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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Energy Demand and Emission from Transport Sector in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper aims to present a comprehensive overview of the current status and future trends of energy demand and emissions from transportation sector in China. ... a brief review of the national profile of energy

Yin Huang; Mengjun Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Sector Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Sector Sector Fred Joseck U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop (TSPI) Transportation and Stationary Power Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop (TSPI) Integration Workshop (TSPI) Phoenix, Arizona October 27, 2008 2 Why Integration? * Move away from conventional thinking...fuel and power generation/supply separate * Make dramatic change, use economies of scale,

3

Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight and passenger rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous

4

Transportation Demand This  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation Demand Transportation Demand This page inTenTionally lefT blank 75 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific and associated technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight

5

Cross-sector Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response...

6

Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Agency/Company /Organization: Victoria Transport Policy Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.vtpi.org/tdm/tdm12.htm Cost: Free Language: English References: Victoria Transport Policy Institute[1] "The Online TDM Encyclopedia is the world's most comprehensive information resource concerning innovative transportation management strategies. It describes dozens of Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies and contains information on TDM planning, evaluation and implementation. It has thousands of hyperlinks that provide instant access

7

Energy demand and economic consequences of transport policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Transport sector is a major consumer of energy. Concern of energy scarcity and price fluctuations enhanced significance of ... sector in national planning. This paper analyses energy demand for transport services...

J. B. Alam; Z. Wadud; J. B. Alam…

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrifica...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector...

9

Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrificati...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Transportation Sector Electrification Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrification 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies...

10

Utility Sector Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a new approach to estimating the marginal utility sector impacts associated with electricity demand reductions. The method uses publicly available data and provides results in the form of time series of impact factors. The input data are taken from the Energy Information Agency's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections of how the electric system might evolve in the reference case, and in a number of side cases that incorporate different effciency and other policy assumptions. The data published with the AEO are used to define quantitative relationships between demand-side electricity reductions by end use and supply-side changes to capacity by plant type, generation by fuel type and emissions of CO2, Hg, NOx and SO2. The impact factors define the change in each of these quantities per unit reduction in site electricity demand. We find that the relative variation in these impacts by end use is small, but the time variation can be significant.

Coughlin, Katie

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

BUILDINGS SECTOR DEMAND-SIDE EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY SUMMARIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................................................................... 2 Demand-Side Efficiency Technologies I. Energy Management Systems (EMSsLBL-33887 UC-000 BUILDINGS SECTOR DEMAND-SIDE EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY SUMMARIES Jonathan G. Koomey

12

Modelling transport fuel demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Transport fuels account for an increasing share of oil ... interest to study the economics of the transport fuel market and thereby to evaluate the efficiency of the price mechanism as an instrument of policy in ...

Thomas Sterner; Carol A. Dahl

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection...

14

Restructuring our Transportation Sector | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Restructuring our Transportation Sector Restructuring our Transportation Sector 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting,...

15

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Transportation Sector Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Transportation Sector Energy Consumption International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 7 - Transportation Sector Energy Consumption In the IEO2009 reference case, transportation energy use in the non-OECD countries increases by an average of 2.7 percent per year from 2006 to 2030, as compared with an average of 0.3 percent per year for the OECD countries. Figure 69. OECD and Non-OECD Transportation Sector Liquids Consumption, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure data Over the next 25 years, world demand for liquids fuels is projected to increase more rapidly in the transportation sector than in any other end-use sector. In the IEO2009 reference case, the transportation share of

16

China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation of Emissions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation of Emissions China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation of Emissions in Urban Transport Jump to: navigation, search Name Transportation Demand Management in Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in urban transport Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft fĂĽr Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Transportation Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA Website http://www.tdm-beijing.org/ Program Start 2011 Program End 2014 Country China Eastern Asia References Transport Management in Beijing[1] Program Overview The project aims to improve transport demand management (TDM) in Beijing in order to manage the steadily increasing traffic density. The project provides capacity building for decision-makers and transport planners in

17

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Transportation Sector Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Transportation Sector Energy Consumption International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 6 - Transportation Sector Energy Consumption In the IEO2008 reference case, transportation energy use in the non-OECD countries increases by an average of 3.0 percent per year from 2005 to 2030, as compared with an average of 0.7 percent per year for the OECD countries. Over the next 25 years, world demand for liquids fuels and other petroleum is expected to increase more rapidly in the transportation sector than in any other end-use sector. In the IEO2008 reference case, the transportation share of total liquids consumption increases from 52 percent in 2005 to 58 percent in 2030. Much of the growth in transportation energy use is projected for the non-OECD nations, where many rapidly expanding economies

18

Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrifica...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV) Vehicle Technology Advancement and...

19

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Key Assumptions Macroeconomic Sector Inputs

20

Yucca MountainTransportation: Private Sector Perspective  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation: Transportation: Private Sector "Lessons Learned" US Transport Council David Blee Executive Director dblee@ustransportcouncil.org DOE Transportation External Coordination (TEC) Working Group April 4, 2005 Phoenix, Arizona US Transport Council -- DOE TEC 4/4/05 2 US Transport Council Formed in 2002 during the Yucca Mountain Ratification debate to provide factual information on nuclear materials transportation, experience, safety & emergency planning Comprised of 24 member companies from the transport sector including suppliers and customers Principal focus is transport education, policy and business commerce related to nuclear materials transport US Transport Council -- DOE TEC 4/4/05 3 USTC Members AREVA BNFL, Inc Burns & Roe Cameco

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologi...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies Program Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum...

22

Transportation Demand Management in Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in urban transport Jump to: navigation, search Name Transportation Demand Management in Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in urban transport Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft fĂĽr Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Transportation Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA Website http://www.tdm-beijing.org/ Program Start 2011 Program End 2014 Country China Eastern Asia References Transport Management in Beijing[1] Program Overview The project aims to improve transport demand management (TDM) in Beijing in order to manage the steadily increasing traffic density. The project provides capacity building for decision-makers and transport planners in Beijing to enable them to calculate baselines and assess reduction

23

The role of private participation in enhancing the Indian transport sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Indian transport sector, one of the largest transport networks in the world, faces some serious issues. These may be identified as follows: * Unmet demand for service and infrastructure * Conflicting responsibilities ...

Sharma, Nand, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Transportation energy demand: Model development and use  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes work undertaken and sponsored by the Energy Commission to improve transportation energy demand forecasting and policy analysis for California. Two ... , the paper discusses some of the import...

Chris Kavalec

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologi...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies Program Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies Program 2012 DOE Hydrogen...

26

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Key Assumptions Macroeconomic Sector Inputs

27

China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beijing: Mitigation of Emissions in Urban Transport Jump to: navigation, search Name Transportation Demand Management in Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in urban transport...

28

Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Agency/Company /Organization: Global Environment Facility, United Nations Environment Programme Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: tech-action.org/Guidebooks/TNAhandbook_Transport.pdf Cost: Free Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Screenshot References: Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector[1] "The options outlined in this guidebook are designed to assist you in the process of developing transport services and facilities in your countries

29

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...gasoline and 6% of its diesel demand by converting...conversion to liquid fuels using the FT process...total current oil consumption of 13.8 Mbbl/d by...conversion of syngas to diesel is 100% selective...liquid hydrocarbon fuel. In our proposal...the transportation engine. Therefore, for coal...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral Approach Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral Approach Agency/Company /Organization: GTZ Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Implementation, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Publications Website: www.transport2012.org/bridging/ressources/files/1/817,Transport_sector Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral Approach Screenshot References: Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport[1] Summary "The large mitigation potential and associated co-benefits of taking action in the land transport sector can be tapped into by a sectoral approach drawing financial resources from a transport window, in the short term

31

Oil prices and transport sector returns: an international analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examines the role of oil prices in explaining ‘transport sector’ equity returns ... study are strongly supportive of some role for oil prices in determining the transport sector returns for ... asymmet...

Mohan Nandha; Robert Brooks

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Policies to Reduce Emissions from the Transportation Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policies to Reduce Emissions from the Transportation Sector Policies to Reduce Emissions from the Transportation Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policies to Reduce Emissions from the Transportation Sector Agency/Company /Organization: PEW Center Sector: Climate Focus Area: Transportation, People and Policy Phase: Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Other Website: www.pewclimate.org/DDCF-Briefs/Transportation Cost: Free References: Policies To Reduce Emissions From The Transportation Sector[1] Provide an overview of policy tools available to reduce GHG emissions from the transportation sector. Overview Provide an overview of policy tools available to reduce GHG emissions from the transportation sector. Outputs include: General Information

33

Propane demand modeling for residential sectors- A regression analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a forecasting model for the propane consumption within the residential sector. In this research we explore the dynamic behavior of different variables… (more)

Shenoy, Nitin K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Post-2012 Climate Instruments in the transport sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Post-2012 Climate Instruments in the transport sector Post-2012 Climate Instruments in the transport sector Jump to: navigation, search Name Post-2012 Climate Instruments in the transport sector Agency/Company /Organization Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands Partner Asian Development Bank Sector Energy Focus Area Transportation Topics Finance Resource Type Presentation Website http://www.slocat.net Program Start 2009 Program End 2010 UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Post-2012 Climate Instruments in the transport sector (CITS)[1] The post 2012 Climate Instruments in the transport sector (CITS) project implemented by the Asian Development Bank (ADB), in cooperation with the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), is a first step to help ensure that the transport sector can benefit from the revised/new climate change

35

New city model to reduce demand for transportation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Managing demand for transportation can be a cost-effective alternative to increasing capacity. A demand management approach to transport services also has the potential to deliver better environmental outcomes, improved public health and stronger communities, and more prosperous and liveable cities The increased distance between places will have a direct impact on the demand of transportation. Public transport system (MRTS) is an answer to the growing traffic congestion. However, the question is; Is MRTS are the last resort? This paper will be an attempt to regularize the development scenario of the city and thus reducing the demand for transportation.

Sumant Sharma; Anoop Sharma; Ashwani Kumar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Harmony Search Algorithm for Transport Energy Demand Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The transport sector is one of the major consumers of energy production throughout the world. Thus, the estimation of medium and long-term energy consumption based on socio-economic and transport related indic...

Halim Ceylan; Huseyin Ceylan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

The Practice of Cost Benefit Analysis in the Transport Sector...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon The Practice of Cost Benefit Analysis in the Transport Sector a Mexican Perspective Jump to: navigation,...

38

Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's Transportation Sector: Methods...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's Transportation Sector: Methods and Applications Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's...

39

Table E6. Transportation Sector Energy Price Estimates, 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

E6. Transportation Sector Energy Price Estimates, 2012 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Total Aviation...

40

Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Name Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ASSESSMENT OF ELECTRICITY DEMAND IN IRAN'S INDUSTRIAL SECTOR USING DIFFERENT INTELLIGENT OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents application of particle swarm optimization (PSO) and genetic algorithm (GA) methods to estimate electricity demand in Iran's industrial sectors, based on economic indicators. The economic indicators used in this study are number of ...

M. A. Behrang; E. Assareh; M. R. Assari; A. Ghanbarzadeh

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report examines the potential infrastructure needs of the U.S. interstate natural gas pipeline transmission system across a range of future natural gas demand scenarios that drive increased electric power sector natural gas use.

43

Modelling useful energy demand system as derived from basic needs in the household sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inter-fuel substitution in the household sector depends on whether their target energy use is similar or not. To account ... for the effect of end-use application on energy demand, the concept of useful energy is...

Zahra A. Barkhordar; Yadollah Saboohi

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Transportation Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

45

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

46

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight, rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

47

Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Name Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies Agency/Company /Organization Hiroshima University Focus Area Transportation Topics Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://ir.lib.hiroshima-u.ac.j Program Start 2010 Country Bangladesh UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References ↑ "Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies"

48

Copenhagen Accord NAMA Submissions Implications for the Transport Sector |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Copenhagen Accord NAMA Submissions Implications for the Transport Sector Copenhagen Accord NAMA Submissions Implications for the Transport Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Bridging the Gap: Copenhagen Accord NAMA Submissions Agency/Company /Organization: GTZ, Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP), Transport Research Laboratory(TRL), International Association for Public Transport (UITP), Veolia Transport Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Case studies/examples Website: www.transport2012.org/bridging/ressources/files/1/586,NAMA-submissions Country: Armenia, Botswana, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Indonesia, Jordan, Republic of Macedonia, Madagascar, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Papua New Guinea, Sierra Leone, Singapore

49

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Transportation Sector Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Transportation Sector Energy Consumption International Energy Outlook 2008 Figure 66. OECD and Non-OECD Transportation Sector Liquids Consumption, 2005-2030 Figure 25 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 67. Change in World Liquids Consumption for Transportation, 2005 to 2030 Figure 26 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 68. Average Annual Growth in OECD and Non-OECD Gros Domestic Product and Transportation Sector Delivered Energy Use, 2005-2030 Figure 27 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 69. Motor Vehicle Ownership in OECD Countries, 2005, 2015, and 2030 Figure 28 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

50

Model documentation report: Commercial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module is a simulation tool based upon economic and engineering relationships that models commercial sector energy demands at the nine Census Division level of detail for eleven distinct categories of commercial buildings. Commercial equipment selections are performed for the major fuels of electricity, natural gas, and distillate fuel, for the major services of space heating, space cooling, water heating, ventilation, cooking, refrigeration, and lighting. The algorithm also models demand for the minor fuels of residual oil, liquefied petroleum gas, steam coal, motor gasoline, and kerosene, the renewable fuel sources of wood and municipal solid waste, and the minor services of office equipment. Section 2 of this report discusses the purpose of the model, detailing its objectives, primary input and output quantities, and the relationship of the Commercial Module to the other modules of the NEMS system. Section 3 of the report describes the rationale behind the model design, providing insights into further assumptions utilized in the model development process to this point. Section 3 also reviews alternative commercial sector modeling methodologies drawn from existing literature, providing a comparison to the chosen approach. Section 4 details the model structure, using graphics and text to illustrate model flows and key computations.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Global Climate Change and the Transportation Sector: An Update on Issues and Mitigation Options  

SciTech Connect

It is clear from numerous energy/economic modeling exercises that addressing the challenges posed by global climate change will eventually require the active participation of all industrial sectors and all consumers on the planet. Yet, these and similar modeling exercises indicate that large stationary CO2 point sources (e.g., refineries and fossil-fired electric power plants) are often the first targets considered for serious CO2 emissions mitigation. Without participation of all sectors of the global economy, however, the challenges of climate change mitigation will not be met. Because of its operating characteristics, price structure, dependence on virtually one energy source (oil), enormous installed infrastructure, and limited technology alternatives, at least in the near-term, the transportation sector will likely represent a particularly difficult challenge for CO2 emissions mitigation. Our research shows that climate change induced price signals (i.e., putting a price on carbon that is emitted to the atmosphere) are in the near term insufficient to drive fundamental shifts in demand for energy services or to transform the way these services are provided in the transportation sector. We believe that a technological revolution will be necessary to accomplish the significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. This paper presents an update of ongoing research into a variety of technological options that exist for decarbonizing the transportation sector and the various tradeoffs among them.

Geffen, CA; Dooley, JJ; Kim, SH

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

52

Global Climate Change and the Unique Challenges Posed by the Transportation Sector  

SciTech Connect

Addressing the challenges posed by global climate change will eventually require the active participation of all industrial sectors and consumers on the planet. To date, however, most efforts to address climate change have focused on only a few sectors of the economy (e.g., refineries and fossil-fired electric power plants) and a handful of large industrialized nations. While useful as a starting point, these efforts must be expanded to include other sectors of the economy and other nations. The transportation sector presents some unique challenges, with its nearly exclusive dependence on petroleum based products as a fuel source coupled with internal combustion engines as the prime mover. Reducing carbon emissions from transportation systems is unlikely to be solely accomplished by traditional climate mitigation policies that place a price on carbon. Our research shows that price signals alone are unlikely to fundamentally alter the demand for energy services or to transform the way energy services are provided in the transportation sector. We believe that a technological revolution will be necessary to accomplish the significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector.

Dooley, J.J.; Geffen, C.A.; Edmonds, J.A.

2002-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

53

Energy efficiency achievements in China?s industrial and transport sectors: How do they rate?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract China is experiencing intensified industrialisation and motorisation. In the world?s largest emerging economy, energy efficiency is expected to play a critical role in the ever-rising demand for energy. Based on factual overviews and numerical analysis, this article carries out an in-depth investigation into the effectiveness of policies announced or implemented in recent decades targeted at energy conservation in the energy intensive manufacturing and transportation sectors. It highlights nine energy intensive sectors that achieved major improvements in their energy technology efficiency efforts. Under the umbrella of the 11th Five-Year Plan, these sectors? performances reflect the effectiveness of China?s energy conservation governance. Numerous actions have been taken in China to reduce the road transport sector?s demand for energy and its GHG emissions by implementing fuel economy standards, promoting advanced energy efficient vehicles, and alternative fuels. Coal-based energy saving technologies, especially industrial furnace technologies, are critical for China?s near and medium-term energy saving. In the long run, renewable energy development and expanding the railway transport system are the most effective ways to reduce energy use and GHG emissions in China. Fuel economy standards could reduce oil consumption and \\{GHGs\\} by 34–35 per cent.

Libo Wu; Hong Huo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...produce liquid hydrocarbon fuel. In our proposal...production of liquid hydrocarbons. Thus, the goal...sustainable production of hydrocarbon fuel for the transportation...The resulting combustion energy not only provides heat for the endothermic...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

transportation.gif (5318 bytes) transportation.gif (5318 bytes) The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

56

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...replaced with gasoline hybrid electric vehicles...the use of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs...electricity from a PV grid could be directly used...current transportation fuel infrastructure, the efficiency improvement...through the proposed hybrid hydrogen-carbon economy...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with gasoline hybrid electric vehicles...of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles...electricity from a PV grid could be directly...by using solar energy. There are two...transportation fuel infrastructure, the efficiency...the proposed hybrid hydrogen-carbon...material and energy balances. The...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...United States alone, oil consumption in the transportation...kPa), the lower heating value (LHV) of H...rise in the petroleum price has refocused the...accounts, conventional oil production is predicted...support 67% of US oil consumption equals yr Hkg...the form of its high heating value (HHV). For...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of liquid hydrocarbon fuels (16, 17). It can...conversion to liquid fuels using the FT process...support total current oil consumption of 13.8 Mbbl/d by the...produce liquid hydrocarbon fuel. In our proposal, the...from the transportation engine. Therefore, for coal...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the internal combustion engine will be highly beneficial. Clearly, the proposed...Transportation 1 SI Appendix General information and Assumption Total...of CH4 = 891 kJ/mol LHV of diesel assuming C15H32 = 43.987 MJ/kg. This...the gasifier. 5. Amount of diesel produced from ASPEN model using...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal reports Coal reports Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector With Data through 2010 | Release Date: November 16, 2012 | Next Release Date: December 2013 | Correction Previous editions Year: 2011 2004 Go Figure 1. Deliveries from major coal basins to electric power plants by rail, 2010 Background In this latest release of Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) significantly expands upon prior versions of this report with the incorporation of new EIA survey data. Figure 1. Percent of total U.S. rail shipments represented in data figure data Previously, EIA relied solely on data from the U.S. Surface Transportation Board (STB), specifically their confidential Carload Waybill Sample. While valuable, due to the statistical nature of the Waybill data,

62

Modeling regional transportation demand in China and the impacts of a national carbon constraint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate and energy policy in China will have important and uneven impacts on the country’s regionally heterogeneous transport system. In order to simulate these impacts, transport sector detail is added to a multi-sector, ...

Kishimoto, Paul

2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

63

Rail Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis & Projections Analysis & Projections ‹ See all Coal Reports Rail Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector Release Date: June 16, 2011 | Next Release Date: July 2012 | full report Introduction The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is releasing a series of estimated data based on the confidential, carload waybill sample obtained from the U.S. Surface Transportation Board (Carload Waybill Sample). These estimated data represent a continuation of EIA's data and analysis products related to coal rail transportation. These estimated data also address a need expressed by EIA's customers for more detailed coal transportation rate data. Having accurate coal rail transportation rate data is important to understanding the price of electricity for two main reasons. First,

64

Impact of demand-enhancing farm policy on the agricultural sector: a firm level simulation of ethanol production subsidies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IMPACT OF DEMAND-ENHANCING FARM POLICY ON THE AGRICULTURAL SECTOR: A FIRM LEVEL SIMULATION OF ETHANOL PRODUCTION SUBSIDIES A Thesis By LETA SUSANNE WASSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics IMPACT OF DEMAND-ENHANCING FARM POLICY ON THE AGRICULTURAL SECTOR: A FIRM LEVEL SIMULATION OF ETHANOL PRODUCTION SUBSIDIES A Thesis...

Wasson, Leta Susanne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

65

HOW DO WE CONVERT THE TRANSPORT SECTOR TO RENEWABLE ENERGY AND IMPROVE THE SECTOR'S INTERPLAY WITH THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..........................................................................................................16 #12;2 1. Summary The global energy scene is currently dominated by two overriding concerns relies almost 100 % on oil, and in 2004 transport energy use amounted to 26% of total world energy useHOW DO WE CONVERT THE TRANSPORT SECTOR TO RENEWABLE ENERGY AND IMPROVE THE SECTOR'S INTERPLAY

66

Development and Demonstration of the Open Automated Demand Response Standard for the Residential Sector  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this study was to demonstrate a demand response system that can signal nearly every customer in all sectors through the integration of two widely available and non- proprietary communications technologies--Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) over lnternet protocol and Utility Messaging Channel (UMC) over FM radio. The outcomes of this project were as follows: (1) a software bridge to allow translation of pricing signals from OpenADR to UMC; and (2) a portable demonstration unit with an lnternet-connected notebook computer, a portfolio of DR-enabling technologies, and a model home. The demonstration unit provides visitors the opportunity to send electricity-pricing information over the lnternet (through OpenADR and UMC) and then watch as the model appliances and lighting respond to the signals. The integration of OpenADR and UMC completed and demonstrated in this study enables utilities to send hourly or sub-hourly electricity pricing information simultaneously to the residential, commercial and industrial sectors.

Herter, Karen; Rasin, Josh; Perry, Tim

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

67

Model documentation report: Industrial sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of the NEMS Industrial Model for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects. The NEMS Industrial Demand Model is a dynamic accounting model, bringing together the disparate industries and uses of energy in those industries, and putting them together in an understandable and cohesive framework. The Industrial Model generates mid-term (up to the year 2015) forecasts of industrial sector energy demand as a component of the NEMS integrated forecasting system. From the NEMS system, the Industrial Model receives fuel prices, employment data, and the value of industrial output. Based on the values of these variables, the Industrial Model passes back to the NEMS system estimates of consumption by fuel types.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA

69

Model documentation report: Commercial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. This report serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1)). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Model documentation report: Commercial sector demand module of the national energy modeling system  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports. Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects.

NONE

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports according to Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Sustainable Campus Transportation through Transit Partnership and Transportation Demand Management: A Case Study from the University of Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. 2005. The impacts of transportation demand management andUnlimited access. Transportation 28 (3): 233–267. Cervero,transit. Journal of Public Transportation 3 (4):10–19. ???.

Bond, Alex; Steiner, Ruth

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Modeling of Demand Side Management Options for Commercial Sector in Maharashtra  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract There has been an unbalance between demand and supply of electricity in Maharashtra, a shortage of 20% peak power was reported in year 2011-12. Demand side management (DSM) in the commercial sector (consuming about 12% of the state electricity) can help to bridge this gap. In this paper three DSM options namely global temperature adjustment (GTA), chilled water storage (CWS) and variable air volume system (VAVS) are evaluated to give potential energy savings and load shifting. Simulation of GTA model for a sample school building gave 21.3% saving in compressor work for a change of room settings from 23oC, 50% RH to 26oC, 40% RH. Model for CWS was simulated for an office building in Mumbai; the results showed a cooling load shifting of 1638TRh out of 2075TRh was possible with an optimum tank size of 450kl. Simulation of VAVS for a sample school building showed fan energy savings of 68% over CAVS.

Vishal Vadabhat; Rangan Banerjee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Climate change mitigation and co-benefits of feasible transport demand policies in Beijing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i n f o Keywords: Climate change mitigation Transport demand management External costs Urban and potential impacts of travel demand management help to define policy instruments that mitigate the damaging. The paper investi- gates the role of demand elasticities and demonstrates that joint demand and supply-side

Kammen, Daniel M.

75

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Freight Transportation Demand: Energy-Efficient Scenarios for a Low-Carbon Future  

SciTech Connect

Freight transportation demand is projected to grow to 27.5 billion tons in 2040, and to nearly 30.2 billion tons in 2050. This report describes the current and future demand for freight transportation in terms of tons and ton-miles of commodities moved by truck, rail, water, pipeline, and air freight carriers. It outlines the economic, logistics, transportation, and policy and regulatory factors that shape freight demand, the trends and 2050 outlook for these factors, and their anticipated effect on freight demand. After describing federal policy actions that could influence future freight demand, the report then summarizes the capabilities of available analytical models for forecasting freight demand. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Grenzeback, L. R.; Brown, A.; Fischer, M. J.; Hutson, N.; Lamm, C. R.; Pei, Y. L.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Vyas, A. D.; Winebrake, J. J.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Agenda for the Transitioning the Transportation Sector--Exploring the Intersection of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles workshop held September 9, 2014.

77

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Transportation Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption isthe sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

78

Transport, energy and greenhouse gases: perspectives on demand limitation. Guest editorial  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The current economic recession results in reduced industrial output and energy consumption, and thus reduces freight transport activity ... , but everything indicates that growth in transport demand should re-sta...

Charles Raux; Martin E. H. Lee-Gosselin

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Reducing CO2 in the transport sector in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we have investigated the cost-effectiveness of alternative fuel vehicles as a measure for CO2 reduction. Computed results indicate that the installation of alternative fuel vehicles is much more expensive than fuel switching in industry or the power generation sector. However, some economic incentives will make the price go down to the level at which alternative fuel vehicles are competitive with conventional vehicles. At the same time, mass production makes their prices go down although it is rather expensive at present. Then, we developed the scenarios in which CO2 emissions could be stabilised at the level in 1990. In the higher demand case (1.2%/yr.), it is indispensable to introduce alternative fuel vehicles into the market. Our model selects electric vehicles and compressed natural gas vehicles as cost-effective options. In the scenario where carbon tax revenue is not offset by subsidy, we have to impose prohibitively high carbon tax to suppress CO2. However, CO2 emission can be suppressed by a reasonable carbon tax if the tax revenue is returned to the market to subsidise alternative fuel vehicles and their infrastructures.

Yoshikuni Yoshida; Hisashi Ishitani; Ryuji Matsuhashi; Osamu Kobayashi; Tetsuo Takeishi

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's Transportation Sector: Methods and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's Transportation Sector: Methods and Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's Transportation Sector: Methods and Applications Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's Transportation Sector: Methods and Applications Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cp/activity20101108.html UN Region: Eastern Asia Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's Transportation Sector: Methods and Applications Screenshot References: Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's Transportation Sector: Methods and Applications[1] "The workshop has two objectives. The first is to examine methodological

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A MODEL FOR THE FLEET SIZING OF DEMAND RESPONSIVE TRANSPORTATION SERVICES WITH TIME WINDOWS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A MODEL FOR THE FLEET SIZING OF DEMAND RESPONSIVE TRANSPORTATION SERVICES WITH TIME WINDOWS Marco a demand responsive transit service with a predetermined quality for the user in terms of waiting time models; Continuous approximation models; Paratransit services; Demand responsive transit systems. #12;3 1

Dessouky, Maged

82

Reducing GHG emissions in the United States' transportation sector  

SciTech Connect

Reducing GHG emissions in the U.S. transportation sector requires both the use of highly efficient propulsion systems and low carbon fuels. This study compares reduction potentials that might be achieved in 2060 for several advanced options including biofuels, hybrid electric vehicles (HEV), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), and fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV), assuming that technical and cost reduction targets are met and necessary fueling infrastructures are built. The study quantifies the extent of the reductions that can be achieved through increasing engine efficiency and transitioning to low-carbon fuels separately. Decarbonizing the fuels is essential for achieving large reductions in GHG emissions, and the study quantifies the reductions that can be achieved over a range of fuel carbon intensities. Although renewables will play a vital role, some combination of coal gasification with carbon capture and sequestration, and/or nuclear energy will likely be needed to enable very large reductions in carbon intensities for hydrogen and electricity. Biomass supply constraints do not allow major carbon emission reductions from biofuels alone; the value of biomass is that it can be combined with other solutions to help achieve significant results. Compared with gasoline, natural gas provides 20% reduction in GHG emissions in internal combustion engines and up to 50% reduction when used as a feedstock for producing hydrogen or electricity, making it a good transition fuel for electric propulsion drive trains. The material in this paper can be useful information to many other countries, including developing countries because of a common factor: the difficulty of finding sustainable, low-carbon, cost-competitive substitutes for petroleum fuels.

Das, Sujit [ORNL; Andress, David A [ORNL; Nguyen, Tien [U.S. DOE

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Guidelines for Marketing Demand-Side Management in the Commercial Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the past decade, electric and gas utilities throughout the nation, not just in hot and humid climates, have promoted energy efficiency through a variety of demand-side management (DSM) programs. In 1984, the Electric Power Research Institute...

George, S. S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Solving a Dial-a-Ride Problem with a Hybrid Evolutionary Multi-objective Application to Demand Responsive Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Demand Responsive Transport R´emy Chevrier,a , Arnaud Liefoogheb,c , Laetitia Jourdanb,c , Clarisse, 59650 Villeneuve d'Ascq, France Abstract Demand responsive transport allows customers to be carried to improve the quality of service, demand responsive transport needs more flexibility. This paper tries

Boyer, Edmond

85

Analysis of Michigan's demand-side electricity resources in the residential sector: Volume 3, End-use studies: Revised final report  

SciTech Connect

This volume of the ''Analysis of Michigan's Demand-Side Electricity Resources in the Residential Sector'' contains end-use studies on various household appliances including: refrigerators, freezers, lighting systems, water heaters, air conditioners, space heaters, and heat pumps. (JEF)

Krause, F.; Brown, J.; Connell, D.; DuPont, P.; Greely, K.; Meal, M.; Meier, A.; Mills, E.; Nordman, B.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Technology detail in a multi-sector CGE model : transport under climate policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A set of three analytical models is used to study the imbedding of specific transport technologies within a multi-sector, multi-region evaluation of constraints on greenhouse emissions. Key parameters of a computable general ...

Schafer, Andreas.

87

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

88

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Freight Transportation Demand: Energy-Efficient Scenarios for a Low-Carbon Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DEMAND DEMAND Freight Transportation Demand: Energy-Efficient Scenarios for a Low-Carbon Future TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES SERIES: Freight Transportation Demand: Energy-Efficient Scenarios for a Low-Carbon Future A Study Sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy March 2013 Prepared by CAMBRIDGE SYSTEMATICS Cambridge, MA 02140 under subcontract DGJ-1-11857-01 Technical monitoring performed by NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Golden, Colorado 80401-3305 managed by Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Under contract DC-A36-08GO28308 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their

89

Energy Outlook for the Transport Sector | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Outlook for Energy: A View to 2030 The Drive for Energy Diversity and Sustainability: The Impact on Transportation Fuels and Propulsion System Portfolios Algae Biofuels Technology...

90

Rail Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

well as other details about the shipment. A waybill can include one or more cars and a train can include one or more waybills. Unlike most other reports with coal transportation...

91

Warm homes: Drivers of the demand for heating in the residential sector in New Zealand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New Zealand houses are large, often poorly constructed and heated, by OECD standards, and consequently are colder and damper indoors than recommended by the World Health Organisation. This affects both the energy consumption and the health of households. The traditional New Zealand household pattern of only heating one room of the house has been unchanged for decades, although there has been substantial market penetration of unflued gas heaters and more recently heat pumps. This paper describes the residential sector and the results of two community-based trials of housing and heating interventions that have been designed to measure the impact of (1) retrofitting insulation and (2) replacing unflued gas heaters and electric resistance heaters with heat pumps, wood pellet burners and flued gas heaters. The paper describes findings on the rebound effect or ‘take-back’—the extent to which households take the gains from insulation and heating improvements as comfort (higher temperatures) rather than energy savings, and compares energy-saving patterns with those suggested by an earlier study. Findings on these aspects of household space heating are discussed in the context of the New Zealand government's policy drive for a more sustainable energy system, and the implications for climate change policy.

Philippa Howden-Chapman; Helen Viggers; Ralph Chapman; Des O’Dea; Sarah Free; Kimberley O’Sullivan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Transportation Sector Energy Use by Fuel Type Within a Mode from EIA AEO  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Energy Use by Fuel Type Within a Mode from EIA AEO Sector Energy Use by Fuel Type Within a Mode from EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Dataset Summary Description Supplemental Table 46 of EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Source EIA Date Released December 08th, 2010 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Annual Energy Outlook EIA Energy Information Administration Fuel mode TEF transportation Transportation Energy Futures Data text/csv icon Transportation_Sector_Energy_Use_by_Fuel_Type_Within_a_Mode.csv (csv, 144.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote

93

High Penetration of Renewable Energy in the Transportation Sector: Scenarios, Barriers, and Enablers; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Transportation accounts for 71% of U.S. petroleum use and 33% of its greenhouse gases emissions. Pathways toward reduced greenhouse gas emissions and petroleum dependence in the transportation sector have been analyzed in considerable detail, but with some limitations. To add to this knowledge, the U.S. Department of Energy has launched a study focused on underexplored greenhouse-gas-abatement and oil-savings opportunities related to transportation. This Transportation Energy Futures study analyzes specific issues and associated key questions to strengthen the existing knowledge base and help cultivate partnerships among federal agencies, state and local governments, and industry.

Vimmerstedt, L.; Brown, A.; Heath, G.; Mai, T.; Ruth, M.; Melaina, M.; Simpkins, T.; Steward, D.; Warner, E.; Bertram, K.; Plotkin, S.; Patel, D.; Stephens, T.; Vyas, A.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Activity based travel demand models as a tool for evaluating sustainable transportation policies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

India is in the course of an economic transition. The economic growth nurtured the life in the cities and cities have become a major livelihood destination for everyone. This migration of people contributed to the increased urbanization of Indian cities. The booming economy fostered the well-being and shaped the lifestyle of people in such a way that the dependency on private vehicle has become an unavoidable affair. Along with population growth, the increased vehicle ownership gave rise to overall spurt in travel demand. But the supply side lagged behind the demand adding to many of the transport related externalities such as accidents, congestion, pollution, inequity etc. The importance of sustainability is understood in the current urban transport scenario leading to the development and promotion of sustainable transport polices. The core agenda of these polices is to target the travel behavior of people and change the way they travel by creating a different travel environment. However, the impacts of many such policies are either unknown or complex. Hence, before adopting and implementing such policies, it is important for the decision makers to be aware of the impacts of them. The role of travel demand models comes here as they predict the future travel demand under different policy scenarios. This paper reviews the ability of travel demand models applied in India in analyzing the sustainable transport policies. The study found that the conventional model system in India, which is trip based four step aggregate methodology, is inadequate in analyzing the sustainable transport policies. A review of alternative approach, known as activity based travel demand modeling found that they are capable of handling such policies better than conventional models and are assistive to the decision makers in arriving at right mix of polices specific to the situations. Since there is no operational activity based travel demand model system developed in India, the study at the end envisaged a conceptual framework of an integrated activity based travel demand model based on the requirements identified from the review. This can potentially replace the existing travel demand models and can be used for planning applications once the modification & validation have been done according to the existing activity-travel behavior of individuals.

Manoj Malayath; Ashish Verma

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Mobility and Carbon: The Blind Side of Transport Fuel Demand in the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mobility and Carbon: The Blind Side of Transport Fuel Demand in the Mobility and Carbon: The Blind Side of Transport Fuel Demand in the Developed and Developing World Speaker(s): Lee Schipper Date: February 15, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Anita Estner James McMahon A new "Great Wall" has emerged in China, this one a string of miles of cars stuck in traffic. Emissions from road transport in developing countries are expected to rise sharply in the coming decades if current trends continue. Projections of passenger and freight activity, vehicle use, and CO2 emissions push up overall CO2 emissions by a factor of three in Latin American and five in Asia by 2030, even with fuel economy improvements. The increase in car use is in part a result of growing incomes and economic activity, but it also reflects the poor quality of transit and

96

Session 5: ÂŤRenewable Energy in the Transportation and Power SectorsÂŽ  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5: "Renewable Energy in the Transportation and Power 5: "Renewable Energy in the Transportation and Power Sectors" Mr. Michael Schaal: Well, let's get started and we'll have people come in as we move along. Welcome to the session which addresses the topic of renewable energy and the transportation and power sectors, a topic that is very much on the minds of the public at large, policymakers who are pondering the cost benefits and preferred outcomes of a variety of current and potential future laws and regulations, and also researchers who are busily involved with pushing the state-of-the-art in a number of key technology areas and also technology developer who are weighing the risks and benefits of pursuing different business plans in this evolving market, and environmentalists who are

97

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation sector energy demand Transportation sector energy demand Growth in transportation energy consumption flat across projection figure data The transportation sector consumes 27.1 quadrillion Btu of energy in 2040, the same as the level of energy demand in 2011 (Figure 70). The projection of no growth in transportation energy demand differs markedly from the historical trend, which saw 1.1-percent average annual growth from 1975 to 2011 [126]. No growth in transportation energy demand is the result of declining energy use for LDVs, which offsets increased energy use for heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs), aircraft, marine, rail, and pipelines. Energy demand for LDVs declines from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 13.0 quadrillion Btu in 2040, in contrast to 0.9-percent average annual growth

98

Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report Report NREL/TP-6A50-56324 December 2012 Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors April Lee, Owen Zinaman, and Jeffrey Logan National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.jisea.org Technical Report NREL/TP-6A50-56324 December 2012 Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors April Lee, Owen Zinaman, and Jeffrey Logan

99

Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors  

SciTech Connect

Use of both natural gas and renewable energy has grown significantly in recent years. Both forms of energy have been touted as key elements of a transition to a cleaner and more secure energy future, but much of the current discourse considers each in isolation or concentrates on the competitive impacts of one on the other. This paper attempts, instead, to explore potential synergies of natural gas and renewable energy in the U.S. electric power and transportation sectors.

Lee, A.; Zinaman, O.; Logan, J.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

An examination of the relationship between energy consumption and performance of transportation sector in Malaysia: output multipliers approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of the current study is to investigate the energy consumption and the performance of Malaysia's transportation sector. It applied output multiplier approach which is based on input-output model. Three input-output tables of Malaysia covering the 1991, 2000 and 2005 periods were used. The results indicate significant changes in the output multipliers of the transportation sector for the (1991-2005) period. Also, the transportation-to-energy subsector multipliers were found to increase over time. The increasing importance of transportation sector to the development of Malaysian economy resulted in a noticeable increase in the consumption of each energy subsector's output especially 'petrol and coal industries' products. Based on the research findings, several policy implications were suggested for the betterment of both sectors' performance and generally for the improvement of Malaysian economy.

Hussain Ali Bekhet; Azlina Abdullah

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehilce Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COMMERCIAL TRUCKS COMMERCIAL TRUCKS AVIATION MARINE MODES RAILROADS PIPELINES OFF-ROAD EQUIPMENT Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES SERIES: Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector A Study Sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy February 2013 Prepared by ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY Argonne, IL 60439 managed by U Chicago Argonne, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

102

Reduction in tribological energy losses in the transportation and electric utilities sectors  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a study of ways and means of advancing the national energy conservation effort, particularly with regard to oil, via progress in the technology of tribology. The report is confined to two economic sectors: transportation, where the scope embraces primarily the highway fleets, and electric utilities. Together these two sectors account for half of the US energy consumption. Goal of the study is to ascertain the energy sinks attributable to tribological components and processes and to recommend long-range research and development (R and D) programs aimed at reducing these losses. In addition to the obvious tribological machine components such as bearings, piston rings, transmissions and so on, the study also extends to processes which are linked to tribology indirectly such as wear of machine parts, coatings of blades, high temperature materials leading to higher cycle efficiencies, attenuation of vibration, and other cycle improvements.

Pinkus, O.; Wilcock, D.F.; Levinson, T.M.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

104

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

105

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services [1].

106

Vehicle Technologies Office: Transitioning the Transportation Sector- Exploring the Intersection of H2 Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The "Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles" workshop report by Sandia National Laboratory summarizes a workshop that discussed common opportunities and challenges in expanding the use of hydrogen (H2) and natural gas (CNG or LNG) as transportation fuels.

107

Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 2  

SciTech Connect

The attachments contained within this appendix provide additional details about the model development and estimation process which do not easily lend themselves to incorporation in the main body of the model documentation report. The information provided in these attachments is not integral to the understanding of the model`s operation, but provides the reader with opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of some of the model`s underlying assumptions. There will be a slight degree of replication of materials found elsewhere in the documentation, made unavoidable by the dictates of internal consistency. Each attachment is associated with a specific component of the transportation model; the presentation follows the same sequence of modules employed in Volume 1. The following attachments are contained in Appendix F: Fuel Economy Model (FEM)--provides a discussion of the FEM vehicle demand and performance by size class models; Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Model--describes data input sources and extrapolation methodologies; Light-Duty Vehicle (LDV) Stock Model--discusses the fuel economy gap estimation methodology; Light Duty Vehicle Fleet Model--presents the data development for business, utility, and government fleet vehicles; Light Commercial Truck Model--describes the stratification methodology and data sources employed in estimating the stock and performance of LCT`s; Air Travel Demand Model--presents the derivation of the demographic index, used to modify estimates of personal travel demand; and Airborne Emissions Model--describes the derivation of emissions factors used to associate transportation measures to levels of airborne emissions of several pollutants.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Reducing Demand through Efficiency and Services: Impacts and Opportunities in Buildings Sector (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

SciTech Connect

Mary Ann Piette, Deputy of LBNL's Building Technologies Department and Director of the Demand Response Research Center, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

Piette, Mary Ann [Director, Demand Response Research Center] [Director, Demand Response Research Center

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

109

Reducing Demand through Efficiency and Services: Impacts and Opportunities in Buildings Sector (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Mary Ann Piette, Deputy of LBNL's Building Technologies Department and Director of the Demand Response Research Center, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

Piette, Mary Ann [Director, Demand Response Research Center

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

110

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Through Greater Efficiency: The Potential for Conservation in California’s Residential Sector. Report

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector  

SciTech Connect

The DOE is conducting a comprehensive technical analysis of a flexible-fuel transportation system in the United States -- that is, a system that could easily switch between petroleum and another fuel, depending on price and availability. The DOE Alternative Fuels Assessment is aimed directly at questions of energy security and fuel availability, but covers a wide range of issues. This report examines environmental, health, and safety concerns associated with a switch to alternative- and flexible-fuel vehicles. Three potential alternatives to oil-based fuels in the transportation sector are considered: methanol, compressed natural gas (CNG), and electricity. The objective is to describe and discuss qualitatively potential environmental, health, and safety issues that would accompany widespread use of these three fuels. This report presents the results of exhaustive literature reviews; discussions with specialists in the vehicular and fuel-production industries and with Federal, State, and local officials; and recent information from in-use fleet tests. Each chapter deals with the end-use and process emissions of air pollutants, presenting an overview of the potential air pollution contribution of the fuel --relative to that of gasoline and diesel fuel -- in various applications. Carbon monoxide, particulate matter, ozone precursors, and carbon dioxide are emphasized. 67 refs., 6 figs. , 8 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for

113

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for

114

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

115

Optimal Intercity Transportation Services with Heterogeneous Demand and Variable Fuel Price.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis we examine how fuel price variation affects the optimal mix of services in intercity transportation. Towards this end, we make two main… (more)

Ryerson, Megan Smirti

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Assessing the impact of recent fare policy changes on public transport demand in London  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public transit agencies across the world have been moving towards electronic ticketing technology and to take advantage of the greater flexibility, have made changes in fare structure. Over the last decade, Transport for ...

Jain, Nihit

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Stochastic Dynamic Demand Inventory Models with Explicit Transportation Costs and Decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the policy where several small loads will be dispatched as a single, combined load. From an inventory-modeling perspec- tive, the integrated inventory-transportation problems add dispatch quantities as decision variables to the stochastic dynamic inventory...): The vendor makes the inventory replen- ishment decisions on how much to order from the outside supplier. 2. Pure Outbound Transportation Models (PO): The collection depot makes the delivery schedules of order dispatches to the buyer(s). 3. Integrated...

Zhang, Liqing

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

commercial.gif (5196 bytes) commercial.gif (5196 bytes) The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings, however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

119

Global Climate Change, Developing Countries and Transport Sector Options in South Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Global Climate Change: Developing Countries and Transporton Global Climate Change: Developing Countries and Transporton Global Climate Change: Developing Countries and Transport

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

The Potential for Energy-Efficient Technologies to Reduce Carbon Emissions in the United States: Transport Sector  

SciTech Connect

The world is searching for a meaningful answer to the likelihood that the continued build-up of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will cause significant changes in the earth`s climate. If there is to be a solution, technology must play a central role. This paper presents the results of an assessment of the potential for cost-effective technological changes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the U.S. transportation sector by the year 2010. Other papers in this session address the same topic for buildings and industry. U.S.transportation energy use stood at 24.4 quadrillion Btu (Quads) in 1996, up 2 percent over 1995 (U.S. DOE/EIA, 1997, table 2.5). Transportation sector carbon dioxide emissions amounted to 457.2 million metric tons of carbon (MmtC) in 1995, almost one third of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions (U.S. DOE/EIA,1996a, p. 12). Transport`s energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions are growing, apparently at accelerating rates as energy efficiency improvements appear to be slowing to a halt. Cost-effective and nearly cost-effective technologies have enormous potential to slow and even reverse the growth of transport`s CO{sub 2} emissions, but technological changes will take time and are not likely to occur without significant, new public policy initiatives. Absent new initiatives, we project that CO{sub 2} emissions from transport are likely to grow to 616 MmtC by 2010, and 646 MmtC by 2015. An aggressive effort to develop and implement cost-effective technologies that are more efficient and fuels that are lower in carbon could reduce emissions by about 12% in 2010 and 18% in 2015, versus the business-as- usual projection. With substantial luck, leading to breakthroughs in key areas, reductions over the BAU case of 17% in 2010 and 25% in 2015,might be possible. In none of these case are CO{sub 2} emissions reduced to 1990 levels by 2015.

Greene, D.L.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Sector  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Overview of lessons learned, integration, barriers, enablers, federal incentives, state programs, and benefits

122

Composites for Aerospace and Transportation As the fuel costs and environment concerns continue to increase, so does the demand for composite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composites for Aerospace and Transportation As the fuel costs and environment concerns continue to increase, so does the demand for composite materials for aerospace and transportation applications. Polymer composites are inherited lighter than their metallic counterparts resulting in significant weight reduction

Li, Mo

123

Toward Novel Hybrid Biomass, Coal, and Natural Gas Processes for Satisfying Current Transportation Fuel Demands, 1: Process Alternatives, Gasification Modeling, Process Simulation, and Economic Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Toward Novel Hybrid Biomass, Coal, and Natural Gas Processes for Satisfying Current Transportation Fuel Demands, 1: Process Alternatives, Gasification Modeling, Process Simulation, and Economic Analysis ... This paper, which is the first part of a series of papers, introduces a hybrid coal, biomass, and natural gas to liquids (CBGTL) process that can produce transportation fuels in ratios consistent with current U.S. transportation fuel demands. ... Steady-state process simulation results based on Aspen Plus are presented for the seven process alternatives with a detailed economic analysis performed using the Aspen Process Economic Analyzer and unit cost functions obtained from literature. ...

Richard C. Baliban; Josephine A. Elia; Christodoulos A. Floudas

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

124

Road Transport Elasticity: How Fuel Price Changes can Affect Traffic Demand on a Toll Motorway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The crisis beginning in late 2008 in Greece, and still in progress, led the Greek Government to undertake a particularly harsh program under the joint auspices of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the European Union and the European Central Bank, aimed at restoring the primary budget surplus. The implementation of such a financial program has dramatically increased fuel taxes - about 82% for unleaded and 31% for diesel – also producing a serious impact on road traffic demand. Starting from the above framework, this paper describes the main outcomes of a study aimed at identifying, assessing and forecasting the effects of fuel prices and tax changes on traffic flows along a 365 km toll motorway corridor project connecting Athens to Tsakona, in the South-West of the Peloponnese.

Antonio Musso; Cristiana Piccioni; Michele Tozzi; Gilles Godard; Alexandre Lapeyre; Kostas Papandreou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The state-of-the-art in air transportation demand and systems analysis : a report on the proceedings of a workshop sponsored by the Civil Aeronautics Board, Department of Transportation, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (June 1975)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction and summary: Forecasting air transportation demand has indeed become a complex and risky business in recent years, especially in view of unpredictable fuel prices, high inflation rates, a declining rate of ...

Taneja, Nawal K.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Assessment of Historic Trend in Mobility and Energy Use in India Transportation Sector Using Bottom-up Approach  

SciTech Connect

Transportation mobility in India has increased significantly in the past decades. From 1970 to 2000, motorized mobility (passenger-km) has risen by 888%, compared with an 88% population growth (Singh,2006). This contributed to many energy and environmental issues, and an energy strategy incorporates efficiency improvement and other measures needs to be designed. Unfortunately, existing energy data do not provide information on driving forces behind energy use and sometime show large inconsistencies. Many previous studies address only a single transportation mode such as passenger road travel; did not include comprehensive data collection or analysis has yet been done, or lack detail on energy demand by each mode and fuel mix. The current study will fill a considerable gap in current efforts, develop a data base on all transport modes including passenger air and water, and freight in order to facilitate the development of energy scenarios and assess significance of technology potential in a global climate change model. An extensive literature review and data collection has been done to establish the database with breakdown of mobility, intensity, distance, and fuel mix of all transportation modes. Energy consumption was estimated and compared with aggregated transport consumption reported in IEA India transportation energy data. Different scenarios were estimated based on different assumptions on freight road mobility. Based on the bottom-up analysis, we estimated that the energy consumption from 1990 to 2000 increased at an annual growth rate of 7% for the mid-range road freight growth case and 12% for the high road freight growth case corresponding to the scenarios in mobility, while the IEA data only shows a 1.7% growth rate in those years.

Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Integration of renewable energy into the transport and electricity sectors through V2G  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keywords: V2G Vehicle to grid Energy system analysis Sustainable energy systems Electric vehicle EV for electricity, transport and heat, includes hourly fluctuations in human needs and the environment (wind energy systems allows integration of much higher levels of wind electricity without excess electric

Firestone, Jeremy

128

Fuel-Mix, Fuel Efficiency, and Transport Demand Affect Prospects for Biofuels in Northern Europe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Consumption structure parameters describe how the four road transport processes are being consumed, such as, for example, the amount of car-sharing and private vehicle ownership per capita—and are based on country-specific trend extrapolation using data provided by national statistical agencies and other research institutions (13-17, 35). ... As Ohrogge et al. point out, although there are uncertainties in the pace of electric car development and market penetration, future strategies aimed at promoting bioelectricity instead of ethanol for substituting conventional fuels like gasoline in cars and promoting more diesel engines in heavier vehicles may be the best route to the goal of reducing petroleum consumption and CO2 emissions (69). ... In the case of Sweden, where forest operations are highly and efficiently mechanized, this stage consumes more fossil fuels than other elements of the wood supply chain (such as silviculture and logging operations). ...

Ryan M. Bright; Anders Hammer Strřmman

2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

129

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector  

SciTech Connect

Considerable research has focused on energy efficiency and fuel substitution options for light-duty vehicles, while much less attention has been given to medium- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, aircraft, marine vessels, trains, pipeline, and off-road equipment. This report brings together the salient findings from an extensive review of literature on future energy efficiency options for these non-light-duty modes. Projected activity increases to 2050 are combined with forecasts of overall fuel efficiency improvement potential to estimate the future total petroleum and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current levels. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Vyas, A. D.; Patel, D. M.; Bertram, K. M.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

raising transportation oil demand. Growing internationalcoal by wire could reduce oil demand by stemming coal roadEastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Model documentation report: Transportation sector model of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of TRAN for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirements of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, 57(b)(1)). Third, it permits continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Link to Sector 7 Users and Collaborators Link to Sector 7 Users and Collaborators This is an incomplete list of Partners from Universities and National Labs who use the facilities at Sector 7. If you wish to add a link to your institutional page, do no hesitate to contact Eric Dufresne at the APS. The APS XSD Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics group Center for Molecular Movies at Copenhagen University Roy Clarke Group at the University of Michigan Rob Crowell Group at BNL Chris Elles's group at Kansas University Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center Fuel Injection and Spray Research Group Paul Evans's group web page at the University of Wisconsin Alexei Grigoriev's group at Univ. of Tulsa Eric Landahl's web page at DePaul University The SLAC Pulse Institute Ultrafast Materials Science group (D. Reis and A. Lindenberg)

133

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector  

SciTech Connect

The Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988 (Public Law 100-494), Section 400EE, states that the Secretary of Energy ...shall study methanol plants, including the costs and practicability of such plants that are (A) capable of utilizing current domestic supplies of unutilized natural gas; (B) relocatable; or (C) suitable for natural gas to methanol conversion by natural gas distribution companies...'' The purpose of this report is to characterize unutilized gas within the lower 48 states and to perform an economic analysis of methanol plants required by the act. The approach with regard to unutilized lower 48 gas is to (1) compare the costs of converting such gas to methanol against the expected price of gasoline over the next 20 years, and (2) compare the economics of converting such gas to methanol against the economics of using the gas as a pipeline-transported fuel. This study concludes that remote gas and low-Btu gas generally cannot be converted to methanol at costs near the expected competitive value of gasoline because of the poor economies of scale of small methanol plants.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

electricity demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords Electricity Consumption electricity demand energy use by sector New Zealand Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Consumption by Sector (1974 - 2009) (xls, 46.1 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Percentage of Consumers by Sector (2002 - 2009) (xls, 43.5 KiB)

135

Transportation Demand This  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(VMT) per vehicle by fleet type stays constant over the forecast period based on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory fleet data. Fleet fuel economy for both conventional and...

136

Optimizing U.S. Mitigation Strategies for the Light-Duty Transportation Sector: What We Learn from a Bottom-Up Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mitigating transportation emission reductions can result in significant changes in personal vehicle technologies, increases in vehicle fuel efficiency, and decreases in overall transportation fuel use. ... The Energy Independence and Security Act (H.R. 6), which includes a 36 billion gallon renewable fuel mandate, was passed by Congress and signed by President Bush on December 19, 2007. ... Mitigation strategies with the potential to achieve significant long-term transportation emission reductions often face significant competition for primary resources with other sectors, including biomass, natural gas, renewables, and coal, and for secondary energy sources such as electricity. ...

Sonia Yeh; Alex Farrell; Richard Plevin; Alan Sanstad; John Weyant

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

137

Warm Winters Held Heating Oil Demand Down While Diesel Grew  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: To understand the inventory situation, we must look the balance between demand and supply that drives inventories up or down. First consider demand. Most of the remaining charts deal with total distillate demand. Total distillate demand includes both diesel and heating oil. These are similar products physically, and prior to the low sulfur requirements for on-road diesel fuel, were used interchangeably. But even today, low sulfur diesel can be used in the heating oil market, but low sulfur requirements keep heating oil from being used in the on-road transportation sector. The seasonal increases and decreases in stocks stem from the seasonal demand in heating oil shown as the bottom red line. Heating oil demand increases by more than 50 percent from its low point to its high

138

Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 3 -- Residential and commercial sector DSM analyses: Detailed results from the DBEDT DSM assessment model; Part 1, Technical potential  

SciTech Connect

The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. Numerous tables and figures illustrating the technical potential for demand-side management are included.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Hydrogen, Transportation Topics: Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: maps.nrel.gov/ Web Application Link: maps.nrel.gov/hydra Cost: Free Language: English References: http://maps.nrel.gov/hydra Logo: Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool Use HyDRA to view, download, and analyze hydrogen data spatially and dynamically. HyDRA provides access to hydrogen demand, resource, infrastructure, cost, production, and distribution data. A user account is

140

Transportation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transportation Transportation Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends From 2009 to 2035, transportation sector energy consumption grows at an average annual rate of 0.6 percent (from 27.2 quadrillion Btu to 31.8 quadrillion Btu), slower than the 1.2 percent average rate from 1975 to 2009. The slower growth is a result of changing demographics, increased LDV fuel economy, and saturation of personal travel demand.[1] References [1] ↑ 1.0 1.1 AEO2011 Transportation Sector Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Transportation&oldid=378906" What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

SciTech Connect

This study analyzes China's coal industry by focusing on four related areas. First, data are reviewed to identify the major drivers of historical and future coal demand. Second, resource constraints and transport bottlenecks are analyzed to evaluate demand and growth scenarios. The third area assesses the physical requirements of substituting coal demand growth with other primary energy forms. Finally, the study examines the carbon- and environmental implications of China's past and future coal consumption. There are three sections that address these areas by identifying particular characteristics of China's coal industry, quantifying factors driving demand, and analyzing supply scenarios: (1) reviews the range of Chinese and international estimates of remaining coal reserves and resources as well as key characteristics of China's coal industry including historical production, resource requirements, and prices; (2) quantifies the largest drivers of coal usage to produce a bottom-up reference projection of 2025 coal demand; and (3) analyzes coal supply constraints, substitution options, and environmental externalities. Finally, the last section presents conclusions on the role of coal in China's ongoing energy and economic development. China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. In 2007 Chinese coal production contained more energy than total Middle Eastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand after 2001 created supply strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about sustainability. Urbanization, heavy industrial growth, and increasing per-capita income are the primary interrelated drivers of rising coal usage. In 2007, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement production accounted for 66% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units would save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand for the power sector. A new wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. If coal to chemicals capacity reaches 70 million tonnes and coal-to-liquids capacity reaches 60 million tonnes, coal feedstock requirements would add an additional 450 million tonnes by 2025. Even with more efficient growth among these drivers, China's annual coal demand is expected to reach 3.9 to 4.3 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not reversed China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Substitution is a matter of scale: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth of 200 million tonnes would require 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas (compared to 2007 growth of 13 BCM), 48 GW of nuclear (compared to 2007 growth of 2 GW), or 86 GW of hydropower capacity (compared to 2007 growth of 16 GW). Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on a high growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China has a low proportion of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport capacity. Furthermore, transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transportation oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 million tonnes by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets.

Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Demand Reduction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Grantees may use funds to coordinate with electricity supply companies and utilities to reduce energy demands on their power systems. These demand reduction programs are usually coordinated through...

143

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial sector energy demand Industrial sector energy demand Growth in industrial energy consumption is slower than growth in shipments figure data Despite a 76-percent increase in industrial shipments, industrial delivered energy consumption increases by only 19 percent from 2011 to 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case. The continued decline in energy intensity of the industrial sector is explained in part by a shift in the share of shipments from energy-intensive manufacturing industries (bulk chemicals, petroleum refineries, paper products, iron and steel, food products, aluminum, cement and lime, and glass) to other, less energy-intensive industries, such as plastics, computers, and transportation equipment. Also, the decline in energy intensity for the less energy-intensive industries is almost twice

144

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Market Trends - Industrial sector energy demand Market Trends - Industrial sector energy demand Growth in industrial energy consumption is slower than growth in shipments figure data Despite a 76-percent increase in industrial shipments, industrial delivered energy consumption increases by only 19 percent from 2011 to 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case. The continued decline in energy intensity of the industrial sector is explained in part by a shift in the share of shipments from energy-intensive manufacturing industries (bulk chemicals, petroleum refineries, paper products, iron and steel, food products, aluminum, cement and lime, and glass) to other, less energy-intensive industries, such as plastics, computers, and transportation equipment. Also, the decline in energy intensity for the less energy-intensive industries is almost twice

145

Transportation Sector Market Transition: Using History and Geography to Envision Possible Hydrogen Infrastructure Development and Inform Public Policy  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the challenges to building an infrastructure for hydrogen, for use as transportation fuel. Deployment technologies and policies that could quicken deployment are addressed.

Brown, E.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

To appear in International Journal of Hydrogen Energy 1 Sustainable Convergence of Electricity and Transport Sectors in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

grid investments such as new power generation installations. Keywords: Hydrogen economy, fuel cell sector based on fuel cell vehicles (FCVs). A comprehensive robust optimization planning model AFV Alternative-Fuel Vehicle. FCV Fuel Cell Vehicle. GV Gasoline Vehicle. HHV Higher Heating Value

Cañizares, Claudio A.

147

Demand Response Enabling Technologies and Approaches for Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, there are also huge opportunities for demand response in the industrial sector. This paper describes some of the demand response initiatives that are currently active in New York State, explaining applicability of industrial facilities. Next, we discuss demand...

Epstein, G.; D'Antonio, M.; Schmidt, C.; Seryak, J.; Smith, C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Transportation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

TRANSPORTATION DEMAND MODULE TRANSPORTATION DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Fuel Economy Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Regional Sales Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Alternative-Fuel Vehicle Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Light-Duty Vehicle Stock Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Vehicle-Miles Traveled (VMT) Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Light-Duty Vehicle Commercial Fleet Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Commercial Light Truck Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Air Travel Demand Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Aircraft Fleet Efficiency Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Freight Transport Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Miscellaneous Energy Use Submodule The transportation demand module (TRAN) forecasts the consumption of transportation sector fuels by transportation mode, including the use of

149

Energy demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The basic forces pushing up energy demand are population increase and economic growth. From ... of these it is possible to estimate future energy requirements.

Geoffrey Greenhalgh

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications A Reminder for Sector 7 PIs and Users: Please report your new publications to the Sector Manager and the CAT Director. The APS requires PIs to submit new publications to its Publication Database, a link which can be found on the Publication section of the APS web site. Publication information for work done at 7ID Proper acknowledgement sentences to include in papers. Sector 7 Call for APS User Activity Reports. APS User Activity Reports by MHATT-CATers. Recent articles Recent theses Sector 7 Reports Sector 7 Recent research highlights (New) Design documents in ICMS on Sector 7 construction and operation Sector 7 related ICMS documents Library Resources available on the WWW The ANL Library system ANL electronic journal list AIM Find it! Citation Ranking by ISI (see Journal citation report)

151

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial sector energy demand Industrial sector energy demand On This Page Heat and power energy... Industrial fuel mix changes... Iron and steel... Delivered energy use... Chemical industry use of fuels... Output growth for... Industrial and commercial... Heat and power energy consumption increases in manufacturing industries Despite a 54-percent increase in industrial shipments, industrial energy consumption increases by only 19 percent from 2009 to 2035 in the AEO2011 Reference case. Energy consumption growth is moderated by a shift in the mix of output, as growth in energy-intensive manufacturing output (aluminum, steel, bulk chemicals, paper, and refining) slows and growth in high-value (but less energy-intensive) industries, such as computers and transportation equipment, accelerates. figure data

152

Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type

153

Impact of energy supply infrastructure in life cycle analysis of hydrogen and electric systems applied to the Portuguese transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen and electric vehicle technologies are being considered as possible solutions to mitigate environmental burdens and fossil fuel dependency. Life cycle analysis (LCA) of energy use and emissions has been used with alternative vehicle technologies to assess the Well-to-Wheel (WTW) fuel cycle or the Cradle-to-Grave (CTG) cycle of a vehicle's materials. Fuel infrastructures, however, have thus far been neglected. This study presents an approach to evaluate energy use and CO2 emissions associated with the construction, maintenance and decommissioning of energy supply infrastructures using the Portuguese transportation system as a case study. Five light-duty vehicle technologies are considered: conventional gasoline and diesel (ICE), pure electric (EV), fuel cell hybrid (FCHEV) and fuel cell plug-in hybrid (FC-PHEV). With regard to hydrogen supply, two pathways are analysed: centralised steam methane reforming (SMR) and on-site electrolysis conversion. Fast, normal and home options are considered for electric chargers. We conclude that energy supply infrastructures for FC vehicles are the most intensive with 0.03–0.53 MJeq/MJ emitting 0.7–27.3 g CO2eq/MJ of final fuel. While fossil fuel infrastructures may be considered negligible (presenting values below 2.5%), alternative technologies are not negligible when their overall LCA contribution is considered. EV and FCHEV using electrolysis report the highest infrastructure impact from emissions with approximately 8.4% and 8.3%, respectively. Overall contributions including uncertainty do not go beyond 12%.

Alexandre Lucas; Rui Costa Neto; Carla Alexandra Silva

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

sector | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sector sector Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 5, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption sector South Atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 297.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

155

Q:\asufinal_0107_demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

00 00 (AEO2000) Assumptions to the January 2000 With Projections to 2020 DOE/EIA-0554(2000) Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution

156

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sector 7 : Time Resolved Research Group Sector 7 is operated by the Time Resolved Research Group, which is part of the X-ray Science Division (XSD) of the Advanced Photon Source. Our research focus is the study of Ultrafast fs-laser excitation of matter, using x-ray scattering and spectroscopy techniques. The sector developped two hard x-ray beamlines (7ID and 7BM) focused on time-resolved science. The 7BM beamline has been dedicated for time-resolved radiography of fuel sprays. Sector 7 Links: What's New Beamlines Overview User information: Getting Beamtime Current Research Programs Links to our partners, and collaborators (New) Publications Contact information Operational data (w/ current 7ID schedule) ES&H information (ESAF, EOR, TMS training, User Training)

157

Sector X  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X X If there is an emergency at ETTP requiring evacuation, Sector X reports to the shelter at: Oak Ridge High School 127 Providence Road Oak Ridge, TN 37830 Take most direct route to northbound Bethel Valley Road toward Oak Ridge. Turn left onto Illinois Avenue (Highway 62). Turn right onto Oak Ridge Turnpike and turn left to Oak Ridge High School. If there is an emergency at ORNL requiring evacuation, Sector X reports to the shelter at: Karns High School 2710 Byington Solway Road Knoxville, TN 37931 Take most direct route to northbound Bethel Valley Road toward Knoxville. Then take a left at Highway 62 (Oak Ridge Highway) eastbound to Knoxville. Take a right onto State Route 131 (Byington Beaver Ridge) to Karns High School. If there is an emergency at Y-12 requiring evacuation, Sector X reports to the shelter at:

158

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: News : News Sector 7 calendar of events. APS News APS Monthly meeting slides What's new at the APS Sector 7? 2013 news 2012 news 2011 news 2010 news 2009 news 2008 news 2007 news 2006 news 2005 news 2004 news 2003 news 2002 news 2001 news 2013 News from APS Sector 7 May 2013: Ruben Reininger et al. recently published an article on the optical design of the SPX Imaging and Microscopy beamline (SPXIM). The details can be found on the RSI web site here. A new web page is now available to guide 7-BM users. See the official 7-BM web page for more details. 2012 News from APS Sector 7 August 2012: Jin Wang gave a talk on August 29, 2012 entitled "The APS 7-BM is Open for Business, Officially!" at the August APS Monthly Operation Meeting. On August 1, Alan Kastengren joined the X-ray Science Division to operate the 7-BM beamline. Alan has been involved in the construction

159

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Transportation of Depleted Uranium Materials in Support of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Program Issues associated with transport of depleted UF6 cylinders and conversion products. Conversion Plan Transportation Requirements The DOE has prepared two Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) for the proposal to build and operate depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6) conversion facilities at its Portsmouth and Paducah gaseous diffusion plant sites, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The proposed action calls for transporting the cylinder at ETTP to Portsmouth for conversion. The transportation of depleted UF6 cylinders and of the depleted uranium conversion products following conversion was addressed in the EISs.

160

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Risks » Transportation Health Risks » Transportation DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Transportation A discussion of health risks associated with transport of depleted UF6. Transport Regulations and Requirements In the future, it is likely that depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinders will be transported to a conversion facility. For example, it is currently anticipated that the cylinders at the ETTP Site in Oak Ridge, TN, will be transported to the Portsmouth Site, OH, for conversion. Uranium hexafluoride has been shipped safely in the United States for over 40 years by both truck and rail. Shipments of depleted UF6 would be made in accordance with all applicable transportation regulations. Shipment of depleted UF6 is regulated by the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABORATORY Japan’s Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030o r n i a Japan’s Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030residential sector, where energy demand has grown vigorously

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment for Eastern Interconnection Youngsun Baek, Stanton W. Hadley, Rocio Martinez, Gbadebo Oladosu, Alexander M. Smith, Fran Li, Paul Leiby and Russell Lee Prepared for FY12 DOE-CERTS Transmission Reliability R&D Internal Program Review September 20, 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy DOE National Laboratory Studies Funded to Support FOA 63 * DOE set aside $20 million from transmission funding for national laboratory studies. * DOE identified four areas of interest: 1. Transmission Reliability 2. Demand Side Issues 3. Water and Energy 4. Other Topics * Argonne, NREL, and ORNL support for EIPC/SSC/EISPC and the EISPC Energy Zone is funded through Area 4. * Area 2 covers LBNL and NREL work in WECC and

163

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-3047E Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers G described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers. California Energy

164

Transport Infrastructure and the Environment: Sustainable Mobility and Urbanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sector’s share of global oil demand grew from 33 percent indrive the growth in oil demand (IEA, 2011). World reservesand thus increasing demands for oil, many observe believe it

Cervero, Robert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

service sector | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

service sector service sector Dataset Summary Description The energy consumption data consists of five spreadsheets: "overall data tables" plus energy consumption data for each of the following sectors: transport, domestic, industrial and service. Each of the five spreadsheets contains a page of commentary and interpretation. Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released July 31st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption coal Coke domestic Electricity Electricity Consumption energy data Industrial Natural Gas Petroleum service sector transportation UK Data application/zip icon Five Excel spreadsheets with UK Energy Consumption data (zip, 2.6 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment The data in ECUK are classified as National Statistics

166

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. energy demand U.S. energy demand In the United States, average energy use per person declines from 2010 to 2035 figure data Growth in energy use is linked to population growth through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and goods and services. These changes affect not only the level of energy use but also the mix of fuels consumed. Changes in the structure of the economy and in the efficiency of the equipment deployed throughout the economy also have an impact on energy use per capita. The shift in the industrial sector away from energy-intensive manufacturing toward services is one reason for the projected decline in industrial energy intensity (energy use per dollar of GDP), but its impact on energy consumption per capita is less direct (Figure 71). From 1990 to

167

Transportation Efficiency Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Transportation efficiency reduces travel demand as measured by vehicle miles traveled (VMT). While transportation efficiency policies are often implemented under local governments, national and...

168

Commercial & Industrial Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response...

169

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

170

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Programs Research Programs Sector 7's research program exploits the brilliance of the APS undulator radiation to perform material research studies with high spatial and temporal resolution. Microbeam studies are made using x-ray beam sizes on the submicron-scale, and time-resolved diffraction measurements are carried out with picosecond resolution. Sector 7's undulator line has experimental enclosures dedicated to both time-resolved and microbeam research. In one of these enclosures (7ID-D), a femtosecond laser facility is set up for ultrafast diffraction and spectroscopy studies in a pump-probe geometry. The 7ID-B hutch is a white beam capable station used for time-resolved phase-contrast imaging and beamline optics development. A third enclosure (7ID-C) is instrumented for high-resolution diffraction studies with a Huber 6-circle diffractometer. The instrument is ideal for thin-film and interface studies, including the recently developed Coherent Bragg Rod Analysis (COBRA) technique. The fs-laser has recently been delivered to 7ID-C so time-resolved laser pump-x-ray probe can be performed in 7ID-C since March 2007. An x-ray streak camera is also being commissioned in 7ID-C. 7ID-C is equipped for microdiffraction studies with a small Huber 4-cicle diffractometer used with zone-plate optics.

171

Economic development and the structure of the demand for commercial energy  

SciTech Connect

To deepen understanding of the relation between economic development and energy demand, this study estimates the relations between per-capita GDP and per-capita energy consumption in major economic sectors. Panel data covering up to 123 nations are employed, and measurement problems are treated both in dataset construction and in estimation. Time and country fixed effects are assumed, and flexible forms for income effects are employed. There are substantial differences among sectors in the structure of country, time, and income effects. In particular, the household sector's share of aggregate energy consumption tends to fall with income, the share of transportation tends to rise, and the share of industry follows an inverse-U pattern.

Judson, R.A.; Schmalensee, R.; Stoker, T.M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Transportation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Transportation International Energy Outlook 2010 Transportation Sector Energy Consumption In the IEO2010 Reference case, transportation energy use in non-OECD countries increases by an average of 2.6 percent per year from 2007 to 2035, as compared with an average of 0.3 percent per year for OECD countries. Overview Energy use in the transportation sector includes the energy consumed in moving people and goods by road, rail, air, water, and pipeline. The road transport component includes light-duty vehicles, such as automobiles, sport utility vehicles, minivans, small trucks, and motorbikes, as well as heavy-duty vehicles, such as large trucks used for moving freight and buses used for passenger travel. Consequently, transportation sector energy demand hinges on growth rates for both economic activity and the driving-age population. Economic growth spurs increases in industrial output, which requires the movement of raw materials to manufacturing sites, as well as the movement of manufactured goods to end users.

173

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Transportation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

transportation demand module (TRAN) forecasts the consumption of transportation sector fuels by transportation mode, including the use of renewables and alternative fuels, subject to delivered prices of energy fuels and macroeconomic variables, including disposable personal income, gross domestic product, level of imports and exports, industrial output, new car and light truck sales, and population. The structure of the module is shown in Figure 8. transportation demand module (TRAN) forecasts the consumption of transportation sector fuels by transportation mode, including the use of renewables and alternative fuels, subject to delivered prices of energy fuels and macroeconomic variables, including disposable personal income, gross domestic product, level of imports and exports, industrial output, new car and light truck sales, and population. The structure of the module is shown in Figure 8. Figure 8. Transportation Demand Module Structure NEMS projections of future fuel prices influence the fuel efficiency, vehicle-miles traveled, and alternative-fuel vehicle (AFV) market penetration for the current fleet of vehicles. Alternative-fuel shares are projected on the basis of a multinomial logit vehicle attribute model, subject to State and Federal government mandates.

174

New Zealand Energy Data: Electricity Demand and Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Demand and Consumption Electricity Demand and Consumption Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). The sectors included are: agriculture, forestry and fishing; industrial (mining, food processing, wood and paper, chemicals, basic metals, other minor sectors); commercial; and residential. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago)

175

Fact #561: March 9, 2009 All Sectors' Petroleum Gap  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Before 1989 the U.S. produced enough petroleum to meet the needs of the transportation sector, but was still short of meeting the petroleum needs of all the sectors, including industrial,...

176

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Information & Getting Beamtime User Information & Getting Beamtime There are three ways to request beamtime to perform an experiment on APS-7ID. One can request beam time as an APS General User, as an APS Partner User, or one can contact a staff member of Sector 7 to work collaboratively with them using a small amount of staff time to gather preliminary data. 80% of the available beamtime on 7ID is given to General and Partner Users, while 20% is reserved for staff use. Beam time is allocated and announced by email shortly before the start of an experimental run. In October 2002, beamline 7ID welcomed its first APS General Users (GU). To gain access to 7ID, General or Partner Users are required to submit a proposal to the APS GU Website by the specified deadline. Sucessful proposals will be scheduled for the next cycle following the proposal deadline. There are three proposal cycles per year with deadlines about two months before the start of a run. The deadlines and General User forms are available on the web through the APS General User Web site. Specific instructions for new General Users are available on the site. These instructions can be helpful also for new APS Users in general.

177

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview and History Overview and History Sector 7 consists of two APS beamlines: 7-ID: an insertion device beamline based on an APS Type-A Undulator 7-BM: a bend magnet beam line for time-resolved radiography (currently being commissioned) Overview of 7-ID 7-ID comprises four large experimental enclosures designated A, B, C, and D. In 2004, a laser enclosure was also added (7ID-E). Enclosure 7-ID-A is the first optics enclosure and houses a polished Be window, an empty x-ray filter unit, a pair of white beam slits, a water-cooled double crystal diamond monochromator (Kohzu HLD4), and a P4 mode shutter. The beamline vertical offset is 35 mm. Enclosure 7-ID-B is a white-, or monochromatic-beam experimental enclosure. It is equipped with two precision motorized table for alignment and positioning of experimental equipment. This station is used for white-beam imaging or microdiffraction experiments.

178

Transportation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The romantic rides in Sandburg’s “eagle-car” changed society. On the one hand, motor vehicle transportation is an integral thread of society’s fabric. On the other hand, excess mobility fractures old neighborh...

David Hafemeister

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

D:\assumptions_2001\assumptions2002\currentassump\demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Petroleum Market Module. . . . . . . . . . . . .

180

Downstream Emissions Trading for Transport  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter addresses the issue of downstream emission trading within the transport sector. It is argued that emission trading may be relevant in this sector, and ... regarding international transport, it is arg...

Charles Raux

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Electricity Demand Figure 60. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel, 2006 and 2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Residential and Commercial Sectors Dominate Electricity Demand Growth Total electricity sales increase by 29 percent in the AEO2008 reference case, from 3,659 billion kilowatthours in 2006 to 4,705 billion in 2030, at an average rate of 1.1 percent per year. The relatively slow growth follows the historical trend, with the growth rate slowing in each succeeding

182

Transportation energy strategy: Project {number_sign}5 of the Hawaii Energy Strategy Development Program  

SciTech Connect

This study was prepared for the State Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) as part of the Hawaii Energy Strategy program. Authority and responsibility for energy planning activities, such as the Hawaii Energy Strategy, rests with the State Energy Resources Coordinator, who is the Director of DBEDT. Hawaii Energy Strategy Study No. 5, Transportation Energy Strategy Development, was prepared to: collect and synthesize information on the present and future use of energy in Hawaii`s transportation sector, examine the potential of energy conservation to affect future energy demand; analyze the possibility of satisfying a portion of the state`s future transportation energy demand through alternative fuels; and recommend a program targeting energy use in the state`s transportation sector to help achieve state goals. The analyses and conclusions of this report should be assessed in relation to the other Hawaii Energy Strategy Studies in developing a comprehensive state energy program. 56 figs., 87 tabs.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

http://tti.tamu.edu Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

http://tti.tamu.edu Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation >>> Transportation operat > Freight traffic > Commodities > Travel time > Travel demand > http

184

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Factors behind declining demand for oil include a shift fromfuel. In the industrial sector, oil demand will decrease dueto a falling demand for oil for chemical materials. In the

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

186

Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 2 Climate and Transportation Solutions Chapter 3:Gas Emissions in the Transportation Sector by John Conti,Chase, and John Maples Transportation is the single largest

Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Impacts of Temperature Variation on Energy Demand in Buildings (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In the residential and commercial sectors, heating and cooling account for more than 40% of end-use energy demand. As a result, energy consumption in those sectors can vary significantly from year to year, depending on yearly average temperatures.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Fuel and Vehicle Technology Choices for Passenger Vehicles in Achieving Stringent CO2 Targets: Connections between Transportation and Other Energy Sectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Five fuel options (petroleum, natural gas, synthetic fuels (coal to liquid, CTL; gas to liquid, GTL; biomass to liquid, BTL), electricity, and hydrogen) and five vehicle technologies (ICEV, HEV, BEV, PHEV, and FCV) were considered. ... Petro ICEV, Synth ICEV, NG ICEV, H2 ICEV = internal combustion engine vehicle fueled either by petroleum, synthetic fuel (CTL, GTL, or BTL), natural gas, or gaseous hydrogen; HEV = hybrid electric vehicle; BEV = battery electric vehicle, PHEV = plug-in hybrid electric vehicle; Petro FCV, Synth FCV, H2 FCV = fuel-cell vehicle fueled either by petroleum, synthetic fuel, or gaseous hydrogen. ... In their CO2 reduction scenario (reduction from 1990 of 50% by 2050 and 75% by 2100), the car sector is dominated by gasoline/diesel (first in ICEVs, then HEVs and to a small extent also PHEVs) with hydrogen-fueled FCVs becoming dominant by 2100. ...

M. Grahn; C. Azar; M. I. Williander; J. E. Anderson; S. A. Mueller; T. J. Wallington

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

189

Sector 6 Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 APS Pubs. Database Sector 6 Publications Publications 2013:(45) "Classical and quantum phase transitions revealed using transport and x-ray measurements," Arnab Banerjee, Ph.D.-Thesis, University of Chicago, 2013. "Charge transfer and multiple density waves in the rare earth tellurides," A. Banerjee, Yejun Feng, D.M. Silevitch, Jiyang Wang, J.C. Lang, H.-H. Kuo, I.R. Fisher, T.F. Rosenbaum, Phys. Rev. B 87, 155131 (2013). "Controlling Size-Induced Phase Transformations Using Chemically Designed Nanolaminates," Matt Beekman, Sabrina Disch, Sergei Rouvimov, Deepa Kasinathan, Klaus Koepernik, Helge Rosner, Paul Zschack, Wolfgang S. Neumann, David C. Johnson, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 52, 13211 (2013).

190

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response:both the avoided energy costs (and demand charges) as wellCoordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response,

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Energy demand and indoor climate of a traditional low-energy building in a hot climate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Energy demand in the built environment is quite important. China holds a large population and the energy use in the building sector is about… (more)

Li, Ang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Model for Analysis of Energy Demand (MAED-2) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis of Energy Demand (MAED-2) AgencyCompany Organization: International Atomic Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency Topics: Pathways...

193

LEAPs and Bounds—an Energy Demand and Constraint Optimised Model of the Irish Energy System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper builds a model of energy demand and supply for Ireland with a focus on evaluating, and providing insights for, energy efficiency policies. The demand-side comprises sectoral sub-models, with a ... line...

Fionn Rogan; Caiman J. Cahill; Hannah E. Daly; Denis Dineen…

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Impact on Implementing Demand Side Management in Residential Sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Residential electricity consumption in Malaysia increased at a rate of 14% per year between 1993 to 1997. In 1998, over 60% of population lived in urban areas. The growth of urban population at a rate of 4% per a...

H. A. Rahman; M. S. Majid; M. Y. Hassan…

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

“Demand-Side Management (DSM) in the Electricity Sector:peg/publications/dsm_electricity_sector_057A01.pdfreview_of_nashik_pilot_CFL_DSM_program_of_ MSEDCL_092A01.pdf

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

benefits of Demand Side Management (DSM) are insufficient toefficiency, demand side management (DSM) cost effectivenessResearch Center Demand Side Management Demand Side Resources

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Due to limited parking, all visitors are strongly encouraged to: Due to limited parking, all visitors are strongly encouraged to: 1) car-pool, 2) take the Lab's special conference shuttle service, or 3) take the regular off-site shuttle. If you choose to use the regular off-site shuttle bus, you will need an authorized bus pass, which can be obtained by contacting Eric Essman in advance. Transportation & Visitor Information Location and Directions to the Lab: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is located in Berkeley, on the hillside directly above the campus of University of California at Berkeley. The address is One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720. For comprehensive directions to the lab, please refer to: http://www.lbl.gov/Workplace/Transportation.html Maps and Parking Information: On Thursday and Friday, a limited number (15) of barricaded reserved parking spaces will be available for NON-LBNL Staff SNAP Collaboration Meeting participants in parking lot K1, in front of building 54 (cafeteria). On Saturday, plenty of parking spaces will be available everywhere, as it is a non-work day.

198

Mass Market Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

199

Demand Response Assessment INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response Assessment INTRODUCTION This appendix provides more detail on some of the topics raised in Chapter 4, "Demand Response" of the body of the Plan. These topics include 1. The features, advantages and disadvantages of the main options for stimulating demand response (price mechanisms

200

Fact #609: February 8, 2010 The Transportation Petroleum Gap...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09: February 8, 2010 The Transportation Petroleum Gap Fact 609: February 8, 2010 The Transportation Petroleum Gap In 1989 the transportation sector petroleum consumption surpassed...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fact #560: March 2, 2009 The Transportation Petroleum Gap | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: March 2, 2009 The Transportation Petroleum Gap Fact 560: March 2, 2009 The Transportation Petroleum Gap In 1989 the transportation sector petroleum consumption surpassed U.S....

202

Fact #687: August 8, 2011 The Transportation Petroleum Gap |...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

7: August 8, 2011 The Transportation Petroleum Gap Fact 687: August 8, 2011 The Transportation Petroleum Gap In 1989 the transportation sector petroleum consumption surpassed U.S....

203

Projections of highway vehicle population, energy demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions in India through 2040.  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents projections of motor vehicles, oil demand, and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions for India through the year 2040. The populations of highway vehicles and two-wheelers are projected under three different scenarios on the basis of economic growth and average household size in India. The results show that by 2040, the number of highway vehicles in India would be 206-309 million. The oil demand projections for the Indian transportation sector are based on a set of nine scenarios arising out of three vehicle-growth and three fuel-economy scenarios. The combined effects of vehicle-growth and fuel-economy scenarios, together with the change in annual vehicle usage, result in a projected demand in 2040 by the transportation sector in India of 404-719 million metric tons (8.5-15.1 million barrels per day). The corresponding annual CO{sub 2} emissions are projected to be 1.2-2.2 billion metric tons.

Arora, S.; Vyas, A.; Johnson, L.; Energy Systems

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

204

Electricity demand and supply projections for Indian economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present paper deals with an econometric model to forecast future electricity requirements for various sectors of Indian economy. Following the analysis of time series of sectoral GDPs, number of consumers in various sectors and price indices of electricity, a logarithmic linear regression model has been developed to forecast long-term demand of electricity up to the year 2045. Using the historical GDP growth in various sectors and the corresponding electricity consumption for the period 1971-2005, it is predicted that the total electricity demand will be 5000 billion kWh, against a supply of 1500 billion kWh in the year 2045. This may lead to a disastrous situation for the country unless drastic policy measures are taken to improve the supply side as well as to reduce demand.

Subhash Mallah; N.K. Bansal

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Aviation fuel demand development in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper analyzes the core factors and the impact path of aviation fuel demand in China and conducts a structural decomposition analysis of the aviation fuel cost changes and increase of the main aviation enterprises’ business profits. Through the establishment of an integrated forecast model for China’s aviation fuel demand, this paper confirms that the significant rise in China’s aviation fuel demand because of increasing air services demand is more than offset by higher aviation fuel efficiency. There are few studies which use a predictive method to decompose, estimate and analyze future aviation fuel demand. Based on a structural decomposition with indirect prediction, aviation fuel demand is decomposed into efficiency and total amount (aviation fuel efficiency and air transport total turnover). The core influencing factors for these two indexes are selected using path analysis. Then, univariate and multivariate models (ETS/ARIMA model and Bayesian multivariate regression) are used to analyze and predict both aviation fuel efficiency and air transport total turnover. At last, by integrating results, future aviation fuel demand is forecast. The results show that the aviation fuel efficiency goes up by 0.8% as the passenger load factor increases 1%; the air transport total turnover goes up by 3.8% and 0.4% as the urbanization rate and the per capita GDP increase 1%, respectively. By the end of 2015, China’s aviation fuel demand will have increased to 28 million tonnes, and is expected to be 50 million tonnes by 2020. With this in mind, increases in the main aviation enterprises’ business profits must be achieved through the further promotion of air transport.

Jian Chai; Zhong-Yu Zhang; Shou-Yang Wang; Kin Keung Lai; John Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Energy Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data Figure 55 From AEO2011 report . Market Trends Growth in energy use is linked to population growth through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and goods and services. These changes affect not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels used. Energy consumption per capita declined from 337 million Btu in 2007 to 308 million Btu in 2009, the lowest level since 1967. In the AEO2011 Reference case, energy use per capita increases slightly through 2013, as the economy recovers from the 2008-2009 economic downturn. After 2013, energy use per capita declines by 0.3 percent per year on average, to 293 million Btu in 2035, as higher efficiency standards for vehicles and

207

Regional Allocation of Biomass to U.S. Energy Demands under a Portfolio of Policy Scenarios  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study develops a spatially explicit, best-use framework to optimally allocate cellulosic biomass feedstocks to energy demands in transportation, electricity, and residential heating sectors, while minimizing total system costs and tracking greenhouse gas emissions. ... Steubing et al.(6) consider the optimal use of several biomass feedstocks to substitute fossil energy technologies in Europe, which is broader than the previously listed studies, but the authors use a ranking method to identify preferred allocation strategies with a nonspatial model. ... This study builds on these studies in developing a spatially explicit, best-use framework for model year 2020 that optimally allocates cellulosic biomass feedstocks to competing energy end uses (heating, transportation, electricity) based on minimizing total system costs. ...

Kimberley A. Mullins; Aranya Venkatesh; Amy L. Nagengast; Matt Kocoloski

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

208

Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral Approach Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport:...

209

International Transportation Energy Demand Determinants (ITEDD...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

type Commercial Vehicle Sales Comm Sales by Technology Type Personal Vehicle Sales Private Sales by Technology Type Stock Accounting by Vehicle and Techn Type Policy...

210

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IEfficiency and Demand Response Programs for 2005/2006,Application to Demand Response Energy Pricing” SenSys 2003,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Demand Response Programs for Oregon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response Programs for Oregon Utilities Public Utility Commission May 2003 Public Utility ....................................................................................................................... 1 Types of Demand Response Programs............................................................................ 3 Demand Response Programs in Oregon

213

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

behavior in developing a demand response future. Phase_II_Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IIYi Yuan The goal of the Demand Response Enabling Technology

Arens, Edward; Auslander, David; Huizenga, Charlie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Demand Response In California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation covers the demand response in California and is given at the FUPWG 2006 Fall meeting, held on November 1-2, 2006 in San Francisco, California.

216

Energy Demand Forecasting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents alternative approaches used in forecasting energy demand and discusses their pros and cons. It... Chaps. 3 and 4 ...

S. C. Bhattacharyya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Demand Side Bidding. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This document sets forth the final report for a financial assistance award for the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) to enhance coordination between the building operators and power system operators in terms of demand-side responses to Location Based Marginal Pricing (LBMP). Potential benefits of this project include improved power system reliability, enhanced environmental quality, mitigation of high locational prices within congested areas, and the reduction of market barriers for demand-side market participants. NARUC, led by its Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment (ERE), actively works to promote the development and use of energy efficiency and clean distributive energy policies within the framework of a dynamic regulatory environment. Electric industry restructuring, energy shortages in California, and energy market transformation intensifies the need for reliable information and strategies regarding electric reliability policy and practice. NARUC promotes clean distributive generation and increased energy efficiency in the context of the energy sector restructuring process. NARUC, through ERE's Subcommittee on Energy Efficiency, strives to improve energy efficiency by creating working markets. Market transformation seeks opportunities where small amounts of investment can create sustainable markets for more efficient products, services, and design practices.

Spahn, Andrew

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Deep carbon reductions in California require electrification and integration across economic sectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Meeting a greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction target of 80% below 1990 levels in the year 2050 requires detailed long-term planning due to complexity, inertia, and path dependency in the energy system. A detailed investigation of supply and demand alternatives is conducted to assess requirements for future California energy systems that can meet the 2050 GHG target. Two components are developed here that build novel analytic capacity and extend previous studies: (1) detailed bottom-up projections of energy demand across the building, industry and transportation sectors; and (2) a high-resolution variable renewable resource capacity planning model (SWITCH) that minimizes the cost of electricity while meeting GHG policy goals in the 2050 timeframe. Multiple pathways exist to a low-GHG future, all involving increased efficiency, electrification, and a dramatic shift from fossil fuels to low-GHG energy. The electricity system is found to have a diverse, cost-effective set of options that meet aggressive GHG reduction targets. This conclusion holds even with increased demand from transportation and heating, but the optimal levels of wind and solar deployment depend on the temporal characteristics of the resulting load profile. Long-term policy support is found to be a key missing element for the successful attainment of the 2050 GHG target in California.

Max Wei; James H Nelson; Jeffery B Greenblatt; Ana Mileva; Josiah Johnston; Michael Ting; Christopher Yang; Chris Jones; James E McMahon; Daniel M Kammen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Convergence of carbon dioxide emissions in different sectors in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, we analyze differences in per capita carbon dioxide emissions from 1996 to 2010 in six sectors across 28 provinces in China and examine the ?-convergence, stochastic convergence and ?-convergence of these emissions. We also investigate the factors that impact the convergence of per capita carbon dioxide emissions in each sector. The results show that per capita carbon dioxide emissions in all sectors converged across provinces from 1996 to 2010. Factors that impact the convergence of per capita carbon dioxide emissions in each sector vary: GDP (gross domestic product) per capita, industrialization process and population density impact convergence in the Industry sector, while GDP per capita and population density impact convergence in the Transportation, Storage, Postal, and Telecommunications Services sector. Aside from GDP per capita and population density, trade openness also impacts convergence in the Wholesale, Retail, Trade, and Catering Service sector. Population density is the only factor that impacts convergence in the Residential Consumption sector.

Juan Wang; Kezhong Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Demand Management Institute (DMI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Demand Management Institute (DMI) Demand Management Institute (DMI) Jump to: navigation, search Name Demand Management Institute (DMI) Address 35 Walnut Street Place Wellesley, Massachusetts Zip 02481 Sector Buildings Product Provides analysis for buildings on reducing energy use Website http://www.dmiinc.com/ Coordinates 42.3256508°, -71.2530294° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3256508,"lon":-71.2530294,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Sector 1 welcome  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome to Sector 1 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) located at Argonne Welcome to Sector 1 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) located at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The Sector 1 beamlines are operated by the Materials Physics & Engineering Group (MPE) of the APS X-ray Science Division (XSD). Sector 1 consists of the 1-ID and 1-BM beamlines, and 80% of the available beamtime is accessible to outside users through the General User program. The main programs pursued at Sector 1 are described below. 1-ID is dedicated to providing and using brilliant, high-energy x-ray beams (50-150 keV) for the following activities: Coupled high-energy small- and wide-angle scattering (HE-SAXS/WAXS) High-energy diffraction microscopy (HEDM) Sector 1 General Layout Stress/strain/texture studies Pair-distribution function (PDF) measurements

222

CALIFORNIA ENERGY CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2010-2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prepared the industrial forecast. Mark Ciminelli forecasted energy for transportation, communication developed the energy efficiency program estimates. Glen Sharp prepared the residential sector forecast ................................................................................................................... 2 EndUser Natural Gas Forecast Results

223

Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

224

Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

225

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...designed to co-feed a biomass gasifier with H2 and CO2 recycled from...the benefits. In a typical gasifier, oxygen and steam are supplied...value of the coal fed to the gasifier. Energy in the H 2 goes toward...think of the synthetic oil as a medium for storing H 2 , then the...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biomass for the H 2 CAR process will always...improvement in PV cell and electrolyzer efficiencies...generate electricity or hydrogen from solar cells or an alternative...energy as synthetic fuels. Comparison with...requirement for the H 2 CAR process with the...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...7). Both of these energy carriers, when produced...carbon-free primary energy source such as nuclear, solar, wind, etc. or a...with technical and economical challenges. For the...storage density of the energy (6). The current...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a Billion-Ton Annual Supply , www1.eere.energy.gov/biomass/publications...Composition and Property Database , www1.eere.energy.gov/biomass/feedstock_databases...Billion-Ton Annual Supply http://www1.eere.energy.gov/biomass/publications...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...were recycled to the gasifier. ASPEN (23) simulations...decreases to support a given size of plant. (viii) Less...by using biomass Case Gasifier efficiency, % Biomass land area...of the coal fed to the gasifier. Energy in the H 2 goes...the synthetic oil as a medium for storing H 2 , then...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Climate forcing from the transport sectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...National Greenhouse Gas Inventories ( Institute for Global Environmental...century, ships were fired by coal...use and electricity generation. The data on electricity generation includes renewable...biomass burning, nuclear power, hydroelectric power...

Jan Fuglestvedt; Terje Berntsen; Gunnar Myhre; Kristin Rypdal; Ragnhild Bieltvedt Skeie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...source of liquid hydrocarbon fuels (16, 17...gasification data provided in...produce liquid hydrocarbon fuel. In our...The resulting combustion energy not only provides heat for the endothermic...pass from the hydrocarbon conversion...well as other heat requirements...From the NRC data in Table E-23...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Climate forcing from the transport sectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...conversion from coal to diesel propulsion but later...memory of the carbon cycle; man-made emissions...Integrated RF is a general indicator that is...the use of gasoline and diesel. In terms of CO 2 equivalents...for aviation fuel and diesel for shipping...

Jan Fuglestvedt; Terje Berntsen; Gunnar Myhre; Kristin Rypdal; Ragnhild Bieltvedt Skeie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...IN 47907 A hybrid hydrogen-carbon...open loop system. (iv...annualized average solar energy conversion...solar, wind, etc. or...source such as solar, nuclear, wind, etc...processing system, and the...source such as solar, nuclear...named the hybrid H 2 -carbon...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biomass to obtain synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of CO and H 2 , and...assuming that the conversion of syngas to diesel is 100% selective...feed stock. The resulting combustion energy not only provides heat...formed in the gasifier from the combustion reaction and through the water...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Property:ProgramSector | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ProgramSector ProgramSector Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "ProgramSector" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2008 Solar Technologies Market Report + Energy + 2010 Solar Market Transformation Analysis and Tools + Energy + 2011 APTA Public Transportation Fact Book + Energy + A A Case for Climate Neutrality: Case Studies on Moving Towards a Low Carbon Economy + Energy +, Land +, Climate + A Conceptual Framework for Progressing Towards Sustainability in the Agriculture and Food Sector + Land + A Guide to Community Solar: Utility, Private, and Non-profit Project Development + Energy + A Low Carbon Economic Strategy for Scotland + Energy +, Land + A Municipal Official's Guide to Diesel Idling Reduction + Climate +, Energy +

236

Applying electrical utility least-cost approach to transportation planning  

SciTech Connect

Members of the energy and environmental communities believe that parallels exist between electrical utility least-cost planning and transportation planning. In particular, the Washington State Energy Strategy Committee believes that an integrated and comprehensive transportation planning process should be developed to fairly evaluate the costs of both demand-side and supply-side transportation options, establish competition between different travel modes, and select the mix of options designed to meet system goals at the lowest cost to society. Comparisons between travel modes are also required under the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA). ISTEA calls for the development of procedures to compare demand management against infrastructure investment solutions and requires the consideration of efficiency, socioeconomic and environmental factors in the evaluation process. Several of the techniques and approaches used in energy least-cost planning and utility peak demand management can be incorporated into a least-cost transportation planning methodology. The concepts of avoided plants, expressing avoidable costs in levelized nominal dollars to compare projects with different on-line dates and service lives, the supply curve, and the resource stack can be directly adapted from the energy sector.

McCoy, G.A.; Growdon, K.; Lagerberg, B.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

[Type text] [Type text] Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study September 2011 September 2011 Page 2 Abstract The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) collaborated to examine the interdependencies between two critical infrastructure sectors - Dams and Energy. 1 The study highlights the importance of hydroelectric power generation, with a particular emphasis on the variability of weather patterns and competing demands for water which determine the water available for hydropower production. In recent years, various regions of the Nation suffered drought, impacting stakeholders in both the Dams and Energy Sectors. Droughts have the potential to affect the operation of dams and reduce hydropower production,

238

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Demand Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Demand Module calculates energy consumption for the four Census Regions (see Figure 5) and disaggregates the energy consumption

239

demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

240

RTP Customer Demand Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides new evidence on customer demand response to hourly pricing from the largest and...real-time pricing...(RTP) program in the United States. RTP creates value by inducing load reductions at times...

Steven Braithwait; Michael O’Sheasy

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

World Energy Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A reliable forecast of energy resources, energy consumption, and population in the future is a ... So, instead of absolute figures about future energy demand and sources worldwide, which would become...3.1 correl...

Giovanni Petrecca

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Floorspace Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Service Demand Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Equipment Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Consumption Submodule The commercial demand module (CDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for eight marketed energy sources plus solar thermal energy. For the three major commercial sector fuels, electricity, natural gas and distillate oil, the CDM is a "structural" model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the commercial floorspace stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. For the remaining five marketed "minor fuels," simple econometric projections are made. The commercial sector encompasses business establishments that are not

243

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecosystems National Security Tourism Transportation Water Resources NOAA Satellite and Information Service National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) National Climatic DataNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet AGRICULTURE Overview A wide

244

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010 NOAA Satellite and Information Service National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Ecosystems National Security Tourism Transportation Water Resources Climate information can be usedNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet COASTAL HAZARDS OVERVIEW Global

245

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be used most effectively. #12;NOAA Satellite and Information Service National Environmental Satellite Insurance Litigation Marine and Coastal Ecosystems National Security TOURISM Transportation WaterNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet TOURISM Overview Tourism

246

DemandDirect | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DemandDirect DemandDirect Jump to: navigation, search Name DemandDirect Place Woodbury, Connecticut Zip 6798 Sector Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Services Product DemandDirect provides demand response, energy efficiency, load management, and distributed generation services to end-use electricity customers in order to reduce electricity consumption, improve grid reliability, and promote renewable energy. Coordinates 44.440496°, -72.414991° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.440496,"lon":-72.414991,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

247

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand > U.S. Coal Supply and Demand U.S. Coal Supply and Demand > U.S. Coal Supply and Demand U.S. Coal Supply and Demand 2010 Review (entire report also available in printer-friendly format ) Previous Editions 2009 Review 2008 Review 2007 Review 2006 Review 2005 Review 2004 Review 2003 Review 2002 Review 2001 Review 2000 Review 1999 Review Data for: 2010 Released: May 2011 Next Release Date: April 2012 Table 3. Electric Power Sector Net Generation, 2009-2010 (Million Kilowatthours) New England Coal 14,378 14,244 -0.9 Hydroelectric 7,759 6,861 -11.6 Natural Gas 48,007 54,680 13.9 Nuclear 36,231 38,361 5.9 Other (1) 9,186 9,063 -1.3 Total 115,559 123,210 6.6 Middle Atlantic Coal 121,873 129,935 6.6 Hydroelectric 28,793 26,463 -8.1 Natural Gas 89,808 104,341 16.2 Nuclear 155,140 152,469 -1.7

248

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.A meta-analysis of the price elasticity of gasoline demand.2007. Consumer demand un- der price uncertainty: Empirical

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Fuel Cells for Transportation | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOE R&D Activities Fuel Cells for Transportation Fuel Cells for Transportation Photo of Ford Focus fuel cell car in front of windmills The transportation sector is the single...

252

Public Sector Energy Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capitol dome Capitol dome Public Sector Energy Efficiency Research on sustainable federal operations supports the implementation of sustainable policies and practices in the public sector. This work serves as a bridge between the technology development of Department of Energy's National Laboratories and the operational needs of public sector. Research activities involve many aspects of integrating sustainability into buildings and government practices, including technical assistance for sustainable building design, operations, and maintenance; project financing for sustainable facilities; institutional change in support of sustainability policy goals; and procurement of sustainable products. All of those activities are supported by our work on program and project evaluation, which analyzes overall program effectiveness while ensuring

253

Changing Energy Demand Behavior: Potential of Demand-Side Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is a great theoretical potential to save resources by managing our demand for energy. However, demand-side management (DSM) programs targeting behavioral patterns of...

Dr. Sylvia Breukers; Dr. Ruth Mourik…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Provider","All Sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Public Service Co of NH","Investor-Owned",4600990,3030181,1391043,179766,0...

255

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado" ,"Entity","Type of Provider","All Sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Public Service Co of Colorado","Investor-Owned",28786033,9192981,12...

256

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Provider","All Sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"First Energy Solutions Corp.","Investor-Owned",18912606,3579076,8038708,7294822,0...

257

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Provider","All Sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Entergy Arkansas Inc","Investor-Owned",21086842,7858971,6302526,6925231,114 2,"Southwestern...

258

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Provider","All Sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Entergy Mississippi Inc","Investor-Owned",13272532,5550307,5322525,2399700,0 2,"Mississippi...

259

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Provider","All Sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Green Mountain Power Corp","Investor-Owned",2477751,835602,896610,745539,0 2,"Central...

260

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut" ,"Entity","Type of Provider","All Sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Connecticut Light & Power Co","Investor-Owned",7162779,5456175,1...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico" ,"Entity","Type of Provider","All Sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Public Service Co of NM","Investor-Owned",9396214,3323544,4301354,177...

262

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Sector 6 Research Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MM-Group Home MM-Group Home MMG Advisory Committees Beamlines 4-ID-C Soft Spectroscopy 4-ID-D Hard Spectroscopy 6-ID-B,C Mag. Scattering 6-ID-D HighE Scattering 29-ID IEX - ARPES,RSXS Getting Beamtime Sector Orientation Sector 4 Orientation Sector 6 Orientation Publications (4-ID) Publications (6-ID) Contact Us APS Ring Status Current APS Schedule Highlights of research on Sector 6 Teasing Out the Nature of Structural Instabilities in Ceramic Compounds Teasing Out the Nature of Structural Instabilities in Ceramic Compounds March 12, 2013 Researchers have used beamlines 6-ID-B at the APS and XmAS at the ESRF to probe the structure of the rare-earth magnetic material europium titanate. In a magnetic field, the optical properties of this system change quite dramatically, presenting hope of a strong magneto-electric material for potential use in new memory, processing, and sensor devices.

264

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS 27 data.

265

Analysis of Ontario's hydrogen economy demands from hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ‘Hydrogen Economy’ is a proposed system where hydrogen is produced from carbon dioxide free energy sources and is used as an alternative fuel for transportation. The utilization of hydrogen to power fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) can significantly decrease air pollutants and greenhouse gases emission from the transportation sector. In order to build the future hydrogen economy, there must be a significant development in the hydrogen infrastructure, and huge investments will be needed for the development of hydrogen production, storage, and distribution technologies. This paper focuses on the analysis of hydrogen demand from hydrogen \\{FCVs\\} in Ontario, Canada, and the related cost of hydrogen. Three potential hydrogen demand scenarios over a long period of time were projected to estimate hydrogen \\{FCVs\\} market penetration, and the costs associated with the hydrogen production, storage and distribution were also calculated. A sensitivity analysis was implemented to investigate the uncertainties of some parameters on the design of the future hydrogen infrastructure. It was found that the cost of hydrogen is very sensitive to electricity price, but other factors such as water price, energy efficiency of electrolysis, and plant life have insignificant impact on the total cost of hydrogen produced.

Hui Liu; Ali Almansoori; Michael Fowler; Ali Elkamel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Demand Response In California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency & Energy Efficiency & Demand Response Programs Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner California Public Utilities Commission California Public Utilities Commission FUPWG 2006 Fall Meeting November 2, 2006 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 1 Highest Priority Resource Energy Efficiency is California's highest priority resource to: Meet energy needs in a low cost manner Aggressively reduce GHG emissions November 2, 2006 2 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 3 http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/PUBLISHED/REPORT/51604.htm Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 4 Energy Action Plan II Loading order continued "Pursue all cost-effective energy efficiency, first." Strong demand response and advanced metering

267

On Demand Guarantees in Iran.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??On Demand Guarantees in Iran This thesis examines on demand guarantees in Iran concentrating on bid bonds and performance guarantees. The main guarantee types and… (more)

Ahvenainen, Laura

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Demand for hybrid car in Indian metro cities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The depleting stock of fossil fuels, environmental problems, and global warming are today's major concerns. Existing studies identify that transport sector is one of the major contributors towards these problems. Constant efforts in search of alternative, less polluting fuel are being made. Hybrid car technology uses the gasoline and electric technology to reduce air pollution, and save oil. From the field study it is observed that the people with conventional thinking, constituting about one-third of respondents, show more concern for environment. The variables leading to demand for hybrid cars could be energy efficiency, concern for environment, etc. Despite being price sensitive, Indian consumers are willing to pay a decent premium for acquiring this environment friendly car. This study is undertaken with the objective of analysing the scenario of hybrid car in India, and its market potential. The study conducts a questionnaire-based consumer survey based on demographic, economic, and desirable features in a hybrid car; using logit model and factor analysis for identifying variables useful for the study.

Debabrata Das; R. Srinivasan; Raj S. Dhankar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. Key assumptions for the commercial sector in the AEO2012 integrated demand technology cases 7. Key assumptions for the commercial sector in the AEO2012 integrated demand technology cases Assumptions Integrated 2011 Deand Technology Integraged High Demand Technologya Integrated Buildings Best Available Demand Technologya End-use equipment Limited to technology menu available in 2011. Promulgated standards still take effect. Earlier availability, lower cost, and/ or higher efficiencies for advanced equipment. Purchases limited to highest available efficiency for each technology class, regardless of cost. Hurdle rates Same as Reference case distribution. All energy efficiency investments evaluated at 7-percent real interest rate. All energy efficiency investments evaluated at 7-percent real interest rate. Building shells Fixed at 2011 levels. 25 percent more improvement than in the Reference case by 2035. 50 percent more improvement than in the Reference case by 2035.

270

Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Southeast Water Pollution Control Plant Case Study Title Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Southeast Water Pollution Control Plant Case Study Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6056E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Olsen, Daniel, Sasank Goli, David Faulkner, and Aimee T. McKane Date Published 12/2012 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords market sectors, technologies Abstract This report details a study into the demand response potential of a large wastewater treatment facility in San Francisco. Previous research had identified wastewater treatment facilities as good candidates for demand response and automated demand response, and this study was conducted to investigate facility attributes that are conducive to demand response or which hinder its implementation. One years' worth of operational data were collected from the facility's control system, submetered process equipment, utility electricity demand records, and governmental weather stations. These data were analyzed to determine factors which affected facility power demand and demand response capabilities.

271

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity On This Page Residential and... Coal-fired plants... Most new capacity... Annual capacity... Growth in generating... Costs and regulatory... EPACT2005 tax... Biomass and wind... Renewable capacity... State portfolio... Electricity use... Real Growth in... Improved interconn... Residential and commercial sectors dominate electricity demand growth Electricity demand growth has slowed in each decade since the 1950s. After 9.8-percent annual growth in the 1950s, demand (including retail sales and direct use) increased 2.4 percent per year in the 1990s. From 2000 to 2009 (including the 2008-2009 economic downturn) demand grew by 0.5 percent per year. In the Reference case, electricity demand growth rebounds but remains relatively slow, as growing demand for electricity services is offset by

272

Energy demand and supply, energy policies, and energy security in the Republic of Korea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Republic of Korea (ROK) has enjoyed rapid economic growth and development over the last 30 years. Rapid increases in energy use—especially petroleum, natural gas, and electricity, and especially in the industrial and transport sectors—have fueled the ROK's economic growth, but with limited fossil fuel resources of its own, the result has been that the ROK is almost entirely dependent on energy imports. The article that follows summarizes the recent trends in the ROK energy sector, including trends in energy demand and supply, and trends in economic, demographic, and other activities that underlie trends in energy use. The ROK has been experiencing drastic changes in its energy system, mainly induced by industrial, supply security, and environmental concerns, and energy policies in the ROK have evolved over the years to address such challenges through measures such as privatization of energy-sector activities, emphases on enhancing energy security through development of energy efficiency, nuclear power, and renewable energy, and a related focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The assembly of a model for evaluating energy futures in the ROK (ROK2010 LEAP) is described, and results of several policy-based scenarios focused on different levels of nuclear energy utilization are described, and their impacts on of energy supply and demand in the ROK through the year 2030 are explored, along with their implications for national energy security and long-term policy plans. Nuclear power continues to hold a crucial position in the ROK's energy policy, but aggressive expansion of nuclear power alone, even if possible given post-Fukushima global concerns, will not be sufficient to attain the ROK's “green economy” and greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals.

Hoseok Kim; Eui-soon Shin; Woo-jin Chung

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gasemissions  

SciTech Connect

In 2000, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published a new set of baseline greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions scenarios in the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) (Nakicenovic et al., 2000). The SRES team defined four narrative storylines (A1, A2, B1 and B2) describing the relationships between the forces driving GHG and aerosol emissions and their evolution during the 21st century. The SRES reports emissions for each of these storylines by type of GHG and by fuel type to 2100 globally and for four world regions (OECD countries as of 1990, countries undergoing economic reform, developing countries in Asia, rest of world). Specific assumptions about the quantification of scenario drivers, such as population and economic growth, technological change, resource availability, land-use changes, and local and regional environmental policies, are also provided. End-use sector-level results for buildings, industry, or transportation or information regarding adoption of particular technologies and policies are not provided in the SRES. The goal of this report is to provide more detailed information on the SRES scenarios at the end use level including historical time series data and a decomposition of energy consumption to understand the forecast implications in terms of end use efficiency to 2030. This report focuses on the A1 (A1B) and B2 marker scenarios since they represent distinctly contrasting futures. The A1 storyline describes a future of very rapid economic growth, low population growth, and the rapid introduction of new and more efficient technologies. Major underlying themes are convergence among regions, capacity building, and increased cultural and social interactions, with a substantial reduction in regional differences in per capita income. The B2 storyline describes a world with an emphasis on economic, social, and environmental sustainability, especially at the local and regional levels. It is a world with moderate population growth, intermediate levels of economic development, and less rapid and more diverse technological change (Nakicenovic et al., 2000). Data were obtained from the SRES modeling teams that provide more detail than that reported in the SRES. For the A1 marker scenario, the modeling team provided final energy demand and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions by fuel for industry, buildings, and transportation for nine world regions. Final energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions for three sectors (industry, transport, buildings) for the four SRES world regions were provided for the B2 marker scenario. This report describes the results of a disaggregation of the SRES projected energy use and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions for the industrial, transport, and buildings sectors for 10 world regions (see Appendix 1) to 2030. An example of further disaggregation of the two SRES scenarios for the residential buildings sector in China is provided, illustrating how such aggregate scenarios can be interpreted at the end use level.

Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Sinton, Jonathan; Worrell, Ernst; Zhou, Nan; Sathaye, Jayant; Levine, Mark

2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

274

Energy Demand Staff Scientist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Demand in China Lynn Price Staff Scientist February 2, 2010 #12;Founded in 1988 Focused on End-Use Energy Efficiency ~ 40 Current Projects in China Collaborations with ~50 Institutions in China Researcher #12;Talk OutlineTalk Outline · Overview · China's energy use and CO2 emission trends · Energy

Eisen, Michael

275

Energy Demand Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From the end of World War II until the early 1970s there was a strong and steady increase in the demand for energy. The abundant supplies of fossil and other ... an actual fall in the real price of energy of abou...

S. L. Schwartz

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock,

277

Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Jump to: navigation, search Name Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Agency/Company /Organization Argonne National Laboratory Sector Energy Topics GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type Software/modeling tools Website http://www.dis.anl.gov/news/Me Country Mexico UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections[1] "CEEESA and the team of experts from Mexico analyzed the country's entire energy supply and demand system using CEEESA's latest version of the popular ENPEP-BALANCE software. The team developed a system representation, a so-called energy network, using ENPEP's powerful graphical user

278

New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control October 4, 2013 - 4:23pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for carbon dioxide (CO2) demand ventilation control within the Federal sector. Benefits Demand ventilation control systems modulate ventilation levels based on current building occupancy, saving energy while still maintaining proper indoor air quality (IAQ). CO2 sensors are commonly used, but a multiple-parameter approach using total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), particulate matter (PM), formaldehyde, and relative humidity (RH) levels can also be used. CO2 sensors control the outside air damper to reduce the amount of outside air that needs to be conditioned and supplied to the building when

279

Energy technologies and their impact on demand  

SciTech Connect

Despite the uncertainties, energy demand forecasts must be made to guide government policies and public and private-sector capital investment programs. Three principles can be identified in considering long-term energy prospects. First energy demand will continue to grow, driven by population growth, economic development, and the current low per capita energy consumption in developing countries. Second, energy technology advancements alone will not solve the problem. Energy-efficient technologies, renewable resource technologies, and advanced electric power technologies will all play a major role but will not be able to keep up with the growth in world energy demand. Third, environmental concerns will limit the energy technology choices. Increasing concern for environmental protection around the world will restrict primarily large, centralized energy supply facilities. The conclusion is that energy system diversity is the only solution. The energy system must be planned with consideration of both supply and demand technologies, must not rely on a single source of energy, must take advantage of all available technologies that are specially suited to unique local conditions, must be built with long-term perspectives, and must be able to adapt to change.

Drucker, H.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Regional Differences in Corn Ethanol Production: Profitability and Potential Water Demands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through the use of a stochastic simulation model this project analyzes both the impacts of the expanding biofuels sector on water demand in selected regions of the United States and variations in the profitability of ethanol production due...

Higgins, Lindsey M.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Program Strategies and Results for California’s Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Energy Partners provides a review of California’s strategic approach to energy efficiency and demand response implementation, with a focus on the industrial sector. The official role of the state, through the California Energy Commission (CEC...

Ehrhard, R.; Hamilton, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries Title Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5319E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ghatikar, Girish, Aimee T. McKane, Sasank Goli, Peter L. Therkelsen, and Daniel Olsen Date Published 01/2012 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords automated dr, controls and automation, demand response, dynamic pricing, industrial controls, market sectors, openadr Abstract California's electricity markets are moving toward dynamic pricing models, such as real-time pricing, within the next few years, which could have a significant impact on an industrial facility's cost of energy use during the times of peak use. Adequate controls and automated systems that provide industrial facility managers real-time energy use and cost information are necessary for successful implementation of a comprehensive electricity strategy; however, little is known about the current control capacity of California industries. To address this gap, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in close collaboration with California industrial trade associations, conducted a survey to determine the current state of controls technologies in California industries. This study identifies sectors that have the technical capability to implement Demand Response (DR) and Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In an effort to assist policy makers and industry in meeting the challenges of real-time pricing, facility operational and organizational factors were taken into consideration to generate recommendations on which sectors Demand Response efforts should be focused. Analysis of the survey responses showed that while the vast majority of industrial facilities have semi- or fully automated control systems, participation in Demand Response programs is still low due to perceived barriers. The results also showed that the facilities that use continuous processes are good Demand Response candidates. When comparing facilities participating in Demand Response to those not participating, several similarities and differences emerged. Demand Response-participating facilities and non-participating facilities had similar timings of peak energy use, production processes, and participation in energy audits. Though the survey sample was smaller than anticipated, the results seemed to support our preliminary assumptions. Demonstrations of Auto-Demand Response in industrial facilities with good control capabilities are needed to dispel perceived barriers to participation and to investigate industrial subsectors suggested of having inherent Demand Response potential.

283

Energy Efficiency and the Finance Sector | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Finance Sector the Finance Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name Energy Efficiency and the Finance Sector Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Finance, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.unepfi.org/fileadmi References Energy Efficiency and the Finance Sector[1] Summary "This survey was carried out in 2008, when high and volatile oil prices, steadily rising demand for energy, and global imperatives, such as climate change, created significant renewed attention to energy efficiency - both in the policy and commercial world. UNEP Finance Initiative sought to provide an evidence base on current lending activities in the energy efficiency space, as well as views on this issue through a survey among

284

Utility Sector Leaders Make Firm Commitment to Energy Efficiency |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Sector Leaders Make Firm Commitment to Energy Efficiency Utility Sector Leaders Make Firm Commitment to Energy Efficiency Utility Sector Leaders Make Firm Commitment to Energy Efficiency Utility Sector Leaders Make Firm Commitment to Energy Efficiency: Press Release, July 31, 2006 announcing an energy efficiency action plan. More than 80 energy, environmental and other organizations announced commitments and public statements in support of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (NAPEE), which provides energy consumers and providers information on policies and techniques to save money as well as protect the environment. Utility Sector Leaders Make Firm Commitment to Energy Efficiency More Documents & Publications Chapter 3: Demand-Side Resources US - Brazil Binational Energy Working Group Joint Action Plan

285

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Natural Gas Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Demand Natural Gas Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Natural Gas Demand Figure 72. Natural gas consumption by sector, 1990-2030 (trillion cubic feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 73. Total natural gas consumption, 1990-2030 (trillion cubic feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Fastest Increase in Natural Gas Use Is Expected for the Buildings Sectors In the reference case, total natural gas consumption increases from 21.7 trillion cubic feet in 2006 to a peak value of 23.8 trillion cubic feet in 2016, followed by a decline to 22.7 trillion cubic feet in 2030. The natural gas share of total energy consumption drops from 22 percent in 2006

286

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

287

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Module calculates

288

Louisville Private Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Private Sector Attendees Private Sector Attendees ENERGY STAR Kick-off Meeting December 2007 5/3rd Bank Al J Schneider Company (The Galt House East) Baptist Hospital East Brown - Forman Building Owner and Managers Association (BOMA) Louisville CB Richard Ellis Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW) Louisville Cushman Wakefield General Electric Company Golden Foods Greater Louisville Chapter of International Facility Management Association (IFMA) Hines Humana, Inc Institute of Real Estate Management (IREM) Kentucky Chapter Jewish Hospital & St Mary's Healthcare Kentucky Chapter, Certified Commercial Investment Managers (CCIM) Kentucky Governor's Office of Energy Policy Kentucky Society of Health Care Engineers Kindred Health Care Louisville Air Pollution Control Board

289

By Sector, 2010 Nonprofit /  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% West USA 46% By Region, 2010 Consul9ng 9% Environment/Energy 7% Finance/Investment Banking 4Public 38% Private 44% By Sector, 2010 Nonprofit / Mul9lateral 18% Asia 32% East USA 22 4% Manufacturing 3% Market Research 4% Media 3% Other 6% Technology 12% Think Tank 2

Tsien, Roger Y.

290

Making Africa's Power Sector Sustainable: An Analysis of Power Sector  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Making Africa's Power Sector Sustainable: An Analysis of Power Sector Making Africa's Power Sector Sustainable: An Analysis of Power Sector Reforms in Africa Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Making Africa's Power Sector Sustainable: An Analysis of Power Sector Reforms in Africa Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme, United Nations Economic Commission for Africa Sector: Energy Topics: Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.uneca.org/eca_programmes/nrid/pubs/powersectorreport.pdf UN Region: Eastern Africa References: Making Africa's Power Sector Sustainable: An Analysis of Power Sector Reforms in Africa[1] Overview "This study assesses the socio-economic and environmental impacts of power

291

Agricultural sector impacts of making ethanol from grain  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a model of the effects on the agricultural sector of producing ethanol from corn in the United States between 1979 and 1983. The model is aggregated at the national level, and results are given for all of the major food and feed crops, ethanol joint products, farm income, government payment, and agricultural exports. A stochastic simulation was performed to ascertain the impacts of yield and demand variations on aggregate performance figures. Results indicate minimal impacts on the agricultural sector for production levels of less than 1 billion gallons of ethanol per year. For higher production levels, corn prices will rise sharply, the agricultural sector will be more vulnerable to variations in yields and demands, and joint-product values will fall. Possibilities for ameliorating such effects are discussed, and such concepts as net energy and the biomass refinery are explored.

Hertzmark, D.; Ray, D.; Parvin, G.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Smart grid technologies and applications for the industrial sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Smart grids have become a topic of intensive research, development, and deployment across the world over the last few years. The engagement of consumer sectors—residential, commercial, and industrial—is widely acknowledged as crucial for the projected benefits of smart grids to be realized. Although the industrial sector has traditionally been involved in managing power use with what today would be considered smart grid technologies, these applications have mostly been one-of-a-kind, requiring substantial customization. Our objective in this article is to motivate greater interest in smart grid applications in industry. We provide an overview of smart grids and of electricity use in the industrial sector. Several smart grid technologies are outlined, and automated demand response is discussed in some detail. Case studies from aluminum processing, cement manufacturing, food processing, industrial cooling, and utility plants are reviewed. Future directions in interoperable standards, advances in automated demand response, energy use optimization, and more dynamic markets are discussed.

Tariq Samad; Sila Kiliccote

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential sector energy demand Residential sector energy demand Residential energy intensity continues to decline across a range of technology assumptions figure data In the AEO2013 Reference case, the energy intensity of residential demand, defined as annual energy use per household, declines from 97.2 million Btu in 2011 to 75.5 million Btu in 2040 (Figure 55). The projected 22-percent decrease in intensity occurs along with a 32-percent increase in the number of homes. Residential energy intensity is affected by various factors-for example, population shifts to warmer and drier climates, improvements in the efficiency of building construction and equipment stock, and the attitudes and behavior of residents toward energy savings. Three alternative cases show the effects of different technology

294

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential sector energy demand Residential sector energy demand Residential energy intensity continues to decline across a range of technology assumptions figure data In the AEO2013 Reference case, the energy intensity of residential demand, defined as annual energy use per household, declines from 97.2 million Btu in 2011 to 75.5 million Btu in 2040 (Figure 55). The projected 22-percent decrease in intensity occurs along with a 32-percent increase in the number of homes. Residential energy intensity is affected by various factors-for example, population shifts to warmer and drier climates, improvements in the efficiency of building construction and equipment stock, and the attitudes and behavior of residents toward energy savings. Three alternative cases show the effects of different technology

295

Demand Response | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand response provides an opportunity for consumers to play a significant role in the operation of the electric grid by reducing or shifting their electricity usage during peak periods in response to time-based rates or other forms of financial incentives. Demand response programs are being used by electric system planners and operators as resource options for balancing supply and demand. Such programs can lower the cost of electricity in wholesale markets, and in turn, lead to lower retail rates. Methods of engaging customers in demand response efforts include offering time-based rates such as time-of-use pricing, critical peak pricing, variable peak pricing, real time pricing, and critical peak rebates. It also includes direct load control programs which provide the

296

Understanding and Analysing Energy Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter introduces the concept of energy demand using basic micro-economics and presents the three-stage decision making process of energy demand. It then provides a set of simple ... (such as price and inco...

Subhes C. Bhattacharyya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Impact of Competition on Quality of Service in Demand Responsive Transit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of Competition on Quality of Service in Demand Responsive Transit Ferdi Grootenboers1@inrets.fr Abstract. Demand responsive transportation has the potential to pro- vide efficient public door-company, quality of service, auction 1 Introduction Demand-Responsive Transit (DRT) services are a form

de Weerdt, Mathijs

298

NREL: Technology Deployment - Fuels, Vehicles, and Transportation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technical experts, policymakers, and other transportation stakeholders in the public and private sectors Providing technical expertise on alternative fuel vehicles and fueling...

299

Demand Response: Load Management Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CenterPoint Load Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs... V. Residential Discussion Points Demand Response Definition of load management per energy efficiency rule 25.181: ? Load control activities that result in a reduction in peak demand, or a shifting of energy usage from a peak to an off...

Simon, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Marketing Demand-Side Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

they the only game in town, enjoying a captive market. Demand-side management (DSM) again surfaced as a method for increasing customer value and meeting these competitive challenges. In designing and implementing demand-side management (DSM) programs we... have learned a great deal about what it takes to market and sell DSM. This paper focuses on how to successfully market demand-side management. KEY STEPS TO MARKETING DEMAND-SIDE MANAGEMENT Management Commitment The first key element in marketing...

O'Neill, M. L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Demand Charges | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Charges Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleDemandCharges&oldid488967"...

302

A Summary Report Keeping pace with changing global markets, meeting world demand for a host  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Manitoba): cor- ridors, demand, energy, information, and people. Corridors and the big picture StewartA Summary Report Keeping pace with changing global markets, meeting world demand for a host, transportation infrastructure, ports, railroads, biofuels and agricultural byproducts, and transportation

Minnesota, University of

303

Assessment of Demand Response Resource  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for PGE and Pacific Power Prepared for: Portland January 15, 2004 K:\\Projects\\2003-53 (PGE,PC) Assess Demand Response\\Report\\Revised Report_011504.doc #12;#12;quantec Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for I-1 PGE and Pacific Power I. Introduction

304

ERCOT Demand Response Paul Wattles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ERCOT Demand Response Paul Wattles Senior Analyst, Market Design & Development, ERCOT Whitacre;Definitions of Demand Response · `The short-term adjustment of energy use by consumers in response to price to market or reliability conditions.' (NAESB) #12;Definitions of Demand Response · The common threads

Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

305

Pricing data center demand response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Demand response is crucial for the incorporation of renewable energy into the grid. In this paper, we focus on a particularly promising industry for demand response: data centers. We use simulations to show that, not only are data centers large loads, ... Keywords: data center, demand response, power network, prediction based pricing

Zhenhua Liu; Iris Liu; Steven Low; Adam Wierman

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and

307

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and

308

Overview of Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

08 PJM 08 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Overview of Demand Response PJM ©2008 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Growth, Statistics, and Current Footprint AEP, Dayton, ComEd, & DUQ Dominion Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Current PJM RTO Statistics Current PJM RTO Statistics PJM Mid-Atlantic Integrations completed as of May 1 st , 2005 ©2008 PJM

309

Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study, September 2011 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study, September 2011 Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study, September 2011 Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study, September 2011 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) collaborated to examine the interdependencies between two critical infrastructure sectors - Dams and Energy. The study highlights the importance of hydroelectric power generation, with a particular emphasis on the variability of weather patterns and competing demands for water which determine the water available for hydropower production. Dams-Energy Interdependency Study.pdf More Documents & Publications Hydroelectric Webinar Presentation Slides and Text Version Impacts of Long-term Drought on Power Systems in the U.S. Southwest - July 2012 Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee

310

Dualmode transportation - impact on the electric grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continual increase in transport demand and uneven road capacity results in chaotic traffic congestion, brings with it high levels of air pollution, an elevated number of accidents, and an insatiable demand for oil to satisfy the motorized vehicles...

Azcarate Lara, Francisco Javier

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Dualmode transportation - impact on the electric grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continual increase in transport demand and uneven road capacity results in chaotic traffic congestion, brings with it high levels of air pollution, an elevated number of accidents, and an insatiable demand for oil to satisfy the motorized vehicles...

Azcarate Lara, Francisco Javier

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

312

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale This article first appeared in the Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995, Energy Information Administration, DOE/EIA-0202(95) (Washington, DC, July 1995), pp. 33-42, 83-85. The regression results and historical data for production, inventories, and imports have been updated in this presentation. Contents * Introduction o Table 1. Oxygenate production capacity and demand * Oxygenate demand o Table 2. Estimated RFG demand share - mandated RFG areas, January 1998 * Fuel ethanol supply and demand balance o Table 3. Fuel ethanol annual statistics * MTBE supply and demand balance o Table 4. EIA MTBE annual statistics * Refinery balances

313

Transportation Business Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Transportation Business Plan is a step in the process of procuring the transportation system. It sets the context for business strategy decisions by providing pertinent background information, describing the legislation and policies governing transportation under the NWPA, and describing requirements of the transportation system. Included in the document are strategies for procuring shipping casks and transportation support services. In the spirit of the NWPA directive to utilize the private sector to the maximum extent possible, opportunities for business ventures are obvious throughout the system development cycle.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Chemical Manufacturing  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Letters of Intent/Agreements Letters of Intent/Agreements American Chemistry Council (ACC), representing 85% of the chemical industry production in the U.S., has agreed American Chemistry Council Logo to an overall greenhouse gas intensity reduction target of 18% by 2012 from 1990 levels. ACC will measure progress based on data collected directly from its members. ACC also pledges to support the search for new products and pursue innovations that help other industries and sectors achieve the President's goal. Activities include increased production efficiencies, promoting coal gasification technology, increasing bio-based processes, and, most importantly, developing efficiency-enabling products for use in other sectors, such as appliance transportation and construction. The following documents are available for download as Adobe PDF documents.

315

Mapping expert perspectives of the aviation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aviation globally is characterised by significant change and consequently the future of the sector has always been difficult to predict. This study adopts a systemic approach based on findings from exploratory interviews with UK aviation academics to: determine the roles of stakeholders in the air transport system; report the current issues facing the sector; explore how these issues interact and impact on the stakeholders in the system; and speculate on the future implications. Six core stakeholders are identified: airlines, airports, consumers, manufacturers, governing institutions and interest groups. Nine core issues are reported, namely: local environment, climate change, peak oil, the state of the economy, social norms, demographics, disruptive events, national (or international) regulations and capacity. A matrix of interactions and their impacts and implications for managing the aviation system is then presented.

Namasoondrum P. Mootien; James P. Warren; Dick Morris; Marcus P. Enoch

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Demand Response Programs, 6. edition  

SciTech Connect

The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of control. Water heater demand response options are notcurrent water heater and air conditioning demand responsecustomer response Demand response water heater participation

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Like HECO actual utility demand response implementations canindustry-wide utility demand response applications tend toobjective. Figure 4. Demand Response Objectives 17  

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities,”Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.for Automated Demand Response. Technical Document to

Rubinstein, Francis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Automating Demand Response Charles McParland, Lawrenceand Automating Demand Response Charles McParland, LBNLCommercial and Residential Demand Response Overview of the

McParland, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency,”Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,technical support from the Demand Response Research Center (

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 1. “Economic” demand response and real time pricing (Implications of Demand Response Programs in CompetitiveAdvanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 2.1 Demand-Side Managementbuildings. The demand side management framework is discussedIssues 2.1 Demand-Side Management Framework Forecasting

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy demand-side management energy information systemdemand response. Demand-side management (DSM) program goalsa goal for demand-side management (DSM) coordination and

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World: Renewable Energy and Demand Response Proliferation intogether the renewable energy and demand response communityimpacts of renewable energy and demand response integration

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

District Small Business Summer Solutions: Energy and DemandSummer Solutions: Energy and Demand Impacts Monthly Energy> B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Annual World Oil Demand Growth  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Following relatively small increases of 1.3 million barrels per day in 1999 and 0.9 million barrels per day in 2000, EIA is estimating world demand may grow by 1.6 million barrels per day in 2001. Of this increase, about 3/5 comes from non-OECD countries, while U.S. oil demand growth represents more than half of the growth projected in OECD countries. Demand in Asia grew steadily during most of the 1990s, with 1991-1997 average growth per year at just above 0.8 million barrels per day. However, in 1998, demand dropped by 0.3 million barrels per day as a result of the Asian economic crisis that year. Since 1998, annual growth in oil demand has rebounded, but has not yet reached the average growth seen during 1991-1997. In the Former Soviet Union, oil demand plummeted during most of the

332

The impact of peak oil on tourism in Spain: An input–output analysis of price, demand and economy-wide effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article examines the potential effects of peak oil on Spanish tourism and indirectly on the rest of the economy. We construct several scenarios of price increases in oil, related fossil fuels and their inflationary effects. These scenarios provide the context for an input–output (I/O) analysis which uses I/O tables extended with Tourism Satellite Accounts. The analysis comprises three steps: (1) applying an I/O price model to estimate the price change of tourism services in Spain due to an increase in the prices of oil and other fossil fuels; (2) assessing the effects of price changes on demand for tourism services; and (3) estimating the impacts of demand change on the country's economy using an I/O demand model. The results show that a decreased demand for tourism services results in the greatest fall in outputs in the tourism-related shares of air, water, land and railway transport sectors. These are followed by tourism agencies' activities, non-market recreational, cultural and sporting activities, restaurants, and hotels. Depending on the oil price scenario adopted, GDP (Gross domestic product) decreases between ?0.08% and ?0.38% and the number of jobs lost through direct and indirect effects varies between approximately 20,000 and 100,000.

Ivana Logar; Jeroen C.J.M. van den Bergh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2003 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Review 3 Review 1 U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2003 Review by Fred Freme U.S. Energy Information Administration Overview U.S. coal production fell for the second year in a row in 2003, declining by 24.8 million short tons to end the year at 1,069.5 million short tons according to preliminary data from the Energy Information Administration (Table 1), down 2.3 percent from the 2002 level of 1,094.3 million short tons. (Note: All percentage change calculations are done at the short ton level.) Total U.S. coal consumption rose in 2003, with all coal-consuming sectors increasing or remaining stable for the year. Coal consumption in the electric power sector increased by 2.4 percent. However, there were only slight gains in consumption by the other sectors. U.S. coal exports rose in 2003 for the first time in

334

Sector 1 - Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS Software APS Software Scientists and researchers at the APS develop custom scientific software to help with acquisition and analysis of beamline data. Several packages are available for a variety of platforms and uses. Data Acquisition Motion control and data collection at the 1-BM and 1-ID beamlines are primarily executed using EPICS software. We also utilize SPEC, running through EPICS, for many experiments. Data Analysis Some of the programs used at Sector 1 to analyse 1-d and/or 2-d data sets are described: Fit2d, for viewing and analysing 2-dimensional data Igor, for analysis of small-angle scattering data Matlab, for strain/texture analysis and image analysis. GSAS/EXPGUI, for structural refinement of diffraction data. A comprehensive list of Powder Diffraction Software and Resources can be

335

Louisville Private Sector Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thursday, December 13, 2007 Thursday, December 13, 2007 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM Agenda * Welcome and introductions from the Mayor (9:00-9:15) o The Mayor's energy and climate protection goals for Louisville o Request for private sector input for the upcoming public-private partnership to promote increased energy efficiency in buildings throughout the Louisville community o Highlights from the December 12 meeting of the ENERGY STAR Challenge implementation group o Introduction to Metro's Green Initiative and goals for today's session * Getting started with ENERGY STAR (9:15-10:00) o Introduction to the program and overview of ENERGY STAR resources o Kentucky and regional ENERGY STAR Partners and labeled buildings o Simple steps for energy savings o The benefits of energy savings

336

Energy Sector Market Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of energy market analysis sponsored by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Weatherization and International Program (WIP) within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The analysis was conducted by a team of DOE laboratory experts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with additional input from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The analysis was structured to identify those markets and niches where government can create the biggest impact by informing management decisions in the private and public sectors. The analysis identifies those markets and niches where opportunities exist for increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy use.

Arent, D.; Benioff, R.; Mosey, G.; Bird, L.; Brown, J.; Brown, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Aabakken, J.; Parks, K.; Lapsa, M.; Davis, S.; Olszewski, M.; Cox, D.; McElhaney, K.; Hadley, S.; Hostick, D.; Nicholls, A.; McDonald, S.; Holloman, B.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

ADB-Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ADB-Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection ADB-Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection Agency/Company /Organization: Asian Development Bank Sector: Energy Topics: Pathways analysis Resource Type: Presentation, Software/modeling tools Website: cdm-mongolia.com/files/2_Methods_Hoseok_16May2010.pdf Cost: Free Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection Screenshot References: Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References ↑ "Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=ADB-Methods_and_Tools_for_Energy_Demand_Projection&oldid=398945" Categories:

338

Electric Power Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Electric Power Sector Hydroelectric Power (a) ............... 0.670 0.785 0.653 0.561 0.633 0.775 0.631 0.566 0.659 0.776 0.625 0.572 2.668 2.605 2.633 Wood Biomass (b) ........................ 0.048 0.043 0.052 0.046 0.045 0.039 0.051 0.052 0.055 0.049 0.060 0.054 0.190 0.187 0.218 Waste Biomass (c) ....................... 0.063 0.064 0.066 0.069 0.061 0.063 0.063 0.064 0.062 0.065 0.068 0.065 0.262 0.250 0.261 Wind ............................................. 0.376 0.361 0.253 0.377 0.428 0.461 0.315 0.400 0.417 0.461 0.340 0.424 1.368 1.604 1.641 Geothermal ................................. 0.036 0.037 0.038 0.039 0.041 0.041 0.041 0.042 0.041 0.040 0.041 0.042 0.149 0.164 0.165 Solar ............................................. 0.007 0.022 0.021 0.014 0.013 0.022 0.026 0.016 0.021 0.048 0.048 0.025 0.064

339

Program Program Organization Country Region Topic Sector Sector  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Program Organization Country Region Topic Sector Sector Program Organization Country Region Topic Sector Sector Albania Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies EC LEDS Albania Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies EC LEDS United States Agency for International Development USAID United States Environmental Protection Agency United States Department of Energy United States Department of Agriculture United States Department of State Albania Southern Asia Low emission development planning LEDS Energy Land Climate Algeria Clean Technology Fund CTF Algeria Clean Technology Fund CTF African Development Bank Asian Development Bank European Bank for Reconstruction and Development EBRD Inter American Development Bank IDB World Bank Algeria South Eastern Asia Background analysis Finance Implementation

340

Sector 9 | Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sitemap A Amptek Detector B Beam Transport (BM) Beam Transport (ID) Beamlines Beamline Alignment (BM) Beamline Alignment (ID) Beamline Equipment (BM) Beamline Equipment (ID) Beryllium Window (ID) Bicron Szintillation Detector BM B-Table BM Beamline BM First Optics Enclosure (FOE) 9-BM A BM User Manual Bruker CCD C Cable / Patch Panel Layout (BM) Cable / Patch Panel Layout (ID) Common Tasks Computers & Software Contact Info Control Panels (BM) Control Panels (ID) Cryo Pump Cryostats Current Amplifier D Differential Pump (BM) Differential Pump (ID) E EPS and PSS Systems (BM) EPS and PSS Systems (ID) EXAFS F Flag Locations (BM) G Gas Distribution (BM) Gas Distribution (ID) Gate Valves Getting Beamtime H High Voltage (HV) Power Supply Home Page Horizontal Focusing Mirror (ID) Hutches (BM)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Turkey energy and environmental review - Task 7 energy sector modeling : executive summary.  

SciTech Connect

Turkey's demand for energy and electricity is increasing rapidly. Since 1990, energy consumption has increased at an annual average rate of 4.3%. As would be expected, the rapid expansion of energy production and consumption has brought with it a wide range of environmental issues at the local, regional and global levels. With respect to global environmental issues, Turkey's carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions have grown along with its energy consumption. Emissions in 2000 reached 211 million metric tons. With GDP projected to grow at over 6% per year over the next 25 years, both the energy sector and the pollution associated with it are expected to increase substantially. This is expected to occur even if assuming stricter controls on lignite and hard coal-fired power generation. All energy consuming sectors, that is, power, industrial, residential, and transportation, will contribute to this increased emissions burden. Turkish Government authorities charged with managing the fundamental problem of carrying on economic development while protecting the environment include the Ministry of Environment (MOE), the Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources (MENR), and the Ministry of Health, as well as the Turkish Electricity Generation & Transmission Company (TEAS). The World Bank, working with these agencies, is planning to assess the costs and benefits of various energy policy alternatives under an Energy and Environment Review (EER). Eight individual studies have been conducted under this activity to analyze certain key energy technology issues and use this analysis to fill in the gaps in data and technical information. This will allow the World Bank and Turkish authorities to better understand the trade-offs in costs and impacts associated with specific policy decisions. The purpose of Task 7-Energy Sector Modeling, is to integrate information obtained in other EER tasks and provide Turkey's policy makers with an integrated systems analysis of the various options for addressing the various energy and environmental concerns. The work presented in this report builds on earlier analyses presented at the COP 6 conference in Bonn.

Conzelmann, G.; Koritarov, V.; Decision and Information Sciences

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

342

Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance  

Energy Savers (EERE)

DRAFT FOR PUBLIC COMMENT SEPTEMBER, 2014 ENERGY SECTOR CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance Table of...

343

Solar Photovoltaic Financing: Residential Sector Deployment ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solar Photovoltaic Financing: Residential Sector Deployment Solar Photovoltaic Financing: Residential Sector Deployment This report presents the information that homeowners and...

344

Harnessing the power of demand  

SciTech Connect

Demand response can provide a series of economic services to the market and also provide ''insurance value'' under low-likelihood, but high-impact circumstances in which grid reliablity is enhanced. Here is how ISOs and RTOs are fostering demand response within wholesale electricity markets. (author)

Sheffrin, Anjali; Yoshimura, Henry; LaPlante, David; Neenan, Bernard

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

China, India demand cushions prices  

SciTech Connect

Despite the hopes of coal consumers, coal prices did not plummet in 2006 as demand stayed firm. China and India's growing economies, coupled with solid supply-demand fundamentals in North America and Europe, and highly volatile prices for alternatives are likely to keep physical coal prices from wide swings in the coming year.

Boyle, M.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility, Commercial, and Industrial Customers Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility,...

347

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Collection for Demand-side Management for QualifyingPrepared by Demand-side Management Task Force of the

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

349

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the projection horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the projection horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

350

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results from the second season of research to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of activities to reduce or shift electricity use to improve the electric grid reliability and manage electricity costs. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. We refer to this as Auto-DR. The evaluation of the control and communications must be properly configured and pass through a set of test stages: Readiness, Approval, Price Client/Price Server Communication, Internet Gateway/Internet Relay Communication, Control of Equipment, and DR Shed Effectiveness. New commissioning tests are needed for such systems to improve connecting demand responsive building systems to the electric grid demand response systems.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review 1 U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review (Revised 5/6/2002) 1 by Fred Freme U.S. Energy Information Administration 1 This article has been revised, deleting 17.6 millions short tons of coal consumed by the manufacturers of synthetic coal from the consumption of coal by "other industrial plants." This change was made because the synthetic coal those plants produced was primarily consumed in the electric sector and reported as coal, resulting in an overstating of total coal consumption. Overview With the dawning of a new century came the beginning of a new era in the coal industry. Instead of the traditional prac- tice of only buying and selling produced coal in the United

352

Water supply and demand in an energy supply model  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a tool for water and energy-related policy analysis, the development of a water supply and demand sector in a linear programming model of energy supply in the United States. The model allows adjustments in the input mix and plant siting in response to water scarcity. Thus, on the demand side energy conversion facilities can substitute more costly dry cooling systems for conventional evaporative systems. On the supply side groundwater and water purchased from irrigators are available as more costly alternatives to unappropriated surface water. Water supply data is developed for 30 regions in 10 Western states. Preliminary results for a 1990 energy demand scenario suggest that, at this level of spatial analysis, water availability plays a minor role in plant siting. Future policy applications of the modeling system are discussed including the evaluation of alternative patterns of synthetic fuels development.

Abbey, D; Loose, V

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial sector energy demand Commercial sector energy demand For commercial buildings, pace of decline in energy intensity depends on technology figure data Average delivered energy consumption per square foot of commercial floorspace declines at an annual rate of 0.4 percent from 2011 to 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 59), while commercial floorspace grows by 1.0 percent per year. Natural gas consumption increases at about one-half the rate of delivered electricity consumption, which grows by 0.8 percent per year in the Reference case. With ongoing improvements in equipment efficiency and building shells, the growth of energy consumption declines more rapidly than commercial floorspace increases, and the average energy intensity of commercial buildings is reduced. Three alternative technology cases show the effects of efficiency

354

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Sector Energy Demand Commercial Sector Energy Demand On This Page End-use efficiency... Growth in electricity use... Core technologies... Improved interconnection... End-use efficiency improvements could lower energy consumption per capita The AEO2011 Reference case shows minimal change in commercial energy use per capita between 2009 and 2035 (Figure 62). While growth in commercial floorspace (1.2 percent per year) is faster than growth in population (0.9 percent per year), energy use per capita remains relatively steady due to efficiency improvements in equipment and building shells. Efficiency standards and the addition of more efficient technologies account for a large share of the improvement in the efficiency of end-use services, notably in space cooling, refrigeration, and lighting. figure data

355

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial sector energy demand Commercial sector energy demand For commercial buildings, pace of decline in energy intensity depends on technology figure data Average delivered energy consumption per square foot of commercial floorspace declines at an annual rate of 0.4 percent from 2011 to 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 59), while commercial floorspace grows by 1.0 percent per year. Natural gas consumption increases at about one-half the rate of delivered electricity consumption, which grows by 0.8 percent per year in the Reference case. With ongoing improvements in equipment efficiency and building shells, the growth of energy consumption declines more rapidly than commercial floorspace increases, and the average energy intensity of commercial buildings is reduced. Three alternative technology cases show the effects of efficiency

356

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal Residential coal Residential market trends icon Market Trends In the AEO2011 Reference case, residential energy use per capita declines by 17.0 percent from 2009 to 2035 (Figure 58). Delivered energy use stays relatively constant while population grows by 26.7 percent during the period. Growth in the number of homes and in average square footage leads to increased demand for energy services, which is offset in part by efficiency gains in space heating, water heating, and lighting equipment. Population shifts to warmer and drier climates also reduce energy demand for space heating. See more issues Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6 quadrillion Btu of delivered energy, or 21 percent of total U.S. energy consumption. The residential sector accounted for 57 percent of that energy

357

Prospect of biofuels as an alternative transport fuel in Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The prospect of biofuels as a transport alternative fuel in Australia is reviewed and discussed in this paper. The Australian transport sector is the second largest energy consuming sector which consumes about 24% of total energy consumption. A part of this energy demand can be met by ecofriendly biofuels. A wide array of different biofuels feedstocks including Australian native species, their distributions, oil content, traditional uses are reviewed and listed in the descending order of their oil content. The world biofuel scenario as well as the 20 largest biofuel production countries and their mandates on biofuels blending with petroleum diesel are presented. Australia’s biofuel production, consumption, production facilities and future investment projects are also reviewed and discussed. The study developed a biofuel supply chain for Australia and found that the second generation biofuels have better prospects as a future alternative transport fuel in Australia. These biofuel feedstocks are readily available and can overcome the shortcomings of the first generation biofuels, such as socio-economic, environmental and food versus land use challenges. Although some research is in progress, further study is needed on the process development of second generation biofuel production at commercial scale in Australia and abroad.

A.K. Azad; M.G. Rasul; M.M.K. Khan; Subhash C. Sharma; M.A. Hazrat

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

SciTech Connect

Over the past several years, interest in large-scale control of peak energy demand and total consumption has increased. While motivated by a number of factors, this interest has primarily been spurred on the demand side by the increasing cost of energy and, on the supply side by the limited ability of utilities to build sufficient electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in electricity use through the use of price incentives. DR systems are also be design to shift or curtail energy demand at critical times when the generation, transmission, and distribution systems (i.e. the 'grid') are threatened with instabilities. To be effectively deployed on a large-scale, these proposed DR systems need to be automated. Automation will require robust and efficient data communications infrastructures across geographically dispersed markets. The present availability of widespread Internet connectivity and inexpensive, reliable computing hardware combined with the growing confidence in the capabilities of distributed, application-level communications protocols suggests that now is the time for designing and deploying practical systems. Centralized computer systems that are capable of providing continuous signals to automate customers reduction of power demand, are known as Demand Response Automation Servers (DRAS). The deployment of prototype DRAS systems has already begun - with most initial deployments targeting large commercial and industrial (C & I) customers. An examination of the current overall energy consumption by economic sector shows that the C & I market is responsible for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer basis, large C & I customers clearly have the most to offer - and to gain - by participating in DR programs to reduce peak demand. And, by concentrating on a small number of relatively sophisticated energy consumers, it has been possible to improve the DR 'state of the art' with a manageable commitment of technical resources on both the utility and consumer side. Although numerous C & I DR applications of a DRAS infrastructure are still in either prototype or early production phases, these early attempts at automating DR have been notably successful for both utilities and C & I customers. Several factors have strongly contributed to this success and will be discussed below. These successes have motivated utilities and regulators to look closely at how DR programs can be expanded to encompass the remaining (roughly) half of the state's energy load - the light commercial and, in numerical terms, the more important residential customer market. This survey examines technical issues facing the implementation of automated DR in the residential environment. In particular, we will look at the potential role of home automation networks in implementing wide-scale DR systems that communicate directly to individual residences.

McParland, Charles

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture  

SciTech Connect

Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) engineers John Zimmerman and Tom Bender directed separate projects within this CRADA. This Project Accomplishments Summary contains their reports independently. Zimmerman: In 1998 Honeywell FM&T partnered with the Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) Cooperative Business Management Program to pilot the Supply Chain Integration Planning Prototype (SCIP). At the time, FM&T was developing an enterprise-wide supply chain management prototype called the Integrated Programmatic Scheduling System (IPSS) to improve the DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) supply chain. In the CRADA partnership, FM&T provided the IPSS technical and business infrastructure as a test bed for SCIP technology, and this would provide FM&T the opportunity to evaluate SCIP as the central schedule engine and decision support tool for IPSS. FM&T agreed to do the bulk of the work for piloting SCIP. In support of that aim, DAMA needed specific DOE Defense Programs opportunities to prove the value of its supply chain architecture and tools. In this partnership, FM&T teamed with Sandia National Labs (SNL), Division 6534, the other DAMA partner and developer of SCIP. FM&T tested SCIP in 1998 and 1999. Testing ended in 1999 when DAMA CRADA funding for FM&T ceased. Before entering the partnership, FM&T discovered that the DAMA SCIP technology had an array of applications in strategic, tactical, and operational planning and scheduling. At the time, FM&T planned to improve its supply chain performance by modernizing the NWC-wide planning and scheduling business processes and tools. The modernization took the form of a distributed client-server planning and scheduling system (IPSS) for planners and schedulers to use throughout the NWC on desktops through an off-the-shelf WEB browser. The planning and scheduling process within the NWC then, and today, is a labor-intensive paper-based method that plans and schedules more than 8,000 shipped parts per month based on more than 50 manually-created document types. The fact that DAMA and FM&T desired to move from paper-based manual architectures to digitally based computer architectures gave further incentive for the partnership to grow. FM&T's greatest strength was its knowledge of NWC-wide scheduling and planning with its role as the NWC leader in manufacturing logistics. DAMA's asset was its new knowledge gained in the research and development of advanced architectures and tools for supply chain management in the textiles industry. These complimentary strengths allowed the two parties to provide both the context and the tools for the pilot. Bender: Honeywell FM&T participated in a four-site supply chain project, also referred to as an Inter-Enterprise Pipeline Evaluation. The MSAD project was selected because it involves four NWC sites: FM&T, Pantex, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). FM&T had previously participated with Los Alamos National Laboratory in FY98 to model a two-site supply chain project, between FM&T and LANL. Evaluation of a Supply Chain Methodology is a subset of the DAMA project for the AMTEX consortium. LANL organization TSA-7, Enterprise Modeling and Simulation, has been involved in AMTEX and DAMA through development of process models and simulations for LANL, the NWC, and others. The FY 1998 and this FY 1999 projects directly involved collaboration between Honeywell and the Enterprise Modeling and Simulation (TSA-7) and Detonation Science and Technology (DX1) organizations at LANL.

Bender, T.R.; Zimmerman, J.J.

2001-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

360

Novolyte Charging Up Electric Vehicle Sector | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Novolyte Charging Up Electric Vehicle Sector Novolyte Charging Up Electric Vehicle Sector Novolyte Charging Up Electric Vehicle Sector August 11, 2010 - 10:15am Addthis Electric vehicles are powered by electricity that comes in the form of electrically charged molecules known as ions. Those ions need a substance to transport them throughout the system as they travel from the anode to the cathode and back again. That substance is an electrolyte. | Staff Photo Illustration Electric vehicles are powered by electricity that comes in the form of electrically charged molecules known as ions. Those ions need a substance to transport them throughout the system as they travel from the anode to the cathode and back again. That substance is an electrolyte. | Staff Photo Illustration Joshua DeLung What does this mean for me?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010 NOAA Satellite and Information Service National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Ecosystems National Security Tourism Transportation Water Resources Climate information can be usedNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet COAStAl HAzArDS Overview Global

362

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector. Technical report twelve: Economic analysis of alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Altemative Fuels Assessment, the Department of Energy (DOE) is studying the use of derivatives of natural gas, including compressed natural gas and methanol, as altemative transportation fuels. A critical part of this effort is determining potential sources of natural gas and the economics of those sources. Previous studies in this series characterized the economics of unutilized gas within the lower 48 United States, comparing its value for methanol production against its value as a pipelined fuel (US Department of Energy 1991), and analyzed the costs of developing undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves in several countries (US Department of Energy 1992c). This report extends those analyses to include Alaskan North Slope natural gas that either is not being produced or is being reinjected. The report includes the following: A description of discovered and potential (undiscovered) quantities of natural gas on the Alaskan North Slope. A discussion of proposed altemative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. A comparison of the economics of the proposed alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the costs of transporting Alaskan North Slope gas to markets in the lower 48 States as pipeline gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), or methanol. It is not intended to recommend one alternative over another or to evaluate the relative economics or timing of using North Slope gas in new tertiary oil recovery projects. The information is supplied in sufficient detail to allow incorporation of relevant economic relationships (for example, wellhead gas prices and transportation costs) into the Altemative Fuels Trade Model, the analytical framework DOE is using to evaluate various policy options.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Title Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4849E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Olsen, Daniel, Sasank Goli, David Faulkner, and Aimee T. McKane Date Published 12/2010 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords cement industry, cement sector, demand response, electricity use, energy efficiency, market sectors, mineral manufacturing, technologies Abstract This study examines the characteristics of cement plants and their ability to shed or shift load to participate in demand response (DR). Relevant factors investigated include the various equipment and processes used to make cement, the operational limitations cement plants are subject to, and the quantities and sources of energy used in the cement-making process. Opportunities for energy efficiency improvements are also reviewed. The results suggest that cement plants are good candidates for DR participation. The cement industry consumes over 400 trillion Btu of energy annually in the United States, and consumes over 150 MW of electricity in California alone. The chemical reactions required to make cement occur only in the cement kiln, and intermediate products are routinely stored between processing stages without negative effects. Cement plants also operate continuously for months at a time between shutdowns, allowing flexibility in operational scheduling. In addition, several examples of cement plants altering their electricity consumption based on utility incentives are discussed. Further study is needed to determine the practical potential for automated demand response (Auto-DR) and to investigate the magnitude and shape of achievable sheds and shifts.

364

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil/Liquids Oil/Liquids Petroleum and other liquids consumption outside industrial sector is stagnant or declines figure data Consumption of petroleum and other liquids peaks at 19.8 million barrels per day in 2019 in the AEO2013 Reference case and then falls to 18.9 million barrels per day in 2040 (Figure 93). The transportation sector accounts for the largest share of total consumption throughout the projection, although its share falls to 68 percent in 2040 from 72 percent in 2012 as a result of improvements in vehicle efficiency following the incorporation of CAFE standards for both LDVs and HDVs. Consumption of petroleum and other liquids increases in the industrial sector, by 0.6 million barrels per day from 2011 to 2040, but decreases in all the other end-use sectors.

365

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil/Liquids Oil/Liquids Petroleum and other liquids consumption outside industrial sector is stagnant or declines figure data Consumption of petroleum and other liquids peaks at 19.8 million barrels per day in 2019 in the AEO2013 Reference case and then falls to 18.9 million barrels per day in 2040 (Figure 93). The transportation sector accounts for the largest share of total consumption throughout the projection, although its share falls to 68 percent in 2040 from 72 percent in 2012 as a result of improvements in vehicle efficiency following the incorporation of CAFE standards for both LDVs and HDVs. Consumption of petroleum and other liquids increases in the industrial sector, by 0.6 million barrels per day from 2011 to 2040, but decreases in all the other end-use sectors.

366

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Sector Specific Tools | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Protocol Initiative: Sector Specific Tools Gas Protocol Initiative: Sector Specific Tools Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Sector Specific Tools Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Industry, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free References: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased Electricity[1] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary Combustion[2] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Transport or Mobil Sources[3]

367

Annual Real Natural Gas Prices by Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Major regulatory reforms at the Federal level began at the end of the 1970s with the passage of the Natural Gas Policy Act, and have affected most phases of the industry and markets Over time the movement to a more competitive model led to lower prices starting around 1983, which was accentuated by the drop in world oil prices in 1986 Gas consumers in all sectors seem to have benefited, on average, from a more competitive marketplace However, several factors have come together recently that have pushed spot gas prices up sharply and which are expected to reverse the downward trend in in real gas prices for the next year or so: U.S. gas production has been relatively flat. Expected demand is high under normal weather assumptions. Gas storage levels are below normal.

368

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

global gasoline and diesel price and income elasticities.shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.Habits and Uncertain Relative Prices: Simulating Petrol Con-

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

World oil demand’s shift toward faster growing and less price-responsive products and regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using data for 1971–2008, we estimate the effects of changes in price and income on world oil demand, disaggregated by product – transport oil, fuel oil (residual and heating oil), and other oil – for six groups of countries. Most of the demand reductions since 1973–74 were due to fuel-switching away from fuel oil, especially in the OECD; in addition, the collapse of the Former Soviet Union (FSU) reduced their oil consumption substantially. Demand for transport and other oil was much less price-responsive, and has grown almost as rapidly as income, especially outside the OECD and FSU. World oil demand has shifted toward products and regions that are faster growing and less price-responsive. In contrast to projections to 2030 of declining per-capita demand for the world as a whole – by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), International Energy Agency (IEA) and OPEC – we project modest growth. Our projections for total world demand in 2030 are at least 20% higher than projections by those three institutions, using similar assumptions about income growth and oil prices, because we project rest-of-world growth that is consistent with historical patterns, in contrast to the dramatic slowdowns which they project.

Joyce M. Dargay; Dermot Gately

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Estimated United States Transportation Energy Use 2005  

SciTech Connect

A flow chart depicting energy flow in the transportation sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 31,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of energy were used throughout the United States in transportation activities. Vehicles used in these activities include automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, buses, airplanes, rail, and ships. The transportation sector is powered primarily by petroleum-derived fuels (gasoline, diesel and jet fuel). Biomass-derived fuels, electricity and natural gas-derived fuels are also used. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the transportation sector.

Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

371

AIDS and the private sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... a host of other celebrities are promoting the US launch of 'Product Red', the private sector's campaign to fight AIDS. Some of the profits on products sold in ... is to be welcomed. For two decades, AIDS activists and officials have implored the private sector to join the fight against AIDS. In reality, that effort remains overwhelmingly dependent ...

2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

372

Geographic information system applications in coal transportation analysis  

SciTech Connect

Geographic information systems (GIS) offer great potential to the coal transportation industry for capitalizing on the growing availability of spatially-referenced data. As computer-based systems for the collection, storage, retrieval and analysis of spatial data, generating information products in a variety of formats, GIS have a great capability to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of coal transportation operations, planning, engineering, and facilities management. Currently GIS are used in the transportation industry at large to analyze, and display information about network infrastructure, fleet operations, property ownership, routing and scheduling, and utilities. Current coal transportation applications include consumer service inquiries, train and locomotive scheduling, and evaluation of network usage. The paper describes the significant potential uses of GIS in the coal transportation sector when integrated with optimization and decision support systems, scientific visualization, data forecasting, and strategic system planning approaches. Ultimately consumer demand and the drive for economic efficiency are likely to stimulate the integration and management of spatial information across the entire coal chain.

Elmes, G. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Economic Development and the Structure of the Demand for Commercial Energy Ruth A. Judson, Richard Schmalensee and Thomas M. Stoker*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development and energy demand, this study estimates the Engel curves that relate per-capita energy consumption in major economic sectors to per- capita GDP. Panel data covering up to 123 nations are employedEconomic Development and the Structure of the Demand for Commercial Energy Ruth A. Judson, Richard

374

Major models and data sources for residential and commercial sector energy conservation analysis. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Major models and data sources are reviewed that can be used for energy-conservation analysis in the residential and commercial sectors to provide an introduction to the information that can or is available to DOE in order to further its efforts in analyzing and quantifying their policy and program requirements. Models and data sources examined in the residential sector are: ORNL Residential Energy Model; BECOM; NEPOOL; MATH/CHRDS; NIECS; Energy Consumption Data Base: Household Sector; Patterns of Energy Use by Electrical Appliances Data Base; Annual Housing Survey; 1970 Census of Housing; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; RECS; Solar Market Development Model; and ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book. Models and data sources examined in the commercial sector are: ORNL Commercial Sector Model of Energy Demand; BECOM; NEPOOL; Energy Consumption Data Base: Commercial Sector; F.W. Dodge Data Base; NFIB Energy Report for Small Businesses; ADL Commercial Sector Energy Use Data Base; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; Nonresidential Buildings Surveys of Energy Consumption; General Electric Co: Commercial Sector Data Base; The BOMA Commercial Sector Data Base; The Tishman-Syska and Hennessy Data Base; The NEMA Commercial Sector Data Base; ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book; and Solar Market Development Model. Purpose; basis for model structure; policy variables and parameters; level of regional, sectoral, and fuels detail; outputs; input requirements; sources of data; computer accessibility and requirements; and a bibliography are provided for each model and data source.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Electricity savings potentials in the residential sector of Bahrain  

SciTech Connect

Electricity is the major fuel (over 99%) used in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors in Bahrain. In 1992, the total annual electricity consumption in Bahrain was 3.45 terawatt-hours (TWh), of which 1.95 TWh (56%) was used in the residential sector, 0.89 TWh (26%) in the commercial sector, and 0.59 TWh (17%) in the industrial sector. Agricultural energy consumption was 0.02 TWh (less than 1%) of the total energy use. In Bahrain, most residences are air conditioned with window units. The air-conditioning electricity use is at least 50% of total annual residential use. The contribution of residential AC to the peak power consumption is even more significant, approaching 80% of residential peak power demand. Air-conditioning electricity use in the commercial sector is also significant, about 45% of the annual use and over 60% of peak power demand. This paper presents a cost/benefit analysis of energy-efficient technologies in the residential sector. Technologies studied include: energy-efficient air conditioners, insulating houses, improved infiltration, increasing thermostat settings, efficient refrigerators and freezers, efficient water heaters, efficient clothes washers, and compact fluorescent lights. We conservatively estimate a 32% savings in residential electricity use at an average cost of about 4 fils per kWh. (The subsidized cost of residential electricity is about 12 fils per kWh. 1000 fils = 1 Bahrain Dinar = US$ 2.67). We also discuss major policy options needed for implementation of energy-efficiency technologies.

Akbari, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Morsy, M.G.; Al-Baharna, N.S. [Univ. of Bahrain, Manama (Bahrain)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

building demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

377

Demand Response Research in Spain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Research in Spain Demand Response Research in Spain Speaker(s): Iñigo Cobelo Date: August 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mary Ann Piette The Spanish power system is becoming increasingly difficult to operate. The peak load grows every year, and the permission to build new transmission and distribution infrastructures is difficult to obtain. In this scenario Demand Response can play an important role, and become a resource that could help network operators. The present deployment of demand response measures is small, but this situation however may change in the short term. The two main Spanish utilities and the transmission network operator are designing research projects in this field. All customer segments are targeted, and the research will lead to pilot installations and tests.

378

EIA - AEO2010 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Electricity Demand Figure 69. U.S. electricity demand growth 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 60. Average annual U.S. retail electricity prices in three cases, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel in three cases, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Electricity generating capacity at U.S. nuclear power plants in three cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035

379

Full Rank Rational Demand Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a nominal income full rank QES. R EFERENCES (A.84)S. G. Donald. “Inferring the Rank of a Matrix. ” Journal of97-102. . “A Demand System Rank Theorem. ” Econometrica 57 (

LaFrance, Jeffrey T; Pope, Rulon D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Demand Forecasting of New Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keeping Unit or SKU) employing attribute analysis techniques. The objective of this thesis is to improve Abstract This thesis is a study into the demand forecasting of new products (also referred to as Stock

Sun, Yu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Fact #792: August 12, 2013 Energy Consumption by Sector and Energy Source, 1982 and 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In the last 30 years, overall energy consumption has grown by about 22 quadrillion Btu. The share of energy consumption by the transportation sector has seen modest growth in that time – from about...

382

Current Photovoltaics Applications—Transport  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most transport systems demand high reliability as personal safety is often at stake. System design and overall integrity is thus the primary requirement. These factors are to be considered in detail. Users will d...

P. R. Wolfe

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response & Energy Efficiency International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations ESL-IC-09-11-05 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 2 ?Less than 5..., 2009 4 An Innovative Solution to Get the Ball Rolling ? Demand Response (DR) ? Monitoring Based Commissioning (MBCx) EnerNOC has a solution involving two complementary offerings. ESL-IC-09-11-05 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference...

384

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

National Action Plan on Demand Response, June 2010 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Action Plan on Demand Response, June 2010 Action Plan on Demand Response, June 2010 National Action Plan on Demand Response, June 2010 The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is required to develop the National Action Plan on Demand Response (National Action Plan) as outlined in section 529 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), entitled "Electricity Sector Demand Response." This National Action Plan is designed to meet three objectives: Identify "requirements for technical assistance to States to allow them to maximize the amount of demand response resources that can be developed and deployed." Design and identify "requirements for implementation of a national communications program that includes broad-based customer education and support."

386

10 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

renewable energy goals, consumption of wood-based energy in the United States is not increasing as quickly energy sectors. The total usage of woody biomass by all energy sectors is expected to be 1 source of renewable energy. But despite the ramping up of demand in other countries as part of meeting

387

Scalability and Evolutionary Dynamics of Air Transportation Networks in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the growing demand for air transportation and the limited ability to increase capacity at key points in the air transportation system, there are concerns that, in the future, the system will not scale to meet demand. ...

Bonnefoy, Philippe

2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

388

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings Title Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-2340e Year of Publication 2009 Authors Piette, Mary Ann, Girish Ghatikar, Sila Kiliccote, David S. Watson, Edward Koch, and Dan Hennage Journal Journal of Computing Science and Information Engineering Volume 9 Issue 2 Keywords communication and standards, market sectors, openadr Abstract This paper describes the concept for and lessons from the development and field-testing of an open, interoperable communications infrastructure to support automated demand response (auto-DR). Automating DR allows greater levels of participation, improved reliability, and repeatability of the DR in participating facilities. This paper also presents the technical and architectural issues associated with auto-DR and description of the demand response automation server (DRAS), the client/server architecture-based middle-ware used to automate the interactions between the utilities or any DR serving entity and their customers for DR programs. Use case diagrams are presented to show the role of the DRAS between utility/ISO and the clients at the facilities.

389

Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GDP per capita Transport Future outlook Drivers of Transport Energyenergy demand per passenger-km. Figure 20. Car Ownership and GDP

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

National Action Plan on Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Response Response Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group November 18, 2008 November 18, 2008 Daniel Gore Daniel Gore Office of Energy Market Regulation Office of Energy Market Regulation Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The author's views do not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Presentation Contents Presentation Contents Statutory Requirements Statutory Requirements National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response General Discussion on Demand Response and Energy Outlook

391

Demand Response Projects: Technical and Market Demonstrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response Projects: Technical and Market Demonstrations Philip D. Lusk Deputy Director Energy Analyst #12;PLACE CAPTION HERE. #12;#12;#12;#12;City of Port Angeles Demand Response History energy charges · Demand charges during peak period only ­ Reduced demand charges for demand response

392

Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Barat, D. Watson. 2006 Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby 2008. Demand Response Spinning ReserveReport 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals. Presented atand Automated Demand Response in Industrial RefrigeratedActions for Industrial Demand Response in California. LBNL-

Mares, K.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

CEC-500-2010-FS-002 Assess New Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEC-500-2010-FS-002 Assess New Transportation and Land-Use Patterns in a Carbon-Constrained Future TRANSPORTATION ENERGY RESEARCH PIER Transportation Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/ transportation/ March 2010 The Issue California's transportation sector is the single largest contributor of greenhouse gas

395

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Change Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas, Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Publications, Technical report Website: www.pewclimate.org...

396

Technology Mapping of the Renewable Energy, Buildings and Transport...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the Renewable Energy, Buildings and Transport Sectors: Policy Drivers and International Trade Aspects AgencyCompany Organization: International Centre for Trade and...

397

Energy Department Awards $45 Million to Deploy Advanced Transportation...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

is helping to build a strong 21st century transportation sector that cuts harmful pollution, creates jobs and leads to a more sustainable energy future," said Energy...

398

Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Findings From Field Studies Title Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Findings From Field Studies Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5763E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ghatikar, Girish, Venkata Ganti, Nance Matson, and Mary Ann Piette Publisher PG&E/SDG&E/CEC/LBNL Keywords communication and standards, control systems, data centers, demand response, enabling technologies, end-use technologies, load migration, market sectors, technologies Abstract The energy use in data centers is increasing and, in particular, impacting the data center energy cost and electric grid reliability during peak and high price periods. As per the 2007 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in the Pacific Gas and Electric Company territory, data centers are estimated to consume 500 megawatts of annual peak electricity. The 2011 data confirm the increase in data center energy use, although it is slightly lower than the EPA forecast. Previous studies have suggested that data centers have significant potential to integrate with supply-side programs to reduce peak loads. In collaboration with California data centers, utilities, and technology vendors, this study conducted field tests to improve the understanding of the demand response opportunities in data centers. The study evaluated an initial set of control and load migration strategies and economic feasibility for four data centers. The findings show that with minimal or no impact to data center operations a demand savings of 25% at the data center level or 10% to 12% at the whole building level can be achieved with strategies for cooling and IT equipment, and load migration. These findings should accelerate the grid-responsiveness of data centers through technology development, integration with the demand response programs, and provide operational cost savings.

399

industrial sector | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

industrial sector industrial sector Dataset Summary Description Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords 2008 biomass consumption industrial sector Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon industrial_biomass_energy_consumption_and_electricity_2008.xls (xls, 27.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

400

Facilitating Renewable Integration by Demand Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Demand response is seen as one of the resources ... expected to incentivize small consumers to participate in demand response. This chapter models the involvement of small consumers in demand response programs wi...

Juan M. Morales; Antonio J. Conejo…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Barat, and D. Watson. 2007. Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby. 2009. Demand Response Spinning ReserveFormat of 2009-2011 Demand Response Activity Applications.

Joseph, Eto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Demand response-enabled residential thermostat controls.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

human dimension of demand response technology from a caseArens, E. , et al. 2008. Demand Response Enabling TechnologyArens, E. , et al. 2006. Demand Response Enabling Technology

Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David M.; Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Value of Demand Response -Introduction Klaus Skytte  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Value of Demand Response - Introduction Klaus Skytte Systems Analysis Department February 7, 2006 Energinet.dk, Ballerup #12;What is Demand Response? Demand response (DR) is the short-term response

404

World Energy Use — Trends in Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to provide adequate energy supplies in the future, trends in energy demand must be evaluated and projections of future demand developed. World energy use is far from static, and an understanding of the demand

Randy Hudson

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050 RyanCEC (2003a) California energy demand 2003-2013 forecast.CEC (2005a) California energy demand 2006-2016: Staff energy

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Balancing of Energy Supply and Residential Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Power demand of private households shows daily fluctuations and ... (BEV) and heat pumps. This additional demand, especially when it remains unmanaged, will ... to an increase in fluctuations. To balance demand,

Martin Bock; Grit Walther

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Assessing the impact of energy saving measures on the future energy demand and related GHG (greenhouse gas) emission reduction of Croatia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the light of European energy-climate package and its measures for increasing security of supply, decreasing the impact on environment and stimulating sustainability, Croatia as a new EU (European Union) member state needs to reconsider and develop new energy policy towards energy efficiency and renewable energy sources. Croatian long-term energy demand and its effect on the future national GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions are analysed in this paper. For that purpose the NeD model was constructed (National energy demand model). The model is comprised out of six modules, each representing one sector: industry, transport, households, services, agriculture and construction. The model is based on bottom up approach. The analysis has shown that energy policy measures, identified through this paper, can potentially achieve energy savings up to 157 PJ in the year 2050, which presents a 40% decrease to referent (frozen efficiency) scenario. Results obtained in this paper were also compared to the Croatian National Energy Strategy for the years 2020 and 2030. It was shown that if already implemented policies were properly taken into account the actual final energy demand for the year 2030 would be 43% lower than projected by the Croatian National Energy Strategy.

Tomislav Pukšec; Brian Vad Mathiesen; Tomislav Novosel; Neven Dui?

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Definition: Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Demand Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand The rate at which electric energy is delivered to or by a system or part of a system, generally expressed in kilowatts or megawatts, at a given instant or averaged over any designated interval of time., The rate at which energy is being used by the customer.[1] Related Terms energy, electricity generation References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Demand&oldid=480555"

409

Winter Demand Impacted by Weather  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: Heating oil demand is strongly influenced by weather. The "normal" numbers are the expected values for winter 2000-2001 used in EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook. The chart indicates the extent to which the last winter exhibited below-normal heating degree-days (and thus below-normal heating demand). Temperatures were consistently warmer than normal throughout the 1999-2000 heating season. This was particularly true in November 1999, February 2001 and March 2001. For the heating season as a whole (October through March), the 1999-2000 winter yielded total HDDs 10.7% below normal. Normal temperatures this coming winter would, then, be expected to bring about 11% higher heating demand than we saw last year. Relative to normal, the 1999-2000 heating season was the warmest in

410

Turkey's energy demand and supply  

SciTech Connect

The aim of the present article is to investigate Turkey's energy demand and the contribution of domestic energy sources to energy consumption. Turkey, the 17th largest economy in the world, is an emerging country with a buoyant economy challenged by a growing demand for energy. Turkey's energy consumption has grown and will continue to grow along with its economy. Turkey's energy consumption is high, but its domestic primary energy sources are oil and natural gas reserves and their production is low. Total primary energy production met about 27% of the total primary energy demand in 2005. Oil has the biggest share in total primary energy consumption. Lignite has the biggest share in Turkey's primary energy production at 45%. Domestic production should be to be nearly doubled by 2010, mainly in coal (lignite), which, at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also increase two-fold over the same period.

Balat, M. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

International Oil Supplies and Demands  

SciTech Connect

The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

International Oil Supplies and Demands  

SciTech Connect

The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6. Differences in transportation demand assumptions across three cases 6. Differences in transportation demand assumptions across three cases Transportation mode Reference Low/No Net Imports High Net Imports Light-duty vehicles Vehicle miles traveled (compound annual growth rate, 2011-2040) 1.2% 0.2% 11% Vehicle technology efficiency in 2040 Baseline Baseline + 10% Baseline - 10% Vehicle technology cost in 2040 Baseline Baseline - 10% Baseline + 10% CAFE standard compliance value in 2040 (miles per gallon) 49.0 57.7 39.9 Flex-fuel vehicle stock in 2040 (millions) 20.9 44.3 20.0 Batter-electric vehicle costs Baseline Baseline - 14% Baseline Heavy-duty vehicles Vehicle technology efficiency in 2040 Baseline Baseline + 10% Baseline - 10% vehicle technology cost in 2040 Baseline Baseline - 10% Baseline + 10%

414

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6. Differences in transportation demand assumptions across three cases 6. Differences in transportation demand assumptions across three cases Transportation mode Reference Low/No Net Imports High Net Imports Light-duty vehicles Vehicle miles traveled (compound annual growth rate, 2011-2040) 1.2% 0.2% 11% Vehicle technology efficiency in 2040 Baseline Baseline + 10% Baseline - 10% Vehicle technology cost in 2040 Baseline Baseline - 10% Baseline + 10% CAFE standard compliance value in 2040 (miles per gallon) 49.0 57.7 39.9 Flex-fuel vehicle stock in 2040 (millions) 20.9 44.3 20.0 Batter-electric vehicle costs Baseline Baseline - 14% Baseline Heavy-duty vehicles Vehicle technology efficiency in 2040 Baseline Baseline + 10% Baseline - 10% vehicle technology cost in 2040 Baseline Baseline - 10% Baseline + 10%

415

The Geography of Transport Systems-Maritime Transportation | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Geography of Transport Systems-Maritime Transportation The Geography of Transport Systems-Maritime Transportation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Geography of Transport Systems-Maritime Transportation Agency/Company /Organization: Hofstra University Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Technology characterizations Resource Type: Publications, Technical report Website: people.hofstra.edu/geotrans/eng/ch3en/conc3en/ch3c4en.html Cost: Free Language: English References: Maritime Transportation[1] "Maritime transportation, similar to land and air modes, operates on its own space, which is at the same time geographical by its physical attributes, strategic by its control and commercial by its usage. While geographical considerations tend to be constant in time, strategic and

416

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Demand Response Technology Development The objective ofin planning demand response technology RD&D by conductingNew and Emerging Technologies into the California Smart Grid

Joseph, Eto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Long-term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response> B-4 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Demand Response - Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Response - Policy Demand Response - Policy Since its inception, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has been committed to modernizing the nation's...

419

Sandia National Laboratories: demand response inverter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

demand response inverter ECIS-Princeton Power Systems, Inc.: Demand Response Inverter On March 19, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Surety, Facilities,...

420

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand Response A pilot program from NSTAR in Massachusetts,Massachusetts, aiming to test whether an intensive program of energy efficiency and demand response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

annual per-capita electricity consumption by demand15 California electricity consumption projections by demandannual per-capita electricity consumption by demand

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies - January 16, 2011 Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies - January 16, 2011 January 16, 2011 Conference Call...

423

Marketing & Driving Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools & Strategies Marketing & Driving Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools & Strategies Presentation slides from the BetterBuildings...

424

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vehicle Conventional and Alternative Fuel Response Simulatormodified to include alternative fuel demand scenarios (whichvehicle adoption and alternative fuel demand) later in the

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The Role of Demand Resources In Regional Transmission Expansion Planning and Reliable Operations  

SciTech Connect

Investigating the role of demand resources in regional transmission planning has provided mixed results. On one hand there are only a few projects where demand response has been used as an explicit alternative to transmission enhancement. On the other hand there is a fair amount of demand response in the form of energy efficiency, peak reduction, emergency load shedding, and (recently) demand providing ancillary services. All of this demand response reduces the need for transmission enhancements. Demand response capability is typically (but not always) factored into transmission planning as a reduction in the load which must be served. In that sense demand response is utilized as an alternative to transmission expansion. Much more demand response is used (involuntarily) as load shedding under extreme conditions to prevent cascading blackouts. The amount of additional transmission and generation that would be required to provide the current level of reliability if load shedding were not available is difficult to imagine and would be impractical to build. In a very real sense demand response solutions are equitably treated in every region - when proposed, demand response projects are evaluated against existing reliability and economic criteria. The regional councils, RTOs, and ISOs identify needs. Others propose transmission, generation, or responsive load based solutions. Few demand response projects get included in transmission enhancement plans because few are proposed. But this is only part of the story. Several factors are responsible for the current very low use of demand response as a transmission enhancement alternative. First, while the generation, transmission, and load business sectors each deal with essentially the same amount of electric power, generation and transmission companies are explicitly in the electric power business but electricity is not the primary business focus of most loads. This changes the institutional focus of each sector. Second, market and reliability rules have, understandably, been written around the capabilities and limitations of generators, the historic reliability resources. Responsive load limitations and capabilities are often not accommodated in markets or reliability criteria. Third, because of the institutional structure, demand response alternatives are treated as temporary solutions that can delay but not replace transmission enhancement. Financing has to be based on a three to five year project life as opposed to the twenty to fifty year life of transmission facilities. More can be done to integrate demand response options into transmission expansion planning. Given the societal benefits it may be appropriate for independent transmission planning organizations to take a more proactive role in drawing demand response alternatives into the resource mix. Existing demand response programs provide a technical basis to build from. Regulatory and market obstacles will have to be overcome if demand response alternatives are to be routinely considered in transmission expansion planning.

Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Oak Ridge Reservation's emergency sectors change | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reservation's emergency sectors change Oak Ridge Reservation's emergency sectors change March 11, 2014 - 11:30am Addthis On March 12, the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency...

427

Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance  

Energy Savers (EERE)

JANUARY 2015 ENERGY SECTOR CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY Energy Sector...

428

Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What's Working and Why Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What's Working and Why Presentation by...

429

Energy Analysis by Sector | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Energy Analysis by Sector Energy Analysis by Sector Manufacturers often rely on energy-intensive technologies and processes. AMO conducts a range of analyses to explore energy use...

430

Rail Coal Transportation Rates  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

reports reports Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector With Data through 2010 | Release Date: November 16, 2012 | Next Release Date: December 2013 | Correction Previous editions Year: 2011 2004 Go Figure 1. Deliveries from major coal basins to electric power plants by rail, 2010 Background In this latest release of Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) significantly expands upon prior versions of this report with the incorporation of new EIA survey data. Figure 1. Percent of total U.S. rail shipments represented in data figure data Previously, EIA relied solely on data from the U.S. Surface Transportation Board (STB), specifically their confidential Carload Waybill Sample. While valuable, due to the statistical nature of the Waybill data,

431

Smart Buildings and Demand Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advances in communications and control technology the strengthening of the Internet and the growing appreciation of the urgency to reduce demand side energy use are motivating the development of improvements in both energy efficiency and demand response (DR) systems in buildings. This paper provides a framework linking continuous energy management and continuous communications for automated demand response (Auto?DR) in various times scales. We provide a set of concepts for monitoring and controls linked to standards and procedures such as Open Automation Demand Response Communication Standards (OpenADR). Basic building energy science and control issues in this approach begin with key building components systems end?uses and whole building energy performance metrics. The paper presents a framework about when energy is used levels of services by energy using systems granularity of control and speed of telemetry. DR when defined as a discrete event requires a different set of building service levels than daily operations. We provide examples of lessons from DR case studies and links to energy efficiency.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Water demand management in Kuwait  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kuwait is an arid country located in the Middle East, with limited access to water resources. Yet water demand per capita is much higher than in other countries in the world, estimated to be around 450 L/capita/day. There ...

Milutinovic, Milan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

UNDP-Costa Rica Regional Programme for LAC - Preparation of Sectoral LEDs  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rica Regional Programme for LAC - Preparation of Sectoral LEDs Rica Regional Programme for LAC - Preparation of Sectoral LEDs for transport and agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDP-Costa Rica Regional Programme for LAC - Preparation of Sectoral LEDs for transport and agriculture Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Agriculture, Transportation Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS Country Costa Rica Central America References UNDP - Latin America & the Caribbean[1] Contents 1 Program Overview 1.1 Program Focus 1.2 Environment and Sustainable Development 2 References Program Overview "Across Latin America and the Caribbean, UNDP helps countries build and share their own solutions to urgent development challenges, supporting

434

Costa Rica-Regional Programme for LAC: Preparation of Sectoral LEDs for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Costa Rica-Regional Programme for LAC: Preparation of Sectoral LEDs for Costa Rica-Regional Programme for LAC: Preparation of Sectoral LEDs for Transport and Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDP-Costa Rica Regional Programme for LAC - Preparation of Sectoral LEDs for transport and agriculture Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Agriculture, Transportation Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS Country Costa Rica Central America References UNDP - Latin America & the Caribbean[1] Contents 1 Program Overview 1.1 Program Focus 1.2 Environment and Sustainable Development 2 References Program Overview "Across Latin America and the Caribbean, UNDP helps countries build and share their own solutions to urgent development challenges, supporting

435

Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes Assistance Project Codes Assistance Project Maureen Guttman, AIA Executive Director, BCAP Alliance to Save Energy 202-530-2211 mguttman@ase.org Tuesday, April 2, 2013 - Thursday, April 4, 2013 Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes - Providing Technical Support and Assistance to States - 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Buildings = largest sector of energy consumption in America * Energy codes are a ready-made regulatory mechanism * States need support for implementation Impact of Project:

436

Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Codes Assistance Project Codes Assistance Project Maureen Guttman, AIA Executive Director, BCAP Alliance to Save Energy 202-530-2211 mguttman@ase.org Tuesday, April 2, 2013 - Thursday, April 4, 2013 Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes - Providing Technical Support and Assistance to States - 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Buildings = largest sector of energy consumption in America * Energy codes are a ready-made regulatory mechanism * States need support for implementation Impact of Project:

437

Demand Response Energy Consulting LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Response Energy Consulting LLC Response Energy Consulting LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Demand Response & Energy Consulting LLC Place Delanson, New York Zip NY 12053 Sector Efficiency Product Delanson-based demand response and energy efficiency consultants. Coordinates 42.748995°, -74.185794° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.748995,"lon":-74.185794,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

438

Alternative and Transitional Energy Sources for Urban Transportation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In urban areas, the transportation sector is one of the principal sources of substantial energy consumption. Although public modes of transportation have ... cities still prefer owning and using their private cars

Linna Li; Becky P. Y. Loo

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Quantitative analysis of alternative transportation under environmental constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on the transportation sector and its role in emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and conventional pollutant emissions. Specifically, it analyzes the potential for hydrogen based transportation, introducing ...

Sandoval López, Reynaldo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Energy and water sector policy strategies for drought mitigation.  

SciTech Connect

Tensions between the energy and water sectors occur when demand for electric power is high and water supply levels are low. There are several regions of the country, such as the western and southwestern states, where the confluence of energy and water is always strained due to population growth. However, for much of the country, this tension occurs at particular times of year (e.g., summer) or when a region is suffering from drought conditions. This report discusses prior work on the interdependencies between energy and water. It identifies the types of power plants that are most likely to be susceptible to water shortages, the regions of the country where this is most likely to occur, and policy options that can be applied in both the energy and water sectors to address the issue. The policy options are designed to be applied in the near term, applicable to all areas of the country, and to ease the tension between the energy and water sectors by addressing peak power demand or decreased water supply.

Kelic, Andjelka; Vugrin, Eric D.; Loose, Verne W.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Industrial Mkt trends Market Trends Despite a 54-percent increase in industrial shipments, industrial energy consumption increases by only 19 percent from 2009 to 2035 in the AEO2011 Reference case. Energy consumption growth is moderated by a shift in the mix of output, as growth in energy-intensive manufacturing output (aluminum, steel, bulk chemicals, paper, and refining) slows and growth in high-value (but less energy-intensive) industries, such as computers and transportation equipment, accelerates. See more figure data Reference Case Tables Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - United States XLS Table 2.1. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - New England XLS Table 2.2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Middle Atlantic XLS

442

Activities to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

sector sector NSTB November 2008 Hank Kenchington - Program Manager Office of Electricity of Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy Activities to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector * 2,000,000 Miles of Oil Pipelines * 1,300,000 Miles of Gas Pipelines * 2,000 Petroleum Terminals * ~1,000,000 Wells * Extensive Ports, Refineries, Transportation, and LNG Facilities * 160,000 Miles of Electrical Transmission lines * ~17,000 Generators; 985,000 Megawatts (net summer capacity) * Over 3,100 Electric Utilities, with 131 million customers Refinery Locations, Crude and Product Pipelines Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil & Gas LNG Import Facilities (Reactivation underway) Legend Interstate Pipelines Intrastate and Other Pipelines

443

Sector 1 Frequently Asked Questions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sector 1 - General Information Sector 1 - General Information Sector 1 Safety Plan (pdf) Useful X-Ray Related Numbers Si a0 = 5.4308 Angstrom CeO2 a0=5.411 Angstrom Cd-109 gamma = 88.036 keV X-ray energy/wavelength conversion constant = 12.39842 Angstrom/keV Useful 1-ID Operations Information Always set the undulator by closing from large to small gap. Always scan the Kohzu monochromator from high to low energy. A Cd-109 source that can be used to calibrate detectors can be obtained by contacting Ali. It has Ag flourescent lines and a 88.036 keV gamma line. Tim Mooney's telephone number is 2-5417. Frequently Asked Questions The following questions come up often when using the Sector 1 beamlines. If you have a question (and maybe answer) that would be of general interest to Sector 1 users, please give it to Jon or Greg for inclusion in this list.

444

LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Key Actions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Actions Actions < LEDSGP‎ | Transportation Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Transportation Toolkit Home Tools Training Contacts Key Actions for Low-Emission Development in Transportation Although no single approach or fixed process exists for low-emission development strategies (LEDS), the following key actions are necessary steps for implementing LEDS in the transportation sector. Undertaking these actions requires flexibility to adapt to dynamic societal conditions in a way that complements existing climate and development goals in other sectors. Planners, researchers, and decision-makers should customize this LEDS implementation framework for the specific conditions of their transport sector, choosing from relevant resources to achieve a comprehensive action

445

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

industrial demand module (IDM) forecasts energy consumption for fuels and feedstocks for nine manufacturing industries and six nonmanufactur- ing industries, subject to delivered prices of energy and macroeconomic variables representing the value of output for each industry. The module includes industrial cogeneration of electricity that is either used in the industrial sector or sold to the electricity grid. The IDM structure is shown in Figure 7. industrial demand module (IDM) forecasts energy consumption for fuels and feedstocks for nine manufacturing industries and six nonmanufactur- ing industries, subject to delivered prices of energy and macroeconomic variables representing the value of output for each industry. The module includes industrial cogeneration of electricity that is either used in the industrial sector or sold to the electricity grid. The IDM structure is shown in Figure 7. Figure 7. Industrial Demand Module Structure Industrial energy demand is projected as a combination of “bottom up” characterizations of the energy-using technology and “top down” econometric estimates of behavior. The influence of energy prices on industrial energy consumption is modeled in terms of the efficiency of use of existing capital, the efficiency of new capital acquisitions, and the mix of fuels utilized, given existing capital stocks. Energy conservation from technological change is represented over time by trend-based “technology possibility curves.” These curves represent the aggregate efficiency of all new technologies that are likely to penetrate the future markets as well as the aggregate improvement in efficiency of 1994 technology.

446

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new

447

Application-oriented modelling of domestic energy demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Detailed residential energy consumption data can be used to offer advanced services and provide new business opportunities to all participants in the energy supply chain, including utilities, distributors and customers. The increasing interest in the residential consumption data is behind the roll-out of smart meters in large areas and led to intensified research efforts in new data acquisition technologies for the energy sector. This paper introduces a novel model for generation of residential energy consumption profiles based on the energy demand contribution of each household appliance and calculated by using a probabilistic approach. The model takes into consideration a wide range of household appliances and its modular structure provides a high degree of flexibility. Residential consumption data generated by the proposed model are suitable for development of new services and applications such as residential real-time pricing schemes or tools for energy demand prediction. To demonstrate the main features of the model, an individual household consumption was created and the effects of a possible change in the user behaviour and the appliance configuration presented. In order to show the flexibility offered in creation of the aggregated demand, the detailed simulation results of an energy demand management algorithm applied to an aggregated user group are used.

J.K. Gruber; S. Jahromizadeh; M. Prodanovi?; V. Rako?evi?

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Program Program Organization Country Region Topic Sector Sector  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Hydrogen Industry People and Policy Solar Transportation Land Use Wind Jordan UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services Jordan UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services...

449

The alchemy of demand response: turning demand into supply  

SciTech Connect

Paying customers to refrain from purchasing products they want seems to run counter to the normal operation of markets. Demand response should be interpreted not as a supply-side resource but as a secondary market that attempts to correct the misallocation of electricity among electric users caused by regulated average rate tariffs. In a world with costless metering, the DR solution results in inefficiency as measured by deadweight losses. (author)

Rochlin, Cliff

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;2008 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering Staff Report Federal Energy metering penetration and potential peak load reduction from demand response have increased since 2006. Significant activity to promote demand response or to remove barriers to demand response occurred at the state

Tesfatsion, Leigh

451

INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS Prepared by Richard Perez et al. NREL subcontract response programs. This is because PV generation acts as a catalyst to demand response, markedly enhancing by solid evidence from three utility case studies. BACKGROUND Demand Response: demand response (DR

Perez, Richard R.

452

Demand Side Management in Rangan Banerjee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Side Management in Industry Rangan Banerjee Talk at Baroda in Birla Corporate Seminar August 31,2007 #12;Demand Side Management Indian utilities ­ energy shortage and peak power shortage. Supply for Options ­ Demand Side Management (DSM) & Load Management #12;DSM Concept Demand Side Management (DSM) - co

Banerjee, Rangan

453

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review - Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review Release Date: June 1, 2011 | Next Release Date: Periodically | full report Introduction Coal production in the United States in 2010 increased to a level of 1,085.3 million short tons according to preliminary data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), an increase of 1.0 percent, or 10.4 million short tons above the 2009 level of 1,074.9 million short tons (Table 1). In 2010 U.S. coal consumption increased in all sectors except commercial and institutional while total coal stocks fell slightly for the year. Coal consumption in the electric power sector in 2010 was higher by 4.5 percent, while coking coal consumption increased by 37.9 percent and the other industrial sector increased by 7.1 percent. The commercial and

454

What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program Title What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2012 Authors Shen, Bo, Chun Chun Ni, Girish Ghatikar, and Lynn K. Price Conference Name ECEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry Date Published 06/2012 Conference Location Arnhem, the Netherlands Keywords china, demand response program, electricity, market sectors Abstract China has achieved remarkable economic growth over the last decade. To fuel the growth, China addeda total of 455 gigawatts of new generation capacity between 2006 and 2011, which is an increase of 76%in five years. Even so, this capacity does not meet the growing demand for electricity, and most ofChina's industrial sector is facing the worst power shortages since 2004. The Chinese government hasbeen managing the capacity shortfall through direct load control programs. While such mandatoryprograms have spared China from electricity outages, it does so at a high cost to the industrial sector.The load control program has significantly affected business operations and economic outputs, whilefailing to trigger greater energy efficiency improvement. Instead, it has led to a proliferation of dieselgenerators used by industrial facilities when electricity is not delivered, increasing diesel use andassociated air pollution.

455

Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Predictive Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on AddThis.com...

456

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsand Techniques for Demand Response. California Energyand S. Kiliccote. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts:

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Incorporating Demand Response into Western Interconnection Transmission Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aggregator Programs. Demand Response Measurement andIncorporating Demand Response into Western Interconnection13 Demand Response Dispatch

Satchwell, Andrew

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Techniques for Demand Response, report for theand Reliability Demand Response Programs: Final Report.Demand Response

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,study of automated demand response in wastewater treatmentopportunities for demand response control strategies in

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Global energy demand to 2060  

SciTech Connect

The projection of global energy demand to the year 2060 is of particular interest because of its relevance to the current greenhouse concerns. The long-term growth of global energy demand in the time scale of climatic change has received relatively little attention in the public discussion of national policy alternatives. The sociological, political, and economic issues have rarely been mentioned in this context. This study emphasizes that the two major driving forces are global population growth and economic growth (gross national product per capita), as would be expected. The modest annual increases assumed in this study result in a year 2060 annual energy use of >4 times the total global current use (year 1986) if present trends continue, and >2 times with extreme efficiency improvements in energy use. Even assuming a zero per capita growth for energy and economics, the population increase by the year 2060 results in a 1.5 times increase in total annual energy use.

Starr, C. (Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Industrial and electric power sectors lead U.S. growth in natural gas consumption figure data U.S. total natural gas consumption grows from 24.4 trillion cubic feet in 2011 to 29.5 trillion cubic feet in 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case. Natural gas use increases in all the end-use sectors except residential (Figure 85), where consumption declines as a result of improvements in appliance efficiency and falling demand for space heating, attributable in part to population shifts to warmer regions of the country. Despite falling early in the projection period from a spike in 2012, which resulted from very low natural gas prices relative to coal, consumption of natural gas for power generation increases by an average of 0.8 percent per year, with more natural gas used for electricity production as relatively

462

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Industrial and electric power sectors lead U.S. growth in natural gas consumption figure data U.S. total natural gas consumption grows from 24.4 trillion cubic feet in 2011 to 29.5 trillion cubic feet in 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case. Natural gas use increases in all the end-use sectors except residential (Figure 85), where consumption declines as a result of improvements in appliance efficiency and falling demand for space heating, attributable in part to population shifts to warmer regions of the country. Despite falling early in the projection period from a spike in 2012, which resulted from very low natural gas prices relative to coal, consumption of natural gas for power generation increases by an average of 0.8 percent per year, with more natural gas used for electricity production as relatively

463

Carbon dioxide emissions from the U.S. electricity sector  

SciTech Connect

As climate change negotiators from around the world prepared together in 1996 to consider new international targets and policies for greenhouse-gas reductions, the US Department of Energy asked the authors to review the options available to the electricity sector to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. The charge was to focus on supply-side options and utility demand-side management (DSM) programs because other researchers were considered energy efficiency options for the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors. The next section presents the EIA baseline projections of electricity production, use, and CO{sub 2} emissions to the year 2010. Subsequent sections briefly summarize the options available to the electricity industry to reduce its CO{sub 2} emissions, speculate on how industry restructuring might affect the ability of the industry and its regulators to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, and discuss the policies available to affect those emissions: research and development, voluntary programs, regulation, and fiscal policies.

Hirst, E.; Baxter, L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Industrial Sector Energy Conservation Programs in the People's Republic of China during the Seventh Five-Year Plan (1986-1990)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy demand. The energy consumption mix i n China'sstructure and product mix in energy-intensive industries;Table 4). The sector's mix of energy sources that year was

Zhiping, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Knowledge base for an autonomic transport layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The accelerated development of Internet and mobile devices has lead to new QoS-demanding distributed applications and new QoS-providing communication services, particularly at the transport level. The diversity of transport services and underlying networks ... Keywords: autonomic computing, model-driven architecture, ontology-driven architecture, transport protocols

Ernesto Exposito; Christophe Chassot; Michel Diaz

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Uptake of Decision Support Systems (DSS) in the GB Forestry Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Greater uptake of DSS by the private sector · New demands for DSS to help managers respond to climate change · DSS can support certification #12;Barriers to uptake #12;25/03/20118 Foresters vs. Scientists absolutes which threaten professional judgement #12;25/03/20119 Communication · Improved communication

467

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Electric Power exec summary Executive Summary The EPA is expected to enact several key regulations in the coming decade that will have an impact on the U.S. power sector, particularly the fleet of coal-fired power plants. Because the rules have not yet been finalized, their impacts cannot be fully analyzed, and they are not included in the Reference case. However, AEO2011 does include several alternative cases that examine the sensitivity of power generation markets to various assumed requirements for environmental retrofits. In addition, a case with an explicit price on CO2 emissions is also examined. See more Mkt trends Market Trends Electricity demand growth has slowed in each decade since the 1950s. After 9.8-percent annual growth in the 1950s, demand (including retail sales and

468

Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologi...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accomplishments Progress 9 Project Partners *CH4 Energy *CP Fuels *Go Natural Towing *Jordan School District *Kenworth PacLease *Ogden City *Questar Gas Company *Robinson Waste...

469

Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologi...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Accomplishments 7 Project Partners *CH4 Energy *CP Fuels *Go Natural Towing *Jordan School District *Ogden City *Questar Gas Company *Robinson Waste *Salt Lake City *Semi...

470

Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologi...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

public stations CNG America: 3 CNG public stations Go Natural Towing: 3 CNG tow trucks Jordan School District: 24 CNG School buses 1 private CNG station with time fill hoses...

471

High Penetration of Renewable Energy in the Transportation Sector...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

currently accounts for 71% of U.S. petroleum consumption and 33% of its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. If the nation seeks to address the associated economic, environmental, and...

472

Fact #619: April 19, 2010 Transportation Sector Revenue by Industry...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

passenger trans, warehouseing and storage, rail, transit and ground passenger trans, pipeline, and water) for the economic census year 2002. For more detailed information, see...

473

Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey data. Each plant receiving CAPP or PRB coal in 2007 and 2010 were mapped and their data used to estimate costs for other cells by interpolating values based on inverse...

474

Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector Electrification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

475

Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector Electrification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

476

Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector Electrification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

477

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Demand U.S. Energy Demand On This Page U.S. average energy use... Industrial and commercial... Renewable sources... Transportation uses... U.S. average energy use per person and per dollar of GDP declines through 2035 Growth in energy use is linked to population growth through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and goods and services. These changes affect not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels used. Energy consumption per capita declined from 337 million Btu in 2007 to 308 million Btu in 2009, the lowest level since 1967. In the AEO2011 Reference case, energy use per capita increases slightly through 2013, as the economy recovers from the 2008-2009 economic downturn. After 2013, energy use per capita declines by 0.3 percent per year on average, to

478

Sector Profiles of Significant Large CHP Markets, March 2004  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Overview of market assessments of large CHP sector profiles of the chemicals, food, and pharmaceuticals sectors

479

Dissipative hidden sector dark matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple way of explaining dark matter without modifying known Standard Model physics is to require the existence of a hidden sector, which interacts with the visible one predominantly via gravity. We consider a hidden sector containing two stable particles charged under an unbroken $U(1)^{'}$ gauge symmetry, hence featuring dissipative interactions. The massless gauge field associated with this symmetry can interact via kinetic mixing with the ordinary photon. In fact, such an interaction of strength $\\epsilon \\sim 10^{-9}$ appears to be necessary in order to explain galactic structure. We calculate the effect of this new physics on Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and its contribution to the relativistic energy density at Hydrogen recombination. Subsequently we examine the process of dark recombination, during which neutral dark states are formed, which is important for large-scale structure formation. We then analyze the phenomenology of our model in the context of galactic structure, and find that it can reproduc...

Foot, R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Competition on the Hospital Sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article is about the role of competition in the health care sector. It concentrates on competition amongst hospitals for fixed budgets. The literature supports the argument that with fixed prices hospitals will compete on quality dimensions, and quality of output will increase. Under variable prices, competition can lead to chiseling of output quality. The evidence, at least with respect to the UK, shows that competition need not have an adverse effect on equity of access to health care.

Z. Cooper; A. McGuire

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation demand sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Definition: Peak Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peak Demand Peak Demand Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Peak Demand The highest hourly integrated Net Energy For Load within a Balancing Authority Area occurring within a given period (e.g., day, month, season, or year)., The highest instantaneous demand within the Balancing Authority Area.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Peak demand is used to refer to a historically high point in the sales record of a particular product. In terms of energy use, peak demand describes a period of strong consumer demand. Related Terms Balancing Authority Area, energy, demand, balancing authority, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ne Glossary Definition Retrieved from

482

Demand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission January 6, 2005 Mike Koszalka Director;Demand Response Results, 2004 Load Control ­ Cool Keeper ­ ID Irrigation Load Control Price Responsive

483

Industrial Equipment Demand and Duty Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand and duty factors have been measured for selected equipment (air compressors, electric furnaces, injection molding machines, centrifugal loads, and others) in industrial plants. Demand factors for heavily loaded air compressors were near 100...

Dooley, E. S.; Heffington, W. M.

484

ConservationandDemand ManagementPlan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Introduction Ontario Regulation 397/11 under the Green Energy Act 2009 requires public agencies and implement energy Conservation and Demand Management (CDM) plans starting in 2014. Requirementsofthe ConservationandDemand ManagementPlan 2014-2019 #12

Abolmaesumi, Purang

485

Energy Demand Analysis at a Disaggregated Level  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this chapter is to consider energy demand at the fuel level or at the ... . This chapter first presents the disaggregation of energy demand, discusses the information issues and introduces framewor...

Subhes C. Bhattacharyya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Seasonal temperature variations and energy demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an empirical study of the relationship between residential energy demand and temperature. Unlike previous studies in this ... different regions and to the contrasting effects on energy demand ...

Enrica De Cian; Elisa Lanzi; Roberto Roson

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by Sector and Source Consumption by Sector and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 17, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into marketed renewable energy, residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electric power. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Commercial Electric Power Industrial Renewable Energy Consumption Residential sector source transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source- Reference Case (xls, 105 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

488

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Electricity Market Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. The major assumptions are summarized below.

489

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

residential.gif (5487 bytes) residential.gif (5487 bytes) The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

490

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

491

Decentralized demand management for water distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Actual Daily Demand for Model 2 . . 26 4 Predicted vs. Actual Peak Hourly Demand for Model 1 27 5 Predicted vs. Actual Peak Hourly Demand for Model 2 28 6 Cumulative Hourly Demand Distribution 7 Bryan Distribution Network 8 Typical Summer Diurnal... locating and controlling water that has not been accounted for. The Ford Meter Box Company (1987) advises the testing and recalibration of existing water meters. Because operating costs in a distribution network can be quite substantial, a significant...

Zabolio, Dow Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

492

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-62226 Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study F. Rubinstein, S. Kiliccote Energy Environmental Technologies Division January 2007 #12;LBNL-62226 Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California Energy

493

Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest Chuck Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory cagoldman@lbl.gov Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project Portland OR May 2, 2007 #12;Overview · Typology Annual Reports ­ Journal articles/Technical reports #12;Demand Response Resources · Incentive

494

Leveraging gamification in demand dispatch systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modern demand-side management techniques are an integral part of the envisioned smart grid paradigm. They require an active involvement of the consumer for an optimization of the grid's efficiency and a better utilization of renewable energy sources. ... Keywords: demand response, demand side management, direct load control, gamification, smart grid, sustainability

Benjamin Gnauk; Lars Dannecker; Martin Hahmann

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Demand Response and Ancillary Services September 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response and Ancillary Services September 2008 #12;© 2008 EnerNOC, Inc. All Rights Reserved programs The purpose of this presentation is to offer insight into the mechanics of demand response and industrial demand response resources across North America in both regulated and restructured markets As of 6

496

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared For: California Energy in this report. #12; ABSTRACT By reducing system loads during criticalpeak times, demand response can help reduce the threat of planned rotational outages. Demand response is also widely regarded as having

497

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared For: California Energy in this report. #12; ABSTRACT By reducing system loads during criticalpeak times, demand response (DR) can.S. and internationally and lay out ideas that could help move California forward. KEY WORDS demand response, peak

498

Modeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current world-wide increase of energy demand cannot be matched by energy production and power grid updateModeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers G. Di Bella, L. Giarr`e, M. Ippolito, A. Jean-Marie, G. Neglia and I. Tinnirello § January 2, 2014 Abstract Energy demand aggregators

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

499

Response to changes in demand/supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response to changes in demand/supply through improved marketing 21.2 #12;#12;111 Impacts of changes log demand in 1995. The composites board mills operating in Korea took advantage of flexibility environment changes on the production mix, some economic indications, statistics of demand and supply of wood

500

Response to changes in demand/supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response to changes in demand/supply through improved marketing 21.2 http with the mill consuming 450 000 m3 , amounting to 30% of total plywood log demand in 1995. The composites board, statistics of demand and supply of wood, costs and competitiveness were analysed. The reactions