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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Total supply chain cost model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sourcing and outsourcing decisions have taken on increased importance within Teradyne to improve efficiency and competitiveness. This project delivered a conceptual framework and a software tool to analyze supply chain ...

Wu, Claudia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Installed Cost Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 140,000 plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) have been sold since December 2010. Critical to maintaining this upward trend is achievement of a diverse and available charging infrastructure. The purpose of this study is to analyze one key element of the charging infrastructure—the cost of installation. While the fuel cost of electricity to charge a PEV is significantly lower than the cost of gasoline, the cost to hire an electrician to install electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) for ...

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

3

How to Reduce Energy Supply Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rising energy costs have many businesses looking for creative ways to reduce their energy usage and lower the costs of energy delivered to their facilities. This paper explores innovative renewable and alternative energy technologies that can help customers control their supply-side costs of energy. Specific topics include distributive wind power generation and solid fuel boilers. It identities factors to consider in determining whether these technologies are economically viable for customers and stresses the importance of fully researching alternatives before committing to major equipment investments.

Swanson, G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/CUTS//2050/energy05.pdf Edward Beimborn Center for Urban Transportation Studies University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Presentation to the District IV Conference Institute of Transportation Engineers June, 2005, updated September

Saldin, Dilano

5

Strategic cost management in a global supply chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the face of an economic downturn, cost has become a focal point of supply chain management. Cost management is increasingly being recognized as a vital core competency needed for survival. As companies transition from ...

Rao, Venkatesh G. (Venkatesh Gopalkrishna), 1971-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Defense waste transportation: cost and logistics studies  

SciTech Connect

Transportation of nuclear wastes from defense programs is expected to significantly increase in the 1980s and 1990s as permanent waste disposal facilities come into operation. This report uses models of the defense waste transportation system to quantify potential transportation requirements for treated and untreated contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) wastes and high-level defense wastes (HLDW). Alternative waste management strategies in repository siting, waste retrieval and treatment, treatment facility siting, waste packaging and transportation system configurations were examined to determine their effect on transportation cost and hardware requirements. All cost estimates used 1980 costs. No adjustments were made for future changes in these costs relative to inflation. All costs are reported in 1980 dollars. If a single repository is used for defense wastes, transportation costs for CH-TRU waste currently in surface storage and similar wastes expected to be generated by the year 2000 were estimated to be 109 million dollars. Recovery and transport of the larger buried volumes of CH-TRU waste will increase CH-TRU waste transportation costs by a factor of 70. Emphasis of truck transportation and siting of multiple repositories would reduce CH-TRU transportation costs. Transportation of HLDW to repositories for 25 years beginning in 1997 is estimated to cost $229 M in 1980 costs and dollars. HLDW transportation costs could either increase or decrease with the selection of a final canister configuration. HLDW transportation costs are reduced when multiple repositories exist and emphasis is placed on truck transport.

Andrews, W.B.; Cole, B.M.; Engel, R.L.; Oylear, J.M.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

NETL: News Release - Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

environmental and cost profiles in comparison to other energy sources. The development of shale gas and other unconventional natural gas wells requires the use of technologies that...

8

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study August 23, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The nation's large resource base of natural gas can be used for cost-effective power generation, with environmental burdens coming primarily from fuel combustion, not resource extraction, according to a new Department of Energy (DOE) study. The report, Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Natural Gas Power Technology Assessment, was prepared by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Analysts focused on seven criteria to evaluate the role of natural gas in the U.S. energy supply

9

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study August 23, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The nation's large resource base of natural gas can be used for cost-effective power generation, with environmental burdens coming primarily from fuel combustion, not resource extraction, according to a new Department of Energy (DOE) study. The report, Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Natural Gas Power Technology Assessment, was prepared by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Analysts focused on seven criteria to evaluate the role of natural gas in the U.S. energy supply

10

External Costs of Transport in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The social costs of intercity transportation: a review andthe Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation,in full social cost-benefit analyses of transportation

Delucchi, Mark A.; McCubbin, Donald R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Joint optimization of location and inventory decisions for improving supply chain cost performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation is focused on investigating the integration of inventory and facility location decisions in different supply chain settings. Facility location and inventory decisions are interdependent due to the economies of scale that are inherent in transportation and replenishment costs. The facility location decisions have an impact on the transportation and replenishment costs which, in turn, affect the optimal inventory policy. On the other hand, the inventory policy dictates the frequency of shipments to replenish inventory which, in turn, affects the number of deliveries, and, hence, the transportation costs, between the facilities. Therefore, our main research objectives are to: • compare the optimal facility location, determined by minimizing total transportation costs, to the one determined by the models that also consider the timing and quantity of inventory replenishments and corresponding costs, • investigate the effect of facility location decisions on optimal inventory decisions, and • measure the impact of integrated decision-making on overall supply chain cost performance. Placing a special emphasis on the explicit modeling of transportation costs, we develop several novel models in mixed integer linear and nonlinear optimization programming. Based on how the underlying facility location problem is modeled, these models fall into two main groups: 1) continuous facility location problems, and 2) discrete facility location problems. For the stylistic models, the focus is on the development of analytical solutions. For the more general models, the focus is on the development of efficient algorithms. Our results demonstrate • the impact of explicit transportation costs on integrated decisions, • the impact of different transportation cost functions on integrated decisions in the context of continuous facility location problems of interest, • the value of integrated decision-making in different supply chain settings, and • the performance of solution methods that jointly optimize facility location and inventory decisions.

Keskin, Burcu Baris

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Transportation Cost and Benefit Analysis Congestion Costs Victoria Transport Policy Institute (www.vtpi.org)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Cost and Benefit Analysis ­ Congestion Costs Victoria Transport Policy Institute congestion is considered one of the most significant transportation problems. The capacity of a road depends, Fundamentals of Traffic Engineering, 13th Edition, Institute of Transportation Studies, UBC (Berkeley; www

O'Donnell, Tom

13

Coal supply and cost under technological and environmental uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal supply and cost under technological and environmental uncertainty Submitted in partial, and Rod Lawrence at Foundation Coal. I received a lot of feedback and input on this report, and would like chapters. My conversations with Kurt Walzer at Clean Air Task Force and Rory McIlmoil at Coal Valley Wind

14

External costs of intercity truck freight transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From a societal perspective, it is desirable for all transportation users to pay their full social (private and external) costs. We estimate four general types of external costs for intercity freight trucking and compare them with the private costs incurred by carriers. Estimated external costs include: accidents (fatalities, injuries, and property damage); emissions (air pollution and greenhouse gases); noise; and unrecovered costs associated with the provision, operation, and maintenance of public facilities. The analysis reveals that external costs are equal to 13.2 % of private costs and user fees would need to be increased about

David J. Forkenbrock

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

The Full Cost of Intercity Highway Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction There has been a great deal of recent interest in identifying and measuring the full costs of transportation, particularly highways (see for instance: Keeler et al. 1974, Fuller et al. 1983, Quinet 1990, Mackenzie et al. 1992, INRETS 1993, Miller and Moffet 1993, IWW/INFRAS 1995, IBI 1995, Levinson et al. 1996, Delucchi 1996). This debate questions whether various modes of transportation are implicitly subsidized and to what extent this biases investment and usage decisions. While environmental impacts are used to stop new infrastructure, the full costs to society of transportation are not generally calculated for financing projects or charging for their use. In this paper we review the theoretical and empirical literature on the cost structure of the provision of intercity highway transportation and specify and estimate our own cost functions . In defining this framework we distinguish between internal (private) and external (social) costs, long and short run cos

David Gillen; David Levinson; David M. Levinson

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

The cost of transportation`s oil dependence  

SciTech Connect

Transportation is critical to the world`s oil dependence problem because of the large share of world oil it consumes and because of its intense dependence on oil. This paper will focus on the economic costs of transportation`s oil dependence.

Greene, D.L.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Evaluating the costs of desalination and water transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Working paper FNU-41 revised Many regions of the world are facing formidable freshwater scarcity. Although there is substantial scope for economizing on the consumption of water without affecting its service level, the main response to water scarcity has been to increase the supply. To a large extent, this is done by transporting water from places where it is abundant to places where it is scarce. At a smaller scale, and without a lot of public and political attention, people have started to tap into the sheer limitless resource of desalinated water. This study looks at the development of desalination and its costs over time. The unit costs of desalinated water for five main processes are evaluated, followed by regressions to analyze the main influencing factors to the costs. The unit costs for all processes have fallen considerably over the years. This study suggests that a cost of 1 $/m 3 for seawater desalination and 0.6 $/m 3 for brackish water would be feasible today. The costs will continue to decline in the future as technology progresses. In addition, a literature review on the costs of water transport is conducted in order to estimate the total cost of desalination and the transport of desalinated water to selected water stress cities. Transport costs range from a few cents per cubic meter to over a dollar. A 100 m vertical lift is about as costly as a 100 km horizontal transport (0.05-0.06$/m 3). Transport makes desalinated water prohibitively expensive in highlands and continental interiors, but not elsewhere.

Yuan Zhou A; Richard S. J. Tol B

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Evaluating the costs of desalination and water transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] Many regions of the world are facing formidable freshwater scarcity. Although there is substantial scope for economizing on the consumption of water without affecting its service level, the main response to water scarcity has been to increase the supply. To a large extent, this is done by transporting water from places where it is abundant to places where it is scarce. At a smaller scale and without a lot of public and political attention, people have started to tap into the sheer limitless resource of desalinated water. This study looks at the development of desalination and its costs over time. The unit costs of desalinated water for five main processes are evaluated, followed by regressions to analyze the main influencing factors to the costs. The unit costs for all processes have fallen considerably over the years. This study suggests that a cost of $1/m 3 for seawater desalination and $0.6/m 3 for brackish water would be feasible today. The costs will continue to decline in the future as technology progresses. In addition, a literature review on the costs of water transport is conducted in order to estimate the total cost of desalination and the transport of desalinated water to selected water stress cities. Transport costs range from a few cents per cubic meter to over a dollar. A 100 m vertical lift is about as costly as a 100 km horizontal transport ($0.05–0.06/m 3). Transport makes desalinated water prohibitively expensive in highlands and continental interiors but not elsewhere.

Yuan Zhou; Richard S. J. Tol

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 1: Cost of feedstock supply logistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supply of corn stover to produce heat and power for a typical 170 dam3 dry mill ethanol plant is proposed. The corn ethanol plant requires 5.6 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat, which creates the annual stover demand of as much as 140 Gg. The corn stover supply system consists of collection, preprocessing, transportation and on-site fuel storage and preparation to produce heat and power for the ethanol plant. Economics of the entire supply system was conducted using the Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics (IBSAL) simulation model. Corn stover was delivered in three formats (square bales, dry chops and pellets) to the combined heat and power plant. Delivered cost of biomass ready to be burned was calculated at 73 $ Mg-1 for bales, 86 $ Mg-1 for pellets and 84 $ Mg-1 for field chopped biomass. Among the three formats of stover supply systems, delivered cost of pelleted biomass was the highest due to high pelleting cost. Bulk transport of biomass in the form of chops and pellets can provide a promising future biomass supply logistic system in the US, if the costs of pelleting and transport are minimized.

Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Measuring Imputed Costs in the Semiconductor Equipment Supply Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the order fulŻllment process of a customized capital equipment supplier. Prior to receiving a Żrm purchase order from the customer, the supplier receives a series of shared forecasts, which are called `soft orders'. Facing a stochastic internal manufacturing lead-time, the supplier must decide at what time to begin the fulŻllment of the order. This decision requires a trade-o ® between starting too early, leading to potential holding or cancellation cost, and the cost of starting too late, leading to potential loss of goodwill. We collect detailed data of shared forecasts, actual purchase orders, production lead-times, and delivery dates for a supplier-buyer dyad in the semiconductor equipment supply chain. Under the assumption that the supplier acts rationally, optimally balancing the cancellation, holding, and delay costs, we are able to estimate the corresponding cost parameters based on the observed data. Our estimation results suggest that the cost of cancellation is four times higher and the holding cost is two times higher than the delay cost. In other words, the supplier is very conservative when commencing the order fulŻllment, which negates the e®ectiveness of the overall forecast sharing mechanism. 1 1

Morris A. Cohen; Teck H. Ho; Justin Z. Ren; Christian Terwiesch

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply January 20, 2011 - 3:48pm Addthis Jonathan Silver Jonathan Silver Executive Director of the Loan Programs Office What does this project do? Nearly triples the amount of renewable diesel produced domestically Diversifies the U.S. fuel supply Today, Secretary Chu announced the offer of a conditional commitment for a $241 million loan guarantee to Diamond Green Diesel, LLC., the DOE Loan Program's first conditional commitment for an advanced biofuels plant. The loan guarantee will support the construction of a 137-million gallon per year renewable diesel facility that will produce renewable diesel fuel primarily from animal fats, used cooking oil and other waste grease

22

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Costs of Storing and Transporting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Costs of Storing and Transporting Hydrogen Project Summary Full Title: Costs of Storing and Transporting Hydrogen Project ID: 114 Principal Investigator: Wade Amos Purpose An...

23

External Costs of Transport in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

European External Cost Estimates,” Transportation Researchin the external-cost estimates reviewed here. Althoughtruck shipment in 1991 (low-cost estimate from Table 1-A5 of

Delucchi, Mark A.; McCubbin, Donald R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

The Full Cost Of Intercity Transportation - A Comparison Of High Speed Rail, Air And Highway Transportation In California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost of transportation today, including the social costs ofIntercity Transportation Page 2-17 Social Costs - additionalsurrounding social costs and transportation, in particular

Levinson, David; Gillen, David; Kanafani, Adib; Mathieu, Jean-michel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Cost overruns in transport projects - Experiences from Sweden.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Cost overrun of transport projects is one of the most important problems in transport planning. Apart from causing budget overruns, it also results in… (more)

Anchalee, Jenpanitsub

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

On EOQ Cost Models with Arbitrary Purchase and Transportation ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: We analyze an economic order quantity cost model with unit ... For the remaining purchase-transportation cost functions, when this problem becomes a  ...

27

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MANUFACTURING THROUGH AN ALTERNATIVE ENERGY SUPPLY Chris Y.Footprint, Alternative Energy, Cost of Ownership ABSTRACTmanufacturing is to use alternative energies to partially

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Including costs of supply chain risk in strategic sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost evaluations do not always include the costs associated with risks when organizations make strategic sourcing decisions. This research was conducted to establish and quantify the impact of risks and risk-related costs ...

Jain, Avani

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Cost Curves for Gas Supply Security: The Case of Bulgaria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.6% Natural gas* 5.7% Liquid fuels 1.2% Notes and sources: SEWRC, December 2008; * cogeneration 6 3.2 Bulgaria is unable to cope with gas supply disruptions Bulgaria was unable to cope with the gas supply disruption of January 2009... of an explanation. First, the Bulgarian gas industry is organised as a de-facto monopoly, with Bulgargaz part of the 100% government-owned Bulgarian Energy Holding. Accordingly, the company is very well...

Silve, Florent; Noël, Pierre

30

New pipeline project could lower natural gas transportation costs ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... natural gas transportation costs to New York City could be reduced with the expansion of the existing Texas Eastern Transmission pipeline from Linden, New ...

31

Transport Studies Enabling Efficiency Optimization of Cost-Competitive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 31, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop and validate a predictive transport model that * enables efficiency maximization at conditions that meet DOE cost...

32

Transportation costs for new fuel forms produced from low rank US coals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transportation costs are examined for four types of new fuel forms (solid, syncrude, methanol, and slurry) produced from low rank coals found in the lower 48 states of the USA. Nine low rank coal deposits are considered as possible feedstocks for mine mouth processing plants. Transportation modes analyzed include ship/barge, pipelines, rail, and truck. The largest potential market for the new fuel forms is coal-fired utility boilers without emission controls. Lowest cost routes from each of the nine source regions to supply this market are determined. 12 figs.

Newcombe, R.J.; McKelvey, D.G. (TMS, Inc., Germantown, MD (USA)); Ruether, J.A. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Transportation Center Seminar "Cost Recovery from Congestion Tolls with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Center Seminar "Cost Recovery from Congestion Tolls with Long-run Uncertainty" Robin Lindsey Professor and CN Chair in Transportation and International Logistics at the Sauder School of Business University of British Columbia Thurs. Feb. 28, 2013 4:00 ­ 5:00 pm Location: Transportation Center

Bustamante, Fabián E.

34

Cost of Providing Ancillary Services from Power Plants: Reactive Supply and Voltage Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a methodology for determining the variable costs of generating and supplying reactive power to a transmission system, via the generator step-up transformer, for system voltage control. The report examines the costs of additional energy losses, maintenance, repair, and plant aging associated with the generation of reactive power. TR-107270-V3SI contains System of International units.

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

35

An interactive fuzzy multi-objective approach for operational transport planning in an automobile supply chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel supply chain operational transport planning model is developed in this paper. The goals of the model are to minimize the number of used trucks and the total inventory levels. Because of somewhat imprecise nature of vehicle capacities and decision ... Keywords: fuzzy multi-objective linear programming, supply chain planning, transport planning, uncertainty

David Peidro; Manuel Díaz-Madrońero; Josefa Mula

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Work Costs and Nonconvex Preferences in the Estimation of Labor Supply Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We first critique the manner in which work costs have been introduced into labor supply estimation, and note the difficulty of incorporating a realistic rendering of the costs of work. We then show that, if work costs are not acounted for in the budget and time constraints in a structural labor supply model, they will be subsumed into the data generating preferences. We show that even if underlying preferences over consumption and leisure are convex, the presence of unobservable work costs can make these preferences appear nonconvex. Absent strong functional form assumptions, these work costs are not identified in data commonly used for labor supply estimation. However, we show that even if work costs cannot be separately identified, policy relevant calculations, such as estimates of the effect of tax changes on labor supply and deadweight loss calculations, are not affected by the fact that estimated preferences incorporate work costs. We would like to thank Joe Altonji and Chris Taber for valuable conversations, and seminar participants

Bradley T. Heim; Bruce D. Meyer

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Potential supply and cost of biomass from energy crops in the TVA region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic and supply structures of energy crop markets have not been established. Establishing the likely price and supply of energy crop biomass in a region is a complex task because biomass is not an established commodity as are oil, natural gas, and coal. In this study, the cost and supply of short-rotation woody crop (SRWC) and switchgrass biomass for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) region-a 276-county area that includes portions of 11 states in the southeastern United States - are projected. Projected prices and quantities of biomass are assumed to be a function of the amount and quality of crop and pasture land available in a region, expected energy crop yields and production costs on differing soils and land types, and the profit that could be obtained from current conventional crop production on these same lands. Results include the supply curves of SRWC and switchgrass biomass that are projected to be available from the entire region, the amount and location of crop and pasture land that would be used, and the conventional agricultural crops that would be displaced as a function of energy crop production. Finally, the results of sensitivity analysis on the projected cost and supply of energy crop biomass are shown. In particular, the separate impacts of varying energy crop production costs and yields, and interest rates are examined.

Graham, R.L.; Downing, M.E.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Assessing the Benefits and Costs of Intelligent Transportation Systems: The Value of Advanced Traveler Information Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Navigation, Full Cost of Transportation, Social CostsThe Social Costs of Intercity Passenger Transportation: ATransportation, Advanced Traveler Information Systems Introduction Recent literature has extensively discussed the social costs

Levinson, David; Gillen, David; Chang, Elva

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Allocation of Space and the Costs of Multimodal Transport in Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B) ), the total social cost of transportation in the city issocial cost of motor vehicle use in the United States. Journal of Transportation and

Gonzales, Eric Justin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Integrating regional strategic transportation planning and supply chain management : along the path to sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A systems perspective for regional strategic transportation planning (RSTP) for freight movements involves an understanding of Supply Chain Management (SCM). This thesis argues that private sector freight shippers and ...

Sgouridis, Sgouris P

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

THE EFFECT OF INCREASING TRANSPORTATION COST ON FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study showed that certain influences in the global environment may have an impact on FDI’s regional or country choice of investment. The following research questions were explored. Are changes in FDI location choices due to elevated transportation costs? Has the emphasis on market changed to a stauncher stance toward efficiency factors due to current oil pricing? The data was tested by applying multiple linear regressions using archival data from Dun and Bradstreet, the World Bank, and the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA). This study looked at data in snapshots of two years of a decade beginning with 1997 and ending with 2007. A broader dataset which has already been developed will be expanded to include the dramatic changes in oil prices pre Y2K and post Y2K. It was hypothesized that results will reflect that the cost of transportation will drive investment closer, rather than further, from the origin of investment. Due to the nature of FDI immobility, it is further hypothesized that emphasis will be placed on efficiency factors rather than market because of concern about transportation costs. The purpose will be to explore the features that affect the location of the foreign direct investment, and to address the differences in emphasis, if any, by decision-makers upon locations chosen because of the present transport costs. The findings of the tests were theoretically along the same lines as the hypothesis predicted. In 1997 market factors were dominant instead of efficiency factors. This was seen through the significance of GDP growth and the amount of roads paved. In 2007 exchange rates and distance showed significance, moving factors to a stauncher stance toward efficiency. A pooled regression showed the results of the effect of transportation cost over all. When looking at the variances at the 0.1 p level a rise in the level of FDI investment was found, concluding that the hypothesis and transportation cost results were counter intuitive.

Gressler, Kimberly

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

42

Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Compressed Hydrogen and PEM Fuel Cell System Discussion Fuel Cell Tech Team FreedomCar Detroit. MI October 20, 2004 TIAX LLC Acorn Park Cambridge, Massachusetts 02140-2390 Ref D0006 SFAA No. DE-SCO2- 98EE50526 Topic 1 Subtopic 1C Agenda EC_2004 10 20 FC Tech Team Presentation 1 1 Project Overview 2 Compressed Hydrogen Storage Cost 3 2004 System Cost Update 4 Appendix Project Overview Approach EC_2004 10 20 FC Tech Team Presentation 2 In our final year of the project, we assessed the cost of compressed hydrogen storage and updated the overall system cost projection. Task 1: PEMFC System Technology Synopsis Task 2: Develop Cost Model and Baseline Estimates Task 3: Identify Opportunities for System Cost Reduction Tasks 4, 5, 6 & 7: Annual Updates

43

The impact of intelligent transportation systems on supply chain management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Businesses are constantly searching for ways to reduce costs and increase revenue. This is a fact of life in a world where shareholder value drives corporate actions. In order to become more profitable, these businesses ...

Beinhaker, Ross, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Supply chain network for hydrogen transportation in Spain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen fuel is considered one of the major emerging renewable substitutes for fossil fuel. A crucial factor as to whether hydrogen will be successful depends on its cost as a substitute. Recently, there has been a growing ...

Liang, Li

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Proceedings: Workshop on CO2 Transport/Storage Cost Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If reductions in CO2 emissions are needed in the utility industry, one of the potential solutions is application of CO2 capture and storage. In order to make informed decisions on applying CO2 capture and storage to the utility industry, high quality estimates of the costs are needed. While significant efforts have been made to evaluate the costs of CO2 capture from power plants, relatively little has been done to develop costs of transport and storage of CO2. This report presents the results of a worksh...

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

46

Production Cost Modeling of Cogenerators in an Interconnected Electric Supply System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Optimal State Electricity Supply System in Texas (OSEST) research project is part of the continuing Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT) effort to identify possible improvements in the production, transmission, and use of electricity in the state. The OSEST project is designed to identify the general configuration of the optimal electric supply system resulting from coordinated system planning and operation from a statewide perspective. The Optimized Generation Planning Program (OGP) and Multi-Area Production Simulation Program with Megawatt Flow (MAPS/MWFLOW) are two computer programs developed by General Electric that are being used in the study. Both of these programs perform production costing calculations to evaluate the performance of various electric supply system configurations necessary to appropriately model the present and future cogeneration activity in the service areas of the electric utilities that compose the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT).

Ragsdale, K.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Analyzing the level of service and cost trade-offs in cold chain transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis discusses the tradeoff between transportation cost and the level of service in cold chain transportation. Its purpose is to find the relationship between transportation cost and the level of service in cold ...

Liu, Saiqi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS -POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS - POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS Senior scientist - "Towards Hydrogen Society" ·biomass resources - potentials, limits ·biomass carbon cycle ·biomass for hydrogen - as compared to other H2- sources and to other biomass paths #12;BIOMASS - THE CARBON CYCLE

49

Appendix D Short-Term Analysis of Refinery Costs and Supply  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Short-Term Analysis of Refinery Costs and Supply 9302 Appendix D Short-Term Analysis of Refinery Costs and Supply As a result of the new regulations issued by the U.S. Estimating Components of the Distillate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for ultra-low- Blend Pool sulfur diesel fuel (ULSD) the U.S. refining industry faces two major challenges: to meet the more stringent specifi- The initial step of the analysis was to analyze the poten- cations for diesel product, and to keep up with demand tial economics of producing ULSD for each refinery. by producing more diesel product from feedstocks of Using input and output data submitted to the Energy lower quality. Some refineries in the United States and Information Administration (E1A) by refiners, the cur-

50

Comparing Infrastructure Costs for Hydrogen and Electricity ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrastructure cost estimates for * hydrogen refueling stations (HRS) and electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) Compare retail costs on a common transportation energy *...

51

Costs of Harvesting, Storing in a Large Pile, and Transporting Corn Stover in a Wet Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corn stover is potentially an attractive biomass resource, but must be stored if used to supply a biorefinery year-round. Based on experience with successfully storing water-saturated large piles of bagasse for the pulping industry, Atchison and Hettenhaus (2003) proposed that such a system can also be applied to corn stover. Regardless of the technical feasibility of this system, in this article we estimate the cost of harvesting corn stover in a single pass with corn grain, delivering the chopped biomass to a storage pile, storing the stover in a wet form in a large pile at 75% moisture in a 211,700-dry Mg facility within a radius of 24 km from the field, and transporting the stover 64 km to a biorefinery. Field-ground corn stover can be delivered to a biorefinery by rail for $55 to $61/dry Mg. Truck transport is more expensive, $71 to $77/dry Mg. To achieve a minimum cost in the system proposed by Atchison and Hettenhaus, it is necessary to field densify stover to 74 dry kg/m3, without losing combine field efficiency, have a large storage pile to spread fixed costs of storage over enough biomass, and use rail transportation. Compared to storage in an on-farm bunker silo at $60/dry Mg, there are limited circumstances in which large pile storage has a cost advantage.

Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

External Costs of Transport in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rail and truck freight transportation,” Transport Researchby rail passengers in Great Britain,” Transport Research,

Delucchi, Mark A.; McCubbin, Donald R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Fuel Cell System for Transportation -- 2005 Cost Estimate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Independent review report of the methodology used by TIAX to estimate the cost of producing PEM fuel cells using 2005 cell stack technology. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Manager asked the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to commission an independent review of the 2005 TIAX cost analysis for fuel cell production. The NREL Systems Integrator is responsible for conducting independent reviews of progress toward meeting the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) technical targets. An important technical target of the Program is the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell cost in terms of dollars per kilowatt ($/kW). The Program's Multi-Year Program Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan established $125/kW as the 2005 technical target. Over the last several years, the Program has contracted with TIAX, LLC (TIAX) to produce estimates of the high volume cost of PEM fuel cell production for transportation use. Since no manufacturer is yet producing PEM fuel cells in the quantities needed for an initial hydrogen-based transportation economy, these estimates are necessary for DOE to gauge progress toward meeting its targets. For a PEM fuel cell system configuration developed by Argonne National Laboratory, TIAX estimated the total cost to be $108/kW, based on assumptions of 500,000 units per year produced with 2005 cell stack technology, vertical integration of cell stack manufacturing, and balance-of-plant (BOP) components purchased from a supplier network. Furthermore, TIAX conducted a Monte Carlo analysis by varying ten key parameters over a wide range of values and estimated with 98% certainty that the mean PEM fuel cell system cost would be below DOE's 2005 target of $125/kW. NREL commissioned DJW TECHNOLOGY, LLC to form an Independent Review Team (the Team) of industry fuel cell experts and to evaluate the cost estimation process and the results reported by TIAX. The results of this independent review will permit NREL and DOE to better understand the credibility of the TIAX cost estimation process and to implement changes in future cost analyses, if necessary. The Team found the methodology used by TIAX to estimate the cost of producing PEM fuel cells to be reasonable and, using 2005 cell stack technology and assuming production of 500,000 units per year, to have calculated a credible cost of $108/kW.

Wheeler, D.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Generalized linear model-based expert system for estimating the cost of transportation projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Timely effective cost management requires reliable cost estimates at every stage of project development. While underestimation of transportation costs seems to be a global trend, improving early cost prediction accuracy in estimates is difficult. This ... Keywords: Cost management, Expert system, Generalized linear model, Relational database, Transportation projects

Jui-Sheng Chou

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Analysis of near-term spent fuel transportation hardware requirements and transportation costs  

SciTech Connect

A computer model was developed to quantify the transportation hardware requirements and transportation costs associated with shipping spent fuel in the commercial nucler fuel cycle in the near future. Results from this study indicate that alternative spent fuel shipping systems (consolidated or disassembled fuel elements and new casks designed for older fuel) will significantly reduce the transportation hardware requirements and costs for shipping spent fuel in the commercial nuclear fuel cycle, if there is no significant change in their operating/handling characteristics. It was also found that a more modest cost reduction results from increasing the fraction of spent fuel shipped by truck from 25% to 50%. Larger transportation cost reductions could be realized with further increases in the truck shipping fraction. Using the given set of assumptions, it was found that the existing spent fuel cask fleet size is generally adequate to perform the needed transportation services until a fuel reprocessing plant (FRP) begins to receive fuel (assumed in 1987). Once the FRP opens, up to 7 additional truck systems and 16 additional rail systems are required at the reference truck shipping fraction of 25%. For the 50% truck shipping fraction, 17 additional truck systems and 9 additional rail systems are required. If consolidated fuel only is shipped (25% by truck), 5 additional rail casks are required and the current truck cask fleet is more than adequate until at least 1995. Changes in assumptions could affect the results. Transportation costs for a federal interim storage program could total about $25M if the FRP begins receiving fuel in 1987 or about $95M if the FRP is delayed until 1989. This is due to an increased utilization of federal interim storage facility from 350 MTU for the reference scenario to about 750 MTU if reprocessing is delayed by two years.

Daling, P.M.; Engel, R.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Infinite-body optimal transport with Coulomb Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce and analyze symmetric infinite-body optimal transport (OT) problems with cost function of pair potential form. We show that for a natural class of such costs, the optimizer is given by the independent product measure all of whose factors are given by the one-body marginal. This is in striking contrast to standard finite-body OT problems, in which the optimizers are typically highly correlated, as well as to infinite-body OT problems with Gangbo-Swiech cost. Moreover, by adapting a construction from the study of exchangeable processes in probability theory, we prove that the corresponding $N$-body OT problem is well approximated by the infinite-body problem. To our class belongs the Coulomb cost which arises in many-electron quantum mechanics. The optimal cost of the Coulombic N-body OT problem as a function of the one-body marginal density is known in the physics and quantum chemistry literature under the name SCE functional, and arises naturally as the semiclassical limit of the celebrated Hohenberg-Kohn functional. Our results imply that in the inhomogeneous high-density limit (i.e. $N\\to\\infty$ with arbitrary fixed inhomogeneity profile $\\rho/N$), the SCE functional converges to the mean field functional. We also present reformulations of the infinite-body and N-body OT problems as two-body OT problems with representability constraints and give a dual characterization of representable two-body measures which parallels an analogous result by Kummer on quantum representability of two-body density matrices.

Codina Cotar; Gero Friesecke; Brendan Pass

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

57

Supplying Synthetic Crude Oil from Canadian Oil Sands: A Comparative Study of the Costs and CO2 Emissions of Mining and In-Situ Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and of unconventional deposits such as heavy oils, tar sands and oil shales.” As conventional oil becomes scarcer, the transport sector will remain dependent on petroleum resources, if no oil substitute is available. Fuels from non-conventional oil resources... www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk E P R G W O R K IN G P A P E R Abstract Supplying Synthetic Crude Oil from Canadian Oil Sands: A Comparative Study of the Costs and CO2 Emissions of Mining and In-situ Recovery EPRG Working Paper 1005...

Méjean, A; Hope, Chris

58

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988 (Public Law 100-494), Section 400EE, states that the Secretary of Energy ...shall study methanol plants, including the costs and practicability of such plants that are (A) capable of utilizing current domestic supplies of unutilized natural gas; (B) relocatable; or (C) suitable for natural gas to methanol conversion by natural gas distribution companies...'' The purpose of this report is to characterize unutilized gas within the lower 48 states and to perform an economic analysis of methanol plants required by the act. The approach with regard to unutilized lower 48 gas is to (1) compare the costs of converting such gas to methanol against the expected price of gasoline over the next 20 years, and (2) compare the economics of converting such gas to methanol against the economics of using the gas as a pipeline-transported fuel. This study concludes that remote gas and low-Btu gas generally cannot be converted to methanol at costs near the expected competitive value of gasoline because of the poor economies of scale of small methanol plants.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Identifying factors and quantifying their impact on transportation costs of pre-processes biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This research presents a rail transportation cost analysis of bulk agricultural commodities (such as grain and wood chips) with similar characteristics as pre-processed biomass.… (more)

Gonzales, Daniela Sofia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

External Costs of Transport in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1986). “Estimating the Cost of Oil Spills: Lessons from theEnergy security/oil-importing costs Brief Review of Methodsnot reflected in the price of oil: the cost of the Strategic

Delucchi, Mark A.; McCubbin, Donald R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Climate Change and Water Resources in California: The Cost of Conservation versus Supply Augmentation for the East Bay Municipal Utility District  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009-2040: aggressive water conservation and the enlargementrationing, recycled water, conservation, and supplementalwhile meetings its costs. Water conservation versus supply

Mourad, Bessma

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Cost analysis of multicast transport architectures in multiservice networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: backbone network topology, cost-based routing algorithms, data flow costs, link sharing, multicast architectures, multicast routing, multisource flow specification

K. Ravindran; Ting-Jian Gong

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

New pipeline project could lower natural gas transportation costs ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The spread between the price of natural gas at a supply ... Bottlenecks exist moving Marcellus natural gas out of Pennsylvania and delivering natural gas into ...

64

Assessing Reliability in Transportation Energy Supply Pathways: A Hydrogen Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

term prospects for natural gas supply. Washington DC: SR/worldwide, subjecting natural gas supply to many of the samenatural gas and petroleum infrastructure: (1) primary energy supply, (

McCarthy, Ryan; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas supplied to the fuel cell power plant is only involved in a chemical oxidation process, instead of burning, in the electricity generation

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel cell power plants use natural gas as their fuel tothe natural gas supplied to the fuel cell power plant is

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Carbon Dioxide Transport and Storage Costs in NETL Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering and Economic Assessment. 2 This study utilized a similar basis for pipeline costs (Oil and Gas Journal's pipeline cost data up to the year 2000) but added a CO 2...

68

Transport Studies Enabling Efficiency Optimization of Cost-Competitive Fuel Cell Stacks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AURORA Program Overview Topic 4A. Transport within the PEM Stack / Transport Studies Transport Studies Enabling Efficiency Optimization of Cost-Competitive Fuel Cell Stacks Award#: DE-EE0000472 US DOE Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting Washington, DC September 30, 2009 Program Objectives The objective of this program is to optimize the efficiency of a stack technology meeting DOE cost targets. As cost reduction is of central importance in commercialization, the objective of this program addresses all fuel cell applications. AURORA C. Performance Technical Barriers Premise: DOE cost targets can be met by jointly exceeding both the Pt loading (1.0 W/cm2) targets.

69

The Cost of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Part I: CO2 Pipeline Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cost of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Part I: CO2 Pipeline Transport Nils Johnson and Dr the economics of transporting carbon dioxide via pipeline from the point of capture and compression at large studies identify pipeline transport as the most economical method for moving large volumes of CO2 overland

California at Davis, University of

70

Low cost power and supply noise estimation and control in scan testing of vlsi circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Test power is an important issue in deep submicron semiconductor testing. Too much power supply noise and too much power dissipation can result in excessive temperature rise, both leading to overkill during delay test. Scan-based test has ...

Zhongwei Jiang / Duncan Walker

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in urban areas like the Detroit region. In such a situation,energy supply based on in Detroit, MI, region in the Unitedsupply figures for the Detroit region where much of the U.S.

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy) (2006). “Fossil energy. ” http://fossil.energy.gov/.through reduction of fossil fuel energy consumption, andWith 85% of U.S. energy supplied by fossil fuels (US DOE

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy supply pattern. On the other hand, wind electricity, with an ownership costcost. ENVIRONMENTAL SAVINGS ANALYSIS Solar, wind, and fuel cells are all considered as clean and renewable energy

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Application of the parametric cost estimation in the textile supply chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a current high competitive business environment, cost estimation is a strategic tool in order to make decisions related to products during their design and development phases. Against traditional estimation methods, that needs to wait until the technical description of the product is completed, there exist new methods allowing to estimate the cost quickly and with an acceptable accuracy. Complementarily to cost management methods (for example, standard cost management analytic or Activity-Based Costing techniques), such new cost estimation methods may shorten the design phase when the rapidity of the conception is needed. This way may be valid when there is a huge number of models, and/or high level of new design rate. This paper compares various cost estimation methods in the textile context: their advantages, drawbacks, and applicability in the product life cycle. The parametric cost estimation model is particularly suited to the earliest stage of design-to-cost approach. It is widely used in different industrial domains such as aerospace, aircraft, telecommunication and automotive industries in order to accelerate and drive the product development process. Even though the industrial contexts seem to be different, this paper shows several possibilities of application of parametric cost estimation methods in the textile and garment industries, and the procedures and tools required for their computation. Finally, this approach has been applied to estimate the unitary cost of a representative family of wool textile fabrics.

M. Camargo; B. Rabenasolo; A-m. Jolly-desodt; J-m. Castelain

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The cost of silage harvest and transport systems for herbaceous crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the highest yielding herbaceous biomass crops are thick- stemmed species. Their relatively high moisture content necessitates they be handled and stored as silage rather than hay bales or modules. This paper presents estimated costs of harvesting and transporting herbaceous crops as silage. Costs are based on an engineering- economic approach. Equipment costs are estimated by combining per hour costs with the hours required to complete the operation. Harvest includes severing, chopping, and blowing stalks into a wagon or truck.

Turhollow, A.; Downing, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Butler, J. [Butler (James), Tifton, GA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Transportation cost inequalities for diffusions under uniform distance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove the transportation inequality with the uniform norm for the laws of diffusion processes with Lipschitz and/or dissipative coefficients and apply them to some singular stochastic differential equations of interest.

Ali Suleyman Ustunel

2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

77

Production costs and supply of biomass by U.S. Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Biofuels Feedstock Development Program has attempted to estimate the cost of producing dedicated energy crops for several regions of the United States. Switchgrass and hybrid poplar have been chosen as representative herbaceous and woody crop species for the estimation. A full economic cost accounting approach is used. This means that not only are out-of-pocket cash expenses (e.g. fertilizers, chemicals, seeds, fuel, repairs) estimated, but fixed costs (e.g., overhead, taxes) and the costs of owned resources (e.g., producer`s own labor, equipment depreciation, land values) are also estimated as part of the cost of producing dedicated energy crops. The costs are estimated as enterprise budgets which means that costs of producing energy crops are estimated as separate entities, and not estimated in context of the entire farm management structure. Competitiveness of energy crops with conventional crops vary by region. Breakeven prices are regional averages. Breakeven prices for poplar are higher than for switchgrass in all regions, in large part due to the higher cost of producing poplars.

Walsh, M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Density functional theory and optimal transportation with Coulomb cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present here novel insight into exchange-correlation functionals in density functional theory, based on the viewpoint of optimal transport. We show that in the case of two electrons and in the semiclassical limit, the exact exchange-correlation functional reduces to a very interesting functional of novel form, which depends on an optimal transport map $T$ associated with a given density $\\rho$. Since the above limit is strongly correlated, the limit functional yields insight into electron correlations. We prove the existence and uniqueness of such an optimal map for any number of electrons and each $\\rho$, and determine the map explicitly in the case when $\\rho$ is radially symmetric.

Codina Cotar; Gero Friesecke; Claudia Klüppelberg

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

79

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environmental savings from solar PV falls in the middle ofCO 2 saving through use of solar PV, wind, and fuel cell2 savings. The cost of solar PV falls in the middle of these

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Benefit/cost analysis for Transportation Infrastructure: A Practitioner's Workshop:Infrastructure: A Practitioner s Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benefit/cost analysis for Transportation Infrastructure: A Practitioner's Workshop for Transportation, Policy, O i d L i iOperations, and Logistics George Mason University #12;The idea of benefit fas well as the nearer future) and a wide view (in the sense of allowing for sideeffects of many

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Preliminary assessment of costs and risks of transporting spent fuel by barge  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to analyze the costs and risks associated with transporting spent fuel by barge. The barge movements would be made in combination with rail movements to transport spent fuel from plants to a repository. For the purpose of this analysis, three candidate repository sites are analyzed: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Deaf Smith, Texas, and Hanford, Washington. This report complements a report prepared by Sandia National Laboratories in 1984 that analyzes the costs and risks of transporting spent fuel by rail and by truck to nine candidate repository sites.

Tobin, R.L.; Meshkov, N.K.; Jones, R.H.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

November 2002 NREL/SR-540-32525 Hydrogen Supply: Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environmental impact, and likely lower cost than mining and surface processing. A " 1'111111' 'III' few shale resources an economically viable alternative for petroleum © 20 I0 American Chemical Society #12 shale ,I, pyrolysis, making the process more efficient and economical. Understanding coke II

83

How to Evaluate the Costs and Benefits of Participating in Coordinated Transportation Services; A Coordination Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Manual focuses on the coordination of transportation resources by social service and community transportation providers. The Manual is designed to assist such providers to understand the potential benefits of coordination, to compare current cost and service patterns to those offered by other providers " to understand the costs incurred when participating in various coordination options, and to compute prices to charge to other agepcies when selling transportation services. The Manual has three messages: 1) in many coordination options there are trade-offs that can or must be made between cost and service variables; 2) in order to participate in coordination programs, agencies must understand all costs which they will continue to incur as well as those that will be experienced for the first time; 3) coordination can be a complex and complicated process which requires serlOUS attention to organizational, administrative and financial

P. Rlorming Organilo. Ion Nomo

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Achieving the Department of Energy target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 depends on transportation-related strategies combining technology innovation, market adoption, and changes in consumer behavior. This study examines expanding low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure to achieve deep GHG emissions reductions, with an emphasis on fuel production facilities and retail components serving light-duty vehicles. Three distinct low-carbon fuel supply scenarios are examined: Portfolio: Successful deployment of a range of advanced vehicle and fuel technologies; Combustion: Market dominance by hybridized internal combustion engine vehicles fueled by advanced biofuels and natural gas; Electrification: Market dominance by electric drive vehicles in the LDV sector, including battery electric, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles, that are fueled by low-carbon electricity and hydrogen. A range of possible low-carbon fuel demand outcomes are explored in terms of the scale and scope of infrastructure expansion requirements and evaluated based on fuel costs, energy resource utilization, fuel production infrastructure expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion for LDVs. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored transportation-related strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence.

Melaina, M. W.; Heath, G.; Sandor, D.; Steward, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Warner, E.; Webster, K. W.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Hydrogen as a transportation fuel: Costs and benefits  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen fuel and vehicles are assessed and compared to other alternative fuels and vehicles. The cost, efficiency, and emissions of hydrogen storage, delivery, and use in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs) are estimated. Hydrogen made thermochemically from natural gas and electrolytically from a range of electricity mixes is examined. Hydrogen produced at central plants and delivered by truck is compared to hydrogen produced on-site at filling stations, fleet refueling centers, and residences. The impacts of hydrogen HEVs, fueled using these pathways, are compared to ultra-low emissions gasoline internal-combustion-engine vehicles (ICEVs), advanced battery-powered electric vehicles (BPEVs), and HEVs using gasoline or natural gas.

Berry, G.D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Distributed Generation versus Centralised Supply: a Social Cost-Benefit Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the prospect of revolutionary new scenarios. In particular, the performance of the small power technologies (the reciprocating engine, gas turbine, and fuel cells) has improved remarkably over the last decade. This has aroused the interest of operators... include Stirling (1997) who provides some interesting arguments to support his thesis. However, we will try to demonstrate that such scepticism is perhaps exaggerated and that external cost methodologies can be very useful despite the considerable...

Gulli, Francesco

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

87

REDUCING ULTRA-CLEAN TRANSPORTATION FUEL COSTS WITH HYMELT HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consisted of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product streams. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream were gasified. Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, consists of gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 5 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations. This report describes activities for the ninth quarter of work performed under this agreement. The design of the vessel for pressure testing has been completed. The design will be finalized and purchased in the next quarter.

Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

REDUCING ULTRA-CLEAN TRANSPORTATION FUEL COSTS WITH HYMELT HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes activities for the third quarter of work performed under this agreement. Atmospheric testing was conducted as scheduled on June 5 through June 13, 2003. The test results were encouraging, however, the rate of carbon dissolution was below expectations. Additional atmospheric testing is scheduled for the first week of September 2003. Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consists of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product stream. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream will be gasified. DOE and EnviRes will evaluate the results of this work to determine the feasibility and desirability of proceeding to Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, which is gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 5 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations.

Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

REDUCING ULTRA-CLEAN TRANSPORTATION FUEL COSTS WITH HYMELT HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes activities for the seventh quarter of work performed under this agreement. We await approval from the Swedish pressure vessel board to allow us to proceed with the procurement of the vessel for super atmospheric testing. Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consists of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product streams. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream will be gasified. DOE and EnviRes will evaluate the results of this work to determine the feasibility and desirability of proceeding to Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, which is gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 5 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations.

Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Analysis of natural gas supply strategies at Fort Drum  

SciTech Connect

This analysis investigates strategies for Fort Drum to acquire a reliable natural gas supply while reducing its gas supply costs. The purpose of this study is to recommend an optimal supply mix based on the life-cycle costs of each strategy analyzed. In particular, this study is intended to provide initial guidance as to whether or not the building and operating of a propane-air mixing station is a feasible alternative to the current gas acquisition strategy. The analysis proceeded by defining the components of supply (gas purchase, gas transport, supplemental fuel supply); identifying alternative options for each supply component; constructing gas supply strategies from different combinations of the options available for each supply component and calculating the life-cycle costs of each supply strategy under a set of different scenarios reflecting the uncertainty of future events.

Stucky, D.J.; Shankle, S.A.; Anderson, D.M.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Use of Incremental Pricing in Coal Supply and Transportation Agreements to Achieve Power Sales: Report Series of Fuel and Power Market Integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increased power market competition is transforming into increased fuel supply competition. This report examines the role that "incremental pricing" for coal supply and transportation services plays in permitting power generators to achieve greater power sales. Surprisingly, the outlook for using such mechanisms for this purpose is more restricted than one might expect.

1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

92

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies The Infrastructure Challenge of...

93

Simulation of large supply chains: simulation of waste processing, transportation, and disposal operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to the accelerated cleanup goals of the Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratory (Sandia) has developed and utilized a number of simulation models to represent the processing, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. Sandia, ...

Janis Trone; Angela Guerin; Amber D. Clay

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Cost Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation: September 30, 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subcontract Report Subcontract Report Cost Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell NREL/SR-560-39104 Systems for Transportation December 2005 September 30, 2005 E.J. Carlson, P. Kopf, J. Sinha, S. Sriramulu, and Y. Yang TIAX LLC Cambridge, Massachusetts NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute â—Ź Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Cost Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation September 30, 2005 E.J. Carlson, P. Kopf, J. Sinha, S. Sriramulu, and Y. Yang TIAX LLC Cambridge, Massachusetts NREL Technical Monitor: K. Wipke Prepared under Subcontract No. KACX-5-44452-01 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-560-39104 December 2005 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy

95

Fast transport, atom sample splitting, and single-atom qubit supply in two-dimensional arrays of optical microtraps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two-dimensional arrays of optical micro-traps created by microoptical elements present a versatile and scalable architecture for neutral atom quantum information processing, quantum simulation, and the manipulation of ultra-cold quantum gases. In this article, we demonstrate advanced capabilities of this approach by introducing novel techniques and functionalities as well as the combined operation of previously separately implemented functions. We introduce piezo-actuator based transport of atom ensembles over distances of more than one trap separation, examine the capabilities of rapid atom transport provided by acousto-optical beam steering, and analyze the adiabaticity limit for atom transport in these configurations. We implement a spatial light modulator with 8-bit transmission control for the per-site adjustment of the trap depth and the number of atoms loaded. We combine single-site addressing, trap depth control, and atom transport in one configuration for demonstrating the splitting of atom ensembles with variable ratio at predefined register sites. Finally, we use controlled sub-poissonian preparation of single trapped atoms from such an ensemble to show that our approach allows for the implementation of a continuous supply of single-atom qubits with high fidelity. These novel implementations and their combined operation significantly extend available techniques for the dynamical and reconfigurable manipulation of ultracold atoms in dipole traps.

Malte Schlosser; Jens Kruse; Christian Gierl; Stephan Teichmann; Sascha Tichelmann; Gerhard Birkl

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

96

Sustainable Transportation Decision-Making: Spatial Decision Support Systems (SDSS) and Total Cost Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building a new infrastructure facility requires a significant amount of time and expense. This is particularly true for investments in transportation for their longstanding and great degree of impact on society. The scope of time and money involved does not mean, however, we only focus on the economies of scale and may ignore other aspects of the built environment. To this extent, how can we achieve a more balanced perspective in infrastructure decision-making? In addition, what aspects should be considered when making more sustainable decisions about transportation investments? These two questions are the foundations of this study. This dissertation shares its process in part with a previous research project – Texas Urban Triangle (TUT). Although the TUT research generated diverse variables and created possible implementations of spatial decision support system (SDSS), the methodology still demands improvement. The current method has been developed to create suitable routes but is not designed to rank or make comparisons. This is admittedly one of the biggest shortfalls in the general SDSS approach, but is also where I see as an opportunity to make alternative interpretation more comprehensive and effective. The main purpose of this dissertation is to develop a Spatial Decision Support System (SDSS) that will lead to more balanced decision-making in transportation investment and optimize the most sustainable high-speed rail (HSR) route. The decision support system developed here explicitly elaborates the advantages and disadvantages of a transportation corridor in three particular perspectives: construction (fixed costs); operation (maintenance costs); and externalities (social and environmental costs), with a specific focus on environmental externalities. Considering more environmental features in rail routing will offset short-term economic losses and creates more sustainable environments in long-term infrastructure planning.

Kim, Hwan Yong

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Supplying Synthetic Crude Oil from Canadian Oil Sands: A Comparative Study of the Costs and CO2 Emissions of Mining and In-situ Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High crude oil prices and the eventual decline of conventional oil production raise the issue of alternative fuels such as non-conventional oil. The paper describes a simple probabilistic model of the costs of synthetic crude oil (SCO) produced from Canadian oil sands. Synthetic crude oil is obtained by upgrading bitumen that is first produced through mining or in-situ recovery techniques. This forward-looking analysis quantifies the effects of learning and production constraints on the costs of supplying synthetic crude oil from Canadian bitumen deposits. The results show the uncertainties associated with the future costs of synthetic crude oil. Carbon costs have a large impact of the total costs of synthetic crude oil, in particular in the case of synthetic crude oil from in-situ bitumen, due to the carbon-intensity of the recovery techniques. The influence of each parameter on the supply costs is examined. In the case of mined SCO, the maximum production rate, the ultimate recovery rate and the depletion parameters show the largest influence on the results, while learning parameters dominate in the case of in-situ SCO.

Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope; Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope; Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

EPRG WORKING PAPER Supplying Synthetic Crude Oil from Canadian Oil Sands: A Comparative Study of the Costs and CO2 Emissions of Mining and In-situ Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High crude oil prices and the eventual decline of conventional oil production raise the issue of alternative fuels such as non-conventional oil. The paper describes a simple probabilistic model of the costs of synthetic crude oil (SCO) produced from Canadian oil sands. Synthetic crude oil is obtained by upgrading bitumen that is first produced through mining or in-situ recovery techniques. This forward-looking analysis quantifies the effects of learning and production constraints on the costs of supplying synthetic crude oil from Canadian bitumen deposits. The results show the uncertainties associated with the future costs of synthetic crude oil. Carbon costs have a large impact of the total costs of synthetic crude oil, in particular in the case of synthetic crude oil from in-situ bitumen, due to the carbon-intensity of the recovery techniques. The influence of each parameter on the supply costs is examined. In the case of mined SCO, the maximum production rate, the ultimate recovery rate and the depletion parameters show the largest influence on the results, while learning parameters dominate in the case of in-situ SCO.

Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope; Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1988 the Department of Energy (DOE) undertook a comprehensive technical analysis of a flexible-fuel transportation system in the United States. During the next two decades, alternative fuels such as alcohol (methanol or ethanol), compressed natural gas (CNG), and electricity could become practical alternatives to oil-based fuels in the US transportation sector. The DOE Alternative Fuels Assessment is aimed directly at questions of energy security and fuel availability. To keep interested parties informed about the progress of the DOE Alternative Fuels Assessment, the Department periodically publishes reports dealing with particular aspects of this complex study. This report provides an analysis of the expected costs to produce methanol from biomass feedstock.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Should we transport coal, gas, or electricity: cost, efficiency, and environmental implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine the life cycle costs, environmental discharges, and deaths of moving coal via rail, coal to synthetic natural gas via pipeline, and electricity via wire from the Powder River Basin (PRB) in Wyoming to Texas. Which method has least social cost depends on how much additional investment in rail line, transmission, or pipeline infrastructure is required, as well as how much and how far energy is transported. If the existing rail lines have unused capacity, coal by rail is the cheapest method (up to 200 miles of additional track could be added). If no infrastructure exists, greater distances and larger amounts of energy favor coal by rail and gasified coal by pipeline over electricity transmission. For 1,000 miles and 9 gigawatts of power, a gas pipeline is cheapest, has less environmental discharges, uses less land, and is least obtrusive. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Joule A. Bergerson; Lester B. Lave [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (US)

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Transaction-Cost Economic Analysis of Institutional Change toward Design-Build Contracts for Public Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sum of Transaction and Production Costs27 Washington’stransaction costs). Production costs and schedules are easyambiguous. In theory, production costs reflect prices on the

Whittington, Jan; Dowall, David E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Transportation in the Balance: A Comparative Analysis of Costs, User Revenues, and Subsidies for Highway, Air, and High Speed Rail Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transportation than air or HSR, but the opportunities to recover some of these social coststransportation modes in dollar cost per passenger kilometer traveled, some public subsidy is justified on the basis of lower social costs,transportation modes in dollar cost per passenger kilometer traveled, some public subsidy is justified on the basis of lower social costs,

Chan, Evelyn; Kanafani, Adib; Canetti, Thomas

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Competitive and Cooperative Inventory Policies in a Two-Stage Supply Chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate a two-stage serial supply chain with stationary stochastic demand and fixed transportation times. Inventory holding costs are charged at each stage, and each stage may incur a consumer backorder penalty cost, e.g. the upper stage (the ... Keywords: Game Theory, Incentive Contracts, Multiechelon Inventory, Supply Chain

Gérard P. Cachon; Paul H. Zipkin

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The transition to hydrogen as a transportation fuel: Costs and infrastructure requirements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen fuel, used in an internal combustion engine optimized for maximum efficiency and as part of a hybrid-electric vehicle, will give excellent performance and range with emissions below one-tenth the ultra-low emission vehicle standards being considered in California as Equivalent Zero Emission Vehicles. These vehicles can also be manufactured with increased but not excessive cost. Hydrogen-fueled engines have demonstrated indicated efficiencies of more than 50% under lean operation. Combining optimized engines and other advanced components, the overall vehicle efficiency should approach 40%, compared with 13% for a conventional vehicle in the urban driving cycle. The optimized engine-generator unit is the mechanical equivalent of the fuel cell but at a cost competitive with today`s engines. The increased efficiency of hybrid-electric vehicles now makes hydrogen fuel competitive with today`s conventional vehicles. Conservative analysis of the infrastructure options to support a transition to a hydrogen-fueled light-duty fleet indicates that hydrogen may be utilized at a total cost comparable to the 3.1 cents/km U.S. vehicle operators pay today while using conventional automobiles. Both on-site production by electrolysis or reforming of natural gas and liquid hydrogen distribution offer the possibility of a smooth transition by taking advantage of existing large-scale energy infrastructures. Eventually, renewable sources of electricity and scalable methods of making hydrogen will have lower costs than today. With a hybrid-electric propulsion system, the infrastructure to supply hydrogen and the vehicles to use it can be developed today and thus be in place when fuel cells become economical for vehicle use.

Schock, R.N.; Berry, G.D.; Ramback, G.D.; Smith, J.R.

1996-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

105

Logging and Agricultural Residue Supply Curves for the Pacific Northwest  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report quantified the volume of logging residues at the county level for current timber harvests. The cost of recovering logging residues was determined for skidding, yearding, loading, chipping and transporting the residues. Supply curves were developed for ten candidate conversion sites in the Pacific Northwest Region. Agricultural field residues were also quantified at the county level using five-year average crop yields. Agronomic constraints were applied to arrive at the volumes available for energy use. Collection costs and transportation costs were determined and supply curves generated for thirteen candidate conversion sites.

Kerstetter, James D.; Lyons, John Kim

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways -costs are compared with cost estimates of similar stationsHydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY An ENERGY STAR Resource Guidedrinking water supply industry to reduce energy consumptionenergy is used in the public drinking water supply industry.

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Modeling the impact of complexity on transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis aimed to understand the drivers of total transportation costs during supply chain complexity events, in particular new product launches, in a fast moving consumer goods company in the United States. The research ...

Fernandez, Jose A. (Jose Antonio Fernandez Chavira)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Transaction-Cost Economic Analysis of Institutional Change toward Design-Build Contracts for Public Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for example, compare DOT cost estimates to the price paid toscope are supported by cost estimates from WSDOT, which wereComplete at Bid DOT Cost Estimate at Bid Bid Price Total

Whittington, Jan; Dowall, David E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Microscopic calculation of the free energy cost for activated transport in glass-forming liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activated transport in liquids—supercooled liquids in particular—occurs via mutual nucleation of alternative

Pyotr Rabochiy; Vassiliy Lubchenko

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Energy and cost analysis of a solar-hydrogen combined heat and power system for remote power supply using a computer simulation  

SciTech Connect

A simulation program, based on Visual Pascal, for sizing and techno-economic analysis of the performance of solar-hydrogen combined heat and power systems for remote applications is described. The accuracy of the submodels is checked by comparing the real performances of the system's components obtained from experimental measurements with model outputs. The use of the heat generated by the PEM fuel cell, and any unused excess hydrogen, is investigated for hot water production or space heating while the solar-hydrogen system is supplying electricity. A 5 kWh daily demand profile and the solar radiation profile of Melbourne have been used in a case study to investigate the typical techno-economic characteristics of the system to supply a remote household. The simulation shows that by harnessing both thermal load and excess hydrogen it is possible to increase the average yearly energy efficiency of the fuel cell in the solar-hydrogen system from just below 40% up to about 80% in both heat and power generation (based on the high heating value of hydrogen). The fuel cell in the system is conventionally sized to meet the peak of the demand profile. However, an economic optimisation analysis illustrates that installing a larger fuel cell could lead to up to a 15% reduction in the unit cost of the electricity to an average of just below 90 c/kWh over the assessment period of 30 years. Further, for an economically optimal size of the fuel cell, nearly a half the yearly energy demand for hot water of the remote household could be supplied by heat recovery from the fuel cell and utilising unused hydrogen in the exit stream. Such a system could then complement a conventional solar water heating system by providing the boosting energy (usually in the order of 40% of the total) normally obtained from gas or electricity. (author)

Shabani, Bahman; Andrews, John; Watkins, Simon [School of Aerospace Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

On-Board Vehicle, Cost Effective Hydrogen Enhancement Technology for Transportation PEM Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Final Report of On-Board Vehicle, Cost Effective Hydrogen Enhancement Technology for Transportation PEM Fuel Cells. The objective of this effort was to technologically enable a compact, fast start-up integrated Water Gas Shift-Pd membrane reactor for integration into an On Board Fuel Processing System (FPS) for an automotive 50 kWe PEM Fuel Cell (PEM FC). Our approach was to: (1) use physics based reactor and system level models to optimize the design through trade studies of the various system design and operating parameters; and (2) synthesize, characterize and assess the performance of advanced high flux, high selectivity, Pd alloy membranes on porous stainless steel tubes for mechanical strength and robustness. In parallel and not part of this program we were simultaneously developing air tolerant, high volumetric activity, thermally stable Water Gas Shift catalysts for the WGS/membrane reactor. We identified through our models the optimum WGS/membrane reactor configuration, and best Pd membrane/FPS and PEM FC integration scheme. Such a PEM FC power plant was shown through the models to offer 6% higher efficiency than a system without the integrated membrane reactor. The estimated FPS response time was < 1 minute to 50% power on start-up, 5 sec transient response time, 1140 W/L power density and 1100 W/kg specific power with an estimated production cost of $35/kW. Such an FPS system would have a Catalytic Partial Oxidation System (CPO) rather than the slower starting Auto-Thermal Reformer (ATR). We found that at optimum WGS reactor configuration that H{sub 2} recovery efficiencies of 95% could be achieved at 6 atm WGS pressure. However optimum overall fuel to net electrical efficiency ({approx}31%) is highest at lower fuel processor efficiency (67%) with 85% H{sub 2} recovery because less parasitic power is needed. The H{sub 2} permeance of {approx}45 m{sup 3}/m{sup 2}-hr-atm{sup 0.5} at 350 C was assumed in these simulations. In the laboratory we achieved a H{sub 2} permeance of 50 m{sup 3}/(m{sup 2}-hr-atm{sup 0.5}) with a H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity of 110 at 350 C with pure Pd. We also demonstrated that we could produce Pd-Ag membranes. Such alloy membranes are necessary because they aren't prone to the Pd-hydride {alpha}-{beta} phase transition that is known to cause membrane failure in cyclic operation. When funding was terminated we were on track to demonstrated Pd-Ag alloy deposition on a nano-porous ({approx}80 nm) oxide layer supported on porous stainless steel tubing using a process designed for scale-up.

Thomas H. Vanderspurt; Zissis Dardas; Ying She; Mallika Gummalla; Benoit Olsommer

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

113

Cost of transporting coal to power plants rose almost 50% in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The average cost of shipping coal by railroad to power plants increased almost 50% in the United States from 2001 to 2010.

114

Cost of transporting coal to power plants rose almost 50% in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, ... The average cost of shipping coal by railroad to power plants increased almost 50% in the United ... National numbers can be ...

115

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies  

SciTech Connect

Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Stephens, T.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Unintended effects of federal transportation policy: a look at the lifecycle costs of the interstate system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The federal surface transportation program in the United States stands at a crossroads. Short on money and lacking vision, the program is in need of reevaluation and reform. This thesis attempts to illustrate the current ...

Lukmann, Andrew T

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Evaluating the costs and benefits of increased funding for public transportation in Chicago  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) off-peak ridership, is at or slightly below break-even with respect to net benefits if the CTA cost structure and tax source of subsidy remains unchanged. In order to justify any significant additional long-term ...

Schofield, Mark L., 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Cost Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation: September 30, 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of sensitivity and Monte Carlo analyses on PEM fuel cell components and the overall system are presented including the most important cost factors and the effects of selected scenarios.

Carlson, E. J.; Kopf, P.; Sinha, J.; Sriramulu, S.; Yang, Y.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Transportation Market Distortions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Highways, Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Evaluating Criticism of Transportation Costing, VictoriaFrom Here: Evaluating Transportation Diversity, Victoria

Litman, Todd

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Improving supply chain resilience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the global expansion of Company A's supply chain network, it is becoming more vulnerable to many disruptions. These disruptions often incur additional costs; and require time to respond to and recover from these ...

Leung, Elsa Hiu Man

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Biotrans: Cost Optimization Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biotrans: Cost Optimization Model Biotrans: Cost Optimization Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Biotrans: Cost Optimization Model Focus Area: Ethanol Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.ecn.nl/units/ps/models-and-tools/biotrans/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/biotrans-cost-optimization-model,http Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation BIOTRANS optimizes the biofuel supply chain allocation by finding the least-cost configuration of resources and trade to meet a specified biofuel demand in the European transportation sector. The user can constrain the optimization by inputting a number of economic and technological assumptions for a specific target year. References Retrieved from

122

An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel Market Network Framework: Theoretical Modeling with Empirical Analysis for New England  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the prices of fuels at energy markets and the transportation/distribution costs in making their economic the fuel price at each energy fuel market am. Since this paper focuses on the electric power supply chain markets that captures both the economic network transactions in energy supply markets and the physical

Nagurney, Anna

123

Pilot-Scale Demonstration of a Novel, Low-Cost Oxygen Supply Process and its Integration with Oxy-Fuel Coal-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to achieve DOE targets for carbon dioxide capture, it is crucial not only to develop process options that will generate and provide oxygen to the power cycle in a cost-effective manner compared to the conventional oxygen supply methods based on cryogenic air separation technology, but also to identify effective integration options for these new technologies into the power cycle with carbon dioxide capture. The Linde/BOC developed Ceramic Autothermal Recovery (CAR) process remains an interesting candidate to address both of these issues by the transfer of oxygen from the air to a recycled CO{sub 2} rich flue-gas stream in a cyclic process utilizing the high temperature sorption properties of perovskites. Good progress was made on this technology in this project, but significant challenges remain to be addressed before CAR oxygen production technology is ready for commercial exploitation. Phase 1 of the project was completed by the end of September 2008. The two-bed 0.7 tons/day O2 CAR process development unit (PDU) was installed adjacent to WRI's pilot scale coal combustion test facility (CTF). Start-up and operating sequences for the PDU were developed and cyclic operation of the CAR process demonstrated. Controlled low concentration methane addition allowed the beds to be heated up to operational temperature (800-900 C) and then held there during cyclic operation of the 2-bed CAR process, in this way overcoming unavoidable heat losses from the beds during steady state operation. The performance of the PDU was optimized as much as possible, but equipment limitations prevented the system from fully achieving its target performance. Design of the flue gas recirculation system to integrate CAR PDU with the CTF and the system was completed and integrated tests successfully performed at the end of the period. A detailed techno-economic analysis was made of the CAR process for supplying the oxygen in oxy-fuel combustion retrofit option using AEP's 450 MW Conesville, Ohio plant and contrasted with the cryogenic air separation option (ASU). Design of a large scale CAR unit was completed to support this techno-economic assessment. Based on the finding that the overall cost potential of the CAR technology compared to cryogenic ASU is nominal at current performance levels and that the risks related to both material and process scale up are still significant, the team recommended not to proceed to Phase 2. CAR process economics continue to look attractive if the original and still 'realistic' target oxygen capacities could be realized in practice. In order to achieve this end, a new fundamental materials development program would be needed. With the effective oxygen capacities of the current CAR materials there is, however, insufficient economic incentive to use this commercially unproven technology in oxy-fuel power plant applications in place of conventional ASUs. In addition, it is now clear that before a larger scale pilot demonstration of the CAR technology is made, a better understanding of the impact of flue-gas impurities on the CAR materials and of thermal transients in the beds is required.

Krish Krishnamurthy; Divy Acharya; Frank Fitch

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

Lab Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

reference materials, bleaching clay, activated bleaching earth and refining cups. Lab Supplies Lab Supplies Lab Supplies Laboratory Services analysis analytical methods aocs certified Certified Reference Materials (CRM) chemist chemists fats lab

125

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation banner Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration T-Shirt Contest Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive...

126

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Print banner Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration T-Shirt Contest Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive...

127

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Transportation and Air Quality Transportation Energy Policy Analysis Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Appliance Energy...

128

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE is conducting a comprehensive technical analysis of a flexible-fuel transportation system in the United States -- that is, a system that could easily switch between petroleum and another fuel, depending on price and availability. The DOE Alternative Fuels Assessment is aimed directly at questions of energy security and fuel availability, but covers a wide range of issues. This report examines environmental, health, and safety concerns associated with a switch to alternative- and flexible-fuel vehicles. Three potential alternatives to oil-based fuels in the transportation sector are considered: methanol, compressed natural gas (CNG), and electricity. The objective is to describe and discuss qualitatively potential environmental, health, and safety issues that would accompany widespread use of these three fuels. This report presents the results of exhaustive literature reviews; discussions with specialists in the vehicular and fuel-production industries and with Federal, State, and local officials; and recent information from in-use fleet tests. Each chapter deals with the end-use and process emissions of air pollutants, presenting an overview of the potential air pollution contribution of the fuel --relative to that of gasoline and diesel fuel -- in various applications. Carbon monoxide, particulate matter, ozone precursors, and carbon dioxide are emphasized. 67 refs., 6 figs. , 8 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Reducing Ultra-Clean Transportation Fuel Costs with HyMelt Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes activities for the thirteenth quarter of work performed under this agreement. EnviRes initiated a wire transfer of funds for procurement of a pressure vessel and associated refractory lining. Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consisted of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product streams. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream were gasified. Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, consists of gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 5 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations.

Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Reducing Ultra-Clean Transportation Fuel Costs with HyMelt Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consisted of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product streams. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream were gasified. Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, consists of gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 5 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations. This report describes activities for the thirteenth quarter of work performed under this agreement. MEFOS, the gasification testing subcontractor, reported to EnviRes that they were having difficulty with refractory vendors meeting specifications for the lining of the pressure vessel. EnviRes is working to resolve this issue.

Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Transportation of Depleted Uranium Materials in Support of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Program Issues associated with transport of depleted UF6 cylinders and conversion products. Conversion Plan Transportation Requirements The DOE has prepared two Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) for the proposal to build and operate depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6) conversion facilities at its Portsmouth and Paducah gaseous diffusion plant sites, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The proposed action calls for transporting the cylinder at ETTP to Portsmouth for conversion. The transportation of depleted UF6 cylinders and of the depleted uranium conversion products following conversion was addressed in the EISs.

132

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy usage and energy cost over time using net presentlower energy costs substantially. (5) Real-Time Monitoring:costs: demand = $10 per kW per month (all 12 months of the year); energy consumption = 7 per kWh (all times

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector. Technical report twelve: Economic analysis of alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the Altemative Fuels Assessment, the Department of Energy (DOE) is studying the use of derivatives of natural gas, including compressed natural gas and methanol, as altemative transportation fuels. A critical part of this effort is determining potential sources of natural gas and the economics of those sources. Previous studies in this series characterized the economics of unutilized gas within the lower 48 United States, comparing its value for methanol production against its value as a pipelined fuel (US Department of Energy 1991), and analyzed the costs of developing undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves in several countries (US Department of Energy 1992c). This report extends those analyses to include Alaskan North Slope natural gas that either is not being produced or is being reinjected. The report includes the following: A description of discovered and potential (undiscovered) quantities of natural gas on the Alaskan North Slope. A discussion of proposed altemative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. A comparison of the economics of the proposed alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the costs of transporting Alaskan North Slope gas to markets in the lower 48 States as pipeline gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), or methanol. It is not intended to recommend one alternative over another or to evaluate the relative economics or timing of using North Slope gas in new tertiary oil recovery projects. The information is supplied in sufficient detail to allow incorporation of relevant economic relationships (for example, wellhead gas prices and transportation costs) into the Altemative Fuels Trade Model, the analytical framework DOE is using to evaluate various policy options.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Risks » Transportation Health Risks » Transportation DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Transportation A discussion of health risks associated with transport of depleted UF6. Transport Regulations and Requirements In the future, it is likely that depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinders will be transported to a conversion facility. For example, it is currently anticipated that the cylinders at the ETTP Site in Oak Ridge, TN, will be transported to the Portsmouth Site, OH, for conversion. Uranium hexafluoride has been shipped safely in the United States for over 40 years by both truck and rail. Shipments of depleted UF6 would be made in accordance with all applicable transportation regulations. Shipment of depleted UF6 is regulated by the

135

Reducing Ultra-Clean Transportation Fuel Costs with HyMelt Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes activities for the sixteenth quarter of work performed under this agreement. MEFOS, the gasification testing subcontractor, reported to EnviRes that the vendor for the pressure vessel for above atmospheric testing now plans to deliver it by November 20, 2006 instead of October 20, 2006 as previously reported. MEFOS performed a hazardous operation review of pressurized testing. The current schedule anticipates above atmospheric pressure testing to begin during the week of April 16, 2007. Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consisted of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product streams. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream were gasified. Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, consists of gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 3 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations.

Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

136

Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transportation systems are an often overlooked critical infrastructure component. These systems comprise a widely diverse elements whose operation impact all aspects of society today. This chapter introduces the key transportation sectors and illustrates ...

Mark Hartong; Rajn Goel; Duminda Wijesekera

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilities use more electricity for distribution (48 millionthe most electricity for distribution. For the utilitiesUse Treatment electricity cost Distribution electricity use

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect

As American drinking water agencies face higher production costs, demand, and energy prices, they seek opportunities to reduce costs without negatively affecting the quality of the water they deliver. This guide describes resources for cost-effectively improving the energy efficiency of U.S. public drinking water facilities. The guide (1) describes areas of opportunity for improving energy efficiency in drinking water facilities; (2) provides detailed descriptions of resources to consult for each area of opportunity; (3) offers supplementary suggestions and information for the area; and (4) presents illustrative case studies, including analysis of cost-effectiveness.

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Brown, Rich

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

139

Power Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Figure: ...Fig. 5 Typical medium-frequency induction power supply incorporating (a) a parallel inverter and (b) a series inverter...

140

Transport Costs, Geography and Regional Inequalities: Evidence from France”, CEPR Discussion Paper, 2894. Revised version: http://www.enpc.fr/ceras/lafourcade/artinf.pdf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper empirically investigates the predictions of economic geography models regarding the role of transport costs on regional inequalities. We perform a structural estimation of such a model on French data at detailed geographic and industry levels (341 “employment areas”, 64 manufacturing and service industries). Transport costs, intermediate inputs, and real geography are shown to play a critical role in the spatial concentration of French activities. Next, we present the estimated model predictions regarding the local economic conditions. For instance, the mark-up per unit is higher either at the France centre (low transport and unit costs even if high competition) or at the extreme periphery (low competition even if high costs), and low in between. However, due to large inequalities in production per plant, our model predicts a decrease in total profit from the center towards the periphery: because of these large concentration incentives at the center, regional inequalities are therefore expected to further increase in the future. Last, we show that, in the short-run, decreasing transport costs may counterbalance the process of spatial concentration at the country level (leading for instance to the emergence of a duo-centric structure of profits). This is not the case at the regional level. Indeed, due to agglomeration mechanisms arising inside

Miren Lafourcade; Henry Overman; Jean-marc Robin; Dan Trefler; Cepr Workshops In

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A Regional-Scale GIS-Based Modeling System for Evaluating the Potential Costs and Supplies of Biomass from Biomass Crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A GIS-based modeling system was developed for analyzing the geographic variation in potential bioenergy feedstock supplies and optimal locations for siting bioenergy facilities. The modeling system is designed for analyzing individual US states but could readily be adapted to any geographic region.

Graham, R.L.; English, B.C.; Noon, C.E.; Liu, W.; Daly, M.J.; Jager, H.I.

1996-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

142

Local Option Taxes and the New Subregionalism in Transportation Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

share of transportation and other social costs. Developersshare of transportation and other social costs. Developers

Goldman, Todd Mitchel

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Personal Nonmonetary Costs of Motor-Vehicle Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. bythe Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. byTransportation Crashes,” in Measuring the Full Social Costs

Delucchi, Mark A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meier AKMeier@lbl.gov (510) 486-4740 Links Transportation and Air Quality Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

145

Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tool to compare existing cost estimates from the literature,It compiles and organizes cost estimates obtained from aE. Hydrogen supply: cost estimate for hydrogen pathways—

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Supply Implications  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Supply Implications. European export gasoline volumes likely to remain unchanged Uncertainties are weighted towards less availability But the quality of the available ...

147

EIA projections of coal supply and demand  

SciTech Connect

Contents of this report include: EIA projections of coal supply and demand which covers forecasted coal supply and transportation, forecasted coal demand by consuming sector, and forecasted coal demand by the electric utility sector; and policy discussion.

Klein, D.E.

1989-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

148

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Improving supply chain resilience by multi-stage supply chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the global expansion of Company A's supply chain network, it is becoming more vulnerable to many disruptions. These disruptions often incur additional costs; and require time to respond to and recover from these ...

Yang, Jingxia, M. Eng, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Improve supply chain resilience by multi-stage supply chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the global expansion of Company A's supply chain network, it is becoming more vulnerable to many disruptions. These disruptions often incur additional costs; and require time to respond to and recover from these ...

Xu, Jie, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Supply chain management in the cement industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditionally supply chain management has played an operational role within cement and mineral extraction commodity companies. Recently, cost reduction projects have brought supply chain management into the limelight. In ...

Agudelo, Isabel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

California GAMA Special Study: An isotopic and dissolved gas investigation of nitrate source and transport to a public supply well in California's Central Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates nitrate contamination of a deep municipal drinking water production well in Ripon, CA to demonstrate the utility of natural groundwater tracers in constraining the sources and transport of nitrate to deep aquifers in the Central Valley. The goal of the study was to investigate the origin (source) of elevated nitrate and the potential for the deep aquifer to attenuate anthropogenic nitrate. The site is ideal for such an investigation. The production well is screened from 165-325 feet below ground surface and a number of nearby shallow and deep monitoring wells were available for sampling. Furthermore, potential sources of nitrate contamination to the well had been identified, including a fertilizer supply plant located approximately 1000 feet to the east and local almond groves. A variety of natural isotopic and dissolved gas tracers including {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He groundwater age and the isotopic composition of nitrate are applied to identify nitrate sources and to characterize nitrate transport. An advanced method for sampling production wells is employed to help identify contaminant contributions from specific screen intervals. Nitrate transport: Groundwater nitrate at this field site is not being actively denitrified. Groundwater parameters indicate oxic conditions, the dissolved gas data shows no evidence for excess nitrogen as the result of denitrification, and nitrate-N and -O isotope compositions do not display patterns typical of denitrification. Contaminant nitrate source: The ambient nitrate concentration in shallow groundwater at the Ripon site ({approx}12 mg/L as nitrate) is typical of shallow groundwaters affected by recharge from agricultural and urban areas. Nitrate concentrations in Ripon City Well 12 (50-58 mg/L as nitrate) are significantly higher than these ambient concentrations, indicating an additional source of anthropogenic nitrate is affecting groundwater in the capture zone of this municipal drinking water well. This study provides two new pieces of evidence that the Ripon Farm Services Plant is the source of elevated nitrate in Ripon City Well 12. (1) Chemical mass balance calculations using nitrate concentration, nitrate isotopic composition, and initial tritium activity all indicate that that the source water for elevated nitrate to Ripon City Well 12 is a very small component of the water produced by City Well 12 and thus must have extremely high nitrate concentration. The high source water nitrate concentration ({approx}1500 mg/L as nitrate) required by these mass balance calculations precludes common sources of nitrate such as irrigated agriculture, dairy wastewater, and septic discharge. Shallow groundwater under the Ripon Farm Services RFS plant does contain extremely high concentrations of nitrate (>1700 mg/L as nitrate). (2) Nitrogen and oxygen isotope compositions of nitrate indicate that the additional anthropogenic nitrate source to Ripon City Well 12 is significantly enriched in {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, an isotopic signature consistent with synthetic nitrate fertilizer, and not with human or animal wastewater discharge (i.e. dairy operations, septic system discharge, or municipal wastewater discharge), or with organic fertilizer. Monitoring wells on and near the RFS plant also have high {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, and the plant has handled and stored synthetic nitrate fertilizer that will have this isotopic signature. The results described here highlight the complexity of attributing nitrate found in long screened, high capacity wells to specific sources. In this case, the presence of a very high concentration source near the well site combined with sampling using multiple isotopic tracer techniques and specialized depth-specific techniques allowed fingerprinting of the source in the mixed-age samples drawn from the production well.

Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K; Roberts, S K; Hillegonds, D J

2010-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

153

Cost Effectiveness of Cleaning Techniques for Controlling Human-based Transport of Invasive Exotic Plants on Electric Transmission Line Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update provides a broad overview of accomplishments over the first full year of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) project to investigate the cost effectiveness of cleaning techniques to control human-based transport of invasive exotic plants on electric transmission line rights-of-way. One-half of the intended field work for the whole project (2012-2015) was completed, with attendant greenhouse and office work ongoing. EPRI expects the project to be completed in ...

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

154

Model for Energy Supply System Alternatives and their General...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by analysing cost optimal energy mixes, investment needs and other costs for new infrastructure, energy supply security, energy resource utilization, rate of introduction...

155

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the literature provides cost estimates of actual stations.Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways -COST ESTIMATES.

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Power supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A modular, low weight impedance dropping power supply with battery backup is disclosed that can be connected to a high voltage AC source and provide electrical power at a lower voltage. The design can be scaled over a wide range of input voltages and over a wide range of output voltages and delivered power.

Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul (Seminole, FL); Hamilton, Pamela Jane (Seminole, FL); Brubaker, Michael Allen (Loveland, CO)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

157

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Due to limited parking, all visitors are strongly encouraged to: Due to limited parking, all visitors are strongly encouraged to: 1) car-pool, 2) take the Lab's special conference shuttle service, or 3) take the regular off-site shuttle. If you choose to use the regular off-site shuttle bus, you will need an authorized bus pass, which can be obtained by contacting Eric Essman in advance. Transportation & Visitor Information Location and Directions to the Lab: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is located in Berkeley, on the hillside directly above the campus of University of California at Berkeley. The address is One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720. For comprehensive directions to the lab, please refer to: http://www.lbl.gov/Workplace/Transportation.html Maps and Parking Information: On Thursday and Friday, a limited number (15) of barricaded reserved parking spaces will be available for NON-LBNL Staff SNAP Collaboration Meeting participants in parking lot K1, in front of building 54 (cafeteria). On Saturday, plenty of parking spaces will be available everywhere, as it is a non-work day.

158

Road Transportation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The recession of the early 1990’s marked the starting point for a transformation of the Swedish transportation industry. Cost oriented production techniques by the… (more)

Gudmundsson, Erik

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

The impact of bimodal distribution in ocean transportation transit time on logistics costs : an empirical & theoretical analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As ocean shipments have increased alongside globalization, transit time uncertainty has increased as well. This problem was observed to have variable levels of impacts on logistics cost and safety stock levels. This thesis ...

Das, Lita

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Strategic Spot Trading in Supply Chains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a variety of industries ranging from agriculture to electronics and oil, procurement takes place through a combination of bilateral fixed-price contracts and open market trading among supply chain participants, which allows them to improve supply ... Keywords: demand and cost information, fixed-price contracts, procurement and supply chain, spot trading

Haim Mendelson; Tunay I. Tunca

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Sustainable Supply Chain | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Supply Chain Sustainable Supply Chain Sustainable Supply Chains Submissions Let's Talk About Sustainable Supply Chain Welcome to the Sustainable Supply Chain Community of Practice Bringing together government, industry, associations, non-profits and academic institutions to achieve more sustainable supply chains. Sustainable Supply Chain - New Updates New Updates View More Be a Champion Be a champion The Sustainable Supply Chain Community of Practice seeks champions from industry, academia and non-profits to lead each of the community market sectors. Do you know or are you a member of a leading edge organization that is implementing sustainable supply chain practices within one of the seven current community market sectors? If yes, nominate the organization as a Champion. Sustainable supply chain practices lead to cost savings,

162

OOTW COST TOOLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.

HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Power supply  

SciTech Connect

An electric power supply employs a striking means to initiate ferroelectric elements which provide electrical energy output which subsequently initiates an explosive charge which initiates a second ferroelectric current generator to deliver current to the coil of a magnetic field current generator, creating a magnetic field around the coil. Continued detonation effects compression of the magnetic field and subsequent generation and delivery of a large output current to appropriate output loads.

Hart, Edward J. (Albuquerque, NM); Leeman, James E. (Albuquerque, NM); MacDougall, Hugh R. (Albuquerque, NM); Marron, John J. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Calvin C. (Amarillo, TX)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Fleet servicing facilities for servicing, maintaining, and testing rail and truck radioactive waste transport systems: functional requirements, technical design concepts and options cost estimates and comparisons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a resource document which examines feasibility design concepts and feasibility studies of a Fleet Servicing Facility (FSF). Such a facility is intended to be used for routine servicing, preventive maintenance, and for performing requalification license compliance tests and inspections, minor repairs, and decontamination of both the transportation casks and their associated rail cars or tractor-trailers. None of the United States' waste handling plants presently receiving radioactive wastes have an on-site FSF, nor is there an existing third party facility providing these services. This situation has caused the General Accounting Office to express concern regarding the quality of waste transport system maintenance once the system is placed into service. Thus, a need is indicated for FSF's, or their equivalent, at various radioactive materials receiving sites. In this report, three forms of FSF's solely for spent fuel transport systems were examined: independent, integrated, and colocated. The independent concept was already the subject of a detailed report and is extensively referenced in this document so that capital cost comparisons of the three concepts could be made. These facilities probably could service high-level, intermediate-level, low-level, or other waste transportation systems with minor modification, but this study did not include any system other than spent fuel. Both the Integrated and Colocated concepts were assumed to be associated with some radioactive materials handling facility such as an AFR repository.

Watson, C.D.; Hudson, B.J.; Keith, D.A.; Preston, M.K. Jr.; McCreery, P.N.; Knox, W.; Easterling, E.M.; Lamprey, A.S.; Wiedemann, G.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Review of Some of the Literature on the Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Policy, “Social Costs of Transportation Systems,” U. S.Quinet, “Full Social Costs of Transportation in Europe,” inthe external and social costs of transportation, in large

Murphy, James; Delucchi, Mark

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Intermediate-Term Uranium Supply Curve Estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was undertaken to estimate U.S. natural uranium supply capacities and associated production costs over the period 1979-1990 and to develop the general supply outlook to 2000. Annual supply capacity schedules were estimated on an individual mill and mine family basis. Future production schedules were estimated by balancing estimated supply capacity with DOE's future demand projections; the impact of private-sector inventory levels was accounted for.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Petroleum supply monthly, April 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographical regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the US.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Petroleum supply monthly, February 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Monthly presents data describing the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders; operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. Data are divided into two sections: Summary statistics and Detailed statistics.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The effect of location and facility demand on the marginal cost of delivered wood chips from energy crops: A case study of the state of Tennessee  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cost-supply curves for delivered wood chips from short rotation woody crops were calculated for 21 regularly-spaced locations spanning the state of Tennessee. These curves were used to systematically evaluate the combined effects of location and facility demand on wood chip feedstock costs in Tennessee. The cost-supply curves were developed using BRAVO, a GIS-based decision support system which calculates marginal cost of delivering wood chips to a specific location given road network maps and maps of farmgate prices and supplies of woody chips from short rotation energy crops. Marginal costs of delivered chips varied by both facility location in the state and facility demand. Marginal costs were lowest in central Tennessee unless the facility demand was greater than 2.7 million dry Mg per year (3 million dry tons per year) in which case west Tennessee was the lowest cost region. Marginal costs rose rapidly with increasing facility demand in the mountainous eastern portion of the state. Transportation costs accounted for 18 to 29% of the delivered cost and ranged between $8 and $18/dry Mg ($7 and $16/dry ton). Reducing the expected farmer participation rate from 100% to 50% or 25% dramatically raised the marginal costs of feedstock supply in the east and central regions of the state. The analysis demonstrates the need to use geographically-specific information when projecting the potential costs and supplies of biomass feedstock.

Graham, R.L.; Liu, W.; Downing, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Biofuels Feedstock Development Program; Noon, C.; Daly, M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Management Science Program; Moore, A. [Dept. of Trade and Industry, Harwell (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Support Unit

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

The Full Cost of Intercity Travel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation," National Resources Defense San Francisco, October Emile Quinet, Monograph the Council, "The Social Cost

Levinson, David

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

RFID-driven global supply chain and management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global supply chain and management has become an important issue. It involves a company's worldwide interests and the coordination of production, inventory, location, and transportation in the entire supply chain. In a global business environment, ... Keywords: EPC, EPCglobal Network, RFID, SCM, database, electronic product code, global supply chains, information security, interoperability, radio frequency identification, real-time information, supply chain management

L. Wang; G. Wang

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXASTRANS TEXAS TRANSPORTATION HALL HONOR OF HALL HONOR OF TEXASTRAN HALL HONOR OF TEXASTRAN HALL HONOR OF Inductees #12;2 TEXAS TRANSPORTATION HALL HONOR OF L NOR OF Texas is recognized as having one of the finest multimodal transportation systems in the world. The existence of this system has been key

173

Total Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grand total social cost of highway transportation Subtotal:of alternative transportation investments. A social-costtransportation option that has These costs will be inefficiently incurred if people do not fully lower total social costs.

Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Maintenance cost studies of present aircraft subsystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report describes two detailed studies of actual maintenance costs for present transport aircraft. The first part describes maintenance costs for jet transport aircraft broken down into subsystem costs according to an ...

Pearlman, Chaim Herman Shalom

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation CTS 21st Annual Transportation Research Conference costs #12;Potential Applications · Roadway Project Feasibility Studies ­ Identified potential roadway infrastructure improvement ­ Documentation of estimated project costs ­ Determine property assessments

Minnesota, University of

176

Why Supply Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why supply chain explains the importance of supply chains. It includes an introduction to ERP as designed by SAP.

Datta, Shoumen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

The Health and Visibility Cost of Air Pollution: A Comparison of Estimation Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

social cost of motor vehicle use. Journal of Transportation andvehicles: social costs and bene?ts in France. Transportation

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James; McCubbin, Donald

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

A Review of the Literature on the Social Cost of Motor Vehicle Use in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. 1997. Full Social Costs of Transportation in Europe.the Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation.the Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation. Edited

Murphy, James; Delucchi, Mark

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Transportation Services and Innovation in the Housing Industry: A Study of the Relations between Transportation and Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

derived social costs by substituting direct transportationsocial gains from both reduced direct transportation costs

Souleyrette, Reginald R. II

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

LNG links remote supplies and markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) has established a niche for itself by matching remote gas supplies to markets that both lacked indigenous gas reserves and felt threatened in the aftermath of the energy crises of the 1970s and 1980s. It has provided a cost-effective energy source for these markets, while also offering an environmentally friendly fuel long before that was fashionable. The introduction of natural-gas use via LNG in the early years (mostly into France and Japan) has also allowed LNG to play a major role in developing gas infrastructure. Today, natural gas, often supplied as LNG, is particularly well-suited for use in the combined cycle technology used in independent power generation projects (IPPs). Today, LNG players cannot simply focus on monetizing gas resources. Instead, they must adapt their projects to meet the needs of changing markets. The impact of these changes on the LNG industry has been felt throughout the value chain from finding and producing gas, gas treatment, liquefaction, transport as a liquid, receiving terminals and regasification, and finally, to consumption by power producers, industrial users, and households. These factors have influenced the evolution of the LNG industry and have implications for the future of LNG, particularly in the context of worldwide natural gas.

Avidan, A.A.; Gardner, R.E.; Nelson, D.; Borrelli, E.N. [Mobil LNG Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Rethore, T.J. [Arthur D. Little Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The growing world LP-gas supply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possible range of future (LPG) export availabilities is huge, but actual production levels depend on factors, many of which are beyond our direct control - world demand for crude oil and gas, developments in technology, and the price of both energy in general and LPG specifically. Although these factors limit some of the potential developments, a substantial increase in LPG supply is certain, and this is likely to depress its price relative to other products. Over the last few years, a dramatic expansion has taken place in the industry. From 1980 to 1987, non-Communist world production of LPG increased by close to 35%, to a total of 115 million tonnes. If this is set against the general energy scene, LPG represented 3.7% of crude oil production by weight in 1980, rising to 5.4% in 1987. This growth reflects rise in consciousness around the world of the value of the product. LPG is no longer regarded as a byproduct, which is flared or disposed of at low value, but increasingly as a co-product, and much of the growth in production has been due to the installation of tailored recovery systems. LPG markets historically developed around sources of supply, constrained by the costs of transportation. The major exceptions, of course, were the Middle East, the large exporter, and Japan, the large importer.

Hoare, M.C.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

The External Damage Cost of Direct Noise From Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects and Social Costs of Road Transport,” Transportationreview of the social costs of transportation in the U. S.social cost MV = motor vehicle NIPA = National Income Product Accounts NOx = nitrogen oxides NPTS = Nationwide Personal Transportation

Delucchi, Mark A.; Hsu, Shi-Ling

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Polynomial policies in supply chain networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis aims to solve the periodic-reviewed inventory control problem in supply chain networks with uncertain demand so as to minimize the overall cost of the system over a fixed planning time horizon. In such problems, ...

He, Liwei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Integrated Graduate Education & Research Traineeships (IGERT): Transportation Technology & Policy Final Grant Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientist, Full Social Costs of Transportation (policyC-4 The Full Social Cost of Transportation Department:The Full Social Cost of Transportation (instructor – Dr.

Mokhtarian, Patricia L; Tolentino, Joan S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Integrated Graduate Education & Research Traineeships: Transportation Technology & Policy Final Grant Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientist, Full Social Costs of Transportation (policyC-4 The Full Social Cost of Transportation Department:The Full Social Cost of Transportation (instructor – Dr.

Mokhtarian, Patricia L; Tolentino, Joan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Review of Transportation Issues and Comparison of Infrastructure ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Infrastructure Costs Associated with Renewable Fuels The DAI study estimates the infrastructure investment costs and the transportation costs

187

Design of wood biomass supply chains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to propose a mathematical programming approach to minimize the total cost in a biomass supply chain. A company that collects material from forests, transforms it into chipped product, stores and delivers it to its customers ... Keywords: biomass, mixed integer programming, optimization, supply chain

Tiago Costa Gomes; Filipe Pereira e Alvelos; Maria Sameiro Carvalho

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Transportation and Site Location Analysis for Regional Integrated Biomass Assessment (RIBA)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The farmgate cost and available supply of biomass often exhibit considerable variation within a State. This variation, combined with the relatively high cost of transporting bulky biomass material, produces a wide range of expected delivered feedstock costs across a State. As a consequence, both production and transportation costs must be well-modeled when analyzing potential locations for conversion facilities. The Regional Integrated Biomass Assessment system consists of two phases. The descriptive phase characterizes a farmgate cost and supply surface for switchgrass production over a given State. These results are passed to the analytical phase, where a transportation model is used to compute the marginal cost of supplying an ethanol plant at a prescribed level of demand. The model generates a marginal cost surface that illustrates the most promising areas for locating an ethanol plant. Next, a sequential location model simulates the commercial development of ethanol production facilities. This model considers every road network node as a potential site and generates a sequence of likely plant locations. Results from the RIBA analysis demonstrate that the cost of switchgrass can increase dramatically from one location to another. This variation will seriously effect the economics of conversion in the proper sizing and locating of ethanol plant facilities.

Noon, C.E.; Daly, M.J.; Graham, R.L.; Zahn, F.B.

1996-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Petroleum supply monthly, January 1994  

SciTech Connect

Data presented describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Supply Curves of Conserved Energy  

SciTech Connect

Supply curves of conserved energy provide an accounting framework that expresses the potential for energy conservation. The economic worthiness of a conservation measure is expressed in terms of the cost of conserved energy, and a measure is considered economical when the cost of conserved energy is less than the price of the energy it replaces. A supply curve of conserved energy is independent of energy prices; however, the economical reserves of conserved energy will depend on energy prices. Double-counting of energy savings and error propagation are common problems when estimating conservation potentials, but supply curves minimize these difficulties and make their consequences predictable. The sensitivity of the cost of conserved energy is examined, as are variations in the optimal investment strategy in response to changes in inputs. Guidelines are presented for predicting the consequences of such changes. The conservation supply curve concept can be applied to peak power, water, pollution, and other markets where consumers demand a service rather than a particular good.

Meier, Alan Kevin

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

H. R. 4604: a bill to promote competition in the natural gas market, to ensure open access to transportation service, to encourage production of natural gas, to provide natural gas consumers with adequate supplies at reasonable prices, to eliminate demand restraints, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, April 16, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Policy Act Amendments of 1986 promotes competition in the natural gas market. Title I ensures open access to transportation service by requiring that interstate pipelines not discriminate in providing transportation services. Title II encourages production of natural gas by removing wellhead price controls and repealing jurisdiction over first sales. Title III provides natural gas consumers with adequate supplies at reasonable prices and eliminates demand restraints. The bill was referred to the House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Roadmap for Agriculture Biomass Feedstock Supply in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee established a goal that biomass will supply 5% of the nation’s power, 20% of its transportation fuels, and 25% of its chemicals by 2030. These combined goals are approximately equivalent to 30% of the country’s current petroleum consumption. The benefits of a robust biorefinery industry supplying this amount of domestically produced power, fuels, and products are considerable, including decreased demand for imported oil, revenue to the depressed agricultural industry, and revitalized rural economies. A consistent supply of highquality, low-cost feedstock is vital to achieving this goal. This biomass roadmap defines the research and development (R&D) path to supplying the feedstock needs of the biorefinery and to achieving the important national goals set for biomass. To meet these goals, the biorefinery industry must be more sustainable than the systems it will replace. Sustainability hinges on the economic profitability of all participants, on environmental impact of every step in the process, and on social impact of the product and its production. In early 2003, a series of colloquies were held to define and prioritize the R&D needs for supplying feedstock to the biorefinery in a sustainable manner. These colloquies involved participants and stakeholders in the feedstock supply chain, including growers, transporters, equipment manufacturers, and processors as well as environmental groups and others with a vested interest in ensuring the sustainability of the biorefinery. From this series of colloquies, four high-level strategic goals were set for the feedstock area: • Biomass Availability – By 2030, 1 billion dry tons of lignocellulosic feedstock is needed annually to achieve the power, fuel, and chemical production goals set by the Biomass Research and Development Technology Advisory Production Committee • Sustainability – Production and use of the 1 billion dry tons annually must be accomplished in a sustainable manner • Feedstock Infrastructure – An integrated feedstock supply system must be developed and implemented that can serve the feedstock needs of the biorefinery at the cost, quality, and consistency of the set targets • System Profitability – Economic profitability and sustainability need to be ensured for all required participants in the feedstock supply system. For each step in the biomass supply process—production, harvesting and collection, storage, preprocessing, system integration, and transportation—this roadmap addresses the current technical situations, performance targets, technical barriers, R&D needs, and R&D priorities to overcome technical barriers and achieve performance targets. Crop residue biomass is an attractive starting feedstock, which shows the best near-term promise as a biorefinery feedstock. Because crop residue is a by-product of grain production, it is an abundant, underutilized, and low cost biomass resource. Corn stover and cereal straw are the two most abundant crop residues available in the United States. Therefore, this roadmap focuses primarily on the R&D needed for using these biomass sources as viable biorefinery feedstocks. However, achieving the goal of 1 billion dry tons of lignocellulosic feedstock will require the use of other biomass sources such as dedicated energy crops. In the long term, the R&D needs identified in this roadmap will need to accommodate these other sources of biomass as well.

J. Richard Hess; Thomas D. Foust; Reed Hoskinson; David Thompson

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Transportation Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (TAMS) Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (TAMS) Application Center for Transportation Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies T he Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) TAMS application is a web-based tool that supports

194

transportation Total Percent delivered cost transportation Percent ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

$12.75 - - - - - 36.0% - 2005 $13.64 - $13.64 - - - - - 36.8% - 2006; $14.50 - $14.04 - - - - - 34.3% - 2007 $15 ...

195

Definition and Measurement of Transportation System Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transportation Economic and social development Entertainment Other Costsbenefits and costs of transportation. It is a social policy

Dahlgren, Joy

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Solar-hydrogen systems for remote area power supply.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Remote area power supply (RAPS) is a potential early market for solar-hydrogen systems because of the comparatively high cost of conventional energy sources such as… (more)

Ali, S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Sustainable Biomass Supply Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) aims to displace 30% of the 2004 gasoline use (60 billion gal/yr) with biofuels by 2030 as outlined in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which will require 700 million tons of biomass to be sustainably delivered to biorefineries annually. Lignocellulosic biomass will make an important contribution towards meeting DOE’s ethanol production goals. For the biofuels industry to be an economically viable enterprise, the feedstock supply system (i.e., moving the biomass from the field to the refinery) cannot contribute more that 30% of the total cost of the biofuel production. The Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of California, Davis and Kansas State University are developing a set of tools for identifying economical, sustainable feedstocks on a regional basis based on biorefinery siting.

Erin Searcy; Dave Muth; Erin Wilkerson; Shahab Sokansanj; Bryan Jenkins; Peter Titman; Nathan Parker; Quinn Hart; Richard Nelson

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.PDF Table 10. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

199

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 Table 21. PAD District 5 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition...

200

Petroleum Supply Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

TABLE8.PDF Table 8. PAD District 3 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE4.PDF Table 4. PAD District 1 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

202

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

May 2013 Table 21. PAD District 5 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, May 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending...

203

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 May 2013 Table 19. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, May 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

204

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 Table 11. PAD District 2 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply...

205

Petroleum Supply Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

TABLE6.PDF Table 6. PAD District 2 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

206

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

December 2011 Table 13. PAD District 3 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition...

207

Petroleum supply monthly, July 1993  

SciTech Connect

Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: Petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

1993-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

208

Updated U.S. Geothermal Supply Curve  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper documents the approach used to update the U.S. geothermal supply curve. The analysis undertaken in this study estimates the supply of electricity generation potential from geothermal resources in the United States and the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE), capital costs, and operating and maintenance costs associated with developing these geothermal resources. Supply curves were developed for four categories of geothermal resources: identified hydrothermal (6.4 GWe), undiscovered hydrothermal (30.0 GWe), near-hydrothermal field enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) (7.0 GWe) and deep EGS (15,900 GWe). Two cases were considered: a base case and a target case. Supply curves were generated for each of the four geothermal resource categories for both cases. For both cases, hydrothermal resources dominate the lower cost range of the combined geothermal supply curve. The supply curves indicate that the reservoir performance improvements assumed in the target case could significantly lower EGS costs and greatly increase EGS deployment over the base case.

Augustine, C.; Young, K. R.; Anderson, A.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost, Durable Seal Cost, Durable Seal George M. Roberts UTC Power Corporation February 14, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information 1 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Outline * Project Objective * Technical Approach * Timeline * Team Roles * Budget * Q&A 2 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Project Objective Develop advanced, low cost, durable seal materials and sealing techniques amenable to high volume manufacture of PEM cell stacks. DOE Targets/Goals/Objectives Project Goal Durability Transportation: 5,000 hr Stationary: 40,000 hr Durability Improve mechanical and chemical stability to achieve 40,000 hr of useful operating life. Low Cost Low Cost A material cost equivalent to or less than the cost of silicones in common use. 3 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL

210

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Costs Project Summary Full Title: Fuel Choice for Fuel Cell Vehicles: Hydrogen Infrastructure Costs Previous Title(s): Guidance for Transportation Technologies: Fuel...

211

The Present, Mid-Term, and Long-Term Supply Curves for Tellurium; and Updates in the Results from NREL's CdTe PV Module Manufacturing Cost Model (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For those PV technologies that rely upon Te, In, and Ga, first-order observations and calculations hint that there may be resource constraints that could inhibit their successful deployment at a SunShot level. These are only first-order approximations, however, and the possibility for an expansion in global Te, In, and Ga supplies needs to be considered in the event that there are upward revisions in their demand and prices.In this study, we examine the current, mid-term, and long-term prospects of Tellurium (Te) for use in PV. We find that the current global supply base of Te would support supply base for Te might be expanded, after compiling several preliminary cumulative availability curves we find that there may be significant upside potential in the supply base for this element - principally vis a vis increasing demand and higher prices. Primarily by reducing the Tellurium intensity in manufacturing and by increasing the recovery efficiency of Te in Cu refining processes, we calculate that it may prove affordable to PV manufacturers to expand the supply base for Te such that 100 GW, or greater, of annual CdTe PV production is possible in the 2030 - 2050 timeframe.

Woodhouse, M.; Goodrich, A.; Redlinger, M.; Lokanc, M.; Eggert, R.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The Present, Mid-Term, and Long-Term Supply Curves for Tellurium; and Updates in the Results from NREL's CdTe PV Module Manufacturing Cost Model (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For those PV technologies that rely upon Te, In, and Ga, first-order observations and calculations hint that there may be resource constraints that could inhibit their successful deployment at a SunShot level. These are only first-order approximations, however, and the possibility for an expansion in global Te, In, and Ga supplies needs to be considered in the event that there are upward revisions in their demand and prices.In this study, we examine the current, mid-term, and long-term prospects of Tellurium (Te) for use in PV. We find that the current global supply base of Te would support <10 GW of annual traditional CdTe PV manufacturing production. But as for the possibility that the supply base for Te might be expanded, after compiling several preliminary cumulative availability curves we find that there may be significant upside potential in the supply base for this element - principally vis a vis increasing demand and higher prices. Primarily by reducing the Tellurium intensity in manufacturing and by increasing the recovery efficiency of Te in Cu refining processes, we calculate that it may prove affordable to PV manufacturers to expand the supply base for Te such that 100 GW, or greater, of annual CdTe PV production is possible in the 2030 - 2050 timeframe.

Woodhouse, M.; Goodrich, A.; Redlinger, M.; Lokanc, M.; Eggert, R.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Petroleum supply monthly, January 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

NONE

1996-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Petroleum Supply Monthly, August 1990  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) district movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics.

Not Available

1990-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

215

Petroleum supply monthly, September 1991  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administrations for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics. 65 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

216

Emissions of Criteria Pollutants, Toxic Air Pollutants, and Greenhouse Gases, From the Use of Alternative Transportation Modes and Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an analysis of the social cost of transportation modes. ForThe full social cost of a transportation mode consists ofof the social cost of alternative transportation modes.

Delucchi, Mark

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Analyzing Impact of Intermodal Facilities on Design and Management of Biofuel Supply Chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of an intermodal facility on location and transportation decisions for biofuel production plants is analyzed. Location decisions affect the management of the inbound and outbound logistics of a plant. This supply chain design and management problem is modeled as a mixed integer program. Input data for this model are location of intermodal facilities and available transportation modes, cost and cargo capacity for each transportation mode, geographical distribution of biomass feedstock and production yields, and biomass processing and inventory costs. Outputs from this model are the number, location, and capacity of biofuel production plants. For each plant, the transportation mode used, timing of shipments, shipment size, inventory size, and production schedule that minimize the delivery cost of biofuel are determined. The model proposed in this research can be used as a decision-making tool for investors in the biofuels industry since it estimates the real cost of the business. The state of Mississippi is considered as the testing grounds for the model.

Eksioglu, Sandra D [ORNL; Li, Song [ORNL; Zhang, Shu [Mississippi State University (MSU); Petrolia, Daniel [Mississippi State University (MSU); Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Secretary Moniz Announces New Biofuels Projects to Drive Cost Reductions,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Moniz Announces New Biofuels Projects to Drive Cost Secretary Moniz Announces New Biofuels Projects to Drive Cost Reductions, Technological Breakthroughs Secretary Moniz Announces New Biofuels Projects to Drive Cost Reductions, Technological Breakthroughs August 1, 2013 - 2:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - During remarks at the Energy Department's Biomass 2013 annual conference, Secretary Moniz today highlighted the important role biofuels play in the Administration's Climate Action Plan to increase our energy security and reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. Secretary Moniz also announced over $22 million in new investments to help develop cost-competitive algae fuels and streamline the biomass feedstock supply chain for advanced biofuels. "By partnering with industry and universities, we can help make clean,

219

Secretary Moniz Announces New Biofuels Projects to Drive Cost Reductions,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moniz Announces New Biofuels Projects to Drive Cost Moniz Announces New Biofuels Projects to Drive Cost Reductions, Technological Breakthroughs Secretary Moniz Announces New Biofuels Projects to Drive Cost Reductions, Technological Breakthroughs August 1, 2013 - 2:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - During remarks at the Energy Department's Biomass 2013 annual conference, Secretary Moniz today highlighted the important role biofuels play in the Administration's Climate Action Plan to increase our energy security and reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. Secretary Moniz also announced over $22 million in new investments to help develop cost-competitive algae fuels and streamline the biomass feedstock supply chain for advanced biofuels. "By partnering with industry and universities, we can help make clean,

220

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the literature provides cost estimates of actual stations.Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways -Appendix A: Summary of Cost Estimates for 10 Station Types

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of Congestion Costs. The Electricity Journal 17,Incremental Transmission Costs Due to Wind Power. Rockville,and Intermittency Really Cost? Supply Curves for Electricity

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Cost of a Ride: The Effects of Densities on Fixed-Guideway Transit Ridership and Capital Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rail transit capital cost study update final. Washington,2005). Managing Capital Costs of Major Federally Fundedin US rail transit project cost overrun. Transportation

Guerra, Erick; Cervero, Robert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. It is prepared in accordance with the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, Section 57(b)(2)). Projected production estimates of U.S. crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects U.S. domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted drilling expenditures and average drilling costs to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

NONE

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

224

2011 Summer Transportation Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Key factors driving the short-term outlook. 2011 Summer Transportation Fuels Outlook. 2 • Disruption of crude oil and liquefied natural gas supply from

225

Costs of lithium-ion batteries for vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the most promising battery types under development for use in both pure electric and hybrid electric vehicles is the lithium-ion battery. These batteries are well on their way to meeting the challenging technical goals that have been set for vehicle batteries. However, they are still far from achieving the current cost goals. The Center for Transportation Research at Argonne National Laboratory undertook a project for the US Department of Energy to estimate the costs of lithium-ion batteries and to project how these costs might change over time, with the aid of research and development. Cost reductions could be expected as the result of material substitution, economies of scale in production, design improvements, and/or development of new material supplies. The most significant contributions to costs are found to be associated with battery materials. For the pure electric vehicle, the battery cost exceeds the cost goal of the US Advanced Battery Consortium by about $3,500, which is certainly enough to significantly affect the marketability of the vehicle. For the hybrid, however, the total cost of the battery is much smaller, exceeding the cost goal of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles by only about $800, perhaps not enough to deter a potential buyer from purchasing the power-assist hybrid.

Gaines, L.; Cuenca, R.

2000-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

226

Proceedings of the Institute of Transportation 50th Birthday Symposium April 23-24, 1998 The Transportation Enterprise: Challenges of ther 21st Century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study of the social costs of transportation (see work byand Costs of Transportation: Review and Prospects,” “Technical Change in Transportation: Social

Bertini, Robert L.; Orrick, Phyllis

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Supply Monthly, October 2011 11 Table 4. U.S. Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum ...

228

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 12. PAD District 2 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-May 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply...

229

The Social-Cost Calculator (SCC): Documentation of Methods and Data, and Case Study of Sacramento  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

social costs and external costs for different transportationestimating social and external costs of transportation, thetransportation plans, I have developed an Excel Workbook, called the “Social Cost

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

THE SOCIAL-COST CALCULATOR (SCC): DOCUMENTATION OF METHODS AND DATA, AND CASE STUDY OF SACRAMENTO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

social costs and external costs for different transportationestimating social and external costs of transportation, thetransportation plans, I have developed an Excel Workbook, called the “Social Cost

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale in the United States, or sell U.S. gas to foreign consumers. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes unconventional gas recovery from low permeability formations of sandstone and shale, and coalbeds. Foreign gas transactions may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico) or transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 89 Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Report #:DOE/EIA-0554(2006) Release date: March 2006

232

Petroleum Supply Monthly, July 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

Not Available

1990-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

233

1992 Conversion Resources Supply Document  

SciTech Connect

In recent years conservation of electric power has become an integral part of utility planning. The 1980 Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Northwest Power Act) requires that the region consider conservation potential in planning acquisitions of resources to meet load growth. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) developed its first estimates of conservation potential in 1982. Since that time BPA has updated its conservation supply analyses as a part of its Resource Program and other planning efforts. Major updates were published in 1985 and in January 1990. This 1992 document presents updated supply curves, which are estimates of the savings potential over time (cumulative savings) at different cost levels of energy conservation measures (ECMs). ECMs are devices, pieces of equipment, or actions that increase the efficiency of electricity use and reduce the amount of electricity used by end-use equipment.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Updated U.S. Geothermal Supply Characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper documents the approach taken to characterize and represent an updated assessment of U.S. geothermal supply for use in forecasting the penetration of geothermal electrical generation in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). This work is motivated by several factors: The supply characterization used as the basis of several recent U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) forecasts of geothermal capacity is outdated; additional geothermal resource assessments have been published; and a new costing tool that incorporates current technology, engineering practices, and associated costs has been released.

Petty, S.; Porro, G.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Building a More Efficient Industrial Supply Chain | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Efficient Industrial Supply Chain More Efficient Industrial Supply Chain Building a More Efficient Industrial Supply Chain November 7, 2011 - 3:06pm Addthis This infographic highlights some of the ways businesses can save money at each step of the energy supply chain. Many companies can identify low-cost ways to reduce energy costs in electricity generation, electricity transmission, industrial processes, product delivery, and retail sales. This infographic highlights some of the ways businesses can save money at each step of the energy supply chain. Many companies can identify low-cost ways to reduce energy costs in electricity generation, electricity transmission, industrial processes, product delivery, and retail sales. Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs

236

Petroleum supply monthly, June 1993  

SciTech Connect

Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. The tables and figures ih the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. Most time series include preliminary estimates for one month based on the Weekly Petroleum Supply Reporting System; statistics based on the most recent data from the Monthly Petroleum Supply Reporting System (MPSRS); and statistics published in prior issues of the PSM and PSA. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. In most cases, the statistics are presented for several geographic areas - - the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia), five PAD Districts, and 12 Refining Districts. At the US and PAD District level, the total volume and the daily rate of activities are presented. The statistics are developed from monthly survey forms submitted by respondents to the EIA and from data provided firom other sources.

Not Available

1993-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

237

The Impact of Biomass Feedstock Supply Variability on the Delivered Price to a Biorefinery in the Peace River Region of Alberta, Canada  

SciTech Connect

Agricultural residue feedstock availability in a given region can vary significantly over the 20 25 year lifetime of a biorefinery. Since delivered price of biomass feedstock to a biorefinery is related to the distance travelled and equipment optimization, and transportation distance increases as productivity decreases, productivity is a primary determinant of feedstock price. Using the Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics (IBSAL) modeling environment and a standard round bale harvest and delivery scenario, harvest and delivery price were modelled for minimum, average, and maximum yields at four potential biorefinery sites in the Peace River region of Alberta, Canada. Biorefinery capacities ranged from 50,000 to 500,000 tonnes per year. Delivery cost is a linear function of transportation distance and can be combined with a polynomial harvest function to create a generalized delivered cost function for agricultural residues. The range in delivered cost is substantial and is an important consideration for the operating costs of a biorefinery.

Stephen, Jamie [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Bi, X.T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Kloeck, T. [Alberta Agriculture; Townley-Smith, Lawrence [AAFC; Stumborg, Mark [AAFC

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

CBTL Design Case Summary Conventional Feedstock Supply System - Herbaceous  

SciTech Connect

A conventional bale feedstock design has been established that represents supply system technologies, costs, and logistics that are achievable today for supplying herbaceous feedstocks as a blendstock with coal for energy production. Efforts are made to identify bottlenecks and optimize the efficiency and capacities of this supply system, within the constraints of existing local feedstock supplies, equipment, and permitting requirements. The feedstock supply system logistics operations encompass all of the activities necessary to move herbaceous biomass feedstock from the production location to the conversion reactor ready for blending and insertion. This supply system includes operations that are currently available such that costs and logistics are reasonable and reliable. The system modeled for this research project includes the uses of field-dried corn stover or switchgrass as a feedstock to annually supply an 800,000 DM ton conversion facility.

Christopher T. Wright; Erin M. Searcy

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Hazardous Materials Transportation RNL has a staff with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radioactive Waste Management plan the transportation system for the shipment of spent nuclear fuel and high Systems Logistics Management Supply Chain Management Modeling and Simulation Transportation Operations, and testing Detailed simulation of loading, transportation, and maintenance facilities for the transportation

240

Life-cycle Environmental Inventory of Passenger Transportation in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects and Social Costs of Road Transport; Transportation The Social Costs of Intercity Passenger  Transportation: A Transportation Research Center, Knoxville, TN.   [Delucchi 1997] Delucchi, M. ; The Annualized Social Cost 

Chester, Mikhail V

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supply Supply Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 11, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million barrels per day. The data is broken down into crude oil, other petroleum supply, other non petroleum supply and liquid fuel consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO disposition EIA liquid fuels Supply Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Liquid Fuels Supply and Disposition- Reference Case (xls, 117 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License

242

Petroleum supply monthly, with data from June 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Division (PSD) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) collects and published information on petroleum supply and disposition in the United States. The information is collected through a series of surveys that make up the Petroleum Supply Reporting System (PSRS). The PSRS data are published in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM), and Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). This report presents information on crude oil production, crude oil imports and exports, refinery operations, natural gas processing, transportation, and oxygenate data.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of...

244

Cost Effectiveness of Cleaning Techniques for Controlling Human-based Transport of Invasive Exotic Plants on Electric Transmission L ine Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a broad overview of accomplishments over the first 3 months of a project to define the cost effectiveness of cleaning techniques on electric transmission rights of way aimed at controlling the spread of invasive exotic (IE) vegetation. It includes the results of a brief literature search of cleaning techniques.BackgroundA science basis for process and procedure to cost effectively clean personnel and equipment so as to reduce the ...

2012-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

245

Magnets and Power Supplies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bibliography Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Longitudinal Bibliography Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Longitudinal bunch profile and Magnets and Power Supplies Dipole Magnets and Power Supplies Value Dipole Number 80+1 No. of power supplies 1 Magnetic length 3.06 m Core length 3.00 m Bending radius 38.9611 m Power supply limit 500.0 A Field at 7 GeV 0.599 T Dipole trim coils Number 80+1 No. of power supplies 80 Magnetic length 3.06 m Core length 3.00 m Power supply limit 20.0 A Maximum field 0.04 T Horizontal Correction Dipoles Number 317 No. of power supplies 317 Magnetic length 0.160 m Core length 0.07 m Power supply limit 150.0 A Maximum field 0.16 T Max. deflection at 7 GeV 1.1 mrad Vertical Corrector Dipoles Number 317 No. of power supplies 317

246

Electricity Supply Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity Supply Sector Part 1 of 6 Supporting Documents Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary

247

Supplying Water Social Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Handbook of Engaged Learning Projects SUPPLYING OUR WATER NEEDS: Africa Project Summary Scenario Student Pages References Index SubjectContent Area: World CulturesSocial Studies...

248

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Supply Monthly, October 2011 49 Table 37. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD District, ...

249

Power supply apparatus  

SciTech Connect

The outputs of a plurality of modules or generators of electrical energy, such as fuel cells, chemical storage batteries, solar cells, MHD generators and the like, whose outputs are different are consolidated efficiently. The modules supply a power distribution system through an inverter. The efficiency is achieved by interconnecting the modules with an alternating voltage supply and electronic valves so controlled that the alternating-voltage supply absorbs power from modules whose output voltage is greater than the voltage at which the inverter operates and supplies this power as a booster to modules whose output voltage is less than the voltage at which the inverter operates.

Dickey, D. E.

1984-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

250

ICT Supply Chain Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ICT Supply Chain Risk Management Manager's Forum ... ICT Supply Chain Risk Management National Institute of Standards and Technology Page 6. ...

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

251

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Accuracy of published data in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, the Petroleum Supply Monthly, and the Petroleum Supply Annual.

Tammy G. Heppner

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

252

Development of the Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics Model (IBSAL)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Integrated Biomass Supply & Logistics (IBSAL) model is a dynamic (time dependent) model of operations that involve collection, harvest, storage, preprocessing, and transportation of feedstock for use at a biorefinery. The model uses mathematical equations to represent individual unit operations. These unit operations can be assembled by the user to represent the working rate of equipment and queues to represent storage at facilities. The model calculates itemized costs, energy input, and carbon emissions. It estimates resource requirements and operational characteristics of the entire supply infrastructure. Weather plays an important role in biomass management and thus in IBSAL, dictating the moisture content of biomass and whether or not it can be harvested on a given day. The model calculates net biomass yield based on a soil conservation allowance (for crop residue) and dry matter losses during harvest and storage. This publication outlines the development of the model and provides examples of corn stover harvest and logistics.

Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Supply chain network optimization : low volume industrial chemical product  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The chemical industry is a highly competitive and low margin industry. Chemical transportation faces stringent safety regulations meaning that Cost-To-Serve (C2S), costs associated with products net flow from manufacturers ...

Dacha, Fred (Frederick Omondi)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vehicles: Social costs and bene®ts in France. TransportationTransportation Research Part D 6 (2001) 371±404 Table 5 The social cost

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Supply Basins...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Major Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors, 2008 U.S. Natural Gas Transporation Corridors out of Major...

256

Supply and demand planning for crude oil procurement in refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The upstream petroleum supply chain is inefficient and uneconomical because of the independence of the four complex and fragmented functions which comprise it. Crude oil exploration, trading, transportation, and refining ...

Nnadili, Beatrice N. (Beatrice Nne)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Demand management : a cross-industry analysis of supply-demand planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Globalization increases product variety and shortens product life cycles. These lead to an increase in demand uncertainty and variability. Outsourcing to low-cost countries increases supply lead-time and supply uncertainty ...

Tan, Peng Kuan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Rail transport. trends in energy efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing cost and insecure future supply of diesel fuel have led the U.S. railroad industry to continuously improve on its already efficient use of energy. Among such improvements that are planned or in progress are a fuel-efficient version of a mainline engine, which should save 13,200 gal/yr of fuel; and lightweight coal cars and freight-car trucks, which offer fuel-saving opportunities. The use of synthetic fuels such as methanol-from-coal or all-electric locomotive on a broad scale is unlikely within the next 20 yr, but an increased use of synthetic fuels in other large fuel-consuming transport modes, notably cars, would ease the rail industry's future diesel fuel supply problems. Other fuel-saving factors to consider, such as proper train-operating procedures and the use of the best routes; and the new design of rail cars are also discussed.

Eldridge, C.C.; Van Gorp, P.H.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Low Cost Carbon Fiber.pub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies Research Brief Background The automotive industry has long been identified by carbon fiber manufacturers as a market with substantial growth potential. When manufactured with carbon fiber as opposed to traditional materials such as steel, automotive parts are able to achieve requisite levels of strength and stiffness with significantly less overall vehicle weight. These potential large reductions in vehicle weight, in turn, afford the

260

CBTL Design Case Summary Conventional Feedstock Supply System - Woody  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conventional woody feedstock design has been developed that represents supply system technologies, costs, and logistics that are achievable today for supplying woody biomass as a blendstock with coal for energy production. Efforts are made to identify bottlenecks and optimize the efficiency and capacities of this supply system, within the constraints and consideration of existing local feedstock supplies, equipment, and permitting requirements. The feedstock supply system logistics operations encompass all of the activities necessary to move woody biomass from the production location to the conversion reactor ready for blending and insertion. This supply system includes operations that are currently available such that costs and logistics are reasonable and reliable. The system modeled for this research project includes the use of the slash stream since it is a more conservative analysis and represents the material actually used in the experimental part of the project.

Christopher T. Wright; Erin M. Searcy

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Supply chain management simulation: modelling a continuous process with discrete simulation techniques and its application to LNG supply chains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the problem of modelling an LNG supply chain efficiently. The production, processing, transportation and consumption of LNG (Liquid National Gas) and the associated products are a topic of major interest in the energy industry. While ...

Niels Stchedroff; Russell C. H. Cheng

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Logistics & Supply Chain Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the logistics industry as the largest growing sector of the transportation industry. Start your own home-based

Asaithambi, Asai

263

Analysis of global channel costs for the pharmaceutical industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The pharmaceutical industry creates products which often have more than one supply chain channel, defined as a route through the supply chain network from sourcing to the end market. Each channel's specific cost characteristics ...

Rimling, Eric C. (Eric Christopher)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Optimization of Supply Chain Management and Facility Location Selection for a Biorefinery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If renewable energy and biofuels are to attain success in the market place, each step of their production and the system as a whole must be optimized to increase material and energy efficiency, reduce production cost and create a competitive alternative to fossil fuels. Systems optimization techniques may be applied to product selection, process design and integration, feedstock procurement and supply chain management to improve performance. This work addresses two problems facing a biorefinery: technology selection and feedstock scheduling in the face of varying feedstock supply and cost. Also addressed is the optimization of a biorefinery supply chain with respect to distributed processing of biomass to bio-products via preprocessing hubs versus centralized processing and facility location selection. Two formulations are proposed that present a systematic approach to address each problem. Case studies are included to demonstrate model capabilities for both formulations. The scheduling model results display model sensitivity to feedstock price and transport distance penalized through carbon dioxide emissions. The distributed model shows that hubs may be used to extend the operating radius of a biorefinery and thereby increase profits.

Bowling, Ian Michael

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 19. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 393 - - - - 330 -111 -46 4 562 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 406 0 2 15 -333 - - 0 20 9 61 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 58 0 - - - -33 - - 0 6 9 10 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 348 - - 2 15 -299 - -

266

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 23. PAD District 5 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,197 - - - - 1,186 - -47 -4 2,340 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 69 0 14 4 - - - -60 83 20 43 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 32 0 - - - - - - -1 26 2 5 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 37 - - 14 4 - - - -59

267

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 September 2013 Table 20. PAD District 4 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 511 - - - - 289 -169 -49 4 579 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 316 0 13 11 -264 - - 2 16 15 44 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 50 0 - - 0 -38 - - 0 6 13 -7 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

268

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 7. PAD District 1 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 24 - - - - 854 -10 42 -28 935 3 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 42 0 27 67 119 - - -30 26 1 259 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 7 0 - - - - - - 0 - 0 7 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 35 - - 27 67 119 - - -30 26

269

Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Agency/Company /Organization: Northwest Power and Conservation Council Sector: Energy Focus Area: Conventional Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Industry, Transportation, Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset, Publications Website: www.nwcouncil.org/energy/grac/20090130_Supply%20Curves_NWPCC_FINAL.pdf Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Screenshot References: Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves[1] Background "The ECL supply curve model includes data on potential emission reductions for approximately 60 separate technology options. It allows the examination of multiple scenarios involving the inclusion or exclusion of technology

270

Crude oil supply curves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-run cost curves shift over time as depletion counters increasing knowledge. Under competition, a rightward (leftward) shift indicates lower (higher) cost and greater (lesser) productivity. A simple coefficient captures ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil and gas supply module (OGSM) consists of a series of process submodules that project the availability of: oil and gas supply module (OGSM) consists of a series of process submodules that project the availability of: Domestic crude oil production and dry natural gas production from onshore, offshore, and Alaskan reservoirs Imported pipeline-quality gas from Mexico and Canada Imported liquefied natural gas. The OGSM regions are shown in Figure 12. Figure 12. Oil and Gas Supply Module Regions The driving assumption of OGSM is that domestic oil and gas exploration and development are undertaken if the discounted present value of the recovered resources at least covers the present value of taxes and the cost of capital, exploration, development, and production. In contrast, international gas trade is determined in part by scenario-dependent, noneconomic factors. Crude oil is transported to refineries, which are simulated in the petroleum market module, for conversion and blending into refined petroleum products. The individual submodules of the oil and gas supply module are solved independently, with feedbacks achieved through NEMS solution iterations (Figure 13).

272

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Ending Stocks by PAD District, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Process PAD Districts U.S. Total 1 2 3 4 5 Total Daily Average Supply Field Production...

273

European supply chain study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction: Supply chain management has been defined as, "..a set of approaches utilized to efficiently integrate suppliers, manufacturers, warehouses and stores, so that merchandise is produced and distributed at the ...

Puri, Mohitkumar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6...

275

Benthic Microbial Fuel Cell Persistent power supply for in-water ...  

Benthic Microbial Fuel Cell Persistent power supply for in-water sensors ... and high-density sensor arrays where the cost of battery replacement is high.

276

Comparing large scale CCS deployment potential in the USA and China: a detailed analysis based on country-specific CO2 transport & storage cost curves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States and China are the two largest emitters of greenhouse gases in the world and their projected continued growth and reliance on fossil fuels, especially coal, make them strong candidates for CCS. Previous work has revealed that both nations have over 1600 large electric utility and other industrial point CO2 sources as well as very large CO2 storage resources on the order of 2,000 billion metric tons (Gt) of onshore storage capacity. In each case, the vast majority of this capacity is found in deep saline formations. In both the USA and China, candidate storage reservoirs are likely to be accessible by most sources with over 80% of these large industrial CO2 sources having a CO2 storage option within just 80 km. This suggests a strong potential for CCS deployment as a meaningful option to efforts to reduce CO2 emissions from these large, vibrant economies. However, while the USA and China possess many similarities with regards to the potential value that CCS might provide, including the range of costs at which CCS may be available to most large CO2 sources in each nation, there are a number of more subtle differences that may help us to understand the ways in which CCS deployment may differ between these two countries in order for the USA and China to work together - and in step with the rest of the world - to most efficiently reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This paper details the first ever analysis of CCS deployment costs in these two countries based on methodologically comparable CO2 source and sink inventories, economic analysis, geospatial source-sink matching and cost curve modeling. This type of analysis provides a valuable insight into the degree to which early and sustained opportunities for climate change mitigation via commercial-scale CCS are available to the two countries, and could facilitate greater collaboration in areas where those opportunities overlap.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.; Dooley, James J.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

277

LNG transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the beginning of 1965, the participants to the starting up of first French LNG transportation system between ARZEW and LE HAVRE were indeed pioneers when they started the cool-down of the three tanks of LE HAVRE, with a LNG freight delivered by old liberty-ship ''BEAUVAIS''. Could they forecast the development of LNG industry in FRANCE and in the world and imagine that modest 'JULES VERNE' and his two english brothers would have, 25 years later, 80 successors - more than five times as big, for the main part of them, that 12 liquefaction plants would be running in the world, supplying about twenty LNG terminals. For the first time, a country - FRANCE - can draw the lessons from the exploitation of the 3 LNG transportation systems during a long period. That is the subject of the present paper.

Picard, J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007. "Utility Wind Integration and Operating Impact Statethat the integration of 20% wind into US electricity marketsand integration costs, Figure 8 provides a supply curve for wind

Wiser, Ryan H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

A Supply Chain Network Perspective for Electric Power Generation, Supply, Transmission, and Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and less costly than older coal-fired power plants. In addition, technological advances in electricity, supply, trans- mission, and consumption is developed. The model is sufficiently general to handle the economics of power production. For example, new gas-fired combined cycle power plants are more effi- cient

Nagurney, Anna

280

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES SERIES: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Learning from Los Angeles: Transport, Urban Form, and Air Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

high social costs, transportation policymakers shouldsocial costs of the automobile, a wide variety of transportationsocial costs, such options would occur without major public expenditures end woutd provide jobs for manymore workers in the transportation

Wachs, Martin

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Petroleum supply annual 1996: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1996 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Capacity; each with final annual data. The summary statistics section show 16 years of data depicting the balance between supply, disposition and ending stocks for various commodities including crude oil, motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, jet fuel propane/propylene, and liquefied petroleum gases. The detailed statistics section provide 1996 detailed statistics on supply and disposition, refinery operations, imports and exports, stocks, and transportation of crude oil and petroleum products. The refinery capacity contain listings of refineries and associated crude oil distillation and downstream capacities by State, as of January 1, 1997, as well as summaries of corporate refinery capacities and refinery storage capacities. In addition, refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation for 1996 are provided. Also included are fuels consumed at refineries, and lists of shutdowns, sales, reactivations, and mergers during 1995 and 1996. 16 figs., 59 tabs.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 September 2013 Table 10. PAD District 2 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 366,285 - - - - 501,418 159,175 -109,633 -12,929 918,349 11,825 0 102,610 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 122,918 -4,579 37,556 21,926 4,444 - - 15,132 24,244 34,819 108,070 58,830 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

284

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20 20 September 2013 Table 14. PAD District 3 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 1,188,751 - - - - 1,015,091 -112,708 94,064 20,399 2,158,191 6,608 0 882,207 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 440,766 -88 123,986 10,625 46,383 - - 16,960 76,972 72,880 454,860 114,138 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

285

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 2. U.S. Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 2,003,948 - - - - 2,123,490 65,265 6,899 4,157,486 28,318 0 1,067,149 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 686,936 -4,909 195,516 47,812 - - 36,219 127,051 118,364 643,721 189,672 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 92,842 -4,909 - - 10,243 - -

286

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.PDF 1.PDF Table 11. PAD District 5 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 36,593 - - - - 31,429 - 4,534 890 71,666 - 0 55,877 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,154 -11 1,013 192 - - - -786 2,587 629 918 3,544 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,013 -11 - - - - - - -35 842 110 85 36 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

287

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE7.PDF TABLE7.PDF Table 7. PAD District 3 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 109,919 - - - - 142,073 -20,272 -3,481 6,003 222,236 - 0 858,776 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 43,678 -17 9,648 1,838 7,546 - - -2,299 8,340 4,663 51,989 65,215 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 4,840 -17 - - 1,688 -3,010 - -

288

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 September 2013 Table 8. PAD District 1 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 32 - - - - 843 -1 230 8 1,061 35 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 71 0 45 40 77 - - 1 16 10 205 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 12 0 - - 1 0 - - 0 0 2 9 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

289

Petroleum Supply Monthly Archives  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Supply Monthly Petroleum Supply Monthly Petroleum Supply Monthly Archives With Data for December 2011 | Release Date: February 29, 2012 Changes to Table 26. "Production of Crude Oil by PAD District and State": Current State-level data are now included in Table 26, in addition to current U.S. and PAD District sums. State offshore production for Louisiana, Texas, Alaska, and California, which are included in the State totals, are no longer reported separately in a "State Offshore Production" category. Previously, State-level values lagged 2 months behind the U.S. and PAD District values. Beginning with this publication, they will be on the same cycle. Also included in this publication are two additional pages for Table 26 that provide October and November data. With the release of

290

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 3. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 5,877 - - - - 8,716 83 -218 14,841 53 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,351 -20 372 252 - - -417 566 206 2,600 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 296 -20 - - 78 - - 37 172 71 75 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 2,055 - - 372 174 - - -454 394 135 2,525

291

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 September 2013 Table 22. PAD District 5 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 300,668 - - - - 297,837 - 31,342 -3,713 633,292 267 0 52,719 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 17,739 -73 18,288 1,401 - - - 3,536 17,170 3,791 12,858 8,270 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 7,914

292

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. TABLE1.PDF 1. TABLE1.PDF Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 190,109 - - - - 264,348 6,359 12,794 445,596 2,425 0 1,039,424 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 73,905 -587 13,044 6,935 - - -11,335 15,883 8,313 80,436 118,039 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 8,824 -587 - - 1,699 - - -805 4,946 2,754 3,041 16,791 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

293

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.PDF 2.PDF Table 12. PAD District 5 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,180 - - - - 1,014 - 146 29 2,312 - 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 69 0 33 6 - - - -25 83 20 30 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 33 0 - - - - - - -1 27 4 3 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 37 - - 33 6 - - - -24 56 17 27 Ethane/Ethylene

294

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 233,810 - - - - 237,344 8,334 7,688 468,825 2,975 0 1,067,149 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 81,196 -552 19,023 4,020 - - 3,027 16,794 13,937 69,929 189,672 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 11,167 -552 - - 772 - - -700 5,666 2,989 3,432 18,036 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

295

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 182,188 - - - - 270,188 2,576 -6,767 460,074 1,646 0 1,026,829 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 72,869 -607 11,545 7,801 - - -12,921 17,534 6,391 80,604 128,709 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 9,170 -607 - - 2,421 - - 1,146 5,321 2,200 2,317 17,598 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

296

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 17. PAD District 4 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 12,175 - - - - 10,226 -3,426 -1,436 132 17,407 1 0 15,969 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 12,584 -10 52 460 -10,314 - - -12 611 282 1,891 1,375 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,788 -10 - - - -1,036 - - -15 174 273 310 180 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

297

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 15. PAD District 3 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 3,327 - - - - 4,646 -720 39 -191 7,482 - 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,380 -1 304 84 227 - - -113 306 108 1,693 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 155 -1 - - 77 -58 - - 35 106 1 31 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

298

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 9. PAD District 2 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 29,019 - - - - 52,699 26,041 2,973 12 109,175 1,544 0 93,189 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 14,079 -560 812 2,541 -423 - - -6,605 4,051 2,114 16,889 48,197 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,354 -560 - - 21 2,843 - - 110 1,049

299

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 September 2013 Table 16. PAD District 3 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 4,354 - - - - 3,718 -413 345 75 7,905 24 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,615 0 454 39 170 - - 62 282 267 1,666 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 195 0 - - 36 -65 - - 15 113 4 35 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

300

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE9.PDF TABLE9.PDF Table 9. PAD District 4 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 12,961 - - - - 10,783 -3,879 896 2,868 17,893 0 0 18,695 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 12,770 -9 127 502 -11,116 - - -50 621 280 1,423 1,326 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,484 -9 - - - -1,152 - - 7 122 264 -70 187 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.PDF .PDF Table 3. PAD District 1 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 734 - - - - 26,368 419 -1,209 627 25,554 130 0 10,529 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,314 -6 923 1,606 2,621 - - -1,556 707 53 7,254 6,409 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 213 -6 - - - - - - 3 5 6 193 34 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

302

Alternate Water Supply System  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Alternate Water Supply Alternate Water Supply System Flushing Report Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site January 2008 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1570 2008 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1570-2008 Alternate Water Supply System Flushing Report Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site January 2008 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally left blank

303

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE5.PDF TABLE5.PDF Table 5. PAD District 2 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 29,902 - - - - 53,695 23,732 5,619 2,406 108,247 2,295 0 95,547 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 13,989 -544 1,333 2,797 949 - - -6,644 3,628 2,687 18,853 41,545 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,274 -544 - - 11 4,162 - - 233 966

304

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 4. U.S. Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 7,340 - - - - 7,778 239 25 15,229 104 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,516 -18 716 175 - - 133 465 434 2,358 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 340 -18 - - 38 - - 20 168 134 38 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 2,176 - - 716

305

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 September 2013 Table 18. PAD District 4 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 139,573 - - - - 79,019 -46,108 -13,333 1,073 158,068 10 0 19,287 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 86,184 -86 3,535 3,052 -71,945 - - 423 4,378 4,054 11,885 1,893 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

306

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

30 30 September 2013 Table 24. PAD District 5 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,101 - - - - 1,091 - 115 -14 2,320 1 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 65 0 67 5 - - - 13 63 14 47 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 29 0 - - - - - - 1 21 4 3 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

307

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 5. PAD District 1 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 751 - - - - 26,471 -300 1,308 -869 28,999 100 0 9,902 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,313 -7 839 2,091 3,702 - - -929 816 33 8,018 7,618 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 225 -7 - - - - - - 3 - 11 204 31 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

308

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 6. PAD District 1 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 8,672 - - - - 230,125 -359 62,824 2,069 289,586 9,606 0 10,326 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 19,329 -83 12,151 10,808 21,118 - - 168 4,287 2,821 56,047 6,541 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

309

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.PDF .PDF Table 2. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 6,133 - - - - 8,527 205 413 14,374 78 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,384 -19 421 224 - - -366 512 268 2,595 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 285 -19 - - 55 - - -26 160 89 98 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 2,099 - - 421 169 - - -340 353 179 2,497 Ethane/Ethylene

310

Hazardous Materials Transportation RNL has a staff with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radioactive Waste Management plan the transportation system for the shipment of spent nuclear fuel and high Systems Logistics Management Supply Chain Management Modeling and Simulation Transportation Operations, design, and testing · Detailed simulation of loading, transportation, and maintenance facilities

311

Calculating Horsepower Requirements and Sizing Supply Pipelines for Irrigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pumping costs are often one of the largest single expenses in irrigated agriculture. This publication explains how to lower pumping costs by calculating horsepower requirements and sizing supply pipelines correctly. Examples take the reader through a step-by-step process. A special section deals with selecting PVC pipe.

Fipps, Guy

1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

312

On Integrating Theories of International Economics in the Strategic Planning of Global Supply Chains and Dynamic Supply Chain Reconfiguration with Capacity Expansion and Contraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation discusses two independent topics. The first part of the dissertation relates three theories of international economics (comparative advantage, competitive advantage, and competitiveness), and formulates the thesis that incorporating them in the form of readily available individual competitiveness indicators in OR/MS models offers promise to enhance decision-support for the strategic planning of global supply chains in general, and for locating facilities in particular. The objectives of this research were to relate each of these theories and to describe their interrelationships; to describe measures provided by two well-known annual competitiveness reports; and to illustrate application of the theories as a means of supporting the thesis of the research, and justifying the research questions we pose for future research. While this research discusses topics relative to the broader background of global supply chain design, it illustrates applications associated with facility location, a component of the global supply chain design. In the last chapter of the first part of the dissertation, we provide a vision to foster future research that will enhance the profitability of international enterprises under NAFTA. The second part of the dissertation deals with the DSCR model with capacity expansion and contraction. The strategic dynamic supply chain reconfiguration (DSCR) problem is to prescribe the location and capacity of each facility, select links used for transportation, and plan material flows through the supply chain, including production, inventory, backorder, and outsourcing levels. The objective is to minimize total cost. The configuration must be dynamically redesigned over time to accommodate changing trends in demand and/or costs by opening facilities, expanding and/or contracting their capacities, and closing facilities. The problem involves a multi-period, multi-product, multi-echelon supply chain. Research objectives are alternative formulations of DSCR and tests that identify the computational characteristics of each model to determine if one offers superior solvability in comparison with the others. To achieve the first objective, we present an initial MIP model, a refined model that relates decision variables according to a convenient structure, and branch and price (B&P) schemes for the refined model. We found that the network-based formulation offered superior solvability compared to the traditional formulation.

Lee, Chaehwa

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Supply Chain - Submissions | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submissions Sustainable Supply Chains Submissions Let's Talk About Sustainable Supply Chain You are here Data.gov Communities Sustainable Supply Chain Sustainable Supply...

314

Comparing the Costs of Intermittent and Dispatchable Electricity Generating Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic evaluations of alternative electric generating technologies typically rely on comparisons between their expected life-cycle production costs per unit of electricity supplied. The standard life-cycle cost metric ...

Joskow, Paul L.

315

Supply Chain Landing Page - Be a champion | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Landing Page - Be a champion Landing Page - Be a champion Sustainable Supply Chains Submissions Let's Talk About Sustainable Supply Chain You are here Data.gov » Communities » Sustainable Supply Chain Be a champion The Sustainable Supply Chain Community of Practice seeks champions from industry, academia and non-profits to lead each of the community market sectors. Do you know or are you a member of a leading edge organization that is implementing sustainable supply chain practices within one of the seven current community market sectors? If yes, nominate the organization as a Champion. Sustainable supply chain practices lead to cost savings, risk mitigation, increased competitiveness and innovation and an organization providing such leadership deserves to be recognized! Click here for a description of Champion activities.

316

Hot water supply system  

SciTech Connect

A hot water supply system is described which consists of: a boiler having an exhaust; solar panels; and a frame supporting the solar panels and including a compartment beneath the solar panels, the boiler exhaust termining in the compartment beneath the solar panels, the boiler being within the compartment.

Piper, J.R.

1986-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

317

Power Supplies for Precooler Ring  

SciTech Connect

Eight power supplies will energize the antiproton Precooler ring. there will be two series connected supplies per quadrant. These supplies will power 32 dipole and 19 quadrupole magnets. The resistance and inductance per quadrant is R = 1.4045 Ohms and L = 0.466. Each powr supply will have 12-phase series bridge rectifiers and will be energized from the 480 V 3-phase grid. The total of eight power supplies are numbered IA, IIA, IIIA, IVA, and IB, IIB, IIIB, and IVB. Each quadrant will contain one A and one B supply. A block diagram of the Precooler ring with its power supplies is shown in Figure 1.

Fuja, Raymond; Praeg, Walter

1980-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

318

The Economic and Financial Implications of Supplying a Bioenergy Conversion Facility with Cellulosic Biomass Feedstocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comprehensive analyses are conducted of the holistic farm production-harvesting-transporting-pre-refinery storage supply chain paradigm which represents the totality of important issues affecting the conversion facility front-gate costs of delivered biomass feedstocks. Targeting the Middle Gulf Coast, Edna-Ganado, Texas area, mathematical programming in the form of a cost-minimization linear programming model(Sorghasaurus) is used to assess the financial and economic logistics costs for supplying a hypothetical 30-million gallon conversion facility with high-energy sorghum (HES) and switchgrass (SG) cellulosic biomass feedstock for a 12-month period on a sustainable basis. A corporate biomass feedstock farming entity business organization structure is assumed. Because SG acreage was constrained in the analysis, both HES and SG are in the optimal baseline solution, with the logistics supply chain costs (to the front gate of the conversion facility) totaling $53.60 million on 36,845 acres of HES and 37,225 acres of SG (total farm acreage is 187,760 acres, including HES rotation acres), i.e., $723.67 per harvested acre, $1.7867 per gallon of biofuel produced not including any conversion costs, and $134.01 per dry ton of the requisite 400,000 tons of biomass feedstock. Several sensitivity scenario analyses were conducted, revealing a potential range in these estimates of $84.75-$261.52 per dry ton of biomass feedstock and $1.1300-$3.4870 per gallon of biofuel. These results are predicated on simultaneous consideration of capital and operating costs, trafficable days, timing of operations, machinery and labor constraints, and seasonal harvested biomass feedstock yield relationships. The enhanced accuracy of a comprehensive, detailed analysis as opposed to simplistic approach of extrapolating from crop enterprise budgets are demonstrated. It appears, with the current state of technology, it is uneconomical to produce cellulosic biomass feedstocks in the Middle Gulf Coast, Edna-Ganado, Texas area. That is, the costs estimated in this research for delivering biomass feedstocks to the frontgate of a cellulosic facility are much higher than the $35 per ton the Department of Energy suggests is needed. The several sensitivity scenarios evaluated in this thesis research provides insights in regards to needed degrees of advancements required to enhance the potential economic competitiveness of biomass feedstock logistics in this area.

McLaughlin, Will

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Positron Accumulator Ring (PAR) power supply  

SciTech Connect

The Positron Accumulator Ring (PAR) consists of 8 dipole magnets connected in series. These magnets are energized via one 12-pulse dc power supply. The power supply consists of four phase controlled half-wave wye group converters. Each of the two half-wave converters are connected through an interphase transformer to obtain a full-wave converter with 120{degrees} conduction. The input voltage for these two half-wave converters are 180{degrees} apart. The two full-wave converters are connected in parallel through a third interphase transformer. This type of connection of the converters not only provides the required output current, it also improves the input power factor of the power supply. The output of the wye group converters is filtered through a passive L-R-C filter to reduce the ripple content of the output current. At low current values of the power supply the current ripple is high, thus a large filter is needed, which adds to the cost of the power supply, however at high output current levels, the current ripple is less severe. The large size of the filter can be reduced by adding an anti-parallel rectifier diode(D1) to the output of the power supply. A freewheeling diode(D2) is connected before the choke to circulate the current once the power supply is turned off. In order to measure the current in the magnet a high precision, low drift, zero flux current transductor is used. This transductor senses the magnet current which provides a feedback signal to control the gating of the converter`s thyristors. A true 14 bit Digital to Analog Converter (DAC) is programmed by the control computer for the required current value, providing a reference for the current regulator. Fast correction of the line transients is provided by a relatively fast voltage loop controlled by a high gain slow response current loop.

Fathizadeh, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Energy Minimization Using Multiple Supply Voltages Jui-Ming Chang and Massoud Pedram  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Minimization Using Multiple Supply Voltages Jui-Ming Chang and Massoud Pedram Department and energy costs of these level shifters must be taken into account when comparing a multiple-supply voltage a dynamic programming technique for solv- ing the multiple supply voltage scheduling problem in both non

Pedram, Massoud

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

uring the 1990s, the elec-tricity supply industry in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D uring the 1990s, the elec- tricity supply industry in Latin America underwent profound, according to the Energy Information Administration, the average cost for electricity supply for a consumer by a government that wanted to introduce market-oriented reforms throughout society, electricity supply included

Rudnick, Hugh

322

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

SciTech Connect

Seal durability is critical to achieving the 2010 DOE operational life goals for both stationary and transportation PEM fuel cell stacks. The seal material must be chemically and mechanically stable in an environment consisting of aggressive operating temperatures, humidified gases, and acidic membranes. The seal must also be producible at low cost. Currentlyused seal materials do not meet all these requirements. This project developed and demonstrated a high consistency hydrocarbon rubber seal material that was able to meet the DOE technical and cost targets. Significant emphasis was placed on characterization of the material and full scale molding demonstrations.

Roberts, George; Parsons, Jason; Friedman, Jake

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

323

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

324

Applying modified NSGA-II for bi-objective supply chain problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper minimizes the value of total cost and bullwhip effect in a supply chain. The objectives have been achieved through developing a new multi-objective formulation for minimizing the total cost and minimizing the bullwhip effect of a two-echelon ... Keywords: Crossover, Fuzzy order, Mutation, NSGA-II, Supply chain

Susmita Bandyopadhyay; Ranjan Bhattacharya

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Production cost and supply chain design for advanced biofuels.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The U.S. government encourages the development of biofuel industry through policy and financial support since 1978. Though first generation biofuels (mainly bio-based ethanol) expand rapidly… (more)

Li, Yihua

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Hedging effects of wind on retail electric supply costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the short term, renewables - especially wind - are not as effective as conventional hedges due to uncertain volume and timing as well as possibly poor correlation with high-value periods. In the long term, there are more potential hedging advantages to renewables because conventional financial hedges are not available very far in the future. (author)

Graves, Frank; Litvinova, Julia

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Social Costs of Intercity Passenger Transportation: AEffects and Social Costs of Road Transport, TransportationTransportation Research Center, Knoxville, TN [Delucchi 1997] Delucchi, M. , The Annualized Social Cost

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Supply Stores | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supply Stores Supply Stores Supply Stores DOE Self Service Supply Stores at Headquarters Operated by: Paperclips, Etc. and the Winston-Salem Industries for the Blind DOE Self-Service Supply Stores Hours of Operation: 9:00 a.m. through 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday DOE Supply Stores Locations Location Phone Fax Forrestal Room GA-171 (202) 554-1451 (202) 554-1452 (202) 554-7074 Germantown Room R-008 (301) 515-9109 (301) 515-9206 (301) 515-8751 The stores provide an Office Supply Product inventory that is tailored to meet the DOE customer's requirements. Office Supply items that are not carried in the store inventory can be special ordered, see the Catalog Order Form section below. The stores are operated for the Department of Energy, Office of Administration, Office of Logistics and Facility Operations, for the Supply

329

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 119 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze crude oil and natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 8). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule[1], and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2011), (Washington, DC, 2011). The OGSM provides

330

Simulation of waste processing, transportation, and disposal operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In response to the accelerated cleanup goals of the Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratory (Sandia) has developed and utilized a number of simulation models to represent the processing, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. Sandia, in conjunction with Simulation Dynamics, has developed a Supply Chain model of the cradle to grave management of radioactive waste. Sandia has used this model to assist the Department of Energy in developing a cost effective, regulatory compliant and efficient approach to dispose of waste from 25 sites across the country over the next 35 years. 1

Janis Trone

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Simulation Of Waste Processing, Transportation, And Disposal Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In response to the accelerated cleanup goals of the Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratory (Sandia) has developed and utilized a number of simulation models to represent the processing, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. Sandia, in conjunction with Simulation Dynamics, has developed a Supply Chain model of the cradle to grave management of radioactive waste. Sandia has used this model to assist the Department of Energy in developing a cost effective, regulatory compliant and efficient approach to dispose of waste from 25 sites across the country over the next 35 years.

J. A. Joines; R. R. Barton; K. Kang; P. A. Fishwick; Janis Trone; Angela Guerin

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

January 2012 January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 190,109 - - - - 264,348 6,359 12,794 445,596 2,425 0 1,039,424 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 73,905 -587 13,044 6,935 - - -11,335 15,883 8,313 80,436 118,039 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 8,824 -587 - - 1,699 - - -805 4,946 2,754 3,041 16,791 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 65,081 - - 13,044 5,236 - - -10,530 10,937 5,559 77,395 101,248 Ethane/Ethylene

333

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.PDF 3.PDF Table 13. Crude Oil Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks by PAD District, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Process PAD Districts U.S. Total 1 2 3 4 5 Total Daily Average Supply Field Production .................................................... 734 29,902 109,919 12,961 36,593 190,109 6,133 Alaskan ............................................................. - - - - - - - - - 18,374 593 Lower 48 States ................................................ - - - - - 171,734 5,540 Imports (PAD District of Entry) ............................. 26,368 53,695 142,073 10,783 31,429 264,348 8,527 Commercial ...................................................... 26,368 53,695 142,073 10,783 31,429 264,348 8,527 Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) ................. - - - - - - - Net Receipts .........................................................

334

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2012 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 2,374,021 - - - - 3,120,755 53,567 34,134 5,489,516 24,693 0 1,060,764 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 881,306 -6,534 230,413 62,192 - - 23,894 186,270 115,054 842,159 153,268 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 116,002 -6,534 - - 10,680 - - -4,857 63,596 43,136 18,273 12,739 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 765,304 - - 230,413 51,512 - - 28,751 122,674 71,918

335

Capability Brief_Supply Chain Analysis.pub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chain Analysis Chain Analysis Center for Transportation Analysis 2360 Cherahala Boulevard Knoxville, TN 37932 For more information please contact: Diane Davidson (865) 946-1475 davidsond@ornl.gov Capabilities Brief Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies O RNL has a staff with extensive experience in supply chain analysis and automated support for supply chain systems. ORNL's Capabilities  Optimization modeling for supply chain systems, including:  Facility number and location analysis,  Distribution network configuration,

336

Supply Side Management Kit: Service for Energy Suppliers and Process Industry Customers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Supply Side Management Kit highlights proposed EPRI's services for energy suppliers and process industries in the supply side area. With the onset of electricity deregulation, process industry customers are increasingly looking at reducing energy costs on the supply of energy. The new environment has created significant opportunities for cost-effective purchase, management, generation, utilization, and sale of energy for process industries. This kit discusses the services offered by EPRI to meet its ...

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

337

CONFIRMATION OF COST SHARING OR MATCHING COMMITMENT Data Entry Date  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MATCHING PROJECT DIRECTOR NAME COST SHARING DEPARTMENT AWARD PERIOD PROJECT TITLE PARTICIPATION OF SUNY = Project Director; C = Co-Project Director; Blank = Other Participant OTHER SUNY COSTS: Please indicate any other commitment of SUNY COSTS such as supplies, etc. OTHER COSTS DERIVED FROM NON-SUNY SOURCES: Project

Krovi, Venkat

338

Power supply requirements for a tokamak fusion reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The power supply requirements for a 7-M major radius commercial tokamak reactor have been examined, using a system approach combining models of the reactor and poloidal coil set, plasma burn cycle and MHD calculations, and power supply characteristics and cost data. A conventional system using an MGF set and solid-state rectifier/inverter power supplies was studied in addition to systems using a homopolar generator, superconducting energy storage inductor, and dump resistors. The requirements and cost of the power supplies depend on several factors but most critically on the ohmic heating ramp time used for startup. Long ramp times (approx. > 8 s) seems to be feasible, from the standpoint of resistive volt-second losses, and would appear to make conventional systems quite competitive with nonconventional ones, which require further research and development.

Brooks, J.N.; Kustom, R.L.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

±metal hydride (NiMH) battery costs, several di€erent ``in other cases. The battery cost per mile is low in partstorage energy ± and hence battery cost ± required to supply

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Fuel Cell System Cost for Transportation-2008 Cost Estimate (Book)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Independent review prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (HFCIT) Program Manager.

Not Available

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze crude oil and natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 8). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule[1], and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2011), (Washington, DC, 2011). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum

342

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data by Tammy G. Heppner and Carol L. French Overview Petroleum supply data collected by the Petroleum Division (PD) in the Office of Oil and Gas (OOG)...

343

The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the U.S., 1990-1991: Summary of Theory, Data, Methods, and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

specific transportation projects, the social-cost analysisold analyses of the social costs of transportation in the U.the Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. by

Delucchi, Mark A.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Industry Supply Chain Development (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Supply Chain Development (Ohio) Industry Supply Chain Development (Ohio) Industry Supply Chain Development (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Transportation Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info State Ohio Program Type Grant Program Industry Recruitment/Support Loan Program Provider Ohio Development Services Agency Supply Chain Development programs are focused on targeted industries that have significant growth opportunities for Ohio's existing manufacturing sector from emerging energy resources and technologies. The Office of Energy is currently working on developing the supply chains for the wind,

345

Integrated technical and economic assessments of transport and storage of hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transportation will be a major market for hydrogen because of its great size and the value of energy at the wheels of a vehicle in comparison to its heating value. Hydrogen also offers important potential efficiency gains over hydrocarbon fuels. However, hydrogen end-use technologies will not develop without a reliable hydrogen supply infrastructure. By the same token, reliable infrastructures will not develop without end-use demand. Our task is to analyze the costs of various infrastructure options for providing hydrogen, as the number of vehicles serviced increased from very small numbers initially, to moderate numbers in the mid-term and to determine if a smooth transition may be possible. We will determine viable market sizes for transport and storage options by examining the technologies and the capital and operating costs of these systems, as well as related issues such as safety, construction time, etc. The product of our work will be data based scenarios of the likely transitions to hydrogen fuel, beginning with small and progressing to larger numbers of vehicles. We are working closely with the suppliers of relevant technologies to (1) determine realistic component costs, and (2) to assure availability of our analyses to business. Preliminary analyses indicate that the cost of transport and storage is as important as production cost in determining the cost of hydrogen fuel to the consumer, and that home electrolysis and centrally processed liquid hydrogen may provide hydrogen in the initial stages.

Berry, G.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States); Smith, J.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 February 2012 Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Supply Monthly, ii December 2011 EIA DATA ARE AVAILABLE IN ELECTRONIC FORM All current EIA publications are available on the EIA web site. Users can view and download selected pages or entire reports, search for information, download EIA data and analysis applications, and find out about new EIA information products and services: World Wide Web: http://www.eia.doe.gov FTP: ftp://ftp.eia.doe.gov Customers who do not have access to the Internet may call the National Energy Information Center (NEIC) to request a single print-

347

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

With Data for September 2013 With Data for September 2013 November 2013 Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Supply Monthly, ii September 2013 EIA DATA ARE AVAILABLE IN ELECTRONIC FORM All current EIA publications are available on the EIA web site. Users can view and download selected pages or entire reports, search for information, download EIA data and analysis applications, and find out about new EIA information products and services: World Wide Web: http://www.eia.doe.gov FTP: ftp://ftp.eia.doe.gov Customers who do not have access to the Internet may call the National Energy Information Center (NEIC) to request a single print-

348

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Decemer 2011 Appendix D Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Information on the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve is available from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Petroleum Reserves web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/reserves/heatingoil/. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) inventories now classified as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) are not considered to be in the commercial sector and therefore are excluded from distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics in Energy

349

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 September 2013 Appendix D Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Information on the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve is available from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Petroleum Reserves web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/reserves/heatingoil/. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) inventories now classified as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) are not considered to be in the commercial sector and therefore are excluded from distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics in Energy

350

Reducing US vulnerability to oil supply shocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1990 crisis in the Middle East has raised concern about the United States`s vulnerability to oil supply disruptions. In addition, a number of trends point to increased US dependence on imported oil. Oil imports have increased and production has declined in the United States for the last eight years. Imports now comprise 42 percent of total oil consumption and US dependence on oil imports is projected to increase over the next 20 years. The Energy Modeling Forum forecasts imports to be more than twice domestic production by the year 2010. There are many studies examining the effects of various policies to protect US energy security. Not many consider the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR), which can be a powerful tool in combating energy supply shocks. The SPR can dramatically increase the domestic short run supply elasticity, which has been found to be a key element in the welfare cost of protectionist policies. Upon examining 5 policies the author finds that the SPR together with a protectionist policy works best against a supply disruption. 27 refs., 3 tabs.

Yuecel, M.K. [Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, TX (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. March 10, 2009 - 6:00am Addthis John Lippert Power supplies convert the AC power that you get from your electric company into the DC power consumed by most electronics, including your computer. We expect our power supplies to be safe, reliable, and durable. If they meet those criteria, then they're all alike, except for cost, right? Well, not exactly. You see, there's one other important feature that sets them apart: efficiency. And I don't know about you, but I believe waste is bad. For me, high efficiency is one important feature that's needed for something to be high quality. So isn't it ridiculous that most power

352

Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. March 10, 2009 - 6:00am Addthis John Lippert Power supplies convert the AC power that you get from your electric company into the DC power consumed by most electronics, including your computer. We expect our power supplies to be safe, reliable, and durable. If they meet those criteria, then they're all alike, except for cost, right? Well, not exactly. You see, there's one other important feature that sets them apart: efficiency. And I don't know about you, but I believe waste is bad. For me, high efficiency is one important feature that's needed for something to be high quality. So isn't it ridiculous that most power

353

Petroleum supply monthly, October 1990. [Contains Glossary  

SciTech Connect

Data presented in this report describes the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. 12 figs., 54 tabs.

Not Available

1990-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

354

Petroleum Supply Monthly, September 1990. [Contains glossary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data presented in this PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. 12 figs., 46 tabs.

Whited, D.; Jacobus, P. (eds.)

1990-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

355

Transparent Cost Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transparent Cost Database Transparent Cost Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Transparent Cost Database Agency/Company /Organization: Department of Energy Partner: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, Transportation Topics: Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Resource assessment, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset, Lessons learned/best practices, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Web Application Link: en.openei.org/apps/TCDB/ Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Featured Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/united-states-transparent-cost-databa Language: English The Transparent Cost Database collects program cost and performance

356

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12;· Marginal Cost: ­ Change in total cost ­ Any production process involves fixed and variable costs. As production increases/expands, fixed costs are unchanged, so

Boisvert, Jeff

357

Blood and water; the archaeological excavation and historical analysis of the Wreck of the Industry, a North-American transport sloop chartered by the British army at the end of the Seven Years' War: British colonial navigation and trade to supply Spanish Florida in the eighteenth century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the 10-mer RNA duplex model system a 4-isocyano TEMPO spin-label is individually attached to one strand and two strands are annealed to measure distances. This methodology is limited to systems in which two oligonucleotides are annealed together. To circumvent this limitation and also to explore single-strand dynamics a new methodology was implemented, double spin-labeling. Double spin-labeled single-stranded RNA was investigated as a single-strand and within a duplex via MALDI-TOF-MS, EPR spectroscopy and RP-HPLC. A double spin-labeling strategy in this work will be applicable to large complex RNAs like Group I intron of Tetrahymena thermophilia. Captain Daniel Lawrence, was one of four sloops detailed to serve as a transport to supply the British Florida garrisons. The Industry ran aground on the bar outside of St. Augustine's harbour on May 6, 1764. The transport was carrying six-pound cannons, ammunition and artificer's tools. Further investigation of documents describing eighteenth-century trade and shipping to St. Augustine led to the discovery that the Lawrence family of sea captains provided a vital link between British New York and Spanish St. Augustine. An examination of the materials recovered from Site 8SJ3478 sheds light on exactly what a particular vessel carried during a period of transition in Florida's history.

Franklin, Marianne

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

MODEL BASED BIOMASS SYSTEM DESIGN OF FEEDSTOCK SUPPLY SYSTEMS FOR BIOENERGY PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Engineering feedstock supply systems that deliver affordable, high-quality biomass remains a challenge for the emerging bioenergy industry. Cellulosic biomass is geographically distributed and has diverse physical and chemical properties. Because of this feedstock supply systems that deliver cellulosic biomass resources to biorefineries require integration of a broad set of engineered unit operations. These unit operations include harvest and collection, storage, preprocessing, and transportation processes. Design decisions for each feedstock supply system unit operation impact the engineering design and performance of the other system elements. These interdependencies are further complicated by spatial and temporal variances such as climate conditions and biomass characteristics. This paper develops an integrated model that couples a SQL-based data management engine and systems dynamics models to design and evaluate biomass feedstock supply systems. The integrated model, called the Biomass Logistics Model (BLM), includes a suite of databases that provide 1) engineering performance data for hundreds of equipment systems, 2) spatially explicit labor cost datasets, and 3) local tax and regulation data. The BLM analytic engine is built in the systems dynamics software package PowersimTM. The BLM is designed to work with thermochemical and biochemical based biofuel conversion platforms and accommodates a range of cellulosic biomass types (i.e., herbaceous residues, short- rotation woody and herbaceous energy crops, woody residues, algae, etc.). The BLM simulates the flow of biomass through the entire supply chain, tracking changes in feedstock characteristics (i.e., moisture content, dry matter, ash content, and dry bulk density) as influenced by the various operations in the supply chain. By accounting for all of the equipment that comes into contact with biomass from the point of harvest to the throat of the conversion facility and the change in characteristics, the BLM evaluates economic performance of the engineered system, as well as determining energy consumption and green house gas performance of the design. This paper presents a BLM case study delivering corn stover to produce cellulosic ethanol. The case study utilizes the BLM to model the performance of several feedstock supply system designs. The case study also explores the impact of temporal variations in climate conditions to test the sensitivity of the engineering designs. Results from the case study show that under certain conditions corn stover can be delivered to the cellulosic ethanol biorefinery for $35/dry ton.

David J. Muth, Jr.; Jacob J. Jacobson; Kenneth M. Bryden

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data by Tammy G. Heppner and Carol L. French Overview Petroleum supply data collected by the Petroleum Division (PD) in the Office of Oil and Gas (OOG) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) showed an improvement in the accuracy of the 2005 data from initial estimates, to interim values, to final values. These data were presented in a series of PD products: the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), This Week in Petroleum (TWIP), the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM), and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Weekly estimates in the WPSR and TWIP were the first values available. Figure FE1 illustrates that as reporting and review time passes from the weekly estimates to the interim monthly values to the final petroleum supply values, the EIA is able to produce more accurate petroleum supply data. For the monthly-from-weekly (MFW) data, respondents

360

Assessing Reliability In Hydrogen Supply Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but increasing portion of natural gas supply – As percentagehighly dependent on natural gas supply infrastructure LNGpercentage of natural gas supply Dependence of other systems

McCarthy, Ryan; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Assessing reliability in energy supply systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Term Prospects for Natural Gas Supply. Energy Informationin coming decades, natural gas supply will increasingly facefunctional zones of natural gas supply, such as reserves and

McCarthy, Ryan W.; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Assessing Reliability in Energy Supply Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Term Prospects for Natural Gas Supply. Energy Informationin coming decades, natural gas supply will increasingly facefunctional zones of natural gas supply, such as reserves and

McCarthy, Ryan; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Supplemental Gas Supplies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Supplemental Gas Supplies by State, 1996 (Million Cubic Feet) Table State Synthetic Natural Gas Propane- Air Refinery Gas Biomass Gas Other Total Alabama ...................... 0 18 0 0 0 18 Colorado...................... 0 344 0 0 a 6,443 6,787 Connecticut ................. 0 48 0 0 0 48 Delaware ..................... 0 1 0 0 0 1 Georgia........................ 0 94 0 0 0 94 Hawaii.......................... 2,761 0 0 0 0 2,761 Illinois .......................... 0 488 3,423 0 0 3,912 Indiana......................... 0 539 0 0 b 2,655 3,194 Iowa............................. 0 301 0 0 0 301 Kentucky...................... 0 45 0 0 0 45 Maine........................... 0 61 0 0 0 61 Maryland...................... 0 882 0 0 0 882 Massachusetts ............ 0 426 0 0 0 426 Michigan ...................... 0 0 0 0 c 21,848 21,848 Minnesota.................... 0 709 0 0 0 709 Missouri

364

Switching power supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a repratable capacitor charging, switching power supply. A ferrite transformer steps up a dc input. The transformer primary is in a full bridge configuration utilizing power MOSFETs as the bridge switches. The transformer secondary is fed into a high voltage, full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The transformer is designed to provide adequate leakage inductance to limit capacitor current. The MOSFETs are switched to the variable frequency from 20 to 50 kHz to charge a capacitor from 0.6 kV. The peak current in a transformer primary and secondary is controlled by increasing the pulse width as the capacitor charges. A digital ripple counter counts pulses and after a preselected desired number is reached an up-counter is clocked.

Mihalka, A.M.

1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

365

NNSA TRITIUM SUPPLY CHAIN  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Site plays a critical role in the Tritium Production Supply Chain for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The entire process includes: • Production of Tritium Producing Burnable Absorber Rods (TPBARs) at the Westinghouse WesDyne Nuclear Fuels Plant in Columbia, South Carolina • Production of unobligated Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) at the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) in Portsmouth, Ohio • Irradiation of TPBARs with the LEU at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Watts Bar Reactor • Extraction of tritium from the irradiated TPBARs at the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) at Savannah River Site • Processing the tritium at the Savannah River Site, which includes removal of nonhydrogen species and separation of the hydrogen isotopes of protium, deuterium and tritium.

Wyrick, Steven [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC, USA; Cordaro, Joseph [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC, USA; Founds, Nanette [National Nuclear Security Administration, Albuquerque, NM, USA; Chambellan, Curtis [National Nuclear Security Administration, Albuquerque, NM, USA

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

366

Transportation Costs in Centralized and Decentralized Structure.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Background: Rottne Industri is a Swedish heavy machinery manufacturer whose production process is divided in three manufacturing plants. The production takes place in the… (more)

Monteforte, Giorgio; Monits, Veronika

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Advanced Accessory Power Supply Topologies  

SciTech Connect

This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) began December 8, 2000 and ended September 30, 2009. The total funding provided by the Participant (General Motors Advanced Technology Vehicles [GM]) during the course of the CRADA totaled $1.2M enabling the Contractor (UT-Battelle, LLC [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a.k.a. ORNL]) to contribute significantly to the joint project. The initial task was to work with GM on the feasibility of developing their conceptual approach of modifying major components of the existing traction inverter/drive to develop low cost, robust, accessory power. Two alternate methods for implementation were suggested by ORNL and both were proven successful through simulations and then extensive testing of prototypes designed and fabricated during the project. This validated the GM overall concept. Moreover, three joint U.S. patents were issued and subsequently licensed by GM. After successfully fulfilling the initial objective, the direction and duration of the CRADA was modified and GM provided funding for two additional tasks. The first new task was to provide the basic development for implementing a cascaded inverter technology into hybrid vehicles (including plug-in hybrid, fuel cell, and electric). The second new task was to continue the basic development for implementing inverter and converter topologies and new technology assessments for hybrid vehicle applications. Additionally, this task was to address the use of high temperature components in drive systems. Under this CRADA, ORNL conducted further research based on GM’s idea of using the motor magnetic core and windings to produce bidirectional accessory power supply that is nongalvanically coupled to the terminals of the high voltage dc-link battery of hybrid vehicles. In order not to interfere with the motor’s torque, ORNL suggested to use the zero-sequence, highfrequency harmonics carried by the main fundamental motor current for producing the accessory power. Two studies were conducted at ORNL. One was to put an additional winding in the motor slots to magnetically link with the high frequency of the controllable zero-sequence stator currents that do not produce any zero-sequence harmonic torques. The second approach was to utilize the corners of the square stator punching for the high-frequency transformers of the dc/dc inverter. Both approaches were successful. This CRADA validated the feasibility of GM’s desire to use the motor’s magnetic core and windings to produce bidirectional accessory power supply. Three joint U.S. patents with GM were issued to ORNL and GM by the U.S. Patent Office for the research results produced by this CRADA.

Marlino, L.D.

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Photovoltaics for municipal planners. Cost-effective municipal applications of photovoltaics for electric power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This booklet is intended for city and county government personnel, as well as community organizations, who deal with supplying, regulating, or recommending electric power resources. Specifically, this document deals with photovoltaic (PV) power, or power from solar cells, which is currently the most cost-effective energy source for electricity requirements that are relatively small, located in isolated areas, or difficult to serve with conventional technology. Recently, PV has been documented to be more cost-effective than conventional alternatives (such as line extensions or engine generators) in dozens of applications within the service territories of electric, gas, and communications utilities. Here, we document numerous cost-effective urban applications, chosen by planners and utilities because they were the most cost-effective option or because they were appropriate for environmental or logistical reasons. These applications occur within various municipal departments, including utility, parks and recreation, traffic engineering, transportation, and planning, and they include lighting applications, communications equipment, corrosion protection, irrigation control equipment, remote monitoring, and even portable power supplies for emergency situations.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation An Energy, Greenhouse Gas, and Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Social Costs of Intercity Passenger Transportation: AEffects and Social Costs of Road Transport, Transportationtransportation vehicles at specific stages in the lifecycle (Table 1). These studies tend to quantify social costs

Horvath, Arpad; Chester, Mikhail

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

22 CSCMP's Supply Chain Quarterly [QUARTER 1/2010] www.SupplyChainQuarterly.com www.SupplyChainQuarterly.com [QUARTER 1/2010] CSCMP's Supply Chain Quarterly 23 IF THERE'S ANYTHING POSITIVE TO BE SAID  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the Texas Mobility Fund. An additional driver license surcharge would be charged at the time of application transportation revenues have grown at a much slower rate. Creating a Driver License Surcharge would help the slower growing transportation revenues keep pace with rising construction costs. Fuel tax revenues

de Weck, Olivier L.

371

Air Handling Unit Supply Air Temperature Optimization During Economizer Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most air handling units (AHUs) in commercial buildings have an air economizer cycle for free cooling under certain outside air conditions. During the economizer cycle, the outside air and return air dampers are modulated to seek mixing air temperature at supply air temperature setpoint. Mechanical cooling is always required when outside air temperature is higher than the supply air temperature setpoint. Generally the supply air temperature setpoint is set at 55°F for space humidity control. Actually the dehumidification is not necessary when outside air dew point is less than 55°F. Meanwhile the space may have less cooling load due to envelope heat loss and/or occupant schedule. These provide an opportunity to use higher supply air temperature to reduce or eliminate mechanical cooling and terminal box reheat. On the other hand the higher supply air temperature will require higher air flow as well as higher fan power. Therefore the supply air temperature has to be optimized to minimize the combined energy for fan, cooling and heating energy. In this paper a simple energy consumption model is established for AHU systems during the economizer and then a optimal supply air temperature control is developed to minimize the total cost of the mechanical cooling and the fan motor power. This paper presents AHU system energy modeling, supply air temperature optimization, and simulated energy savings.

Xu, K.; Liu, M.; Wang, G.; Wang, Z.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air v.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Social Costs of Intercity Passenger Transportation: AEffects and Social Costs of Road Transport, TransportationTransportation Research Center, Knoxville, TN [Delucchi 1997] Delucchi, M. , The Annualized Social Cost

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Realistic costs of carbon capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS excluding transport and storage costs appears to be US$100-150/tCO2 for first-of-a-kind plants and perhaps US$30-50/tCO2 for nth-of-a-kind plants.The estimates for FOAK and NOAK costs appear to be broadly consistent in the light of estimates of the potential for cost reductions with increased experience. Cost reductions are expected from increasing scale, learning on individual components, and technological innovation including improved plant integration. Innovation and integration can both lower costs and increase net output with a given cost base. These factors are expected to reduce abatement costs by approximately 65% by 2030. The range of estimated costs for NOAK plants is within the range of plausible future carbon prices, implying that mature technology would be competitive with conventional fossil fuel plants at prevailing carbon prices.

Al Juaied, Mohammed (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (US). Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam (Hydrogen Energy International Ltd., Weybridge (GB))

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Optics Supply Planning System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to specify the design for an initial optics supply planning system for NIF, and to present quality assurance and test plans for the construction of the system as specified. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large laser facility that is just starting operations. Thousands of specialized optics are required to operate the laser, and must be exchanged over time based on the laser shot plan and predictions of damage. Careful planning and tracking of optic exchanges is necessary because of the tight inventory of spare optics, and the long lead times for optics procurements and production changes. Automated inventory forecasting and production planning tools are required to replace existing manual processes. The optics groups members who are expected to use the supply planning system are the stakeholders for this project, and are divided into three groups. Each of these groups participated in a requirements specification that was used to develop this design. (1) Optics Management--These are the top level stakeholdersk, and the final decision makers. This group is the interface to shot operations, is ultimately responsible for optics supply, and decides which exchanges will be made. (2) Work Center Managers--This group manages the on site optics processing work centers. They schedule the daily work center operations, and are responsible for developing long term processing, equipment, and staffing plans. (3) Component Engineers--This group manages the vendor contracts for the manufacture of new optics and the off site rework of existing optics. They are responsible for sourcing vendors, negotiating contracts, and managing vendor processes. The scope of this analysis is to describe the structure and design details of a system that will meet all requirements that were described by stakeholders and documented in the analysis model for this project. The design specifies the architecture, components, interfaces, and data stores of the system at a level of detail that can be used for construction and deployment. Test and quality assurance plans are also included to insure that the system delivers all requirements when it is built. The design is for an automated forecasting prototype that allocates inventory and processing resources in response to potentially daily changes in the forecasted optics exchanges required to operate NIF. It will automatically calculate future inventory levels and processing rates based on current inventory and projected exchanges, procurements, and capacities. It will include screens that allow users to readily assess the feasibility of the forecast, identify failures to meet the demand, revise input data, and re-run the automated forecast calculation. In addition, the system will automatically retrieve the current exchange demand from an external database. Approved forecasts from the system will automatically update work order plans and procurement plans in the existing inventory and production control database. The timing of optics exchanges affects the forecast of damage and future exchanges, so an approved exchange plan will be fed back to the demand database and be used to calculate the next demand projection. The system will read the demand data and update the forecast and output files daily. This specification has been divided into two parts. This document, Part 1 lays out the major design decisions and specifies the architectural, component, and data structure designs. Part 2 will add interface designs, quality assurance and testing plans, and deployment details.

Gaylord, J

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

375

A Model to Optimize Green Energy Supply Chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioenergy is renewable energy derived from biological sources, to be used for production of heat, electricity and transportation fuels. The collection of biomass is a logistic process from different source locations to energy plants. The biomass-to-energy ... Keywords: supply chain, green, optimize, model

Na Liu

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 26 cost modules—24 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Impacts of motor vehicle operation on water quality - Clean-up Costs and Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

preventing water pollution from motor vehicles would be muchgroundwater pollution; motor-vehicle transportation;the environmental costs of motor vehicle transportation in

Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Reliability Estimates for Power Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Failure rates for large power supplies at a fusion facility are critical knowledge needed to estimate availability of the facility or to set priorties for repairs and spare components. A study of the "failure to operate on demand" and "failure to continue to operate" failure rates has been performed for the large power supplies at DIII-D, which provide power to the magnet coils, the neutral beam injectors, the electron cyclotron heating systems, and the fast wave systems. When one of the power supplies fails to operate, the research program has to be either temporarily changed or halted. If one of the power supplies for the toroidal or ohmic heating coils fails, the operations have to be suspended or the research is continued at de-rated parameters until a repair is completed. If one of the power supplies used in the auxiliary plasma heating systems fails the research is often temporarily changed until a repair is completed. The power supplies are operated remotely and repairs are only performed when the power supplies are off line, so that failure of a power supply does not cause any risk to personnel. The DIII-D Trouble Report database was used to determine the number of power supply faults (over 1,700 reports), and tokamak annual operations data supplied the number of shots, operating times, and power supply usage for the DIII-D operating campaigns between mid-1987 and 2004. Where possible, these power supply failure rates from DIII-D will be compared to similar work that has been performed for the Joint European Torus equipment. These independent data sets support validation of the fusion-specific failure rate values.

Lee C. Cadwallader; Peter I. Petersen

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Updated U.S. Geothermal Supply Characterization and Representation for Market Penetration Model Input  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) tasked the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) with conducting the annual geothermal supply curve update. This report documents the approach taken to identify geothermal resources, determine the electrical producing potential of these resources, and estimate the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE), capital costs, and operating and maintenance costs from these geothermal resources at present and future timeframes under various GTP funding levels. Finally, this report discusses the resulting supply curve representation and how improvements can be made to future supply curve updates.

Augustine, C.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2/9/2005: Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook. This presentation contains content that your browser may not be able to show properly.

383

School supply drive winding down  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

submit School supply drive winding down The drive is collecting materials for schools throughout Northern New Mexico and will be distributed by the Lab and Self Help, Inc....

384

Motor Systems Efficiency Supply Curves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

expert opinion and available data from the United States, Canada, the European Union, Thailand, Vietnam, and Brazil, bottom-up energy efficiency supply curve models were...

385

Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook Briefing for the 7th Annual International Airport Operations/Jet Fuel Conference Orlando, Florida Mike Burdette

386

Sustainable Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THOUGHT PIECE Sustainable Transport by Melvin M. Webberwant to sustain any mode of transport only if we judge it todraconian in rejecting transport modes that have failed in

Webber, Melvin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Crude Oil Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Crude Oil Supply Domestic Production (a) .......................................... 6.22 6.29 6.42 7.02 7.11 7.29 7.61 7.97 8.26 8.45 8.57 8.86 6.49 7.50 8.54 Alaska .................................................................. 0.58 0.53 0.44 0.55 0.54 0.51 0.48 0.52 0.51 0.47 0.42 0.49 0.53 0.51 0.47 Federal Gulf of Mexico (b) .................................... 1.34 1.19 1.18 1.36 1.30 1.22 1.27 1.29 1.34 1.36 1.37 1.45 1.27 1.27 1.38 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ................................ 4.31 4.57 4.80 5.11 5.28 5.56 5.87 6.16 6.41 6.61 6.77 6.91 4.70 5.72 6.68 Crude Oil Net Imports (c) ......................................... 8.55 8.88 8.52 7.89 7.47 7.61 7.94 7.36 6.66 6.78 6.83 6.06 8.46 7.60 6.58 SPR Net Withdrawals ..............................................

388

Petroleum supply monthly, May 1998, with data for March 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. 16 figs., 66 tabs.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Petroleum supply monthly with data for March 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Petroleum supply monthly with data from January 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

United States energy supply and demand forecasts 1979-1995  

SciTech Connect

Forecasts of U.S. energy supply and demand by fuel type and economic sector, as well as historical background information, are presented. Discussion and results pertaining to the development of current and projected marginal energy costs, and their comparison with market prices, are also presented.

Walton, H.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Energy supply network design optimization for distributed energy systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the fluctuations in power and heat demand of the consumers in a region, this paper presents a bi-level programming model for the regional DES (distributed energy system) network planning. The model aims to minimize the total cost of the regional ... Keywords: Bi-level programming, Distributed energy system, Energy supply network, Hybrid algorithm

Ming Dong; Fenglan He; Hairui Wei

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Modeling EU electricity market competition using the residual supply index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An econometric approach to related hourly Residual Supply Index to price-cost margins in the major EU electricity generation markets suggests that market structure, as measured by the RSI, is a significant explanatory factor for markups, even when scarcity and other explanatory variables are included. (author)

Swinand, Gregory; Scully, Derek; Ffoulkes, Stuart; Kessler, Brian

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Social aspects of transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The social costs and benefits of roads are not evident. They will undoubtedly vary by gender, age, occupation and location of the road user. Thus, before measurement procedures can be considered, the range of social costs and benefits of roads have to be identified and categorised. In the ‘Scoping Paper ’ provided for authors, a number of key questions and issues are identified, to be probed. PART ONE Before addressing those, however, it is important, I suggest, to go back to basics and ask ourselves ‘what is transport for? ’ and ‘how best can the economic, social and other objectives identified be achieved’, before we proceed to more specific questions as to the identification and appraisal of social benefits and costs of road transport. Then I consider briefly a range of specific issues which seem to me to be worth commenting on, before turning to the specific questions and issues raised by the Scoping Paper. 1. Why ‘transport’? Transport is a means to specific ends. It is ultimately to improve people’s lives and livelihoods of people. The essential feature of transport development should be: to reduce the time and energy spent on- and thus the cost of- travel and the transport of goods; and thereby to improve people’s access to resources, people, goods, opportunities, markets and services – including the provision of information- they value. The issue of identifying and assessing costs and benefits should, therefore, be framed within this broader framework: what are the costs and benefits of different means of improving access to whatever it is that people value. This suggests, immediately two important points: first, that improving access may not involve improving road transport – it may imply other means of transport, other means of transmitting information, or even other development interventions; and second, that one crucial component of any form of assessment of costs and benefits must be ‘what people themselves value’. Before we become deeply involved in identifying and appraising the costs and benefits of road transport – or more appropriately – of various alternative 1

David Seddon

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2013 6, 2013 Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Washington, D.C. - In a project supported and managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), researchers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks have demonstrated that the use of artificial barriers-snow fences-can significantly increase the amount of fresh water supplies in Arctic lakes at a fraction of the cost of bringing in water from nearby lakes. The results promise to enhance environmentally sound development of Alaska's natural resources, lowering the costs of building ice roads used for exploring for oil and natural gas in Alaska. They could also be used to help augment fresh water supplies at remote villages. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the snow drift.

396

Supplier selection using fuzzy AHP and fuzzy multi-objective linear programming for developing low carbon supply chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental sustainability of a supply chain depends on the purchasing strategy of the supply chain members. Most of the earlier models have focused on cost, quality, lead time, etc. issues but not given enough importance to carbon emission for supplier ... Keywords: Carbon emission, Fuzzy AHP, Fuzzy multi-objective linear programming, Green house gas, Supplier selection, Textile supply chain

Krishnendu Shaw; Ravi Shankar; Surendra S. Yadav; Lakshman S. Thakur

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Microsoft Word - Overview_Role of Champion for Sustainable Supply Chain CoP_August 30 2012.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Data.gov of Data.gov Sustainable Supply Chain Community of Practice "Champions" August 30, 2012 Leading companies, academic institutions and non-profit organizations are increasingly focused on sustainable supply chains as a source of cost savings, innovation and competitive advantage. Recognizing that sustainable supply chains are important to a broad number of stakeholders, GSA established the Sustainable Supply Chain Community of Practice on data.gov. The community's goal is to encourage sharing of practical information such as checklists, tutorials and other supplier engagement tools that businesses, especially small and medium-sized, can use to cost effectively improve the efficiency of their operations and address sustainable supply

398

Evaluation of high-pressure drilling fluid supply systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was undertaken to help determine the technical and economic feasibility of developing a high-pressure fluid-jet drilling system for the production of geothermal wells. Three system concepts were developed and analyzed in terms of costs, component availability, and required new-component development. These concepts included a single-conduit system that supplies the downhole cutting nozzles directly via surface-located high-pressure pumps; a single-conduit system utilizing low-pressure surface pumps to supply and operate a high-pressure downhole pump, which in turn supplies the cutting nozzles; and a dual-conduit system supplying surface-generated high-pressure fluid for cutting via one conduit and low-pressure scavenging fluid via the other. It is concluded that the single-conduit downhole pump system concept has the greatest potential for success in this application. 28 figures, 11 tables.

McDonald, M.C.; Reichman, J.M.; Theimer, K.J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Visualization of World Energy Supply | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Visualization of World Energy Supply Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Visualization of World Energy Supply Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) Sector: Energy Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: en.openei.org/wiki/Visualization_of_World_Energy_Supply Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Community Generated Language: English References: OECD[1] Motion chart visualization of the world energy supply from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The default view shows how much percent of energy produced is renewable energy and how much total energy is produced by each country.

400

submitted to Transportation Quarterly corresponding author:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study evaluates the full cost of three modes of intercity transportation: air, highway, and high speed rail for the California Corridor, connecting the Los Angeles Basin and the San Francisco Bay Area in order to compare the economic implications of investment in, or expansion of, any of these three modes. In this study we include estimates of four types of external, social costs: accidents, congestion, noise, and air pollution. Based on the results, we find that the full cost of air transportation for the California Corridor ($0.1315 per passenger-kilometer traveled (pkt)) is significantly less costly than the other two modes. High speed rail and highway transportation have approximately the same full cost; rail costs $0.2350/pkt and highway costs $0.2302/pkt. However, the modes have a different distribution of internal and external costs, automobiles have the highest external costs while high speed rail has the highest internal costs.

David Levinson; Adib Kanafani; David Gillen; David Levinson

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Transportation System Readiness and Resiliency Assessment Framework: Readiness and Assess Resiliency of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation System Readiness and Resiliency Assessment Framework: Readiness and Assess Resiliency of Transportation Systems (Infrastructure, Systems, Organization and Services) to Deter, Detect Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle

402

Influence of hydrodynamics on the larval supply to hydrothermal vents on the East Pacific Rise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Examination of the scales at which larval supply varies spatially and temporally, and correlation with concurrent physical observations can provide insights into larval transport mechanisms that contribute to structuring ...

Adams, Diane K. (Diane Kirsten)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Repetitive resonant railgun power supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. The supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles.

Honig, Emanuel M. (Los Alamos, NM); Nunnally, William C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY PLANNING AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accepted standards, which is an important planning aspect for water supply agencies. Yeh et al. (2000CHAPTER 3 REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY PLANNING AND CAPACITY EXPANSION MODELS Messele Z. Ejeta California Department of Water Resources Sacramento, California Larry W. Mays Department of Civil and Environmental

Mays, Larry W.

405

Repetitive resonant railgun power supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. The supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles.

Honig, E.M.; Nunnally, W.C.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

406

Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 With Data for 2012 | Release Date: September 27, 2013 | Next Release Date: August 28, 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 Go Re-release of the Petroleum Supply Annual with data for 2011 Volume 1 - Final annual data for the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. Volume 1 Tables All Tables All Tables Detailed Statistics Tables National Statistics 1 U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF CSV 2 U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF CSV Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 3 PAD District 1 PDF CSV 4 Daily Average PAD District 1 PDF CSV

407

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data by Tammy G. Heppner and Matthew M. Breslin Overview For 2007, 66 petroleum supply data series were analyzed to determine how close the PSM values were to the final PSA values. For these series, 50 out of the 66 PSM values were within 1 percent of the PSA values in terms of mean absolute percent error as compared to 38 out of 66 in 2006. Sixty-two petroleum supply data series were analyzed to see how close the MFW estimates were to the final PSA values. For these 62 series, 22 MFW estimates were within 2 percent of the PSA values in terms of mean absolute percent error and, of those, 9 were within 1 percent, compared to 27 and 10, respectively, for 2006. Petroleum supply data collected by the Petroleum Division

408

electricity supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

supply supply Dataset Summary Description The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) publishes a wide selection of data and statistics on energy power technologies from a variety of sources (e.g. EIA, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, EPRI and AWEA). In 2006, NREL published the 4th edition, presenting, among other things, data on the U.S. electricity supply. Source NREL Date Released March 05th, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords electricity supply NREL Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Supply (13 worksheets) (xls, 1.2 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment

409

Supply Curves for Solar PV-Generated Electricity for the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy supply curves attempt to estimate the relationship between the cost of an energy resource and the amount of energy available at or below that cost. In general, an energy supply curve is a series of step functions with each step representing a particular group or category of energy resource. The length of the step indicates how much of that resource is deployable or accessible at a given cost. Energy supply curves have been generated for a number of renewable energy sources including biomass fuels and geothermal, as well as conservation technologies. Generating a supply curve for solar photovoltaics (PV) has particular challenges due to the nature of the resource. The United States has a massive solar resource base -- many orders of magnitude greater than the total consumption of energy. In this report, we examine several possible methods for generating PV supply curves based exclusively on rooftop deployment.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Outbound transportation collaboration- Do It Yourself (DIY)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continuous increases in transportation costs on one hand and companies' desire to reduce inventories and receiving costs on the other hand, have been forcing shippers to come up with innovative ways in tackling these two ...

Taherian, Homayoun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Forest Products Supply Chain --Availability of Woody Biomass in Indiana for Bioenergy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest Products Supply Chain -- Availability of Woody Biomass in Indiana for Bioenergy Production or wood waste biomass · Map Indiana's wood waste for each potential bioenergy supply chain · Develop break-even analyses for transportation logistics of wood waste biomass Isaac S. Slaven Abstract: The purpose

412

Optimal Design of Sustainable Cellulosic Biofuel Supply Chains: Multiobjective Optimization Coupled with Life  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a tremendous challenge for the sector and its supply chain to deliver an unprecedented scale of development students C ranfield University is gearing up to supply the energy engineering graduates of the future derived products play a part in both power generation and for transport fuel. Biofuels are particu- larly

413

Emerging Issues for Interstate Transportation Market  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Emerging Issues for Interstate Transportation Market. ... How, when or will the pricing structure change from cost of service rates to market based rates?

414

The Geography of Transport Systems-Maritime Transportation | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Geography of Transport Systems-Maritime Transportation The Geography of Transport Systems-Maritime Transportation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Geography of Transport Systems-Maritime Transportation Agency/Company /Organization: Hofstra University Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Technology characterizations Resource Type: Publications, Technical report Website: people.hofstra.edu/geotrans/eng/ch3en/conc3en/ch3c4en.html Cost: Free Language: English References: Maritime Transportation[1] "Maritime transportation, similar to land and air modes, operates on its own space, which is at the same time geographical by its physical attributes, strategic by its control and commercial by its usage. While geographical considerations tend to be constant in time, strategic and

415

1 The Price Elasticity of Supply of Renewable Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many states have adopted policies aimed at promoting the growth of renewable electricity within their state. The most salient of these policies is a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) which mandates that retail electricity providers purchase a predetermined fraction of their electricity from renewable sources. Renewable portfolio standards are a policy tool likely to persist for many decades due to the long term goals of many state RPSs and the likely creation of a federal RPS alongside any comprehensive climate change bill. However, there is little empirical evidence about the costs of these RPS policies. I take an instrumental variables approach to estimate the long-run price elasticity of supply of renewable generation. To instrument for the price paid to renewable generators I use the phased-in implementation of RPSs over time. Using this IV strategy, my preferred estimate of the supply elasticity is 2.7. This parameter allows me to measure the costs of carbon abatement in the electricity sector and to compare those costs with the costs of a broader based policy. Using my parameter estimates, I find that a policy to reduce the CO2 emissions in the northeastern US electricity sector by 2.5 % using only an RPS would cost at least six times more than the regional cap-and-trade system (Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative). The marginal cost of CO2 abatement is $12 using the most optimistic assumptions for an RPS compared to a marginal cost of abatement of $2 in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative.

Erik Johnson; Erik Johnson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Vendors of Supplies and Equipment Used in ReceivingWater Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

low-cost GPS units, other navigation aids, waders, and other general outdoor equipment@aol.com, Internet: holidayjunction.com/aro/ · Aquaculture Supply (culture foods and equipment, airstones, Spirulina

Pitt, Robert E.

417

Multi-echelon inventory optimization in a rapid-response supply chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The motivation for multi-echelon supply chain management at Nike is to more cost-effectively accommodate customer-facing lead time reduction in the rapid-response replenishment business model. Multi-echelon inventory ...

Giacomantonio, Robert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Design and optimization of global distribution supply chain at McCain Foods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Network design has been successfully used by numerous organizations to achieve supply chain excellence through cost effectiveness and superior utilization of resources. This thesis addresses how network optimization methods ...

Gentiletti, Andrea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Multi-echelon inventory management for a fresh produce retail supply chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perishability presents a challenging problem in inventory management for the fresh produce industry since it can lead to higher inventory costs and lower service levels. If a supply chain has multiple echelons, that further ...

Suryawanshi, Yogeshwar D. (Yogeshwar Dattatraya)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Price strategies in dynamic duopolistic markets with deregulated electricity supplies using mixed strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While effective competition can force service providers to seek economically efficient methods to reduce costs, the deregulated electricity supply industry still allows some generators to exercise market power at particular locations, thereby preventing ... Keywords: deregulated electricity supplies, mixed strategies, price strategies

Jose B. Cruz, Jr.; Xiaohuan Tan

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A new optimal planning approach for crude oil procurement in distributed supply chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the crude oil procurement planning and suppliers selection problem in distributed multiple supplier/refinery supply chain, and develops under constraints of limited resources an optimal procurement model to minimize the total costs. ... Keywords: crude oil, procurement optimization, suppliers selection, supply chain

Xiao Liu; Xiaochuan Luo; Chengen Wang; Dingwei Wang

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Price strategies in dynamic duopolistic markets with deregulated electricity supplies using mixed strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While effective competition can force service providers to seek economically efficient methods to reduce costs, the deregulated electricity supply industry still allows some generators to exercise market power at particular locations, thereby preventing ... Keywords: Deregulated electricity supplies, Mixed strategies, Price strategies

Jose B. Cruz, Jr.; Xiaohuan Tan

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Multiple resonant railgun power supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. A plurality of serially connected paired parallel rails are powered by similar power supplies. Each supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles. The multiple serial operation permits relatively small energy components to deliver overall relatively large amounts of energy to the projectiles being propelled.

Honig, Emanuel M. (Los Alamos, NM); Nunnally, William C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Multiple resonant railgun power supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. A plurality of serially connected paired parallel rails are powered by similar power supplies. Each supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles. The multiple serial operation permits relatively small energy components to deliver overall relatively large amounts of energy to the projectiles being propelled.

Honig, E.M.; Nunnally, W.C.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

425

Advanced fuel cells for transportation applications. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Research and Development (R and D) contract was directed at developing an advanced technology compressor/expander for supplying compressed air to Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells in transportation applications. The objective of this project was to develop a low-cost high-efficiency long-life lubrication-free integrated compressor/expander utilizing scroll technology. The goal of this compressor/expander was to be capable of providing compressed air over the flow and pressure ranges required for the operation of 50 kW PEM fuel cells in transportation applications. The desired ranges of flow, pressure, and other performance parameters were outlined in a set of guidelines provided by DOE. The project consisted of the design, fabrication, and test of a prototype compressor/expander module. The scroll CEM development program summarized in this report has been very successful, demonstrating that scroll technology is a leading candidate for automotive fuel cell compressor/expanders. The objectives of the program are: develop an integrated scroll CEM; demonstrate efficiency and capacity goals; demonstrate manufacturability and cost goals; and evaluate operating envelope. In summary, while the scroll CEM program did not demonstrate a level of performance as high as the DOE guidelines in all cases, it did meet the overriding objectives of the program. A fully-integrated, low-cost CEM was developed that demonstrated high efficiency and reliable operation throughout the test program. 26 figs., 13 tabs.

NONE

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

426

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408) costs apply to those items that are consumed in production process and are roughly proportional to level in cash flow analysis and in the decision to use the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12

Boisvert, Jeff

427

Hydrogen Supply: Pathways and Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrolysis, biomass gasification), issue is cost ratherrequired for H2 via gasification 100 million H vehicles w/

Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Logistics and Supply Chain Management - Center for Transportation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

analysis. Simulation study of logistics support requirements for nuclear non-proliferation support. Evaluation of practical capabilities of electronic (RF) tags in...

429

coal supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

coal supply coal supply Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 15, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into production, net imports, consumption by sector and price. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO coal coal supply disposition. prices EIA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Coal Supply, Disposition, and Prices- Reference Case (xls, 91.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

430

energy supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

supply supply Dataset Summary Description OECD Factbook 2010: Economic, Environmental and Social Statistics - ISBN 92-64-08356-1 - © OECD 2010. Available directly from the OECD Statistics website (beta version). Source OECD Date Released January 01st, 2010 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords energy supply ISBN 92-64-08356-1 OECD renewable energy world Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon OECD Factbook 2010: Contribution of Renewables to Energy Supply (xls, 38.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1971 - 2008 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment the User can upload up to 1,500 words or 2,000 cells (equivalent to 4 tables or graphs) provided that suitable acknowledgement of OECD as source and copyright owner is given. The User must link to the OECD page where the uploaded material was taken from;

431

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale This article first appeared in the Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995, Energy Information Administration, DOE/EIA-0202(95) (Washington, DC, July 1995), pp. 33-42, 83-85. The regression results and historical data for production, inventories, and imports have been updated in this presentation. Contents * Introduction o Table 1. Oxygenate production capacity and demand * Oxygenate demand o Table 2. Estimated RFG demand share - mandated RFG areas, January 1998 * Fuel ethanol supply and demand balance o Table 3. Fuel ethanol annual statistics * MTBE supply and demand balance o Table 4. EIA MTBE annual statistics * Refinery balances

432

The 3He Supply Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the main uses for 3He is in gas proportional counters for neutron detection. Radiation portal monitors deployed for homeland security and non-proliferation use such detectors. Other uses of 3He are for research detectors, commercial instruments, well logging detectors, dilution refrigerators, for targets or cooling in nuclear research, and for basic research in condensed matter physics. The US supply of 3He comes almost entirely from the decay of tritium used in nuclear weapons by the US and Russia. A few other countries contribute a small amount to the world’s 3He supply. Due to the large increase in use of 3He for homeland security, the supply has dwindled, and can no longer meet the demand. This white paper reviews the problems of supply, utilization, and alternatives.

Kouzes, Richard T.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

A presentation to the 7th Annual International Airport Operations/Jet Fuel Conference, in Orlando, Florida, on February 3, 2005, giving EIAżs outlook for petroleum supply and prices, with particular attention to jet fuel.

Information Center

2005-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

434

TRANSISTOR HIGH VOLTAGE POWER SUPPLY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High voltage, direct current power supplies are described for use with battery powered nuclear detection equipment. The particular advantages of the power supply described, are increased efficiency and reduced size and welght brought about by the use of transistors in the circuit. An important feature resides tn the employment of a pair of transistors in an alternatefiring oscillator circuit having a coupling transformer and other circuit components which are used for interconnecting the various electrodes of the transistors.

Driver, G.E.

1958-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

External Costs of Energy Technologies Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society believes that decisions concerning national energy policy should appropriately take external costs into account. In some energy options, external costs are not included in the cost of the energy produced; instead, they are borne by parties not involved in the original transaction, generally without consent or due compensation. External costs 1 may be related to many factors, including impacts on public health, environmental impacts, degradation of quality of life, degradation of agricultural land, depletion of natural resources, and reduction in security. These costs are incurred at various stages of the life cycle of an energy technology. While some energy technologies may appear to have smaller environmental impacts than others, their external costs may be significant when the complete life cycle costs are taken into account. Particularly, an energy source that is inherently intermittent will require, for applications demanding reliable performance, either a backup energy supply or an energy storage facility, whose external costs are not negligible. On the other hand, practically all the costs to make nuclear power technology safe and secure, including the costs of waste management and disposal, are already incorporated into the cost of electricity generation. 2 Appropriately accounting for external costs should be an essential element in energy policy since in doing so, the final product is compared based on a consistent set of parameters for all technologies, and the resulting mix of energy sources will more appropriately balance the competing economic, environmental, and social needs from energy production and consumption.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Agency/Company /Organization: Victoria Transport Policy Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.vtpi.org/tdm/tdm12.htm Cost: Free Language: English References: Victoria Transport Policy Institute[1] "The Online TDM Encyclopedia is the world's most comprehensive information resource concerning innovative transportation management strategies. It describes dozens of Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies and contains information on TDM planning, evaluation and implementation. It has thousands of hyperlinks that provide instant access

437

On the energy sources of Mozambican households and the demand-supply curves for domestic electricity in the northern electrical grid in Mozambique.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The development of electrical infrastructure to supply rural households is considered economically unfeasible because of the high cost of capital investment required to expand the… (more)

Arthur, Maria de Fatima Serra Ribeiro

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Update Sustainable Transportation Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 * July 2012 3 * July 2012 Boosting the battery industry Future automotive batteries could cost less and pack more power because of ORNL's new Battery Manufacturing Facility. Co-located with the National Transportation Research Center and Manufacturing Demonstration Facility off Hardin Valley Road, the $3 million DOE facility allows for collaboration with industry and other national labs while protecting

439

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable energy spillage, operating costs and capacityfocused on renewable energy utilization, cost of operationssystem operating costs, • renewable energy utilization,

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Cost Study for Large Wind Turbine Blades  

SciTech Connect

The cost study for large wind turbine blades reviewed three blades of 30 meters, 50 meters, and 70 meters in length. Blade extreme wind design loads were estimated in accordance with IEC Class I recommendations. Structural analyses of three blade sizes were performed at representative spanwise stations assuming a stressed shell design approach and E-glass/vinylester laminate. A bill of materials was prepared for each of the three blade sizes using the laminate requirements prepared during the structural analysis effort. The labor requirements were prepared for twelve major manufacturing tasks. TPI Composites developed a conceptual design of the manufacturing facility for each of the three blade sizes, which was used for determining the cost of labor and overhead (capital equipment and facilities). Each of the three potential manufacturing facilities was sized to provide a constant annual rated power production (MW per year) of the blades it produced. The cost of the production tooling and overland transportation was also estimated. The results indicate that as blades get larger, materials become a greater proportion of total cost, while the percentage of labor cost is decreased. Transportation costs decreased as a percentage of total cost. The study also suggests that blade cost reduction efforts should focus on reducing material cost and lowering manufacturing labor, because cost reductions in those areas will have the strongest impact on overall blade cost.

ASHWILL, THOMAS D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Review of Some of the Literature on the Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concludes that oil dependency costs the State of CaliforniaL. Parker, External Costs of Oil Used in Transportation, 92-such as gas, oil and parts; the indirect costs, such as

Murphy, James; Delucchi, Mark

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

ANALYSES OF ENERGY SUPPLY OPTIONS AND SECURITY OF ENERGY SUPPLY IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FOREWORD In its broadest meaning “energy security ” is the ability of a nation to muster the energy resources needed to ensure its welfare. In a narrower meaning it refers to territorial energy autonomy. Consequently, energy supply security is a matter of both domestic policy and international relations. Perceived and real threats may be economic or logistic, politically motivated or the result of war or natural causes. They may be source, technology or transport related, specific to a facility or a function of system structure, due to sabotage or to inadequate investment or maintenance, or result from pricing or regulatory policies. Energy security has become a growing concern in the Baltic States of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania since regaining independence in 1991. As their national energy systems depend on essentially one single foreign supplier for most of their oil and all of their natural gas supplies, a comprehensive analysis of potential measures to improve security including alternative supply options becomes vital. Such an analysis needs to consider, for example, the availability of domestic energy reserves and resources, the vintage of existing energy infrastructures (including regional and interregional interconnections), storage facilities, as well as future

In The Baltic States; In The Baltic States; Wagramer Strasse

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

PAFC Cost Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAFC Cost Challenges Sridhar Kanuri Manager, PAFC Technology *Sridhar.Kanuri@utcpower.com 2 AGENDA Purecell 400 cost challenge Cost reduction opportunities Summary 3 PURECELL ...

444

Petroleum Supply Monthly - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

30 Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Supply Monthly, October 2011 Table 24. PAD District 5 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil ...

445

NREL: Jobs and Economic Competitiveness - Supply Constraints...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supply Constraints Analysis Some of the materials used in solar PV modules, such as tellurium and indium, are rare materials in limited supply. Solar PV technologies have grown...

446

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ous systems absorb large amounts of hydroelectric power.that snow melts and hydroelectric power supply increases andwater supplies from hydroelectric dams or discards renewable

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Environmental decision making: supply-chain considerations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. It is seen that the “power generation and supply” sectortool manufacturing. The power generation value, however, iskg are caused by the “power generation and supply” sector.

Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Dornfeld, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Documents: Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Transportation PDF Icon Transportation Impact Assessment for Shipment of Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) Cylinders...

449

Petroleum supply monthly, December 1998 with data for October 1998  

SciTech Connect

Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the US and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the US. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. 82 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Costs of Oil Dependence: A 2000 Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.............................................................. ix 1. INTRODUCTION ........................................................ 1 2. COST COMPONENTS .................................................... 7 2.1 LOSS OF POTENTIAL GDP ......................................... 7 2.2 MACROECONOMIC ADJUSTMENT COSTS ........................... 7 2.3 TRANSFER OF WEALTH ........................................... 8 3. MEASURING THE COSTS ................................................ 9 3.1 TRANSFER OF WEALTH ........................................... 9 3.2 LOSS OF POTENTIAL GDP ........................................ 11 3.3 MACROECONOMIC ADJUSTMENT LOSSES ......................... 14 4. DATA ................................................................ 17 4.1 EMPIRICAL ESTIMATES OF PRICE SLOPES AND ADJUSTMENT RATES OF OIL SUPPLY AND DEMAND IN THE UNITED STATES ............. 17 5. RESULTS ............................................................. 21 5.1 SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS .....

David L. Greene; Nataliya I. Tishchishyna

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Procurement Options for New Renewable Electricity Supply | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Procurement Options for New Renewable Electricity Supply Procurement Options for New Renewable Electricity Supply Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Procurement Options for New Renewable Electricity Supply Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Finance, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Lessons learned/best practices, Technical report Website: nrelpubs.nrel.gov/Webtop/ws/nich/www/public/Record?rpp=25&upp=0&m=1&w= Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): feed-in tariffs, renewable portfolio standards, FITs, FIT, RPS, renewable energy, procurement UN Region: Northern America Language: English Tool Overview "State renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies require utilities and

452

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Test and Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deployment of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) to support the electrification of transportation continues worldwide. In the United States alone, thousands of EVSEs have been deployed over the last year. EVSE hardware is designed to safely provide AC or DC power to plug-in electric vehicles in both commercial and residential spaces. More than 40 vendors have been identified that manufacture EVSE products for the North American market. EPRI has performed laboratory evaluations for a ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

BC gas takes new approach to gas supply optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wide-ranging changes have taken place in the US and Canada since the mid-1980s in the way that local gas distribution utilities and large industrial customers contract for their gas supplies. This paper reports that these changes have been brought about by open-access policies, the intent of which was to allow customers more latitude to make their gas purchase and transportation arrangements and to improve the access of shippers to available gas transmission capacity. The effects of the new open-access regime have been profound on both sides of the border. More than 70% of North American gas supplies are now sold under unbundled arrangements in which gas supply is contracted under separate commodity and transportation agreements. For local distribution utilities, the numbers of potential supply options have become extremely large. Analysis of these options has become increasingly complex with the need to take account of complicated contract provisions, a wider range of storage options and swap arrangements with other utilities, opportunities for some customers to purchase gas directly and uncertainty about future demand, prices and supplier reliability.

Cawdery, J.; Swoveland, C. (Quantalytics Inc., Vancouver, British Columbia (CA))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Long Term World Oil Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: The following pages summarize a recent EIA presentation on estimates of the world conventional oil resource base and the year when production from it will peak and then begin to decline. A version of this presentation was given by former EIA Administrator Jay Hakes to the April 18, 2000 meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists in New Orleans, Louisiana. Specific information about this presentation may be obtained from John Wood (john.wood@eia.doe.gov), Gary Long (gary.long@eia.doe.gov) or David Morehouse (david.morehouse@eia.doe.gov). Long Term World Oil Supply http://www.eia.doe.gov/pub/oil_gas/petroleum/presentations/2000/long_term_supply/sld001.htm [8/10/2000 4:56:23 PM] Slide 2 of 20 http://www.eia.doe.gov/pub/oil_gas/petroleum/presentations/2000/long_term_supply/sld002.htm [8/10/2000 4:56:24 PM]

455

oil supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

oil supply oil supply Dataset Summary Description CIA: World Factbook assessment of proved reserves of crude oil in barrels (bbl). Proved reserves are those quantities of petroleum which, by analysis of geological and engineering data, can be estimated with a high degree of confidence to be commercially recoverable from a given date forward, from known reservoirs and under current economic conditions. Estimated as of January 1st, 2010. Source CIA Date Released January 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords crude oil energy energy data international oil oil supply Data text/csv icon 2010 Proved Oil Reserves (csv, 4.6 KiB) text/plain icon Original Text Format (txt, 6.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency

456

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

in in the Office of Oil and Gas (OOG) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) showed an improvement in the accuracy of the 2006 data from initial estimates, to interim values, to final values. These data were presented in a series of PD products: the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), This Week in Petroleum (TWIP), the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM), and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Weekly estimates in the WPSR and TWIP were the first values available. Figure FE1 illustrates that just as there was an improvement in gas mileage over time, there was an improvement in petroleum supply data accuracy with increasing review time. For the monthly-from-weekly (MFW) data, respondents have the shortest reporting time, analysts have the shortest review time, and the data are least accurate. For the PSM data, respondents have a longer reporting time than the weekly, analysts have

457

External > Programs > Nuclear Fuel Supply  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

division manages a cooperative agreement with the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) that facilitates the deployment of new, cost-effective, advanced enrichment technology...

458

Minimum Changeover Cost Arborescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

having minimum changeover cost, a cost that we now describe. ... We define the changeover cost at j, denoted by d(j), as the sum of the costs at j paid for each of  ...

459

APPLICATION FOR FUNDING FOR EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES UNDER THE REASONABLE ACCOMODATION POLICY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

outlined in "Reasonable Accommodation Fund for Equipment and Supplies: Guiding Principles and Process and note the supplier information, model number and technical specifications where relevant) Estimated Cost $ Total Estimated Cost $ Is the requested item (s) for long term use, or to accommodate a temporary need

MacMillan, Andrew

460

Microsoft Word - Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign Providing Automated Interfaces between Legacy Systems Army National Guard Issues and Technology Impact The National Guard Bureau (NGB) requires capabilities beyond the scope of standard army systems in order to increase the efficiency and cost effectiveness of its operations. However, the NGB has limited control over the process of enhancing standard army systems. Changing these systems to introduce new capabilities for NGB can require a great deal of time and money. It is a significant achievement to leverage standard army systems to enhance NGB capabilities even when changes to these systems are not permitted or the cost of changes is prohibitive. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers a solution for this challenge called Objective

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Fuel Cell System Cost for Transporationa--2008 Cost Estimate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell System Cost for Fuel Cell System Cost for Transportation-2008 Cost Estimate National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Independent Review Published for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program NREL/BK-6A1-45457 May 2009 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

462

High-Voltage Power Supply System for Laser Isotope Separation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents several concepts for Laser High-Voltage Power Supply (HVPS) Systems for a Laser Isotope Separation facility. Selection of equipments and their arrangement into operational systems is based on proven designs and on application concepts now being developed. This report has identified a number of alternative system arrangements and has provided preliminary cost estimates for each. The report includes a recommendation for follow-on studies that will further define the optimum Laser HVPS Systems. Brief descriptions are given of Modulator/Regulator circuit trade-offs, system control interfaces, and their impact on costs.

Ketaily, E.C.; Buckner, R.P.; Uhrik, R.L.

1979-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

463

Meet the Challenge - Supply Chain | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meet the Challenge - Supply Chain Sustainable Supply Chains Submissions Let's Talk About Sustainable Supply Chain You are here Data.gov Communities Sustainable Supply Chain...

464

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: The outlook for heating oil costs this winter, due to high crude oil costs and tight heating oil supplies, breaks down to an expected increase in heating expenditures for a typical oil-heated household of more than $200 this winter, the result of an 18% increase in the average price and an 11% increase in consumption. The consumption increase is due to the colder than normal temperatures experienced so far this winter and our expectations of normal winter weather for the rest of this heating season. Last winter, Northeast heating oil (and diesel fuel) markets experienced an extremely sharp spike in prices when a severe weather situation developed in late January. It is virtually impossible to gauge the probability of a similar (or worse) price shock recurring this winter,

465

Petroleum supply monthly, June 1995 with data for April 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

1995-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

466

Petroleum supply monthly, May 1995 with data for March 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

NONE

1995-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

467

Petroleum supply monthly - with data for May 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. This document contains a glossary.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Petroleum supply monthly, September 1995 with data for July 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

NONE

1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

469

Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. Projected production estimates of US crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian/Antrim shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects US domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted profitability to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Petroleum Supply Monthly, March 1996 (with data for January 1996)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

NONE

1996-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

471

Petroleum supply monthly with data from April 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Petroleum supply monthly, with data for August 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Petroleum supply monthly, March 1999, with data for January 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four petroleum supply publications produced by the Petroleum Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the US and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the US. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

PEP MAGNET POWER SUPPLY SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bend circuit requires 1858 volts at 1319 amps or 2450 kWtotal at 18 GeV. Four 600 volt supplies will be used, two inlocation vary from 293 to 538 volts at the 18 GeV operation

Jackson, L.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Cost calculation algorithm for stand-alone photovoltaic systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photovoltaics are the technology that generates direct current (DC) electrical power measured in watts or kilowatts from semiconductors when they are illuminated by photons. Photovoltaics are the technological symbol for a future sustainable energy supply ... Keywords: PV system design, life cycle cost, photovoltaic cell, present worth, software, unit energy cost

Irfan Güney; Nevzat Onat; Gökhan Koçyi?it

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Economic analysis of geothermal energy costs  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of the computer program, GEOCOST, and its application to some analyses of the economics of geothermal energy. GEOCOST combines both technical and economic factors into one systematic cost accounting framework. The program, which simulates production of electricity from most types of geothermal resources, is composed of two parts: a reservoir model which simulates the costs associated with the exploration, development, and operation of a geothermal reservoir; and a power-plant model which simulates the costs associated with the design, construction, and operation of the power plant. The costs from the reservoir model become the energy supply costs to the power plant. The combined reservoir and power plant models represent the complete energy production system. (LBS)

Bloomster, C.H.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Impact of DOE Program Goals on Hydrogen Vehicles: Market Prospect, Costs, and Benefits - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Zhenhong Lin (Primary Contact), David Greene, Jing Dong Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) National Transportation Research Center 2360 Cherahala Boulevard Knoxville, TN 37932 Phone: (865) 946-1308 Email: linz@ornl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 2011 Project End Date: September 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Project market penetrations of hydrogen vehicles under * varied assumptions on processes of achieving the DOE program goals for fuel cells, hydrogen storage, batteries, motors, and hydrogen supply. Estimate social benefits and public costs under different *

479

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VERY LARGE SCALE INTEGRATTION (VLSI) SYSTEMS, VOL. 5, NO. 4, DECEMBER 1997 1 Energy Minimization Using Multiple Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Minimization Using Multiple Supply Voltages Jui-Ming Chang, Massoud Pedram Abstract|We present dependencies, and the energy cost of level shifters. Experimental results show that using three supply voltage level. Keywords| Energy Minimization, Multiple Supply Volt- ages, Scheduling, Dynamic Programming

Pedram, Massoud

480

Waste management facilities cost information: System cost model product description. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

In May of 1994, Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) in Idaho Falls, Idaho and subcontractors developed the System Cost Model (SCM) application. The SCM estimates life-cycle costs of the entire US Department of Energy (DOE) complex for designing; constructing; operating; and decommissioning treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities for mixed low-level, low-level, transuranic, and mixed transuranic waste. The SCM uses parametric cost functions to estimate life-cycle costs for various treatment, storage, and disposal modules which reflect planned and existing facilities at DOE installations. In addition, SCM can model new facilities based on capacity needs over the program life cycle. The SCM also provides transportation costs for DOE wastes. Transportation costs are provided for truck and rail and include transport of contact-handled, remote-handled, and alpha (transuranic) wastes. The user can provide input data (default data is included in the SCM) including the volume and nature of waste to be managed, the time period over which the waste is to be managed, and the configuration of the waste management complex (i.e., where each installation`s generated waste will be treated, stored, and disposed). Then the SCM uses parametric cost equations to estimate the costs of pre-operations (designing), construction costs, operation management, and decommissioning these waste management facilities.

Lundeen, A.S.; Hsu, K.M.; Shropshire, D.E.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation cost supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Combined Natural Gas Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Combined Natural Gas Transportation Maps Combined Natural Gas Transportation Maps About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Map of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Major Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors Map of Major Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors see related text enlarge see related text enlarge U.S. Regional Breakdown Map of U.S. Regional Breakout States (in Grey) Highly Dependent on Interstate Pipelines for Natural Gas Supplies Map of States (in Grey) Highly Dependent on Interstate Pipelines for Natural Gas Supplies

482

A unique power supply for the PEP II klystron at SLAC  

SciTech Connect

Each of the eight 1.2 MW RF klystrons for the PEP-II storage rings require a 2.5 MVA DC power supply of 83 Kv at 23 amps. The design for the supply was base on three factors, low cost, small size to fit existing substation pads, and good protection against damage to the klystron including klystron gun arcs. The supply uses a 12 pulse 12.5 KV primary thyristor star point controller with primary filter inductor to provide rapid voltage control, good voltage regulation, and fast turn off during klystron tube faults. The supply also uses a unique secondary rectifier, filter capacitor configuration to minimize the energy available under a klystron fault. The voltage control is from 0--90 KV with a regulation of < 0.1% and voltage ripple of < 1% P-P, (< 0.2% RMS) above 60 KV. The supply utilizes a thyristor crowbar, which under a klystron tube arc limits the energy in the klystron arc to < 5 joules. If the thyristor crowbar is disabled the energy supplied is < 40 joules into the arc. The size of the supply was reduced small enough to fit the existing PEP transformer yard pads. The cost of the power supply was < $140 per KVA.

Cassel, R.; Nguyen, M.N.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

High voltage DC power supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high voltage DC power supply having a first series resistor at the output for limiting current in the event of a short-circuited output, a second series resistor for sensing the magnitude of output current, and a voltage divider circuit for providing a source of feedback voltage for use in voltage regulation is disclosed. The voltage divider circuit is coupled to the second series resistor so as to compensate the feedback voltage for a voltage drop across the first series resistor. The power supply also includes a pulse-width modulated control circuit, having dual clock signals, which is responsive to both the feedback voltage and a command voltage, and also includes voltage and current measuring circuits responsive to the feedback voltage and the voltage developed across the second series resistor respectively. 7 figs.

Droege, T.F.

1989-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

484