresponding to the scenarios in mobility, while the IEA data only shows a 1.7% growth rate in those years.

  5. Cavity enhanced transport of excitons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannes Schachenmayer; Claudiu Genes; Edoardo Tignone; Guido Pupillo

    2015-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that exciton-type transport in certain materials can be dramatically modified by their inclusion in an optical cavity: the modification of the electromagnetic vacuum mode structure introduced by the cavity leads to transport via delocalized polariton modes rather than through tunneling processes in the material itself. This can help overcome exponential suppression of transmission properties as a function of the system size in the case of disorder and other imperfections. We exemplify massive improvement of transmission for excitonic wave-packets through a cavity, as well as enhancement of steady-state exciton currents under incoherent pumping. These results may have implications for experiments of exciton transport in disordered organic materials. We propose that the basic phenomena can be observed in quantum simulators made of Rydberg atoms, cold molecules in optical lattices, as well as in experiments with trapped ions.

  6. Architecture AddressingModes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Dat H.

    MIPS R2000 Architecture and Assembly (Part 1) 1. CPU Registers 2. Byte Order 3. AddressingModes 4­endian byte order 3 2 1 0 0 1 2 3 Or Byte number #12; AddressingModes . MIPS is a load/store architecture . RICS -- Load/Store architecture -- All instructions have equal length of 4 bytes -- Every register can

  7. U.S. Transport Task Force Meeting - April 2014 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tynan, George R. [UC San Diego

    2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate goal of the U.S. Transport Task Force is to develop a physics-based understanding of confinement and particle, momentum and heat transport in magnetic fusion devices. This understanding should be of sufficient depth that it allows the development of predictive models of plasma transport that can be validated against experiment, and then used to anticipate the future performance of burning plasmas in ITER, as well as to provide guidance to the design of next-step fusion nuclear science facilities. To achieve success in transport science, it is essential to characterize local fluctuations and transport in toroidal plasmas, to understand the basic mechanisms responsible for transport, and ultimately to control these transport processes. These goals must be pursued in multiple areas, including ion and electron thermal transport, particle and momentum transport, the physics of H-modes and the edge pedestal, Internal Transport Barriers, energetic particle transport and 3D effects on all the underlying transport processes. Demonstrating our understanding requires multiple, successful, quantitative tests of theory, simulation and modeling using experimental results in fusion-relevant and basic plasmas (i.e., verification and validation). The 2014 U.S. TTF meeting was held in April 2014 in San Antonio TX to provide a forum for leading scientists focused on the study of transport of particles, momentum and heat in fusion plasmas. Approximately 110 scientists from the US and several from the EU and from China attended and heard oral talks on recent transport results. Several poster sessions were also held. One day of plenary talks were followed by Breakout sessions and poster sessions that were held on focused topics, including L-H transition physics, energetic particles, transport in high performance plasmas, divertor particle and heat flux management and innovative divertor designs, fundamental turbulence studies, end edge transport shortfall. Most of the invited oral talks are archived at the meeting website, see http://ttf2014.ucsd.edu/TTF_2014/Presentations.html A book of abtracts for all presentations and posters at the meeting is also available, see http://ttf2014.ucsd.edu/TTF_2014/Home_files/TTF%202014%20Abstract%20Book%20Final.pdf Finally the program for the meeting is also available, see http://ttf2014.ucsd.edu/TTF_2014/Home_files/TTF%202014%20Meeting%20Schedule.pdf

  8. Transportation Institutional Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Institutional Plan is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 provides background information, discusses the purposes of the Plan and the policy guidance for establishing the transportation system, and describes the projected system and the plans for its integrated development. Chapter 2 discusses the major participants who must interact to build the system. Chapter 3 suggests mechanisms for interaction that will foster wide participation in program planning and implementation and provides a framework for managing and resolving the issues related to development and operation of the transportation system. A list of acronyms and a glossary are included for the reader's convenience. Also included in this Plan are four appendices. Of particular importance is Appendix A, which includes detailed discussion of specific transportation issues. Appendices B, C, and D provide supporting material to assist the reader in understanding the roles of the involved institutions.

  9. Coherent Transport and Symmetry Breaking - Laser Dynamics of Constrained Granular Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Lubatsch; Regine Frank

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present diagrammatic transport theory including self-consistent nonlinear enhancement and dissipation in the multiple scattering regime. Our model of Vollhardt-W\\"olfle transport of photons is fit-parameter-free and raises the claim that the results hold up to the closest packed volume of randomly arranged ZnO Mie scatterers. We find that a symmetry breaking caused by dissipative effects of a lossy underlying substrate leads to qualitatively different physics of coherence and lasing in granular amplifying media. According to our results, confined and extended mode and their laser thresholds can be clearly attributed to unbroken and broken spatial symmetry. The diameters and emission profiles of random laser modes, as well as their thresholds and the positional-dependent degree of coherence can be checked experimentally.

  10. Mode-synthesizing atomic force microscopy and mode-synthesizing sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Passain, Ali; Thundat, Thomas George; Tetard, Laurene

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analyzing a sample that includes applying a first set of energies at a first set of frequencies to a sample and applying, simultaneously with the applying the first set of energies, a second set of energies at a second set of frequencies, wherein the first set of energies and the second set of energies form a multi-mode coupling. The method further includes detecting an effect of the multi-mode coupling.

  11. Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Selected Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 51115 6.15 6.08 6.28 6.83 6.96 6.75 3.06 5415 6.14 6.06...

  12. Sponsorship includes: Agriculture in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Sponsorship includes: · Agriculture in the Classroom · Douglas County Farm Bureau · Gifford Farm · University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center · University of Nebraska- Lincoln Awareness Coalition is to help youth, primarily from urban communities, become aware of agriculture

  13. Standby and Off-Mode Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Standby and Off-Mode Energy Losses In New Appliances Measured in Shops #12;ISBN: 978 with the University of Coimbra. Its research interests include energyefficient technologies, renewable energies, and energy planning. Recent work includes the coordination of several European projects on market

  14. Computational Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    ), in-vehicle computers, and computers in the transportation infrastructure are integrated ride- sharing, real-time multi-modal routing and navigation, to autonomous/assisted driving

  15. Edge transport barrier studies on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Jerry W. (Jerry Wayne), 1975-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Edge transport barriers (ETBs) in tokamak plasmas accompany transitions from low confinement (L-mode) to high confinement (H-mode) and exhibit large density and temperature gradients in a narrow pedestal region near the ...

  16. Microwave mode shifting antenna system for regenerating particulate filters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Kirby, Kevin W [Calabasas Hills, CA; Phelps, Amanda [Malibu, CA; Gregoire, Daniel J [Thousand Oaks, CA

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A regeneration system comprises a particulate matter (PM) filter including a microwave energy absorbing surface, and an antenna system comprising N antennas and an antenna driver module that sequentially drives the antenna system in a plurality of transverse modes of the antenna system to heat selected portions of the microwave absorbing surface to regenerate the PM filter, where N is an integer greater than one. The transverse modes may include transverse electric (TE) and/or transverse magnetic (TM) modes.

  17. The electron geodesic acoustic mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakrabarti, N. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Calcutta 700 064 (India); Guzdar, P. N. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Kaw, P. K. [Institute for Plasma Research Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, a novel new mode, named the electron geodesic acoustic mode, is presented. This mode can occur in toroidal plasmas like the conventional geodesic acoustic mode (GAM). The frequency of this new mode is much larger than that of the conventional GAM by a factor equal to the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio.

  18. Multi-mode ultrasonic welding control and optimization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tang, Jason C.H.; Cai, Wayne W

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for providing multi-mode control of an ultrasonic welding system. In one embodiment, the control modes include the energy of the weld, the time of the welding process and the compression displacement of the parts being welded during the welding process. The method includes providing thresholds for each of the modes, and terminating the welding process after the threshold for each mode has been reached, the threshold for more than one mode has been reached or the threshold for one of the modes has been reached. The welding control can be either open-loop or closed-loop, where the open-loop process provides the mode thresholds and once one or more of those thresholds is reached the welding process is terminated. The closed-loop control provides feedback of the weld energy and/or the compression displacement so that the weld power and/or weld pressure can be increased or decreased accordingly.

  19. Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes requirements and responsibilities for management of Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration, materials transportation and packaging and ensures the safe, secure, efficient packaging and transportation of materials, both hazardous and non-hazardous.

  20. Particles in Surface Waters: Coagulation and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culkin, Gerald W.; Lawler, Desmond F.

    -averaged, unsteady particle transport were developed to approximate the size-dependent particle transport processes, which included advection, dispersion, and settling. Coupled exchange of discrete particles between the water column and sediment bed was modeled using...

  1. Steering of a Bosonic Mode with a Double Quantum Dot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Brandes; N. Lambert

    2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the transport and coherence properties of a double quantum dot coupled to a single damped boson mode. Our numerically results reveal how the properties of the boson distribution can be steered by altering parameters of the electronic system such as the energy difference between the dots. Quadrature amplitude variances and the Wigner function are employed to illustrate how the state of the boson mode can be controlled by a stationary electron current through the dots.

  2. Spent fuel integrity during transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Funk, C.W.; Jacobson, L.D.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conditions of recent shipments of light water reactor spent fuel were surveyed. The radioactivity level of cask coolant was examined in an attempt to find the effects of transportation on LWR fuel assemblies. Discussion included potential cladding integrity loss mechanisms, canning requirements, changes of radioactivity levels, and comparison of transportation in wet or dry media. Although integrity loss or degradation has not been identified, radioactivity levels usually increase during transportation, especially for leaking assemblies.

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - air transport division Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Training Program Summary: or mode of delivery Course Purpose: Dry ice is regulated as Dangerous Goods when transported by air... to be trained in accordance...

  4. A comparative financial analysis of the automobile and public transportation in London

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kothari, Tejus Jitendra

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Automobile systems and public transportation are often organized separately within government structure inhibiting a comparative analysis between the two modes. Further complicating the comparison is that in public ...

  5. Transportation Market Distortions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litman, Todd

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Highways, Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Evaluating Criticism of Transportation Costing, VictoriaFrom Here: Evaluating Transportation Diversity, Victoria

  6. Second harmonic effect on geodesic modes in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elfimov, A. G.; Galvão, R. M. O. [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-090 (Brazil)] [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-090 (Brazil); Smolyakov, A. I. [University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Saskatoon S7N 5E2 (Canada) [University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Saskatoon S7N 5E2 (Canada); Institute of Tokamak Physics, NRC “Kurchatov Institute,” 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Melnikov, A. V. [Institute of Tokamak Physics, NRC “Kurchatov Institute,” 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Institute of Tokamak Physics, NRC “Kurchatov Institute,” 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a kinetic treatment of Geodesic Acoustic Modes (GAMs) that fully takes into account ion parallel dynamics, including the magnetic field component, are presented. The finite-orbit-width (FOW) parameter is considered in the calculation of the second harmonic effect on GAMs. For larger values of the FOW parameter, it is shown that dispersive effects related to the m = 2 harmonics is the cause of the mode frequency splitting and the modes appear due to the interaction with the ion sound mode. Furthermore, the modes may have enhanced damping rates due to second harmonic Landau damping.

  7. Negative mode problem in false vacuum decay with gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Lavrelashvili

    2000-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a single negative mode in the spectrum of small perturbations about the tunneling solutions describing a metastable vacuum decay in flat spacetime. This mode is needed for consistent description of decay processes. When gravity is included the situation is more complicated. An approach based on elimination of scalar field perturbations shows no negative mode, whereas the recent approach based on elimination of gravitational perturbations indicates presence of a negative mode. In this contribution we analyse and compare the present approaches to the negative mode problem in false vacuum decay with gravity.

  8. Reduced Fast Ion Transport Model For The Tokamak Transport Code TRANSP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Podesta,, Mario; Gorelenkova, Marina; White, Roscoe

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast ion transport models presently implemented in the tokamak transport code TRANSP [R. J. Hawryluk, in Physics of Plasmas Close to Thermonuclear Conditions, CEC Brussels, 1 , 19 (1980)] are not capturing important aspects of the physics associated with resonant transport caused by instabilities such as Toroidal Alfv#19;en Eigenmodes (TAEs). This work describes the implementation of a fast ion transport model consistent with the basic mechanisms of resonant mode-particle interaction. The model is formulated in terms of a probability distribution function for the particle's steps in phase space, which is consistent with the MonteCarlo approach used in TRANSP. The proposed model is based on the analysis of fast ion response to TAE modes through the ORBIT code [R. B. White et al., Phys. Fluids 27 , 2455 (1984)], but it can be generalized to higher frequency modes (e.g. Compressional and Global Alfv#19;en Eigenmodes) and to other numerical codes or theories.

  9. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual establishes standard transportation practices for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials and waste. The revision reflects ongoing collaboration of DOE and outside organizations on the transportation of radioactive material and waste. Cancels DOE M 460.2-1.

  10. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  11. A turbulent transport network model in MULTIFLUX coupled with TOUGH2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, G.; Bahrami, D.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new numerical method is described for the fully iterated, conjugate solution of two discrete submodels, involving (a) a transport network model for heat, moisture, and airflows in a high-permeability, air-filled cavity; and (b) a variably saturated fractured porous medium. The transport network submodel is an integrated-parameter, computational fluid dynamics solver, describing the thermal-hydrologic transport processes in the flow channel system of the cavity with laminar or turbulent flow and convective heat and mass transport, using MULTIFLUX. The porous medium submodel, using TOUGH2, is a solver for the heat and mass transport in the fractured rock mass. The new model solution extends the application fields of TOUGH2 by integrating it with turbulent flow and transport in a discrete flow network system. We present demonstrational results for a nuclear waste repository application at Yucca Mountain with the most realistic model assumptions and input parameters including the geometrical layout of the nuclear spent fuel and waste with variable heat load for the individual containers. The MULTIFLUX and TOUGH2 model elements are fully iterated, applying a programmed reprocessing of the Numerical Transport Code Functionalization model-element in an automated Outside Balance Iteration loop. The natural, convective airflow field and the heat and mass transport in a representative emplacement drift during postclosure are explicitly solved in the new model. The results demonstrate that the direction and magnitude of the air circulation patterns and all transport modes are strongly affected by the heat and moisture transport processes in the surrounding rock, justifying the need for a coupled, fully iterated model solution such as the one presented in the paper.

  12. RADTRAN3. Radioactive Material Transport Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madsen, M.M.; Taylor, J.M.; Ostmeyer, R.M.; Reardon, P.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RADTRAN3 is a flexible analytical tool for calculating both the incident-free and accident impacts of transporting radioactive materials. The consequences from incident-free shipments are apportioned among eight population subgroups and can be calculated for several transport modes. The radiological accident risk (probability times consequence summed over all postulated accidents) is calculated in terms of early fatalities, early morbidities, latent cancer fatalities, genetic effects, and economic impacts. Groundshine, ingestion, inhalation, direct exposure, resuspension, and cloudshine dose pathways are modeled to calculate the radiological health risks from accidents. Economic impacts are evaluated based on costs for emergency response, cleanup, evacuation, income loss, and land use. RADTRAN3 can be applied to specific scenario evaluations (individual transport modes or specified combinations), to compare alternative modes or to evaluate generic radioactive material shipments. Unit-risk factors can easily be evaluated to aid in performing generic analyses when several options must be compared with the amount of travel as the only variable.

  13. electrifyingthefuture transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    electrifyingthefuture transportation The UK Government's carbon reduction strategy vehicles and the new Birmingham Science City Energy Systems Integration Laboratory (ESIL) will further enhance this work. The laboratory - unique within the UK and world leading - brings together cutting edge

  14. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

  15. Nanoengineered membranes for controlled transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; McKnight, Timothy E. (Greenback, TN) [Greenback, TN; Melechko, Anatoli V. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Lowndes, Douglas H. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael A. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Merkulov, Vladimir I. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A nanoengineered membrane for controlling material transport (e.g., molecular transport) is disclosed. The membrane includes a substrate, a cover definining a material transport channel between the substrate and the cover, and a plurality of fibers positioned in the channel and connected to an extending away from a surface of the substrate. The fibers are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the substrate, and have a width of 100 nanometers or less. The diffusion limits for material transport are controlled by the separation of the fibers. In one embodiment, chemical derivitization of carbon fibers may be undertaken to further affect the diffusion limits or affect selective permeability or facilitated transport. For example, a coating can be applied to at least a portion of the fibers. In another embodiment, individually addressable carbon nanofibers can be integrated with the membrane to provide an electrical driving force for material transport.

  16. STOMP Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases, Version 4.0, User’s Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Mark D.; Oostrom, Martinus

    2006-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide describes the general use, input file formatting, compilation and execution of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator, a scientific tool for analyzing single and multiple phase subsurface flow and transport. A description of the simulator’s governing equations, constitutive functions and numerical solution algorithms are provided in a companion theory guide. In writing these guides for the STOMP simulator, the authors have assumed that the reader comprehends concepts and theories associated with multiple-phase hydrology, heat transfer, thermodynamics, radioactive chain decay, and relative permeability-saturation-capillary pressure constitutive relations. The authors further assume that the reader is familiar with the computing environment on which they plan to compile and execute the STOMP simulator. Source codes for the sequential versions of the simulator are available in pure FORTRAN 77 or mixed FORTRAN 77/90 forms. The pure FORTRAN 77 source code form requires a parameters file to define the memory requirements for the array elements. The mixed FORTRAN 77/90 form of the source code uses dynamic memory allocation to define memory requirements, based on a FORTRAN 90 preprocessor STEP, that reads the input files. The simulator utilizes a variable source code configuration, which allows the execution memory and speed to be tailored to the problem specifics, and essentially requires that the source code be assembled and compiled through a software maintenance utility. The memory requirements for executing the simulator are dependent on the complexity of physical system to be modeled and the size and dimensionality of the computational domain. Likewise execution speed depends on the problem complexity, size and dimensionality of the computational domain, and computer performance. Selected operational modes of the STOMP simulator are available for scalable execution on multiple processor (i.e., parallel) computers. These versions of the simulator are written in pure FORTRAN 90 with imbedded directives that are interpreted by a FORTRAN preprocessor. Without the preprocessor, the scalable version of the simulator can be executed sequentially on a single processor computer. The scalable versions of the STOMP modes carry the “-Sc” designator on the operational mode name. For example, STOMP-WCS-Sc is the scalable version of the STOMP-WCS (Water-CO2-Salt) mode. A separate mode containing an evaporation model as a boundary condition on the upper surface of the computation domain has also been included. This mode, STOMP-WAE-B (Water-Air-Energy-Barriers) can be viewed as an extension of the STOMP-WAE (Water-Air-Energy) mode. Details of this particular mode are outlined by Ward et al. (2005)(a). STOMP V4.0 includes the reactive transport module ECKEChem (Equilibrium-Conservation-Kinetic Equation Chemistry) for the STOMP-W (Water) and STOMP-WCS (Water-CO2-Salt) modes. For this particular module, the “-R” designator is included in the operational mode name (e.g., STOMP-W-R, STOMP-WCS-R-Sc). This mode is described in detail by White and McGrail (2005)(b). For all operational modes and processor implementations, the memory requirements for executing the simulator are dependent on the complexity of physical system to be modeled and the size and dimensionality of the computational domain. Likewise execution speed depends on the problem complexity, size and dimensionality of the computational domain, and computer performance. Additional information about the simulator can be found on the STOMP webpage: http://stomp.pnl.gov. The website includes an introductory short course with problems ranging from simple one-dimensional saturated flow to complex multiphase system computations.

  17. Modes of energy transfer from the solar wind to the inner magnetosphere D. Vassiliadisa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vassiliadis, Dimitrios

    Modes of energy transfer from the solar wind to the inner magnetosphere D. Vassiliadisa. A. Mewaldt California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California Received 19 June 2002; accepted 7 November 2002 Energy transport from the interplanetary plasma to Earth's inner magnetosphere

  18. Forecasting Turbulent Modes with Nonparametric Diffusion Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyrus Berry; John Harlim

    2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a nonparametric diffusion modeling approach for forecasting partially observed noisy turbulent modes. The proposed forecast model uses a basis of smooth functions (constructed with the diffusion maps algorithm) to represent probability densities, so that the forecast model becomes a linear map in this basis. We estimate this linear map by exploiting a previously established rigorous connection between the discrete time shift map and the semi-group solution associated to the backward Kolmogorov equation. In order to smooth the noisy data, we apply diffusion maps to a delay embedding of the noisy data, which also helps to account for the interactions between the observed and unobserved modes. We show that this delay embedding biases the geometry of the data in a way which extracts the most predictable component of the dynamics. The resulting model approximates the semigroup solutions of the generator of the underlying dynamics in the limit of large data and in the observation noise limit. We will show numerical examples on a wide-range of well-studied turbulent modes, including the Fourier modes of the energy conserving Truncated Burgers-Hopf (TBH) model, the Lorenz-96 model in weakly chaotic to fully turbulent regimes, and the barotropic modes of a quasi-geostrophic model with baroclinic instabilities. In these examples, forecasting skills of the nonparametric diffusion model are compared to a wide-range of stochastic parametric modeling approaches, which account for the nonlinear interactions between the observed and unobserved modes with white and colored noises.

  19. Transportation Energy Data Book, Edition 18

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy C.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 18 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. This edition of the Data Book has 11 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 - energy Chapter 3 - emissions; Chapter 4 - transportation and the economy; Chapter 5 - highway vehicles; Chapter 6 - Light vehicles; Chapter 7 - heavy vehicles; Chapter 8 - alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 9 - fleet vehicles; Chapter 10 - household vehicles; and Chapter 11 - nonhighway modes. The sources used represent the latest available data.

  20. Multi-processor including data flow accelerator module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davidson, George S. (Albuquerque, NM); Pierce, Paul E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An accelerator module for a data flow computer includes an intelligent memory. The module is added to a multiprocessor arrangement and uses a shared tagged memory architecture in the data flow computer. The intelligent memory module assigns locations for holding data values in correspondence with arcs leading to a node in a data dependency graph. Each primitive computation is associated with a corresponding memory cell, including a number of slots for operands needed to execute a primitive computation, a primitive identifying pointer, and linking slots for distributing the result of the cell computation to other cells requiring that result as an operand. Circuitry is provided for utilizing tag bits to determine automatically when all operands required by a processor are available and for scheduling the primitive for execution in a queue. Each memory cell of the module may be associated with any of the primitives, and the particular primitive to be executed by the processor associated with the cell is identified by providing an index, such as the cell number for the primitive, to the primitive lookup table of starting addresses. The module thus serves to perform functions previously performed by a number of sections of data flow architectures and coexists with conventional shared memory therein. A multiprocessing system including the module operates in a hybrid mode, wherein the same processing modules are used to perform some processing in a sequential mode, under immediate control of an operating system, while performing other processing in a data flow mode.

  1. Theory of semicollisional kinetic Alfven modes in sheared magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahm, T.S.; Chen, L.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectra of the semicollisional kinetic Alfven modes in a sheared slab geometry are investigated, including the effects of finite ion Larmor radius and diamagnetic drift frequencies. The eigenfrequencies of the damped modes are derived analytically via asymptotic analyses. In particular, as one reduces the resistivity, we find that, due to finite ion Larmor radius effects, the damped mode frequencies asymptotically approach finite real values corresponding to the end points of the kinetic Alfven continuum.

  2. An informatics based analysis of the impact of isotope substitution on phonon modes in graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broderick, Scott; Srinivasan, Srikant; Rajan, Krishna [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Ray, Upamanyu; Balasubramanian, Ganesh, E-mail: bganesh@iastate.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown by informatics that the high frequency short ranged modes exert a significant influence in impeding thermal transport through isotope substituted graphene nanoribbons. Using eigenvalue decomposition methods, we have extracted features in the phonon density of states spectra that reveal correlations between isotope substitution and phonon modes. This study also provides a data driven computational framework for the linking of materials chemistry and transport properties in 2D systems.

  3. Promoting sustainable transportation through the integration of cycling with public transit : lessons from Copenhagen and Munich for Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Eugene Siong Aun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainable modes of transportation like cycling and public transit are always desired, but trying to achieve a mode shift from the automobile to cycling and public transit can be quite a challenge because cycling and ...

  4. Apparatus for transporting hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Osterman, Robert A. (Canonsburg, PA); Cox, Robert (West Mifflin, PA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are provided for selectively receiving, transporting, and releasing one or more radioactive or other hazardous samples for analysis on a differential thermal analysis (DTA) apparatus. The apparatus includes a portable sample transporting apparatus for storing and transporting the samples and includes a support assembly for supporting the transporting apparatus when a sample is transferred to the DTA apparatus. The transporting apparatus includes a storage member which includes a plurality of storage chambers arrayed circumferentially with respect to a central axis. An adjustable top door is located on the top side of the storage member, and the top door includes a channel capable of being selectively placed in registration with the respective storage chambers thereby permitting the samples to selectively enter the respective storage chambers. The top door, when closed, isolates the respective samples within the storage chambers. A plurality of spring-biased bottom doors are located on the bottom sides of the respective storage chambers. The bottom doors isolate the samples in the respective storage chambers when the bottom doors are in the closed position. The bottom doors permit the samples to leave the respective storage chambers from the bottom side when the respective bottom doors are in respective open positions. The bottom doors permit the samples to be loaded into the respective storage chambers after the analysis for storage and transport to a permanent storage location.

  5. Fact #699: October 31, 2011 Transportation Energy Use by Mode...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Graph showing transporation energy use (gasoline, diesel fuel, liquefied petroleum gas, jet fuel, residual fuel oil, natural gas, and electricity) by various transporation sectors...

  6. The impact of fuel price volatility on transportation mode choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Eun Hie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the price of oil has driven large fluctuations in the price of diesel fuel, which is an important cost component in freight logistics. This thesis explores the impact of fuel price volatility on supply ...

  7. Texas' cotton distribution patterns and utilized transportation modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vulcain, Ronald JMA

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the state cotton produc- tion. These coop gina provided service to an estimated 30, 217 cotton growers. * Texas Cotton Warehouses Booz-Allen and Hamilton, Inc. , surveyed U. S. cotton warehouses in 1980 and noted that 20 to 302 of the United States... picked (U. S. Department of Agriculture (a)). Traditionally, trailers have been used to move cotton out of the field to ginning facilities. However, in the last few years, investments in module builders have increased the operational efficiency...

  8. Online Safety Monitoring Using Safety Modes Jeremie Guiochet, David Powell and Etienne Baudin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : transportation [3], space [4], medical systems [5], [6], civil engineering [7], nuclear power plants [8- functional robotic systems. We present an approach and a formalization of the process for determining safety by the monitored system. In practice, each safety mode is related to one or several functional modes

  9. Implementing the DC Mode in Cosmological Simulations with Supercomoving Variables

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Rudd, Douglas H.

    2011-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    As emphasized by previous studies, proper treatment of the density fluctuation on the fundamental scale of a cosmological simulation volume - the 'DC mode' - is critical for accurate modeling of spatial correlations on scales ~> 10% of simulation box size. We provide further illustration of the effects of the DC mode on the abundance of halos in small boxes and show that it is straightforward to incorporate this mode in cosmological codes that use the 'supercomoving' variables. The equations governing evolution of dark matter and baryons recast with these variables are particularly simple and include the expansion factor, and hence the effect of the DC mode, explicitly only in the Poisson equation.

  10. Special purpose modes in photonic band gap fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spencer, James; Noble, Robert; Campbell, Sara

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic band gap fibers are described having one or more defects suitable for the acceleration of electrons or other charged particles. Methods and devices are described for exciting special purpose modes in the defects including laser coupling schemes as well as various fiber designs and components for facilitating excitation of desired modes. Results are also presented showing effects on modes due to modes in other defects within the fiber and due to the proximity of defects to the fiber edge. Techniques and devices are described for controlling electrons within the defect(s). Various applications for electrons or other energetic charged particles produced by such photonic band gap fibers are also described.

  11. Energy transport using natural convection boundary layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection is one of the major modes of energy transport in passive solar buildings. There are two primary mechanisms for natural convection heat transport through an aperture between building zones: (1) bulk density differences created by temperature differences between zones; and (2) thermosyphon pumping created by natural convection boundary layers. The primary objective of the present study is to compare the characteristics of bulk density driven and boundary layer driven flow, and discuss some of the advantages associated with the use of natural convection boundary layers to transport energy in solar building applications.

  12. Pulse transmission transmitter including a higher order time derivate filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dress Jr., William B.; Smith, Stephen F.

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for pulse-transmission low-power communication modes are disclosed. A pulse transmission transmitter includes: a clock; a pseudorandom polynomial generator coupled to the clock, the pseudorandom polynomial generator having a polynomial load input; an exclusive-OR gate coupled to the pseudorandom polynomial generator, the exclusive-OR gate having a serial data input; a programmable delay circuit coupled to both the clock and the exclusive-OR gate; a pulse generator coupled to the programmable delay circuit; and a higher order time derivative filter coupled to the pulse generator. The systems and methods significantly reduce lower-frequency emissions from pulse transmission spread-spectrum communication modes, which reduces potentially harmful interference to existing radio frequency services and users and also simultaneously permit transmission of multiple data bits by utilizing specific pulse shapes.

  13. Progress In Understanding The Enhanced Petestal H-mode In NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Canik, J. M.; Maingi, R.; Battaglia, D.; Bell, R. E.; Guttenfelder, W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H.; Sabbagh, S.

    2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    ThIS paper describes the enhanced pedestal (EP) H-mode observed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The defining characteristics of EP H-mode are given, namely i)transition after the L- to H-mode transition, ii) region of very steep ion temperature gradient, and iii) associated region of strong rotational shear. A newly observed long-pulse EP H-mode example shows quiescent behavior for as long as the heating and current drive sources are maintained. Cases are shown where the region of steep ion temperature gradient is located at the very edge, and cases where it is shifted up to 10 cm inward from the plasma edge; these cases are united by a common dependence of the ion temperature gradient on the toroidal rotation frequency shear. EP H-mode examples have been observed across a wide range of q95 and pedestal collisionality. No strong changes in the fluctuation amplitudes have been observed following the eP H-mode transition, and transport analysis indicates that the ion t hermal transport is comparable to or less than anticipated from a simple neoclassical transport model. Cases are shown where EP H-modes were reliably generated, through these low-q95 examples were difficult to sustain. A case where an externally triggered ELM precipitates the transition to EP H-mode is also shown, though an initial experiment designed to trigger EP-H-modes in this fashion was successful.

  14. Progress in understanding the enhanced pedestal H-mode in NSTX

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gerhardt, S.P.; Canik, J.M; Maingi, R.; Battaglia, D.; Bell, R.E.; Guttenfelder, W.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Smith, D.R.; Yuh, H.; Sabbagh, S.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes the enhanced pedestal (EP) H-mode observed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The defining characteristics of EP H-mode are given, namely i)transition after the L- to H-mode transition, ii) region of very steep ion temperature gradient, and iii) associated region of strong rotational shear. A newly observed long-pulse EP H-mode example shows quiescent behavior for as long as the heating and current drive sources are maintained. Cases are shown where the region of steep ion temperature gradient is located at the very edge, and cases where it is shifted up to 10 cm inward from the plasma edge; these cases are united by a common dependence of the ion temperature gradient on the toroidal rotation frequency shear. EP H-mode examples have been observed across a wide range of q95 and pedestal collisionality. No strong changes in the fluctuation amplitudes have been observed following the eP H-mode transition, and transport analysis indicates that the ion t hermal transport is comparable to or less than anticipated from a simple neoclassical transport model. Cases are shown where EP H-modes were reliably generated, through these low-q95 examples were difficult to sustain. A case where an externally triggered ELM precipitates the transition to EP H-mode is also shown, though an initial experiment designed to trigger EP-H-modes in this fashion was successful.

  15. Progress in understanding the enhanced pedestal H-mode in NSTX

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gerhardt, S.P.; Canik, J.M; Maingi, R.; Battaglia, D.; Bell, R.E.; Guttenfelder, W.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Smith, D.R.; Yuh, H.; Sabbagh, S.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes the enhanced pedestal (EP) H-mode observed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The defining characteristics of EP H-mode are given, namely i)transition after the L- to H-mode transition, ii) region of very steep ion temperature gradient, and iii) associated region of strong rotational shear. A newly observed long-pulse EP H-mode example shows quiescent behavior for as long as the heating and current drive sources are maintained. Cases are shown where the region of steep ion temperature gradient is located at the very edge, and cases where it is shifted up to 10 cm inward from themore »plasma edge; these cases are united by a common dependence of the ion temperature gradient on the toroidal rotation frequency shear. EP H-mode examples have been observed across a wide range of q95 and pedestal collisionality. No strong changes in the fluctuation amplitudes have been observed following the eP H-mode transition, and transport analysis indicates that the ion t hermal transport is comparable to or less than anticipated from a simple neoclassical transport model. Cases are shown where EP H-modes were reliably generated, through these low-q95 examples were difficult to sustain. A case where an externally triggered ELM precipitates the transition to EP H-mode is also shown, though an initial experiment designed to trigger EP-H-modes in this fashion was successful.« less

  16. A streamlined failure mode and effects analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Eric C., E-mail: eford@uw.edu; Smith, Koren; Terezakis, Stephanie; Croog, Victoria; Gollamudi, Smitha; Gage, Irene; Keck, Jordie; DeWeese, Theodore; Sibley, Greg [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Explore the feasibility and impact of a streamlined failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) using a structured process that is designed to minimize staff effort. Methods: FMEA for the external beam process was conducted at an affiliate radiation oncology center that treats approximately 60 patients per day. A structured FMEA process was developed which included clearly defined roles and goals for each phase. A core group of seven people was identified and a facilitator was chosen to lead the effort. Failure modes were identified and scored according to the FMEA formalism. A risk priority number,RPN, was calculated and used to rank failure modes. Failure modes with RPN > 150 received safety improvement interventions. Staff effort was carefully tracked throughout the project. Results: Fifty-two failure modes were identified, 22 collected during meetings, and 30 from take-home worksheets. The four top-ranked failure modes were: delay in film check, missing pacemaker protocol/consent, critical structures not contoured, and pregnant patient simulated without the team's knowledge of the pregnancy. These four failure modes hadRPN > 150 and received safety interventions. The FMEA was completed in one month in four 1-h meetings. A total of 55 staff hours were required and, additionally, 20 h by the facilitator. Conclusions: Streamlined FMEA provides a means of accomplishing a relatively large-scale analysis with modest effort. One potential value of FMEA is that it potentially provides a means of measuring the impact of quality improvement efforts through a reduction in risk scores. Future study of this possibility is needed.

  17. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    40 pp. IEA, 2004c: Biofuels for Transport: An Internationalthe ACT Map scenario, transport biofuels production reachesestimates that biofuels’ share of transport fuel could

  18. Transportation System Concept of Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Slater-Thompson

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, authorized the DOE to develop and manage a Federal system for the disposal of SNF and HLW. OCRWM was created to manage acceptance and disposal of SNF and HLW in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. This responsibility includes managing the transportation of SNF and HLW from origin sites to the Repository for disposal. The Transportation System Concept of Operations is the core high-level OCRWM document written to describe the Transportation System integrated design and present the vision, mission, and goals for Transportation System operations. By defining the functions, processes, and critical interfaces of this system early in the system development phase, programmatic risks are minimized, system costs are contained, and system operations are better managed, safer, and more secure. This document also facilitates discussions and understanding among parties responsible for the design, development, and operation of the Transportation System. Such understanding is important for the timely development of system requirements and identification of system interfaces. Information provided in the Transportation System Concept of Operations includes: the functions and key components of the Transportation System; system component interactions; flows of information within the system; the general operating sequences; and the internal and external factors affecting transportation operations. The Transportation System Concept of Operations reflects OCRWM's overall waste management system policies and mission objectives, and as such provides a description of the preferred state of system operation. The description of general Transportation System operating functions in the Transportation System Concept of Operations is the first step in the OCRWM systems engineering process, establishing the starting point for the lower level descriptions. of subsystems and components, and the Transportation System Requirements Document. Other program and system documents, plans, instructions, and detailed designs will be consistent with and informed by the Transportation System Concept of Operations. The Transportation System Concept of Operations is a living document, enduring throughout the OCRWM systems engineering lifecycle. It will undergo formal approval and controlled revisions as appropriate while the Transportation System matures. Revisions will take into account new policy decisions, new information available through system modeling, engineering investigations, technical analyses and tests, and the introduction of new technologies that can demonstrably improve system performance.

  19. CEC-500-2010-FS-002 Assess New Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 The Issue California's transportation sector is the single largest contributor of greenhouse gas change. California must find strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. Research addressing additional land-use measures, shifts to less carbon emitting modes, and new policies

  20. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Measurement, Causation and Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. CO2 emissions sources. U.S. CO2 transportation emissions sources by mode. #12;Center% of the carbon dioxide we produce. As such it is a leading candidate for greenhouse gas ((GHG) (CO2, NH4, HFCsTransportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Measurement, Causation and Mitigation Oak Ridge

  1. STOMP Sparse Vegetation Evapotranspiration Model for the Water-Air-Energy Operational Mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Anderson L.; White, Mark D.; Freeman, Eugene J.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Water-Air-Energy (WAE) Operational Mode of the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) numerical simulator solves the coupled conservation equations for water mass, air mass, and thermal energy in multiple dimensions. This addendum describes the theory, input file formatting, and application of a soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) scheme for STOMP that is based on a sparse vegetation evapotranspiration model. The SVAT scheme is implemented as a boundary condition on the upper surface of the computational domain and has capabilities for simulating evaporation from bare surfaces as well as evapotranspiration from sparsely vegetated surfaces populated with single or multiple plant species in response to meteorological forcings. With this extension, the model calculates water mass, air mass and thermal energy across a boundary surface in addition to root-water transport between the subsurface and atmosphere. This mode represents the barrier extension of the WAE mode and is designated as STOMP-WAE-B. Input for STOMP-WAE-B is specified via three input cards and include: atmospheric conditions through the Atmospheric Conditions Card; time-invariant plant species data through the Plant Properties Card; and time varying plant species data through the Boundary Conditions Card. Two optional cards, the Observed Data and UCODE Control Cards allow use of STOMP-WAE with UCODE in an inverse mode to estimate model parameters. STOMP-WAE was validated by solving a number of test problems from the literature that included experimental observations as well as analytical or numerical solutions. Several of the UNSAT-H verification problems are included along with a benchmark simulation derived from a recently published intercode comparison for barrier design tools. Results show that STOMP is able to meet, and in most cases, exceed performance of other commonly used simulation codes without having to resort to may of their simplifying assumptions. Use of the fully coupled STOMP simulator to guide barrier design will result in optimized designs with reduced construction costs; reduced environmental impacts at borrow sites; and minimized post-closure care and monitoring needs, while meeting regulatory requirements.

  2. Energy for Cleaner Transportation Hydro-Quebec

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    testing and evaluation, b. diagnostics of failure modes, and c. low cost components. The fuel cell electrolyte fuel cells and capacitors. The battery papers were presented in sessions on a. performance and Methanol Transport in Direct Methanol Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells M. Lefebvre and D. Olmeijer 35

  3. University Transport Strategy 1. Aims and Objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    .7 To encourage car sharing for those for whom travel by non-car modes is not a practical option. 4. Existing will consider using to influence travel to and from the campus with an emphasis on using car parking controls in car parks on the University campus. 3. General Transport Policies #12;The University has, as part

  4. Master Thesis ICT/ECS-2006-71 Multi-IP-Based SoC Design Including CCM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jantsch, Axel

    Master Thesis ICT/ECS-2006-71 Multi-IP-Based SoC Design Including CCM Security Mode of Operation. This thesis mainly implements CCM security mode of operation on a FPGA platform by using the AES encryption algorithm, it then builds a complete SoC that is based on multi IP cores including CCM. Except for the hard

  5. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Freight Transportation Modal Shares: Scenarios for a Low-Carbon Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brogan, J. J.; Aeppli, A. E.; Beagan, D. F.; Brown, A.; Fischer, M. J.; Grenzeback, L. R.; McKenzie, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Vyas, A. D.; Witzke, E.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Truck, rail, water, air, and pipeline modes each serve a distinct share of the freight transportation market. The current allocation of freight by mode is the product of technologic, economic, and regulatory frameworks, and a variety of factors -- price, speed, reliability, accessibility, visibility, security, and safety -- influence mode. Based on a comprehensive literature review, this report considers how analytical methods can be used to project future modal shares and offers insights on federal policy decisions with the potential to prompt shifts to energy-efficient, low-emission modes. There are substantial opportunities to reduce the energy used for freight transportation, but it will be difficult to shift large volumes from one mode to another without imposing considerable additional costs on businesses and consumers. This report explores federal government actions that could help trigger the shifts in modal shares needed to reduce energy consumption and emissions. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  6. The Burst Mode of Protostellar Accretion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. I. Vorobyov; Shantanu Basu

    2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new numerical simulations in the thin-disk approximation which characterize the burst mode of protostellar accretion. The burst mode begins upon the formation of a centrifugally balanced disk around a newly formed protostar. It is comprised of prolonged quiescent periods of low accretion rate (typically $\\la 10^{-7} \\Msun$ yr$^{-1}$) which are punctuated by intense bursts of accretion (typically $\\ga 10^{-4} \\Msun$ yr$^{-1}$, with duration $\\la 100$ yr) during which most of the protostellar mass is accumulated. The accretion bursts are associated with the formation of dense protostellar/protoplanetary embryos, which are later driven onto the protostar by the gravitational torques that develop in the disk. Gravitational instability in the disk, driven by continuing infall from the envelope, is shown to be an effective means of transporting angular momentum outward, and mass inward to the protostar. We show that the disk mass always remains significantly less than the central protostar mass throughout this process. The burst phenomenon is robust enough to occur for a variety of initial values of rotation rate, frozen-in (supercritical) magnetic field, and density-temperature relations. Even in cases where the bursts are nearly entirely suppressed, a moderate increase in cloud size or rotation rate can lead to vigorous burst activity. We conclude that most (if not all) protostars undergo a burst mode of evolution during their early accretion history, as inferred empirically from observations of FU Orionis variables.

  7. Computing observables in curved multifield models of inflation - A guide (with code) to the transport method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mafalda Dias; Jonathan Frazer; David Seery

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe how to apply the transport method to compute inflationary observables in a broad range of multiple-field models. The method is efficient and encompasses scenarios with curved field-space metrics, violations of slow-roll conditions and turns of the trajectory in field space. It can be used for an arbitrary mass spectrum, including massive modes and models with quasi-single-field dynamics. In this note we focus on practical issues. It is accompanied by a Mathematica code which can be used to explore suitable models, or as a basis for further development.

  8. Computing observables in curved multifield models of inflation - A guide (with code) to the transport method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dias, Mafalda; Seery, David

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe how to apply the transport method to compute inflationary observables in a broad range of multiple-field models. The method is efficient and encompasses scenarios with curved field-space metrics, violations of slow-roll conditions and turns of the trajectory in field space. It can be used for an arbitrary mass spectrum, including massive modes and models with quasi-single-field dynamics. In this note we focus on practical issues. It is accompanied by a Mathematica code which can be used to explore suitable models, or as a basis for further development.

  9. A methodology for estimating the residual contamination contribution to the source term in a spent-fuel transport cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, T.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Jordan, H. (EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant); Pasupathi, V. (Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)); Mings, W.J. (USDOE Idaho Field Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Reardon, P.C. (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the ranges of the residual contamination that may build up in spent-fuel transport casks. These contamination ranges are calculated based on data taken from published reports and from previously unpublished data supplied by cask transporters. The data involve dose rate measurements, interior smear surveys, and analyses of water flushed out of cask cavities during decontamination operations. A methodology has been developed to estimate the effect of residual contamination on spent-fuel cask containment requirements. Factors in estimating the maximum permissible leak rates include the form of the residual contamination; possible release modes; internal gas-borne depletion; and the temperature, pressure, and vibration characteristics of the cask during transport under normal and accident conditions. 12 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Future of Sustainable Transportation This is the January 2015 issue of the Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter. Illustration of an electric vehicle Illustration of an...

  11. A publication of the Airport Technical Assistance Program of the Center for Transportation Studies at the University of Minnesota Winter 2014 Vol. 14, No. 1 For more on the Fall Forum, including video highlights, see www.AirTAP.umn.edu.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    at the University of Minnesota Winter 2014 Vol. 14, No. 1 Briefings For more on the Fall Forum, including video department. That full-time staff is augmented with 28 heavy equipment operators in the winter who work got a look at how the airport handles the snow and ice that's part of a typical Minnesota winter

  12. Off-Highway Transportation-Related Fuel Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.

    2004-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The transportation sector includes many subcategories--for example, on-highway, off-highway, and non-highway. Use of fuel for off-highway purposes is not well documented, nor is the number of off-highway vehicles. The number of and fuel usage for on-highway and aviation, marine, and rail categories are much better documented than for off-highway land-based use. Several sources document off-highway fuel use under specific conditions--such as use by application (e.g., recreation) or by fuel type (e.g., gasoline). There is, however, no single source that documents the total fuel used off-highway and the number of vehicles that use the fuel. This report estimates the fuel usage and number of vehicles/equipment for the off-highway category. No new data have been collected nor new models developed to estimate the off-highway data--this study is limited in scope to using data that already exist. In this report, unless they are being quoted from a source that uses different terminology, the terms are used as listed below. (1) ''On-highway/on-road'' includes land-based transport used on the highway system or other paved roadways. (2) ''Off-highway/off-road'' includes land-based transport not using the highway system or other paved roadways. (3) ''Non-highway/non-road'' includes other modes not traveling on highways such as aviation, marine, and rail. It should be noted that the term ''transportation'' as used in this study is not typical. Generally, ''transportation'' is understood to mean the movement of people or goods from one point to another. Some of the off-highway equipment included in this study doesn't transport either people or goods, but it has utility in movement (e.g., a forklift or a lawn mower). Along these lines, a chain saw also has utility in movement, but it cannot transport itself (i.e., it must be carried) because it does not have wheels. Therefore, to estimate the transportation-related fuel used off-highway, transportation equipment is defined to include all devices that have wheels, can move or be moved from one point to another, and use fuel. An attempt has been made to exclude off-highway engines that do not meet all three of these criteria (e.g., chain saws and generators). The following approach was used to determine the current off-highway fuel use. First, a literature review was conducted to ensure that all sources with appropriate information would be considered. Secondly, the fuel use data available from each source were compiled and compared in so far as possible. Comparable data sets (i.e., same fuel type; same application) were evaluated. Finally, appropriate data sets were combined to provide a final tally.

  13. Photon transport in binary photonic lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. M. Rodríguez-Lara; H. Moya-Cessa

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a review on the mathematical methods used to theoretically study classical propagation and quantum transport in arrays of coupled photonic waveguides. We focus on analysing two types of binary photonic lattices where self-energies or couplings are alternated. For didactic reasons, we split the analysis in classical propagation and quantum transport but all methods can be implemented, mutatis mutandis, in any given case. On the classical side, we use coupled mode theory and present an operator approach to Floquet-Bloch theory in order to study the propagation of a classical electromagnetic field in two particular infinite binary lattices. On the quantum side, we study the transport of photons in equivalent finite and infinite binary lattices by couple mode theory and linear algebra methods involving orthogonal polynomials. Curiously the dynamics of finite size binary lattices can be expressed as roots and functions of Fibonacci polynomials.

  14. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

    2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second quarterly progress report for Year-4 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between October 1, 2002 and December 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks. (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System, Task 4: Addition of a Pipe Rotation System. (b) New research project (Task 9b): ''Development of a Foam Generator/Viscometer for Elevated Pressure and Elevated Temperature (EPET) Conditions''. (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b). (f) New Research project (Task 13): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (g) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (h) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  15. Environmental Impacts of Transportation to the Potential Repository at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.L. Sweeney; R. Best; P. Bolton; P. Adams

    2002-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada analyzes a Proposed Action to construct, operate, monitor, and eventually close a geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. As part of the Proposed Action, the EIS analyzes the potential impacts of transporting commercial and DOE spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste to Yucca Mountain from 77 sites across the United States. The analysis includes information on the comparative impacts of transporting these materials by truck and rail and discusses the impacts of building a rail line or using heavy-haul trucks to move rail casks from a mainline railroad in Nevada to the site. This paper provides an overview of the analyses and the potential impacts of these transportation activities. The potential transportation impacts were looked at from two perspectives: transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste by legal-weight truck or by rail on a national scale and impacts specific to Nevada from the transportation of these materials from the State borders to the Yucca Mountain site. In order to address the range of impacts that could result from the most likely modes, legal-weight truck and rail, the EIS employed two analytical scenarios--mostly legal-weight truck and mostly rail. Estimated national transportation impacts were based on 24 years of transportation activities. Approximately 8 fatalities could occur from all causes in the nationwide general population from incident-free transportation activities of the mostly legal-weight truck scenario and about 4 from the mostly rail scenario. The analysis examined the radiological consequences under the maximum foreseeable accident scenario and also overall accident risk. The overall accident risk over the 24 year period would be about 0.0002 latent cancer fatality for the mostly legal-weight truck scenario and about 0.0005 latent cancer fatality for the mostly rail scenario. The maximum reasonably foreseeable accident scenario resulted in 0.55 latent cancer fatality for the legal-weight truck case and 5 latent cancer fatalities in the case of mostly rail. The EIS also analyzed the impacts associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the State of Nevada. This included: constructing a branch rail line and using it to ship waste to the repository; upgrading highways in Nevada for use by heavy-haul trucks; constructing and operating an intermodal transfer station; and transporting personnel and materials to support construction and operation of the repository.

  16. UFD Storage and Transportation - Transportation Working Group Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maheras, Steven J.; Ross, Steven B.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Transportation Task commenced in October 2010. As its first task, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) compiled a list of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) of transportation systems and their possible degradation mechanisms during extended storage. The list of SSCs and the associated degradation mechanisms [known as features, events, and processes (FEPs)] were based on the list of used nuclear fuel (UNF) storage system SSCs and degradation mechanisms developed by the UFD Storage Task (Hanson et al. 2011). Other sources of information surveyed to develop the list of SSCs and their degradation mechanisms included references such as Evaluation of the Technical Basis for Extended Dry Storage and Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel (NWTRB 2010), Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification, Revision 1 (OCRWM 2008), Data Needs for Long-Term Storage of LWR Fuel (EPRI 1998), Technical Bases for Extended Dry Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel (EPRI 2002), Used Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Extended Storage Collaboration Program (EPRI 2010a), Industry Spent Fuel Storage Handbook (EPRI 2010b), and Transportation of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel, Issues Resolution (EPRI 2010c). SSCs include items such as the fuel, cladding, fuel baskets, neutron poisons, metal canisters, etc. Potential degradation mechanisms (FEPs) included mechanical, thermal, radiation and chemical stressors, such as fuel fragmentation, embrittlement of cladding by hydrogen, oxidation of cladding, metal fatigue, corrosion, etc. These degradation mechanisms are discussed in Section 2 of this report. The degradation mechanisms have been evaluated to determine if they would be influenced by extended storage or high burnup, the need for additional data, and their importance to transportation. These categories were used to identify the most significant transportation degradation mechanisms. As expected, for the most part, the transportation importance was mirrored by the importance assigned by the UFD Storage Task. A few of the more significant differences are described in Section 3 of this report

  17. Spin-one color superconductors: collective modes and effective Lagrangian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin-yi Pang; Tomas Brauner; Qun Wang

    2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the collective excitations in spin-one color superconductors. We classify the Nambu--Goldstone modes by the pattern of spontaneous symmetry breaking, and then use the Ginzburg--Landau theory to derive their dispersion relations. These soft modes play an important role for the low-energy dynamics of the system such as the transport phenomena and hence are relevant for late-stage evolution of neutron stars. In the case of the color-spin-locking phase, we use a functional technique to obtain the low-energy effective action for the physical Nambu--Goldstone bosons that survive after gauging the color symmetry.

  18. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReportTransmissionResearchNewsTransportation News

  19. Surety applications in transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matalucci, R.V.; Miyoshi, D.S.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Infrastructure surety can make a valuable contribution to the transportation engineering industry. The lessons learned at Sandia National Laboratories in developing surety principles and technologies for the nuclear weapons complex and the nuclear power industry hold direct applications to the safety, security, and reliability of the critical infrastructure. This presentation introduces the concepts of infrastructure surety, including identification of the normal, abnormal, and malevolent threats to the transportation infrastructure. National problems are identified and examples of failures and successes in response to environmental loads and other structural and systemic vulnerabilities are presented. The infrastructure surety principles developed at Sandia National Laboratories are described. Currently available technologies including (a) three-dimensional computer-assisted drawing packages interactively combined with virtual reality systems, (b) the complex calculational and computational modeling and code-coupling capabilities associated with the new generation of supercomputers, and (c) risk-management methodologies with application to solving the national problems associated with threats to the critical transportation infrastructure are discussed.

  20. Temperature-package power correlations for open-mode geologic disposal concepts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardin, Ernest L.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Logistical simulation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) management in the U.S. combines storage, transportation and disposal elements to evaluate schedule, cost and other resources needed for all major operations leading to final geologic disposal. Geologic repository reference options are associated with limits on waste package thermal power output at emplacement, in order to meet limits on peak temperature for certain key engineered and natural barriers. These package power limits are used in logistical simulation software such as CALVIN, as threshold requirements that must be met by means of decay storage or SNF blending in waste packages, before emplacement in a repository. Geologic repository reference options include enclosed modes developed for crystalline rock, clay or shale, and salt. In addition, a further need has been addressed for open modes in which SNF can be emplaced in a repository, then ventilated for decades or longer to remove heat, prior to permanent repository closure. For each open mode disposal concept there are specified durations for surface decay storage (prior to emplacement), repository ventilation, and repository closure operations. This study simulates those steps for several timing cases, and for SNF with three fuel-burnup characteristics, to develop package power limits at which waste packages can be emplaced without exceeding specified temperature limits many years later after permanent closure. The results are presented in the form of correlations that span a range of package power and peak postclosure temperature, for each open-mode disposal concept, and for each timing case. Given a particular temperature limit value, the corresponding package power limit for each case can be selected for use in CALVIN and similar tools.

  1. Consequences of melt transport for uranium series disequilibrium in young lavas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiegelman, Marc W.

    Consequences of melt transport for uranium series disequilibrium in young lavas Marc Spiegelman do not actu- ally include melt transport. Here we explore the be- haviour of short

  2. Electron geodesic acoustic modes in electron temperature gradient mode turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Johan; Nordman, Hans [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Singh, Raghvendra; Kaw, Predhiman [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the first demonstration of an electron branch of the geodesic acoustic mode (el-GAM) driven by electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes is presented. The work is based on a fluid description of the ETG mode retaining non-adiabatic ions and the dispersion relation for el-GAMs driven nonlinearly by ETG modes is derived. A new saturation mechanism for ETG turbulence through the interaction with el-GAMs is found, resulting in a significantly enhanced ETG turbulence saturation level compared to the mixing length estimate.

  3. Three-dimensional equilibria and transport in RFX-mod: A description using stellarator tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gobbin, M.; Bonfiglio, D.; Lorenzini, R.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Martines, E.; Momo, B.; Predebon, I.; Puiatti, M. E.; Spizzo, G.; Terranova, D. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Boozer, A. H. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Cooper, A. W. [EPFL, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Lausanne CH-1015 (Switzerland); Escande, D. F. [UMR 6633 CNRS-Universite de Provence, Marseille F13397 (France); Hirshman, S. P.; Lore, J.; Sanchez, R.; Spong, D. A. [ORNL Fusion Energy Division, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Pomphrey, N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    RFX-mod self-organized single helical axis (SHAx) states provide a unique opportunity to advance 3D fusion physics and establish a common knowledge basis in a parameter region not covered by stellarators and tokamaks. The VMEC code has been adapted to the reversed-field pinch (RFP) to model SHAx equilibria in fixed boundary mode with experimental measurements as constraint. The averaged particle diffusivity over the helical volume, estimated with the Monte Carlo code ORBIT, has a neoclassical-like dependence on collisionality and does not show the 1/{nu} trend of un-optimized stellarators. In particular, the helical region boundary, corresponding to an electron transport barrier with zero magnetic shear and improved confinement, has been investigated using numerical codes common to the stellarator community. In fact, the DKES/PENTA codes have been applied to RFP for local neoclassical transport computations, including radial electric field, to estimate thermal diffusion coefficients in the barrier region for typical RFX-mod temperature and density profiles. A comparison with power balance estimates shows that residual chaos due to secondary tearing modes and small-scale turbulence still contribute to drive anomalous transport in the barrier region.

  4. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE H-MODE PEDESTAL AND EXTRAPOLATION TO ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OSBORNE,TH; CORDEY,JG; GROEBNER,RJ; HATAE,T; HUBBARD,A; HORTON,LD; KAMADA,Y; KRITZ,A; LAO,LL; LEONARD,AW; LOARTE,A; MAHDAVI,MA; MOSSESSIAN,D; ONJUN,T; OSSENPENKO,M; ROGNLIEN,TD; SAIBNE,G; SNYDER,PB; SUGIHARA,M; SHURYGIN,R; THOMSEN,K; WADE,MR; WILSON,HR; XU,XQ; YATSU,K

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A271 CHARACTERISTICS OF THE H-MODE PEDESTAL AND EXTRAPOLATION TO ITER. The peeling-ballooning mode model for edge stability along with a model for the H-mode transport barrier width is used as an approach to estimating the H-mode pedestal conditions in ITER. Scalings of the barrier width based on ion-orbit loss, neutral penetration, and turbulence suppression are examined and empirical scalings of the barrier width are presented. An empirical scaling for the pedestal {beta} is derived based on ideas from stability and the empirical width scaling. The impact of the stability model and other factors on ELM size is discussed.

  5. Mixed Mode Matrix Multiplication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng-Shiou Wu; Srinivas Aluru; Ricky A. Kendall

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In modern clustering environments where the memory hierarchy has many layers (distributed memory, shared memory layer, cache,...), an important question is how to fully utilize all available resources and identify the most dominant layer in certain computations. When combining algorithms on all layers together, what would be the best method to get the best performance out of all the resources we have? Mixed mode programming model that uses thread programming on the shared memory layer and message passing programming on the distributed memory layer is a method that many researchers are using to utilize the memory resources. In this paper, they take an algorithmic approach that uses matrix multiplication as a tool to show how cache algorithms affect the performance of both shared memory and distributed memory algorithms. They show that with good underlying cache algorithm, overall performance is stable. When underlying cache algorithm is bad, superlinear speedup may occur, and an increasing number of threads may also improve performance.

  6. Parallel Transports in Webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Fleischhack

    2003-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    For connected reductive linear algebraic structure groups it is proven that every web is holonomically isolated. The possible tuples of parallel transports in a web form a Lie subgroup of the corresponding power of the structure group. This Lie subgroup is explicitly calculated and turns out to be independent of the chosen local trivializations. Moreover, explicit necessary and sufficient criteria for the holonomical independence of webs are derived. The results above can even be sharpened: Given an arbitrary neighbourhood of the base points of a web, then this neighbourhood contains some segments of the web whose parameter intervals coincide, but do not include 0 (that corresponds to the base points of the web), and whose parallel transports already form the same Lie subgroup as those of the full web do.

  7. STOMP Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases: STOMP-CO2 and STOMP-CO2e Guide: Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Mark D.; Bacon, Diana H.; McGrail, B. Peter; Watson, David J.; White, Signe K.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) guide document describes the theory, use, and application of the STOMP-CO2 and STOMP-CO2e operational modes. These operational modes of the STOMP simulator are configured to solve problems involving the sequestration of CO2 in geologic saline reservoirs. STOMP-CO2 is the isothermal version and STOMP-CO2e is the nonisothermal version. These core operational modes solve the governing conservation equations for component flow and transport through geologic media; where, the STOMP-CO2 components are water, CO2 and salt and the STOMP-CO2e operational mode also includes an energy conservation equation. Geochemistry can be included in the problem solution via the ECKEChem (Equilibrium-Conservation-Kinetic-Equation Chemistry) module, and geomechanics via the EPRMech (Elastic-Plastic-Rock Mechanics) module. This addendum is designed to provide the new user with a full guide for the core capabilities of the STOMP-CO2 and -CO2e simulators, and to provide the experienced user with a quick reference on implementing features. Several benchmark problems are provided in this addendum, which serve as starting points for developing inputs for more complex problems and as demonstrations of the simulator’s capabilities.

  8. Vapor Transport in Dry Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2001-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-vapor movement in soils is a complex process, controlled by both diffusion and advection and influenced by pressure and thermal gradients acting across tortuous flow paths. Wide-ranging interest in water-vapor transport includes both theoretical and practical aspects. Just how pressure and thermal gradients enhance water-vapor flow is still not completely understood and subject to ongoing research. Practical aspects include dryland farming (surface mulching), water harvesting (aerial wells), fertilizer placement, and migration of contaminants at waste-sites. The following article describes the processes and practical applications of water-vapor transport, with emphasis on unsaturated (dry) soil systems.

  9. System and methods for determining masking signals for applying empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and for demodulating intrinsic mode functions obtained from application of EMD

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Senroy, Nilanjan (New Delhi, IN); Suryanarayanan, Siddharth (Littleton, CO)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer-implemented method of signal processing is provided. The method includes generating one or more masking signals based upon a computed Fourier transform of a received signal. The method further includes determining one or more intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) of the received signal by performing a masking-signal-based empirical mode decomposition (EMD) using the at least one masking signal.

  10. Nonlinear dynamics of multiple neoclassical tearing modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandra, D.; Sen, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Agullo, O.; Benkadda, S. [France-Japan Magnetic Fusion Lab, LIA 336, CNRS/Lab PIIM, UMR 6633, CNRS-Universite de Provence, 13397 Marseille (France); Garbet, X. [Association Euratom-CEA, DRFC, CEA Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations investigating the interaction of co-existent 2/1 and 3/1 neoclassical tearing modes are presented. The results obtained from an initial value 3D toroidal code that solves a set of generalized reduced MHD equations exhibit a host of complex phenomena arising from the coupling of the two modes. These include a modification of the island saturation widths of the two modes, a significant modification in the perpendicular flow patterns in the vicinity of the islands, and the excitation of geodesic acoustic mode like oscillations that lead to concomitant oscillations in the kinetic and magnetic energies of the islands. These oscillations only occur in the presence of the neoclassical stress tensor contribution and are absent for two coupled classical tearing modes.

  11. aircraft transportation system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    737-800 commercial transport aircraft) Boeing,2 Lockheed-Martin,3 Northrop-Grumman,4 Raytheon,5 and BAE Systems6 all include some version de Weck, Olivier L. 167 Transport...

  12. Mode trap for absorbing transverse modes of an accelerated electron beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chojnacki, E.P.

    1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A mode trap to trap and absorb transverse modes formed by a beam in a linear accelerator includes a waveguide having a multiplicity of electrically conductive (preferably copper) irises and rings, each iris and ring including an aperture, and the irises and rings being stacked in a side-by-side, alternating fashion such that the apertures of the irises and rings are concentrically aligned. An absorbing material layer such as a dielectric is embedded in each iris and ring, and this absorbing material layer encircles, but is circumferentially spaced from its respective aperture. Each iris and ring includes a plurality of circumferentially spaced slots around its aperture and extending radially out toward its absorbing material layer. 9 figs.

  13. Groundwater flow with energy transport and waterice phase change: Numerical simulations, benchmarks, and application to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

    saturated, coupled porewater-energy transport, with freezing and melting porewater, and includes propor transport; Freezing; Cold regions; Benchmark; Modelling 1. Introduction The freezing and thawingGroundwater flow with energy transport and water­ice phase change: Numerical simulations

  14. Control Strategies for HCCI Mixed-Mode Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Delphi Automotive Systems and ORNL established this CRADA to expand the operational range of Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) mixed-mode combustion for gasoline en-gines. ORNL has extensive experience in the analysis, interpretation, and control of dynamic engine phenomena, and Delphi has extensive knowledge and experience in powertrain compo-nents and subsystems. The partnership of these knowledge bases was important to address criti-cal barriers associated with the realistic implementation of HCCI and enabling clean, efficient operation for the next generation of transportation engines. The foundation of this CRADA was established through the analysis of spark-assisted HCCI data from a single-cylinder research engine. This data was used to (1) establish a conceptual kinetic model to better understand and predict the development of combustion instabilities, (2) develop a low-order model framework suitable for real-time controls, and (3) provide guidance in the initial definition of engine valve strategies for achieving HCCI operation. The next phase focused on the development of a new combustion metric for real-time characterization of the combustion process. Rapid feedback on the state of the combustion process is critical to high-speed decision making for predictive control. Simultaneous to the modeling/analysis studies, Delphi was focused on the development of engine hardware and the engine management system. This included custom Delphi hardware and control systems allowing for flexible control of the valvetrain sys-tem to enable HCCI operation. The final phase of this CRADA included the demonstration of conventional and spark assisted HCCI on the multi-cylinder engine as well as the characterization of combustion instabilities, which govern the operational boundaries of this mode of combustion. ORNL and Delphi maintained strong collaboration throughout this project. Meetings were held on a bi-weekly basis with additional reports, presentation, and meetings as necessary to maintain progress. Delphi provided substantial support through modeling, hardware, data exchange, and technical consultation. This CRADA was also successful at establishing important next steps to further expanding the use of an HCCI engine for improved fuel efficiency and emissions. These topics will be address in a follow-on CRADA. The objectives are: (1) Improve fundamental understanding of the development of combustion instabilities with HCCI operation through modeling and experiments; (2) Develop low-order model and feedback combustion metrics which are well suited to real-time predictive controls; and (3) Construct multi-cylinder engine system with advanced Delphi technologies and charac-terize HCCI behavior to better understand limitations and opportunities for expanded high-efficiency operation.

  15. PHYSICS AND CONTROL OF ELMING H-MODE NEGATIVE CENTRAL SHEAR ADVANCED TOKAMAK SCENARIO BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL PROFILES FOR ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LAO,LL; CHAN,VS; EVANS,TE; HUMPHREYS,DA; LEUER,JA; MAHDAVI,MA; PETRIE,TW; SNYDER,PB; STJOHN,HE; STAEBLER,GM; STAMBAUGH,RD; TAYLOR,TS; TURNBULL,AD; WEST,WP; BRENNAN,DP

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A271 PHYSICS AND CONTROL OF ELMING H-MODE NEGATIVE CENTRAL SHEAR ADVANCED TOKAMAK SCENARIO BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL PROFILES FOR ITER. Key DIII-D AT experimental and modeling results are applied to examine the physics and control issues for ITER to operate in a negative central shear (NCS) AT scenario. The effects of a finite edge pressure pedestal and current density are included based on the DIII-D experimental profiles. Ideal and resistive stability analyses indicate that feedback control of resistive wall modes by rotational drive or flux conserving intelligent coils is crucial for these AT configurations to operate at attractive {beta}{sub N} values in the range of 3.0-3.5. Vertical stability and halo current analyses show that reliable disruption mitigation is essential and mitigation control using an impurity gas can significantly reduce the local mechanical stress to an acceptable level. Core transport and turbulence analyses demonstrate that control of the rotational shear profile is essential to maintain the good confinement necessary for high {beta}. Consideration of edge stability and core transport suggests that a sufficiently wide pedestal is necessary for the projected fusion performance. Heat flux analyses indicate that with core-only radiation enhancement the outboard peak divertor heat load is near the design limit of 10 MW/m{sup 2}

  16. Amarillo Metropolitan Transportation Plan 2010-2035

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amarillo Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , natural resources, environmental protection, conservation, and historic preservation concerning the development of long- and short- range transportation plans. MPO maintains a website www.amarillompo.org that includes this Metropolitan Transportation... Commissioner City of Amarillo Alan M. Taylor City Manager City of Amarillo Howard Holland, P.E. District Engineer TxDOT Kenneth Petr, P.E. Dir. of Transportation Planning & Development TxDOT Judge Arthur Ware County Judge Potter County H.R. Kelly County...

  17. Beam transport design for a recirculating-linac FEL driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuffer, D.; Douglas, D. [CEBAF, Newport News, VA (United States); Li, Z.; Cornacchia, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Garren, A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam transport system for the CEBAF Industrial FEL includes a two-pass transport of the beam with acceleration from injector to wiggler, followed by energy recovery transport from wiggler to dump. From that context, the authors discuss the general problem of multi-pass energy-recovery beam transport for FELs. Tunable, nearly-isochronous, large-momentum-acceptance transport systems are required. The entire transport must preserve beam quality, particularly in the acceleration transport to the wiggler, and have low losses throughout the entire system. Various possible designs are presented, and results of dynamic analyses are discussed.

  18. Transport Model with Quasipions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiong, L.; Ko, Che Ming; Koch, V.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the transport model that takes into account both nucleon-nucleon collisions and the nuclear mean-field po- tential (normally called the Ulasov-Uehling-Uhlenbeck or Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck model [3]) have been ex- tended to include the pion degree... equation, the pion collision term is obtained from the imaginary part of its self-energy. In nuclear medium, the pion self-energy is modified by the strong p-wave pion- nucleon interaction. This not only afFects the production and absorption of the pion...

  19. Hawking radiation and Quasinormal modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SangChul Yoon

    2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectrum of Hawking radiation by quantum fields in the curved spacetime is continuous, so the explanation of Hawking radiation using quasinormal modes can be suspected to be impossible. We find that quasinormal modes do not explain the relation between the state observed in a region far away from a black hole and the short distance behavior of the state on the horizon.

  20. Mediating Religion: Modes of Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Mediating Religion: Modes of Communication in Religious Contexts Keynote: Dr. Lerone Martin, particularly given recent innovations in mass media and digital communications technologies. Turning attention to modes of communication in religious contexts, this conference will address ways in which mass media have

  1. Transportation Security | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Security SHARE Global Threat Reduction Initiative Transportation Security Cooperation Secure Transport Operations (STOP) Box Security of radioactive material while...

  2. Angular neutron transport investigation in the HZETRN free-space ion and nucleon transport and shielding computer program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleterry, R.C. Jr. [Argonne National Lab. - West, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wilson, J.W. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extension of the high charge and energy (HZE) transport computer program HZETRN for angular transport of neutrons is considered. For this paper, only light ion transport, He{sup 4} and lighter, will be analyzed using a pure solar proton source. The angular transport calculator is the ANISN/PC program which is being controlled by the HZETRN program. The neutron flux values are compared for straight-ahead transport and angular transport in one dimension. The shield material is aluminum and the target material is water. The thickness of these materials is varied; however, only the largest model calculated is reported which is 50 gm/cm{sup 2} of aluminum and 100 gm/cm{sup 2} of water. The flux from the ANISN/PC calculation is about two orders of magnitude lower than the flux from HZETRN for very low energy neutrons. It is only a magnitude lower for the neutrons in the 10 to 20 MeV range in the aluminum and two orders lower in the water. The major reason for this difference is in the transport modes: straight-ahead versus angular. The angular treatment allows a longer path length than the straight-ahead approximation. Another reason is the different cross section sets used by the ANISN/PC-BUGLE-80 mode and the HZETRN mode. The next step is to investigate further the differences between the two codes and isolate the differences to just the angular versus straight-ahead transport mode. Then, create a better coupling between the angular neutron transport and the charged particle transport.

  3. Multiprocessor system with multiple concurrent modes of execution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahn, Daniel; Ceze, Luis H; Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan; Heidelberger, Philip; Ohmacht, Martin

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiprocessor system supports multiple concurrent modes of speculative execution. Speculation identification numbers (IDs) are allocated to speculative threads from a pool of available numbers. The pool is divided into domains, with each domain being assigned to a mode of speculation. Modes of speculation include TM, TLS, and rollback. Allocation of the IDs is carried out with respect to a central state table and using hardware pointers. The IDs are used for writing different versions of speculative results in different ways of a set in a cache memory.

  4. ITER L-Mode Confinement Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.M. Kaye and the ITER Confinement Database Working Group

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the content of an L-mode database that has been compiled with data from Alcator C-Mod, ASDEX, DIII, DIII-D, FTU, JET, JFT-2M, JT-60, PBX-M, PDX, T-10, TEXTOR, TFTR, and Tore-Supra. The database consists of a total of 2938 entries, 1881 of which are in the L-phase while 922 are ohmically heated (OH) only. Each entry contains up to 95 descriptive parameters, including global and kinetic information, machine conditioning, and configuration. The paper presents a description of the database and the variables contained therein, and it also presents global and thermal scalings along with predictions for ITER. The L-mode thermal confinement time scaling was determined from a subset of 1312 entries for which the thermal confinement time scaling was provided.

  5. Observation of coupled plasmon-polariton modes in Au nanoparticle chain waveguides of different lengths: Estimation of waveguide loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    Observation of coupled plasmon-polariton modes in Au nanoparticle chain waveguides of different corresponding to longitudinal (L) and transverse (T) plasmon-polariton modes of Au nanoparticle chains. Far noble metal nanoparticles.1 Energy transport in these plasmon waveguides relies on near-field coupling

  6. "Educating transportation professionals."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    "Educating transportation professionals." Michael Demetsky Henry L. Kinnier Professor mjd of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 434.924.7464 Transportation Engineering & Management Research Our group works closely with the Virginia Center for Transportation Innovation and Research (VCTIR), located

  7. Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for management of Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), materials transportation and packaging to ensure the safe, secure, efficient packaging and transportation of materials, both hazardous and nonhazardous. Cancels DOE O 460.2 and DOE O 460.2 Chg 1

  8. Subwavelength Transportation of Light with Atomic Resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chui, Siu-Tat; Jo, Gyu-Boong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and investigate a new type of optical waveguide made by an array of atoms without involving conventional Bragg scattering or total internal reflection. A finite chain of atoms collectively coupled through their intrinsic resonance supports a propagating mode with minimal radiative loss when the array spacing $a$ is around 0.6$\\lambda_0/2\\pi$ where $\\lambda_0$ is the wavelength of the nearly resonant optical transition. We find that the transportation is robust with respect to position fluctuation and remains possible when the atoms are placed on a circle. Our result paves the way to implement the subwavelength transportation of light in integrated optical circuits with cold atoms.

  9. Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    11 Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug and projected improvements in gasoline internal combustion engine technology are introduced rapidly 3) BIOFUELS Large scale use of biofuels, including ethanol and biodiesel 4) PLUG-IN HYBRID SUCCESS PHEVs play

  10. Sustainability and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005. Integrating Sustainability into the Trans- portationTHOUGHT PIECE Sustainability and Transport by Richardof the concept of sustainability to transport planning. In

  11. Chapter 12 Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2-1 November 2012 Words in bold and acronyms are defined in Chapter 32, Glossary and Acronyms. Chapter 12 Transportation This chapter describes existing transportation resources in...

  12. Transportation | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation From modeling and simulation programs to advanced electric powertrains, engines, biofuels, lubricants, and batteries, Argonne's transportation research is vital to...

  13. Transporting Hazardous Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transporting Hazardous Materials The procedures given below apply to all materials that are considered to be hazardous by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Consult your...

  14. Multi-mode radio frequency device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Ronald W. (Morgan Hill, CA); Carrender, Curtis Lee (Morgan Hill, CA); Anderson, Gordon A. (Benton City, WA); Steele, Kerry D. (Kennewick, WA)

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A transponder device having multiple modes of operation, such as an active mode and a passive mode, wherein the modes of operation are selected in response to the strength of a received radio frequency signal. A communication system is also provided having a transceiver configured to transmit a radio frequency signal and to receive a responsive signal, and a transponder configured to operate in a plurality of modes and to activate modes of operation in response to the radio frequency signal. Ideally, each mode of operation is activated and deactivated independent of the other modes, although two or more modes may be concurrently operational.

  15. Quasilinear Carbon Transport In An Impurity Hole Plasma In LHD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikkelsen, David R. [PPPL; Tanaka, K. [NIFS; Nunami, M. [NIFS; Watanabe, T-H. [Nagoya University; Sugama, H. [NIFS; Yoshinuma, M. [NIFS; Suzuki, Y. [NIFS; Goto, M. [NIFS; Morita, S. [NIFS; Wieland, B. [NIFS; Yamada, I. [NIFS; Yashura, R. [NIFS; Akiyama, T. [NIFS; Pablant, Novimir A. [PPPL

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comprehensive electrostatic gyrokinetic linear stability calculations for ion-scale microinstabilities in an LHD plasma with an ion-ITB and carbon "impurity hole" are used to make quasilinear estimates of particle flux to explore whether microturbulence can explain the observed outward carbon fluxes that flow "up" the impurity density gradient. The ion temperature is not stationary in the ion-ITB phase of the simulated discharge, during which the core carbon density decreases continuously. To fully sample these varying conditions the calculations are carried out at three radial locations and four times. The plasma parameter inputs are based on experimentally measured profiles of electron and ion temperature, as well as electron and carbon density. The spectroscopic line-average ratio of hydrogen and helium densities is used to set the density of these species. Three ion species (H,He,C) and the electrons are treated kinetically, including collisions. Electron instability drive does enhance the growth rate significantly, but the most unstable modes have characteristics of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in all cases. As the carbon density gradient is scanned between the measured value and zero, the quasilinear carbon flux is invariably inward when the carbon density profile is hollow, so turbulent transport due to the instabilities considered here does not explain the observed outward flux of impurities in impurity hole plasmas. The stiffness of the quasilinear ion heat flux is found to be 1.7-2.3, which is lower than several estimates in tokamaks.

  16. MHK technologies include current energy conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research leverages decades of experience in engineering and design and analysis (D&A) of wind power technologies, and its vast research complex, including high-performance...

  17. Plasma Transport at the Magnetospheric Flank Boundary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otto, Antonius

    2012-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is highlighted in these areas: 1. Model of magnetic reconnection induced by three-dimensional Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) modes at the magnetospheric flank boundary; 2. Quantitative evaluation of mass transport from the magnetosheath onto closed geomagnetic field for northward IMF; 3. Comparison of mass transfer by cusp reconnection and Flank Kelvin Helmholtz modes; 4. Entropy constraint and plasma transport in the magnetotail - a new mechanism for current sheet thinning; 5. Test particle model for mass transport onto closed geomagnetic field for northward IMF; 6. Influence of density asymmetry and magnetic shear on (a) the linear and nonlinear growth of 3D Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) modes, and (b) three-dimensional KH mediated mass transport; 7. Examination of entropy and plasma transport in the magnetotail; 8. Entropy change and plasma transport by KH mediated reconnection - mixing and heating of plasma; 9. Entropy and plasma transport in the magnetotail - tail reconnection; and, 10. Wave coupling at the magnetospheric boundary and generation of kinetic Alfven waves.

  18. Hydrogen transport membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mundschau, Michael V.

    2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite hydrogen transport membranes, which are used for extraction of hydrogen from gas mixtures are provided. Methods are described for supporting metals and metal alloys which have high hydrogen permeability, but which are either too thin to be self supporting, too weak to resist differential pressures across the membrane, or which become embrittled by hydrogen. Support materials are chosen to be lattice matched to the metals and metal alloys. Preferred metals with high permeability for hydrogen include vanadium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, palladium, and alloys thereof. Hydrogen-permeable membranes include those in which the pores of a porous support matrix are blocked by hydrogen-permeable metals and metal alloys, those in which the pores of a porous metal matrix are blocked with materials which make the membrane impervious to gases other than hydrogen, and cermets fabricated by sintering powders of metals with powders of lattice-matched ceramic.

  19. Why Disks Shine: the Transport of Angular Momentum in Hot, Thin Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. T. Vishniac

    1993-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    I review recent work on the radial transport of angular momentum in ionized, Keplerian accretion disks. Proposed mechanisms include hydrodynamic and MHD local instabilities and long range effects mediated by wave transport. The most promising models incorporate the Velikhov-Chandrasekhar instability, caused by an instability of the magnetic field embedded in a differentially rotating disk. This has the important feature that the induced turbulent motions necessarily transport angular momentum outward. By contrast, convective modes may transport angular momentum in either direction. Combining the magnetic field instability with an $\\alpha-\\Omega$ dynamo driven by internal waves leads to a model in which the dimensionless viscosity scales as $(H/r)^{4/3}$. However, this model has a phenomenology which is quite different from the $\\alpha$ disk model. For example, an active disk implies some source of excitation for the internal waves. In binary systems with a mass ratio of order unity the most likely exciting mechanism is a parametric instability due to tidal forces. This implies that in systems where the accretion stream is intermittent, like MV Lyrae or TT Ari, epochs when the mass flow is absent or very small will be epochs in which the disk shrinks and becomes relatively inactive and dark. This model also implies that forced vertical mixing is important, even in convectively stable disks. I discuss various observational tests of this model and the focus of current theoretical work.

  20. ELM Suppression in Low Edge Collisionality H-Mode Discharges Using n=3 Magnetic Perturbations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrell, K H; Evans, T E; Doyle, E J; Fenstermacher, M E; Groebner, R J; Leonard, A W; Moyer, R A; Osborne, T H; Schaffer, M J; Snyder, P B; Thomas, P R; West, W P; Boedo, J A; Garofalo, A M; Gohil, P; Jackson, G L; La Haye, R J; Lasnier, C J; Reimerdes, H; Rhodes, T L; Scoville, J T; Solomon, W M; Thomas, D M; Wang, G; Watkins, J G; Zeng, L

    2005-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Using resonant magnetic perturbations with toroidal mode number n = 3, we have produced H-mode discharges without edge localized modes (ELMs) which run with constant density and radiated power for periods up to about 2550 ms (17 energy confinement times). These ELM suppression results are achieved at pedestal collisionalities close to those desired for next step burning plasma experiments such as ITER and provide a means of eliminating the rapid erosion of divertor components in such machines which could be caused by giant ELMs. The ELM suppression is due to an enhancement in the edge particle transport which reduces the edge pressure gradient and pedestal current density below the threshold for peeling-ballooning modes. These n = 3 magnetic perturbations provide a means of active control of edge plasma transport.

  1. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairns, Elton J.; Hietbrink, Earl H.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This section includes some historical background of the rise and fall and subsequent rebirth of the electric vehicle; and a brief discussion of current transportation needs, and environmental and energy utilization issues that resulted in the renewed interest in applying electrochemical energy conversion technology to electric vehicle applications. Although energy utilization has evolved to be the most significant and important issue, the environmental issue will be discussed first in this section only because of its chronological occurrence. The next part of the chapter is a review of passenger and commercial electric vehicle technology with emphasis on vehicle design and demonstrated performance of vehicles with candidate power sources being developed. This is followed by a discussion of electrochemical power source requirements associated with future electric vehicles that can play a role in meeting modern transportation needs. The last part of the chapter includes first a discussion of how to identify candidate electrochemical systems that might be of interest in meeting electric vehicle power source requirements. This is then followed by a review of the current technological status of these systems and a discussion of the most significant problems that must be resolved before each candidate system can be a viable power source.

  2. Estimated United States Transportation Energy Use 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

    2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow chart depicting energy flow in the transportation sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 31,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of energy were used throughout the United States in transportation activities. Vehicles used in these activities include automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, buses, airplanes, rail, and ships. The transportation sector is powered primarily by petroleum-derived fuels (gasoline, diesel and jet fuel). Biomass-derived fuels, electricity and natural gas-derived fuels are also used. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the transportation sector.

  3. Multiphase transport model for relativistic nuclear collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, B.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Lin, ZW.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To study heavy ion collisions at energies available from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we have developed a multiphase transport model that includes both initial partonic and final hadronic interactions. Specifically, the Zhang's parton...

  4. Multiphase transport model for relativistic nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, B.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Lin, ZW.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To study heavy ion collisions at energies available from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we have developed a multiphase transport model that includes both initial partonic and final hadronic interactions. Specifically, the Zhang's parton...

  5. Megacities : sustainability, transport, and economic development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobias, Justin Charles, 1980-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The connections between sustainability, transport, and economic development are and will remain essential in the governance of cities. Sustainability concepts include valuing and preserving the earth's resources so that ...

  6. QUIESCENT DOUBLE BARRIER H-MODE PLASMAS IN THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.H. BURRELL; M.E. AUSTIN; D.P. BRENNAN; J.C. DeBOO; E.J. DOYLE; C. FENZI; C. FUCHS; P. GOHIL; R.J. GROEBNER; L.L. LAO; T.C. LUCE; M.A. MAKOWSKI; G.R. McKEE; R.A. MOYER; C.C. PETTY; M. PORKOLAB; C.L.RETTIG; T.L. RHODES; J.C. ROST; B.W. STALLARD; E.J. STRAIT; E.J. SYNAKOWSKI; M.R. WADE; J.G. WATKINS; W.P. WEST

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High confinement (H-mode) operation is the choice for next-step tokamak devices based either on conventional or advanced tokamak physics. This choice, however, comes at a significant cost for both the conventional and advanced tokamaks because of the effects of edge localized modes (ELMs). ELMs can produce significant erosion in the divertor and can affect the beta limit and reduced core transport regions needed for advanced tokamak operation. Experimental results from DIII-D [J.L. Luxon, et al., Plasma Phys. and Contr. Nucl. Fusion Research 1986 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987) Vol. I, p. 159] this year have demonstrated a new operating regime, the quiescent H-mode regime, which solves these problems. We have achieved quiescent H-mode operation which is ELM-free and yet has good density and impurity control. In addition, we have demonstrated that an internal transport barrier can be produced and maintained inside the H-mode edge barrier for long periods of time (>3.5 seconds or >25 energy confinement times {tau}{sub E}), yielding a quiescent double barrier regime. By slowly ramping the input power, we have achieved {beta}{sub N} H{sub 89} = 7 for up to 5 times the {tau}{sub E} of 150 ms. The {beta}{sub N} H{sub 89} values of 7 substantially exceed the value of 4 routinely achieved in standard ELMing H-mode. The key factors in creating the quiescent H-mode operation are neutral beam injection in the direction opposite to the plasma current (counter injection) plus cryopumping to reduce the density. Density and impurity control in the quiescent H-mode is possible because of the presence of an edge magnetic hydrodynamic (MHD) oscillation, the edge harmonic oscillation, which enhances the edge particle transport while leaving the energy transport unaffected.

  7. Diffraction mode terahertz tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Bradley; Wang, Shaohong; Zhang, Xi-Cheng

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of obtaining a series of images of a three-dimensional object. The method includes the steps of transmitting pulsed terahertz (THz) radiation through the entire object from a plurality of angles, optically detecting changes in the transmitted THz radiation using pulsed laser radiation, and constructing a plurality of imaged slices of the three-dimensional object using the detected changes in the transmitted THz radiation. The THz radiation is transmitted through the object as a two-dimensional array of parallel rays. The optical detection is an array of detectors such as a CCD sensor.

  8. Vibrational Modes of Adsorbed Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LAWRENCE, WR; Allen, Roland E.

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of adsorbed atoms. vi rational modes *Present address: S h University of H c ool of Scienc City, Tex. ouston at Clear La ', r e e and Technology Lake City, Clea Lak %. R. wrence and R. E. Allen published). Allen, Phys. Rev. B (to be 2G. P... are about t r Ne on Kr. The d ou he same as fo mode labeled 2V a as large in the f' t X is almost erst (adsorbate) la e od( b t t)l pure surface mod e ayer. The 1H mode at X is a 4, this mode bec m e. Just to the r'right of X in Fig. e ecomes a...

  9. Single-mode fiber, velocity interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauter, K. G.; Jacobson, G. F.; Patterson, J. R.; Nguyen, J. H.; Ambrose, W. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore California 94551 (United States)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we describe a velocity interferometer system based entirely on single-mode fiber optics. This paper includes a description of principles used in developing the single-mode velocity interferometry system (SMV). The SMV design is based on polarization-insensitive components. Polarization adjusters are included to eliminate the effects of residual birefringence and polarization dependent losses in the interferometers. Characterization measurements and calibration methods needed for data analysis and a method of data analysis are described. Calibration is performed directly using tunable lasers. During development, we demonstrated its operation using exploding-foil bridge-wire fliers up to 200 m/s. In a final test, we demonstrated the SMV in a gas gun experiment up to 1.2 km/sec. As a basis for comparison in the gas gun experiment, we used another velocimetry technique that is also based on single-mode fiber optics: photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV). For the gas gun experiment, we split the light returned from a single target spot and performed a direct comparison of the homodyne (SMV) and heterodyne (PDV) techniques concurrently. The two techniques had a negligible mean difference and a 1.5% standard deviation in the one-dimensional shock zone. Within one interferometer delay time after a sudden Doppler shift, a SMV unencumbered by multimode-fiber dispersion exhibits two color beats. These beats have the same period as PDV beats--this interference occurs between the ''recently'' shifted and ''formerly unshifted'' paths within the interferometer. We believe that recognizing this identity between homodyne and heterodyne beats is novel in the shock-physics field. SMV includes the conveniences of optical fiber, while removing the time resolution limitations associated with the multimode delivery fiber.

  10. Turbulence transport with nonlocal interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linn, R.R.; Clark, T.T.; Harlow, F.H.; Turner, L.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This preliminary report describes a variety of issues in turbulence transport analysis with particular emphasis on closure procedures that are nonlocal in wave-number and/or physical space. Anomalous behavior of the transport equations for large scale parts of the turbulence spectrum are resolved by including the physical space nonlocal interactions. Direct and reverse cascade processes in wave-number space are given a much richer potential for realistic description by the nonlocal formulations. The discussion also describes issues, many still not resolved, regarding new classes of self-similar form functions.

  11. Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operat

  12. Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freig pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freig pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation ope

  13. Stable transport in proton driven Fast Ignition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bret, A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton beam transport in the context of proton driven Fast Ignition is usually assumed to be stable due to protons high inertia, but an analytical analysis of the process is still lacking. The stability of a charge and current neutralized proton beam passing through a plasma is therefore conducted here, for typical proton driven Fast Ignition parameters. In the cold regime, two fast growing Buneman-like modes are found, with an inverse growth-rate much smaller than the beam time-of-flight to the target core. The stability issue is thus not so obvious, and Kinetic effects are investigated. One unstable mode is found stabilized by the background plasma protons and electrons temperatures. The second mode is also damped, providing the proton beam thermal spread is larger than $\\sim$ 10 keV. In Fusion conditions, the beam propagation should therefore be stable.

  14. SATURATED ZONE FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODEL ABSTRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.W. ARNOLD

    2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the saturated zone (SZ) flow and transport model abstraction task is to provide radionuclide-transport simulation results for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) calculations. This task includes assessment of uncertainty in parameters that pertain to both groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in the models used for this purpose. This model report documents the following: (1) The SZ transport abstraction model, which consists of a set of radionuclide breakthrough curves at the accessible environment for use in the TSPA-LA simulations of radionuclide releases into the biosphere. These radionuclide breakthrough curves contain information on radionuclide-transport times through the SZ. (2) The SZ one-dimensional (I-D) transport model, which is incorporated in the TSPA-LA model to simulate the transport, decay, and ingrowth of radionuclide decay chains in the SZ. (3) The analysis of uncertainty in groundwater-flow and radionuclide-transport input parameters for the SZ transport abstraction model and the SZ 1-D transport model. (4) The analysis of the background concentration of alpha-emitting species in the groundwater of the SZ.

  15. Graduate Certificate in Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Graduate Certificate in Transportation Nohad A. Toulan School of Urban Studies and Planning of Engineering and Computer Science integrated transportation systems. The Graduate Certificate in Transportation their capabilities. Students in the program can choose among a wide range of relevant courses in transportation

  16. TRANSPORTATION Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    2003 CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION STUDIES Annual Report #12;Center for Transportation Studies University of Minnesota 200 Transportation and Safety Building 511 Washington Avenue S.E. Minneapolis, MN publication is a report of transportation research, education, and outreach activities for the period July

  17. Transportation Electrification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwendeman, Lawrence; Crouch, Alan

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has accomplished the following objectives: to address the critical need for technician training in new and emerging propulsion technologies by developing new courses, including information and training on electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel cell vehicles; to integrate the new certificate with the existing Associate of Applied Science Degree and Certificate automotive degrees; to disseminate these leading edge courses throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia and neighboring Mid-Atlantic States; and to provide training opportunities for displaced workers and underrepresented populations seeking careers in the automotive industry.

  18. Equilibrium and transport for quasi-helical reversed field pinches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappello, Susanna [CNR-RFX; Bonfiglio, Daniele [CNR-RFX; Escande, Dominique [PIIM, Marseille, France; Guo, S. C. [CNR-RFX; Predebon, I. [RFX, Padova, Italy; Sattin, F. [CNR-RFX; Veranda, M. [CNR-RFX; Zanca, P. [CNR-RFX; Angioni, C. [EURATOM / IPP Garching, Germany; Chacon, Luis [ORNL; Dong, J. Q. [Zhejiang University; Garbet, X. [CEA Cadarache, St. Paul lex Durance, France; Liu, S. F. [Nankai University

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the most recent results in theoretical/numerical studies on the physics of the quasi-helical regime in reversed field pinch (RFP) configurations. Such regime systematically characterizes RFX-mod experiments at high currents (Ip > 1.2 MA), producing clear internal electron transport barriers. Several approaches, ranging from a macroscopic (MHD) to a microscopic (transport) description, have been used to tackle the related complex physics. From the macroscopic point of view, we derive analytically the electrostatic velocity field consistent with a generic helical ohmic equilibrium. We also provide the first MHD initial-value simulation results in toroidal geometry obtained with the PIXIE3D code. Concerning transport, the effect of magnetic chaos healing by mode separatrix expulsion, believed to favour the formation of transport barriers, is discussed. Results indicate that helical equilibria originated by non-resonant modes are more resilient to chaos formation. Finally, gyrofluid and gyrokinetic tools have been used towards a first assessment of the role of microturbulence in the RFP. Concerning the electrostatic branches, ion temperature gradient mode stability is robustly improved in RFP with respect to tokamaks, due to stronger Landau damping effects, and the marginality condition is estimated to be only spottily reached in present experimental regimes, unless the effects of impurities are considered. Impurities, which in RFX-mod accumulate in the edge, may also significantly impact the stability of the impurity-driven modes. On the electromagnetic side, microtearing turbulence is found to probably play a role at the transport barriers.

  19. High compliance all-terrain transport and heavy cargo hybrid bicycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soto-Fernández, Orlando

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A design project was carried out which involved the design, manufacturing, and assembly of a hybrid bicycle. The bicycle was required to operate between two modes, one that permitted fast transport of the operator from one ...

  20. EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison against 6th Power Plan (Update cyclically Data Clearinghouse BPA/RTF NEEA/Regional Programs Group Update Regional EE Technology Roadmap Lighting

  1. DIDACTICAL HOLOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT INCLUDING (HOLOGRAPHIC TELEVISION)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

    DIDACTICAL HOLOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT INCLUDING HoloTV (HOLOGRAPHIC TELEVISION) José J. Lunazzi , DanielCampinasSPBrasil Abstract: Our Institute of Physics exposes since 1980 didactical exhibitions of holography in Brazil where

  2. Sessions include: Beginning Farmer and Rancher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Sessions include: ­ Beginning Farmer and Rancher ­ New Markets and Regulations ­ Food Safety ­ Good Bug, Bad Bug ID ­ Horticulture ­ Hydroponics ­ Livestock and Pastured Poultry ­ Mushrooms ­ Organic ­ Live animal exhibits ­ Saturday evening social, and ­ Local foods Florida Small Farms and Alternative

  3. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  4. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  5. Minnesota's Transportation Economic Development (TED)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Minnesota's Transportation Economic Development (TED) Pilot Program Center for Transportation Studies Transportation Research Conference May 24-25, 2011 #12;Transportation Role in Economic Development · Carefully targeted transportation infrastructure improvements will: ­ Stimulate new economic development

  6. Introduction Transport in disordered graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Ballistic transport in disordered graphene P, Gornyi, Mirlin Ballistic transport in disordered graphene #12;Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Outline 1 Introduction Model Experimental motivation Transport in clean graphene 2

  7. A TRANSPORTATION RISK ASSESSMENT TOOL FOR ANALYZING THE TRANSPORT OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AND HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TO THE PROPOSED YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) analysis addressed the potential for transporting spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from 77 origins for 34 types of spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste, 49,914 legal weight truck shipments, and 10,911 rail shipments. The analysis evaluated transportation over 59,250 unique shipment links for travel outside Nevada (shipment segments in urban, suburban or rural zones by state), and 22,611 links in Nevada. In addition, the analysis modeled the behavior of 41 isotopes, 1091 source terms, and used 8850 food transfer factors (distinct factors by isotope for each state). The analysis also used mode-specific accident rates for legal weight truck, rail, and heavy haul truck by state, and barge by waterway. This complex mix of data and information required an innovative approach to assess the transportation impacts. The approach employed a Microsoft{reg_sign} Access database tool that incorporated data from many sources, including unit risk factors calculated using the RADTRAN IV transportation risk assessment computer program. Using Microsoft{reg_sign} Access, the analysts organized data (such as state-specific accident and fatality rates) into tables and developed queries to obtain the overall transportation impacts. Queries are instructions to the database describing how to use data contained in the database tables. While a query might be applied to thousands of table entries, there is only one sequence of queries that is used to calculate a particular transportation impact. For example, the incident-free dose to off-link populations in a state is calculated by a query that uses route segment lengths for each route in a state that could be used by shipments, populations for each segment, number of shipments on each segment, and an incident-free unit risk factor calculated using RADTRAN IV. In addition to providing a method for using large volumes of data in the calculations, the queries provide a straight-forward means used to verify results. Another advantage of using the MS Access database was the ability to develop query hierarchies using nested queries. Calculations were broken into a series of steps, each step represented by a query. For example, the first query might calculate the number of shipment kilometers traveled through urban, rural and suburban zones for all states. Subsequent queries could join the shipment kilometers query results with another table containing unit risk factors calculated using RADTRAN IV to produce radiological impacts. Through the use of queries, impacts by origin, mode, fuel type or many other parameters can be obtained. The paper will show both the flexibility of the assessment tool and the ease it provides for verifying results.

  8. Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High Level Waste to Yucca Mountain: The Next Step in Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, Robin L,; Lechel, David J.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In the U.S. Department of Energy's ''Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada,'' the Department states that certain broad transportation-related decisions can be made. These include the choice of a mode of transportation nationally (mostly legal-weight truck or mostly rail) and in Nevada (mostly rail, mostly legal-weight truck, or mostly heavy-haul truck with use of an associated intermodal transfer station), as well as the choice among alternative rail corridors or heavy-haul truck routes with use of an associated intermodal transfer station in Nevada. Although a rail line does not service the Yucca Mountain site, the Department has identified mostly rail as its preferred mode of transportation, both nationally and in the State of Nevada. If mostly rail is selected for Nevada, the Department would then identify a preference for one of the rail corridors in consultation with affected stakeholders, particularly the State of Nevada. DOE would then select the rail corridor and initiate a process to select a specific rail alignment within the corridor for the construction of a rail line. Five proposed rail corridors were analyzed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement. The assessment considered the impacts of constructing a branch rail line in the five 400-meter (0.25mile) wide corridors. Each corridor connects the Yucca Mountain site with an existing mainline railroad in Nevada.

  9. Mixed-Mode Ventilation and Building Retrofits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brager, Gail; Ackerly, Katie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Page 15 Mixed-Mode Ventilation and Building RetrofitsEngineers. 2000. Mixed-mode ventilation. CIBSE ApplicationsMichael. 2000. Hybrid Ventilation Systems: An Arup Approach

  10. Occupant satisfaction in mixed-mode buildings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brager, Gail; Baker, Lindsay

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategies for Mixed-Mode Buildings, Summary Report, CenterCBE). 2006. Website: Mixed-Mode Building Case Studies.Department of Environmental Building Research Establishment

  11. Occupant satisfaction in mixed-mode buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brager, Gail; Baker, Lindsay

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Quality in Green Buildings”. Indoor Air; 14 (Strategies for Mixed-Mode Buildings, Summary Report, CenterCBE). 2006. Website: Mixed-Mode Building Case Studies.

  12. Josephson photonics with a two-mode superconducting circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Armour; Björn Kubala; Joachim Ankerhold

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the quantum dynamics of two electromagnetic oscillators coupled in series to a voltage biased Josephson junction. When the applied voltage leads to a Josephson frequency across the junction which matches the sum of the two mode frequencies, tunneling Cooper pairs excite photons in both modes simultaneously leading to far-from-equilibrium states. These states display highly non-classical features including strong anti-bunching, violation of Cauchy-Schwartz inequalities, and number squeezing. The regimes of low and high photon occupancies allow for analytical results which are supported by a full numerical treatment. The impact of asymmetries between the two modes is explored, revealing a pronounced enhancement of number squeezing when the modes are damped at different rates.

  13. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan Miska; Troy Reed; Ergun Kuru

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Cuttings Transport Study (ACTS) was a 5-year JIP project undertaken at the University of Tulsa (TU). The project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and JIP member companies. The objectives of the project were: (1) to develop and construct a new research facility that would allow three-phase (gas, liquid and cuttings) flow experiments under ambient and EPET (elevated pressure and temperature) conditions, and at different angle of inclinations and drill pipe rotation speeds; (2) to conduct experiments and develop a data base for the industry and academia; and (3) to develop mechanistic models for optimization of drilling hydraulics and cuttings transport. This project consisted of research studies, flow loop construction and instrumentation development. Following a one-year period for basic flow loop construction, a proposal was submitted by TU to the DOE for a five-year project that was organized in such a manner as to provide a logical progression of research experiments as well as additions to the basic flow loop. The flow loop additions and improvements included: (1) elevated temperature capability; (2) two-phase (gas and liquid, foam etc.) capability; (3) cuttings injection and removal system; (4) drill pipe rotation system; and (5) drilling section elevation system. In parallel with the flow loop construction, hydraulics and cuttings transport studies were preformed using drilling foams and aerated muds. In addition, hydraulics and rheology of synthetic drilling fluids were investigated. The studies were performed under ambient and EPET conditions. The effects of temperature and pressure on the hydraulics and cuttings transport were investigated. Mechanistic models were developed to predict frictional pressure loss and cuttings transport in horizontal and near-horizontal configurations. Model predictions were compared with the measured data. Predominantly, model predictions show satisfactory agreements with the measured data. As a part of this project, instrumentation was developed to monitor cuttings beds and characterize foams in the flow loop. An ultrasonic-based monitoring system was developed to measure cuttings bed thickness in the flow loop. Data acquisition software controls the system and processes the data. Two foam generating devices were designed and developed to produce foams with specified quality and texture. The devices are equipped with a bubble recognition system and an in-line viscometer to measure bubble size distribution and foam rheology, respectively. The 5-year project is completed. Future research activities will be under the umbrella of Tulsa University Drilling Research Projects. Currently the flow loop is being used for testing cuttings transport capacity of aqueous and polymer-based foams under elevated pressure and temperature conditions. Subsequently, the effect of viscous sweeps on cuttings transport under elevated pressure and temperature conditions will be investigated using the flow loop. Other projects will follow now that the ''steady state'' phase of the project has been achieved.

  14. Methods of producing transportation fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Cherrillo, Ralph Anthony (Houston, TX); Bauldreay, Joanna M. (Chester, GB)

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing transportation fuel is described herein. The method for producing transportation fuel may include providing formation fluid having a boiling range distribution between -5.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process to a subsurface treatment facility. A liquid stream may be separated from the formation fluid. The separated liquid stream may be hydrotreated and then distilled to produce a distilled stream having a boiling range distribution between 150.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. The distilled liquid stream may be combined with one or more additives to produce transportation fuel.

  15. Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation. Through smart technology, it will anticipate user needs; detect available bandwidths and frequencies then seamlessly connect vehicles, infrastructures, and consumer devices; and it will support the Department of Transportation IntelliDrive Program, helping researchers, auto manufacturers, and Federal and State officials advance the connectivity of US transportation systems for improved safety, mobility, and environmental conditions. Using cognitive radio, a commercial vehicle will know its driver, onboard freight and destination route. Drivers will save time and resources communicating with automatic toll booths and know ahead of time whether to stop at a weigh station or keep rolling. At accident scenes, cognitive radio sensors on freight and transportation modes can alert emergency personnel and measure on-site, real-time conditions such as a chemical leak. The sensors will connect freight to industry, relaying shipment conditions and new delivery schedules. For industry or military purposes, cognitive radio will enable real-time freight tracking around the globe and its sensory technology can help prevent cargo theft or tampering by alerting shipper and receiver if freight is tampered with while en route. For the average consumer, a vehicle will tailor the transportation experience to the passenger such as delivering age-appropriate movies via satellite. Cognitive radio will enhance transportation safety by continually sensing what is important to the user adapting to its environment and incoming information, and proposing solutions that improve mobility and quality of life.

  16. Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation. Through smart technology, it will anticipate user needs; detect available bandwidths and frequencies then seamlessly connect vehicles, infrastructures, and consumer devices; and it will support the Department of Transportation IntelliDrive Program, helping researchers, auto manufacturers, and Federal and State officials advance the connectivity of US transportation systems for improved safety, mobility, and environmental conditions. Using cognitive radio, a commercial vehicle will know its driver, onboard freight and destination route. Drivers will save time and resources communicating with automatic toll booths and know ahead of time whether to stop at a weigh station or keep rolling. At accident scenes, cognitive radio sensors on freight and transportation modes can alert emergency personnel and measure on-site, real-time conditions such as a chemical leak. The sensors will connect freight to industry, relaying shipment conditions and new delivery schedules. For industry or military purposes, cognitive radio will enable real-time freight tracking around the globe and its sensory technology can help prevent cargo theft or tampering by alerting shipper and receiver if freight is tampered with while en route. For the average consumer, a vehicle will tailor the transportation experience to the passenger such as delivering age-appropriate movies via satellite. Cognitive radio will enhance transportation safety by continually sensing what is important to the user adapting to its environment and incoming information, and proposing solutions that improve mobility and quality of life.

  17. Seepage Model for PA Including Dift Collapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Li; C. Tsang

    2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the predictions and analysis performed using the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA) and the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain. These results will be used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into waste-emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as part of the evaluation of the long term performance of the potential repository. This AMR is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153447]). This purpose is accomplished by performing numerical simulations with stochastic representations of hydrological properties, using the Seepage Model for PA, and evaluating the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift using the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel. Seepage of water into waste-emplacement drifts is considered one of the principal factors having the greatest impact of long-term safety of the repository system (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153225], Table 4-1). This AMR supports the analysis and simulation that are used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into drift, and is therefore a model of primary (Level 1) importance (AP-3.15Q, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''). The intended purpose of the Seepage Model for PA is to support: (1) PA; (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Seepage; and (3) Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). Seepage into drifts is evaluated by applying numerical models with stochastic representations of hydrological properties and performing flow simulations with multiple realizations of the permeability field around the drift. The Seepage Model for PA uses the distribution of permeabilities derived from air injection testing in niches and in the cross drift to stochastically simulate the 3D flow of water in the fractured host rock (in the vicinity of potential emplacement drifts) under ambient conditions. The Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel evaluates the impact of the partial collapse of a drift on seepage. Drainage in rock below the emplacement drift is also evaluated.

  18. New insights into self-heating in double-gate transistors by solving Boltzmann transport equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thu Trang Nghiêm, T., E-mail: tthutrang.nghiem@gmail.com [Institute of Fundamental Electronics, UMR 8622, CNRS-University of Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); The Center for Thermal Sciences of Lyon, UMR 5008, CNRS–INSA–University of Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); Saint-Martin, J.; Dollfus, P. [Institute of Fundamental Electronics, UMR 8622, CNRS-University of Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Electro-thermal effects become one of the most critical issues for continuing the downscaling of electron devices. To study this problem, a new efficient self-consistent electron-phonon transport model has been developed. Our model of phonon Boltzmann transport equation (pBTE) includes the decay of optical phonons into acoustic modes and a generation term given by electron-Monte Carlo simulation. The solution of pBTE uses an analytic phonon dispersion and the relaxation time approximation for acoustic and optical phonons. This coupled simulation is applied to investigate the self-heating effects in a 20?nm-long double gate MOSFET. The temperature profile per mode and the comparison between Fourier temperature and the effective temperature are discussed. Some significant differences occur mainly in the hot spot region. It is shown that under the influence of self-heating effects, the potential profile is modified and both the drain current and the electron ballisticity are reduced because of enhanced electron-phonon scattering rates.

  19. Power Flow Analysis Algorithm for Islanded LV Microgrids Including Distributed Generator Units with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhary, Sanjay

    Power Flow Analysis Algorithm for Islanded LV Microgrids Including Distributed Generator Units With larger portion of growing electricity demand which is being fed through distributed generation (DG power system. Being able to operate in both grid-connected and islanded mode, a microgrid manages

  20. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  1. Challenges of Including the Mina Route in the Nevada Rail Alignment Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanthrum, G.; Larson, N. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste, Washington, DC (United States); Mussler, R. [Booze Allen Hamilton, Suite (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management is developing the Yucca Mountain repository for the disposition of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level radioactive waste (HLW). Part of that development is the transportation infrastructure needed to ship SNF and HLW from 77 sites around the country to the repository. A Record of Decision was issued in 2004 to use mostly rail as the mode of transport both nationally, and in the State of Nevada. No rail access exists to the Yucca Mountain site, so a Rail Alignment Environmental Impact Statement (RA-EIS) is being prepared to address the impacts associated with connecting existing track in Nevada to Yucca Mountain. Late in the preparation of the Draft RA-EIS, an option to consider an additional alignment alternative was introduced. This paper describes the consideration given to the new alternative and describes how it is being incorporated into the RA-EIS. (authors)

  2. Phonon thermal transport through tilt grain boundaries in strontium titanate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Zexi; Chen, Xiang; Yang, Shengfeng; Xiong, Liming; Chen, Youping [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Deng, Bowen; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we perform nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to study phonon scattering at two tilt grain boundaries (GBs) in SrTiO{sub 3}. Mode-wise energy transmission coefficients are obtained based on phonon wave-packet dynamics simulations. The Kapitza conductance is then quantified using a lattice dynamics approach. The obtained results of the Kapitza conductance of both GBs compare well with those obtained by the direct method, except for the temperature dependence. Contrary to common belief, the results of this work show that the optical modes in SrTiO{sub 3} contribute significantly to phonon thermal transport, accounting for over 50% of the Kapitza conductance. To understand the effect of the GB structural disorder on phonon transport, we compare the local phonon density of states of the atoms in the GB region with that in the single crystalline grain region. Our results show that the excess vibrational modes introduced by the structural disorder do not have a significant effect on phonon scattering at the GBs, but the absence of certain modes in the GB region appears to be responsible for phonon reflections at GBs. This work has also demonstrated phonon mode conversion and simultaneous generation of new modes. Some of the new modes have the same frequency as the initial wave packet, while some have the same wave vector but lower frequencies.

  3. Communication in automation, including networking and wireless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antsaklis, Panos

    Communication in automation, including networking and wireless Nicholas Kottenstette and Panos J and networking in automation is given. Digital communication fundamentals are reviewed and networked control are presented. 1 Introduction 1.1 Why communication is necessary in automated systems Automated systems use

  4. Electrochemical cell including ribbed electrode substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breault, R.D.; Goller, G.J.; Roethlein, R.J.; Sprecher, G.C.

    1981-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical cell including an electrolyte retaining matrix layer located between and in contact with cooperating anode and cathode electrodes is disclosed herein. Each of the electrodes is comprised of a ribbed (or grooved) substrate including a gas porous body as its main component and a catalyst layer located between the substrate and one side of the electrolyte retaining matrix layer. Each substrate body includes a ribbed section for receiving reactant gas and lengthwise side portions on opposite sides of the ribbed section. Each of the side portions includes a channel extending along its entire length from one surface thereof (e.g., its outer surface) to but stopping short of an opposite surface (e.g., its inner surface) so as to provide a web directly between the channel and the opposite surface. Each of the channels is filled with a gas impervious substance and each of the webs is impregnated with a gas impervious substance so as to provide a gas impervious seal along the entire length of each side portion of each substrate and between the opposite faces thereof (e.g., across the entire thickness thereof).

  5. Prices include compostable serviceware and linen tablecloths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    & BLACK BEAN ENCHILADAS Fresh corn tortillas stuffed with tender brown butter sautéed butternut squash, black beans and yellow on- ions, garnished with avocado and sour cream. $33 per person EDAMAME & CORN SQUASH & BLACK BEAN ENCHILADA FREE RANGE CHICK- EN SANDWICH PLATED ENTREES All plated entrees include

  6. Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namboodiri, Vinod

    Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Communication Devices Pavel Somavat1 consumption, questions are being asked about the energy contribution of computing equipment. Al- though studies have documented the share of energy consumption by this type of equipment over the years, research

  7. Transportation and packaging resource guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arendt, J.W.; Gove, R.M.; Welch, M.J.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this resource guide is to provide a convenient reference document of information that may be useful to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractor personnel involved in packaging and transportation activities. An attempt has been made to present the terminology of DOE community usage as it currently exists. DOE`s mission is changing with emphasis on environmental cleanup. The terminology or nomenclature that has resulted from this expanded mission is included for the packaging and transportation user for reference purposes. Older terms still in use during the transition have been maintained. The Packaging and Transportation Resource Guide consists of four sections: Sect. 1, Introduction; Sect. 2, Abbreviations and Acronyms; Sect. 3, Definitions; and Sect. 4, References for packaging and transportation of hazardous materials and related activities, and Appendices A and B. Information has been collected from DOE Orders and DOE documents; U.S Department of Transportation (DOT), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations; and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standards and other international documents. The definitions included in this guide may not always be a regulatory definition but are the more common DOE usage. In addition, the definitions vary among regulatory agencies. It is, therefore, suggested that if a definition is to be used in a regulatory or a legal compliance issue, the definition should be verified with the appropriate regulation. To assist in locating definitions in the regulations, a listing of all definition sections in the regulations are included in Appendix B. In many instances, the appropriate regulatory reference is indicated in the right-hand margin.

  8. Scissors modes: The first overtone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatada, Keisuke [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, c.p. 13, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Hayakawa, Kuniko [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, c.p. 13, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Centro Fermi, Compendio Viminale, Roma I-00184 (Italy); Palumbo, Fabrizio [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, c.p. 13, I-00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Scissors modes were predicted in the framework of the two-rotor model. This model has an intrinsic harmonic spectrum, so that the level above the scissors mode, the first overtone, has excitation energy twice that of the scissors mode. Because the latter is of the order of 3 MeV in the rare-earth region, the energy of the overtone is below threshold for nucleon emission, and its width should remain small enough for the overtone to be observable. We find that B(E2){up_arrow}{sub overtone}=(1/64 {theta}{sub 0}{sup 2})B(E2){up_arrow}{sub scissors}, where {theta}{sub 0} is the zero-point oscillation amplitude, which in the rare-earth region is of order 10{sup -1}.

  9. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana

    2003-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/ Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Existing facilities were modified for evaluation of environmental assisted slow crack growth and creep in flexural mode. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition were continued for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment. These studies in parallel to those on the LSFCO composition is expect to yield important information on questions such as the role of cation segregation and the stability of the perovskite structure on crack initiation vs. crack growth. Studies have been continued on the La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} composition using neutron diffraction and TGA studies. A transition from p-type to n-type of conductor was observed at relative low pO{sub 2}, at which the majority carriers changed from the holes to electrons because of the valence state decreases in Fe due to the further loss of oxygen. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Data obtained at 850 C show that the stoichiometry in La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x} vary from {approx}2.85 to 2.6 over the pressure range studied. From the stoichiometry a lower limit of 2.6 corresponding to the reduction of all Fe{sup 4+} to Fe{sup 3+} and no reduction of Cr{sup 3+} is expected.

  10. Secure Transportation Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, P. W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Secure Transport Management Course (STMC) course provides managers with information related to procedures and equipment used to successfully transport special nuclear material. This workshop outlines these procedures and reinforces the information presented with the aid of numerous practical examples. The course focuses on understanding the regulatory framework for secure transportation of special nuclear materials, identifying the insider and outsider threat(s) to secure transportation, organization of a secure transportation unit, management and supervision of secure transportation units, equipment and facilities required, training and qualification needed.

  11. Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE...

  12. Transverse Mode Coupling Instability with chromaticity and space charge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balbekov, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Transverse mode coupling instability is considered in the paper at different bunch and wake shapes. Exact solution for “hollow” bunch is arrived at and used to develop a proper technique for more realistic distributions. The three-modes approach is proposed for arbitrary bunch with chromaticity included. It is shown that the TMCI threshold and rate depend only slightly on the bunch model used being rather sensitive to the wake shape. Resistive wall wake is considered in detail, and a comparison of the TMCI and collective mode instability with this wake is performed. Space charge tune shift of arbitrary value is included in the consideration providing a firm bridge between the known cases of absent and dominating space charge

  13. QUANTITATIVE TESTS OF ELMS AS INTERMEDIATE N PEELING-BALOONING MODES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LAO,LL; SNYDER,PB; LEONARD,AW; OIKAWA,T; OSBORNE,TH; PETRIE,TW; FERRON,JR; GROEBNER,RJ; HORTON,LD; KAMADA,Y; MURAKAMI,M; SAARELMA,S; STJOHN,HE; TURNBULL,AD; WILSON,HR

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A271 QUANTITATIVE TESTS OF ELMS AS INTERMEDIATE N PEELING-BALOONING MODES. Several testable features of the working model of edge localized modes (ELMs) as intermediate toroidal mode number peeling-ballooning modes are evaluated quantitatively using DIII-D and JT-60U experimental data and the ELITE MHD stability code. These include the hypothesis that ELM sizes are related to the radial widths of the unstable MHD modes, the unstable modes have a strong ballooning character localized in the outboard bad curvature region, and ELM size generally becomes smaller at high edge collisionality. ELMs are triggered when the growth rates of the unstable MHD modes become significantly large. These testable features are consistent with many ELM observations in DIII-D and JT-60U discharges.

  14. Subterranean barriers including at least one weld

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Sloan, Paul A.; Richardson, John G.; Walsh, Stephanie; Kostelnik, Kevin M.

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A subterranean barrier and method for forming same are disclosed, the barrier including a plurality of casing strings wherein at least one casing string of the plurality of casing strings may be affixed to at least another adjacent casing string of the plurality of casing strings through at least one weld, at least one adhesive joint, or both. A method and system for nondestructively inspecting a subterranean barrier is disclosed. For instance, a radiographic signal may be emitted from within a casing string toward an adjacent casing string and the radiographic signal may be detected from within the adjacent casing string. A method of repairing a barrier including removing at least a portion of a casing string and welding a repair element within the casing string is disclosed. A method of selectively heating at least one casing string forming at least a portion of a subterranean barrier is disclosed.

  15. Power generation method including membrane separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

  16. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snitchler, Gregory L. (Shrewsbury, MA); Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Voccio, John P. (Somerville, MA)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  17. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  18. Transportation technology quick reference file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepherd, E.W. (ed.)

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication is a collection of items written by different authors on subjects relating to the transportation of radioactive materials. The purpose of the document is to meet the continuing need for information on specific subjects for dissemination to the public at their request. The subjects included were selected on the basis of the questions most often asked about radioactive materials and their transportation. Additional subjects are being considered and will be included in the future. The loose-leaf notebook format is used to facilitate the updating of this material. The data used in many of the papers represent the best available at time of publication and will be updated as more current information becomes available.

  19. Progress in Simulating Turbulent Electron Thermal Transport in NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttenfelder, Walter; Kaye, S. M.; Ren, Y.; Bell, R. E.; Hammett, G. W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Mikkelsen, D. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton, NJ (United States); Peterson, J. L.; Nevins, W. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States); Candy, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Yuh, H. [Nova Photonics, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear simulations based on multiple NSTX discharge scenarios have progressed to help differentiate unique instability mechanisms and to validate with experimental turbulence and transport data. First nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of microtearing (MT) turbulence in a high-beta NSTX H-mode discharge predict experimental levels of electron thermal transport that are dominated by magnetic flutter and increase with collisionality, roughly consistent with energy confinement times in dimensionless collisionality scaling experiments. Electron temperature gradient (ETG) simulations predict significant electron thermal transport in some low and high beta discharges when ion scales are suppressed by E x B shear. Although the predicted transport in H-modes is insensitive to variation in collisionality (inconsistent with confinement scaling), it is sensitive to variations in other parameters, particularly density gradient stabilization. In reversed shear (RS) Lmode discharges that exhibit electron internal transport barriers, ETG transport has also been shown to be suppressed nonlinearly by strong negative magnetic shear, s<<0. In many high beta plasmas, instabilities which exhibit a stiff beta dependence characteristic of kinetic ballooning modes (KBM) are sometimes found in the core region. However, they do not have a distinct finite beta threshold, instead transitioning gradually to a trapped electron mode (TEM) as beta is reduced to zero. Nonlinear simulations of this "hybrid" TEM/KBM predict significant transport in all channels, with substantial contributions from compressional magnetic perturbations. As multiple instabilities are often unstable simultaneously in the same plasma discharge, even on the same flux surface, unique parametric dependencies are discussed which may be useful for distinguishing the different mechanisms experimentally.

  20. Transportation Infrastructure and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boarnet, Marlon G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Better Forecasting Tool for Transportation Decision-making,” Mineta Transportation Institute, San Jose Stateat the 2008 meeting of the Transportation Research Board and

  1. Transportation Analysis | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Analysis SHARE Transportation Analysis Transportation Analysis efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory contribute to the efficient, safe, and free movement of...

  2. A comparative study of the i-mode in stellarator and tokamak geometries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A comparative study of the i-mode in stellarator and tokamak geometries J. Anderson, T. Rafiq, M the anomalous transport in present tokamaks. An advanced fluid model is applied for the ion physics whereas and the perpendicular wavenumber( )k on different magnetic surfaces in stellarator and tokamak equilibria. Quantitative

  3. Transportation Investment and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    Transportation Investment and Economic Development: Has the TIED turned? David Levinson University Transportation Investments was Historically Concomitant with Land and Economic Development #12;Canals Railways Surfaced Roads Crude Oil Pipelines Gas Pipelines Telegraph 1825 1985 Proportion of Maximum Extent Growth

  4. Transportation Management Research Collection /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    , Peterbilt Motors, and General Electric. He was a national panel member of the American Arbitration, Noise and Environmental Pollution, Transportation Co-ordination and Consolidation, Transportation -- Docket 8613 1957 Civil Aeronautics Board ­ General passenger fare investigation -- Docket 8008 et al

  5. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials andor modal transport. Cancels DOE 1540.2 and DOE 5480.3

  6. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Canceled by DOE 460.1A

  7. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1.

  8. Biofuels and Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Biofuels and Transportation Impacts and Uncertainties Some Observations of a Reformed Ethanol and Logistics Symposium 3 Topics · Why Biofuels · Ethanol Economics · Ethanol Transportation Equipment Biofuels? · National Security · Reduce Imports of oil · Peak Oil · Replace Fossil Resources

  9. Linear Motor Powered Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Richard D.

    This special issue on linear-motor powered transportation covers both supporting technologies and innovative transport systems in various parts of the World, as this technology moves from the lab to commercial operations. ...

  10. Dynamics and control of internal transport barriers in reversed shear discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, David

    Dynamics and control of internal transport barriers in reversed shear discharges D. E. Newman, B. A to a transport model in order to investigate the dynamics of the transition to this enhanced confinement mode profiles, a rich variety of transition dynamics is uncovered. Transition dynamics and their concomitant

  11. Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's evaluation of Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation's (IndyGo's) hybrid electric buses.

  12. Lubbock Metropolitan Transportation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubbock Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    for Users (SAFETEA-LU) and its predecessors, the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21) and the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) of 1991, specified the transportation systems on which certain federal funds can... in Chapter 5 ? Streets and Highways; Chapter 6 ? Public Transportation; Chapter 7 ? Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan; Chapter 8 ? Lubbock International Airport and Chapter 9 ? Railroads and Trucking. Federally funded transit projects were developed...

  13. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    subsidies on fossil transport fuels, subsidies on commutingC. , 2003: Subsidies that encourage fossil fuel use in

  14. Multiverse rate equation including bubble collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael P. Salem

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The volume fractions of vacua in an eternally inflating multiverse are described by a coarse-grain rate equation, which accounts for volume expansion and vacuum transitions via bubble formation. We generalize the rate equation to account for bubble collisions, including the possibility of classical transitions. Classical transitions can modify the details of the hierarchical structure among the volume fractions, with potential implications for the staggering and Boltzmann-brain issues. Whether or not our vacuum is likely to have been established by a classical transition depends on the detailed relationships among transition rates in the landscape.

  15. PFLOTRAN: Reactive Flow & Transport Code for Use on Laptops to Leadership-Class Supercomputers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.; Lu, Chuan; Mills, Richard T.

    2012-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    PFLOTRAN, a next-generation reactive flow and transport code for modeling subsurface processes, has been designed from the ground up to run efficiently on machines ranging from leadership-class supercomputers to laptops. Based on an object-oriented design, the code is easily extensible to incorporate additional processes. It can interface seamlessly with Fortran 9X, C and C++ codes. Domain decomposition parallelism is employed, with the PETSc parallel framework used to manage parallel solvers, data structures and communication. Features of the code include a modular input file, implementation of high-performance I/O using parallel HDF5, ability to perform multiple realization simulations with multiple processors per realization in a seamless manner, and multiple modes for multiphase flow and multicomponent geochemical transport. Chemical reactions currently implemented in the code include homogeneous aqueous complexing reactions and heterogeneous mineral precipitation/dissolution, ion exchange, surface complexation and a multirate kinetic sorption model. PFLOTRAN has demonstrated petascale performance using 2{sup 17} processor cores with over 2 billion degrees of freedom. Accomplishments achieved to date include applications to the Hanford 300 Area and modeling CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep geologic formations.

  16. Axonal Transport of Microtubule-Associated Protein 1B (MAP1B) in the Sciatic Nerve of Adult Rat: Distinct Transport Rates of Different

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Itzhak

    transported with slow com- ponents a and b (SCa and SCb). In peripheral nerves, the transport velocity of SCa, which includes neurofilaments and tubulin, is 1­2 mm/d, whereas SCb, which includes actin, tu- bulin transport components SCa and SCb. Several other proteins were detected within the component that moved

  17. Northwestern University Transportation Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    Northwestern University Transportation Center 2011 Business Advisory Committee NUTC #12;#12;I have the pleasure of presenting our Business Advisory Committee members--a distinguished group of transportation industry lead- ers who have partnered with the Transportation Center in advancing the state of knowledge

  18. PalladianDigest Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    PalladianDigest CONNECT. EMPOWER. GROW. Tackling Transportation Challenges Nebraska has been a vital link in the nation's transportation system since the days when carts, wagons to University of Nebraska­Lincoln research. That's fine with UNL transportation researchers, said Larry Rilett

  19. TRANSPORTATION: THE POTENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    INTERMODAL TRANSPORTATION: THE POTENTIAL AND THE CHALLENGE A Summary Report 2003 #12;June 2003 To the Reader This report summarizes the second James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology. Over two days, we explored the chal- lenges and opportunities in intermodal transportation, addressing

  20. Louisiana Transportation Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    Louisiana Transportation Research Center LTRC www.ltrc.lsu.edu 2012-13 ANNUALREPORT #12;The Louisiana Transportation Research Center (LTRC) is a research, technology transfer, and training center administered jointly by the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (DOTD) and Louisiana State

  1. Introduction to Transportation Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Introduction to Transportation Planning CMP 4710/6710 Fall 2012 3 Credit Hours Room: ARCH 229 on a Saturday night, transportation is not an objective in and of itself, but a means to carry out the functions of daily living (i.e., it's a "derived good"). As a consequence, the transportation systems we build

  2. Rural Intelligent Transportation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Rural Intelligent Transportation Systems In a technical session at the 2011 NACE conference, Dennis Foderberg of SEH Inc. discussed intelligent transportation systems (ITS) developed by SEH in collaboration with Network Transportation Technologies, Inc. These systems address the problem of crashes on low-volume roads

  3. Structural analysis in support of the waterborne transport of radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.J.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safety of the transportation of radioactive materials by road and rail has been well studied and documented. However, the safety of waterborne transportation has received much less attention. Recent highly visible waterborne transportation campaigns have led to DOE and IAEA to focus attention on the safety of this transportation mode. In response, Sandia National Laboratories is conducting a program to establish a method to determine the safety of these shipments. As part of that program the mechanics involved in ship-to-ship collisions are being evaluated to determine the loadings imparted to radioactive material transportation packages during these collisions. This paper will report on the results of these evaluations.

  4. The impact of pedestal turbulence and electron inertia on edge-localized-mode crashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xi, P. W. [FSC and State Key Lab of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [FSC and State Key Lab of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Xu, X. Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Diamond, P. H. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of) [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences and Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0429 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that the occurrence of Edge-Localized-Modes (ELM) crashes does not depend only on the linear peeling-ballooning threshold, but also relies on nonlinear processes. Wave-wave interaction constrains the growth time of a mode, thus inducing a shift in the criterion for triggering an ELM crash. An ELM crash requires the P-B growth rate to exceed a critical value ?>?{sub c}, where ?{sub c} is set by 1/?{sup ¯}{sub c}, and ?{sup ¯}{sub c} is the averaged mode phase coherence time. For 0transport. We also show that electron inertia dramatically changes the instability threshold when density is low. However, P-B turbulence alone cannot generate enough current transport to allow fast reconnection during an ELM crash.

  5. Higgs as a Top-Mode Pseudo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hidenori S. Fukano; Masafumi Kurachi; Shinya Matsuzaki; Koichi Yamawaki

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In the spirit of the top quark condensation, we propose a model which has a naturally light composite Higgs boson, "tHiggs", to be identified with the 126 GeV Higgs discovered at the LHC. The tHiggs, a bound state of the top quark and its flavor (vector-like) partner, emerges as a pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson (NGB), "Top-Mode Pseudo", together with the exact NGBs to be absorbed into the W and Z bosons as well as another (heavier) Top-Mode Pseudo (CP-odd composite scalar). Those five composite (exact/pseudo) NGBs are dynamically produced simultaneously by a single supercritical four-fermion interaction having U(3) x U(1) symmetry which includes the electroweak symmetry, where the vacuum is aligned by small explicit breaking term so as to break the symmetry down to a subgroup, U(2) x U(1)', in a way not to retain the electroweak symmetry, in sharp contrast to the little Higgs models. The explicit breaking term for the vacuum alignment gives rise to a mass of the tHiggs, which is protected by the symmetry and hence naturally controlled against radiative corrections. Realistic top quark mass is easily realized similarly to the top-seesaw mechanism by introducing an extra (subcritical) four-fermion coupling which explicitly breaks the residual U(2) x U(1)' symmetry. We present a phenomenological Lagrangian of the Top-Mode Pseudos along with the standard model particles, which will be useful for the study of the collider phenomenology. The coupling property of the tHiggs is shown to be consistent with the currently available data reported from the LHC. Several phenomenological consequences and constraints from experiments are also addressed.

  6. Spin Transport in Semiconductor heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Domnita Catalina Marinescu

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of the research performed under this grant has been the investigation of spin transport in magnetic semiconductor heterostructures. The interest in these systems is motivated both by their intriguing physical properties, as the physical embodiment of a spin-polarized Fermi liquid, as well as by their potential applications as spintronics devices. In our work we have analyzed several different problems that affect the spin dynamics in single and bi-layer spin-polarized two-dimensional (2D) systems. The topics of interests ranged from the fundamental aspects of the electron-electron interactions, to collective spin and charge density excitations and spin transport in the presence of the spin-orbit coupling. The common denominator of these subjects is the impact at the macroscopic scale of the spin-dependent electron-electron interaction, which plays a much more subtle role than in unpolarized electron systems. Our calculations of several measurable parameters, such as the excitation frequencies of magneto-plasma modes, the spin mass, and the spin transresistivity, propose realistic theoretical estimates of the opposite-spin many-body effects, in particular opposite-spin correlations, that can be directly connected with experimental measurements.

  7. Methods of making transportation fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Mo, Weijian (Sugar Land, TX); Muylle, Michel Serge Marie (Houston, TX); Mandema, Remco Hugo (Houston, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing alkylated hydrocarbons is disclosed. Formation fluid is produced from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. The liquid stream is fractionated to produce at least a second gas stream including hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3. The first gas stream and the second gas stream are introduced into an alkylation unit to produce alkylated hydrocarbons. At least a portion of the olefins in the first gas stream enhance alkylation. The alkylated hydrocarbons may be blended with one or more components to produce transportation fuel.

  8. Transportation YOU 2013 DC Youth Summit WTS Transportation YOU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Transportation YOU 2013 DC Youth Summit WTS Transportation YOU CTS Research Conference May 21, 2014 Lisa Rasmussen, WTS / Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc #12;Transportation YOU 2013 DC Youth SummitTransportation YOU 2013 DC Youth Summit Agenda What is Transportation YOU? Transportation YOU ­ WTS Local Chapter

  9. PROGRESS IN QUANTIFYING THE EDGE PHYSICS OF H-MODE REGIME IN DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.J. GROEBNER; D.R. BAKER; J.A. BOEDO; K.H. BURRELL; T.N. CARLSTROM; R.D. DERANIAN; E.J. DOYLE; J.R. FERRON; P. GOHIL; G.R. MOYER; C.L. RETTIG; T.L. RHODES; D.M. THOMAS; T.H. OSBORNE; W.P. WEST

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Edge conditions in DIII-D are being quantified in order to provide insight into the physics of the H-mode regime. Electron temperature is not the key parameter that controls the L-H transition. Gradients of edge temperature and pressure are much more promising candidates for such parameters. The quality of H-mode confinement is strongly correlated with the height of the H-mode pedestal for the pressure. The gradient of the pressure appears to be controlled by MHD modes, in particular by kink-ballooning modes with finite mode number n. For a wide variety of discharges, the width of the barrier is well described with a relationship that is proportional to ({beta}{sub p}{sup ped}){sup 1/2}. An attractive regime of confinement has been discovered which provides steady-state operation with no ELMs, low impurity content and normal H-mode confinement. A coherent edge MHD-mode evidently provides adequate particle transport to control the plasma density and impurity content while permitting the pressure pedestal to remain almost identical to that observed in ELMing discharges.

  10. Plasma confinement regimes and collective modes characterizing them

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coppi, B.; Zhou, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A unified theory is presented for the modes that are excited at the edge of the plasma column and are important signatures of the advanced confinement regimes into which magnetically confined plasmas can be driven. In particular, the so-called EDA H-Regime, the Elmy H-Regime, and the I-Regime are considered. The modes that are identified theoretically have characteristics that are consistent with or have anticipated those of the modes observed experimentally for each of the investigated regimes. The phase velocities, the produced transport processes, the frequencies, the wavelengths, and the consistency with the direction of spontaneous rotation are the factors considered for comparison with the relevant experiments. The quasi-coherent mode [I. Cziegler, Ph.D. dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2011] that is present in the EDA H-Regime has a phase velocity in the direction of the ion diamagnetic velocity in the plasma reference frame. Consequently, this is identified as a ballooning mode near finite Larmor radius marginal stability involving the effects of transverse ion viscosity and other dissipative effects. In this regime, impurities are driven outward by the combined effects of the local temperature gradients of the impurities and their thermal conductivity, while in the Elmy H-Regime impurities are driven toward the center of the plasma column. In the I-Regimes, the excited 'Heavy Particle' modes [B. Coppi and T. Zhou, Phys. Plasmas 19, 012302 (2012); Phys. Lett. A 375, 2916 (2011)] are not of the ballooning kind and are shown to expel the impurities toward the plasma edge in the presence of significant fluctuations. These modes can have a finite frequency of oscillation with a phase velocity in the direction of the electron diamagnetic velocity or they can be nearly purely growing, explaining why there are I-Regimes where fluctuations are not observed. Instead, the modes considered for the Elmy H-Regime are of the ballooning kind. They are driven by the combined effects of the plasma pressure gradient and the magnetic field curvature, are close to conditions under which the acquired growth rates are proportional to half power of the relevant dissipation parameters, involve the effects of finite magnetic diffusivity and finite electron thermal conductivity, and can have phase velocities in either direction.

  11. Confinement physics of H-mode discharges in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrell, K.H.; Allen, S.L.; Bramson, G.; Brooks, N.H.; Callis, R.W.; Carlstrom, T.N.; Chu, M.S.; Colleraine, A.P.; Content, D.; DeBoo, J.C.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our data indicate that the L-mode to H-mode transition in the DIII-D tokamak is associated with the sudden reduction in anomalous, fluctuation-connected transport across the outer midplane of the plasma. In addition to the reduction in edge density and magnetic fluctuations observed at the transition, the edge radial electric field becomes more negative after the transition. We have determined the scaling of the H-mode power threshold with various plasma parameters; the roughly linear increase with plasma density and toroidal field are particularly significant. Control of the ELM frequency and duration by adjusting neutral beam input power has allowed us to produce H-mode plasmas with constant impurity levels and durations up to 5 s. Energy confinement time in Ohmic H-mode plasmas and in deuterium H-mode plasmas with deuterium beam injection can exceed saturated Ohmic confinement times by at least a factor of two. Energy confinement times above 0.3 s have been achieved in these beam-heated plasmas with plasma currents in the range of 2.0 to 2.5 MA. Local transport studies have shown that electron and ion thermal diffusivities and angular momentum diffusivity are comparable in magnitude and all decrease with increasing plasma current. 51 refs., 16 figs.

  12. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeSanto, Leonard (Dunkirk, MD); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  13. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

    2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  14. Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

  15. Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Panagiotis Scarlatos, Ph.D., Director Transportation Safety and Security #12;Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Partners #12 evacuations · Tracking systems for hazardous materials Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety

  16. Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City of Lakes Minneapolis Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study #12;Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City of Lakes Background: · Currently, funding

  17. Effects of Modes of Cockpit Automation on Pilot Performance and Workload in a Next Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    Effects of Modes of Cockpit Automation on Pilot Performance and Workload in a Next Generation of advanced cockpit automation for flight planning on pilot performance and workload under a futuristic arrivals to an airport using three modes of automation (MOAs), including a control-display unit (CDU

  18. Closed Form of the Biphoton K-Vector Spectrum for Arbitrary Spatio-Temporal Pump Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey Perkins

    2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A closed form solution is derived for the biphoton k-vector spectrum for an arbitrary pump spatial mode. The resulting mode coefficients for the pump input that maximize the probability of biphoton detection in the far field are found. It is thus possible to include the effect of arbitrary crystal poling strucures, and optimize the resulting biphoton flux.

  19. A Multi-Mode Sensing System for Corrosion Detection Using Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    methods, including ultrasonic, impedance, and thickness measurement, we introduce the concept of PWAS Columbia, SC 29208, pollocpj@engr.sc.edu ABSTRACT As an emerging technology for in-situ damage detection in propagating wave mode or electromechanical impedance mode. Its small size and low cost (about ~$10 each) make

  20. Advancing the Physics Basis of Quiescent H-mode through Exploration of ITER Relevant Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, W. M. [PPPL; Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics; Fenstermacher, M. E. [LLNL; Garofalo, A. M. [General Atomics; Grierson, B. A. [PPPL; Loarte, A. [ITER; McKee, G. R. [U of Wisc, Madison; Nazikian, R. [PPPL; Snyder, B. P. [General Atomics

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments on DIII-D have overcome a long-standing limitation in accessing quiescent H-mode (QH-mode), a high confinement state of the plasma that does not exhibit the explosive instabilities associated with edge localized modes (ELMs). In the past, QH-mode was associated with low density operation, but has now been extended to high normalized densities compatible with operation envisioned for ITER. Through the use of strong shaping, QH-mode plasmas have been maintained at high densities, both absolute (?e ? 7 × 1019 m—3) and normalized Greenwald fraction (?e/?G > 0:7) . In these plasmas, the pedestal can evolve to very high pressures and current as the density is increased. Calculations of the pedestal height and width from the EPED model are quantitatively consistent with the experimental observed evolution with density. The comparison of the dependence of the maximum density threshold for QH-mode with plasma shape help validate the underlying theoretical peeling-ballooning models describing ELM stability. High density QH-mode operation with strong shaping has allowed stable access to a previously predicted regime of very high pedestal dubbed \\Super H-mode". In general, QH-mode is found to achieve ELM-stable operation while maintaining adequate impurity exhaust, due to the enhanced impurity transport from an edge harmonic oscillation, thought to be a saturated kink- peeling mode driven by rotation shear. In addition, the impurity confinement time is not affected by rotation, even though the energy confinement time and measured E ? B shear is observed to increase at low toroidal rotation. Together with demonstrations of high beta, high confinement and low q95 for many energy confinement times, these results suggest QH-mode as a potentially attractive operating scenario for ITER's Q=10 mission.

  1. Transportation Beyond 2000: Technologies Needed for Engineering Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huebner, L.D.; Asbury, S.C.; Lamar, J.E.; Mckinley, R.E. Jr.; Scott, R.C.; Small, W.J.; Torres, A.O.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the workshop was to acquaint the staff of the NASA Langley Research Center with the broad spectrum of transportation challenges and concepts foreseen within the next 20 years. The hope is that material presented at the workshop and contained in this document will stimulate innovative high-payoff research directed towards the efficiency of future transportation systems. The workshop included five sessions designed to stress the factors that will lead to a revolution in the way one will travel in the 21st century. The first session provides the historical background and a general perspective for future transportation, including emerging transportation alternatives such as working at a distance. Personal travel is the subject of Session Two. The third session looks at mass transportation, including advanced rail vehicles, advanced commuter aircraft, and advanced transport aircraft. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the database for articles from this workshop.

  2. Review of petroleum transport network models and their applicability to a national refinery model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooker, J. N.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines four petroleum transport network models to determine whether parts of them can be incorporated into the transportation component of a national refinery model. Two questions in particular are addressed. (a) How do the models under examination represent the oil transport network, estimate link capacities, and calculate transport costs. (b) Are any of these network representations, capacity estimates, or cost functions suitable for inclusion in a linear programming model of oil refinery and primary distribution in the US. Only pipeline and waterway transport is discussed. The models examined are the Department of Energy's OILNET model, the Department of Transportation's Freight Energy Model, the Federal Energy Administration Petroleum Transportation Network Model, and an Oak Ridge National Laboratory oil pipeline energy model. Link capacity and cost functions are recommended for each transport mode. The coefficients of the recommended pipeline cost functions remain to be estimated.

  3. Engine lubrication circuit including two pumps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lane, William H.

    2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A lubrication pump coupled to the engine is sized such that the it can supply the engine with a predetermined flow volume as soon as the engine reaches a peak torque engine speed. In engines that operate predominately at speeds above the peak torque engine speed, the lubrication pump is often producing lubrication fluid in excess of the predetermined flow volume that is bypassed back to a lubrication fluid source. This arguably results in wasted power. In order to more efficiently lubricate an engine, a lubrication circuit includes a lubrication pump and a variable delivery pump. The lubrication pump is operably coupled to the engine, and the variable delivery pump is in communication with a pump output controller that is operable to vary a lubrication fluid output from the variable delivery pump as a function of at least one of engine speed and lubrication flow volume or system pressure. Thus, the lubrication pump can be sized to produce the predetermined flow volume at a speed range at which the engine predominately operates while the variable delivery pump can supplement lubrication fluid delivery from the lubrication pump at engine speeds below the predominant engine speed range.

  4. Models of Procyon A including seismic constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Eggenberger; F. Carrier; F. Bouchy

    2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed models of Procyon A based on new asteroseismic measurements by Eggenberger et al (2004) have been computed using the Geneva evolution code including shellular rotation and atomic diffusion. By combining all non-asteroseismic observables now available for Procyon A with these seismological data, we find that the observed mean large spacing of 55.5 +- 0.5 uHz favours a mass of 1.497 M_sol for Procyon A. We also determine the following global parameters of Procyon A: an age of t=1.72 +- 0.30 Gyr, an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.290 +- 0.010, a nearly solar initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0234 +- 0.0015 and a mixing-length parameter alpha=1.75 +- 0.40. Moreover, we show that the effects of rotation on the inner structure of the star may be revealed by asteroseismic observations if frequencies can be determined with a high precision. Existing seismological data of Procyon A are unfortunately not accurate enough to really test these differences in the input physics of our models.

  5. Quantum simulation of Dirac fermion mode, Majorana fermion mode and Majorana-Weyl fermion mode in cavity QED lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sujit Sarkar

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum simulation aims to simulate a quantum system using a controble laboratory system that underline the same mathematical model. Cavity QED lattice system is that prescribe system to simulate the relativistic quantum effect. We quantum simulate the Dirac fermion mode, Majorana fermion mode and Majorana-Weyl fermion mode and a crossover between them in cavity QED lattice. We also present the different analytical relations between the field operators for different mode excitations.

  6. Continuous scanning mode for ptychography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clark, Jesse N.; Huang, Xiaojing; Harder, Ross J.; Robinson, Ian K.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We outline how ptychographic imaging can be performed without the need for discrete scan positions. Through an idealized experiment, we demonstrate how a discrete-position scan regime can be replaced with a continuously scanned one with suitable modification of the reconstruction scheme based on coherent modes. The impact of this is that acquisition times can be reduced, significantly aiding ptychographic imaging with x rays, electrons, or visible light.

  7. Transition between Two Oscillation Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricardo Lopez-Ruiz; Yves Pomeau

    2002-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A model for the symmetric coupling of two self-oscillators is presented. The nonlinearities cause the system to vibrate in two modes of different symmetries. The transition between these two regimes of oscillation can occur by two different scenarios. This might model the release of vortices behind circular cylinders with a possible transition from a symmetric to an antisymmetric Benard-von Karman vortex street.

  8. The U. S. transportation sector in the year 2030: results of a two-part Delphi survey.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, G.; Stephens, T.S. (Energy Systems); (Univ. of California at Davis); (ES)

    2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-part Delphi Survey was given to transportation experts attending the Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy in August, 2011. The survey asked respondents about trends in the US transportation sector in 2030. Topics included: alternative vehicles, high speed rail construction, rail freight transportation, average vehicle miles traveled, truck versus passenger car shares, vehicle fuel economy, and biofuels in different modes. The survey consisted of two rounds -- both asked the same set of seven questions. In the first round, respondents were given a short introductory paragraph about the topic and asked to use their own judgment in their responses. In the second round, the respondents were asked the same questions, but were also given results from the first round as guidance. The survey was sponsored by Argonne National Lab (ANL), the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL), and implemented by University of California at Davis, Institute of Transportation Studies. The survey was part of the larger Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project run by the Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Of the 206 invitation letters sent, 94 answered all questions in the first round (105 answered at least one question), and 23 of those answered all questions in the second round. 10 of the 23 second round responses were at a discussion section at Asilomar, while the remaining were online. Means and standard deviations of responses from Round One and Two are given in Table 1 below. One main purpose of Delphi surveys is to reduce the variance in opinions through successive rounds of questioning. As shown in Table 1, the standard deviations of 25 of the 30 individual sub-questions decreased between Round One and Round Two, but the decrease was slight in most cases.

  9. ACCURATE CHARACTERIZATION OF HIGH-DEGREE MODES USING MDI OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korzennik, S. G. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rabello-Soares, M. C.; Schou, J.; Larson, T. P. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first accurate characterization of high-degree modes, derived using the best Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) full-disk full-resolution data set available. A 90 day long time series of full-disk 2 arcsec pixel{sup -1} resolution Dopplergrams was acquired in 2001, thanks to the high rate telemetry provided by the Deep Space Network. These Dopplergrams were spatially decomposed using our best estimate of the image scale and the known components of MDI's image distortion. A multi-taper power spectrum estimator was used to generate power spectra for all degrees and all azimuthal orders, up to l = 1000. We used a large number of tapers to reduce the realization noise, since at high degrees the individual modes blend into ridges and thus there is no reason to preserve a high spectral resolution. These power spectra were fitted for all degrees and all azimuthal orders, between l = 100 and l = 1000, and for all the orders with substantial amplitude. This fitting generated in excess of 5.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} individual estimates of ridge frequencies, line widths, amplitudes, and asymmetries (singlets), corresponding to some 5700 multiplets (l, n). Fitting at high degrees generates ridge characteristics, characteristics that do not correspond to the underlying mode characteristics. We used a sophisticated forward modeling to recover the best possible estimate of the underlying mode characteristics (mode frequencies, as well as line widths, amplitudes, and asymmetries). We describe in detail this modeling and its validation. The modeling has been extensively reviewed and refined, by including an iterative process to improve its input parameters to better match the observations. Also, the contribution of the leakage matrix on the accuracy of the procedure has been carefully assessed. We present the derived set of corrected mode characteristics, which includes not only frequencies, but line widths, asymmetries, and amplitudes. We present and discuss their uncertainties and the precision of the ridge-to-mode correction schemes, through a detailed assessment of the sensitivity of the model to its input set. The precision of the ridge-to-mode correction is indicative of any possible residual systematic biases in the inferred mode characteristics. In our conclusions, we address how to further improve these estimates, and the implications for other data sets, like GONG+ and HMI.

  10. Progress towards sustainment of internal transport barriers in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, B.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Ferron, J.R.; Burrell, K.H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)] [and others

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutral beam heated discharges with internal transport barriers (ITB) have been observed in most of the world`s major tokamaks including DIII-D, TFTR, JT-60U and JET. Improved core confinement has been observed over a range of q profiles, including negative central magnetic shear (NCS) and weak positive shear. In discharges with an L-mode edge, the duration of ITBs is generally limited to a few energy confinement times ({tau}{sub e}) by low-n MHD activity driven by the steep core pressure gradient or by q{sub min} passing through low-order rational values. In order for ITBs to be useful in achieving a more compact advanced tokamak, the radius of the ITB must be expanded and the pressure gradient must be controlled in order to optimize {beta}{sub N} and the bootstrap alignment. In this paper, the authors discuss the results of recent experiments on DIII-D to produce and sustain ITBs for longer pulse lengths. Three techniques are evaluated: (1) reduction of neutral beam power (P{sub NBI}) and plasma current to form a weaker ITB which can be sustained; (2) use of an ELMing H-mode edge to help broaden the pressure profile and improve MHD instability; (3) modification of the plasma shape (squareness) to achieve smaller ELMs with a lower density pedestal at the edge.

  11. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study the local environmentals of LSFT with various level of oxygen deficiency. Ionic valence state, magnetic interaction and influence of Ti on superexchange are discussed Stable crack growth studies on Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were done at elevated temperature, pressure and elevated conditions. Post-fracture X-ray data of the OTM fractured at 1000 C in environment were refined by FullProf code and results indicate a distortion of the parent cubic perovskite to orthorhombic structure with reduced symmetry. TGA-DTA studies on the post-fracture samples also indicated residual effect arising from the thermal and stress history of the samples. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. The initial measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} are reported. Neutron diffraction measurements of the same composition are in agreement with both the stoichiometry and the kinetic behavior observed in coulometric titration measurements. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The COCO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  12. Helium transport in enhanced confinement regimes on the TEXTOR and DIII-D tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillis, D.L.; Hogan, J.T.; Wade, M.R.; Klepper, C.C.; Mioduszewski, P.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Finken, K.H.; Baek, W.Y.; Dippel, K.H.; Euringer, H.; Pospieszcyk, A.; Reiter, D.; Rusbuldt, D.; Wolf, G.H. (Association Euratom-Kernforschungsanlage Juelich GmbH (Germany)); West, W.P.; Burrell, K.H.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R.; Seraydarian, R.A. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comparisons of helium (He) transport and exhaust in L-mode and in an enhanced confinement regime (H-mode), which is induced by a polarizing electrode, have been made for the TEXTOR tokamak. The results show an increased tendency for He accumulation when bulk plasma energy and particle confinement are improved during the polarization induced H-mode. Since these results imply that a high He pumping efficiency may be necessary for H-mode burning plasmas, we have begun exploring He transport in a divertor H-mode, similar to that proposed for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). A collaborative program has been initiated to measure He transport and scaling on DIII-D during L-mode, H-mode, and ELMing H-mode plasma conditions. To simulate the presence of He ash in DIII-D, a 25 ms He puff is injected into a DIII-D plasma resulting in a He concentration of {approx}5%. The time dependence of the He{sup 2+} density profiles in the plasma core is measured by charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy at 11 radial locations.

  13. Linear and nonlinear dynamics of electron temperature gradient mode in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zakir, U.; Qamar, A. [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar (Pakistan)] [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar (Pakistan); Haque, Q. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Islamabad (Pakistan) [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of non-Maxwellian distributed ions on electron temperature gradient mode is investigated. The linear dispersion relation of ?{sub e}?mode is obtained which shows that the behavior of this mode changes in the presence of superthermal ions. The growth rate of ?{sub e}?mode driven linear instability is found and is observed to modify due to nonthermal ions. However, it is found that this leaves the electron energy transport coefficient unchanged. In the nonlinear regime, a dipolar vortex solution is derived which indicates that the dynamic behavior of the vortices changes with the inclusion of kappa distributed ions. The importance of present study with respect to space and laboratory plasmas is also pointed out.

  14. 1.258J / 11.541J / ESD.226J Public Transportation Service and Operations Planning, Fall 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Nigel H. M.

    Evolution and role of urban public transportation modes, systems, and services, focussing on bus and rail. Description of technological characteristics and their impacts on capacity, service quality, and cost. Current ...

  15. 1.258J / 11.541J / ESD.226J Public Transportation Service and Operations Planning, Spring 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Nigel

    This course describes the evolution and role of urban public transportation modes, systems, and services, focusing on bus and rail. Technological characteristics and their impacts on capacity, service quality, and cost are ...

  16. The design of a reduced diameter Pebble Bed Modular Reactor for reactor pressure vessel transport by railcar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everson, Matthew S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many desirable locations for Pebble Bed Modular Reactors are currently out of consideration as construction sites for current designs due to limitations on the mode of transportation for large RPVs. In particular, the ...

  17. Not planning a sustainable transport system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finnveden, Göran, E-mail: goran.finnveden@abe.kth.se; Åkerman, Jonas

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the Swedish transport policy is to ensure the economically efficient and sustainable provision of transport services for people and business throughout the country. More specifically, the transport sector shall, among other things, contribute to the achievement of environmental quality objectives in which the development of the transport system plays an important role in the achievement of the objectives. The aim of this study is to analyse if current transport planning supports this policy. This is done by analysing two recent cases: the National Infrastructure Plan 2010–2021, and the planning of Bypass Stockholm, a major road investment. Our results show that the plans are in conflict with several of the environmental quality objectives. Another interesting aspect of the planning processes is that the long-term climate goals are not included in the planning processes, neither as a clear goal nor as factor that will influence future transport systems. In this way, the long-term sustainability aspects are not present in the planning. We conclude that the two cases do not contribute to a sustainable transport system. Thus, several changes must be made in the processes, including putting up clear targets for emissions. Also, the methodology for the environmental assessments needs to be further developed and discussed. - Highlights: • Two cases are studied to analyse if current planning supports a sustainable transport system. • Results show that the plans are in conflict with several of the environmental quality objectives. • Long-term climate goals are not included in the planning processes. • Current practices do not contribute to a sustainable planning processes. • Methodology and process for environmental assessments must be further developed and discussed.

  18. Optical waveguides having flattened high order modes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Messerly, Michael Joseph; Beach, Raymond John; Heebner, John Edward; Dawson, Jay Walter; Pax, Paul Henry

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A deterministic methodology is provided for designing optical fibers that support field-flattened, ring-like higher order modes. The effective and group indices of its modes can be tuned by adjusting the widths of the guide's field-flattened layers or the average index of certain groups of layers. The approach outlined here provides a path to designing fibers that simultaneously have large mode areas and large separations between the propagation constants of its modes.

  19. Experimental aspects of effects of high-energy particles on Alfven modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heidbrink, W.W.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global Alfven modes are observed in a number of tokamaks, including DIII-D and TFTR. Instabilities occur during neutral-beam injection and during fast-wave ICRF heating, and may recently have been observed during alpha-particle heating. Identification of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) is based primarily on the scaling of the real frequency of the mode. Other modes, including the beta-induced Alfven eigenmode (BAE), are also observed. The stability threshold of TAE modes agree (to within a factor of two) with theoretical predictions. Toroidal mode numbers of n = 2-6 are usually most unstable, as theoretically expected. Measurements of the poloidal and radial mode structure are consistent with theoretical predictions, but the uncertainties are large. Both TAE and BAE modes can cause large, concentrated losses of fast ions. Phenomenologically, beam-driven Alfven modes usually {open_quotes}saturate{close_quotes} through bursts that expel beam ions, while modes observed during ICPF heating approach a steady saturation amplitude.

  20. Composite oxygen ion transport element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Jack C. (Getzville, NY); Besecker, Charles J. (Batavia, IL); Chen, Hancun (Williamsville, NY); Robinson, Earil T. (Mentor, OH)

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite oxygen ion transport element that has a layered structure formed by a dense layer to transport oxygen ions and electrons and a porous support layer to provide mechanical support. The dense layer can be formed of a mixture of a mixed conductor, an ionic conductor, and a metal. The porous support layer can be fabricated from an oxide dispersion strengthened metal, a metal-reinforced intermetallic alloy, a boron-doped Mo.sub.5Si.sub.3-based intermetallic alloy or combinations thereof. The support layer can be provided with a network of non-interconnected pores and each of said pores communicates between opposite surfaces of said support layer. Such a support layer can be advantageously employed to reduce diffusion resistance in any type of element, including those using a different material makeup than that outlined above.

  1. Spontaneous Lorentz violation, Nambu-Goldstone modes, and gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bluhm, Robert [Physics Department, Colby College, Waterville, Maine 04901 (United States); Kostelecky, V. Alan [Physics Department, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States)

    2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The fate of the Nambu-Goldstone modes arising from spontaneous Lorentz violation is investigated. Using the vierbein formalism, it is shown that up to 10 Lorentz and diffeomorphism Nambu-Goldstone modes can appear and that they are contained within the 10 modes of the vierbein associated with gauge degrees of freedom in a Lorentz-invariant theory. A general treatment of spontaneous local Lorentz and diffeomorphism violation is given for various spacetimes, and the fate of the Nambu-Goldstone modes is shown to depend on both the spacetime geometry and the dynamics of the tensor field triggering the spontaneous Lorentz violation. The results are illustrated within the general class of bumblebee models involving vacuum values for a vector field. In Minkowski and Riemann spacetimes, the bumblebee model provides a dynamical theory generating a photon as a Nambu-Goldstone boson for spontaneous Lorentz violation. The Maxwell and Einstein-Maxwell actions are automatically recovered in axial gauge. Associated effects of potential experimental relevance include Lorentz-violating couplings in the matter and gravitational sectors of the Standard-Model Extension and unconventional Lorentz-invariant couplings. In Riemann-Cartan spacetime, the possibility also exists of a Higgs mechanism for the spin connection, leading to the absorption of the propagating Nambu-Goldstone modes into the torsion component of the gravitational field.

  2. Hydrodynamic Simulation of Supernova Remnants Including Efficient Particle Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donald C. Ellison; Anne Decourchelle; Jean Ballet

    2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of supernova remnants (SNRs) show nonthermal X-rays assumed to be synchrotron emission from shock accelerated TeV electrons. The existence of these TeV electrons strongly suggests that the shocks in SNRs are sources of galactic cosmic rays (CRs). In addition, there is convincing evidence from broad-band studies of individual SNRs and elsewhere that the particle acceleration process in SNRs can be efficient and nonlinear. If SNR shocks are efficient particle accelerators, the production of CRs impacts the thermal properties of the shock heated, X-ray emitting gas and the SNR evolution. We report on a technique that couples nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration, including the backreaction of the accelerated particles on the structure of the forward and reverse shocks, with a hydrodynamic simulation of SNR evolution. Compared to models which ignore CRs, the most important hydrodynamical effects of placing a significant fraction of shock energy into CRs are larger shock compression ratios and lower temperatures in the shocked gas. We compare our results, which use an approximate description of the acceleration process, with a more complete model where the full CR transport equations are solved (i.e., Berezhko et al., 2002), and find excellent agreement for the CR spectrum summed over the SNR lifetime and the evolving shock compression ratio. The importance of the coupling between particle acceleration and SNR dynamics for the interpretation of broad-band continuum and thermal X-ray observations is discussed.

  3. Broadband frequency mode entanglement in waveguided PDC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Eckstein; Christine Silberhorn

    2008-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the observation of beatings of the coincidence event rate in a Hong-Ou-Mandel interference (HOMI) between signal and idler photons from a parametric downconversion (PDC) process inside a multi-mode KTP waveguide. As explanation we introduce bi-photonic states entangled in their broadband frequency modes generated by waveguide mode triples and propose a suitable entanglement detection scheme.

  4. Hydrodynamic Lyapunov Modes in Translation Invariant Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrodynamic Lyapunov Modes in Translation Invariant Systems Jean­Pierre Eckmann and Omri Gat De modes in the slowly growing part of the Lyapunov spectrum, which are analogous to the hydrodynamic modes)]. The hydrodynamic Lyapunov vectors loose the typical random structure and exhibit instead the structure of weakly

  5. Hydrodynamic Lyapunov Modes in Translation Invariant Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckmann, Jean-Pierre

    Hydrodynamic Lyapunov Modes in Translation Invariant Systems Jean­Pierre Eckmann and Omri Gat De modes in the slowly growing part of the Lyapunov spectrum, which are analogous to the hydrodynamic modes)]. The hydrodynamic Lyapunov vectors loose the typical random structure and exhibit instead the structure of weakly

  6. Linear calculations of edge current driven kink modes with BOUT++ code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, G. Q., E-mail: ligq@ipp.ac.cn; Xia, T. Y. [Institute of Plasma Physics, CAS, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Xu, X. Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Snyder, P. B.; Turnbull, A. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Ma, C. H.; Xi, P. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); FSC, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work extends previous BOUT++ work to systematically study the impact of edge current density on edge localized modes, and to benchmark with the GATO and ELITE codes. Using the CORSICA code, a set of equilibria was generated with different edge current densities by keeping total current and pressure profile fixed. Based on these equilibria, the effects of the edge current density on the MHD instabilities were studied with the 3-field BOUT++ code. For the linear calculations, with increasing edge current density, the dominant modes are changed from intermediate-n and high-n ballooning modes to low-n kink modes, and the linear growth rate becomes smaller. The edge current provides stabilizing effects on ballooning modes due to the increase of local shear at the outer mid-plane with the edge current. For edge kink modes, however, the edge current does not always provide a destabilizing effect; with increasing edge current, the linear growth rate first increases, and then decreases. In benchmark calculations for BOUT++ against the linear results with the GATO and ELITE codes, the vacuum model has important effects on the edge kink mode calculations. By setting a realistic density profile and Spitzer resistivity profile in the vacuum region, the resistivity was found to have a destabilizing effect on both the kink mode and on the ballooning mode. With diamagnetic effects included, the intermediate-n and high-n ballooning modes can be totally stabilized for finite edge current density.

  7. Final report of the SPS space transportation workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After a brief description of space power system concepts and the current status of the SPS program, issues relevant to earth-surface-to-low-earth-orbit (ESLEO) and orbit-to-orbit transport are discussed. For ESLEO, vehicle concepts include shuttle transportation systems, heavy lift launch vehicles, and single-stage-to-orbit vehicles. Orbit transfer vehicle missions include transport of cargo and the SPS module from low earth orbit to geosynchronous earth orbit as well as personnel transport. Vehicles discussed for such missions include chemical rocket orbital transfer vehicles, and electric orbital transfer vehicles. Further discussions include SPS station-keeping and attitude control, intra-orbit transport, and advanced propulsion and vehicle concepts. (LEW)

  8. High repetition rate mode-locked erbium-doped fiber lasers with complete electric field control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sickler, Jason William, 1978-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in fully-stabilized mode-locked laser systems are enabling many applications, including optical arbitrary waveform generation (OAWG). In this thesis work, we describe the development of high repetition-rate ...

  9. RTSTEP regional transportation simulation tool for emergency planning - final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ley, H.; Sokolov, V.; Hope, M.; Auld, J.; Zhang, K.; Park, Y.; Kang, X. (Energy Systems)

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale evacuations from major cities during no-notice events - such as chemical or radiological attacks, hazardous material spills, or earthquakes - have an obvious impact on large regions rather than on just the directly affected area. The scope of impact includes the accommodation of emergency evacuation traffic throughout a very large area; the planning of resources to respond appropriately to the needs of the affected population; the placement of medical supplies and decontamination equipment; and the assessment and determination of primary escape routes, as well as routes for incoming emergency responders. Compared to events with advance notice, such as evacuations based on hurricanes approaching an affected area, the response to no-notice events relies exclusively on pre-planning and general regional emergency preparedness. Another unique issue is the lack of a full and immediate understanding of the underlying threats to the population, making it even more essential to gain extensive knowledge of the available resources, the chain of command, and established procedures. Given the size of the area affected, an advanced understanding of the regional transportation systems is essential to help with the planning for such events. The objectives of the work described here (carried out by Argonne National Laboratory) is the development of a multi-modal regional transportation model that allows for the analysis of different evacuation scenarios and emergency response strategies to build a wealth of knowledge that can be used to develop appropriate regional emergency response plans. The focus of this work is on the effects of no-notice evacuations on the regional transportation network, as well as the response of the transportation network to the sudden and unusual demand. The effects are dynamic in nature, with scenarios changing potentially from minute to minute. The response to a radiological or chemical hazard will be based on the time-delayed dispersion of such materials over a large area, with responders trying to mitigate the immediate danger to the population in a variety of ways that may change over time (e.g., in-place evacuation, staged evacuations, and declarations of growing evacuation zones over time). In addition, available resources will be marshaled in unusual ways, such as the repurposing of transit vehicles to support mass evacuations. Thus, any simulation strategy will need to be able to address highly dynamic effects and will need to be able to handle any mode of ground transportation. Depending on the urgency and timeline of the event, emergency responders may also direct evacuees to leave largely on foot, keeping roadways as clear as possible for emergency responders, logistics, mass transport, and law enforcement. This RTSTEP project developed a regional emergency evacuation modeling tool for the Chicago Metropolitan Area that emergency responders can use to pre-plan evacuation strategies and compare different response strategies on the basis of a rather realistic model of the underlying complex transportation system. This approach is a significant improvement over existing response strategies that are largely based on experience gained from small-scale events, anecdotal evidence, and extrapolation to the scale of the assumed emergency. The new tool will thus add to the toolbox available to emergency response planners to help them design appropriate generalized procedures and strategies that lead to an improved outcome when used during an actual event.

  10. Alternative Fuel Transportation Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets "Alternative Fuel Transportation Program" Dana O'Hara, DOE Ted Sears, NREL Vehicle Technologies Program June 20,...

  11. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Options for Liquid Biofuels Development in Ireland. SEI, 562006: Outlook for advanced biofuels. Energy Policy, 34(17),40 pp. IEA, 2004c: Biofuels for Transport: An International

  12. Transportation Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLuchi, Mark A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRANSPORTATION ment of Oil Shale Technology. Washing- ton,interest and investments in oil shale, ethanol, coal liquidsbiomass materials, coal, oil shale, tar sands, natural gas,

  13. Sustainable Transportation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in transportation technologies, alternative fuels, and fuel cell technologies.

  14. Mixed mode control method and engine using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kesse, Mary L. (Peoria, IL); Duffy, Kevin P. (Metamora, IL)

    2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of mixed mode operation of an internal combustion engine includes the steps of controlling a homogeneous charge combustion event timing in a given engine cycle, and controlling a conventional charge injection event to be at least a predetermined time after the homogeneous charge combustion event. An internal combustion engine is provided, including an electronic controller having a computer readable medium with a combustion timing control algorithm recorded thereon, the control algorithm including means for controlling a homogeneous charge combustion event timing and means for controlling a conventional injection event timing to be at least a predetermined time from the homogeneous charge combustion event.

  15. Batch-mode vs Online-mode Supervised Learning Motivations for Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehenkel, Louis

    Batch-mode vs Online-mode Supervised Learning Motivations for Artificial Neural Networks Linear ANN-mode vs Online-mode Supervised Learning Motivations for Artificial Neural Networks Linear ANN Models for Artificial Neural Networks Linear ANN Models Single neuron models Single layer models Nonlinear ANN Models

  16. 2006 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    2006 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2006 Transportation Tomorrow Survey Data Presentation #12;2006 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO City of Hamilton City of Kawartha Lakes City of Guelph City of Brantford

  17. NSLS-II Transport Line Progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliller R. P.; Wahl, W.; Anderson, A.; Benish, B.; DeBoer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Heese, R.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Hu, J.-P.; Johanson, M.P.; Kosciuk, B.N.; Padrazo, D.; Roy, K.; Shaftan, T.; Singh, O.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state-of-the-art 3-GeV third generation light source currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac, a 3-GeV booster synchrotron and associated transfer lines. The first part of the Linac to Booster Transport (LBT) line has been installed for linac commissioning. This part includes all components necessary to commission the NSLS-II linac. The second part of this transport line is undergoing installation. Initial results of hardware commissioning will be discussed. The Booster to Storage Ring (BSR) transport line underwent a design review. The first part of the BSR transport line, consisting of all components necessary to commission the booster will be installed in 2012 for booster commissioning. We report on the final design of the BSR line along with the plan to commission the booster.

  18. Development of Low Temperature Combustion Modes to Reduce Overall Emissions from a Medium-Duty, Four Cylinder Diesel Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breen, Jonathan Robert

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    generation. This engine system is used more commonly in the ground transportation, the maritime transportation, and the base-load power generation industries over the spark-ignition (i.e. gasoline) engine due to its improved fuel efficiency. The diesel... (LTC) engine systems are a very current topic of research inside the automotive industry. This novel combustion mode is heavily present in current literature due to its probable application in next generation diesel engines. Industry and academic...

  19. Two-phase microfluidics, heat and mass transport in direct methanol fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER 9 Two-phase microfluidics, heat and mass transport in direct methanol fuel cells G. Lu & C, including two-phase microfluidics, heat and mass transport. We explain how the better understanding

  20. http://w3.pppl.gov/~zakharov/LEZ-130514.pdf Are "transport barriers" a zone of good

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    of H-mode and ETB 4 2 Core-transport based interpretation of pedestals 6 3 The logic of LiWF: from, 2013, PPPL, Princeton, NJ #12;1 Discovery of H-mode and ETB 4/20 "Regime of Improved Confinement

  1. http://tti.tamu.edu Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    http://tti.tamu.edu Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation >>> Transportation operat > Freight traffic > Commodities > Travel time > Travel demand > http

  2. INLAND PORT TRANSPORTATION EVALUATION GUIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    INLAND PORT TRANSPORTATION EVALUATION GUIDE by Robert Harrison, Center for Transportation Research Transportation Institute, The Texas A&M University System; and Jolanda Prozzi, Center for Transportation Research, The University of Texas at Austin CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH Bureau of Engineering Research

  3. MAESTRAEN TRANSPORTE ESPECIALIZACINEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vásquez, Carlos

    investigaciones que permitan la comprensión de distintos componentes delsistema del transporte así como para Investigación de Operaciones y Redes de transporte Medidas y Administración del Tránsito Tecnologías de

  4. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1A. Canceled by DOE O 460.1C.

  5. Expert systems in transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, K.P.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 5 papers in the report deal with the following areas: Knowledge representation and software selection for expert-systems design; Expert-system architecture for retaining-wall design; Development of expert-systems technology in the California Department of Transportation; Development of an expert system to assist in the interactive graphic transit system design process; Expert systems development for contingency transportation planing.

  6. Optoelectronic device with nanoparticle embedded hole injection/transport layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Qingwu (Chelmsford, MA); Li, Wenguang (Andover, MA); Jiang, Hua (Methuen, MA)

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An optoelectronic device is disclosed that can function as an emitter of optical radiation, such as a light-emitting diode (LED), or as a photovoltaic (PV) device that can be used to convert optical radiation into electrical current, such as a photovoltaic solar cell. The optoelectronic device comprises an anode, a hole injection/transport layer, an active layer, and a cathode, where the hole injection/transport layer includes transparent conductive nanoparticles in a hole transport material.

  7. Ark-Tex Area Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ark-Tex Council of Governments

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ? 30 corridor. The transportation network in the Ark-Tex area is managed and operated through two transit providers, a variety of organizations that provide or fund transportation in support of their primary programs (including public entities... and Texarkana proper. 3. Ark-Tex Area Agency on Aging (AAA) ? Senior transportation throughout the service area to meals and other services. 4. Northeast Texas Community College ? Service from Mt. Pleasant to the community college is provided by TRAX...

  8. Texas State Planning Region 3 Report of Regional Transportation Coordination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nortex Regional Planning Commission

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the 24 regions studying public transportation in their area was charged with assessing Barriers, Constraints and Best Practices in public transportation. This Coordination Committee addressed this issue with enthusiasm, generating significant topics...DOT requirement that all vehicles be ADA compliant, Medicaid restrictions and Insurance as significant barriers to public transportation. Best practices included sharing of information regarding this project through publication in rural newspapers, inter...

  9. to the PORTAL servers, including count, occupancy, and time mean speeds in each lane. PORTAL also includes incident and variable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    , transportation is a heavy user of society's time and energy resources. Sustainability measures, also described. SUSTAINABILITY MEASURES The concept of sustainability is becoming more important in trans- portation systems Sustainability Transportation is a major contributor to urban air pollution through vehicle emissions (1). Road

  10. Energy use in ground transportation. Final report, June-December 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karlin, A.; Riviera, A.; McDonald, M.; Turner, D.; Stickler, J.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation systems account for approximately twenty-five percent of the country's total energy consumption. Such a large fraction on the Nation's energy resources has prompted increased awareness of the role which transportation technology plays in the area of energy consumption. Of the different transportation modes, automobiles and trucks combine to consume approximately three-quarters of all transportation energy as of 1980. The report stresses that the importance of technologies aimed at reducing these large expenditures of our Nation's resources cannot be minimized.

  11. Improving Efficiency and Equity in Transportation Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, Michael

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fueling Transportation Finance. ” Ian W. H. Parry andFueling Transportation Finance. ” Transportation ResearchFueling Transportation Finance: A Primer on the Gas Tax •

  12. Sandia Energy - Transportation Energy Systems Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Energy Systems Analysis Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Transportation Energy Systems Analysis Transportation Energy Systems AnalysisTara...

  13. Shear flow effects on ion thermal transport in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tajima, T.; Horton, W.; Dong, J.Q. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Institute for Fusion Studies; Kishimoto, Y. [JAERI (Japan). Naka Fusion Research

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From various laboratory and numerical experiments, there is clear evidence that under certain conditions the presence of sheared flows in a tokamak plasma can significantly reduce the ion thermal transport. In the presence of plasma fluctuations driven by the ion temperature gradient, the flows of energy and momentum parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field are coupled with each other. This coupling manifests itself as significant off-diagonal coupling coefficients that give rise to new terms for anomalous transport. The authors derive from the gyrokinetic equation a set of velocity moment equations that describe the interaction among plasma turbulent fluctuations, the temperature gradient, the toroidal velocity shear, and the poloidal flow in a tokamak plasma. Four coupled equations for the amplitudes of the state variables radially extended over the transport region by toroidicity induced coupling are derived. The equations show bifurcations from the low confinement mode without sheared flows to high confinement mode with substantially reduced transport due to strong shear flows. Also discussed is the reduced version with three state variables. In the presence of sheared flows, the radially extended coupled toroidal modes driven by the ion temperature gradient disintegrate into smaller, less elongated vortices. Such a transition to smaller spatial correlation lengths changes the transport from Bohm-like to gyrobohm-like. The properties of these equations are analyzed. The conditions for the improved confined regime are obtained as a function of the momentum-energy deposition rates and profiles. The appearance of a transport barrier is a consequence of the present theory.

  14. Reducing the environmental impacts of intermodal transportation: a multi-criteria analysis based on ELECTRE and AHP methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Reducing the environmental impacts of intermodal transportation: a multi-criteria analysis on a case of freight transport between Paris and Marseille. Keywords: Supply chain, Environmental impacts with lower environmental impacts, such as rail and waterways. The dilemma here is that all motorized modes

  15. Edge Profile Stiffness and Insensitivity of the Density Pedestal to Neutral Fueling in Alcator C-Mod Edge Transport Barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Jerry

    are associated with edge transport barrier (ETB) formation in tokamaks, are investigated on Alcator C little effect on density gradient scale lengths in the ETB and a relatively weak impact on the height-mode) regime [3] is the result of a strong edge transport barrier (ETB), evinced by localized regions

  16. Transportation activity analysis using smartphones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Yu

    Transportation activity surveys investigate when, where and how people travel in urban areas to provide information necessary for urban transportation planning. In Singapore, the Land Transport Authority (LTA) carries out ...

  17. Mirror Modes in the Heliosheath

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsurutani, B. T. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Calif. Inst. Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); Guarnieri, F. L. [UNIVAP, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Echer, E. E. [INPE, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Lakhina, G. S. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai (India); Verkhoglyadova, O. P. [CSPAR, Univ. Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States)

    2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Mirror mode (MM) structures are identified in the Voyager 1 heliosheath magnetic field data. Their characteristics are: (1) quasiperiodic structures with a typical scale size of {approx}57 {rho}{sub p}(proton gyroradii), (2) little or no angular changes across the structures ({approx}3 deg. longitude and {approx}3 deg. latitude), and (3) a lack of sharp boundaries at the magnetic dip edges. It is proposed that the pickup of interstellar neutrals in the upstream region of the termination shock (TS) is the likely cause of MM instability during intervals when the IMF is nearly orthogonal to the solar wind flow direction. Concomitant (quasiperpendicular) shock compression of the MM structures at the TS and additional injection of pickup ions (PUIs) throughout the heliosheath will enhance MM growth.

  18. Symmetry breaking patterns and collective modes of spin-one color superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomas Brauner; Jin-yi Pang; Qun Wang

    2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Spin-one color superconductor is a viable candidate phase of dense matter in the interiors of compact stars. Its low-energy excitations will influence the transport properties of such matter and thus have impact on late-stage evolution of neutron stars. It also provides a good example of spontaneous symmetry breaking with rich breaking patterns. In this contribution, we reanalyze the phase diagram of a spin-one color superconductor and point out that a part of it is occupied by noninert states, which have been neglected in literature so far. We classify the collective Nambu--Goldstone modes, which are essential to the transport phenomena.

  19. 2040 Transportation Policy Plan Conversion to Performance Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    and cost-effective and encourage investments to include appropriate provisions for bicycle and pedestrian · Investment Plan · Performance Measures/Targets #12;4 TPP Elements ­ Goals · Goals are broad statements · Leveraging Transportation Investment to Guide Land Use #12;5 · Sample Goals · Transportation System

  20. Notes 07. Thermal analysis of finite length journal bearings including fluid inertia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and holes), multiple pads with mechanical preloads to enhance their load capacity and stability. The analysis includes the evaluation of the film mean temperature field from an energy transport equation. The film temperature affects the viscosity... of typical cylindrical journal bearings comprised of a journal rotating with angular speed (?) and a bearing with one or more arcuate pads. A film of lubricant fills the gap between the bearing and its journal. Journal center dislacements (eX, eY) refer...

  1. Plasma confinement theory and transport simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, D.W.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives continue to be: (1) to advance the transport studies of tokamaks, including development and maintenance of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Database, and (2) to provide theoretical interpretation, modeling and equilibrium and stability for TEXT-Upgrade. Recent publications and reports, and conference presentations of the Fusion Research Center theory group are listed.

  2. Heavy duty transport research needs assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of the desire to decrease the dependence of the US on foreign petroleum as a transportation fuel, this report assesses the research needs to further develop heavy duty engines. The topics covered include diesel engines, alternative fuels, electric vehicle technology, gas turbine engines, and stirling cycle alternative engines. (GHH)

  3. Transport in Dynamical Astronomy and Multibody Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koon, Wang Sang

    from chemistry to the transport of Mars impact ejecta underlines this point (Jaff´e, Ross, Lo et al and broad-based; they may be applied to diverse areas of study, including fluid mixing (Rom-Kedar, Leonard]; Lekien, Coulliette, and Marsden [2003]), N-body problems in physical chemistry (Jaff´e, Farrelly

  4. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was carried out on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} to investigate oxygen deficiency ({delta}) of the sample. The TGA was performed in a controlled atmosphere using oxygen, argon, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with adjustable gas flow rates. In this experiment, the weight loss and gain of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} was directly measured by TGA. The weight change of the sample was evaluated at between 600 and 1250 C in air or 1000 C as a function of oxygen partial pressure. The oxygen deficiencies calculated from TGA data as a function of oxygen activity and temperature will be estimated and compared with that from neutron diffraction measurement in air. The LSFT and LSFT/CGO membranes were fabricated from the powder obtained from Praxair Specialty Ceramics. The sintered membranes were subjected to microstructure analysis and hardness analysis. The LSFT membrane is composed of fine grains with two kinds of grain morphology. The grain size distribution was characterized using image analysis. In LSFT/CGO membrane a lot of grain pullout was observed from the less dense, porous phase. The hardness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes were studied at various loads. The hardness values obtained from the cross section of the membranes were also compared to that of the values obtained from the surface. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. Measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} as a function of temperature an oxygen partial pressure are reported. Further analysis of the dilatometry data obtained previously is presented. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  5. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, in situ neutron diffraction was used to characterize the chemical and structural properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} (here after as L2SF55T) specimen, which was subject to measurements of neutron diffraction from room temperature to 900 C in N{sub 2}. Space group of R3c was found to result in a better refinement and is used in this study. The difference for crystal structure, lattice parameters and local crystal chemistry for LSFT nearly unchanged when gas environment switched from air to N{sub 2}. Stable crack growth studies on Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were done at room temperature in air. A bridge-compression fixture was fabricated to achieve stable pre-cracks from Vickers indents. Post fracture evaluation indicated stable crack growth from the indent and a regime of fast fracture. Post-fracture X-ray data of the OTM fractured at 1000 C in environment were refined by FullProf code and results indicate a distortion of the parent cubic perovskite to orthorhombic structure with reduced symmetry. TGA-DTA studies on the post-fracture samples also indicated residual effect arising from the thermal and stress history of the samples. The thermal and chemical expansion of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} were studied at 800 {le} T {le} 1000 C and at {approx} 1 x 10{sup -15} {le} pO{sub 2} {le} 0.21 atm. The thermal expansion coefficient of the sample was calculated from the dilatometric analysis in the temperature range between room temperature and 1200 C in air. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  6. Transportation Economic Assistance Program (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Transportation Economic Assistance Program provides state grants to private business and local governments to improve transportation to projects improving economic conditions and creating or...

  7. Transportation Resources | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Resources The following means of transportation are available for getting to Argonne. Airports Argonne is located within 25 miles of two major Chicago airports:...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Transportation Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E. Coli Bacteria Engineered to Eat Switchgrass and Make Transportation Fuels On December 7, 2011, in Energy, JBEI, News, Renewable Energy, Transportation Energy A milestone has...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Transportation Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JBEI, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Systems Analysis, Transportation Energy Biofuels hold great promise for the future of transportation energy, but...

  10. Subsurface Flow and Transport | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subsurface related to contaminant transport, carbon cycling, enhanced oil recovery and carbon dioxide sequestration. See a complete list of Subsurface Flow and Transport...

  11. Superconnections and Parallel Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumitrescu, Florin

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note addresses the construction of a notion of parallel transport along superpaths arising from the concept of a superconnection on a vector bundle over a manifold $M$. A superpath in $M$ is, loosely speaking, a path in $M$ together with an odd vector field in $M$ along the path. We also develop a notion of parallel transport associated with a connection (a.k.a. covariant derivative) on a vector bundle over a \\emph{supermanifold} which is a direct generalization of the classical notion of parallel transport for connections over manifolds.

  12. Alternatives to traditional transportation fuels: An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the first compilation by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of information on alternatives to gasoline and diesel fuel. The purpose of the report is: (1) to provide background information on alternative transportation fuels and replacement fuels compared with gasoline and diesel fuel, and (2) to furnish preliminary estimates of alternative transportation fuels and alternative fueled vehicles as required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), Title V, Section 503, ``Replacement Fuel Demand Estimates and Supply Information.`` Specifically, Section 503 requires the EIA to report annually on: (1) the number and type of alternative fueled vehicles in existence the previous year and expected to be in use the following year, (2) the geographic distribution of these vehicles, (3) the amounts and types of replacement fuels consumed, and (4) the greenhouse gas emissions likely to result from replacement fuel use. Alternative fueled vehicles are defined in this report as motorized vehicles licensed for on-road use, which may consume alternative transportation fuels. (Alternative fueled vehicles may use either an alternative transportation fuel or a replacement fuel.) The intended audience for the first section of this report includes the Secretary of Energy, the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the automobile manufacturing industry, the transportation fuel manufacturing and distribution industries, and the general public. The second section is designed primarily for persons desiring a more technical explanation of and background for the issues surrounding alternative transportation fuels.

  13. Transportation needs assessment: Emergency response section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transportation impacts of moving high level nuclear waste (HLNW) to a repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada are of concern to the residents of the State as well as to the residents of other states through which the nuclear wastes might be transported. The projected volume of the waste suggests that shipments will occur on a daily basis for some period of time. This will increase the risk of accidents, including a catastrophic incident. Furthermore, as the likelihood of repository construction and operation and waste shipments increase, so will the attention given by the national media. This document is not to be construed as a willingness to accept the HLNW repository on the part of the State. Rather it is an initial step in ensuring that the safety and well-being of Nevada residents and visitors and the State`s economy will be adequately addressed in federal decision-making pertaining to the transportation of HLNW into and across Nevada for disposal in the proposed repository. The Preferred Transportation System Needs Assessment identifies critical system design elements and technical and social issues that must be considered in conducting a comprehensive transportation impact analysis. Development of the needs assessment and the impact analysis is especially complex because of the absence of information and experience with shipping HLNW and because of the ``low probability, high consequence`` aspect of the transportation risk.

  14. Engine including hydraulically actuated valvetrain and method of valve overlap control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cowgill, Joel (White Lake, MI)

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An exhaust valve control method may include displacing an exhaust valve in communication with the combustion chamber of an engine to an open position using a hydraulic exhaust valve actuation system and returning the exhaust valve to a closed position using the hydraulic exhaust valve actuation assembly. During closing, the exhaust valve may be displaced for a first duration from the open position to an intermediate closing position at a first velocity by operating the hydraulic exhaust valve actuation assembly in a first mode. The exhaust valve may be displaced for a second duration greater than the first duration from the intermediate closing position to a fully closed position at a second velocity at least eighty percent less than the first velocity by operating the hydraulic exhaust valve actuation assembly in a second mode.

  15. Wind motor applications for transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lysenko, G.P.; Grigoriev, B.V.; Karpin, K.B. [Moscow Aviation Inst. (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Motion equation for a vehicle equipped with a wind motor allows, taking into account the drag coefficients, to determine the optimal wind drag velocity in the wind motor`s plane, and hence, obtain all the necessary data for the wind wheel blades geometrical parameters definition. This optimal drag velocity significantly differs from the flow drag velocity which determines the maximum wind motor power. Solution of the motion equation with low drag coefficients indicates that the vehicle speed against the wind may be twice as the wind speed. One of possible transportation wind motor applications is its use on various ships. A ship with such a wind motor may be substantially easier to steer, and if certain devices are available, may proceed in autonomous control mode. Besides, it is capable of moving within narrow fairways. The cruise speed of a sailing boat and wind-motored ship were compared provided that the wind velocity direction changes along a harmonic law with regard to the motion direction. Mean dimensionless speed of the wind-motored ship appears to be by 20--25% higher than that of a sailing boat. There was analyzed a possibility of using the wind motors on planet rovers in Mars or Venus atmospheric conditions. A Mars rover power and motor system has been assessed for the power level of 3 kW.

  16. Tensor B mode and stochastic Faraday mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massimo Giovannini

    2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the Faraday effect as a different source of B mode polarization. The E mode polarization is Faraday rotated provided a stochastic large-scale magnetic field is present prior to photon decoupling. In the first part of the paper we discuss the case where the tensor modes of the geometry are absent and we argue that the B mode recently detected by the Bicep2 collaboration cannot be explained by a large-scale magnetic field rotating, through the Faraday effect, the well established E mode polarization. In this case, the observed temperature autocorrelations would be excessively distorted by the magnetic field. In the second part of the paper the formation of Faraday rotation is treated as a stationary, random and Markovian process with the aim of generalizing a set of scaling laws originally derived in the absence of the tensor modes of the geometry. We show that the scalar, vector and tensor modes of the brightness perturbations can all be Faraday rotated even if the vector and tensor parts of the effect have been neglected, so far, by focussing the attention on the scalar aspects of the problem. The mixing between the power spectra of the E mode and B mode polarizations involves a unitary transformation depending nonlinearly on the Faraday rotation rate. The present approach is suitable for a general scrutiny of the polarization observables and of their frequency dependence.

  17. Transportation 2035 Longview Metropolitan Transportation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longview Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Owen, MPO Director Melissa Bechtold, Transportation Planner Nalora Moser, Planning Technician MPO TECHNICAL COMMITTEE Karen Owen, City of Longview Fred Marquez, TXDOT-Austin Dale Spitz, TXDOT-Tyler District Debbie Sadler, City of White... Oak Will Buskell, TXDOT-Longview Area Rea Donna Jones, TXDOT-Atlanta District Margie McAllister, TCEQ-Austin Randy Redmond, TXDOT-Tyler District John Paul Jones, Harrison County Keith Bonds, City of Longview Steve Juneau, TXDOT-Marshall...

  18. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation Secure Data Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReportTransmissionResearchNewsTransportation

  19. Simulation of Non-resonant Internal Kink Mode with Toroidal Rotation in NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Guoyong

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasmas in spherical and conventional tokamaks, with weakly reversed shear q pro le and minimum q above but close to unity, are susceptible to an non-resonant (m, n ) = (1, 1) internal kink mode. This mode can saturate and persist and can induce a (2; 1) seed island for Neoclassical Tearing Mode (NTMs)1 . The mode can also lead to large energetic particle transport and signi cant broadening of beam-driven current. Motivated by these important e ects, we have carried out extensive nonlinear simulations of the mode with nite toroidal rotation using parameters and pro les of an NTSX plasma with a weakly reversed shear pro le. The numerical results show that, at the experimental level, plasma rotation has little e ect on either equilibrium or linear stability. However, rotation can signi cantly inuence the nonlinear dynamics of the (1, 1) mode and the the induced (2, 1) magnetic island. The simulation results show that a rotating helical equilibrium is formed and maintained in the nonlinear phase at nite plasma rotation. In contrast, for non-rotating cases, the nonlinear evolution exhibits dynamic oscillations between a quasi-2D state and a helical state. Furthermore, the e ects of rotation are found to greatly suppress the (2, 1) magnetic island even at a low level.

  20. PBA Transportation Websites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PBA Transportation Websites presented to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

  1. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be generated from coal and nuclear energy in contrast to 7%in the use of coal and nuclear energy for transportation andparticularly for coal and nuclear energy utilization, would

  2. Atmospheric Transport of Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, T.V.

    2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations is to provide estimates of concentration and surface deposition from routine and accidental releases of pollutants to the atmosphere. This paper discusses this topic.

  3. Clean Transportation Internship Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clean Transportation Internship Description The NC Solar Center at North Carolina State University to other ongoing projects by focusing on time-sensitive tasks. While the main thrust of this internship

  4. Alternative Fuel Transportation Program

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    federal register Monday May 17, 1999 Part II Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 10 CFR Part 490 Alternative Fuel Transportation Program; P-series...

  5. Accident resistant transport container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andersen, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Cole, James K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  6. Zero-mode clad waveguides for performing spectroscopy with confined effective observation volumes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levene, Michael J.; Korlach, Jonas; Turner, Stephen W.; Craighead, Harold G.; Webb, Watt W.

    2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a method and an apparatus for analysis of an analyte. The method involves providing a zero-mode waveguide which includes a cladding surrounding a core where the cladding is configured to preclude propagation of electromagnetic energy of a frequency less than a cutoff frequency longitudinally through the core of the zero-mode waveguide. The analyte is positioned in the core of the zero-mode waveguide and is then subjected, in the core of the zero-mode waveguide, to activating electromagnetic radiation of a frequency less than the cut-off frequency under conditions effective to permit analysis of the analyte in an effective observation volume which is more compact than if the analysis were carried out in the absence of the zero-mode waveguide.

  7. Integrated System for Retrieval, Transportation and Consolidated Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel in the US - 13312

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bracey, William; Bondre, Jayant; Shelton, Catherine [Transnuclear, Inc., 7135 Minstrel Way Suite 300, Columbia MD 21045 (United States)] [Transnuclear, Inc., 7135 Minstrel Way Suite 300, Columbia MD 21045 (United States); Edmonds, Robert [AREVA Federal Services, 7207 IBM Drive, Charlotte NC 28262 (United States)] [AREVA Federal Services, 7207 IBM Drive, Charlotte NC 28262 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current inventory of used nuclear fuel assemblies (UNFAs) from commercial reactor operations in the United States totals approximately 65,000 metric tons or approximately 232,000 UNFAs primarily stored at the 104 operational reactors in the US and a small number of decommissioned reactors. This inventory is growing at a rate of roughly 2,000 to 2,400 metric tons each year, (Approx. 7,000 UNFAs) as a result of ongoing commercial reactor operations. Assuming an average of 10 metric tons per storage/transportation casks, this inventory of commercial UNFAs represents about 6,500 casks with an additional of about 220 casks every year. In January 2010, the Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) [1] was directed to conduct a comprehensive review of policies for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle and recommend a new plan. The BRC issued their final recommendations in January 2012. One of the main recommendations is for the United States to proceed promptly to develop one or more consolidated storage facilities (CSF) as part of an integrated, comprehensive plan for safely managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Based on its extensive experience in storage and transportation cask design, analysis, licensing, fabrication, and operations including transportation logistics, Transnuclear, Inc. (TN), an AREVA Subsidiary within the Logistics Business Unit, is engineering an integrated system that will address the complete process of commercial UNFA management. The system will deal with UNFAs in their current storage mode in various configurations, the preparation including handling and additional packaging where required and transportation of UNFAs to a CSF site, and subsequent storage, operation and maintenance at the CSF with eventual transportation to a future repository or recycling site. It is essential to proceed by steps to ensure that the system will be the most efficient and serve at best its purpose by defining: the problem to be resolved, the criteria to evaluate the solutions, and the alternative solutions. The complexity of the project is increasing with time (more fuel assemblies, new storage systems, deteriorating logistics infrastructure at some sites, etc.) but with the uncertainty on the final disposal path, flexibility and simplicity will be critical. (authors)

  8. B. TRANSPORTATION, CIRCULATION AND PARKING B. TRANSPORTATION, CIRCULATION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullins, Dyche

    B. TRANSPORTATION, CIRCULATION AND PARKING 231 B. TRANSPORTATION, CIRCULATION AND PARKING on transportation and connectivity issues common to UCSF as a whole. Please refer to Chapter 5, Plans for Existing characteristics specific to each individual UCSF site. DETERMINANTS OF THE 1996 LRDP The transportation

  9. Metropolitan Transportation Plan 2035

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyler Area Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Adopted by the Tyler Area MPO Policy Committee December 4, 2009 METROPOLITAN TRANSPORTATION PLAN 2035 Revised April 22, 2010 Adopted by the Tyler Area MPO Policy Committee December 4, 2009 Amended/Revised April 22, 2010 Prepared by: Bucher..., Willis, and Ratliff Corporation 1828 East Southeast Loop 323, Suite 202 Tyler, Texas 75701 903.581.7844 This Document Serves as an Update to the Tyler Area Metropolitan Transportation Plan 2030. Portions of that Document were Unchanged and Appear...

  10. Thermoelectric transport in superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinecke, T.L.; Broido, D.A.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermoelectric transport properties of superlattices have been studied using an exact solution of the Boltzmann equation. The role of heat transport along the barrier layers, of carrier tunneling through the barriers, of valley degeneracy and of the well width and energy dependences of the carrier-phonon scattering rates on the thermoelectric figure of merit are given. Calculations are given for Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and for PbTe, and the results of recent experiments are discussed.

  11. Interactive Transportable Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver Irschitz; Priam Givord; Newyork Exit Newyork; Flavia Sparacino

    Transportable architecture which embeds the means to communicate with real or imaginary digital information spaces in a natural fashion offers unprecedented opportunities to make multimedia experiences available to the public almost everywhere. This installation demonstrates an example of interactive transportable architecture which incorporates unencumebered real-time body tracking and gesture recognition to explore a 3-D cityscape and a brain-like web-based information space.

  12. Campus Village Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, Emmanuel

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Emmanuel Hernandez THE CAMPUS V ILLAGE : TRANSPORTATION Objective The Campus Village is a new community being constructed in northwest Lawrence with a intergenerational focus in mind. The site will be equipped with housing for students, athletes..., retirement community members, and families. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the city’s current transportation network and make recommendations on that network to better accommodate the needs of the new property. Specifically, the goal...

  13. Regional Transportation Coordination Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden Crescent Regional Planning Commission

    Committee for this study. ? Develop a coordination public transportation plan ? Identify resources required to develop the plan ? Provide policy guidance to lead the planning and coordination effort Golden Crescent Regional Transit 1... of Texas. This resource will be relied upon for further development of the Intermodal Transportation Terminal. ? FTA Section 5309 (Bus) Discretionary Support ? To assist in meeting the GCRPC?s capital replacement needs. This resource...

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Aerosol Transport and Deposition Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Yingjie

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, various aerosol particle transport and deposition mechanisms were studied through the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, including inertial impaction, gravitational effect, lift force, interception, and turbophoresis, within...

  15. Nanoscale transport of phonons: Dimensionality, subdiffusion, molecular damping, and interference effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walczak, Kamil; Yerkes, Kirk L. [Aerospace Systems Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine heat transport carried by acoustic phonons in the systems composed of nanoscale chains of masses coupled to two thermal baths of different temperatures. Thermal conductance is obtained by using linearized Landauer-type formula for heat flux with phonon transmission probability calculated within atomistic Green's functions (AGF) method. AGF formalism is extended onto dissipative chains of masses with harmonic coupling beyond nearest-neighbor approximation, while atomistic description of heat reservoirs is also included into computational scheme. In particular, the phonon lifetimes and the phonon frequency shifts are discussed for harmonic lattices of different dimensions. Further, resonant structure of phonon transmission spectrum is analyzed with respect to reservoir-induced effects, molecular damping, and mass-to-mass harmonic coupling. Analysis of transmission zeros (antiresonances) and their accompanied Fano-shape resonances are discussed as a result of interference effects between different vibrational modes. Finally, we also predict subdiffusive transport regime for low-frequency ballistic phonons propagated along a linear chain of harmonically coupled masses.

  16. Mode I - mode II delamination fractrue toughness of a unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderkley, Peter Stephen

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MODE I - MODE II DELAMINATION FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF A UNIDIRECTIONAL GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITE A Thesis by PETER STEPHEN VANDERKLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Demember 1981 Najor Subject: Mechanical Engineering MODE I - MODE II DELAMINATION FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF A UNIDIRECTIONAL GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITE A Thesis by PETER STEPHEN VANDERKLEY Approved as to style and content by...

  17. PCR detection of groundwater bacteria associated with colloidal transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruz-Perez, P.; Stetzenbach, L.D.; Alvarez, A.J.

    1996-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Colloidal transport may increase the amount of contaminant material than that which could be transported by water flow alone. The role of colloids in groundwater contaminant transport is complicated and may involve many different processes, including sorption of elements onto colloidal particles, coagulation/dissolution, adsorption onto solid surfaces, filtration, and migration. Bacteria are known to concentrate minerals and influence the transport of compounds in aqueous environments and may also serve as organic colloids, thereby influencing subsurface transport of radionuclides and other contaminants. The initial phase of the project consisted of assembling a list of bacteria capable of sequestering or facilitating mineral transport. The development and optimization of the PCR amplification assay for the detection of the organisms of interest, and the examination of regional groundwaters for those organisms, are presented for subsequent research.

  18. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transport trailer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ard, K.E.; King, D.A.; Leigh, H.; Satoh, J.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, MSIN N1-25, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System, designated as System 100, comprises four major systems. The four major systems are designated as the Packaging System (System 120), Trailer System (System 140), Operations and Ancillary Equipment System (System 160), and Shipping and Receiving Facility Transport System (System 180). Packaging System (System 120), including the RTG packaging is licensed (regulatory) hardware; it is certified by the U.S. Department of Energy to be in accordance with Title 10, {ital Code} {ital of} {ital Federal} {ital Regulations}, Part 71 (10 CFR 71). System 140, System 160, and System 180 are nonlicensed (nonregulatory) hardware. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  19. Normalizable fermion modes in a holographic superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven S. Gubser; Fabio D. Rocha; Pedro Talavera

    2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider fermions in a zero-temperature superconducting anti-de Sitter domain wall solution and find continuous bands of normal modes. These bands can be either partially filled or totally empty and gapped. We present a semi-classical argument which approximately captures the main features of the normal mode spectrum.

  20. Theory of longitudinal modes in semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, K.Y.; Yariv, A.

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A theory of longitudinal mode lasing spectrum of semiconductor lasers is developed which takes into account the nonuniform carrier and photon distributions and local gain spectrum shifts inside lasers with low end mirror reflectivities. The theory gives results consistent with observed longitudinal mode behavior in lasers with reduced facet reflectivity.

  1. Broadband frequency mode entanglement in waveguided PDC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckstein, Andreas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the observation of beatings of the coincidence event rate in a Hong-Ou-Mandel interference (HOMI) between signal and idler photons from a parametric downconversion process inside a multi-mode KTP waveguide. As explanation we introduce bi-photonic states entangled in their broadband frequency modes and propose a suitable entanglement witness.

  2. Nonlinear mode coupling in rotating stars and the r-mode instability in neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Katrin Schenk; Phil Arras; Eanna E. Flanagan; Saul A. Teukolsky; Ira Wasserman

    2001-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop the formalism required to study the nonlinear interaction of modes in rotating Newtonian stars in the weakly nonlinear regime. The formalism simplifies and extends previous treatments. At linear order, we elucidate and extend slightly a formalism due to Schutz, show how to decompose a general motion of a rotating star into a sum over modes, and obtain uncoupled equations of motion for the mode amplitudes under the influence of an external force. Nonlinear effects are added perturbatively via three-mode couplings. We describe a new, efficient way to compute the coupling coefficients, to zeroth order in the stellar rotation rate, using spin-weighted spherical harmonics. We apply this formalism to derive some properties of the coupling coefficients relevant to the nonlinear interactions of unstable r-modes in neutron stars, postponing numerical integrations of the coupled equations of motion to a later paper. From an astrophysical viewpoint, the most interesting result of this paper is that many couplings of r-modes to other rotational modes (modes with zero frequencies in the non-rotating limit) are small: either they vanish altogether because of various selection rules, or they vanish to lowest order in the angular velocity. In zero-buoyancy stars, the coupling of three r-modes is forbidden entirely and the coupling of two r-modes to one hybrid rotational mode vanishes to zeroth order in rotation frequency. In incompressible stars, the coupling of any three rotational modes vanishes to zeroth order in rotation frequency.

  3. Differential rotation of the unstable nonlinear r-modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, John L; Lockitch, Keith H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At second order in perturbation theory, the $r$-modes of uniformly rotating stars include an axisymmetric part that can be identified with differential rotation of the background star. If one does not include radiation-reaction, the differential rotation is constant in time and has been computed by S\\'a. It has a gauge dependence associated with the family of time-independent perturbations that add differential rotation to the unperturbed equilibrium star: For stars with a barotropic equation of state, one can add to the time-independent second-order solution arbitrary differential rotation that is stratified on cylinders (that is a function of distance $\\varpi$ to the axis of rotation). We show here that the gravitational radiation-reaction force that drives the $r$-mode instability removes this gauge freedom: The expontially growing differential rotation of the unstable second-order $r$-mode is unique. We derive a general expression for this rotation law for Newtonian models and evaluate it explicitly for s...

  4. Dark matter transport properties and rapidly rotating neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. J. Horowitz

    2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron stars are attractive places to look for dark matter because their high densities allow repeated interactions. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) may scatter efficiently in the core or in the crust of a neutron star. In this paper we focus on WIMP contributions to transport properties, such as shear viscosity or thermal conductivity, because these can be greatly enhanced by long mean free paths. We speculate that WIMPs increase the shear viscosity of neutron star matter and help stabilize r-mode oscillations. These are collective oscillations where the restoring force is the Coriolis force. At present r-modes are thought to be unstable in many observed rapidly rotating stars. If WIMPs stabilize the r-modes, this would allow neutron stars to spin rapidly. This likely requires WIMP-nucleon cross sections near present experimental limits and an appropriate density of WIMPs in neutron stars.

  5. Handbook of high-level radioactive waste transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sattler, L.R.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Handbook serves as a reference to which state officials and members of the general public may turn for information on radioactive waste transportation and on the federal government`s system for transporting this waste under the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The Handbook condenses and updates information contained in the Midwestern High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer. It is intended primarily to assist legislators who, in the future, may be called upon to enact legislation pertaining to the transportation of radioactive waste through their jurisdictions. The Handbook is divided into two sections. The first section places the federal government`s program for transporting radioactive waste in context. It provides background information on nuclear waste production in the United States and traces the emergence of federal policy for disposing of radioactive waste. The second section covers the history of radioactive waste transportation; summarizes major pieces of legislation pertaining to the transportation of radioactive waste; and provides an overview of the radioactive waste transportation program developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). To supplement this information, a summary of pertinent federal and state legislation and a glossary of terms are included as appendices, as is a list of publications produced by the Midwestern Office of The Council of State Governments (CSG-MW) as part of the Midwestern High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Project.

  6. Texas Transportation Poll Final report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Transportation Poll Final report PRC 14-16-F #12;2 Texas Transportation Poll Texas A&M Transportation Institute PRC 14-16-F September 2014 Authors Chris Simek Tina Geiselbrecht #12;3 Table of Contents .......................................................................................................................... 8 Transportation Funding

  7. Transportation Systems Engineering GRADUATE STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuhang

    Transportation Systems Engineering GRADUATE STUDIES TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS are the building blocks and provides for an improved quality of life. However, transportation systems by their very nature also affect the environment through physical construction and operation of transportation facilities, and through the travel

  8. Energy Policy Act transportation rate study: Interim report on coal transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of this report is to examine changes in domestic coal distribution and railroad coal transportation rates since enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90). From 1988 through 1993, the demand for low-sulfur coal increased, as a the 1995 deadline for compliance with Phase 1 of CAAA90 approached. The shift toward low-sulfur coal came sooner than had been generally expected because many electric utilities switched early from high-sulfur coal to ``compliance`` (very low-sulfur) coal. They did so to accumulate emissions allowances that could be used to meet the stricter Phase 2 requirements. Thus, the demand for compliance coal increased the most. The report describes coal distribution and sulfur content, railroad coal transportation and transportation rates, and electric utility contract coal transportation trends from 1979 to 1993 including national trends, regional comparisons, distribution patterns and regional profiles. 14 figs., 76 tabs.

  9. Surface plasmon modes and the Casimir energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Intravaia; A. Lambrecht

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show the influence of surface plasmons on the Casimir effect between two plane parallel metallic mirrors at arbitrary distances. Using the plasma model to describe the optical response of the metal, we express the Casimir energy as a sum of contributions associated with evanescent surface plasmon modes and propagative cavity modes. In contrast to naive expectations, the plasmonic modes contribution is essential at all distances in order to ensure the correct result for the Casimir energy. One of the two plasmonic modes gives rise to a repulsive contribution, balancing out the attractive contributions from propagating cavity modes, while both contributions taken separately are much larger than the actual value of the Casimir energy. This also suggests possibilities to tailor the sign of the Casimir force via surface plasmons.

  10. Saturation of the R-mode Instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phil Arras; Eanna E. Flanagan; Sharon M. Morsink; A. Katrin Schenk; Saul A. Teukolsky; Ira Wasserman

    2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Rossby waves (r-modes) in rapidly rotating neutron stars are unstable because of the emission of gravitational radiation. We study saturation of this instability by nonlinear transfer of energy to stellar "inertial" oscillation modes. We present detailed calculations of stellar inertial modes in the WKB limit, their linear damping by bulk and shear viscosity, and the nonlinear coupling forces among these modes. The saturation amplitude is derived in the extreme limits of strong or weak driving by radiation reaction, as compared to the damping rate of low order inertial modes. We find the saturation energy is {\\it extremely small}, at least four orders of magnitude smaller than that found by previous investigators. We discuss the consequences of this result for spin evolution of young neutron stars, and neutron stars being spun up by accretion in Low Mass X-ray Binaries.We also discuss the detection of these gravitational waves by LIGO.

  11. Topological modes driven by Lyapunov control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. C. Shi; X. L. Zhao; X. X. Yi

    2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    By Lyapunov control, we present a proposal to drive quasiparticles into a topological mode in quantum systems described by quadratic Hamiltonian. The merit of this control strategy is that only manipulation of the boundary sites are required, and the proposal works for both Fermi and Bose systems. We take the Kitaev's chain as an illustration for Fermi system and show that by manipulating the chemical potential of the boundary sites, we can steer an arbitrary excitation mode into the Majorana zero mode. For Bose system, taking the noninteracting Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model as an example, we illustrate how to drive the system into the edge mode, i.e., the mode localized at the boundary sites. Finally, we explore the possibility to replace the continuous control field by square wave pulses.

  12. Nonclassicality in two-mode BEC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandip Kumar Giri; Biswajit Sen; C H Raymond Ooi; Anirban Pathak

    2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytic operator solution of a generalized quantum mechanical Hamiltonian of two-mode Bose Einstein condensates (BECs) is obtained and the same is used to investigate the nonclassical properties of the modes present in the system. Nonclassical characters are observed by means of single mode and intermodal squeezing, single mode and intermodal sub-Poissonian boson statistics and intermodal entanglement. In addition to the traditionally studied lower order nonclassical properties, signatures of higher order nonclassical characters of two-mode BEC systems are also obtained by investigating the possibility of higher order antibunching and higher order entanglement. The mutual relation among the observed nonclassicalities and their evolution (variation) with rescaled time and the ratio of the single boson tunneling amplitude ($\\varepsilon$) and the coupling constant for the intra-modal interaction ($\\kappa$) are also reported.

  13. NONLINEAR DEVELOPMENT OF THE R-MODE INSTABILITY AND THE MAXIMUM ROTATION RATE OF NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bondarescu, Ruxandra [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zurich, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Wasserman, Ira, E-mail: ruxandra@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: ira@astro.cornell.edu [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe how the nonlinear development of the R-mode instability of neutron stars influences spin up to millisecond periods via accretion. When nearly resonant interactions of the l = m = 2 R-mode with pairs of 'daughter modes' are included, the R-mode saturates at the lowest amplitude which leads to significant excitation of a pair of modes. The lower bound for this threshold amplitude is proportional to the damping rate of the particular daughter modes that are excited parametrically. We show that if dissipation occurs in a very thin boundary layer at the crust-core boundary, the R-mode saturation amplitude is too large for angular momentum gain from accretion to overcome loss to gravitational radiation. We find that lower dissipation is required to explain spin up to frequencies much higher than 300 Hz. We conjecture that if the transition from the fluid core to the crystalline crust occurs over a distance much longer than 1 cm, then a sharp viscous boundary layer fails to form. In this case, damping is due to shear viscosity dissipation integrated over the entire star. We estimate the lowest parametric instability threshold from first principles. The resulting saturation amplitude is low enough to permit spin up to higher frequencies. The requirement to allow continued spin up imposes an upper bound to the frequencies attained via accretion that plausibly may be about 750 Hz. Within this framework, the R-mode is unstable for all millisecond pulsars, whether accreting or not.

  14. Gyrokinetic simulations of mesoscale energetic particle-driven Alfvenic turbulent transport embedded in microturbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, E. M.; Waltz, R. E. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Energetic particle (EP) transport from local high-n toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs) and energetic particle modes (EPMs) is simulated with a gyrokinetic code. Linear and nonlinear simulations have identified a parameter range where the longwave TAE and EPM are unstable alongside the well-known ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) and trapped-electron-mode (TEM) instabilities. A new eigenvalue solver in GYRO facilitates this mode identification. States of nonlinearly saturated local TAE/EPM turbulent intensity are identified, showing a 'soft' transport threshold for enhanced energetic particle transport against the TAE/EPM drive from the EP pressure gradient. The very long-wavelength (mesoscale) TAE/EPM transport is saturated partially by nonlinear interaction with microturbulent ITG/TEM-driven zonal flows. Fixed-gradient-length, nonlinearly saturated states are accessible over a relatively narrow range of EP pressure gradient. Within this range, and in the local limit employed, TAE/EPM-driven transport more closely resembles drift-wave microturbulent transport than 'stiff' ideal MHD transport with a clamped critical total pressure gradient. At a higher, critical EP pressure gradient, fixed-gradient nonlinear saturation fails: EP transport increases without limit and background transport decreases. Presumably saturation is then obtained by relaxation of the EP pressure gradient to near this critical EP pressure gradient. If the background plasma gradients driving the ITG/TEM turbulence and zonal flows are weakened, the critical gradient collapses to the TAE/EPM linear stability threshold. Even at the critical EP pressure gradient there is no evidence that TAE/EPM instability significantly increases transport in the background plasma channels.

  15. Comprehensive energy transport scalings derived from DIII-D similarity experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petty, C.C.; Luce, T.C. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Baity, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dependences of heat transport on the dimensionless plasma physics parameters has been measured for both L-mode and H-mode plasmas on the DIII-D tokamak. Heat transport in L-mode plasmas has a gyroradius scaling that is gyro-Bohm-like for electrons and worse than Bohm-like for ions, with no measurable beta or collisionality dependence; this corresponds to having an energy confinement time that scales like {tau}{sub E} {proportional_to} n{sup 0.5}P{sup {minus}0.5}. H-mode plasmas have gyro-Bohm-like scaling of heat transport for both electrons and ions, weak beta scaling, and moderate collisionality scaling. In addition, H-mode plasmas have a strong safety factor scaling ({chi} {approximately} q{sup 2}) at all radii. Combining these four dimensionless parameter scalings together gives an energy confinement time scaling for H-mode plasmas like {tau}{sub E} {proportional_to} B{sup {minus}1}{rho}{sup {minus}3.15}{beta}{sup 0.03}v{sup {minus}0.42}q{sub 95}{sup {minus}1.43} {proportional_to} I{sup 0.84}B{sup 0.39}n{sup 0.18}P{sup {minus}0.41}L{sup 2.0}, which is similar to empirical scalings derived from global confinement databases.

  16. JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2001 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY of Transportation, Ontario Additions in 1996 Regional Municipalities of Niagara, Waterloo Counties of Peterborough not to participate) #12;JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2001 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY

  17. Director Position Center for Urban Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, Hüseyin

    Director Position Center for Urban Transportation The Center for Urban Transportation Research for state policymakers, transportation agencies, transportation professionals and the public. CUTR conducts of Transportation's Federal Transit Administration and Federal Highway Administration, the Florida Department

  18. Delaware Transportation Infrastructure Forum Problem Identification Statements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    2013 Delaware Transportation Infrastructure Forum Problem Identification Statements Sponsored by The Delaware Center for Transportation and the Delaware Department of Transportation Delaware Center for Transportation Your main resource for transportation education and research Identifying Important Issues Related

  19. Overview of Advanced Technology Transportation, 2005 Update. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnitt, R.; Eudy, L.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Document provides an overview of the transportation market in 2005. Areas covered include hybrid, fuel cell, hydrogen, and alternative fuel vehicles.

  20. 1.212J / ESD.221J An Introduction to Intelligent Transportation Systems, Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussman, Joseph

    Basic elements of intelligent transportation systems. Technological, systems, and institutional aspects of ITS considered, including system architecture, congestion pricing, public/private partnerships, network models, ITS ...

  1. A wide bandwidth free-electron laser with mode locking using current modulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kur, E.; Dunning, D. J.; McNeil, B. W. J.; Wurtele, J.; Zholents, A. A. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS)); (Univ. of California at Berkeley); (Univ. of Strathclyde); (STFC Daresbury Lab.); (LBNL)

    2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A new scheme for mode locking a free-electron laser amplifier is proposed based on electron beam current modulation. It is found that certain properties of the original concept, based on the energy modulation of electrons, are improved including the spectral brightness of the source and the purity of the series of short pulses. Numerical comparisons are made between the new and old schemes and between a mode-locked free-electron laser and self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser. Illustrative examples using a hypothetical mode-locked free-electron laser amplifier are provided. The ability to generate intense coherent radiation with a large bandwidth is demonstrated.

  2. Mode-locked solid state lasers using diode laser excitation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holtom, Gary R. (Boston, MA)

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A mode-locked laser employs a coupled-polarization scheme for efficient longitudinal pumping by reshaped laser diode bars. One or more dielectric polarizers are configured to reflect a pumping wavelength having a first polarization and to reflect a lasing wavelength having a second polarization. An asymmetric cavity provides relatively large beam spot sizes in gain medium to permit efficient coupling to a volume pumped by a laser diode bar. The cavity can include a collimation region with a controlled beam spot size for insertion of a saturable absorber and dispersion components. Beam spot size is selected to provide stable mode locking based on Kerr lensing. Pulse durations of less than 100 fs can be achieved in Yb:KGW.

  3. Present and Future Modes of Low Frequency Climate Variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cane, Mark A.

    2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This project addressed area (1) of the FOA, “Interaction of Climate Change and Low Frequency Modes of Natural Climate Variability”. Our overarching objective is to detect, describe and understand the changes in low frequency variability between model simulations of the preindustrial climate and simulations of a doubled CO2 climate. The deliverables are a set of papers providing a dynamical characterization of interannual, decadal, and multidecadal variability in coupled models with attention to the changes in this low frequency variability between pre-industrial concentrations of greenhouse gases and a doubling of atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The principle mode of analysis, singular vector decomposition, is designed to advance our physical, mechanistic understanding. This study will include external natural variability due to solar and volcanic aerosol variations as well as variability internal to the climate system. An important byproduct is a set of analysis tools for estimating global singular vector structures from the archived output of model simulations.

  4. GONG p-mode frequency changes with solar activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bhatnagar; Kiran Jain; S. C. Tripathy

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a correlation analysis of GONG p-mode frequencies with nine solar activity indices for the period 1995 August to 1997 August. This study includes spherical harmonic degree in the range 2 to 150 and the frequency range of 1500-3500 \\mu Hz. Using three statistical tests, the measured mean frequency shifts show strong to good correlation with activity indices. A decrease of 0.06 \\mu Hz in frequency, during the descending phase of solar cycle 22 and an increase of 0.04 \\mu Hz in the ascending phase of solar cycle 23 is observed. These results provide the first evidence for change in p-mode frequencies around the declining phase of solar cycle 22 and beginning of new cycle 23. This analysis further confirms that the temporal behaviour of the solar frequency shifts closely follow the phase of the solar activity cycle.

  5. Please fax to: 949 -824-9690 Attention: Tanya Zabalegui UCI Extension Airport Transportation Request

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford, Kyle

    Please fax to: 949 -824-9690 Attention: Tanya Zabalegui ­ UCI Extension Airport Transportation in the UC Irvine area and need transportation from the airport to your housing location, please readth , 2011. Destinations: We will provide transportation to your housing location including UC Irvine

  6. UCSB 2010 Transportation Study Prepared Spring 2010 in collaboration with the Chancellor's Campus Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akhmedov, Azer

    UCSB 2010 Transportation Study Prepared Spring 2010 in collaboration with the Chancellor's Campus transportation studies. The purposes of this report include: characterizing the commuting habits of UCSB of transportation; and helping estimate UCSB's scope 3 GHG emissions. Over time, consistent reporting of this data

  7. Selected Studies in Mountain Meteorology From Downslope Windstorms to Air Pollution Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gohm, Alexander

    and associated cold fronts, as well as local winds in valleys that cause air pollution transport. HighSelected Studies in Mountain Meteorology From Downslope Windstorms to Air Pollution Transport, including downslope windstorms and air pollution transport, they are all linked to mountain meteorology

  8. Efficient Transportation Decision Public Web Site: Bridging the Gap Between Transportation Planning and the Public

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roaza, Ruth

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for accomplishing transportation planning and projectprocess – the Efficient Transportation Decision Making (Process - is to make transportation decisions more quickly

  9. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; Thomas W. Eagar; Harold R. Larson; Raymundo Arroyave; X.-D Zhou; Y.-W. Shin; H.U. Anderson; Nigel Browning; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present quarterly report describes some of the initial studies on newer compositions and also includes newer approaches to address various materials issues such as in metal-ceramic sealing. The current quarter's research has also focused on developing a comprehensive reliability model for predicting the structural behavior of the membranes in realistic conditions. In parallel to industry provided compositions, models membranes have been evaluated in varying environment. Of importance is the behavior of flaws and generation of new flaws aiding in fracture. Fracture mechanics parameters such as crack tip stresses are generated to characterize the influence of environment. Room temperature slow crack growth studies have also been initiated in industry provided compositions. The electrical conductivity and defect chemistry of an A site deficient compound (La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}) was studied. A higher conductivity was observed for La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3} than that of La{sub 0.60}Sr{sub 0.40}FeO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.20}FeO{sub 3}. Defect chemistry analysis showed that it was primarily contributed by a higher carrier concentration in La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}. Moreover, the ability for oxygen vacancy generation is much higher in La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3} as well, which indicates a lower bonding strength between Fe-O and a possible higher catalytic activity for La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}. The program continued to investigate the thermodynamic properties (stability and phase separation behavior) and total conductivity of prototype membrane materials. The data are needed together with the kinetic information to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Previous report listed initial measurements on a sample of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-x} prepared in-house by Praxair. Subsequently, a second sample of powder from a larger batch of sample were characterized and compared with the results from the previous batch.

  10. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Andy L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Daily, William D.; Fink, James B.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Hoversten, Gary M.; Keller, Jason M.; Majer, Ernest L.; Murray, Christopher J.; White, Mark D.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    From FY 2000 through FY 2003, a series of vadose zone transport field experiments were conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Project, now known as the Remediation and Closure Science Project, and managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The series of experiments included two major field campaigns, one at a 299-E24-11 injection test site near PUREX and a second at a clastic dike site off Army Loop Road. The goals of these experiments were to improve our understanding of vadose zone transport processes; to develop data sets to validate and calibrate vadose zone flow and transport models; and to identify advanced monitoring techniques useful for evaluating flow-and-transport mechanisms and delineating contaminant plumes in the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. This report summarizes the key findings from the field studies and demonstrates how data collected from these studies are being used to improve conceptual models and develop numerical models of flow and transport in Hanford’s vadose zone. Results of these tests have led to a better understanding of the vadose zone. Fine-scale geologic heterogeneities, including grain fabric and lamination, were observed to have a strong effect on the large-scale behavior of contaminant plumes, primarily through increased lateral spreading resulting from anisotropy. Conceptual models have been updated to include lateral spreading and numerical models of unsaturated flow and transport have revised accordingly. A new robust model based on the concept of a connectivity tensor was developed to describe saturation-dependent anisotropy in strongly heterogeneous soils and has been incorporated into PNNL’s Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator. Application to field-scale transport problems have led to a better understanding plume behavior at a number of sites where lateral spreading may have dominated waste migration (e.g. BC Cribs and Trenches). The improved models have been also coupled with inverse models and newly-developed parameter scaling techniques to allow estimation of field-scale and effective transport parameters for the vadose zone. The development and utility of pedotransfer functions for describing fine-scale hydrogeochemical heterogeneity and for incorporating this heterogeneity into reactive transport models was explored. An approach based on grain-size statistics appears feasible and has been used to describe heterogeneity in hydraulic properties and sorption properties, such as the cation exchange capacity and the specific surface area of Hanford sediments. This work has also led to the development of inverse modeling capabilities for time-dependent, subsurface, reactive transport with transient flow fields using an automated optimization algorithm. In addition, a number of geophysical techniques investigated for their potential to provide detailed information on the subtle changes in lithology and bedding surfaces; plume delineation, leak detection. High-resolution resistivity is now being used for detecting saline plumes at several waste sites at Hanford, including tank farms. Results from the field studies and associated analysis have appeared in more than 46 publications generated over the past 4 years. These publications include test plans and status reports, in addition to numerous technical notes and peer reviewed papers.

  11. Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos A consortium led by the University of Michigan that includes LANL as...

  12. Predictions of the poloidal asymmetries and transport frequencies in KSTAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bae, C., E-mail: cbae@nfri.re.kr; Lee, S. G.; Terzolo, L. [National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)] [National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Stacey, W. M. [Fusion Research Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)] [Fusion Research Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The extended neoclassical rotation theory formulated in Miller flux surface geometry enables unprecedented neoclassical calculations of the poloidal asymmetries in density, rotation velocities, electrostatic potential along the flux surfaces, and of the inertial (Reynolds stress) and gyroviscous transport frequencies, which are strong functions of these asymmetries. This paper presents such calculations of the poloidal asymmetries and non-negligible inertial and gyroviscous transport frequencies in two KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) [Kwon et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 094006 (2011)] Neutral Beam Injection H-mode discharges. The in-out asymmetries in the velocities are an order of magnitude larger than their up-down asymmetries. The magnitudes of the predicted inertial and gyroviscous transport frequencies depend on the magnitudes of the density and velocity asymmetries. The neoclassically predicted density asymmetries are shown to correspond with the reported measurements in tokamaks and the predicted carbon toroidal velocities agree very well with the measurements in KSTAR.

  13. Intermodal Transportation, USACE Style

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grumski, K. M.; Coutts, P. W.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has developed project management techniques with a proven track record for safe and successful results for constructing large scale and massive projects such as improving our nations water transportation systems, flood control, bridges and dams. Applying many of these techniques to the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) managed by USACE to remediate the environment is achieving the same safe and successful results as their construction projects. This paper examines the additional economics and improved safety results of using intermodal containers and a combination of rail and truck transportation conveyances to transport the contaminated soil and debris from the Linde FUSRAP site, located in Tonawanda, New York.

  14. A Roadmap to Success: Hiring, Retaining, and Including People...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A Roadmap to Success: Hiring, Retaining, and Including People with Disabilities A Roadmap to Success: Hiring, Retaining, and Including People with Disabilities December 5, 2014...

  15. [Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and include the consumer exist. Some examples include advanced two-way metering (AMI), demand response (DR), and distributed energy resources (DER). A common misconception is...

  16. Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts Document describes...

  17. Investigations into the Nature of Halogen Bonding Including Symmetry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    into the Nature of Halogen Bonding Including Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory Analyses. Investigations into the Nature of Halogen Bonding Including Symmetry Adapted...

  18. MSIV leakage airborne iodine transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cline, J.E. (Cline Associates Inc., Rockville, MD (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gaseous iodine deposits on surfaces exposed to vapors. Basic chemical and physical principles predict this behavior, and several laboratory and in-plant measurements demonstrate the characteristic. An empirical model was developed that describes the deposition, resuspension, and transformation of airborne radioiodine molecular species as a stream containing these forms moves along its pathway. The model uses a data base of measured values of deposition and resuspension rates in its application and describes the conversion of the more reactive inorganic iodine species I[sub 2] to the less reactive organic species CH[sub 3]I as the iodine deposits and resuspends along the path. It also considers radioactive decay and chemical surface bonding during residence on surfaces. For the 8-day [sup 131]I, decay during the airborne portion of the transport is negligible. Verification of the model included measurement tests of long gaseous-activity sampling lines of different diameters, operated at different flow rates and stream temperatures. The model was applied to the streams at a boiling water reactor nuclear power plant to describe the transport through leaking main steam isolation valves (MSIVs), following a loss-of-coolant accident.

  19. Experimental constraints on transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luce, T.C.; Petty, K.H.; Burrell, K.H.; Forest, C.B.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R.J.; De Haas, J.C.M.; James, R.A.; Makowski, M.A.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of the cross-field energy transport in magnetic confinement experiments in a manner applicable to the accurate assessment of future machine performance continues to be a challenging goal. Experimental results from the DIII-D tokamak in the areas of dimensionless scaling and non-diffusive transport represent progress toward this goal. Dimensionless scaling shows how beneficial the increase in machine size and magnetic field is for future devices. The experiments on DIII-D are the first to determine separately the electron and ion scaling with normalized gyroradius {rho}{sub *}; the electrons scale as expected from gyro-Bohm class theories, while the ions scale consistent with the Goldston empirical scaling. This result predicts an increase in transport relative to Bohm diffusion as {rho}{sub *} decreases in future devices. The existence of distinct {rho}{sub *} scalings for ions and electrons cautions against a physical interpretation of one-fluid or global analysis. The second class of experiments reported here are the first to demonstrate the existence of non-diffusive energy transport. Electron cyclotron heating was applied at the half radius; the electron temperature profile remains substantially peaked. Power balance analysis indicates that heat must flow in the direction of increasing temperature, which is inconsistent with purely diffusive transport. The dynamics of electron temperature perturbations indicate the presence in the heat flux of a term dependent on temperature rather than its gradient. These two observations strongly constrain the types of models which can be applied to cross-field heat transport.

  20. Energy star compliant voice over internet protocol (VoIP) telecommunications network including energy star compliant VoIP devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kouchri, Farrokh Mohammadzadeh

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) communications system, a method of managing a communications network in such a system and a program product therefore. The system/network includes an ENERGY STAR (E-star) aware softswitch and E-star compliant communications devices at system endpoints. The E-star aware softswitch allows E-star compliant communications devices to enter and remain in power saving mode. The E-star aware softswitch spools messages and forwards only selected messages (e.g., calls) to the devices in power saving mode. When the E-star compliant communications devices exit power saving mode, the E-star aware softswitch forwards spooled messages.

  1. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of Travel Reduction and Efficient Driving on Transportation: Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; DeFlorio, J.; McKenzie, E.; Tao, W.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 1970s, numerous transportation strategies have been formulated to change the behavior of drivers or travelers by reducing trips, shifting travel to more efficient modes, or improving the efficiency of existing modes. This report summarizes findings documented in existing literature to identify strategies with the greatest potential impact. The estimated effects of implementing the most significant and aggressive individual driver behavior modification strategies range from less than 1% to a few percent reduction in transportation energy use and GHG emissions. Combined strategies result in reductions of 7% to 15% by 2030. Pricing, ridesharing, eco-driving, and speed limit reduction/enforcement strategies are widely judged to have the greatest estimated potential effect, but lack the widespread public acceptance needed to accomplish maximum results. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  2. Smart vehicular transportation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, C.Q.; Wilson, C.W.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work builds upon established Sandia intelligent systems technology to develop a unique approach for the integration of intelligent system control into the US Highway and urban transportation systems. The Sandia developed concept of the COPILOT controller integrates a human driver with computer control to increase human performance while reducing reliance on detailed driver attention. This research extends Sandia expertise in sensor based, real-time control of robotics systems to high speed transportation systems. Knowledge in the form of maps and performance characteristics of vehicles provides the automatic decision making intelligence needed to plan optimum routes, maintain safe driving speeds and distances, avoid collisions, and conserve fuel.

  3. Extending ACNET communication types to include multicast semantics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neswold, R.; King, C.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Fermilab's accelerator control system, multicast communication wasn't properly incorporated into ACNET's transport layer, nor in its programming API. We present some recent work that makes multicasts naturally fit in the ACNET network environment. We also show how these additions provide high-availability for ACNET services.

  4. Source depth for solar p-modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawan Kumar; Sarbani Basu

    2000-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretically calculated power spectra are compares with observed solar p-mode velocity power spectra over a range of mode degree and frequency. The depth for the sources responsible for exciting p-modes of frequency 2.0 mHz is determined from the asymmetry of their power spectra and found to be about 800 km below the photosphere for quadrupole sources and 150 km if sources are dipole. The source depth for high frequency oscillations of frequency greater than about 6 mHz is 180 (50) km for quadrupole (dipole) sources.

  5. Edge modes in band topological insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukasz Fidkowski; T. S. Jackson; Israel Klich

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We characterize gapless edge modes in translation invariant topological insulators. We show that the edge mode spectrum is a continuous deformation of the spectrum of a certain gluing function defining the occupied state bundle over the Brillouin zone (BZ). Topologically non-trivial gluing functions, corresponding to non-trivial bundles, then yield edge modes exhibiting spectral flow. We illustrate our results for the case of chiral edge states in two dimensional Chern insulators, as well as helical edges in quantum spin Hall states.

  6. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system safety analysis report for packaging. Volumes 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, P.C.

    1996-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This SARP describes the RTG Transportation System Package, a Type B(U) packaging system that is used to transport an RTG or similar payload. The payload, which is included in this SARP, is a generic, enveloping payload that specifically encompasses the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) RTG payload. The package consists of two independent containment systems mounted on a shock isolation transport skid and transported within an exclusive-use trailer.

  7. Confinement and stability of VH-mode discharges in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, T.S.; Osborne, T.H.; Burrell, K.H.; Carlstrom, T.N.; Chan, V.S.; Chu, M.S.; DeBoo, J.C.; Doyle, E.J.; Greenfield, C.M.; Groebner, R.J.; Hsieh, C.L.; Jackson, G.L.; James, R.; Lao, L.L.; Lazarus, E.A.; Lippman, S.I.; Petrie, T.W.; Rettig, C.L.; St. John, H.; Schissel, D.P.; Stambaugh, R.D.; Strait, E.J.; Turnbull, A.D.; West, W.P.; Winter, J.; Wroblewski, D.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A regime of very high confinement (VH-mode) has been observed in neutral beam-heated deuterium discharges in the DIII-D tokamak with thermal energy confinement times up to {approx}3.6 times that predicted by the ITER-89P L-mode scaling and 2 times that predicted by ELM-free H-mode thermal confinement scalings. This high confinement has led to increased plasma performance, n{sub D} (0)T{sub i}(0){tau}{sub E} = 2 {times} 10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3} keV sec with I{sub p} = 1.6 MA, B{sub T} = 2.1 T, Z{sub eff} {le} 2. Detailed transport analysis shows a correspondence between the large decrease in thermal diffusivity in the region 0.75 {le} {rho} {le} 0.9 and the development of a strong shear in the radial electric field in the same region. This suggests that stabilization of turbulence by sheared E {times} B flow is responsible for the improved confinement in VH-mode. A substantial fraction of the edge plasma entering the second regime of stability may also contribute to the increase in confinement. The duration of the VH-mode phase has been lengthened by feedback controlling the input power to limit plasma beta.

  8. Confinement and stability of VH-mode discharges in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, T.S.; Osborne, T.H.; Burrell, K.H.; Carlstrom, T.N.; Chan, V.S.; Chu, M.S.; DeBoo, J.C.; Doyle, E.J.; Greenfield, C.M.; Groebner, R.J.; Hsieh, C.L.; Jackson, G.L.; James, R.; Lao, L.L.; Lazarus, E.A.; Lippman, S.I.; Petrie, T.W.; Rettig, C.L.; St. John, H.; Schissel, D.P.; Stambaugh, R.D.; Strait, E.J.; Turnbull, A.D.; West, W.P.; Winter, J.; Wroblewski, D.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A regime of very high confinement (VH-mode) has been observed in neutral beam-heated deuterium discharges in the DIII-D tokamak with thermal energy confinement times up to [approx]3.6 times that predicted by the ITER-89P L-mode scaling and 2 times that predicted by ELM-free H-mode thermal confinement scalings. This high confinement has led to increased plasma performance, n[sub D] (0)T[sub i](0)[tau][sub E] = 2 [times] 10[sup 20] m[sup [minus]3] keV sec with I[sub p] = 1.6 MA, B[sub T] = 2.1 T, Z[sub eff] [le] 2. Detailed transport analysis shows a correspondence between the large decrease in thermal diffusivity in the region 0.75 [le] [rho] [le] 0.9 and the development of a strong shear in the radial electric field in the same region. This suggests that stabilization of turbulence by sheared E [times] B flow is responsible for the improved confinement in VH-mode. A substantial fraction of the edge plasma entering the second regime of stability may also contribute to the increase in confinement. The duration of the VH-mode phase has been lengthened by feedback controlling the input power to limit plasma beta.

  9. CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM All types of batteries are collected by Chemical Waste Services (CWS) for recycling. These include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM BATTERIES All types of batteries are collected by Chemical Waste Services (CWS) for recycling. These include alkaline, lithium, rechargeable, coin batteries, lead are shrink wrapped and secured with bands to keep them intact during transportation to a permitted recycling

  10. Assessment Update 2006 CHBE assessment activities during AY 2005-06 and 2006-07 included the following

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    1 Assessment Update 2006 CHBE assessment activities during AY 2005-06 and 2006-07 included Student Portfolio: Transport Project DAC review of faculty proposals o Curriculum changes (AY 2005-06) o Objective (AY 2006-07) Department Advisory Committee (DAC) Input The [2005-06] DAC's conclusions (additional

  11. PLASTIC DEFORMATIONPLASTIC DEFORMATION Modes of Deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramaniam, Anandh

    PLASTIC DEFORMATIONPLASTIC DEFORMATION Modes of Deformation The Uniaxial Tension Test Mechanisms underlying Plastic Deformation Strengthening mechanisms Mechanical Metallurgy George E Dieter McClick here to know about all the mechanisms by which materials fail #12;Slip (Dislocation motion) Plastic

  12. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, R.P.

    1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability. 6 figs.

  13. Whispering-gallery-mode-based seismometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fourguette, Dominique Claire; Otugen, M Volkan; Larocque, Liane Marie; Ritter, Greg Aan; Meeusen, Jason Jeffrey; Ioppolo, Tindaro

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A whispering-gallery-mode-based seismometer provides for receiving laser light into an optical fiber, operatively coupling the laser light from the optical fiber into a whispering-gallery-mode-based optical resonator, operatively coupling a spring of a spring-mass assembly to a housing structure; and locating the whispering-gallery-mode-based optical resonator between the spring-mass assembly and the housing structure so as to provide for compressing the whispering-gallery-mode-based optical resonator between the spring-mass assembly and the housing structure responsive to a dynamic compression force from the spring-mass assembly responsive to a motion of the housing structure relative to an inertial frame of reference.

  14. TRANSPORT...18 SHOPPING...22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    of renewable energy sources, paying attention to the environmental impact of our activities, and setting, while changes are made here on the ground through campaigns around transport, food and ethical targets for the reduction of energy consumption, and the attainment of carbon neutrality. I am delighted

  15. Storing and transporting energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClaine, Andrew W. (Lexington, MA); Brown, Kenneth (Reading, MA)

    2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Among other things, hydrogen is released from water at a first location using energy from a first energy source; the released hydrogen is stored in a metal hydride slurry; and the metal hydride slurry is transported to a second location remote from the first location.

  16. Policy Research TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to attract businesses and jobs to Texas, as the state has become increasingly dependent on the efficient will continue to be an important part of the 21st century transportation model, more efficient use of available and innovation; and · Serve as an independent resource to the Texas Legislature, providing analyses of the state

  17. Parking & Transportation Services Sustainability &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    responsibility. Embracing the policies of the larger university, Parking and Transportation Services has institution, to take a leadership role in encouraging environmental responsibility on a statewide level Development at the U of M ­ for purchasing practices from diverse suppliers · 2010 Transit System of the Year

  18. 21st Annual Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    would cost more than $40 billion over next 20 years ·! If used alone, state gas tax would need more than Investment Plan ·! Mn/DOT Statewide Transportation Plan #12;MHSIS goals ·! Develop a long range vision expansions ·!Fiscally-constrained approach #12;New investment strategy ·! Realistic ·! Innovative ·! Focuses

  19. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation. Radionuclides irreversibly sorbed onto this fraction of colloids also transport without retardation. The transport times for these radionuclides will be the same as those for nonsorbing radionuclides. The fraction of nonretarding colloids developed in this analysis report is used in the abstraction of SZ and UZ transport models in support of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This analysis report uses input from two Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) analysis reports. This analysis uses the assumption from ''Waste Form and In-Drift Colloids-Associated Radionuclide Concentrations: Abstraction and Summary'' that plutonium and americium are irreversibly sorbed to colloids generated by the waste degradation processes (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025]). In addition, interpretations from RELAP analyses from ''Saturated Zone In-Situ Testing'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170010]) are used to develop the retardation factor distributions in this analysis.

  20. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hough, Paul V. C. (Port Jefferson, NY); Wang, Chengpu (Upton, NY)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An atomic force microscope utilizes a pulse release system and improved method of operation to minimize contact forces between a probe tip affixed to a flexible cantilever and a specimen being measured. The pulse release system includes a magnetic particle affixed proximate the probe tip and an electromagnetic coil. When energized, the electromagnetic coil generates a magnetic field which applies a driving force on the magnetic particle sufficient to overcome adhesive forces exhibited between the probe tip and specimen. The atomic force microscope includes two independently displaceable piezo elements operable along a Z-axis. A controller drives the first Z-axis piezo element to provide a controlled approach between the probe tip and specimen up to a point of contact between the probe tip and specimen. The controller then drives the first Z-axis piezo element to withdraw the cantilever from the specimen. The controller also activates the pulse release system which drives the probe tip away from the specimen during withdrawal. Following withdrawal, the controller adjusts the height of the second Z-axis piezo element to maintain a substantially constant approach distance between successive samples.