Sample records for transportation applications eta

  1. Singular perturbation applications in neutron transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Losey, D.C. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Lee, J.C. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a paper on singular perturbation applications in neutron transport for submission at the next ANS conference. A singular perturbation technique was developed for neutron transport analysis by postulating expansion in terms of a small ordering parameter {eta}. Our perturbation analysis is carried, without approximation, through {Omicron}({eta}{sup 2}) to derive a material interface correction for diffusion theory. Here we present results from an analytical application of the perturbation technique to a fixed source problem and then describe and implementation of the technique in a computational scheme.

  2. Dust Formation Events in Colliding Winds: an application to eta Car

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Falceta-Goncalves; V. Jatenco-Pereira; Z. Abraham

    2002-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent IR observations indicate that many massive binary systems present dust formation episodes, in regions close to the stars, during the periastron passage. These systems are known to be high-energy sources, and it is believed that wind collisions are the origin of the emission. In this work we show that wind collisions not only increase the X-ray emission but also allow dust formation. As an application we study eta Car, which presents, near periastron, an increase in the X-ray emission followed by a sudden decrease that lasts for about a month. We reproduce this feature calculating the optical depth due to dust formation along the orbital period.

  3. Surety applications in transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matalucci, R.V.; Miyoshi, D.S.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Infrastructure surety can make a valuable contribution to the transportation engineering industry. The lessons learned at Sandia National Laboratories in developing surety principles and technologies for the nuclear weapons complex and the nuclear power industry hold direct applications to the safety, security, and reliability of the critical infrastructure. This presentation introduces the concepts of infrastructure surety, including identification of the normal, abnormal, and malevolent threats to the transportation infrastructure. National problems are identified and examples of failures and successes in response to environmental loads and other structural and systemic vulnerabilities are presented. The infrastructure surety principles developed at Sandia National Laboratories are described. Currently available technologies including (a) three-dimensional computer-assisted drawing packages interactively combined with virtual reality systems, (b) the complex calculational and computational modeling and code-coupling capabilities associated with the new generation of supercomputers, and (c) risk-management methodologies with application to solving the national problems associated with threats to the critical transportation infrastructure are discussed.

  4. Transportation Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (TAMS) Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transportation Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (TAMS) Application Center for Transportation Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies T he Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) TAMS application is a web-based tool that supports

  5. Panel 4 - applications to transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Au, J. [Sundstrand Aerospace, Rockford, IL (United States); Bhattacharya, R. [Universal Energy Systems, Inc., Dayton, OH (United States); Bhushan, B. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States); Blunier, D. [Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States); Boardman, B. [Deere & Co., Moline, IL (United States); Brombolich, L. [Compu-Tec Engineering, Chesterfield, MO (United States); Davidson, J. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Graham, M. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Hakim, N. [Detroit Diesel Corp., MI (United States); Harris, K. [Dubbeldee Harris Diamond Corp., Mt. Arlington, NJ (United States); Hay, R. [Norton Diamond Film, Northboro, MA (United States); Herk, L. [Southwest Research Inst., Southfield, MI (United States); Hojnacki, H.; Rourk, D. [Intelligent Structures Incorporated, Canton, MI (United States); Kamo, R. [Adiabatics, Inc., Columbus, IN (United States); Nieman, B. [Allied-Signal Inc., Des Plaines, IL (United States); O`Neill, D. [3M, St. Paul, MN (United States); Peterson, M.B. [Wear Sciences, Arnold, MD (United States); Pfaffenberger, G. [Allison Gas Turbine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Pryor, R.W. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Russell, J. [Superconductivity Publications, Inc., Somerset, NJ (United States); Syniuta, W. [Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc., Newton, MA (United States); Tamor, M. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States); Vojnovich, T. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Yarbrough, W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States); Yust, C.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this group was to compile a listing of current and anticipated future problem areas in the transportation industry where the properties of diamond and DLC films make them especially attractive and where the panel could strongly endorse the establishment of DOE/Transportation Industry cooperative research efforts. This section identifies the problem areas for possible applications of diamond/DLC technology and presents indications of current approaches to these problems.

  6. Wind motor applications for transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lysenko, G.P.; Grigoriev, B.V.; Karpin, K.B. [Moscow Aviation Inst. (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Motion equation for a vehicle equipped with a wind motor allows, taking into account the drag coefficients, to determine the optimal wind drag velocity in the wind motor`s plane, and hence, obtain all the necessary data for the wind wheel blades geometrical parameters definition. This optimal drag velocity significantly differs from the flow drag velocity which determines the maximum wind motor power. Solution of the motion equation with low drag coefficients indicates that the vehicle speed against the wind may be twice as the wind speed. One of possible transportation wind motor applications is its use on various ships. A ship with such a wind motor may be substantially easier to steer, and if certain devices are available, may proceed in autonomous control mode. Besides, it is capable of moving within narrow fairways. The cruise speed of a sailing boat and wind-motored ship were compared provided that the wind velocity direction changes along a harmonic law with regard to the motion direction. Mean dimensionless speed of the wind-motored ship appears to be by 20--25% higher than that of a sailing boat. There was analyzed a possibility of using the wind motors on planet rovers in Mars or Venus atmospheric conditions. A Mars rover power and motor system has been assessed for the power level of 3 kW.

  7. Solid fuel applications to transportation engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The utilization of solid fuels as alternatives to liquid fuels for future transportation engines is reviewed. Alternative liquid fuels will not be addressed nor will petroleum/solid fuel blends except for the case of diesel engines. With respect to diesel engines, coal/oil mixtures will be addressed because of the high interest in this specific application as a result of the large number of diesel engines currently in transportation use. Final assessments refer to solid fuels only for diesel engines. The technical assessments of solid fuels utilization for transportation engines is summarized: solid fuel combustion in transportation engines is in a non-developed state; highway transportation is not amenable to solid fuels utilization due to severe environmental, packaging, control, and disposal problems; diesel and open-cycle gas turbines do not appear worthy of further development, although coal/oil mixtures for slow speed diesels may offer some promise as a transition technology; closed-cycle gas turbines show some promise for solid fuels utilization for limited applications as does the Stirling engine for use of cleaner solid fuels; Rankine cycle engines show good potential for limited applications, such as for locomotives and ships; and any development program will require large resources and sophisticated equipment in order to advance the state-of-the-art.

  8. Eta absorption by mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Liu; C. M. Ko; L. W. Chen

    2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the $[SU(3)_{\\mathrm{L}} \\times SU(3)_{\\mathrm{R}}]_{\\mathrm{global}% }\\times [SU(3)_V]_{\\mathrm{local}}$ chiral Lagrangian with hidden local symmetry, we evaluate the cross sections for the absorption of eta meson ($% \\eta$) by pion ($\\pi$), rho ($\\rho$), omega ($\\omega$), kaon ($K$), and kaon star ($K^*$) in the tree-level approximation. With empirical masses and coupling constants as well as reasonable values for the cutoff parameter in the form factors at interaction vertices, we find that most cross sections are less than 1 mb, except the reactions $\\rho\\eta\\to K\\bar K^*(\\bar KK^*)$, $\\omega\\eta\\to K\\bar K^*(\\bar KK^*)$, $K^*\\eta\\to\\rho K$, and $K^*\\eta\\to\\omega K$, which are a few mb, and the reactions $\\pi\\eta\\to K\\bar K$ and $K\\eta\\to\\pi K$, which are more than 10 mb. Including these reactions in a kinetic model based on a schematic hydrodynamic description of relativistic heavy ion collisions, we find that the abundance of eta mesons likely reaches chemical equilibrium with other hadrons in nuclear collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  9. Quantum corrections to eta/s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert C. Myers; Miguel F. Paulos; Aninda Sinha

    2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider corrections to the ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density in strongly coupled nonabelian plasmas using the AdS/CFT correspondence. In particular, higher derivative terms with the five-form RR flux, which have been ignored in all previous calculations, are included. This provides the first reliable calculation of the leading order correction in the inverse 't Hooft coupling to the celebrated result eta/s=1/4pi. The leading correction in inverse powers of the number of colours is computed. Our results hold very generally for quiver gauge theories with an internal manifold L_pqr in the holographic dual. Our analysis implies that the thermal properties of these theories will not be affected by the five-form flux terms at this order.

  10. Enhancing the stability of kinesin motors for microscale transport applications{

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hancock, William O.

    Enhancing the stability of kinesin motors for microscale transport applications{ Maruti Uppalapati- or nanoscale active transport when integrated into microscale devices. However, the stability and limited shelf to their implementation. Here we demonstrate that freeze-drying or critical point-drying kinesins adsorbed to glass

  11. A Study of Transport Protocols for Wide Area Scientific Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vishal Misra

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final project report of award "A Study of Transport Protocols for Wide Area Scientific Applications", given by DOE in 2003 to Vishal Misra at Columbia University.

  12. Fuel cell system for transportation applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL); Ahmed, Shabbir (Evanston, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Myles, Kevin M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A propulsion system for a vehicle having pairs of front and rear wheels and a fuel tank. An electrically driven motor having an output shaft operatively connected to at least one of said pair of wheels is connected to a fuel cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by an electrolyte for producing dc power to operate the motor. A partial oxidation reformer is connected both to the fuel tank and to the fuel cell receives hydrogen-containing fuel from the fuel tank and water and air and for partially oxidizing and reforming the fuel with water and air in the presence of an oxidizing catalyst and a reforming catalyst to produce a hydrogen-containing gas. The hydrogen-containing gas is sent from the partial oxidation reformer to the fuel cell negative electrode while air is transported to the fuel cell positive electrode to produce dc power for operating the electric motor.

  13. Fuel cell system for transportation applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

    1993-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A propulsion system is described for a vehicle having pairs of front and rear wheels and a fuel tank. An electrically driven motor having an output shaft operatively connected to at least one of said pair of wheels is connected to a fuel cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by an electrolyte for producing dc power to operate the motor. A partial oxidation reformer is connected both to the fuel tank and to the fuel cell and receives hydrogen-containing fuel from the fuel tank and uses water and air for partially oxidizing and reforming the fuel in the presence of an oxidizing catalyst and a reforming catalyst to produce a hydrogen-containing gas. The hydrogen-containing gas is sent from the partial oxidation reformer to the fuel cell negative electrode while air is transported to the fuel cell positive electrode to produce dc power for operating the electric motor. 3 figures.

  14. Application of the smart portal in transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercel, S.W.; Baylor, V.M.; Dress, W.B.; Hickerson, T.W.; Jatko, W.B.; Labaj, L.E.; Muhs, J.D.; Pack, R.M.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Under a program sponsored by the Department of Energy, the Oak Ridge complex is developed a ``Portal-of-the-Future``, or ``smart portal``. This is a security portal for vehicular traffic which is intended to quickly detect explosives, hidden passengers, etc. It uses several technologies, including microwaves, weigh-in-motion, digital image processing, and electroacoustic wavelet-based heartbeat detection. A novel component of particular interest is the Enclosed Space Detection System (ESDS), which detects the presence of persons hiding in a vehicle. The system operates by detecting the presence of a human ballistocardiographic signature. Each time the heart beats, it generates a small but measurable shock wave that propagates through the body. The wave, whose graph is called a ballistocardiogram, is the mechanical analog of the electrocardiogram, which is routinely used for medical diagnosis. The wave is, in turn, coupled to any surface or object with which the body is in contact. If the body is located in an enclosed space, this will result in a measurable deflection of the surface of the enclosure. Independent testing has shown ESDS to be highly reliable. The technologies used in the smart portal operate in real time and allow vehicles to be checked through the portal in much less time than would be required for human inspection. Although not originally developed for commercial transportation, the smart portal has the potential to solve several transportation problems. It could relieve congestion at international highway border crossings by reducing the time required to inspect each vehicle while increasing the level of security. It can reduce highway congestion at the entrance of secure facilities such as prisons. Also, it could provide security at intermodal transfer points, such as airport parking lots and car ferry terminals.

  15. Diffusion in random velocity fields with applications to contaminant transport in groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suciu, Nicolae

    Diffusion in random velocity fields with applications to contaminant transport in groundwater is the mathematical object underlying cur- rently used stochastic models of transport in groundwater. The essential: Groundwater, Transport processes, Ergodicity, Random fields, Random walk, PDF methods 1. Introduction

  16. Polymer Nanofibers and Nanotubes: Charge Transport and Device Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey N. Aleshin

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A critical analysis of recent advances in synthesis and electrical characterization of nanofibers and nanotubes made of different conjugated polymers is presented. The applicability of various theoretical models is considered in order to explain results on transport in conducting polymer nanofibers and nanotubes. The relationship between these results and the one-dimensional (1D) nature of the conjugated polymers is discussed in light of theories for tunneling in 1D conductors (e.g. Luttinger liquid, Wigner crystal). The prospects for nanoelectronic applications of polymer fibers and tubes as wires, nanoscale field-effect transistors (nanoFETs), and in other applications are analyzed.

  17. Diamond and diamond-like films for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, J.M.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This section is a compilation of transparency templates which describe the goals of the Office of Transportation Materials (OTM) Tribology Program. The positions of personnel on the OTM are listed. The role and mission of the OTM is reviewed. The purpose of the Tribology Program is stated to be `to obtain industry input on program(s) in tribology/advanced lubricants areas of interest`. The objective addressed here is to identify opportunities for cost effective application of diamond and diamond-like carbon in transportation systems.

  18. PEM fuel cells for transportation and stationary power generation applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleghorn, S.J.; Ren, X.; Springer, T.E.; Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe recent activities at LANL devoted to polymer electrolyte fuel cells in the contexts of stationary power generation and transportation applications. A low cost/high performance hydrogen or reformate/air stack technology is being developed based on ultralow Pt loadings and on non-machined, inexpensive elements for flow-fields and bipolar plates. On board methanol reforming is compared to the option of direct methanol fuel cells because of recent significant power density increases demonstrated in the latter.

  19. Search for Invisible Decays of {eta} and {eta}{sup '} in J/{psi}{yields}{phi}{eta} and {phi}{eta}{sup '}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; Bai, J. Z.; Bian, J. G.; Cai, X.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. X.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, Jin; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Cui, X. Z.; Deng, Z. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, C. S.; Gu, S. D.; Guo, Y. N.; Guo, Y. Q.; He, K. L. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049 (China)] (and others)

    2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a data sample of 58x10{sup 6} J/{psi} decays collected with the Beijing Spectrometer II detector at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider, searches for invisible decays of {eta} and {eta}{sup '} in J/{psi} to {phi}{eta} and {phi}{eta}{sup '} are performed. The {phi} signals, which are reconstructed in K{sup +}K{sup -} final states, are used to tag the {eta} and {eta}{sup '} decays. No signals are found for the invisible decays of either {eta} or {eta}{sup '}, and upper limits at the 90% confidence level are determined to be 1.65x10{sup -3} for the ratio (B({eta}{yields}invisible)/B({eta}{yields}{gamma}{gamma})) and 6.69x10{sup -2} for (B({eta}{sup '}{yields}invisible)/B({eta}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{gamma})). These are the first searches for {eta} and {eta}{sup '} decays into invisible final states.

  20. Study of B{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup (')} decays and determination of {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing angle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Jingwu [Department of Physics, Xu Zhou Normal University, XuZhou 221116 (China); Du Dongsheng [Institute of High Energy Physics, P.O. Box 918(4), Beijing 100049 (China)

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study B{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup (')} decays and suggest two methods to determine the {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing angle. We calculate not only the factorizable contribution in the QCD factorization scheme but also the nonfactorizable hard spectator corrections in the pQCD approach. We get the branching ratio of B{yields}J/{psi}{eta}, which is consistent with recent experimental data, and predict the branching ratio of B{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '} to be 7.59x10{sup -6}. Two methods for determining the {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing angle are suggested in this paper. For the first method, we get the {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing angle to be about -13.1 deg., which is consistent with others in the literature. The second method depends on fewer parameters and can thus be used to determine the {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing angle with better accuracy but needs, as an input, the branching ratio for B{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '}, which should be measured in the near future.

  1. Measurement of the {eta}{sup '}-Meson Mass using J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Libby, J.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Wilkinson, G. [University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Ecklund, K. M. [State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); Love, W.; Savinov, V. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Mendez, H. [University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico); Ge, J. Y.; Miller, D. H.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Adams, G. S.; Anderson, M.; Cummings, J. P.; Danko, I.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); He, Q. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)] (and others)

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the mass of the {eta}{sup '} meson using {psi}(2S){yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}J/{psi}, J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '} events acquired with the CLEO-c detector operating at the CESR e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. Using three decay modes, {eta}{sup '}{yields}{rho}{sup 0}{gamma}, {eta}{sup '}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{eta} with {eta}{yields}{gamma}{gamma}, and {eta}{sup '}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{eta} with {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, we find M{sub {eta}{sup '}}=957.793{+-}0.054{+-}0.036 MeV, in which the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This result is consistent with but substantially more precise than the current world average.

  2. $\\eta$ and $\\eta'$ transition form factors from Pad\\'e approximants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez-Puertas, Pablo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We employ a systematic and model-independent method to extract, from space- and time-like data, the $\\eta$ and $\\eta'$ transition form factors (TFFs) obtaining the most precise determination for their low-energy parameters and discuss the $\\Gamma_{\\eta\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma}$ impact on them. Using TFF data alone, we also extract the $\\eta-\\eta'$ mixing parameters, which are compatible to those obtained from more sophisticated and input-demanding procedures.

  3. Framework Application for Core Edge Transport Simulation (FACETS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Pigarov, Alexander

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The FACETS (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) project of Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program was aimed at providing a high-fidelity whole-tokamak modeling for the U.S. magnetic fusion energy program and ITER through coupling separate components for each of the core region, edge region, and wall, with realistic plasma particles and power sources and turbulent transport simulation. The project also aimed at developing advanced numerical algorithms, efficient implicit coupling methods, and software tools utilizing the leadership class computing facilities under Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR). The FACETS project was conducted by a multi-discipline, multi-institutional teams, the Lead PI was J.R. Cary (Tech-X Corp.). In the FACETS project, the Applied Plasma Theory Group at the MAE Department of UCSD developed the Wall and Plasma-Surface Interaction (WALLPSI) module, performed its validation against experimental data, and integrated it into the developed framework. WALLPSI is a one-dimensional, coarse grained, reaction/advection/diffusion code applied to each material boundary cell in the common modeling domain for a tokamak. It incorporates an advanced model for plasma particle transport and retention in the solid matter of plasma facing components, simulation of plasma heat power load handling, calculation of erosion/deposition, and simulation of synergistic effects in strong plasma-wall coupling.

  4. STOMP Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases: Application guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, W.E.; Aimo, N.J.; Oostrom, M.; White, M.D.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through the Office of Technology Development, has requested the demonstration of remediation technologies for the cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated radionuclides within the soil and ground water at arid sites. This demonstration program, called the VOC-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstrated Program (Arid-ID), has been initially directed at a volume of unsaturated and saturated soil contaminated with carbon tetrachloride on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. A principal subtask of the Arid-ID program involves the development of an integrated engineering simulator for evaluating the effectiveness and efficiency of various remediation technologies. The engineering simulator`s intended users include scientists and engineers who are investigating soil physics phenomena associated with remediation technologies. Principal design goals for the engineering simulator include broad applicability, verified algorithms, quality assurance controls, and validated simulations against laboratory and field-scale experiments. An important goal for the simulator development subtask involves the ability to scale laboratory and field-scale experiments to full-scale remediation technologies, and to transfer acquired technology to other arid sites. The STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator has been developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for modeling remediation technologies. Information on the use, application, and theoretical basis of the STOMP simulator are documented in three companion guide guides. This document, the Application Guide, provides a suite of example applications of the STOMP simulator.

  5. Eta Car and other LBVs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. F. Corcoran

    2007-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) are believed to be evolved, extremely massive stars close to the Eddington Limit and hence prone to bouts of large-scale, unstable mass loss. I discuss current understanding of the evolutionary state of these objects, the role duplicity may play and known physical characteristics of these stars using the X-ray luminous LBVs Eta Carinae and HD 5980 as test cases.

  6. An artificial neural network controller for intelligent transportation systems applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitela, J.E.; Hanebutte, U.R.; Reifman, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Reactor Analysis Div.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Autonomous Intelligent Cruise Control (AICC) has been designed using a feedforward artificial neural network, as an example for utilizing artificial neural networks for nonlinear control problems arising in intelligent transportation systems applications. The AICC is based on a simple nonlinear model of the vehicle dynamics. A Neural Network Controller (NNC) code developed at Argonne National Laboratory to control discrete dynamical systems was used for this purpose. In order to test the NNC, an AICC-simulator containing graphical displays was developed for a system of two vehicles driving in a single lane. Two simulation cases are shown, one involving a lead vehicle with constant velocity and the other a lead vehicle with varying acceleration. More realistic vehicle dynamic models will be considered in future work.

  7. Effects of refrigeration in a transportable cryogenic aerospace application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan, B.D.; Mahefkey, T. [Wright Lab., Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States); Ramalingam, M.L. [UES, Inc., Dayton, OH (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary feasibility studies, based on refrigeration thermodynamics, have been conducted for candidate power conditioning components in a 1MWe terrestrial/transportable cryogenic power system. The cryogenic power system being considered has a super conducting generator for high power applications such as the power source for a Ground Based Radar (GBR) System. While the superconducting generator operates at 77K or lower, the present analysis indicates that significant benefits cannot be derived by cooling the various components of the power conditioning system to such low temperatures. It was found that, by operating the power conditioning component at 150K instead of at 77K the overall system efficiency was not jeopardized by way of large input power requirements to dissipate small refrigerator loads. This is an acute problem as current cryogenic refrigeration systems allow for very low levels of energy dissipation while performing at about 7 to 10% of the Carnot coefficients of performance (COP) between 300K and 77K.

  8. The porous atmosphere of eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nir J. Shaviv

    2000-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the wind generated by the great 20 year long super-Eddington outburst of eta-Carinae. We show that using classical stellar atmospheres and winds theory, it is impossible to construct a consistent wind model in which a sufficiently small amount of mass, like the one observed, is shed. One expects the super-Eddington luminosity to drive a thick wind with a mass loss rate substantially higher than the observed one. The easiest way to resolve the inconsistency is if we alleviate the implicit notion that atmospheres are homogeneous. An inhomogeneous atmosphere, or "porous", allows more radiation to escape while exerting a smaller average force. Consequently, such an atmosphere yields a considerably lower mass loss rate for the same total luminosity. Moreover, all the applications of the Eddington Luminosity as a strict luminosity limit should be revised, or at least reanalyzed carefully.

  9. Experimental test accelerator (ETA) II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fessenden, T.J.; Atchison, W.L.; Birx, D.L.

    1981-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) is designed to produce a 10 kAmp electron beam at an energy of 4.5 MeV in 40 nsec pulses at an average rate of 2 pps. The accelerator also operates in bursts of 5 pulses spaced by as little as one millisec at an average rate of 5 pps. The machine is currently operating near 80% of its design values and has accumulated over 2.5 million pulses - mostly at a rate of one pps. The plasma cathode electron source, the remainder of the accelerator, and the operating characteristics of the machine are discussed.

  10. Application of robust and inverse optimization in transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Thai Dung

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the use of inverse and robust optimization to address two problems in transportation: finding the travel times and designing a transportation network. We assume that users choose the route selfishly and the flow ...

  11. Measurements of {psi}(2S) decays into {phi}{pi}{sup 0}, {phi}{eta}, {phi}{eta}{sup '}, {omega}{eta}, and {omega}{eta}{sup '}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; Bai, J.Z.; Bian, J.G.; Cai, X.; Chang, J.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chen, H.X.; Chen, J.C.; Chen Jin; Chen, M.L.; Chen, Y.B.; Chu, Y.P.; Cui, X.Z.; Dai, H.L.; Deng, Z.Y.; Dong, L.Y.; Du, S.X.; Du, Z.Z.; Fang, J.; Fu, C.D. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039 (China)] [and others

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decays of the {psi}(2S) into vector plus pseudoscalar meson final states have been studied with 14x10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) events collected with the BESII detector. Branching fractions of {psi}(2S){yields}{phi}{eta}, {phi}{eta}{sup '}, and {omega}{eta}{sup '}, and upper limits of {psi}(2S){yields}{phi}{pi}{sup 0} and {omega}{eta} are obtained: B({psi}(2S){yields}{phi}{eta})=(3.3{+-}1.1{+-}0.5)x10{sup -5}, B({psi}(2S){yields}{phi}{eta}{sup '})=(3.1{+-}1.4{+-}0.7)x10{sup -5}, and B({psi}(2S){yields}{omega}{eta}{sup '})=(3.2{sub -2.0}{sup +2.4}{+-}0.7)x10{sup -5}; and B({psi}(2S){yields}{phi}{pi}{sup 0})<0.40x10{sup -5}, and B({psi}(2S){yields}{omega}{eta})<3.1x10{sup -5} at the 90% C.L. These results are used to test the perturbative QCD ''12% rule.''.

  12. Theoretical Description of Heavy Impurity Transport and its Application to the Modelling of Tungsten in JET and ASDEX Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theoretical Description of Heavy Impurity Transport and its Application to the Modelling of Tungsten in JET and ASDEX Upgrade

  13. Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive Committee Getting to Berkeley...

  14. Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Print Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive Committee Getting to...

  15. Fractional derivatives and CTRWs: applications to plasma turbulent transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín-Solís, José Ramón

    ? Use experimental scaling-laws as engineers do to build aeroplanes. · Energy confinement time does not scale with size or forcing as expected: - extE SL Bohm scaling, =1 Power degradation, =0.5 · Up not be diffusive: scale-free transport · Why? Quantitative modelling of transport and losses in these systems

  16. Portal: Applications of New Technology to Transportation Data Archiving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufte, Kristin

    Transportation Data Archive (2004-...) ! Portland Observatory (2013-...) #12;+ New Technologies Big Data, Cloud Data's Implications for Transportation Operations: An Exploration ! White Paper ­ March 2014; Prepared Slide credit: Adam Moore, Miguel Figliozzi, PSU #12;+ The Cloud: NoSQL vs. NewSQL vs. RDBMS ! Cloud

  17. Plasma transport in a converging magnetic field with applications to helicon plasma thrusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choueiri, Edgar

    .1, which represents a new design criteria for helicon plasma thrusters. I. Introduction ElectrodelessPlasma transport in a converging magnetic field with applications to helicon plasma thrusters IEPC University, Princeton, New Jersey, 08540, USA Plasma transport in the convergent magnetic field region

  18. THERMAL EFFECTS ON DROPLET TRANSPORT IN DIGITIAL MICROFLUIDICS WITH APPLICATIONS TO CHIP COOLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    THERMAL EFFECTS ON DROPLET TRANSPORT IN DIGITIAL MICROFLUIDICS WITH APPLICATIONS TO CHIP COOLING, on a platform we call "digital microfluidics," where nanoliter-sized discrete liquid droplets immersed in oil-dependent system parameters on droplet transport in this digital microfluidic platform. We demonstrate

  19. Integration Of Locational Decisions with the Household Activity Pattern Problem and Its Applications in Transportation Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jee E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hazardous materials transportation: risk analysis, routing/scheduling and facility location,locations, several papers present applications, such as medicine (Or and Pierskalla, 1979; Chan et al, 2001), waste/hazardous

  20. Integration of Locational Decisions with the Household Activity Pattern Problem and Its Applications in Transportation Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jee Eun

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hazardous materials transportation: risk analysis, routing/scheduling and facility location,locations, several papers present applications, such as medicine (Or and Pierskalla, 1979; Chan et al, 2001), waste/hazardous

  1. Charmonium decays to {gamma}{pi}{sup 0}, {gamma}{eta}, and {gamma}{eta}{sup '}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedlar, T. K.; Xavier, J. [Luther College, Decorah, Iowa 52101 (United States); Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Hietala, J.; Klein, T.; Poling, R.; Zweber, P. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tan, B. J. Y.; Tomaradze, A. [Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Libby, J.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Thomas, C.; Wilkinson, G. [University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Mendez, H. [University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico); Ge, J. Y. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] (and others)

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using data acquired with the CLEO-c detector at the CESR e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, we measure branching fractions for J/{psi}, {psi}(2S), and {psi}(3770) decays to {gamma}{pi}{sup 0}, {gamma}{eta}, and {gamma}{eta}{sup '}. Defining R{sub n}{identical_to}B[{psi}(nS){yields}{gamma}{eta}]/B[{psi}(nS){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '}], we obtain R{sub 1}=(21.1{+-}0.9)% and, unexpectedly, an order of magnitude smaller limit, R{sub 2}<1.8% at 90% C.L. We also use J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '} events to determine branching fractions of improved precision for the five most copious {eta}{sup '} decay modes.

  2. Ballistic Transport in Nanostructures, and its Application to Functionalized Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzari, Nicola

    We developed and implemented a first-principles based theory of the Landauer ballistic conductance, to determine the transport properties of nanostructures and molecular-electronics devices. Our approach starts from a ...

  3. Phenomenology of some rare and forbidden. eta. -decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herczeg, P.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the contribution from possible new physics to the decays {eta} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}, {eta} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, {eta} {yields} {mu}e and {eta} {pi}{mu}e, and assess the sensitivities required for experimental studies of these decays to extend our knowledge about the new interactions. 61 refs.

  4. A partially quenched analysis of the eta-eta' system in N_f=2 QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, H; Negele, John W; Schilling, K; Lippert, Th.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a first, comprehensive partially quenched study of the eta-eta' problem, based on SESAM configurations on a 16^3x32 lattice at beta=5.6 QCD with two (mass degenerate) active sea quark flavours. By means of the spectral approximation of the two-loop (hairpin) diagrams, we find clear plateau formation in the effective masses which enables us both to determine the eta-eta' mass matrix and the alpha-parameter in the effective chiral Lagrangian for the flavour singlet sector, alpha=0.028 +- 0.013.

  5. A study of the eta eta channel produced in central pp interactions at 450 GeV/c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The WA102 Collaboration; D. Barberis

    2000-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The reaction pp -> pf (eta eta) ps has been studied at 450 GeV/c. For the first time a partial wave analysis of the centrally produced eta eta system has been performed. Signals for the f0(1500), f0(1710) and f2(2150) are observed and the decay branching fractions of these states are determined.

  6. Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinson, Steve

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation in ancient Egypt entailed the use of boats2007 Land transport in Roman Egypt: A study of economics andDieter 1991 Building in Egypt: Pharaonic stone masonry. New

  7. Application of reactive transport modelling to growth and transport of microorganisms in the capillary fringe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hron, Pavel; Bastian, Peter; Gallert, Claudia; Winter, Josef; Ippisch, Olaf

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multicomponent multiphase reactive transport simulator has been developed to facilitate the investigation of a large variety of phenomena in porous media including component transport, diffusion, microbiological growth and decay, cell attachment and detachment and phase exchange. The coupled problem is solved using operator splitting. This approach allows a flexible adaptation of the solution strategy to the concrete problem. Moreover, the individual submodels were optimised to be able to describe behaviour of Escherichia coli (HB101 K12 pGLO) in the capillary fringe in the presence or absence of dissolved organic carbon and oxygen under steady-state and flow conditions. Steady-state and flow through experiments in a Hele-Shaw cell, filled with quartz sand, were conducted to study eutrophic bacterial growth and transport in both saturated and unsaturated porous media. As E. coli cells can form the green fluorescent protein (GFP), the cell densities, calculated by evaluation of measured fluorescence intensit...

  8. Thermal Transport in Porous Media with Application to Fuel Cell Diffusion Media and Metal Foams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Thermal Transport in Porous Media with Application to Fuel Cell Diffusion Media and Metal Foams to Fuel Cell Diffusion Media and Metal Foams by Ehsan Sadeghi B.Sc., Sharif University of Technology, Iran make them excellent candidates for a variety of thermofluid applications including fuel cells, compact

  9. A Lagrangian subgridscale model for particle transport improvement and application in the Adriatic Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgökmen, Tamay M.

    such as dispersion of pollutants, biological species, and sediments. Forecasting of the Lagrangian pathways of the dispersion of pollutants, biological species, and sediments. At the basis of such applications is the transA Lagrangian subgridscale model for particle transport improvement and application in the Adriatic

  10. FACETS: Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -institutional main project: Tech-X (Physics, CS/AM); LLNL (Physics, CS/AM); PPPL (Physics); ANL (CS/AM); UCSD (Physics); CSU (AM); ORNL (CS, perf); ParaTools (CS, perf) · Appended SAP: GA, ORNL · Advisory: Columbia transitions · Core is a collisionless, 1D transport system with local, only-cross-surface fluxes · Edge

  11. Single eta production in heavy quarkonia: breakdown of multipole expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. A. Simonov; A. I. Veselov

    2008-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The $\\eta$ production in the $(n,n')$ bottomonium transitions $\\Upsilon (n) \\to \\Upsilon (n') \\eta, $ is studied in the method used before for dipion heavy quarkonia transitions. The widths $\\Gamma_\\eta(n,n')$ are calculated without fitting parameters for $n=2,3,4,5, n'=1$. Resulting $\\Gamma_\\eta(4,1)$ is found to be large in agreement with recent data. Multipole expansion method is shown to be inadequate for large size systems considered.

  12. A SEA CHANGE IN ETA CARINAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehner, Andrea; Davidson, Kris; Humphreys, Roberta M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Martin, John C. [University of Illinois Springfield, Springfield, IL 62703 (United States); Ishibashi, Kazunori [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Ferland, Gary J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Walborn, Nolan R., E-mail: mehner@astro.umn.ed [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major stellar-wind emission features in the spectrum of {eta} Car have recently decreased by factors of order 2 relative to the continuum. This is unprecedented in the modern observational record. The simplest, but unproven, explanation is a rapid decrease in the wind density.

  13. Superluminous supernovae: No threat from Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian C. Thomas; Adrian L. Melott; Brian D. Fields; Barbara J. Anthony-Twarog

    2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently Supernova 2006gy was noted as the most luminous ever recorded, with a total radiated energy of ~10^44 Joules. It was proposed that the progenitor may have been a massive evolved star similar to eta Carinae, which resides in our own galaxy at a distance of about 2.3 kpc. eta Carinae appears ready to detonate. Although it is too distant to pose a serious threat as a normal supernova, and given its rotation axis is unlikely to produce a Gamma-Ray Burst oriented toward the Earth, eta Carinae is about 30,000 times nearer than 2006gy, and we re-evaluate it as a potential superluminous supernova. We find that given the large ratio of emission in the optical to the X-ray, atmospheric effects are negligible. Ionization of the atmosphere and concomitant ozone depletion are unlikely to be important. Any cosmic ray effects should be spread out over ~10^4 y, and similarly unlikely to produce any serious perturbation to the biosphere. We also discuss a new possible effect of supernovae, endocrine disruption induced by blue light near the peak of the optical spectrum. This is a possibility for nearby supernovae at distances too large to be considered "dangerous" for other reasons. However, due to reddening and extinction by the interstellar medium, eta Carinae is unlikely to trigger such effects to any significant degree.

  14. THE ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES ACCEPTANCE (ETA) PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christina B. Behr-Andres

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Environmental Technologies Acceptance (ETA) Program at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is to advance the development, commercial acceptance, and timely deployment of selected private sector technologies for the cleanup of sites in the nuclear defense complex as well as the greater market. As a result of contract changes approved by National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) representatives to incorporate activities previously conducted under another NETL agreement, there are now an additional task and an expansion of activities within the stated scope of work of the ETA program. As shown in Table 1, this cooperative agreement, funded by NETL (No. DE-FC26-00NT40840), consists of four tasks: Technology Selection, Technology Development, Technology Verification, and System Engineering. As currently conceived, ETA will address the needs of as many technologies as appropriate under its current 3-year term. There are currently four technical subtasks: Long-Term Stewardship Initiative at the Mound Plant Site; Photocatalysis of Mercury-Contaminated Water; Subcritical Water Treatment of PCB and Metal-Contaminated Paint Waste; and Vegetative Covers for Low-Level Waste Repositories. This report covers activities during the second six months of the three-year ETA program.

  15. Search for rare and forbidden eta ' decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, X.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched for rare and forbidden decays of the eta' meson in hadronic events at the CLEO II detector. The search is conducted on 4.80 fb(-1) of e(+)e(-) collisions at 10.6 GeV center-of-mass energy at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. We...

  16. A renewed look at eta' in medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youngshin Kwon; Su Houng Lee; Kenji Morita; Gyuri Wolf

    2012-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the question of whether the U_A(1) symmetry is effectively restored in hot and dense medium. In particular, by generalizing the Witten-Veneziano formula to finite temperature, we investigate whether the mass of eta'-meson will change in medium due to the restoration of chiral symmetry.

  17. Application for Special Use Parking Permit Parking and Transportation Services EMPLOYEES ONLY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Application for Special Use Parking Permit Parking and Transportation Services EMPLOYEES ONLY (657 CHAIR/ DIRECTOR NAME CSUF EMAIL ADDRESS DAY PHONE # DEPARTMENT Individual Special Permit Department "Shared Use" Special Permit Please provide a written explanation of the purpose for the Special Use Permit

  18. Old F-Area Seepage Basin Transport Analyses in Support of a SCDHEC Mixing Zone Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleman, S.E.

    1998-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the groundwater flow and transport results presented in the groundwater mixing zone application (GWMZ) for the Old F-Area Seepage Basin (OFASB) submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in March, 1997 (WSRC, 1997).

  19. Differential cross sections for the reactions gamma p-> p eta and gamma p -> p eta-prime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Williams; Z. Krahn; D. Applegate; M. Bellis; C. A. Meyer; for the CLAS Collaboration

    2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    High-statistics differential cross sections for the reactions gamma p -> p eta and gamma p -> p eta-prime have been measured using the CLAS at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass energies from near threshold up to 2.84 GeV. The eta-prime results are the most precise to date and provide the largest energy and angular coverage. The eta measurements extend the energy range of the world's large-angle results by approximately 300 MeV. These new data, in particular the eta-prime measurements, are likely to help constrain the analyses being performed to search for new baryon resonance states.

  20. Flow visualization using momentum and energy transport tubes and applications to turbulent flow in wind farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Johan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a generalization of the mass-flux based classical stream-tube, the concept of momentum and energy transport tubes is discussed as a flow visualization tool. These transport tubes have the property, respectively, that no fluxes of momentum or energy exist over their respective tube mantles. As an example application using data from large-eddy simulation, such tubes are visualized for the mean-flow structure of turbulent flow in large wind farms, in fully developed wind-turbine-array boundary layers. The three-dimensional organization of energy transport tubes changes considerably when turbine spacings are varied, enabling the visualization of the path taken by the kinetic energy flux that is ultimately available at any given turbine within the array.

  1. Physics and Outlook for Rare, All-neutral Eta Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mack, David J. [JLAB

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The $\\eta$ meson provides a laboratory to study isospin violation and search for new flavor-conserving sources of C and CP violation with a sensitivity approaching $10^{-6}$ of the isospin-conserving strong amplitude. Some of the most interesting rare $\\eta$ decays are the neutral modes, yet the effective loss of photons from the relatively common decay $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\pi^0 \\rightarrow 6\\gamma$ (33$\\%$) has largely limited the sensitivity for decays producing 3-5$\\gamma$'s. Particularly important relevant branches include the highly suppressed $\\eta \\rightarrow \\pi^0 2\\gamma \\rightarrow 4\\gamma$, which provides a rare window on testing models of $O(p^6)$ contributions in ChPTh, and $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\gamma$ and $\\eta \\rightarrow 2\\pi^0 \\gamma \\rightarrow 5\\gamma$ which provide direct constraints on C violation in flavor-conserving processes. The substitution of lead tungstate in the forward calorimeter of the GluEx setup in Jefferson Lab's new Hall D would allow dramatically improved measurements. The main niche of this facility, which we call the JLab Eta Factory (JEF), would be $\\eta$ decay neutral modes. However, this could likely be expanded to rare $\\eta'(958)$ decays for low energy QCD studies as well as $\\eta$ decays involving muons for new physics searches.

  2. The Neutral Decay Modes of the Eta-Meson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. M. K. Nefkens; J. W. Price

    2002-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutral decay modes of the eta meson are reviewed. The most recent results obtained with the Crystal Ball multiphoton detector at BNL are incorporated. This includes a new, precise result for the slope parameter alpha of the Dalitz plot in eta -> 3pi0 decay and a new, lower branching ratio for eta -> pi0 gamma gamma which is consistent with chiral perturbation theory. Recently-obtained limits are given for novel tests of CP and C invariance based on several rare eta decays.

  3. The exotic eta'pi- Wave in 190 GeV pi-p --> pi-eta'p at COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Schlüter; for the COMPASS Collaboration

    2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample of 35,000 events of the type pi-p --> eta'pi-p_slow (eta' --> eta pi-pi+, eta --> gamma gamma) with -t>0.1 GeV^2/c^2 was selected from COMPASS 2008 data for a partial-wave analysis. We study the broad P_+ structure known from previous experiments at lower energies, in particular its phase motion relative to the D_+-wave near the a_2(1320) mass and relative to a broad D_+-wave structure at higher mass. We also find the a_4(2040). We compare kinematic plots for the eta'pi^- and eta pi- final states.

  4. Irradiation of commercial, high-Tc superconducting tape for potential fusion applications: electromagnetic transport properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aytug, Tolga [ORNL; Gapud, Albert A. [University of South Alabama, Mobile; List III, Frederick Alyious [ORNL; Leonard, Keith J [ORNL; Rupich, Marty [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Greenwood, N T [University of South Alabama, Mobile; Alexander, J A [University of South Alabama, Mobile; Khan, A [University of South Alabama, Mobile

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of low dose irradiation on the electrical transport current properties of commercially available high-temperature superconducting, coated-conductor tapes were investigated, in view of potential applications in the irradiative environment of fusion reactors. Three different tapes, each with unique as-grown flux-pinning structures, were irradiated with Au and Ni ions at energies that provide a range of damage effects, with accumulated damage levels near that expected for conductors in a fusion reactor environment. Measurements using transport current determined the pre- and post-irradiation resistivity, critical current density, and pinning force density, yielding critical temperatures, irreversibility lines, and inferred vortex creep rates. Results show that at the irradiation damage levels tested, any detriment to as-grown pre-irradiation properties is modest; indeed in one case already-superior pinning forces are enhanced, leading to higher critical currents.

  5. A LIGHTHOUSE EFFECT IN ETA CARINAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madura, Thomas I.; Groh, Jose H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new model for the behavior of scattered time-dependent, asymmetric near-UV emission from the nearby ejecta of {eta} Car. Using a three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical simulation of {eta} Car's binary colliding winds, we show that the 3D binary orientation derived by Madura et al. in 2012 is capable of explaining the asymmetric near-UV variability observed in the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/High Resolution Camera F220W images of Smith et al.. Models assuming a binary orientation with i Almost-Equal-To 130 Degree-Sign -145 Degree-Sign , {omega} Almost-Equal-To 230 Degree-Sign -315 Degree-Sign , P.A.{sub z} Almost-Equal-To 302 Degree-Sign -327 Degree-Sign are consistent with the observed F220W near-UV images. We find that the hot binary companion does not significantly contribute to the near-UV excess observed in the F220W images. Rather, we suggest that a bore-hole effect and the reduction of Fe II optical depths inside the wind-wind collision cavity carved in the extended photosphere of the primary star lead to the time-dependent directional illumination of circumbinary material as the companion moves about in its highly elliptical orbit.

  6. MID-CYCLE CHANGES IN ETA CARINAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, John C. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Illinois, Springfield, IL 62703 (United States); Davidson, Kris; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Mehner, Andrea [Astronomy Department, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In late 2006, ground-based photometry of {eta} Car plus the Homunculus showed an unexpected decrease in its integrated apparent brightness, an apparent reversal of its long-term brightening. Subsequent Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/WFPC2 photometry of the central star in the near-UV showed that this was not a simple reversal. This multi-wavelength photometry did not support increased extinction by dust as the explanation for the decrease in brightness. A spectrum obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on the Gemini-South telescope revealed subtle changes mid-way in {eta} Car's 5.5 yr spectroscopic cycle when compared with HST/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) spectra at the same phase in the cycle. At mid-cycle the secondary star is 20-30 AU from the primary. We suggest that the spectroscopic changes are consistent with fluctuations in the density and velocity of the primary star's wind, unrelated to the 5.5 yr cycle but possibly related to its latitude-dependent morphology. We also discuss subtle effects that must be taken into account when comparing ground-based and HST/STIS spectra.

  7. The Systemic Velocity of Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution spectra of molecular hydrogen in the Homunculus nebula allow for the first direct measurement of the systemic velocity of Eta Carinae. Near-infrared long-slit data for H2 1-0 S(1) lambda 21218 obtained with the Phoenix spectrometer on the Gemini South telescope give Vsys=-8.1pm1 km/s (heliocentric), or VLSR=-19.7pm1 km/s, from the average of the near and far sides of the Homunculus. This measurement considerably improves the precision for the value of -7pm10 km/s inferred from neighboring O-type stars in the Carina nebula. New near-infrared spectra also provide a high-resolution line profile of [Fe II] lambda 16435 emission from gas condensations known as the Weigelt objects without contamination from the central star, revealing a line shape with complex kinematic structure. Previously, uncertainty in the Weigelt knots' kinematics was dominated by the adopted systemic velocity of Eta Car.

  8. FUEL DEVICE APPLICATION Use this application to request a fuel device to access the University of Michigan (U-M) Parking and Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    FUEL DEVICE APPLICATION Use this application to request a fuel device to access the University of Michigan (U-M) Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) service stations for fuel. A fuel device owned and managed by PTS Fleet Services equipped with an automated fuel device. Please read the Use

  9. Direct methanol fuel cells for transportation applications. Quarterly technical report, June 1996--September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, T.F.; Kunz, H.R.; Moore, R.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research and development effort is to advance the performance and viability of direct methanol fuel cell technology for light-duty transportation applications. For fuel cells to be an attractive alternative to conventional automotive power plants, the fuel cell stack combined with the fuel processor and ancillary systems must be competitive in terms of both performance and costs. A major advantage for the direct methanol fuel cell is that a fuel processor is not required. A direct methanol fuel cell has the potential of satisfying the demanding requirements for transportation applications, such as rapid start-up and rapid refueling. The preliminary goals of this effort are: (1) 310 W/l, (2) 445 W/kg, and (3) potential manufacturing costs of $48/kW. In the twelve month period for phase 1, the following critical areas will be investigated: (1) an improved proton-exchange membrane that is more impermeable to methanol, (2) improved cathode catalysts, and (3) advanced anode catalysts. In addition, these components will be combined to form membrane-electrode assemblies (MEA`s) and evaluated in subscale tests. Finally a conceptual design and program plan will be developed for the construction of a 5 kW direct methanol stack in phase II of the program.

  10. Measurement of $J/\\psi\\to\\gamma\\eta_{\\rm c}$ decay rate and $\\eta_{\\rm c}$ parameters at KEDR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anashin, V V; Baldin, E M; Barladyan, A K; Barnyakov, A Yu; Barnyakov, M Yu; Baru, S E; Basok, I Yu; Bedny, I V; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bobrov, A V; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bogomyagkov, A V; Bondar, A E; Buzykaev, A R; Eidelman, S I; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Gulevich, V V; Gusev, D V; Karnaev, S E; Karpov, G V; Karpov, S V; Kharlamova, T A; Kiselev, V A; Kononov, S A; Kotov, K Yu; Kravchenko, E A; Kulikov, V F; Kurkin, G Ya; Kuper, E A; Levichev, E B; Maksimov, D A; Malyshev, V M; Maslennikov, A L; Medvedko, A S; Meshkov, O I; Mishnev, S I; Morozov, I I; Muchnoi, N Yu; Neufeld, V V; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Okunev, I N; Onuchin, A P; Oreshkin, S B; Orlov, I O; Osipov, A A; Peleganchuk, S V; Pivovarov, S G; Piminov, P A; Petrov, V V; Poluektov, A O; Pospelov, G E; Prisekin, V G; Rezanova, O L; Ruban, A A; Sandyrev, V K; Savinov, G A; Shamov, A G; Shatilov, D N; Shwartz, B A; Simonov, E A; Sinyatkin, S V; Skrinsky, A N; Smaluk, V V; Sokolov, A V; Sukharev, A M; Starostina, E V; Talyshev, A A; Tayursky, V A; Telnov, V I; Tikhonov, Yu A; Todyshev, K Yu; Tumaikin, G M; Usov, Yu V; Vorobiov, A I; Yushkov, A N; Zhilich, V N; Zhulanov, V V; Zhuravlev, A N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the inclusive photon spectrum based on a data sample collected at the $J/\\psi$ peak with the KEDR detector at the VEPP-4M $e^+e^-$ collider, we measured the rate of the radiative decay $J/\\psi\\to\\gamma\\eta_{\\rm c}$ as well as $\\eta_{\\rm c}$ mass and width. Taking into account an asymmetric photon lineshape we obtained: $\\Gamma^0_{\\gamma\\eta_{\\rm c}}=2.98\\pm0.18 \\phantom{|}^{+0.15}_{-0.33}$ keV, $M_{\\eta_{\\rm c}} = 2983.5 \\pm 1.4 \\phantom{|}^{+1.6}_{-3.6}$ MeV/$c^2$, $\\Gamma_{\\eta_{\\rm c}} = 27.2 \\pm 3.1 \\phantom{|}^{+5.4}_{-2.6}$ MeV.

  11. Role of Light Scalar Mesons in eta, eta [prime] --> 3 pi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou Abdel-Rehim; Deirdre M. Black; Amir H. Fariborz; Joseph Schechter

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the role of a light scalar nonet in the interesting decay eta --> 3 pi. The framework is a Chiral effective Lagrangian of pseudo-scalars, scalars and vectors. At leading order, the scalars increase the predicted width by about 14%. We note that although individual scalar contributions are not small, there are cancellations among the scalar diagrams. Including higher order symmetry breaking terms reduce the amount of cancellations among the scalar diagrams but the total predicted width remain the same. The vectors contribution is found to be very small. A preliminary discussion of the related decay eta --> 3 pi is given. We found that the leading order results of pseudo-scalars alone are reasonable and close to the experimental data. Including the scalars or the vectors gives a huge enhancement indicating the importance of higher order corrections in this case.

  12. Review and assessment of nanofluid technology for transportation and other applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Choi, S. U. S.; Routbort, J. L.; Energy Systems

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a literature review on the research and development work contributing to the current status of nanofluid technology for heat transfer applications in industrial processes. Nanofluid technology is a relatively new field, and as such, the supporting studies are not extensive. Specifically, the experimental results and theoretical predictions regarding the enhancement of the thermal conductivity and convective heat transfer of nanofluids relative to conventional heat transfer fluids were reviewed and assessments were made of the current status to derive future research and development directions for industrial applications. Pertinent parameters were considered individually as to the current state of knowledge. Experimental results from multiple research groups were cast into a consistent parameter, 'the enhancement ratio,' to facilitate comparisons of data among research groups and identification of thermal property and heat transfer trends. The current state of knowledge is presented as well as areas where the data are currently inconclusive or conflicting. Heat transfer enhancement for available nanoparticles is known to be in the 15-40% range, with a few situations resulting in orders of magnitude enhancement. The direction of future research should be to substantiate the lower range results and to continue investigations into the higher enhancements. The focus of this study is primarily transportation applications. However, some attention is given to other industrial applications of nanofluid heat transfer. Also discussed are barriers to be addressed prior to commercialization of nanofluids.

  13. Groundwater flow with energy transport and waterice phase change: Numerical simulations, benchmarks, and application to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

    saturated, coupled porewater-energy transport, with freezing and melting porewater, and includes propor transport; Freezing; Cold regions; Benchmark; Modelling 1. Introduction The freezing and thawingGroundwater flow with energy transport and water­ice phase change: Numerical simulations

  14. Photoproduction of eta-mesons from light nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Krusche

    2003-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In a series of experiments coherent and quasifree eta-photoproduction from light nuclei (4He, 3He, 2H) was investigated with the TAPS-detector at the Mainz MAMI-accelerator. The experiments were motivated by two different subjects: the determination of the isospin structure of the electromagnetic excitation of the S11(1535) resonance and the study of the eta-nucleon and eta-nucleus interaction at small momenta. The results for the deuteron and 4He are summarized and first preliminary results for 3He are presented.

  15. Determination of the total width of the eta' meson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Czerwinski; P. Moskal; D. Grzonka; R. Czyzykiewicz; D. Gil; B. Kamys; A. Khoukaz; J. Klaja; P. Klaja; W. Krzemien; W. Oelert; J. Ritman; T. Sefzick; M. Siemaszko; M. Silarski; J. Smyrski; A. Taschner; M. Wolke; P. Wustner; J. Zdebik; M. Zielinski; W. Zipper

    2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Taking advantage of both the low-emittance proton-beam of the Cooler Synchrotron COSY and the high momentum precision of the COSY-11 detector system, the mass distribution of the eta' meson was measured with a resolution of 0.33 MeV/c^2 (FWHM), improving the experimental mass resolution by almost an order of magnitude with respect to previous results. Based on the sample of more than 2300 reconstructed pp --> pp eta' events the total width of the eta' meson was determined to be 0.226 +- 0.017(stat.) +- 0.014(syst.) MeV/c^2.

  16. Measurement of Prominent {eta}-Decay Branching Fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez, J. [University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico); Ge, J. Y.; Miller, D. H.; Sanghi, B.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Adams, G. S.; Anderson, M.; Cummings, J. P.; Danko, I.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); He, Q.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)] (and others)

    2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay {psi}(2S){yields}{eta}J/{psi} is used to measure, for the first time, all prominent {eta}-meson branching fractions with the same experiment in the same dataset, thereby providing a consistent treatment of systematics across branching fractions. We present results for {eta} decays to {gamma}{gamma}, {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, 3{pi}{sup 0}, {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} and e{sup +}e{sup -}{gamma}, accounting for 99.9% of all {eta} decays. The precision of several of the branching fractions and their ratios is improved. Two channels, {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} and e{sup +}e{sup -}{gamma}, show results that differ at the level of three standard deviations from those previously determined.

  17. Modeling Water and Solute Transport in Porous Media: Theory and Application Modeling Water and Solute Transport in Porous Media: Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    and transport near horizontal wells, hydraulics of flowing horizontal wells, fresh water/sea water upconing and fractured media, and hydrogeophysics. He is an associate editor of some well-know journal such as Water Resources Research, Advances in Water Resources, and Journal of contaminant Hydrology. Chunmiao Zheng

  18. The periodicity of the eta Carinae events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Damineli; M. F. Corcoran; D. J. Hillier; O. Stahl; R. S. Levenhagen; N. V. Leister; J. H. Groh; M. Teodoro; J. F. Albacete Colombo; F. Gonzalez; J. Arias; H. Levato; M. Grosso; N. Morrell; R. Gamen; G. Wallerstein; V. Niemela

    2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive spectral observations of eta Carinae over the last cycle, and particularly around the 2003.5 low excitation event, have been obtained. The variability of both narrow and broad lines, when combined with data taken from two earlier cycles, reveal a common and well defined period. We have combined the cycle lengths derived from the many lines in the optical spectrum with those from broad-band X-rays, optical and near-infrared observations, and obtained a period length of 2022.7+-1.3 d. Spectroscopic data collected during the last 60 years yield an average period of 2020+-4 d, consistent with the present day period. The period cannot have changed by more than $\\Delta$P/P=0.0007 since 1948. This confirms the previous claims of a true, stable periodicity, and gives strong support to the binary scenario. We have used the disappearance of the narrow component of HeI 6678 to define the epoch of the Cycle 11 minimum, T_0=JD 2,452,819.8. The next event is predicted to occur on 2009 January 11 (+-2 days). The dates for the start of the minimum in other spectral features and broad-bands is very close to this date, and have well determined time delays from the HeI epoch.

  19. Measurements of the mass and width of the eta_c using psi' -> gamma eta_c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BESIII Collaboration; M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; D. Alberto; D. J. Ambrose; F. F. An; Q. An; Z. H. An; J. Z. Bai; R. B. Ferroli; Y. Ban; J. Becker; N. Berger; M. B. Bertani; J. M. Bian; E. Bogera; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; V. Bytev; X. Cai; A. C. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkova; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; H. X. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; Y. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; Y. P. Chu; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; I. Denysenkob; M. Destefanis; W. L. Ding; Y. Ding; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; C. Q. Feng; C. D. Fu; J. L. Fu; Y. Gao; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Y. L. Han; X. Q. Hao; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Z. Y. He; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; B. Huang; G. M. Huang; J. S. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. P. Huang; T. Hussain; C. S. Ji; Q. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. K. Jia; L. L. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; F. F. Jing; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; M. Kavatsyuk; W. Kuehn; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; J. K. C. Leung; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; Cui Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; K. Li; Lei Li; N. B. Li; Q. J. Li; S. L. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; X. R. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; G. R. Liao; X. T. Liao; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; C. Y. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. Liu; H. B. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; H. W. Liu; J. P. Liu; K. Liu; K. Liu; K. Y. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; X. H. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Yong Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; Q. W. Lu; X. R. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; C. L. Ma; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. Y. Ma; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; H. Mao; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; N. Yu. Muchnoi; Y. Nefedov; I. B. Nikolaev; Z. Ning; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. P. Pacettic; J. W. Park; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; C. S. J. Pun; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; X. S. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; A. Sarantsevd; J. Schulze; M. Shao; C. P. Shene; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; X. Y. Song; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; D. H. Sun; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; X. D. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; E. H. Thorndike; H. L. Tian; D. Toth; G. S. Varner; B. Wang; B. Q. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. Wang; Q. J. Wang; S. G. Wang; X. F. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; D. H. Wei; Q. G. Wen; S. P. Wen; U. Wiedner; L. H. Wu; N. Wu; W. Wu; Z. Wu; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; Q. L. Xiu; G. F. Xu; G. M. Xu; H. Xu; Q. J. Xu; X. P. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. R. Xu; Z. Xue; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; T. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; S. P. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; W. L. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. A. Zafar; A. Z. Zallo; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; L. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; T. R. Zhang; X. J. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Y. S. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; G. Zhao; H. S. Zhao; Jingwei Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; X. H. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugova; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; B. Zhong; J. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; C. Zhu; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; S. H. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; X. W. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou; J. X. Zuo

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mass and width of the lowest lying S-wave spin singlet charmonium state, the eta_c, are measured using a data sample of 1.06x10^8 psi' decays collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII storage ring. We use a model that incorporates interference between the signal reaction, psi' -> gamma eta_c, and a non-resonant radiative background to successfully describe the line shape of the eta_c. We measure the eta_c mass to be 2984.3 +- 0.6 +- 0.6 MeV/c^2 and the total width to be 32.0 +- 1.2 +- 1.0 MeV, where the first errors are statistical and the second are systematic.

  20. GROUNDWATER FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODELING Application to Submarine Groundwater Discharge, Coastal Wetland Hydrology, and Deep Well Injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukop, Mike

    GROUNDWATER FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODELING Application to Submarine Groundwater Discharge, Coastal, but is also lost to surface water drainage and potential submarine groundwater discharge. There are also to deal with issues such as submarine groundwater discharge and coastal wetland hydrology. SEAWAT also has

  1. THE APPLICATION OF THE LAND TRANSFORMATION, GROUNDWATER FLOW AND SOLUTE TRANSPORT MODELS FOR MICHIGAN'S GRAND TRAVERSE BAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 THE APPLICATION OF THE LAND TRANSFORMATION, GROUNDWATER FLOW AND SOLUTE TRANSPORT MODELS). The two hydrogeologic models that are being used here allow us to explore the dynamics of groundwater flow Meeting, New Orleans, Louisiana, March 14, 2001. #12;2 INTRODUCTION Grand Traverse Bay and the Grand

  2. Steady-State Gyrokinetics Transport Code (SSGKT), A Scientific Application Partnership with the Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fahey, Mark R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Candy, Jeff [General Atomics] [General Atomics

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This project initiated the development of TGYRO ? a steady-state Gyrokinetic transport code (SSGKT) that integrates micro-scale GYRO turbulence simulations into a framework for practical multi-scale simulation of conventional tokamaks as well as future reactors. Using a lightweight master transport code, multiple independent (each massively parallel) gyrokinetic simulations are coordinated. The capability to evolve profiles using the TGLF model was also added to TGYRO and represents a more typical use-case for TGYRO. The goal of the project was to develop a steady-state Gyrokinetic transport code (SSGKT) that integrates micro-scale gyrokinetic turbulence simulations into a framework for practical multi-scale simulation of a burning plasma core ? the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) in particular. This multi-scale simulation capability will be used to predict the performance (the fusion energy gain, Q) given the H-mode pedestal temperature and density. At present, projections of this type rely on transport models like GLF23, which are based on rather approximate fits to the results of linear and nonlinear simulations. Our goal is to make these performance projections with precise nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. The method of approach is to use a lightweight master transport code to coordinate multiple independent (each massively parallel) gyrokinetic simulations using the GYRO code. This project targets the practical multi-scale simulation of a reactor core plasma in order to predict the core temperature and density profiles given the H-mode pedestal temperature and density. A master transport code will provide feedback to O(16) independent gyrokinetic simulations (each massively parallel). A successful feedback scheme offers a novel approach to predictive modeling of an important national and international problem. Success in this area of fusion simulations will allow US scientists to direct the research path of ITER over the next two decades. The design of an efficient feedback algorithm is a serious numerical challenge. Although the power source and transport balance coding in the master are standard, it is nontrivial to design a feedback loop that can cope with outputs that are both intermittent and extremely expensive. A prototypical feedback scheme has already been successfully demonstrated for a single global GYRO simulation, although the robustness and efficiency are likely far from optimal. Once the transport feedback scheme is perfected, it could, in principle, be embedded into any of the more elaborate transport codes (ONETWO, TRANSP, and CORSICA), or adopted by other FSP-related multi-scale projects.

  3. Review of petroleum transport network models and their applicability to a national refinery model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooker, J. N.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines four petroleum transport network models to determine whether parts of them can be incorporated into the transportation component of a national refinery model. Two questions in particular are addressed. (a) How do the models under examination represent the oil transport network, estimate link capacities, and calculate transport costs. (b) Are any of these network representations, capacity estimates, or cost functions suitable for inclusion in a linear programming model of oil refinery and primary distribution in the US. Only pipeline and waterway transport is discussed. The models examined are the Department of Energy's OILNET model, the Department of Transportation's Freight Energy Model, the Federal Energy Administration Petroleum Transportation Network Model, and an Oak Ridge National Laboratory oil pipeline energy model. Link capacity and cost functions are recommended for each transport mode. The coefficients of the recommended pipeline cost functions remain to be estimated.

  4. New Mobility Solutions for a Changing Automotive Landscape: Development of a Shared Transportation Web Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    New Mobility Solutions for a Changing Automotive Landscape: Development of a Shared Transportation.funginstitute.berkeley.edu #12;New Mobility Solutions for a Changing Automotive Landscape: Development of a Shared Transportation

  5. Application of thermodynamic approach to pneumatic transport at pipe orientations above the horizontal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaltash, A.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of thermodynamic analogy to pneumatic transport in 0.0266 m and 0.0504 m systems held at various angles of inclination was investigated. Particles used in these systems included glass particles of 67 ..mu..m, 450 ..mu..m, and 900 ..mu..m weight mean diameter as well as iron ore of 400 ..mu..m weight mean diameter. An equation of state similar to the van der Waals has been suggested for these systems. Measurements in these experimental set-ups included pressure drops, particle velocities, and solids mass flow rates in both the upper and lower halves of the pipe. These measurements were used to describe the phase behavior of the systems studied. It was found that the van der Waals analog is capable of describing the phase behavior of these systems. A method has been proposed to estimate the parameters of the van der Waals analog equation. The incorporation of dimensionless pressure drop into the analysis has been attempted by the use of energy functions in thermodynamics. The effect of inclination angle, pipe diameter, and particle characteristics on basic flow parameters were studied. The ratio of solids flow in the top half to that of the bottom half of the pipe showed that the concentration gradient is influenced by particle characteristics, and by the pipe diameter and orientation. Glass test section was used in these systems for visual observations of the flow patterns. 53 refs., 176 figs., 52 tabs.

  6. Development and applications of GREET 2.7 -- The Transportation Vehicle-CycleModel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnham, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Wu, Y.

    2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a vehicle-cycle module for the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model. The fuel-cycle GREET model has been cited extensively and contains data on fuel cycles and vehicle operations. The vehicle-cycle model evaluates the energy and emission effects associated with vehicle material recovery and production, vehicle component fabrication, vehicle assembly, and vehicle disposal/recycling. With the addition of the vehicle-cycle module, the GREET model now provides a comprehensive, lifecycle-based approach to compare the energy use and emissions of conventional and advanced vehicle technologies (e.g., hybrid electric vehicles and fuel cell vehicles). This report details the development and application of the GREET 2.7 model. The current model includes six vehicles--a conventional material and a lightweight material version of a mid-size passenger car with the following powertrain systems: internal combustion engine, internal combustion engine with hybrid configuration, and fuel cell with hybrid configuration. The model calculates the energy use and emissions that are required for vehicle component production; battery production; fluid production and use; and vehicle assembly, disposal, and recycling. This report also presents vehicle-cycle modeling results. In order to put these results in a broad perspective, the fuel-cycle model (GREET 1.7) was used in conjunction with the vehicle-cycle model (GREET 2.7) to estimate total energy-cycle results.

  7. Development and application of a hybrid transport methodology for active interrogation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royston, K.; Walters, W.; Haghighat, A. [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech., 900 N Glebe Rd., Arlington, VA 22203 (United States); Yi, C.; Sjoden, G. [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, Georgia Tech, 801 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid Monte Carlo and deterministic methodology has been developed for application to active interrogation systems. The methodology consists of four steps: i) neutron flux distribution due to neutron source transport and subcritical multiplication; ii) generation of gamma source distribution from (n, 7) interactions; iii) determination of gamma current at a detector window; iv) detection of gammas by the detector. This paper discusses the theory and results of the first three steps for the case of a cargo container with a sphere of HEU in third-density water cargo. To complete the first step, a response-function formulation has been developed to calculate the subcritical multiplication and neutron flux distribution. Response coefficients are pre-calculated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code. The second step uses the calculated neutron flux distribution and Bugle-96 (n, 7) cross sections to find the resulting gamma source distribution. In the third step the gamma source distribution is coupled with a pre-calculated adjoint function to determine the gamma current at a detector window. The AIMS (Active Interrogation for Monitoring Special-Nuclear-Materials) software has been written to output the gamma current for a source-detector assembly scanning across a cargo container using the pre-calculated values and taking significantly less time than a reference MCNP5 calculation. (authors)

  8. The processing of alcohols, hydrocarbons and ethers to produce hydrogen for a PEMFC for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dams, R.A.J.; Hayter, P.R.; Moore, S.C. [Wellman CJB Limited, Portsmouth (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Wellman CJB Limited is involved in a number of projects to develop fuel processors to provide a hydrogen-rich fuel in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) systems for transportation applications. This work started in 1990 which resulted in the demonstration of 10kW PEMFC system incorporating a methanol reformer and catalytic gas clean-up system. Current projects include: The development of a compact fast response methanol reformer and gas clean-up system for a motor vehicle; Reforming of infrastructure fuels including gasoline, diesel, reformulated fuel gas and LPG to produce a hydrogen rich gas for PEMFC; Investigating the potential of dimethylether (DME) as source of hydrogen rich gas for PEMFCs; The use of thin film palladium diffusers to produce a pure hydrogen stream from the hydrogen rich gas from a reformer; and Processing of naval logistic fuels to produce a hydrogen rich gas stream for PEMFC power system to replace diesel generators in surface ships. This paper outlines the background to these projects and reports their current status.

  9. Transport Properties of He-N{sub 2} Binary Gas Mixtures for CBC Space Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tournier, Jean-Michel P.; El-Genk, Mohamed S. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies and Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to reduce the size and mass of the single-shaft turbo-machines, with little impact on the size of the heat transfer components in the CBC loop, He-Xe binary mixture with a molecular weight of 40 g/mole has been the working fluid of choice in space nuclear reactor power systems with Close Brayton Cycle (CBC) for energy conversion. This working fluid is also a suitable coolant for the fission reactors heat source designed with fast neutron energy spectra. For space nuclear reactors with thermal neutron energy spectra, however, the high capture neutron cross-section of Xe will reduce the beginning-of-life excess reactivity of the reactor, decreasing its effective operation lifetime. In addition, the neutron activation of Xe in the reactor will introduce a radioactivity source term in the CBC loop. Alternative working fluids with no activation concerns and comparable performance are N{sub 2} and the binary mixtures of He-N{sub 2}. This paper calculates the transport properties of these working fluids and compares their values to those of noble gas binary mixtures at the temperatures and pressures expected in CBC space reactor power system applications. Also investigated is the impact of using these working fluids on the pressure losses, heat transfer coefficient, and the aerodynamic loading of the blades in the CBC turbo-machines.

  10. Deuterated polyethylene coatings for ultra-cold neutron applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altarev, I; Fierlinger, P; Geltenbort, P; Gutsmiedl, E; Kuchler, F; Lauer, T; Lins, T; Marino, M G; Niessen, B; Petzoldt, G; Ruhstorfer, D; Seeman, K M; Soltwedel, O; Stuiber, St; Taubenheim, B; Windmayer, D; Zechlau, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the fabrication and use of deuterated polyethylene (dPE) as a coating material for ultra-cold neutron (UCN) storage and transport. The Fermi potential has been determined to be 214 neV and the wall loss coefficient $\\eta$ is 2$\\cdot$10$^4$ per wall collision. The coating technique allows for a wide range of applications and new possibilities in this field of physics. In particular, flexible and quasi-massless UCN guides with slit-less shutters and slit-less UCN storage volumes become possible. These properties enable the use in next-generation measurements of the electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  11. Observation of high momentum eta(l) production in B decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first observation of B --> eta'X transitions with high momentum eta' mesons. We observe 39.0 +/- 11.6 B decay events with 2.0 c processes is suppressed. We...

  12. Upper limit of the total cross section for the pn --> pn eta' reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Klaja; P. Moskal; S. D. Bass; E. Czerwinski; R. Czyzykiewicz; D. Gil; D. Grzonka; T. Johansson; B. Kamys; A. Khoukaz; P. Klaja; W. Krzemien; W. Oelert; B. Rejdych; J. Ritman; T. Sefzick; M. Siemaszko; M. Silarski; J. Smyrski; A. Taschner; M. Wolke; P. Wustner; J. Zdebik; M. Zielinski; W. Zipper

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper limit of the total cross section for the pn --> pn eta' reaction has been determined near the kinematical threshold in the excess energy range from 0 to 24 MeV. The measurement was performed using the COSY-11 detector setup, a deuteron cluster target, and the proton beam of COSY with a momentum of 3.35 GeV/c. The energy dependence of the upper limit of the cross section was extracted exploiting the Fermi momenta of nucleons inside the deuteron. Comparison of the determined upper limit of the ratio R_eta' = sigma(pn --> pn eta') / sigma(pp --> pp eta') with the corresponding ratio for eta-meson production does not favor the dominance of the N*(1535) resonance in the production process of the eta' meson and suggests nonidentical production mechanisms for eta and eta' mesons.

  13. Conceptual design report for a Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell for transportation application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the conceptual design for a Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for transportation applications. The design is based on the initial selection of the Chrysler LH sedan as the target vehicle with a 50 kW (gross) PEM Fuel Cell Stack (FCS) as the primary power source, a battery-powered Load Leveling Unit (LLU) for surge power requirements, an on-board hydrogen storage subsystem containing high pressure gaseous storage, a Gas Management Subsystem (GMS) to manage the hydrogen and air supplies for the FCS, and electronic controllers to control the electrical system. The design process has been dedicated to the use of Design-to-Cost (DTC) principles. The Direct Hydrogen-Powered PEM Fuel Cell Stack Hybrid Vehicle (DPHV) system is designed to operate on the Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS) and Hiway Cycles. These cycles have been used to evaluate the vehicle performance with regard to range and hydrogen usage. The major constraints for the DPHV vehicle are vehicle and battery weight, transparency of the power system and drive train to the user, equivalence of fuel and life cycle costs to conventional vehicles, and vehicle range. The energy and power requirements are derived by the capability of the DPHV system to achieve an acceleration from 0 to 60 MPH within 12 seconds, and the capability to achieve and maintain a speed of 55 MPH on a grade of seven percent. The conceptual design for the DPHV vehicle is shown in a figure. A detailed description of the Hydrogen Storage Subsystem is given in section 4. A detailed description of the FCS Subsystem and GMS is given in section 3. A detailed description of the LLU, selection of the LLU energy source, and the power controller designs is given in section 5.

  14. The importance of the nucleon-nucleon correlations for the eta alpha S-wave scattering length, and the pi-eta mixing angle in the low-energy eta alpha scattering length model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Ceci; D. Hrupec; A. Svarc

    2001-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the new set of dd --> eta alpha near threshold experimental data, the estimate of the importance of the nucleon-nucleon correlations for the eta alpha S-wave scattering length in the multiple scattering theory is obtained using the low-energy scattering length model. The contribution turns out to be much bigger then previously believed. The pi-eta mixing angle is extracted using the experimental data on the dd --> eta alpha and dd --> pi alpha processes. The model is dominated by the subthreshold extrapolation recipe for the eta alpha scattering amplitudes. When the recipe is chosen the model is completely insensitive to the eta alpha parameters for the subthreshold value of the eta cm momentum of p_{eta}^2 = -(0.46)^2 fm^{-2}. Provided that the subthreshold extrapolation recipe is correct, a good estimate of the pi-eta mixing angle is obtained, if the experimental cross sections for the dd --> pi alpha reaction at the corresponding deuteron input energy are taken from the literature.

  15. Observation of eta '(c) production in gamma gamma fusion at CLEO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besson, David Zeke

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) = 115.1 +/- 2.0 MeV and DeltaM(hf)(2S) = 43.1 +/- 3.4 MeV. Assuming that the eta(c) and eta(c)' have equal branching fractions to K(s)Kpi, we obtain Gamma(gammagamma)(eta(c)') = 1.3 +/- 0.6 keV....

  16. Search for the 3He-eta bound state at COSY-11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Krzemien; J. Smyrski; A. Budzanowski; E. Czerwinski; R. Czyzykiewicz; D. Gil; D. Grzonka; L. Jarczyk; B. Kamys; A. Khoukaz; P. Klaja; P. Moskal; W. Oelert; J. Przerwa; J. Ritman; T. Sefzick; M. Siemaszko; M. Silarski; A. Taeschner; M. Wolke; P. Wuestner; J. Zdebik; M. J. Zielinski; W. Zipper

    2009-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured excitation function for dp -> ppp_pi- reaction near the eta production threshold. We observe an enhancement of the counting rate above the threshold which can originate from the production of the eta meson in the reaction dp -> 3He eta and its subsequent absorption on neutron in the 3He nucleus leading to creation of the p_pi- pair.

  17. Effects of Light Scalar Mesons in eta -> 3pi decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou Abdel-Rehim; Deirdre Black; Amir H. Fariborz; Joseph Schechter

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the role of a possible nonet of light scalar mesons in the still interesting [eta] -> 3[p]i decay process, with the primary motivation of learning more about the scalars themselves. The framework is a conventional non-linear chiral Lagrangian of pseudoscalars and vectors extended to include the scalars. The parameters involving the scalars were previously obtained to fit the s-wave [pi][pi] and [pi] K scatterings in the region up to about 1 GeV as well as the strong decay [eta]' --> [eta][pi][pi]. At first, one might expect a large enhancement from diagrams including a light [sigma] (560). However there is an amusing cancellation mechanism which prevents this from occurring. In the simplest model there is an enhancement of about 13 per cent in the [eta] -> 3[pi] decay rate due to the scalars. In a more complicated model which includes derivative type symmetry breakers, the cancellation is modified and the scalars contribute about 30 percent of the total decay rate (although the total is not significantly changed). The vectors do not contribute much. Our model produces a reasonable estimate for the related a{sub 0}(980) - f{sub 0}(980) mixing strength, which has been a topic of current debate. Promising directions for future work along the present line are suggested.

  18. Measurement of tau-decays involving eta-mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay tau- --> nu(tau)pi-pi0eta has been observed for the first time using the CLEO-II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. The measured branching ratio (0.17 +/- 0.02 +/- 0.02)%, agrees with the CVC (conserved ...

  19. Insights into the pi- p -> eta n reaction mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durand, J; Lee, T -S H; Saghai, B; Sato, T

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dynamical coupled-channels formalism is used to investigate the $\\eta-$meson production mechanism on the proton induced by pions, in the total center-of-mass energy region from threshold up to 2 GeV. We show how and why studying exclusively total cross section data might turn out to be misleading in pinning down the reaction mechanism.

  20. Final Report for Project "Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations (FACETS)"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estep, Donald [Colorado State University] [Colorado State University

    2014-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for the Colorado State University Component of the FACETS Project. FACETS was focused on the development of a multiphysics, parallel framework application that could provide the capability to enable whole-device fusion reactor modeling and, in the process, the development of the modeling infrastructure and computational understanding needed for ITER. It was intended that FACETS be highly flexible, through the use of modern computational methods, including component technology and object oriented design, to facilitate switching from one model to another for a given aspect of the physics, and making it possible to use simplified models for rapid turnaround or high-fidelity models that will take advantage of the largest supercomputer hardware. FACETS was designed in a heterogeneous parallel context, where different parts of the application can take advantage through parallelism based on task farming, domain decomposition, and/or pipelining as needed and applicable. As with all fusion simulations, an integral part of the FACETS project was treatment of the coupling of different physical processes at different scales interacting closely. A primary example for the FACETS project is the coupling of existing core and edge simulations, with the transport and wall interactions described by reduced models. However, core and edge simulations themselves involve significant coupling of different processes with large scale differences. Numerical treatment of coupling is impacted by a number of factors including, scale differences, form of information transferred between processes, implementation of solvers for different codes, and high performance computing concerns. Operator decomposition involving the computation of the individual processes individually using appropriate simulation codes and then linking/synchronizing the component simulations at regular points in space and time, is the defacto approach to high performance simulation of multiphysics, multiscale systems. Various forms of operator decomposition are used in nearly all fusion simulations. However, operator decomposition generally has a complex effect on accuracy and stability of numerical simulations. Yet, these effects can be difficult to detect. The Colorado State University component of the FACETS team led by P. I. D. Estep was focused on analyzing the effects of operator decomposition on fusion simulations. The approach was based on a posteriori error analysis employing adjoint problems, computable residuals, and variational analysis to produce accurate computational error estimates for quantities of interest. Computable residuals are used to quantify the effects of various discretization choices. The generalized Greens function satisfying the adjoint problem quantities the effects of stability. Technical issues to be addressed included: (1) defining appropriate adjoint operators for operator decomposition discretizations; (2) determining the appropriate residuals for the multifaceted aspects involved with multiphysics discretizations; (3) producing the estimates within the computational framework of existing fusion codes; (4) carrying out the analysis for discretizations used in fusion simulations; and (5) devising efficient approaches to mitigating the effects of discretization. This report provides a summary of the accomplished research and a detailed description of personnel, activities, outcomes and achievements.

  1. Numerical simulations of ion transport membrane oxy-fuel reactors for CO? capture applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Jongsup

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations were performed to investigate the key features of oxygen permeation and hydrocarbon conversion in ion transport membrane (ITM) reactors. ITM reactors have been suggested as a novel technology to enable ...

  2. Outsourcing transportation infrastructure maintenance : a theoretical approach with application to JR East

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirano, Jun, 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In transportation agencies, how to reduce maintenance and operation cost is one of the biggest and most common concerns, because their revenue is not expected to increase drastically in the future. One of the solutions ...

  3. Reactive Transport Modeling of Natural Attenuation in Stormwater Bioretention Cells and Under Land Application of Wastewater 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jingqiu

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrocarbon, nutrient, metals, and solids. Vegetation also plays an important role in reducing water volume, and removing nutrients and solutes from the contaminated soil. We used a reactive transport model MIN3P-THM to simulate the natural attenuation...

  4. Measurement of J/psi to eta_c gamma at KEDR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anashin, V V; Baldin, E M; Barladyan, A K; Barnyakov, A Yu; Barnyakov, M Yu; Baru, S E; Bedny, I V; Beloborodova, O L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bobrov, A V; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bogomyagkov, A V; Bondar, A E; Buzykaev, A R; Eidelman, S I; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Gulevich, V V; Gusev, D V; Karnaev, S E; Karpov, G V; Karpov, S V; Kharlamova, T A; Kiselev, V A; Kononov, S A; Kotov, K Yu; Kravchenko, E A; Kulikov, V F; Kurkin, G Ya; Kuper, E A; Levichev, E B; Maksimov, D A; Malyshev, V M; Maslennikov, A L; Medvedko, A S; Meshkov, O I; Milstein, A I; Mishnev, S I; Morozov, I I; Muchnoi, N Yu; Neufeld, V V; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Okunev, I N; Onuchin, A P; Oreshkin, S B; Orlov, I O; Osipov, A A; Peleganchuk, S V; Pivovarov, S G; Piminov, P A; Petrov, V V; Poluektov, A O; Popkov, I N; Pospelov, G E; Prisekin, V G; Ruban, A A; Sandyrev, V K; Savinov, G A; Shamov, A G; Shatilov, D N; Shwartz, B A; Simonov, E A; Sinyatkin, S V; Skovpen, Yu I; Skrinsky, A N; Smaluk, V V; Sukharev, A M; Starostina, E V; Talyshev, A A; Tayursky, V A; Telnov, V I; Tikhonov, Yu A; Todyshev, K Yu; Tumaikin, G M; Usov, Yu V; Vorobiov, A I; Yushkov, A N; Zhilich, V N; Zhulanov, V V; Zhuravlev, A N

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the inclusive photon spectra from 5.9 million J/psi decays collected with the KEDR detector at the VEPP-4M e+e- collider. We measure the branching fraction of radiative decay J/psi to eta_c gamma, eta_c width and mass. Our preliminary results are: M(eta_c) = 2979.4+-1.5+-1.9 MeV, G(eta_c) = 27.8+-5.1+-3.3 MeV, B(J/psi to eta_c gamma) = (2.34+-0.15+-0.40)%.

  5. ODEs, Homework #3 1. Suppose A, B are constant square matrices such that etA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karageorgis, Paschalis

    ODEs, Homework #3 Solutions 1. Suppose A, B are constant square matrices such that etA etB = et identity with respect to t, we find that etA etB = et(A+B) = AetA etB + etA BetB = (A + B)et(A+B) . Differentiating once again, we now get A2 etA etB + AetA BetB + AetA BetB + etA B2 etB = (A + B)2 et(A+B) so we

  6. Application of Momentum Transfer Theory for Ion and Electron Transport in Pure Gases and in Gas Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jovanovic, J.V. [Institute of Physics, P.O.Box 68, 11080 Zemun, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Vrhovac, S. B. [Institute of Physics, P.O.Box 68, 11080 Zemun, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we have presented two applications of Momentum Transfer Theory (MTT), which were both aimed at obtaining reliable data for modeling of non-equilibrium plasma. Transport properties of ion swarms in presence of Resonant Charge Transfer (RCT) collisions are studied using Momentum Transfer Theory (MTT). Using the developed MTT we tested a previously available anisotropic set of cross-sections for Ar++Ar collisions bay making the comparisons with the available data for the transverse diffusion coefficient. We also developed an anisotropic set of Ne++Ne integral cross-sections based on the available data for mobility, longitudinal and transverse diffusion. Anisotropic sets of cross-sections are needed for Monte Carlo simulations of ion transport and plasma models. Application of Blanc's Law for drift velocities of electrons and ions in gas mixtures at arbitrary reduced electric field strengths E/n0 was studied theoretically and by numerical examples. Corrections for Blanc's Law that include effects of inelastic collisions were derived. In addition we have derived the common mean energy procedure that was proposed by Chiflikian in a general case both for ions and electrons. Both corrected common E/n0 and common mean energy procedures provide excellent results even for electrons at moderate E/n0 where application of Blanc's Law was regarded as impossible. In mixtures of two gases that have negative differential conductivity (NDC) even when neither of the two pure gases show NDC the Blanc's Law procedure was able to give excellent predictions.

  7. Reactive Transport Modeling of Natural Attenuation in Stormwater Bioretention Cells and Under Land Application of Wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jingqiu

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    application. Due to less water and chemical input, climate patterns may lead to better removal of heavy metals. For land application of Oil and Gas Exploration and Production wastewater, five scenarios were developed to study the impact of chloride, salts...

  8. Kinematic studies of transport across an island wake, with application to the Canary islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathias Sandulescu; Emilio Hernandez-Garcia; Cristobal Lopez; Ulrike Feudel

    2006-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Transport from nutrient-rich coastal upwellings is a key factor influencing biological activity in surrounding waters and even in the open ocean. The rich upwelling in the North-Western African coast is known to interact strongly with the wake of the Canary islands, giving rise to filaments and other mesoscale structures of increased productivity. Motivated by this scenario, we introduce a simplified two-dimensional kinematic flow describing the wake of an island in a stream, and study the conditions under which there is a net transport of substances across the wake. For small vorticity values in the wake, it acts as a barrier, but there is a transition when increasing vorticity so that for values appropriate to the Canary area, it entrains fluid and enhances cross-wake transport.

  9. Research and Development of Proton-Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for Transportation Applications: Initial Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses Task 1.1, model development and application, and Task 1.2, vehicle mission definition. Overall intent is to produce a methanol-fueled 10-kW power source, and to evaluate electrochemical engine (ECE) use in transportation. Major achievements include development of an ECE power source model and its integration into a comprehensive power source/electric vehicle propulsion model, establishment of candidate FCV (fuel cell powered electric vehicle) mission requirements, initial FCV studies, and a candidate FCV recommendation for further study.

  10. Application of canonical profiles transport model to the H-mode shots in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dnestrovskij, Yu. N.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Danilov, A. V.; Lysenko, S. E.; Cherkasov, S. V. [Institute of Tokamak Physics, Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Gerasimov, S. N.; Hender, T. C.; Voitsekhovitch, I. A.; Roach, C. M.; Walsh, M. J. [Culham Science Centre, EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The linear and nonlinear versions of the Canonical Profiles Transport Model (CPTM), which includes both heat and particle transport equations, are used to simulate core and pedestal plasma for JET, and MAST H-mode shots. Simulations by the nonlinear version show reasonable agreement with experiment for both ELMy and ELM-free shots. RMS deviations of calculated results from the experimental ones are on the level 10-12% in main. The calculated ion and electron temperature profiles are very insensitive to the change of the deposited peaked power profiles. The calculated pedestal temperature rapidly increases with plasma current; density profile peaking increases at low collisionalities.

  11. Final Report for the "Fusion Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations (FACETS)"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cary, John R; Kruger, Scott

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The FACETS project over its lifetime developed the first self-consistent core-edge coupled capabilities, a new transport solver for modeling core transport in tokamak cores, developed a new code for modeling wall physics over long time scales, and significantly improved the capabilities and performance of legacy components, UEDGE, NUBEAM, GLF23, GYRO, and BOUT++. These improved capabilities leveraged the team’s expertise in applied mathematics (solvers and algorithms) and computer science (performance improvements and language interoperability). The project pioneered new methods for tackling the complexity of simulating the concomitant complexity of tokamak experiments.

  12. Reforming of Diesel Fuel for Transportation Applications J. P. Kopasz, S. Lottes, D-J. Liu, R. Ahluwalia, V. Novick and S. Ahmed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reforming of Diesel Fuel for Transportation Applications J. P. Kopasz, S. Lottes, D-J. Liu, R. Ahluwalia, V. Novick and S. Ahmed Argonne National Laboratory Applications of diesel fuel reforming reformate injection in internal combustion engine (ICE) and/or reformate feed to selective catalytic

  13. Eta Car and Its Surroundings: the X-ray Diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. F. Corcoran; K. Hamaguchi

    2007-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray emission from the supermassive star Eta Carinae (\\ec) originates from hot shocked gas produced by current stellar mass loss as well as ejecta from prior eruptive events. Absorption of this emission by cool material allows the determination of the spatial and temporal distribution of this material. Emission from the shocked gas can provide important information about abundances through the study of thermal X-ray line emission. We discuss how studies of the X-ray emission from Eta Car at a variety of temporal, spatial and spectral scales and resolutions have helped refine our knowledge of both the continuous and discrete mass loss from the system, and its interactions with more extended material around the star.

  14. Algorithmic Solutions to Some Transportation Optimization Problems with Applications in the Metallurgical Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    resources (natural gas, oil), and so on. Each of these fields has its own specific transportation problems costs and resource usage. All the considered problems are motivated by practical situations arising, computer networks (file transfers, live and on-demand audio/video streaming), distribution of natural

  15. PARALLEL PROCESSING OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL FIELD-SCALE REACTIVE TRANSPORT APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    BRGM (French Geological Survey), Water Department, Groundwater and Geochemistry Modeling 3, Avenue C for the mixed hybrid finite element kernel. Com- putations of the reaction step are performed using a newly- tions. 1. INTRODUCTION The shape and scope of multi-component reactive transport models changed dramati

  16. New seismological results on the G0 IV eta Bootis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Carrier; P. Eggenberger; F. Bouchy

    2005-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Several attempts have been made to detect solar-like oscillations in the G0 IV star eta Boo. We present here new observations on this star simultaneously conducted with two spectrographs: Coralie mounted on the 1.2-m Swiss telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile) and Elodie based on the 1.93-m telescope at the Observatoire de Haute Provence (France). In total, 1239 spectra were collected over 13 nights. The power spectrum of the high precision velocity time series clearly presents several identifiable peaks between 0.4 and 1.0 mHz showing regularity with a large and small separations of Delta_nu = 39.9 uHz and delta_nu02 = 3.95 uHz respectively. Twenty-two individual frequencies have been identified. Detailed models based on these measurements and non-asteroseismic observables were computed using the Geneva evolution code including shellular rotation and atomic diffusion. By combining these seismological data with non-asteroseismic observations, we determine the following global parameters for eta Boo: a mass of 1.57 +- 0.07 M_sol, an age t=2.67 +- 0.10 Gyr and an initial metallicity Z/X_i=0.0391 +- 0.0070. We also show that the mass of eta Boo is very sensitive to the choice of the observed metallicity, while the age of eta Boo depends on the input physics used. Indeed, a higher metallicity favours a higher mass, while non-rotating models without overshooting predict a smaller age.

  17. Scaling dependence on time and distance in nonlinear fractional diffusion equations and possible applications to the water transport in soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwok Sau Fa; E. K. Lenzi

    2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, fractional derivatives have been employed to analyze various systems in engineering, physics, finance and hidrology. For instance, they have been used to investigate anomalous diffusion processes which are present in different physical systems like: amorphous semicondutors, polymers, composite heterogeneous films and porous media. They have also been used to calculate the heat load intensity change in blast furnace walls, to solve problems of control theory \\ and dynamic problems of linear and nonlinear hereditary mechanics of solids. In this work, we investigate the scaling properties related to the nonlinear fractional diffusion equations and indicate the possibilities to the applications of these equations to simulate the water transport in unsaturated soils. Usually, the water transport in soils with anomalous diffusion, the dependence of concentration on time and distance may be expressed in term of a single variable given by $\\lambda _{q}=x/t^{q}.$ In particular, for $q=1/2$ the systems obey Fick's law and Richards' equation for water transport. We show that a generalization of Richards' equation via fractional approach can incorporate the above property.

  18. Scrutinizing the eta-eta' mixing, masses and pseudoscalar decay constants in the framework of U(3) chiral effective field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Xu-Kun; Oller, Jose Antonio; Sanz-Cillero, Juan Jose

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the $\\eta$-$\\eta'$ mixing up to next-to-next-to-leading-order in $U(3)$ chiral perturbation theory in the light of recent lattice simulations and phenomenological inputs. A general treatment for the $\\eta$-$\\eta'$ mixing at higher orders, with the higher-derivative, kinematic and mass mixing terms, is addressed. The connections between the four mixing parameters in the two-mixing-angle scheme and the low energy constants in the $U(3)$ chiral effective theory are provided both for the singlet-octet and the quark-flavor bases. The axial-vector decay constants of pion and kaon are studied in the same order and confronted with the lattice simulation data as well. The quark-mass dependences of $m_\\eta$, $m_{\\eta'}$ and $m_K$ are found to be well described at next-to-leading order. Nonetheless, in order to simultaneously describe the lattice data and phenomenological determinations for the properties of light pseudoscalars $\\pi, K, \\eta$ and $\\eta'$, the next-to-next-to-leading order study is essential. Fu...

  19. Thermal Issues in Emerging Technologies, ThETA 2, Cairo, Egypt, Dec 17-20th ThETA2/052 1/9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermal Issues in Emerging Technologies, ThETA 2, Cairo, Egypt, Dec 17-20th 2008 ThETA2/052 1 energy conversion. Thermoelectric coolers are currently used in microelectronic and optoelectronic. The basic thermoelectric energy conversion is determined by the material's figure-of-merit ZT. ZT is defined

  20. Event simulations in a transport model for intermediate energy heavy ion collisions: Applications to multiplicity distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallik, S; Chaudhuri, G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform transport model calculations for central collisions of mass 120 on mass 120 at laboratory beam energy in the range 20 MeV/nucleon to 200 MeV/nucleon. A simplified yet accurate method allows calculation of fluctuations in systems much larger than what was considered feasible in a well-known and already existing model. The calculations produce clusters. The distribution of clusters is remarkably similar to that obtained in equilibrium statistical model.

  1. Event simulations in a transport model for intermediate energy heavy ion collisions: Applications to multiplicity distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Mallik; S. Das Gupta; G. Chaudhuri

    2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform transport model calculations for central collisions of mass 120 on mass 120 at laboratory beam energy in the range 20 MeV/nucleon to 200 MeV/nucleon. A simplified yet accurate method allows calculation of fluctuations in systems much larger than what was considered feasible in a well-known and already existing model. The calculations produce clusters. The distribution of clusters is remarkably similar to that obtained in equilibrium statistical model.

  2. Application of Chebyshev Formalism to Identify Nonlinear Magnetic Field Components in Beam Transport Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Spata

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment was conducted at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility to develop a beam-based technique for characterizing the extent of the nonlinearity of the magnetic fields of a beam transport system. Horizontally and vertically oriented pairs of air-core kicker magnets were simultaneously driven at two different frequencies to provide a time-dependent transverse modulation of the beam orbit relative to the unperturbed reference orbit. Fourier decomposition of the position data at eight different points along the beamline was then used to measure the amplitude of these frequencies. For a purely linear transport system one expects to find solely the frequencies that were applied to the kickers with amplitudes that depend on the phase advance of the lattice. In the presence of nonlinear fields one expects to also find harmonics of the driving frequencies that depend on the order of the nonlinearity. Chebyshev polynomials and their unique properties allow one to directly quantify the magnitude of the nonlinearity with the minimum error. A calibration standard was developed using one of the sextupole magnets in a CEBAF beamline. The technique was then applied to a pair of Arc 1 dipoles and then to the magnets in the Transport Recombiner beamline to measure their multipole content as a function of transverse position within the magnets.

  3. Eta Carinae and Nebulae Around Massive Stars: Similarities to Planetary Nebulae?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss some observational properties of aspherical nebulae around massive stars, and conclusions inferred for how they may have formed. Whether or not these ideas are applicable to the shaping of planetary nebulae is uncertain, but the observed similarities between some PNe and bipolar nebulae around massive stars is compelling. In the well-observed case of Eta Carinae, several lines of observational evidence point to a scenario where the shape of its bipolar nebula resulted from an intrinsically bipolar explosive ejection event rather than an interacting winds scenario occurring after ejection from teh star. A similar conclusion has been inferred for some planetary nebulae. I also briefly mention bipolar nebulae around some other massive stars, such as the progenitor of SN 1987A and related blue supergiants.

  4. Tuning the transport properties of layer-by-layer thin films for fuel cell applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashcraft, James Nathan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing global focus on alternative energy sources has led to a renewed interest in fuel cells. For low power, portable applications, direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are the most promising type of fuel cell. DMFCs ...

  5. Adaptive control of media applications in best-effort networks using reliable transport protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangan, John Wilford

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , along with adaptive predictive control at the application layer. The proposed algorithms are rooted in traditional process control. End-to-end delay measurements and predictions are used to compensate for the dynamic effects of time-varying time delays...

  6. Measurements of {psi}(2S) decays into {gamma}KK{pi} and {gamma}{eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; Bai, J. Z.; Bian, J. G.; Cai, X.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. X.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, Jin; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Cui, X. Z.; Deng, Z. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, C. S.; Gu, S. D.; Guo, Y. N.; Guo, Y. Q.; He, K. L. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049 (China)] (and others)

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative decays of the {psi}(2S) into {gamma}KK{pi} and {gamma}{eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final states are studied using 14x10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) events collected with the BESII detector. Branching fractions or upper limits on the branching fractions of {psi}(2S) and {chi}{sub cJ} decays are reported. No significant signal for {eta}(1405)/{eta}(1475) is observed in the KK{pi} or {eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} mass spectra, and upper limits on the branching fractions of {psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}{eta}(1405)/{eta}(1475), {eta}(1405)/{eta}(1475){yields}KK{pi}, and {eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} are determined.

  7. Emerging Technologies Applicable to the Safe and Secure Transportation of Hazardous Materials

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office ofEnergyFinalEnergyEVProposedNational Transportation Stakeholders

  8. Measurement of pi0 and eta Mesons with PHENIX in sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV Au+Au Collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Sahlmueller; for the PHENIX collaboration

    2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The pi0 meson has been a crucial proble for observing jet quenching in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC. Measurements of the eta meson in the same collisions have also shed light on a possible dependence of the observed suppression on the particle species. The preliminary pi0 nuclear modification factor R_AA from the 2004 RHIC run allowed a first systematic comparison between a precise measurement with high statistics and theoretical calculations, constraining model parameters such as the initial gluon density dN^g/dy, and the transport coefficient qhat. The final pi0 spectra and R_AA are shown as well as the first eta results obtained with both PHENIX electromagnetic calorimeters.

  9. Observation of eta_c^' Production in gamma-gamma Fusion at CLEO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Ernst

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the observation of the eta_c^' (2 ^1S_0), the radial excitation of eta_c (1 ^1S_0) ground state of charmonium, in the two-photon fusion reaction gamma gamma to eta_c^' to K_S^0 K^{\\pm} pi^{\\mp} in 13.4 fb^{-1} of CLEO II/II.V data and 9.2 fb^{-1} of CLEO III data. The data have been analyzed to extract the eta_c^' resonance parameters.

  10. Determination of the eta'-proton scattering length in free space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Czerwinski; P. Moskal; M. Silarski; S. D. Bass; D. Grzonka; B. Kamys; A. Khoukaz; J. Klaja; W. Krzemien; W. Oelert; J. Ritman; T. Sefzick; J. Smyrski; A. Taschner; M. Wolke; M. Zielinski

    2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Taking advantage of both the high mass resolution of the COSY-11 detector and the high energy resolution of the low-emittance proton-beam of the Cooler Synchrotron COSY we determine the excitation function for the pp --> pp eta' reaction close-to-threshold. Combining these data with previous results we extract the scattering length for the eta'-proton potential in free space to be Re(a_{p eta'}) = 0+-0.43 fm and Im(a_{p eta'}) = 0.37(+0.40)(-0.16) fm.

  11. Application of the multigrid amplitude function method for time-dependent transport equation using MOC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsujita, K.; Endo, T.; Yamamoto, A. [Nagoya University, Department of Material, Physics and Energy Engineering, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient numerical method for time-dependent transport equation, the mutigrid amplitude function (MAF) method, is proposed. The method of characteristics (MOC) is being widely used for reactor analysis thanks to the advances of numerical algorithms and computer hardware. However, efficient kinetic calculation method for MOC is still desirable since it requires significant computation time. Various efficient numerical methods for solving the space-dependent kinetic equation, e.g., the improved quasi-static (IQS) and the frequency transform methods, have been developed so far mainly for diffusion calculation. These calculation methods are known as effective numerical methods and they offer a way for faster computation. However, they have not been applied to the kinetic calculation method using MOC as the authors' knowledge. Thus, the MAF method is applied to the kinetic calculation using MOC aiming to reduce computation time. The MAF method is a unified numerical framework of conventional kinetic calculation methods, e.g., the IQS, the frequency transform, and the theta methods. Although the MAF method is originally developed for the space-dependent kinetic calculation based on the diffusion theory, it is extended to transport theory in the present study. The accuracy and computational time are evaluated though the TWIGL benchmark problem. The calculation results show the effectiveness of the MAF method. (authors)

  12. The application of strategic environmental assessment in a non-mandatory context: Regional transport planning in New Zealand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGimpsey, Paul, E-mail: paul.mcgimpsey@urs.com [URS, St. George's House, 5 St. George's Road, London SW19 4DR (United Kingdom)] [URS, St. George's House, 5 St. George's Road, London SW19 4DR (United Kingdom); Morgan, Richard K., E-mail: rkm@geography.otago.ac.nz [Department of Geography, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin 9054 (New Zealand)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There is no legal mandate for strategic environmental assessment (SEA) in New Zealand. However, a requirement to consider environmental and sustainability issues is a key feature of many statutes, including that relating to regional transport planning. Given this, the research sought to determine whether SEA could be used to improve the incorporation of environmental and sustainability aspects into the regional transport planning process in New Zealand. Existing practice was evaluated, examining what factors currently limiting the consideration of environmental and sustainability issues and to what extent elements of SEA are currently being used. The research culminated in the development of a conceptual model where SEA elements could be incorporated into the existing framework to promote improved consideration of environmental and sustainability issues. The results provide some reassurance about the value of SEA even where its application is not legally mandated. However, it also highlighted some ongoing issues around the integration of SEA in existing frameworks and around the scope of SEA as a decision-aiding tool. -- Highlights: • The research examined whether SEA can provide benefits even where it is not mandated. • The research examined the extent to which SEA elements are currently being used. • A conceptual model was developed to incorporate necessary SEA elements into an existing framework.

  13. Search for {psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sub c}(2S) via fully reconstructed {eta}{sub c}(2S) decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Gong, D. T.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Poling, R.; Zweber, P. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tan, B. J. Y.; Tomaradze, A. [Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Libby, J.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Thomas, C.; Wilkinson, G. [University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Mendez, H. [University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico); Ge, J. Y. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a search for the decay {psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sub c}(2S) in a sample of 25.9x10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) events collected with the CLEO-c detector. No signals are observed in any of the 11 exclusive {eta}{sub c}(2S) decay modes studied, or in their sum. Product branching fraction upper limits are determined as a function of {Gamma}[{eta}{sub c}(2S)] for the 11 individual modes.

  14. Odd and Even Partial Waves of $\\eta\\pi^-$ and $\\eta'\\pi^-$ in $\\pi^-p\\to\\eta^{(\\prime)}\\pi^-p$ at $191\\,\\textrm{GeV}/c$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adolph, C.; Alexeev, M.G.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E.R.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Buchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S.U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M.L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Donskov, S.V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; M. Finger jr; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; von Hohenesche, N. du Fresne; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmuller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hahne, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F.H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Hoppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Jorg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuss, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kramer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R.P.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G.K.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.D.; Nunes, A.S.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rossiyskaya, N.S.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Rychter, A.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schluter, T.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schonning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Wolbeek, J. ter; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Virius, M.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exclusive production of $\\eta\\pi^-$ and $\\eta'\\pi^-$ has been studied with a $191\\,\\textrm{GeV}/c$ $\\pi^-$ beam impinging on a hydrogen target at COMPASS (CERN). Partial-wave analyses reveal different odd/even angular momentum ($L$) characteristics in the inspected invariant mass range up to $3\\,\\textrm{GeV}/c^2$. A striking similarity between the two systems is observed for the $L=2,4,6$ intensities (scaled by kinematical factors) and the relative phases. The known resonances $a_2(1320)$ and $a_4(2040)$ are in line with this similarity. In contrast, a strong enhancement of $\\eta'\\pi^-$ over $\\eta\\pi^-$ is found for the $L=1,3,5$ waves, which carry non-$q\\bar q$ quantum numbers. The $L=1$ intensity peaks at $1.7\\,\\textrm{GeV}/c^2$ in $\\eta'\\pi^-$ and at $1.4\\,\\textrm{GeV}/c^2$ in $\\eta\\pi^-$, the corresponding phase motions with respect to $L=2$ are different.

  15. eta Chameleontis: abnormal initial mass function or dynamical evolution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Moraux; W. Lawson; C. Clarke

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Eta Chamaeleontis is a unique young (~9 Myr) association with 18 systems concentrated in a radius of ~35 arcmin, i.e. 1pc at the cluster distance of 97pc. No other members have been found up to 1.5 degrees from the cluster centre. The cluster mass function is consistent with the IMF of other rich young open clusters in the higher mass range but shows a clear deficit of low mass stars and brown dwarfs with no objects below 0.1Msun. The aim of this paper is to test whether this peculiar mass function could result from dynamical evolution despite the young age of the cluster. We performed N-body numerical calculations starting with a log-normal IMF and different initial conditions in terms of number of systems and cluster radius using the code NBODY3. We simulated the cluster dynamical evolution over 10 Myr and compared the results to the observations. We found that it is possible to reproduce eta Cha when starting with a very compact configuration (with Ninit=40 and R0=0.005pc) which suggests that the IMF of the association might not be abnormal. The high initial density might also explain the deficit of wide binaries that is observed in the cluster.

  16. The first full orbit of Eta Carinae seen by Fermi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reitberger, K; Reimer, O; Takahashi, H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The binary system eta Carinae has completed its first 5.54y orbit since the beginning of science operation of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We are now able to investigate the high-energy gamma-ray source at the position of eta Carinae over its full orbital period. By this, we can address and confirm earlier predictions for temporal and spectral variability. Newer versions of the LAT datasets, instrument response functions and background models allow for a more accurate analysis. Therefore it is important to re-evaluate the previously analyzed time period along with the new data to further constrain location, spectral shape, and flux time history of the gamma-ray source. We confirm earlier predictions of increasing flux values above 10 GeV toward the next periastron passage. For the most recent part of the data sample, flux values as high as those before the first periastron passage in 2008 are recorded. A comparison of spectral energy distributions around periastron and apastron passages reveals stron...

  17. A Blast Wave from the 1843 Eruption of Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Very massive stars shed much of their mass in violent precursor eruptions as luminous blue variables (LBVs) before reaching their most likely end as supernovae, but the cause of LBV eruptions is unknown. The 19th century eruption of Eta Carinae, the prototype of these events, ejected about 12 solar masses at speeds of 650 km/s, with a kinetic energy of almost 10^50 ergs. Some faster material with speeds up to 1000-2000 km/s had previously been reported but its full distribution was unknown. Here I report observations of much faster material with speeds up to 3500-6000 km/s, reaching farther from the star than the fastest material in earlier reports. This fast material roughly doubles the kinetic energy of the 19th century event, and suggests that it released a blast wave now propagating ahead of the massive ejecta. Thus, Eta Car's outer shell now mimics a low-energy supernova remnant. The eruption has usually been discussed in terms of an extreme wind driven by the star's luminosity, but fast material reported here suggests that it was powered by a deep-seated explosion rivalling a supernova, perhaps triggered by the pulsational pair instability. This may alter interpretations of similar events seen in other galaxies.

  18. August 30, 2000 In Proceedings of the MC2000. An International Conference on Advanced Monte Carlo PNNL-SA-33487 for Radiation Physics, Particle Transport Simulation and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, James S.

    PNNL-SA-33487 for Radiation Physics, Particle Transport Simulation and Applications 23-26 October, 2000 Laboratory (PNNL) is developing new software to estimate tumor control probabilities (TCPs) using three. To improve tumor response modeling, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing new

  19. Application of Mn/DOT Utility Coordination Process to Local Agencies Based on national best practices, the Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT) Utility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Application of Mn/DOT Utility Coordination Process to Local Agencies Based on national best practices, the Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT) Utility Coordination Process incorporates Processes There are projects where the full process is not necessary. The Mn/DOT Utilities Manual provides

  20. Observation of eta_c^{prime} Production in gamma gamma Fusion at CLEO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. M. Asner; CLEO Collaboration

    2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the observation of the eta_{c}^{prime}(2^{1}S_{0}), the radial excitation of eta_{c}(1^{1}S_{0}) ground state of charmonium, in the two-photon fusion reaction gamma gamma rightarrow eta_{c}^{prime} rightarrow K_{S}^{0}K^{pm}pi^{mp} in 13.6 fb^{-1} of CLEO II/II.V data and 13.1 fb^{-1} of CLEO III data. We obtain M(eta_{c}^{prime})=3642.9 pm 3.1(stat) pm1.5(syst) MeV, and M(eta_{c})=2981.8 pm1.3(stat) pm 1.5(syst) MeV. The corresponding values of hyperfine splittings between ^{1}S_{0} and ^{3}S_{1} states are \\Delta M_{hf}(1S)=115.1 pm 2.0 MeV, Delta M_{hf}(2S)=43.1 pm3.4 MeV. Assuming that the eta_{c} and eta_{c}^{prime} have equal branching fractions to K_{S}K pi, we obtain Gamma_{gamma gamma}(eta_{c}^{prime})=1.3 pm 0.6 keV.

  1. A study of the centrally produced eta pi0 and eta pi- systems in pp interactions at 450 GeV/c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The WA102 Collaboration; D. Barberis

    2000-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A partial wave analysis of the centrally produced eta pi0 and eta pi- channels has been performed in pp collisions using an incident beam momentum of 450 GeV/c. Clear a0(980) and a2(1320) signals have been observed in S and D+ waves respectively. The dPT, phi and |t| distributions of these resonances are presented.

  2. STTI, Beta Eta-at-Large Chapter Invites You to Join Us! Social Justice: Through the Nursing Lens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    STTI, Beta Eta-at-Large Chapter Invites You to Join Us! Social Justice: Through the Nursing Lens payable to: Beta Eta-at-Large Chapter Mail to: Colleen Gullickson, Associate Dean Henry Predolin School

  3. Evidence for {psi}' Decays into {gamma}{pi}{sup 0} and {gamma}{eta}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Berger, N.; Bian, J. M.; Cai, X.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Deng, Z. Y.; Dong, L. Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The decays {psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{pi}{sup 0}, {gamma}{eta} and {gamma}{eta}{sup '} are studied using data collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The processes {psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{pi}{sup 0} and {psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{eta} are observed for the first time with signal significances of 4.6{sigma} and 4.3{sigma}, respectively. The branching fractions are determined to be B({psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{pi}{sup 0})=(1.58{+-}0.40{+-}0.13)x10{sup -6}, B({psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{eta})=(1.38{+-}0.48{+-}0.09)x10{sup -6}, and B({psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '})=(126{+-}3{+-}8)x10{sup -6}, where the first errors are statistical and the second ones systematic.

  4. Measurement of B(J/psi->eta_c gamma) at KEDR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anashin, V V; Baldin, E M; Barladyan, A K; Barnyakov, A Yu; Barnyakov, M Yu; Baru, S E; Basok, I Yu; Bedny, I V; Beloborodova, O L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bobrov, A V; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bogomyagkov, A V; Bondar, A E; Buzykaev, A R; Eidelman, S I; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Gulevich, V V; Gusev, D V; Karnaev, S E; Karpov, G V; Karpov, S V; Kharlamova, T A; Kiselev, V A; Kononov, S A; Kotov, K Yu; Kravchenko, E A; Kulikov, V F; Kurkin, G Ya; Kuper, E A; Levichev, E B; Maksimov, D A; Malyshev, V M; Maslennikov, A L; Medvedko, A S; Meshkov, O I; Milstein, A I; Mishnev, S I; Morozov, I I; Muchnoi, N Yu; Neufeld, V V; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Okunev, I N; Onuchin, A P; Oreshkin, S B; Orlov, I O; Osipov, A A; Peleganchuk, S V; Pivovarov, S G; Piminov, P A; Petrov, V V; Poluektov, A O; Shatilov, D N; Pospelov, G E; Prisekin, V G; Ruban, A A; Sandyrev, V K; Savinov, G A; Shamov, A G; Shwartz, B A; Simonov, E A; Sinyatkin, S V; Skovpen, Yu I; Skrinsky, A N; Smaluk, V V; Sokolov, A V; Sukharev, A M; Starostina, E V; Talyshev, A A; Tayursky, V A; Telnov, V I; Tikhonov, Yu A; Todyshev, K Yu; Tumaikin, G M; Usov, Yu V; Vorobiov, A I; Yushkov, A N; Zhilich, V N; Zhulanov, V V; Zhuravlev, A N

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the inclusive photon spectrum from 6.3 million J/psi decays collected with the KEDR detector at the VEPP-4M e+e- collider. We measure the branching fraction of the radiative decay J/psi -> eta_c gamma, eta_c width and mass. Taking into account an asymmetric photon line shape we obtain: M(eta_c) = (2978.1 +- 1.4 +- 2.0) MeV/c^2, Gamma(eta_c) = (43.5 +- 5.4 +- 15.8) MeV, B(J/psi->eta_c gamma) = (2.59 +- 0.16 +- 0.31)%$.

  5. Central Production of Eta and Eta-prime via Double Pomeron Exchange in the Sakai-Sugimoto Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil Anderson; Sophia K. Domokos; Jeffrey A. Harvey; Nelia Mann

    2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a string-inspired model for the central production of $\\eta$ and $\\eta'$ mesons in proton-proton collisions, via double Pomeron exchange. Using general symmetry considerations, we construct a low-energy differential cross section for double glueball exchange in terms of some undetermined coupling constants and form factors. We extend this model to the Regge regime, replacing the glueball propagators with Pomeron trajectories, and modifying the interaction term by a factor derived from the 5-string scattering amplitude in flat space. We then fix the couplings which remain undetermined, using the Sakai-Sugimoto framework to model low-energy QCD. Finally, we generate a simulation of the scattering process at $\\sqrt{s} = 29.1 GeV$, where double Pomeron exchange should play a role (secondary to double Reggeon exchange). We focus on the dependence of the scattering cross section on the angle between the scattered protons in the transverse plane. The results exhibit a definite deviation from the angular dependence that arises as a consequence of natural parity violation alone. The amount of deviation is primarily determined by couplings that come from the Chern-Simons action of the AdS/QCD supergravity dual, which is directly related to the QCD gravitational anomaly, and thus constitutes a universal part of any five-dimensional string/gravity dual theory of QCD. We argue that this makes the high energy central production of pseudoscalar mesons an interesting probe of AdS/QCD models.

  6. A methodology for optimal MSW management, with an application in the waste transportation of Attica Region, Greece

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Economopoulou, M.A. [Hellenic Statistical Authority, Pireos 46 and Eponiton, Pireus 185 10 (Greece); Economopoulou, A.A. [Ministry of Environment, Energy and Climatic Change, 15 Amaliados Street, Athens 11523 (Greece); Economopoulos, A.P., E-mail: eco@otenet.gr [Environmental Engineering Dept., Technical University of Crete, Chania 73100 (Greece)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • A two-step (strategic and detailed optimal planning) methodology is used for solving complex MSW management problems. • A software package is outlined, which can be used for generating detailed optimal plans. • Sensitivity analysis compares alternative scenarios that address objections and/or wishes of local communities. • A case study shows the application of the above procedure in practice and demonstrates the results and benefits obtained. - Abstract: The paper describes a software system capable of formulating alternative optimal Municipal Solid Wastes (MSWs) management plans, each of which meets a set of constraints that may reflect selected objections and/or wishes of local communities. The objective function to be minimized in each plan is the sum of the annualized capital investment and annual operating cost of all transportation, treatment and final disposal operations involved, taking into consideration the possible income from the sale of products and any other financial incentives or disincentives that may exist. For each plan formulated, the system generates several reports that define the plan, analyze its cost elements and yield an indicative profile of selected types of installations, as well as data files that facilitate the geographic representation of the optimal solution in maps through the use of GIS. A number of these reports compare the technical and economic data from all scenarios considered at the study area, municipality and installation level constituting in effect sensitivity analysis. The generation of alternative plans offers local authorities the opportunity of choice and the results of the sensitivity analysis allow them to choose wisely and with consensus. The paper presents also an application of this software system in the capital Region of Attica in Greece, for the purpose of developing an optimal waste transportation system in line with its approved waste management plan. The formulated plan was able to: (a) serve 113 Municipalities and Communities that generate nearly 2 million t/y of comingled MSW with distinctly different waste collection patterns, (b) take into consideration several existing waste transfer stations (WTS) and optimize their use within the overall plan, (c) select the most appropriate sites among the potentially suitable (new and in use) ones, (d) generate the optimal profile of each WTS proposed, and (e) perform sensitivity analysis so as to define the impact of selected sets of constraints (limitations in the availability of sites and in the capacity of their installations) on the design and cost of the ensuing optimal waste transfer system. The results show that optimal planning offers significant economic savings to municipalities, while reducing at the same time the present levels of traffic, fuel consumptions and air emissions in the congested Athens basin.

  7. Solving a Dial-a-Ride Problem with a Hybrid Evolutionary Multi-objective Application to Demand Responsive Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to Demand Responsive Transport R´emy Chevrier,a , Arnaud Liefoogheb,c , Laetitia Jourdanb,c , Clarisse, 59650 Villeneuve d'Ascq, France Abstract Demand responsive transport allows customers to be carried to improve the quality of service, demand responsive transport needs more flexibility. This paper tries

  8. Active core profile and transport modification by application of Ion Bernstein Wave power in PBX-M

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeBlanc, B.; Bell, R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Batha, S. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of Ion Bernstein Wave Heating (IBWH) into the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M) tokamak stabilizes sawtooth oscillations and generates peaked density profiles. A transport barrier, spatially correlated with the IBWH power deposition profile, is observed in the core of IBWH assisted neutral beam injection (NBI) discharges. A precursor to the fully developed barrier is seen in the soft x-ray data during edge localized mode (ELM) activity. Sustained IBWH operation is conducive to a regime where the barrier supports large {triangledown}n{sub e}, {triangledown}T{sub e}, {triangledown}v{sub phi}, and {triangledown}T{sub i}, delimiting the confinement zone. This regime is reminiscent of the H(high)-mode but with a confinement zone moved inwards. The core region has better than H-mode confinement while the peripheral region is L(low)-mode-like. The peaked profile enhanced NBI core deposition and increases nuclear reactivity. An increase in central T{sub i} results from {chi}{sub i} reduction (compared to H-mode) and better beam penetration. Bootstrap current fractions of up to 0.32--0.35 locally and 0.28 overall were obtained when an additional NBI burst is applied to this plasma.

  9. Evaluation of the Potential Environmental Impacts from Large-Scale Use and Production of Hydrogen in Energy and Transportation Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wuebbles, D.J.; Dubey, M.K., Edmonds, J.; Layzell, D.; Olsen, S.; Rahn, T.; Rocket, A.; Wang, D.; Jia, W.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to systematically identify and examine possible near and long-term ecological and environmental effects from the production of hydrogen from various energy sources based on the DOE hydrogen production strategy and the use of that hydrogen in transportation applications. This project uses state-of-the-art numerical modeling tools of the environment and energy system emissions in combination with relevant new and prior measurements and other analyses to assess the understanding of the potential ecological and environmental impacts from hydrogen market penetration. H2 technology options and market penetration scenarios will be evaluated using energy-technology-economics models as well as atmospheric trace gas projections based on the IPCC SRES scenarios including the decline in halocarbons due to the Montreal Protocol. Specifically we investigate the impact of hydrogen releases on the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, the long-term stability of the ozone layer due to changes in hydrogen emissions, the impact of hydrogen emissions and resulting concentrations on climate, the impact on microbial ecosystems involved in hydrogen uptake, and criteria pollutants emitted from distributed and centralized hydrogen production pathways and their impacts on human health, air quality, ecosystems, and structures under different penetration scenarios

  10. $\\eta$ meson production of high-energy nuclear collisions at NLO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Wei; Zhang, Ben-Wei; Wang, Enke

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transverse momentum spectrum of $\\eta$ meson in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is studied at the next-to-leading-order (NLO) within the perturbative QCD, where the jet quenching effect in the QGP is incorporated with the effectively medium-modified $\\eta$ fragmentation functions using the higher-twist approach. We show that the theoretical simulations could give nice descriptions of PHENIX data on $\\eta$ meson in both $\\rm p+p$ and central $\\rm Au+Au$ collisions at the RHIC, and also provide numerical predictions of $\\eta$ spectra in central $\\rm Pb+Pb$ collisions with $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76$~TeV at the LHC. The ratios of $\\eta/\\pi^0$ in $\\rm p+p$ and in central $\\rm Au+Au$ collisions at $200$~GeV are found to overlap in a wide $p_T$ region, which matches well the measured ratio $\\eta / \\pi^0$ by PHENIX. We demonstrate that, at the asymptotic region when $p_{T} \\rightarrow \\infty$ the ratios of $\\eta/\\pi^{0}$ in both $\\rm Au+Au$ and $\\rm p+p$ are almost determined only by quark jets fragmentation and thus...

  11. Search for eta-mesic 4He with the WASA-at-COSY detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krzemien, Wojciech

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed a search for the 4He-eta bound state via exclusive measurement of the excitation function for the dd->3Heppi- reaction, where the outgoing p-pi- pair originates from the conversion of the eta meson on a neutron inside the 4He nucleus. The measurements were performed at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY-Juelich with the WASA-at-COSY detection system.The internal deuteron beam of COSY was scattered on a pellet-type deuteron target. The data were taken during a slow acceleration of the beam from 2.185 GeV/c to 2.400 GeV/c crossing the kinematical threshold for the eta production in the dd->4He-eta reaction at 2.336 GeV/c. The corresponding excess energy in the 4He-eta system varied from -51.4 MeV to 22 MeV. Events corresponding to decays of the eta-mesic 4He were selected using cuts on the 3He momentum, p and pi- kinetic energies and the relative p-pi- angle in the center of mass system. The range of the applied cuts was inferred from simulations of decay of the 4He-eta bound state proceeding via excitati...

  12. A Measurement of the B ---> Eta/C K Branching Fraction Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Frank; /Manchester U.

    2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The branching fraction is measured for the decay channels B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sub S}{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sup +} where {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{bar K}{pi}, using the BABAR detector. The {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decay channels are used, including non-resonant decays and possibly those through intermediate resonances.

  13. The eta transition form factor from space- and time-like experimental data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escribano, R; Sanchez-Puertas, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The $\\eta$ transition form factor is analysed for the first time in both space- and time-like regions at low and intermediate energies in a model-independent approach through the use of rational approximants. The $\\eta\\rightarrow e^+e^-\\gamma$ experimental data provided by the A2 Collaboration in the very low energy region of the dilelectron invariant mass distribution allows for the extraction of the most precise up-to-date slope and curvature parameters of the form factors as well as their values at zero and infinity. The impact of these new results on the mixing parameters of the $\\eta$-$\\eta^\\prime$ system, together with the role played by renormalisation dependent effects, and on the determination of the $VP\\gamma$ couplings from $V\\to P\\gamma$ and $P\\to V\\gamma$ radiative decays are also discussed.

  14. Application for CHE-CCE 2012 Summer Internship Title of project: "Public Acceptance of Congestion Pricing of Transportation"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    Pricing of Transportation" Worksite Location: Ithaca, NY Faculty sponsor: Rick Geddes County Cornell standards for cars and light trucks reduce greenhouse gas emissions and enhance energy independence the acceptance of variable transportation pricing. This includes extant studies that utilize data from telephone

  15. PKC{eta} is a negative regulator of AKT inhibiting the IGF-I induced proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahaf, Galit; Rotem-Dai, Noa; Koifman, Gabriela; Raveh-Amit, Hadas; Frost, Sigal A.; Livneh, Etta, E-mail: etta@bgu.ac.il

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The PI3K-AKT pathway is frequently activated in human cancers, including breast cancer, and its activation appears to be critical for tumor maintenance. Some malignant cells are dependent on activated AKT for their survival; tumors exhibiting elevated AKT activity show sensitivity to its inhibition, providing an Achilles heel for their treatment. Here we show that the PKC{eta} isoform is a negative regulator of the AKT signaling pathway. The IGF-I induced phosphorylation on Ser473 of AKT was inhibited by the PKC{eta}-induced expression in MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cancer cells. This was further confirmed in shRNA PKC{eta}-knocked-down MCF-7 cells, demonstrating elevated phosphorylation on AKT Ser473. While PKC{eta} exhibited negative regulation on AKT phosphorylation it did not alter the IGF-I induced ERK phosphorylation. However, it enhanced ERK phosphorylation when stimulated by PDGF. Moreover, its effects on IGF-I/AKT and PDGF/ERK pathways were in correlation with cell proliferation. We further show that both PKC{eta} and IGF-I confer protection against UV-induced apoptosis and cell death having additive effects. Although the protective effect of IGF-I involved activation of AKT, it was not affected by PKC{eta} expression, suggesting that PKC{eta} acts through a different route to increase cell survival. Hence, our studies show that PKC{eta} provides negative control on AKT pathway leading to reduced cell proliferation, and further suggest that its presence/absence in breast cancer cells will affect cell death, which could be of therapeutic value.

  16. The Source of the Helium Visible Lines in Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kashi, A; Kashi, Amit; Soker, Noam

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We assume that the helium-I lines emitted by the massive binary system Eta Carinae are formed in the acceleration zone of the less-massive secondary star. We calculate the Doppler shift of the lines as a function of orbital phase and of several parameters of the binary system. We find that a good fit is obtained if the helium lines are formed in the region where the secondary wind speed is 430 km/sec. The acceptable binary eccentricity is in the range 0.9-0.95, and the inclination angle (the angle between a line perpendicular to the orbital plane and the line of sight) is in the range 40-55 degrees. Lower values of e require higher values of i, and vice versa. The binary system is oriented such that the secondary star is in our direction (closer to us) during periastron passage. The orbital motion can account in part to the Doppler shift of the peak in X-ray emission.

  17. The Source of the Helium Visible Lines in Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amit Kashi; Noam Soker

    2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We assume that the helium-I lines emitted by the massive binary system Eta Carinae are formed in the acceleration zone of the less-massive secondary star. We calculate the Doppler shift of the lines as a function of orbital phase and of several parameters of the binary system. We find that a good fit is obtained if the helium lines are formed in the region where the secondary wind speed is 430 km/sec. The acceptable binary eccentricity is in the range 0.9-0.95, and the inclination angle (the angle between a line perpendicular to the orbital plane and the line of sight) is in the range 40-55 degrees. Lower values of e require higher values of i, and vice versa. The binary system is oriented such that the secondary star is in our direction (closer to us) during periastron passage. The orbital motion can account in part to the Doppler shift of the peak in X-ray emission.

  18. Giant Outbursts of the Eta Carinae-P Cygni Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2006-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss the role of short-duration eruptive mass loss in the evolution of very massive stars. Giant eruptions of Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) like the 19th century event of $\\eta$ Carinae can remove large quantities of mass almost instantaneously, making them significant in stellar evolution. They can potentially remove more mass from the star than line-driven winds, especially if winds are clumped such that O star mass-loss rates need to be revised downward. When seen in other galaxies as ``supernova impostors'', these eruptions typically last for less than a decade, and they can remove of order 10 M$_{\\odot}$ as indicated by massive nebulae around LBVs. Such extreme mass-loss rates cannot be driven by radiation pressure on spectral lines. Instead, these outbursts must either be continuum-driven super-Eddington winds or outright hydrodynamic explosions, both of which are insensitive to metallicity. As such, this eruptive mode of mass loss could play a pivotal role for massive metal-poor stars in the early universe.

  19. A multispectral view of the periodic events in eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Damineli; D. J. Hillier; M. F. Corcoran; O. Stahl; J. H. Groh; J. Arias; M. Teodoro; N. Morrell; R. Gamen; F. Gonzalez; N. V. Leister; H. Levato; R. S. Levenhagen; M. Grosso; J. F. Albacete Colombo; G. Wallerstein

    2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A full description of the 5.5-yr low excitation events in Eta Carinae is presented. We show that they are not as simple and brief as previously thought, but a combination of two components. The first, the 'slow variation' component, is revealed by slow changes in the ionization level of circumstellar matter across the whole cycle and is caused by gradual changes in the wind-wind collision shock-cone orientation, angular opening and gaseous content. The second, the 'collapse' component, is restricted to around the minimum, and is due to a temporary global collapse of the wind-wind collision shock. High energy photons (E > 16 eV) from the companion star are strongly shielded, leaving the Weigelt objects at low ionization state for >6 months. High energy phenomena are sensitive only to the 'collapse', low energy only to the 'slow variation' and intermediate energies to both components. Simple eclipses and mechanisms effective only near periastron (e.g., shell ejection or accretion onto the secondary star) cannot account for the whole 5.5-yr cycle. We find anti-correlated changes in the intensity and the radial velocity of P Cygni absorption profiles in FeII 6455 and HeI 7065 lines, indicating that the former is associated to the primary and the latter to the secondary star. We present a set of light curves representative of the whole spectrum, useful for monitoring the next event (2009 January 11).

  20. Application of United States Department of Transportation regulations to hazardous material and waste shipments on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnside, M.E.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All hazardous material and waste transported over roadways open to the public must be in compliance with the US Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations. The DOT states that the hazardous material regulations (HMR) also apply to government-owned, contractor-operated (GOCO) transportation operations over any US Department of Energy (DOE) site roadway where the public has free and unrestricted access. Hazardous material and waste in packages that do not meet DOE regulations must be transported on DOE site roadways in a manner that excludes the public and nonessential workers. At the DOE Richland Field Office (the Hanford Site), hazardous material and waste movements that do not meet DOE requirements are transported over public access roadways during off-peak hours with the roadways barricaded. These movements are accomplished using a transportation plan that involves the DOE, DOE contractors, and private utilities who operate on or near the Hanford Site. This method, which is used at the Hanford Site to comply with DOE regulations onsite, can be communicated to other DOE sites to provide a basis for achieving consistency in similar transportation operations.

  1. Time resolved, 2-D hard X-ray imaging of relativistic electron-beam target interactions on ETA-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crist, C.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sampayan, S.; Westenskow, G.; Caporaso, G.; Houck, T.; Weir, J.; Trimble, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Krogh, M. [AlliedSignal FM and T, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced radiographic applications require a constant source size less than 1 mm. To study the time history of a relativistic electron beam as it interacts with a bremsstrahlung converter, one of the diagnostics they use is a multi-frame time-resolved hard x-ray camera. They are performing experiments on the ETA-II accelerator at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to investigate details of the electron beam/converter interactions. The camera they are using contains 6 time-resolved images, each image is a 5 ns frame. By starting each successive frame 10 ns after the previous frame, they create a 6-frame movie from the hard x-rays produced from the interaction of the 50-ns electron beam pulse.

  2. Streaked spectrometry using multilayer x-ray-interference mirrors to investigate energy transport in laser-plasma applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stradling, G.L.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Henke, B.L.; Campbell, E.M.; Mead, W.C.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transport of energy in laser-produced plasmas is scrutinized by devising spectrally and temporally identifiable characteristics in the x-ray emission history which identify the heat-front position at various times in the heating process. Measurements of the relative turn-on times of these characteristics show the rate of energy transport between various points. These measurements can in turn constrain models of energy transport phenomena. We are time-resolving spectrally distinguishable subkilovolt x-ray emissions from different layers of a disk target to examine the transport rate of energy into the target. A similar technique is used to measure the lateral expansion rate of the plasma spot. A soft x-ray streak camera with 15-psec temporal resolution is used to make the temporal measurements. Spectral discrimination of the incident signal is provided by multilayer x-ray interference mirrors.

  3. Technology transition in the national air transportation system : market failure and game theoretic analysis with application to ADS-B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Xiaojie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research analyzes the problem of technology transition in the national air transportation system, focusing on the implementation of Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B). ADS-B is a key technology in the ...

  4. Prediction of net bedload transport rates obtained in oscillating water tunnels and applicability to real surf zone waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David

    Experimental studies of sediment transport rates due to near shore waves are often conducted in oscillating water tunnels (OWTs). In an OWT, the oscillatory motion produced by the piston propagates almost instantaneously ...

  5. ETA FORMS AND THE CHERN CHARACTER ABSTRACT: The semi-topological nature of the eta-invariant of a self-adjoint elliptic differential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, Colin J.

    and regularized traces on infinite-dimensional vector bundles realized as the limiting values of superconnection(D) = Ker(D+ ) Ker(D- ) on B. The eta-form Aodd(B) = i (B, 2i+1TB) of the Bismut superconnection-Simons form for superconnections. 1 #12;2 Extensions to compatible Dirac operators associated to a fibration

  6. Application of a data assimilation method via an ensemble Kalman filter to reactive urea hydrolysis transport modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juxiu Tong; Bill X. Hu; Hai Huang; Luanjin Guo; Jinzhong Yang

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With growing importance of water resources in the world, remediations of anthropogenic contaminations due to reactive solute transport become even more important. A good understanding of reactive rate parameters such as kinetic parameters is the key to accurately predicting reactive solute transport processes and designing corresponding remediation schemes. For modeling reactive solute transport, it is very difficult to estimate chemical reaction rate parameters due to complex processes of chemical reactions and limited available data. To find a method to get the reactive rate parameters for the reactive urea hydrolysis transport modeling and obtain more accurate prediction for the chemical concentrations, we developed a data assimilation method based on an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) method to calibrate reactive rate parameters for modeling urea hydrolysis transport in a synthetic one-dimensional column at laboratory scale and to update modeling prediction. We applied a constrained EnKF method to pose constraints to the updated reactive rate parameters and the predicted solute concentrations based on their physical meanings after the data assimilation calibration. From the study results we concluded that we could efficiently improve the chemical reactive rate parameters with the data assimilation method via the EnKF, and at the same time we could improve solute concentration prediction. The more data we assimilated, the more accurate the reactive rate parameters and concentration prediction. The filter divergence problem was also solved in this study.

  7. Search for eta-mesic 4He with the WASA-at-COSY detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojciech Krzemien

    2012-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed a search for the 4He-eta bound state via exclusive measurement of the excitation function for the dd->3Heppi- reaction, where the outgoing p-pi- pair originates from the conversion of the eta meson on a neutron inside the 4He nucleus. The measurements were performed at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY-Juelich with the WASA-at-COSY detection system.The internal deuteron beam of COSY was scattered on a pellet-type deuteron target. The data were taken during a slow acceleration of the beam from 2.185 GeV/c to 2.400 GeV/c crossing the kinematical threshold for the eta production in the dd->4He-eta reaction at 2.336 GeV/c. The corresponding excess energy in the 4He-eta system varied from -51.4 MeV to 22 MeV. Events corresponding to decays of the eta-mesic 4He were selected using cuts on the 3He momentum, p and pi- kinetic energies and the relative p-pi- angle in the center of mass system. The range of the applied cuts was inferred from simulations of decay of the 4He-eta bound state proceeding via excitation the N* resonance. The integrated luminosity in the experiment was determined using the dd->3He-n reaction and the relative normalization of the points of the dd->3Heppi- excitation function was based on the quasi-elastic proton-proton scattering. No signal of the 4He-eta bound state was observed in the excitation function. An upper limit for the cross-section for the bound state formation and decay in the process dd->(4He-eta)_bound->3Heppi- determined for the bound state width of 10, 20 and 30 MeV equals to 28, 32 and 41 nb, respectively. The measured angular and momentum distributions of the reaction products are close to those simulated under the assumption of uniform phase-space distribution.

  8. Application of precision mechanical engineering techniques to the design of a moderate energy beam transport for the FAA explosive detection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lujan, R.; Christensen, K.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the application of precision mounting and alignment techniques to a moderate energy beam transport system (MEBT) used on the exit of a 1.75 MeV RFQ. While frequently found in optical systems, techniques-such-as kinematic mounting, and degree-of-freedom decoupling, are not as widely used for accelerator components. The MEBT consist of one permanent magnet quadrupole, four electro magnet quadrupole, and one debuncher cavity. Included in the paper are discussions of design and fabrication considerations as well as, installation, alignment and operations experience during the successful implementation on a working accelerator.

  9. Application of precision mechanical engineering techniques to the design of a moderate energy beam transport for the FAA explosive detection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lujan, R.; Christensen, K.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the application of precision mounting and alignment techniques to a moderate energy beam transport system (MEBT) used on the exit of a 1.75 MeV RFQ. While frequently found in optical systems, techniques-such-as kinematic mounting, and degree-of-freedom decoupling, are not as widely used for accelerator components. The MEBT consist of one permanent magnet quadrupole, four electro magnet quadrupole, and one debuncher cavity. Included in the paper are discussions of design and fabrication considerations as well as, installation, alignment and operations experience during the successful implementation on a working accelerator.

  10. Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration for High-Order Discontinuous Finite Element SN Transport Schemes and Application to Locally Refined Unstructured Meshes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaqi Wang; Jean C. Ragusa

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA) schemes compatible with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) grids are derived for the SN transport equations discretized using high-order discontinuous finite elements. These schemes are directly obtained from the discretized transport equations by assuming a linear dependence in angle of the angular flux along with an exact Fick's law and, therefore, are categorized as partially consistent. These schemes are akin to the symmetric interior penalty technique applied to elliptic problems and are all based on a second-order discontinuous finite element discretization of a diffusion equation (as opposed to a mixed or P1 formulation). Therefore, they only have the scalar flux as unknowns. A Fourier analysis has been carried out to determine the convergence properties of the three proposed DSA schemes for various cell optical thicknesses and aspect ratios. Out of the three DSA schemes derived, the modified interior penalty (MIP) scheme is stable and effective for realistic problems, even with distorted elements, but loses effectiveness for some highly heterogeneous configurations. The MIP scheme is also symmetric positive definite and can be solved efficiently with a preconditioned conjugate gradient method. Its implementation in an AMR SN transport code has been performed for both source iteration and GMRes-based transport solves, with polynomial orders up to 4. Numerical results are provided and show good agreement with the Fourier analysis results. Results on AMR grids demonstrate that the cost of DSA can be kept low on locally refined meshes.

  11. Measurement of the beam asymmetry in eta-photoproduction off the proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Elsner et al.

    2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam asymmetry, $\\Sigma$, was measured at ELSA in the reaction $\\vec \\gamma p \\to \\eta p$ using linearly polarised tagged photon beams, produced by coherent bremsstrahlung off a diamond. The crystal was oriented to provide polarised photons in the energy range $E_\\gamma = 800$ to 1400 MeV with the maximum polarisation of $P_\\gamma = 49$ % obtained at 1305 MeV. Both dominant decay modes of the $\\eta$ into two photons and $3\\pi^0$ were used to extract the beam asymmetry from the azimuthal modulation of the cross section. The measurements cover the angular range $\\Theta_\\text{cm}\\simeq 50$ -- 150 degrees. Large asymmetries up to 80 % are observed, in agreement with a previous measurement. The eta-MAID model and the Bonn--Gatchina partial wave analysis describe the measurements, but the required partial waves differ significantly.

  12. First observation of the hadronic transition $ \\Upsilon(4S) \\to \\eta h_{b}(1P)$ and new measurement of the $h_b(1P)$ and $\\eta_b(1S)$ parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamponi, U; Abdesselam, A; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Asner, D M; Atmacan, H; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Badhrees, I; Bakich, A M; Barberio, E; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Biswal, J; Bondar, A; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bra?ko, M; Browder, T E; ?ervenkov, D; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S -K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Danilov, M; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Fulsom, B G; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Getzkow, D; Gillard, R; Goh, Y M; Golob, B; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Hedges, M T; Hou, W -S; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Jaegle, I; Joffe, D; Julius, T; Kato, E; Katrenko, P; Kichimi, H; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kim, S H; Kinoshita, K; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumita, T; Kuzmin, A; Lange, J S; Lewis, P; Libby, J; Lukin, P; Matvienko, D; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Mori, T; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Natkaniec, Z; Nayak, M; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ostrowicz, W; Oswald, C; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Park, H; Pedlar, T K; Pesántez, L; Pestotnik, R; Petri?c, M; Piilonen, L E; Ribežl, E; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Ryu, S; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Stari?, M; Steder, M; Stypula, J; Tanida, K; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Uchida, M; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Vossen, A; Wagner, M N; Wang, M -Z; Wang, X L; Watanabe, Y; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yashchenko, S; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a sample of $771.6 \\times 10^{6}$ $\\Upsilon(4S)$ decays collected by the Belle experiment at the KEKB $e^+e^-$ collider, we observe for the first time the transition $\\Upsilon(4S) \\to \\eta h_b(1P)$ with the branching fraction ${\\cal B}[\\Upsilon(4S) \\to \\eta h_b(1P)]= (2.18 \\pm 0.11 \\pm 0.18) \\times 10^{-3}$ and we measure the $h_b(1P)$ mass $M_{h_{b}(1P)} = (9899.3 \\pm 0.4 \\pm 1.0)$ MeV/$c^{2}$, corresponding to the hyperfine splitting $\\Delta M_{\\mathrm HF}(1P) = (0.6 \\pm 0.4 \\pm 1.0)$ MeV/$c^{2}$. Using the transition $h_b(1P) \\to \\gamma \\eta_b(1S)$, we measure the $\\eta_b(1S)$ mass $M_{\\eta_{b}(1S)} = (9400.7 \\pm 1.7 \\pm 1.6)$ MeV/$c^{2}$, corresponding to $\\Delta M_{\\mathrm HF}(1S) = (59.6 \\pm 1.7 \\pm 1.6)$ MeV/$c^{2}$, the $\\eta_b(1S)$ width $\\Gamma_{\\eta_{b}(1S)} = (8 ^{+6}_{-5} \\pm 5)$ MeV/$c^{2}$ and the branching fraction ${\\cal B}[h_b(1P) \\to \\gamma \\eta_b(1S)]= (56 \\pm 8 \\pm 4) \\%$.

  13. Transportation and Stationary Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) is small. Previous feedback from industry has indicated that existing transportation fuel providers (oil for multiple fuel cell applications, including material handling equipment, backup power, and light- or heavy

  14. Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, N.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a critical role in combustion processes just as chemicalparameters are essential for combustion modeling; molecularwith Application to Combustion. Transport Theor Stat 2003;

  15. Construction of the eta->3pi (and K->3pi) amplitudes using dispersive approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Zdrahal; K. Kampf; M. Knecht; J. Novotny

    2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The dispersive approach based only on very general principles, unitarity, analyticity and crossing symmetry, combined with chiral counting enables to construct fully relativistic model-independent representations of the eta and K three-pion decays valid up to and including two-loop corrections. Here we demonstrate the procedure on the eta->3pi^0 decay. We perform possible matchings of our dispersive approach with the two-loop ChPT result and briefly discuss corresponding predictions of the Dalitz plot slope parameter alpha.

  16. UM SERVICE VEHICLE PARKING PERMIT APPLICATION Return the completed application to Parking and Transportation Services, 1213 Kipke Dr., 2002, or fax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    UM SERVICE VEHICLE PARKING PERMIT APPLICATION Return the completed application to Parking vehicles that provide service as stated in the definition below qualify to receive this permit. DEFINITION A service vehicle is any licensed University vehicle, typically a truck or van, whose primary purpose

  17. Contribution of Case Based Reasoning (CBR) in the Exploitation of Return of Experience. Application to Accident Scenarii in Railroad Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maalel, Ahmed

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study is from a base of accident scenarii in rail transport (feedback) in order to develop a tool to share build and sustain knowledge and safety and secondly to exploit the knowledge stored to prevent the reproduction of accidents / incidents. This tool should ultimately lead to the proposal of prevention and protection measures to minimize the risk level of a new transport system and thus to improve safety. The approach to achieving this goal largely depends on the use of artificial intelligence techniques and rarely the use of a method of automatic learning in order to develop a feasibility model of a software tool based on case based reasoning (CBR) to exploit stored knowledge in order to create know-how that can help stimulate domain experts in the task of analysis, evaluation and certification of a new system.

  18. Application of the INSTANT-HPS PN Transport Code to the C5G7 Benchmark Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Wang; H. Zhang; R. H. Szilard; R. C. Martineau

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INSTANT is the INL's next generation neutron transport solver to support high-fidelity multi-physics reactor simulation INSTANT is in continuous development to extend its capability Code is designed to take full advantage of middle to large cluster (10-1000 processors) Code is designed to focus on method adaptation while also mesh adaptation will be possible. It utilizes the most modern computing techniques to generate a neutronics tool of full-core transport calculations for reactor analysis and design. It can perform calculations on unstructured 2D/3D triangular, hexagonal and Cartesian geometries. Calculations can be easily extended to more geometries because of the independent mesh framework coded with the model Fortran. This code has a multigroup solver with thermal rebalance and Chebyshev acceleration. It employs second-order PN and Hybrid Finite Element method (PNHFEM) discretization scheme. Three different in-group solvers - preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (CG) method, preconditioned Generalized Minimal Residual Method (GMRES) and Red-Black iteration - have been implemented and parallelized with the spatial domain decomposition in the code. The input is managed with extensible markup language (XML) format. 3D variables including the flux distributions are outputted into VTK files, which can be visualized by tools such as VisIt and ParaView. An extension of the code named INSTANTHPS provides the capability to perform 3D heterogeneous transport calculations within fuel pins. C5G7 is an OECD/NEA benchmark problem created to test the ability of modern deterministic transport methods and codes to treat reactor core problems without spatial homogenization. This benchmark problem had been widely analyzed with various code packages. In this transaction, results of the applying the INSTANT-HPS code to the C5G7 problem are summarized.

  19. Measurement of the B -> Omega l Nu and B -> Eta l Nu Branching Fractions Using Neutrino Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, Vincent; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present a study of the charmless semileptonic B-meson decays B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu} and B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}. The analysis is based on 383 million B{bar B} pairs recorded at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The {omega} mesons are reconstructed in the channel {omega} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and the {eta} mesons in the channels {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. They measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.14 {+-} 0.16{sub stat} {+-} 0.08{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (0.31 {+-} 0.06{sub stat} {+-} 0.08{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4}.

  20. A compact transport and charge model for GaN-based high electron mobility transistors for RF applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radhakrishna, Ujwal

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gallium Nitride (GaN)-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) are rapidly emerging as front-runners in high-power mm-wave circuit applications. For circuit design with current devices and to allow sensible future ...

  1. Transportation Faculty Position The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Washington continues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transportation Faculty Position The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering of this action, applications are being solicited for a full-time, tenure-track faculty position in transportation in traffic operations, freight transportation, transportation planning, transportation safety

  2. The Curvaton Hypothesis and the eta-problem of Quintessential Inflation, with and without Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konstantinos Dimopoulos

    2002-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    It is argued why, contrary to expectations, steep brane-inflation cannot really help in overcoming the eta-problem of quintessential inflation model-building. In contrast it is shown that the problem is substantially ameliorated under the curvaton hypothesis. This is quantified by considering possible modular quintessential inflationary models in the context of both standard and brane cosmology.

  3. Search for neutrinoless tau decays involving pi(0) or eta mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched for lepton flavor violating decays of the tau lepton using final states with an electron Or a muon and one or two pi(0) or eta mesons but no neutrinos. The data used in the search were collected with the CLEO II detector...

  4. S-matrix for strings on $\\eta$-deformed AdS5 x S5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arutyunov, Gleb; Frolov, Sergey

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the bosonic part of the superstring sigma model Lagrangian on $\\eta$-deformed AdS5 x S5, and use it to compute the perturbative world-sheet scattering matrix of bosonic particles of the model. We then compare it with the large string tension limit of the q-deformed S-matrix and find exact agreement.

  5. X-ray Modeling of \\eta\\ Carinae and WR140 from SPH Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Christopher M P; Okazaki, Atsuo T; Madura, Thomas I; Owocki, Stanley P

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The colliding wind binary (CWB) systems \\eta\\ Carinae and WR140 provide unique laboratories for X-ray astrophysics. Their wind-wind collisions produce hard X-rays that have been monitored extensively by several X-ray telescopes, including RXTE. To interpret these RXTE X-ray light curves, we model the wind-wind collision using 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations. Adiabatic simulations that account for the absorption of X-rays from an assumed point source at the apex of the wind-collision shock cone by the distorted winds can closely match the observed 2-10keV RXTE light curves of both \\eta\\ Car and WR140. This point-source model can also explain the early recovery of \\eta\\ Car's X-ray light curve from the 2009.0 minimum by a factor of 2-4 reduction in the mass loss rate of \\eta\\ Car. Our more recent models relax the point-source approximation and account for the spatially extended emission along the wind-wind interaction shock front. For WR140, the computed X-ray light curve again matches the ...

  6. Coupled-channels study of the $\\pi^{-}p \\to \\eta n$ process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durand, J; Lee, T -S H; Saghai, B; Sato, T

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reaction $\\pi^{-}p \\to \\eta n$ is investigated within a dynamical coupled-channels model of meson production reactions in the nucleon resonance region. The meson baryon channels included are $\\pi N$, $\\eta N$, $\\pi \\Delta$, $\\sigma N$, and $\\rho N$. The non-resonant meson-baryon interactions of the model are derived from a set of Lagrangians by using a unitary transformation method. One or two excited nucleon states in each of $S$, $P$, $D$, and $F$ partial waves are included to generate the resonant amplitudes. Data of $\\pi^{-}p \\to \\eta n$ reaction from threshold up to a total center-of-mass energy of about 2 GeV are satisfactorily reproduced and the roles played by the following nine nucleon resonances are investigated: $S_{11}(1535)$, $S_{11}(1650)$, $P_{11}(1440)$, $P_{11}(1710)$, $P_{13}(1720)$, $D_{13}(1520)$, $D_{13}(1700)$, $D_{15}(1675)$, and $F_{15}(1680)$. The reaction mechanism as well as the predicted $\\eta N$ scattering length are discussed.

  7. Transportation Services Fueling Operation Transportation Services has installed a software system that will facilitate fueling of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transportation Services Fueling Operation Transportation Services has installed a software system into this system. All University vehicles that wish to fuel at UH M noa Transportation Services will be required the application below and submit your application to Transportation Services before attempting to fuel your

  8. FINDING {eta} CAR ANALOGS IN NEARBY GALAXIES USING SPITZER. I. CANDIDATE SELECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Rubab; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S., E-mail: khan@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: kstanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: ckochanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The late-stage evolution of the most massive stars such as {eta} Carinae is controlled by the effects of mass loss, which may be dominated by poorly understood eruptive mass ejections. Understanding this population is challenging because no true analogs of {eta} Car have been clearly identified in the Milky Way or other galaxies. We utilize Spitzer IRAC images of seven nearby ({approx}< 4 Mpc) galaxies to search for such analogs. We find 34 candidates with a flat or rising mid-IR spectral energy distributions toward longer mid-infrared wavelengths that emit >10{sup 5} L{sub Sun} in the IRAC bands (3.6 to 8.0 {mu}m) and are not known to be background sources. Based on our estimates for the expected number of background sources, we expect that follow-up observations will show that most of these candidates are not dust enshrouded massive stars, with an expectation of only 6 {+-} 6 surviving candidates. Since we would detect true analogs of {eta} Car for roughly 200 years post-eruption, this implies that the rate of eruptions like {eta} Car is less than the core-collapse supernova rate. It is possible, however, that every M > 40 M{sub Sun} star undergoes such eruptions given our initial results. In Paper II we will characterize the candidates through further analysis and follow-up observations, and there is no barrier to increasing the galaxy sample by an order of magnitude. The primary limitation of the present search is that Spitzer's resolution limits us to the shorter wavelength IRAC bands. With the James Webb Space Telescope, such surveys can be carried out at the far more optimal wavelengths of 10-30 {mu}m, allowing identification of {eta} Car analogs for millennia rather than centuries post-eruption.

  9. Local Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Local Transportation. Transportation from the Airport to Hotel. There are two types of taxi companies that operate at the airport: special and regular taxis (

  10. Greening Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Goal 2: Greening Transportation LANL supports and encourages employees to reduce their personal greenhouse gas emissions by offering various commuting and work...

  11. Chamber transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  12. A new measurement of the rare decay eta -> pi^0 gamma gamma with the Crystal Ball/TAPS detectors at the Mainz Microtron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nefkens, B. M.; Prakhov, S.; Aguar-Bartolom??, P.; Annand, J. R.; Arends, H. J.; Bantawa, K.; Beck, R.; Bekrenev, V.; Bergh??user, H.; Braghieri, A.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brudvik, J.; Cherepnya, S.; Codling, R. F.; Collicott, C.; Costanza, S.; Danilkin, I. V.; Denig, A.; Demissie, B.; Dieterle, M.; Downie, E. J.; Drexler, P.; Fil'kov, L. V.; Fix, A.; Garni, S.; Glazier, D. I.; Gregor, R.; Hamilton, D.; Heid, E.; Hornidge, D.; Howdle, D.; Jahn, O.; Jude, T. C.; Kashevarov, V. L.; K??ser, A.; Keshelashvili, I.; Kondratiev, R.; Korolija, M.; Kotulla, M.; Koulbardis, A.; Kruglov, S.; Krusche, B.; Lisin, V.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J.; Maghrbi, Y.; Mancel, J.; Manley, D. M.; McNicoll, E. F.; Mekterovic, D.; Metag, V.; Mushkarenkov, A.; Nikolaev, A.; Novotny, R.; Oberle, M.; Ortega, H.; Ostrick, M.; Ott, P.; Otte, P. B.; Oussena, B.; Pedroni, P.; Polonski, A.; Robinson, J.; Rosner, G.; Rostomyan, T.; Schumann, S.; Sikora, M. H.; Starostin, A.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strub, T.; Suarez, I. M.; Supek, I.; Tarbert, C. M.; Thiel, M.; Thomas, A.; Unverzagt, M.; Watts, D. P.; Werthmueller, D; Witthauer, L.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new measurement of the rare, doubly radiative decay eta->pi^0 gamma gamma was conducted with the Crystal Ball and TAPS multiphoton spectrometers together with the photon tagging facility at the Mainz Microtron MAMI. New data on the dependence of the partial decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma), on the two-photon invariant mass squared, m^2(gamma gamma), as well as a new, more precise value for the decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma) = (0.33+/-0.03_tot) eV, are based on analysis of 1.2 x 10^3 eta->pi^0 gamma gamma decays from a total of 6 x 10^7 eta mesons produced in the gamma p -> eta p reaction. The present results for dGamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma)/dm^2(gamma gamma) are in good agreement with previous measurements and recent theoretical calculations for this dependence.

  13. Thermal Energy Storage Technology for Transportation and Other...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Storage Technology for Transportation and Other Applications D. Bank, M. Maurer, J. Penkala, K. Sehanobish, A. Soukhojak Thermal Energy Storage Technology for Transportation...

  14. Search for B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '}K{sup +} and B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '}K{sub S}{sup 0} decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Q. L.; Zhang, C. C. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Abe, K.; Adachi, I.; Gershon, T.; Haba, J.; Hazumi, M.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kichimi, H.; Krokovny, P.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Ozaki, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sumisawa, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Takasaki, F.; Tamai, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan)] (and others)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of searches for B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '}K{sup +} and B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '}K{sub S}{sup 0} decays, using a sample of 388x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected with the Belle detector at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance. No statistically significant signal is found for either of the two decay modes and upper limits for the branching fractions are determined to be B(B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '}K{sup +})<8.8x10{sup -5} and B(B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '}K{sub S}{sup 0})<2.5x10{sup -5} at 90% confidence level.

  15. Improved measurement of the branching fraction and energy spectrum of {eta}{sup '} from {upsilon}(1S) decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aquines, O.; Li, Z.; Lopez, A. [University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico); Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] (and others)

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an improved measurement of the {eta}{sup '} meson energy spectrum in {upsilon}(1S) decays, using 1.2 fb{sup -1} of data taken at the {upsilon}(1S) center-of-mass energy with the CLEO III detector. We compare our results with models of the {eta}{sup '} gluonic form factor that have been suggested to explain the unexpectedly large B{yields}{eta}{sup '}X{sub s} rate. Models based on perturbative QCD fail to fit the data for large {eta}{sup '} energies, and thus an explanation outside the realm of the Standard Model or an improved understanding of nonperturbative QCD effects may be needed to account for this large rate.

  16. Diameters of delta Cephei and eta Aquilae Measured with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. T. Armstrong; Tyler E. Nordgren; M. E. Germain; Arsen R. Hajian; R. B. Hindsley; C. A. Hummel; D. Mozurkewich; R. N. Thessin

    2000-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the diameters of the Cepheid variables delta Cephei (18 nights) and eta Aquilae (11 nights) with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer. The primary results of these observations are the mean angular diameters of these Cepheids: 1.520 +/- 0.014 milliseconds of arc (mas) for delta Cep and 1.69 +/- 0.04 mas for eta Aql. We also report limb-darkened diameters for the check stars in this program: for beta Lac, theta(LD) = 1.909 +/- 0.011 mas, and for 12 Aql, theta(LD) = 2.418 +/- 0.010 mas. When combined with radius estimates from period-radius relations in the literature, the Cepheid angular diameters suggest distances slightly smaller than, but still consistent with, the Hipparcos distances. Pulsations are weakly detected at a level of about 1.5 sigma to 2 sigma for both Cepheids.

  17. Electron-donor properties of eta/sup 5/-cyclopentadienylcarbonyl and eta/sup 6/-arenecarbonyl compounds of transition metals in reactions with v acceptors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gur'yanova, E.N.; Isaeva, E.S.; Ginzburg, A.G.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complexation reactions of compounds of the types eta/sup 5/-CpM(CO)/sub n/(PR/sub 3/)/sub 3-n/ (M = Mn, Re; R = i-C/sub 3/H/sub 7/, C/sub 6/H/sub 5/, 4-CH/sub 3/C/sub 6/H/sub 4/; n = 1 to 3) and eta/sup 6/-MesM(CO)/sub 3/ (Mes = 1,3,5-(CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/C/sub 6/H/sub 3/, M = Cr, Mo, W) with aluminum bromide, gallium trichloride, and mercuric trifluoroacetate in various solvents (benzene, methylene chloride, dichloroethane) have been investigated by IR spectroscopy, calorimetry, and measurements of the dielectric constant. The coordination sites have been established. It has been shown that the compounds investigated coordinate the acceptor molecules by means of their metal atoms. One exception is CpMn (CO)/sub 3/, which gives a complex with AlBr/sub 3/ with the participation of an oxygen atom of a carbonyl group. The heats of formation and the dipole moments of the complexes have been determined. The dipole moments of the intermolecular M-Al and M-Ga bonds have been evaluated. On the basis of a comparison of the energy of the coordinate bonds and the degree of charge transfer, it has been conducted that the intermolecular metal-metal bonds in the complexes investigated have a donor-acceptor nature.

  18. The CHANDRA HETGS X-ray Grating Spectrum of Eta Car

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. F. Corcoran; J. H. Swank; R. Petre; K. Ishibashi; K. Davidson; L. Townsley; R. Smith; S. White; R. Viotti; A. Damineli

    2001-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Eta Car may be the most massive and luminous star in the Galaxy and is suspected to be a massive, colliding wind binary system. The CHANDRA X-ray observatory has obtained a calibrated, high-resolution X-ray spectrum of the star uncontaminated by the nearby extended soft X-ray emisssion. Our 89 ksec CHANDRA observation with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) shows that the hot gas near the star is non-isothermal. The temperature distribution may represent the emission on either side of the colliding wind bow shock, effectively ``resolving'' the shock. If so, the pre-shock wind velocities are ~ 700 and ~ 1800 km/s in our analysis, and these velocities may be interpreted as the terminal velocities of the winds from Eta Car and from the hidden companion star. The forbidden-to-intercombination (f/i) line ratios for the He-like ions of S, Si and Fe are large, indicating that the line forming region lies far from the stellar photosphere. The iron fluorescent line at 1.93 Angstrom, first detected by ASCA, is clearly resolved from the thermal iron line in the CHANDRA grating spectrum. The Fe fluorescent line is weaker in our CHANDRA observation than in any of the ASCA spectra. The CHANDRA observation also provides an uninterrupted high-time resolution lightcurve of the stellar X-ray emission from Eta Car and suggests that there was no significant, coherent variability during the CHANDRA observation. The Eta Car CHANDRA grating spectrum is unlike recently published X-ray grating spectra of single massive stars in significant ways and is generally consistent with colliding wind emission in a massive binary.

  19. Resolved debris disk emission around eta Tel: a young Solar System or ongoing planet formation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Smith; L. J. Churcher; M. C. Wyatt; M. M. Moerchen; C. M. Telesco

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    60% of the A star members of the 12 Myr old beta Pictoris moving group (BPMG) show significant excess emission in the mid-infrared, several million years after the proto-planetary disk is thought to disperse. Theoretical models suggest this peak may coincide with the formation of Pluto-sized planetesimals in the disk, stirring smaller bodies into collisional destruction. Here we present resolved mid-infrared imaging of the disk of eta Tel (A0V in the BPMG) and consider its implications for the state of planet formation in this system. eta Tel was observed at 11.7 and 18.3um using T-ReCS on Gemini South. The resulting images were compared to simple disk models to constrain the radial distribution of the emitting material. The emission observed at 18.3um is shown to be significantly extended beyond the PSF along a position angle 8 degrees. This is the first time dust emission has been resolved around eta Tel. Modelling indicates that the extension arises from an edge-on disk of radius 0.5 arcsec (~24 AU). Combining the spatial constraints from the imaging with those from the spectral energy distribution shows that >50% of the 18um emission comes from an unresolved dust component at ~4 AU. The radial structure of the eta Tel debris disk is reminiscent of the Solar System, suggesting that this is a young Solar System analogue. For an age of 12Myr, both the radius and dust level of the extended cooler component are consistent with self-stirring models for a protoplanetary disk of 0.7 times minimum mass solar nebula. The origin of the hot dust component may arise in an asteroid belt undergoing collisional destruction, or in massive collisions in ongoing terrestrial planet formation.

  20. Preliminary results of t and f asymmetries for {eta} photoproduction from the proton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, Ross J. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Ritchie, Barry G. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Dugger, Michael R. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present preliminary data for the T and F asymmetries in {eta} photoproduction from the proton, along with comparisons to theoretical predictions. The data used in the present analysis were taken using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab, a cryogenic target which utilized transversely polarized protons in a butanol target, and incident tagged photons with energy between 0.62 and 2.93 GeV.

  1. CP Violation in B->eta'K0 and Status of SU(3)-related Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. G. Smith

    2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements from Belle and BABAR of the time-dependent CP-violation parameters S and C in B->eta'K0 decays. Both experiments observe mixing-induced CP violation with a significance of more than 5 standard deviations in this b-> s penguin dominated mode. We also compare with theoretical expectations and discuss the latest results for SU(3)-related decays which are useful for obtaining bounds on the expected values of S and C.

  2. Resonances in coupled pi K, eta K scattering from quantum chromodynamics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dudek, Jozef J [JLAB; Edwards, Robert G [JLAB; Thomas, Christopher E; Wilson, David J

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using first-principles calculation within Quantum Chromodynamics, we are able to reproduce the pattern of experimental strange resonances which appear as complex singularities within coupled pi K, eta K scattering amplitudes. We make use of numerical computation within the lattice discretized approach to QCD, extracting the energy dependence of scattering amplitudes through their relation- ship to the discrete spectrum of the theory in a finite-volume, which we map out in unprecedented detail.

  3. Test of charge conjugation invariance in the decay of the eta meson into pi(+)pi(-)pi(0)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Zielinski; P. Moskal

    2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we present the preliminary results of the analysis of the pp->pp eta(->pp pi(+)pi(-)pi(0) reaction aiming to test the charge conjugation symmetry C in strong interactions. Based on approximately $10^5$ identified eta->pi(+)pi(-)pi(0) decay events we have extracted asymmetry parameters sensitive to C symmetry violation for different isospin values of the final state and we have established that all are consistent with zero within the obtained accuracy.

  4. Application of the Granuflow Process to Pipeline-Transported Coal Slurry CRADA PC96-010, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard P. Killmeyer; Wu-Wey Wen

    1997-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In light of the current difficulties in processing fine coal and the potential for a significant increase in fines due to more demanding quality specifications, the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) has been involved in the reconstitution of the fine clean coal resulting from advanced fine coal cleaning technologies. FETC has invented and developed a new strategy that combines fine-coal dewatering and reconstitution into one step. The process reduces the moisture content of the clean coal, and alleviates handling problems related to dustiness, stickiness, flowability, and freezing. This process has been named the GranuFlow Process. Early work successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the process for laboratory-scale vacuum filtration dewatering using asphalt emulsion. Further tests focused on the application of the process to a screen-bowl centrifuge via batch mode tests at 300 lb/hr. These tests produced roughly the same results as the laboratory filtration tests did, and they included some testing using Orimulsion, a bitumen emulsion. The Orimulsion seemed to offer greater potential for moisture reduction and was less affected by colder slurry temperatures. Most recently, FETC has conducted several series of tests in its Coal Preparation Process Research Facility. These tests dramatically showed the visible difference in the dewatered product by applying the GranuFlow Process, turning it from a clumpy, wet, sticky material into a granular, dry free-flowing product. In addition, it verified previous results with improvements in moisture content, dustiness, stickiness, and freezing. Orimulsion showed a significant benefit over asphalt emulsion in moisture reduction at additions more than 5%. The overall goal of this project was to successfully apply FETC'S GranuFlow Process to improve coal slurry pipeline operations. Williams Technologies, Inc. (WTI), a leader in pipeline technology, has an interest in reducing the moisture content of the coal at the end of a coal slurry pipeline beyond what is being achieved with conventional mechanical dewatering technology. In addition, they would like to improve the handling characteristics of the dewatered coal. The GranuFlow Process has the potential of assisting in both of these areas, and its degree of applicability needed to be explored. A formal Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between FETC and WTI was signed in November 1996. This CRADA consisted of 6 tasks progressing from preliminary scoping tests to a commercial field test. Task 1 was completed in February 1997, and it provided sufficient information about the applicability of the GranuFlow Process to coal slurry pipelines that further testing was not needed at the present time. Thus the CRADA was terminated.

  5. RECENT X-RAY VARIABILITY OF {eta} CARINAE: THE QUICK ROAD TO RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K. [CRESST and X-ray Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Pittard, J. M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Russell, C. M. P.; Owocki, S. P. [Bartol Research Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Parkin, E. R. [Institut d'Astrophysique et de Geophysique, Universite de Liege, 17, Allee du 6 Aout, B5c, B-4000 Sart Tilman (Belgium); Okazaki, A. [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkai-Gakuen University, Toyohira-ku, Sapporo 062-8605 (Japan)

    2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report continued monitoring of the superluminous binary system {eta} Car by the Proportional Counter Array on the Rossi X-ray Timing Observatory (RXTE) through the 2009 X-ray minimum. The RXTE campaign shows that the minimum began on 2009 January 16, consistent with the phasings of the two previous minima, and overall, the temporal behavior of the X-ray emission was similar to that observed by RXTE in the previous two cycles. However, important differences did occur. The 2-10 keV X-ray flux and X-ray hardness decreased in the 2.5 year interval leading up to the 2009 minimum compared to the previous cycle. Most intriguingly, the 2009 X-ray minimum was about 1 month shorter than either of the previous two minima. During the egress from the 2009 minimum the X-ray hardness increased markedly as it had during egress from the previous two minima, although the maximum X-ray hardness achieved was less than the maximum observed after the two previous recoveries. We suggest that the cycle-to-cycle variations, especially the unexpectedly early recovery from the 2009 X-ray minimum, might have been the result of a decline in {eta} Car's wind momentum flux produced by a drop in {eta} Car's mass loss rate or wind terminal velocity (or some combination), though if so the change in wind momentum flux required to match the X-ray variation is surprisingly large.

  6. Dissecting the Homunculus nebula around Eta Carinae with spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Near-infrared emission lines provide unique diagnostics of the geometry, structure, kinematics, and excitation of eta Carinae's circumstellar ejecta, and give clues to the nature of its wind. The infrared spectrum is a strong function of position in eta Car's nebula, with a mix of intrinsic and reflected emission. Molecular hydrogen traces cool gas and dust in the polar lobes, while [Fe II] blankets their inner surfaces. These lines reveal the back wall of the SE polar lobe for the first time, and give the clearest picture yet of the 3-D geometry. Additionally, collisionally-excited [Fe II] reveals the kinematic structure of a recently discovered `Little Homunculus' expanding inside the larger one. Equatorial gas in the `Fan', on the other hand, shows a spectrum indicating recombination and fluorescent pumping. Some equatorial ejecta glow in the He I 10830 line, showing evidence for material ejected in the 1890 outburst of eta Car. Closer to the star, the compact `Weigelt blobs' are marginally resolved, allowing their infrared spectrum to be separated from the star for the first time. In general, infrared spectra reveal a coherent, directional dependence of excitation in the Homunculus: polar ejecta are collisionally excited, whereas equatorial ejecta are dominated by fluorescence and normal photoexcitation. These are important clues to the geometry of the central star's UV radiation field. Reflected near-infrared emission lines also reveal interesting latitudinal dependence in the stellar wind.

  7. Infrared spectroscopic studies on the photocatalytic hydrogenation of norbornadiene by group 6 metal carbonyls. 2. The role of the diene and the characterization of (. eta. sup 4 -norbornadiene)(. eta. sup 2 -norbornadiene)M(CO) sub 3 complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, P.M.; Jackson, S.A.; Poliakoff, M.; Turner, J.J. (Univ. of Nottingham (England)); Jacke, J.; Grevels, F.W. (Max Planck Institut fuer Strahlenchemie, Ruhr (West Germany))

    1990-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    UV laser flash photolysis of M(CO){sub 6} and (NBD)M(CO){sub 4} (NBD = norbornadiene) is used to generate, respectively, the intermediates M(CO){sub 5}(s) (s = n-heptane; M = Cr, Mo, and W) and ({eta}{sup 4}-NBD)M(CO){sub 3}(s) fac and mer isomers; M = Mo and W. Fast ({mu}s) time-resolved IR spectroscopy is then used to measure the rates of reaction of these intermediates with species likely to be components of the catalytic hydrogenation mixture (e.g., H{sub 2}, NBD, CO, etc.). The measurements show that, for a particular intermediate, the rates of reaction with H{sub 2} and NBD are quite similar. Thus, in a typical catalytic reaction mixture, intermediates are more likely to react with NBD than H{sub 2}, because the concentration of NBD is considerably higher than that of H{sub 2}. Fourier-transform IR is used to monitor the carbonyl species present in solution during photocatalytic deuteration at room temperature. These include the previously unknown complexes fac- and mer-({eta}{sup 4}-NBD)({eta}{sup 2}-NBD)M(CO){sub 3}. In the case of W, it is shown that accumulation of mer-({eta}{sup 4}-NBD)({eta}{sup 2}-NBD)W(CO){sub 3} in the solution frustrates the catalytic deuteration (as monitored by the {nu}(C-D) IR bands of the deuterated products). Furthermore, there is a striking wavelength dependence in the catalytic efficiency of the W system. mer-({eta}{sup 4}-NBD)({eta}{sup 2}-NBD)W(CO){sub 3} is sufficiently stable for them to have isolated a sample (ca, 90% purity). {sup 13}C NMR data support the identification of the complex.

  8. Confirmation of the X(1835) and Observation of the Resonances X(2120) and X(2370) in J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{eta}'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Berger, N.; Bian, J. M.; Cai, X.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Deng, Z. Y.; Dong, L. Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    With a sample of (225.2{+-}2.8)x10{sup 6} J/{psi} events registered in the BESIII detector, J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{eta}' is studied using two {eta}{sup '} decay modes: {eta}{sup '}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{eta} and {eta}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{rho}{sup 0}. The X(1835), which was previously observed by BESII, is confirmed with a statistical significance that is larger than 20{sigma}. In addition, in the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{eta}' invariant-mass spectrum, the X(2120) and the X(2370), are observed with statistical significances larger than 7.2{sigma} and 6.4{sigma}, respectively. For the X(1835), the angular distribution of the radiative photon is consistent with expectations for a pseudoscalar.

  9. Microbial Transport in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginn, Timothy R.; Camesano, Terri; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Nelson, Kirk B.; Clement, T. P.; Wood, Brian D.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we focus on the physical, chemical, and biological processes involved in the transport of bacteria in the saturated subsurface. We will first review conceptual models of bacterial phases in the subsurface, and then the processes controlling fate and transport on short (e.g., bioremediation) time scales. Finally we briefly review field bacterial transport experiments and discuss a number of issues that impact the application of current process descriptions and models at the field scale.

  10. A COMPANION AS THE CAUSE OF LATITUDE-DEPENDENT EFFECTS IN THE WIND OF ETA CARINAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groh, J. H. [Geneva Observatory, Geneva University, Chemin des Maillettes 51, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Madura, T. I.; Weigelt, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Hillier, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Kruip, C. J. H., E-mail: jose.groh@unige.ch [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Postbus 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze spatially resolved spectroscopic observations of the Eta Carinae binary system obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope/STIS. Eta Car is enshrouded by the dusty Homunculus nebula, which scatters light emitted by the central binary and provides a unique opportunity to study a massive binary system from different vantage points. We investigate the latitudinal and azimuthal dependence of H{alpha} line profiles caused by the presence of a wind-wind collision (WWC) cavity created by the companion star. Using two-dimensional radiative transfer models, we find that the wind cavity can qualitatively explain the observed line profiles around apastron. Regions of the Homunculus which scatter light that propagated through the WWC cavity show weaker or no H{alpha} absorption. Regions scattering light that propagated through a significant portion of the primary wind show stronger P Cygni absorption. Our models overestimate the H{alpha} absorption formed in the primary wind, which we attribute to photoionization by the companion, not presently included in the models. We can qualitatively explain the latitudinal changes that occur during periastron, shedding light on the nature of Eta Car's spectroscopic events. Our models support the idea that during the brief period of time around periastron when the primary wind flows unimpeded toward the observer, H{alpha} absorption occurs in directions toward the central object and Homunculus SE pole, but not toward equatorial regions close to the Weigelt blobs. We suggest that observed latitudinal and azimuthal variations are dominated by the companion star via the WWC cavity, rather than by rapid rotation of the primary star.

  11. Nitrogen and Oxygen Abundance Variations in the Outer Ejecta of Eta Carinae: Evidence for Recent Chemical Enrichment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith; Jon A. Morse

    2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present optical spectra of the ionized `Outer Ejecta' of Eta Carinae that reveal differences in chemical composition at various positions. In particular, young condensations just outside the dusty Homunculus Nebula show strong nitrogen lines and little or no oxygen -- but farther away, nitrogen lines weaken and oxygen lines become stronger. The observed variations in the apparent N/O ratio may signify either that the various blobs were ejected with different abundances, or more likely, that the more distant condensations are interacting with normal-composition material. The second hypothesis is supported by various other clues involving kinematics and X-ray emission, and would suggest that Eta Car is enveloped in a ``cocoon'' deposited by previous stellar-wind mass loss. In particular, all emission features where we detect strong oxygen lines are coincident with or outside the soft X-ray shell. In either case, the observed abundance variations suggest that Eta Car's ejection of nitrogen-rich material is a recent phenomenon -- taking place in just the last few thousand years. Thus, Eta Carinae may be at a critical stage of evolution when ashes of the CNO cycle have just appeared at its surface. Finally, these spectra reveal some extremely fast nitrogen-rich material, with Doppler velocities up to 3200 km/s, and actual space velocities that may be much higher. This is the fastest material yet seen in Eta Car's nebula, but with unknown projection angles its age is uncertain.

  12. 3D radiative transfer simulations of Eta Carinae's inner colliding winds - II: Ionization structure of helium at periastron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clementel, Nicola; Kruip, Chael J H; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral observations of the massive colliding wind binary Eta Carinae show phase-dependent variations, in intensity and velocity, of numerous helium emission and absorption lines throughout the entire 5.54-year orbit. Approaching periastron, the 3D structure of the wind-wind interaction region (WWIR) gets highly distorted due to the eccentric ($e \\sim 0.9$) binary orbit. The secondary star ($\\eta_{\\mathrm{B}}$) at these phases is located deep within the primary's dense wind photosphere. The combination of these effects is thought to be the cause of the particularly interesting features observed in the helium lines at periastron. We perform 3D radiative transfer simulations of $\\eta$ Car's interacting winds at periastron. Using the SimpleX radiative transfer algorithm, we post-process output from 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of the inner 150 au of the $\\eta$ Car system for two different primary star mass-loss rates ($\\dot{M}_{\\eta_{\\mathrm{A}}}$). Using previous results from simulations at ap...

  13. \\b{eta}-delayed three-proton decay of 31Ar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lis, A A; Dominik, W; Janas, Z; Pfützner, M; Pomorski, M; Acosta, L; Baraeva, S; Casarejos, E; Duénas-Díaz, J; Dunin, V; Espino, J M; Estrade, A; Farinon, F; Fomichev, A; Geissel, H; Gorshkov, A; Kami?ski, G; Kiselev, O; Knöbel, R; Krupko, S; Kuich, M; Litvinov, Yu A; Marquinez-Durán, G; Martel, I; Mukha, I; Nociforo, C; Ordúz, A K; Pietri, S; Prochazka, A; Sánchez-Benítez, A M; Simon, H; Sitar, B; Slepnev, R; Stanoiu, M; Strmen, P; Szarka, I; Takechi, M; Tanaka, Y; Weick, H; Winfield, J S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The beta decay of 31Ar, produced by fragmentation of a 36Ar beam at 880 MeV/nucleon, was investigated. Identified ions of 31Ar were stopped in a gaseous time projection chamber with optical readout allowing to record decay events with emission of protons. In addition to \\b{eta}-delayed emission of one and two protons we have clearly observed the beta-delayed three-proton branch. The branching ratio for this channel in 31Ar is found to be 0.07(2)%.

  14. \\b{eta}-delayed three-proton decay of 31Ar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Lis; C. Mazzocchi; W. Dominik; Z. Janas; M. Pfützner; M. Pomorski; L. Acosta; S. Baraeva; E. Casarejos; J. Duénas-Díaz; V. Dunin; J. M. Espino; A. Estrade; F. Farinon; A. Fomichev; H. Geissel; A. Gorshkov; G. Kami?ski; O. Kiselev; R. Knöbel; S. Krupko; M. Kuich; Yu. A. Litvinov; G. Marquinez-Durán; I. Martel; I. Mukha; C. Nociforo; A. K. Ordúz; S. Pietri; A. Prochazka; A. M. Sánchez-Benítez; H. Simon; B. Sitar; R. Slepnev; M. Stanoiu; P. Strmen; I. Szarka; M. Takechi; Y. Tanaka; H. Weick; J. S. Winfield

    2015-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The beta decay of 31Ar, produced by fragmentation of a 36Ar beam at 880 MeV/nucleon, was investigated. Identified ions of 31Ar were stopped in a gaseous time projection chamber with optical readout allowing to record decay events with emission of protons. In addition to \\b{eta}-delayed emission of one and two protons we have clearly observed the beta-delayed three-proton branch. The branching ratio for this channel in 31Ar is found to be 0.07(2)%.

  15. Meson dominance in the 'second class' {tau}{yields}{eta}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paver, N.; Riazuddin [Department of Physics, University of Trieste, 34100 Trieste (Italy) and INFN-Sezione di Trieste, 34100 Trieste (Italy); Centre for Advanced Mathematics and Physics, National University of Sciences and Technology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan and National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by recent estimates of the isospin-violating process {tau}{yields}{eta}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}, mostly relying on the {rho} and a{sub 0} dominance of the relevant form factors near threshold, we present an assessment for the branching ratio that accounts for additional, potential effects from the lowest radial excitations {rho}{sup '{identical_to}{rho}}(1450) and a{sub 0}{sup '{identical_to}}a{sub 0}(1450), respectively, also lying in the decay phase space.

  16. Computational Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    ), in-vehicle computers, and computers in the transportation infrastructure are integrated ride- sharing, real-time multi-modal routing and navigation, to autonomous/assisted driving

  17. Studies of the $\\eta$ meson with WASA at COSY and KLOE-2 at DA$\\Phi$NE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moskal, P

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the basic motivations of the KLOE-2 and WASA-at-COSY experiments is the test of fundamental symmetries and the search for phenomena beyond the Standard Model in the hadronic and leptonic decays of ground-state mesons and in particular in decays of the $\\eta$ meson. At COSY these mesons are produced in collisions of proton or deuteron beam with hydrogen or deuterium pellet target, and at DA$\\Phi$NE $\\eta$ mesons originate from radiative decays of $\\phi$ meson or from the fusion of virtual gamma quanta exchanged between colliding electrons and positrons. This contribution includes brief description of experimental techniques used by KLOE-2 and WASA-at-COSY as well as some of physics aspects motivating investigations of production and decays of $\\eta$ mesons.

  18. Searches for isospin-violating transitions $\\chi_{c0,2} \\rightarrow \\pi^{0} \\eta_{c}$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch, M; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, Y; Gao, Z; Garzia, I; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Han, Y L; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, H P; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Kupsc, A; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, P R; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X M; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, R Q; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Pu, Y N; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ren, H L; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Santoro, V; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first upper-limit measurement of the branching fractions of the isospin-violating transitions $\\chi_{c0,2} \\rightarrow \\pi^{0} \\eta_{c}$. The measurements are performed using $106\\times 10^{6}$ $\\psi(3686)$ events accumulated with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII $e^{+}e^{-}$ collider at a center-of-mass energy corresponding to the $\\psi(3686)$ mass. We obtained upper limits on the branching fractions at a 90\\% confidence level of $B(\\chi_{c0} \\rightarrow \\pi^{0} \\eta_{c}) < 1.6 \\times 10^{-3}$ and $B(\\chi_{c2} \\rightarrow \\pi^{0} \\eta_{c}) < 3.2 \\times 10^{-3}$.

  19. On the origin of \\gamma-ray emission in \\eta\\ Carina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohm, S; Hinton, J A; Parkin, E R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    \\eta\\ Car is the only colliding-wind binary for which high-energy \\gamma\\ rays are detected. Although the physical conditions in the shock region change on timescales of hours to days, the variability seen at GeV energies is weak and on significantly longer timescales. The \\gamma-ray spectrum exhibits two features that can be interpreted as emission from the shocks on either side of the contact discontinuity. Here we report on the first time-dependent modelling of the non-thermal emission in \\eta\\ Car. We find that emission from primary electrons is likely not responsible for the \\gamma-ray emission, but accelerated protons interacting with the dense wind material can explain the observations. In our model, efficient acceleration is required at both shocks, with the primary side acting as a hadron calorimeter, whilst on the companion side acceleration is limited by the flow time out of the system, resulting in changing acceleration conditions. The system therefore represents a unique laboratory for the explor...

  20. 3D Printing Meets Computational Astrophysics: Deciphering the Structure of Eta Carinae's Inner Colliding Winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madura, Thomas I; Gull, Theodore R; Kruip, Chael J H; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first 3D prints of output from a supercomputer simulation of a complex astrophysical system, the colliding stellar winds in the massive (>120 M_Sun), highly eccentric (e ~ 0.9) binary star system Eta Carinae. We demonstrate the methodology used to incorporate 3D interactive figures into a PDF journal publication and the benefits of using 3D visualization and 3D printing as tools to analyze data from multidimensional numerical simulations. Using a consumer-grade 3D printer (MakerBot Replicator 2X), we successfully printed 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of Eta Carinae's inner (r ~ 110 au) wind-wind collision interface at multiple orbital phases. The 3D prints and visualizations reveal important, previously unknown 'finger-like' structures at orbital phases shortly after periastron (phi ~ 1.045) that protrude radially outward from the spiral wind-wind collision region. We speculate that these fingers are related to instabilities (e.g. thin-shell, Rayleigh-Taylor) that arise a...

  1. Student Disability Transportation Policies and Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portman, Douglas

    Student Disability Transportation Policies and Procedures Enrolled students with a permanent or temporary disability that require transportation while on-campus, should submit an application form through the University Health Service office. If approved through UHS, the transportation coordinator will contact you

  2. Invariant mass distributions for the pp to p p eta reaction at Q=10 MeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Moskal; R. Czyzykiewicz; E. Czerwinski; D. Gil; D. Grzonka; L. Jarczyk; B. Kamys; A. Khoukaz; J. Klaja; P. Klaja; W. Krzemien; W. Oelert; J. Ritman; T. Sefzick; M. Siemaszko; M. Silarski; J. Smyrski; A. Taschner; M. Wolke; P. Wustner; J. Zdebik; M. J. Zielinski; W. Zipper

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton-proton and proton-eta invariant mass distributions and the total cross section for the pp to pp eta reaction have been determined near the threshold at an excess energy of Q=10 MeV. The experiment has been conducted using the COSY-11 detector setup and the cooler synchrotron COSY. The determined invariant mass spectra reveal significant enhancements in the region of low proton-proton relative momenta, similarly as observed previously at higher excess energies of Q=15.5 MeV and Q= 40MeV.

  3. Transportation Market Distortions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litman, Todd

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Highways, Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Evaluating Criticism of Transportation Costing, VictoriaFrom Here: Evaluating Transportation Diversity, Victoria

  4. A deviational Monte Carlo formulation of ab initio phonon transport and its application to the study of kinetic effects in graphene ribbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landon, Colin Donald

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a deviational Monte Carlo method for solving the Boltzmann equation for phonon transport subject to the linearized ab initio 3-phonon scattering operator. Phonon dispersion relations and transition rates are ...

  5. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

  6. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP-Violating Asymmetries in B^0 Meson Decays to eta' K^0_L

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

    2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present a preliminary measurement of CP-violating parameters S and C from fits of the time-dependence of B{sup 0} meson decays to {eta}'K{sub L}{sup 0}. The data were recorded with the BABAR detector at PEP-II and correspond to 232 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation through the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. By fitting the time-dependent CP asymmetry of the reconstructed B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}'K{sub L}{sup 0} events, they find S = 0.60 {+-} 0.31 {+-} 0.04 and C = 0.10 {+-} 0.21 {+-} 0.03, where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. They also perform a combined fit using both {eta}'K{sub S}{sup 0} and {eta}'K{sub L}{sup 0} data, and find S = 0.36 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.03 and C = -0.16 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.02.

  7. Exclusive {pi}{sup 0},{eta} electroproduction in the resonance region at high Q{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ungaro, M.; Joo, K. [University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 06269 (United States)

    2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present preliminary results from {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} electroproduction data taken with CLAS at Jefferson Lab. These and other CLAS measurements, coupled with recent theoretical developments, will allow non-perturbative approaches to shed lights on the role of quarks and gluons in nuclei and address issues such as confinement and the non-zero quark mass in the chiral limit.

  8. Dual constrictor and dilator actions of ETB receptors in the rat renal microcirculation: interactions with ETA receptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Just, Armin

    Dual constrictor and dilator actions of ETB receptors in the rat renal microcirculation, and William J. Arendshorst. Dual constrictor and dilator actions of ETB receptors in the rat renal the combination of vasoconstrictor ETA and ETB receptors on smooth muscle cells and vasodilator ETB receptors

  9. electrifyingthefuture transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    electrifyingthefuture transportation The UK Government's carbon reduction strategy vehicles and the new Birmingham Science City Energy Systems Integration Laboratory (ESIL) will further enhance this work. The laboratory - unique within the UK and world leading - brings together cutting edge

  10. The high energy X-ray tail of Eta Car revealed by BeppoSAX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. F. Viotti; L. A. Antonelli; C. Rossi; S. Rebecchi

    2004-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the June 2000 long (100 ks) BeppoSAX exposure that has unveiled above 10 keV a new very high energy component of the X-ray spectrum of Eta Car extending to at least 50 keV. We find that the 2-150 keV spectrum is best reproduced by a thermal + non-thermal model. The thermal component dominates the 2-10 keV spectral range with kT_h=5.5 +/- 0.3 keV and log NH_h=22.68 +/- 0.01. The spectrum displays a prominent iron emission line centred at 6.70 keV. Its equivalent width of 0.94 keV, if produced by the thermal source, gives a slightly sub-solar iron abundance ([Fe/H]=-0.15 +/- 0.02). The high energy tail above 10 keV is best fitted by a power law with a photon index of 2.42 +/- 0.04. The integrated 13-150 keV luminosity of ~12 L-sun is comparable to that of the 2-10 keV thermal component. The present result can be explained, in the Eta Car binary star scenario, by Comptonisation of low frequency radiation by high energy electrons, probably generated in the colliding wind shock front, or in instabilities in the wind of the S Dor primary star. It is possible that the high energy tail had largely weakened near the minimum of the 5.53 yr cycle. With respect to the thermal component, it probably has a longer recovering time like that of the highest excitation optical emission lines. Both features can be associated with the large absorption measured by BeppoSAX at phase 0.05.

  11. Applicability of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as biosensors: Effect of biomolecular adsorption on the transport properties of carbon and boron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandey, Ravi

    Applicability of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as biosensors: Effect of biomolecular;Applicability of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as biosensors: Effect of biomolecular adsorption University, Houghton, Michigan 49931, USA 2 US Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research

  12. Survey and discussion of models applicable to the transport and fate thrust area of the Department of Energy Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The availability and easy production of toxic chemical and biological agents by domestic and international terrorists pose a serious threat to US national security, especially to civilian populations in and around urban areas. To address this threat, the Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (CBNP) with the goal of focusing the DOE`s technical resources and expertise on capabilities to deny, deter, mitigate and respond to clandestine releases of chemical and biological agents. With the intent to build on DOE core competencies, the DOE has established six technology thrust areas within the CBNP Program: Biological Information Resources; Point Sensor Systems; Stand-off Detection; Transport and Fate; Decontamination; and Systems Analysis and Integration. The purpose of the Transport and Fate Thrust is to accurately predict the dispersion, concentration and ultimate fate of chemical and biological agents released into the urban and suburban environments and has two major goals: (1) to develop an integrated and validated state-of-the-art atmospheric transport and fate modeling capability for chemical and biological agent releases within the complex urban environment from the regional scale down to building and subway interiors, and (2) to apply this modeling capability in a broad range of simulation case studies of chemical and biological agent release scenarios in suburban, urban and confined (buildings and subways) environments and provide analysis for the incident response user community. Sections of this report discuss subway transport and fate models; buildings interior transport and fate modeling; models for flow and transport around buildings; and local-regional meteorology and dispersion models.

  13. Experimental constraints on transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luce, T.C.; Petty, K.H.; Burrell, K.H.; Forest, C.B.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R.J.; De Haas, J.C.M.; James, R.A.; Makowski, M.A.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of the cross-field energy transport in magnetic confinement experiments in a manner applicable to the accurate assessment of future machine performance continues to be a challenging goal. Experimental results from the DIII-D tokamak in the areas of dimensionless scaling and non-diffusive transport represent progress toward this goal. Dimensionless scaling shows how beneficial the increase in machine size and magnetic field is for future devices. The experiments on DIII-D are the first to determine separately the electron and ion scaling with normalized gyroradius {rho}{sub *}; the electrons scale as expected from gyro-Bohm class theories, while the ions scale consistent with the Goldston empirical scaling. This result predicts an increase in transport relative to Bohm diffusion as {rho}{sub *} decreases in future devices. The existence of distinct {rho}{sub *} scalings for ions and electrons cautions against a physical interpretation of one-fluid or global analysis. The second class of experiments reported here are the first to demonstrate the existence of non-diffusive energy transport. Electron cyclotron heating was applied at the half radius; the electron temperature profile remains substantially peaked. Power balance analysis indicates that heat must flow in the direction of increasing temperature, which is inconsistent with purely diffusive transport. The dynamics of electron temperature perturbations indicate the presence in the heat flux of a term dependent on temperature rather than its gradient. These two observations strongly constrain the types of models which can be applied to cross-field heat transport.

  14. HTS applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noe, M; Fietz, W H; Goldacker, W; Schneider, Th

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconductivity has found many attractive applications in medicine, science, power systems, engineering, transport and electronics. One of the most prominent applications of superconductivity are superconducting magnets e.g. MRI magnets, NMR magnets, accelerator magnets, and magnets for fusion; most applications still use low temperature superconductors. Since the discovery of high temperature superconductivity (HTS) in 1986 there has been a tremendous progress in R&D of HTS material, wires and applications. Especially for power system applications, HTS offers considerable economic benefits. Many HTS demonstrator or prototype applications have been built and successfully tested, and some HTS applications like cables and superconducting fault current limiters seem very close to commercialisation. This paper gives an overview about the present and future HTS applications in power applications, high field magnets and current leads. In addition results of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe program to develop H...

  15. High order Semi-Lagrangian Methods for Transport Problems with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High order Semi-Lagrangian Methods for Transport Problems with Applications to Vlasov Simulations and Global Transport Jan 31 2014 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Wei Guo, The University of...

  16. Transport properties of the hot and dense sQGP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza Berrehrah; Elena Bratkovskaya; Wolfgang Cassing; Rudy Marty

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The transport properties of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) are studied in a QCD medium at finite temperature and chemical potential. We calculate the shear viscosity $\\eta(T,\\mu_q)$ and the electric conductivity $\\sigma_e(T,\\mu_q)$ for a system of interacting massive and broad quasi-particles as described by the dynamical quasi-particle model "DQPM" at finite temperature $T$ and quark chemical potential $\\mu_q$ within the relaxation time approximation. Our results are in a good agreement with lattice QCD at finite temperature and show clearly the increase of the transport coefficients with increasing $T$ and $\\mu_q$. Our results provide the basic ingredients for the study of the hot and dense matter in the Beam Energy Scan (BES) at RHIC and CBM at FAIR.

  17. Direct evidence of quantum transport in photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukamel, Shaul

    Direct evidence of quantum transport in photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes Gitt demonstrating that quantum transport of energy occurs in biological systems. The observed population oscillation solar energy applications. energy transport photosynthesis quantum biology ultrafast phenomena

  18. ReaxFF Reactive Force Field for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems with Application to Oxygen Ion Transport in Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    through yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) membranes. All parameters for ReaxReaxFF Reactive Force Field for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems with Application to Oxygen Ion temperature, leading to applications as oxygen sensors and as membranes for high temperature solid oxide fuel

  19. Two-proton correlation function for the pp -> pp+eta and pp -> pp+pions reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Klaja; P. Moskal; E. Czerwinski; R. Czyzykiewicz; A. Deloff; D. Gil; D. Grzonka; B. Kamys; A. Khoukaz; J. Klaja; W. Krzemien; W. Oelert; J. Ritman; T. Sefzick; M. Siemaszko; M. Silarski; J. Smyrski; A. Taeschner; M. Wolke; J. Zdebik; M. Zielinski; W. Zipper

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    For the very first time, the correlation femtoscopy method is applied to a kinematically complete measurement of meson production in the collisions of hadrons. A two-proton correlation function was derived from the data for the pp -> ppX reaction, measured near the threshold of eta meson production. A technique developed for the purpose of this analysis permitted to establish the correlation function separately for the production of the pp+eta and of the pp+pions systems. The shape of the two-proton correlation function for the ppeta differs from that for the pp(pions) and both do not show a peak structure opposite to results determined for inclusive measurements of heavy ion collisions.

  20. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    40 pp. IEA, 2004c: Biofuels for Transport: An Internationalthe ACT Map scenario, transport biofuels production reachesestimates that biofuels’ share of transport fuel could

  1. ETA CARINAE ACROSS THE 2003.5 MINIMUM: ANALYSIS IN THE VISIBLE AND NEAR-INFRARED SPECTRAL REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, K. E.; Kober, G. Vieira [Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Weis, K.; Bomans, D. J. [Astronomisches Institut, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Universitaetsstrasse 150, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Gull, T. R. [Astrophysics Science Division, Code 667, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Stahl, O. [ZAH, Landessternwarte Heidelberg-Koenigstuhl, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: krister.nielsen@nasa.gov

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the visible through near-infrared spectrum of Eta Carinae ({eta} Car) and its ejecta obtained during the '{eta} Car Campaign with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT)'. This is a part of larger effort to present a complete {eta} Car spectrum, and extends the previously presented analyses with the Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS) in the UV (1240-3159 A) to 10,430 A. The spectrum in the mid- and near-UV is characterized by the ejecta absorption. At longer wavelengths, stellar wind features from the central source and narrow-emission lines from the Weigelt condensations dominate the spectrum. However, narrow absorption lines from the circumstellar shells are present. This paper provides a description of the spectrum between 3060 and 10,430 A, including line identifications of the ejecta absorption spectrum, the emission spectrum from the Weigelt condensations and the P Cygni stellar wind features. The high spectral resolving power of VLT/UVES enables equivalent width measurements of atomic and molecular absorption lines for elements with no transitions at the shorter wavelengths. However, the ground-based seeing and contributions of nebular-scattered radiation prevent direct comparison of measured equivalent widths in the VLT/UVES and HST/STIS spectra. Fortunately, HST/STIS and VLT/UVES have a small overlap in wavelength coverage which allows us to compare and adjust for the difference in scattered radiation entering the instruments' apertures. This paper provides a complete online VLT/UVES spectrum with line identifications and a spectral comparison between HST/STIS and VLT/UVES between 3060 and 3160 A.

  2. Impact of {\\eta}earth on the capabilities of affordable space missions to detect biosignatures on extrasolar planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leger, Alain; Malbet, Fabien; Labadie, Lucas; Absil, Olivier

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analytic model to estimate the capabilities of space missions dedicated to the search for biosignatures in the atmosphere of rocky planets located in the habitable zone of nearby stars. Relations between performance and mission parameters such as mirror diameter, distance to targets, and radius of planets, are obtained. Two types of instruments are considered: coronagraphs observing in the visible, and nulling interferometers in the thermal infrared. Missions considered are: single-pupil coronagraphs with a 2.4 m primary mirror, and formation flying interferometers with 4 x 0.75 m collecting mirrors. The numbers of accessible planets are calculated as a function of {\\eta}earth. When Kepler gives its final estimation for {\\eta}earth, the model will permit a precise assessment of the potential of each instrument. Based on current estimations, {\\eta}earth = 10% around FGK stars and 50% around M stars, the coronagraph could study in spectroscopy only ~1.5 relevant planets, and the interferometer ~14...

  3. IMAGING THE TIME EVOLUTION OF ETA CARINAE'S COLLIDING WINDS WITH HST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gull, Theodore R. [Astrophysics Science Division, Code 667, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Madura, Thomas I.; Groh, Jose H. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hugel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Corcoran, Michael F., E-mail: Theodore.R.Gull@nasa.gov [CRESST and X-ray Astrophysics Laboratory, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report new Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph observations that map the high-ionization forbidden line emission in the inner arcsecond of Eta Car, the first that fully image the extended wind-wind interaction region of the massive colliding wind binary. These observations were obtained after the 2009.0 periastron at orbital phases 0.084, 0.163, and 0.323 of the 5.54 year spectroscopic cycle. We analyze the variations in brightness and morphology of the emission, and find that blueshifted emission (-400 to -200 km s{sup -1}) is symmetric and elongated along the northeast-southwest axis, while the redshifted emission (+100 to +200 km s{sup -1}) is asymmetric and extends to the north-northwest. Comparison with synthetic images generated from a three-dimensional (3D) dynamical model strengthens the 3D orbital orientation found by Madura et al., with an inclination of i Almost-Equal-To 138 Degree-Sign , an argument of periapsis of {omega} Almost-Equal-To 270 Degree-Sign , and an orbital axis that is aligned at the same position angle on the sky as the symmetry axis of the Homunculus, 312 Degree-Sign . We discuss the potential that these and future mappings have for constraining the stellar parameters of the companion star and the long-term variability of the system.

  4. A spectroscopic event of eta Car viewed from different directions: The data and first results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otmar Stahl; Kerstin Weis; Dominik J. Bomans; Kris Davidson; Theodore R. Gull; Roberta M. Humphreys

    2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present spectroscopic observations with high spectral resolution of eta Car as seen by the SE lobe of the Homunculus nebula over the 2003.5 "spectroscopic event". The observed spectra represent the stellar spectrum emitted near the pole of the star and are much less contaminated with nebular emission lines than direct observations of the central object. The "event" is qualitatively similar near the pole to what is observed in direct spectra of the star (more equator-on at 45 degree), but shows interesting differences. The observations show that the equivalent width changes of H alpha emission and other lines are less pronounced at the pole than in the line of sight. Also the absorption components appear less variable. A pronounced high-velocity absorption is present near the event in the He I lines indicating a mass-ejection event. This feature is also seen, but less pronounced, in the hydrogen lines. HeII4686 emission is observed for a brief period of time near the event and appears, if corrected for light travel time, to precede similar emission in the direct view. Our observations indicate that the event is probably not only a change in ionization and excitation structure or a simple eclipse-like event.

  5. PERIASTRON PASSAGE TRIGGERING OF THE 19TH CENTURY ERUPTIONS OF ETA CARINAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashi, Amit; Soker, Noam, E-mail: kashia@physics.technion.ac.i, E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.i [Department of Physics, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We reconstruct the evolution of {eta} Car in the last two centuries under the assumption that the two 19th century eruptions were triggered by periastron passages and through this reconstruction constrain the binary parameters. The beginning of the lesser eruption (LE) at the end of the 19th century occurred when the system was very close to periastron passage, suggesting that the secondary triggered the LE. We assume that the 1838-1858 great eruption (GE) was triggered by a periastron passage as well. We also assume that mass transferred from the primary to the secondary star accounts for the extra energy of the GE. With these assumptions we constrain the total mass of the binary system to be M = M{sub 1} + M{sub 2} {approx}> 250 M{sub sun}. These higher than commonly used masses better match the observed luminosity with stellar evolutionary tracks. Including mass loss by the two stars and mass transfer from the primary to the secondary we obtain a good match of periastron passages to the two peaks in the light curve of the GE. Based on these findings and a similar behavior of P Cygni, we speculate that major luminous blue variable eruptions are triggered by stellar companions and that in extreme cases a short duration event with a huge mass transfer rate can lead to a bright transient event on timescales of weeks to months (a 'supernova impostor').

  6. The Eta Chamaeleontis Cluster Origin in the Sco-Cen OB Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamajek, E E; Feigelson, E D; Mamajek, Eric E.; Lawson, Warrick A.; Feigelson, Eric D.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A young, nearby compact aggregate of X-ray emitting pre-main sequence stars was recently discovered in the vicinity of eta Cha (B8V). In this paper, we further investigate this cluster: its membership, its environs and origins. ROSAT HRI X-ray data for the cluster's T Tauri stars show high levels of magnetic activity and variability. The cluster has an anomalous X-ray luminosity function compared to other young clusters, deficient in stars with low, but detectable X-ray luminosities. This suggests that many low-mass members have escaped the surveyed core region. Photographic photometry from the USNO-A2.0 catalog indicates that additional, X-ray-quiet members exist in the cluster core region. The components of the eclipsing binary RS Cha, previously modeled in the literature as post-MS with discordant ages, are shown to be consistent with being coeval pre-MS stars. We compute the Galactic motion of the cluster from Hipparcos data, and compare it to other young stars and associations in the fourth Galactic quad...

  7. Doppler tomography of the Little Homunculus: High resolution spectra of [Fe II] 16435 around Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution spectra of [Fe II] 16435 around eta Carinae provide powerful diagnostics of the geometry and kinematics of the ``Little Homunculus'' (LH) growing inside the larger Homunculus nebula. The LH expansion is not perfectly homologous: while low-latitudes are consistent with linear expansion since 1910, the polar caps imply ejection dates around 1920--1930. However, the expansion speed of the LH is slower than the post-eruption wind, so the star's powerful wind may accelerate it. With an initial ejection speed of 200 km/s in 1890, the LH would have been accelerated to its present speed if the mass is roughly 0.1 Msun. This agrees with an independent estimate of the LH mass based on its density and volume. In any case, an ejection after 1930 is ruled out. Using the LH as a probe of the 1890 event, then, it is evident that its most basic physical parameters (total mass and kinetic energy; 0.1 Msun and 10^46.9 ergs, respectively) are orders of magnitude less than during the giant eruption in the 1840s. Thus, the ultimate energy sources were different for these two events -- yet their ejecta have the same bipolar geometry. This clue may point toward a collimation mechanism separate from the underlying causes of the outbursts.

  8. PENETRATING THE HOMUNCULUS-NEAR-INFRARED ADAPTIVE OPTICS IMAGES OF ETA CARINAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artigau, Etienne [Gemini Observatory-South and Departement de Physique and Observatoire du Mont Megantic, Universite de Montreal, QC, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Martin, John C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Illinois-Springfield, IL 62703 (United States); Humphreys, Roberta M.; Davidson, Kris [Astronomy Department, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Chesneau, Olivier [UMR 6525 H. Fizeau, Univ. Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP4229 F-06304 Nice, Cedex 4 (France); Smith, Nathan [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Near-infrared adaptive optics imaging with the Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Imager (NICI) and NaCO reveal what appears to be a three-winged or lobed pattern, the 'butterfly nebula', outlined by bright Br{gamma} and H{sub 2} emission and light scattered by dust. In contrast, the [Fe II] emission does not follow the outline of the wings, but shows an extended bipolar distribution which is tracing the Little Homunculus ejected in {eta} Car's second or lesser eruption in the 1890s. Proper motions measured from the combined NICI and NaCO images together with radial velocities show that the knots and filaments that define the bright rims of the butterfly were ejected at two different epochs corresponding approximately to the great eruption and the second eruption. Most of the material is spatially distributed 10{sup 0}-20{sup 0} above and below the equatorial plane apparently behind the Little Homunculus and the larger SE lobe. The equatorial debris either has a wide opening angle or the clumps were ejected at different latitudes relative to the plane. The butterfly is not a coherent physical structure or equatorial torus but spatially separate clumps and filaments ejected at different times, and now 2000-4000 AU from the star.

  9. Ordered transport and identification of particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shera, E.B.

    1993-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are provided for application of electrical field gradients to induce particle velocities to enable particle sequence and identification information to be obtained. Particle sequence is maintained by providing electroosmotic flow for an electrolytic solution in a particle transport tube. The transport tube and electrolytic solution are selected to provide an electroosmotic radius of >100 so that a plug flow profile is obtained for the electrolytic solution in the transport tube. Thus, particles are maintained in the same order in which they are introduced in the transport tube. When the particles also have known electrophoretic velocities, the field gradients introduce an electrophoretic velocity component onto the electroosmotic velocity. The time that the particles pass selected locations along the transport tube may then be detected and the electrophoretic velocity component calculated for particle identification. One particular application is the ordered transport and identification of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a strand of DNA.

  10. Ordered transport and identification of particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shera, E. Brooks (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are provided for application of electrical field gradients to induce particle velocities to enable particle sequence and identification information to be obtained. Particle sequence is maintained by providing electroosmotic flow for an electrolytic solution in a particle transport tube. The transport tube and electrolytic solution are selected to provide an electroosmotic radius of >100 so that a plug flow profile is obtained for the electrolytic solution in the transport tube. Thus, particles are maintained in the same order in which they are introduced in the transport tube. When the particles also have known electrophoretic velocities, the field gradients introduce an electrophoretic velocity component onto the electroosmotic velocity. The time that the particles pass selected locations along the transport tube may then be detected and the electrophoretic velocity component calculated for particle identification. One particular application is the ordered transport and identification of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a strand of DNA.

  11. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Future of Sustainable Transportation This is the January 2015 issue of the Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter. Illustration of an electric vehicle Illustration of an...

  12. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation. Radionuclides irreversibly sorbed onto this fraction of colloids also transport without retardation. The transport times for these radionuclides will be the same as those for nonsorbing radionuclides. The fraction of nonretarding colloids developed in this analysis report is used in the abstraction of SZ and UZ transport models in support of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This analysis report uses input from two Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) analysis reports. This analysis uses the assumption from ''Waste Form and In-Drift Colloids-Associated Radionuclide Concentrations: Abstraction and Summary'' that plutonium and americium are irreversibly sorbed to colloids generated by the waste degradation processes (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025]). In addition, interpretations from RELAP analyses from ''Saturated Zone In-Situ Testing'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170010]) are used to develop the retardation factor distributions in this analysis.

  13. Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes Department of Energy (DOE) policies and requirements to supplement applicable laws, rules, regulations, and other DOE Orders for materials transportation and packaging operations. Cancels DOE 1540.1A, DOE 1540.2, DOE 1540.3A.

  14. Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes Department of Energy (DOE) policies and requirements to supplement applicable laws, rules, regulations, and other DOE Orders for materials transportation and packaging operations. Cancels: DOE 1540.1A, DOE 1540.2, and DOE 1540.3A.

  15. Carbon Dioxide Transportation and Sequestration Act (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act applies to the application process for the issuance of a certificate of authority by an owner or operator of a pipeline designed, constructed, and operated to transport and to sequester...

  16. State of Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities - ApplicationRenewal for Encroachment Permit Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form:...

  17. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReportTransmissionResearchNewsTransportation News

  18. PhD Graduate Assistantship in Environmental Management/Applied Mathematics Mathematical and computational modeling of ocean transport with application to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billings, Lora

    PhD Graduate Assistantship in Environmental Management/Applied Mathematics Mathematical. Applications are invited for a PhD graduate research assistant in Environmental Management at Montclair State University (MSU), Montclair, NJ, USA. The goal of the PhD research will be to combine computer models

  19. Current status, research needs, and opportunities in applications of surface processing to transportation and utilities technologies. Proceedings of a December 1991 workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czanderna, A.W.; Landgrebe, A.R. [eds.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Goal of surface processing is to develop innovative methods of surface modification and characterization for optimum performance and environmental protection for cost-effective operational lifetimes of systems, materials, and components used in transportation and utilities. These proceedings document the principal discussions and conclusions reached at the workshop; they document chapters about the current status of surface characterization with focus on composition, structure, bonding, and atomic-scale topography of surfaces. Also documented are chapters on the current status of surface modification techniques: electrochemical, plasma-aided, reactive and nonreactive physical vapor deposition, sol-gel coatings, high-energy ion implantation, ion-assisted deposition, organized molecular assemblies, solar energy. Brief chapters in the appendices document basic research in surface science by NSF, Air Force, and DOE. Participants at the workshop were invited to serve on 10 working groups. Separate abstracts were prepared for the data base where appropriate.

  20. The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent X-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system, and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allaria, Enrico; Callegari, Carlo; Cocco, Daniele; Fawley, William M.; Kiskinova, Maya; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    FERMI@Elettra is comprised of two free electron lasers (FELs) that will generate short pulses (tau ~;; 25 to 200 fs) of highly coherent radiation in the XUV and soft X-ray region. The use of external laser seeding together with a harmonic upshift scheme to obtain short wavelengths will give FERMI@Elettra the capability to produce high quality, longitudinal coherent photon pulses. This capability together with the possibilities of temporal synchronization to external lasers and control of the output photon polarization will open new experimental opportunities not possible with currently available FELs. Here we report on the predicted radiation coherence properties and important configuration details of the photon beam transport system. We discuss the several experimental stations that will be available during initial operations in 2011, and we give a scientific perspective on possible experiments that can exploit the critical parameters of this new light source.

  1. Applying distributions of hydraulic conductivity for anisotropic systems and applications to Tc Transport at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen G Hunt

    2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    43Tc99 is spreading mostly laterally through the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford site sediments. At higher tensions in the unsaturated zone, the hydraulic conductivity may be strongly anisotropic as a consequence of finer soils to retain more water than coarser ones, and for these soils to have been deposited primarily in horizontal structures. We have tried to develop a consistent modeling procedure that could predict the behavior of Tc plumes. Our procedure consists of: (1) Adapting existing numerical recipes based on critical path analysis to calculate the hydraulic conductivity, K, as a function of tension, h, (2) Statistically correlating the predicted K at various values of the tension with fine content, (3) Seeking a tension value, for which the anisotropy and the horizontal K values are both sufficiently large to accommodate multi-kilometer spreading, (4) Predicting the distribution of K values for vertical flow as a function of system support volume, (5) Comparing the largest likely K value in the vertical direction with the expected K in the horizontal direction, (6) Finding the length scale at which the two K values are roughly equal, (7) Comparing that length scale with the horizontal spreading of the plume. We find that our predictions of the value of the tension at which the principle spreading is likely occurring compares very well with experiment. However, we seem to underestimate the physical length scale at which the predominantly horizontal spreading begins to take on significant vertical characteristics. Our data and predictions would seem to indicate that this should happen after horizontal transport of somewhat over a km, but the chiefly horizontal transport appears to continue out to scales of 10km or so.

  2. Final Technical Report - Stochastic Analysis of Advection-Diffusion-reaction Systems with Applications to Reactive Transport in Porous Media - DE-FG02-07ER24818

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karniadakis, George Em [Brown University] [Brown University

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this project is to develop new computational tools for uncertainty quantifica- tion (UQ) of systems governed by stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) with applications to advection-diffusion-reaction systems. We pursue two complementary approaches: (1) generalized polynomial chaos and its extensions and (2) a new theory on deriving PDF equations for systems subject to color noise. The focus of the current work is on high-dimensional systems involving tens or hundreds of uncertain parameters.

  3. Study of {psi}(2S) decays to {gamma}pp, {pi}{sup 0}pp, and {eta}pp, and search for pp threshold enhancements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Das, S.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Patterson, J. R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Ryd, A.; Sadoff, A. J.; Shi, X.; Sun, W. M. [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Yelton, J. [University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Rubin, P. [George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decays of {psi}(2S) into {gamma}pp, {pi}{sup 0}pp, and {eta}pp have been studied with the CLEO-c detector using a sample of 24.5x10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) events obtained from e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at {radical}(s)=3686 MeV. The data show evidence for the excitation of several N{sup *} resonances in p{pi}{sup 0} and p{eta} channels in {pi}{sup 0}pp and {eta}pp decays, and f{sub 2} states in {gamma}pp decay. Branching fractions for decays of {psi}(2S) to {gamma}pp, {pi}{sup 0}pp, and {eta}pp have been determined. No evidence for pp threshold enhancements was found in the reactions {psi}(2S){yields}Xpp, where X={gamma}, {pi}{sup 0}, {eta}. We do, however, find confirming evidence for a pp threshold enhancement in J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}pp as previously reported by BES.

  4. Transporting particulate material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldred, Derek Leslie (North Hollywood, CA); Rader, Jeffrey A. (North Hollywood, CA); Saunders, Timothy W. (North Hollywood, CA)

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

  5. Vapor Transport in Dry Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2001-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-vapor movement in soils is a complex process, controlled by both diffusion and advection and influenced by pressure and thermal gradients acting across tortuous flow paths. Wide-ranging interest in water-vapor transport includes both theoretical and practical aspects. Just how pressure and thermal gradients enhance water-vapor flow is still not completely understood and subject to ongoing research. Practical aspects include dryland farming (surface mulching), water harvesting (aerial wells), fertilizer placement, and migration of contaminants at waste-sites. The following article describes the processes and practical applications of water-vapor transport, with emphasis on unsaturated (dry) soil systems.

  6. Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hengbing

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applications of Natural Gas as Transportation Engine Fuel,duty vehicle transportation sector, but current natural gasnatural gas to displace fossil diesel fuel in the freight transportation

  7. Transportation Security | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Security SHARE Global Threat Reduction Initiative Transportation Security Cooperation Secure Transport Operations (STOP) Box Security of radioactive material while...

  8. Task 3: PNNL Visit by JAEA Researchers to Participate in TODAM Code Applications to Fukushima Rivers and to Evaluate the Feasibility of Adaptation of FLESCOT Code to Simulate Radionuclide Transport in the Pacific Ocean Coastal Water Around Fukushima

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Yasuo

    2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Four JAEA researchers visited PNNL for two weeks in February, 2013 to learn the PNNL-developed, unsteady, one-dimensional, river model, TODAM and the PNNL-developed, time-dependent, three dimensional, coastal water model, FLESCOT. These codes predict sediment and contaminant concentrations by accounting sediment-radionuclide interactions, e.g., adsorption/desorption and transport-deposition-resuspension of sediment-sorbed radionuclides. The objective of the river and coastal water modeling is to simulate • 134Cs and 137Cs migration in Fukushima rivers and the coastal water, and • their accumulation in the river and ocean bed along the Fukushima coast. Forecasting the future cesium behavior in the river and coastal water under various scenarios would enable JAEA to assess the effectiveness of various on-land remediation activities and if required, possible river and coastal water clean-up operations to reduce the contamination of the river and coastal water, agricultural products, fish and other aquatic biota. PNNL presented the following during the JAEA visit to PNNL: • TODAM and FLESCOT’s theories and mathematical formulations • TODAM and FLESCOT model structures • Past TODAM and FLESCOT applications • Demonstrating these two codes' capabilities by applying them to simple hypothetical river and coastal water cases. • Initial application of TODAM to the Ukedo River in Fukushima and JAEA researchers' participation in its modeling. PNNL also presented the relevant topics relevant to Fukushima environmental assessment and remediation, including • PNNL molecular modeling and EMSL computer facilities • Cesium adsorption/desorption characteristics • Experiences of connecting molecular science research results to macro model applications to the environment • EMSL tour • Hanford Site road tour. PNNL and JAEA also developed future course of actions for joint research projects on the Fukushima environmental and remediation assessments.

  9. Guidelines for NIH Rodent Transportation 1. The IC Veterinarian or IC Animal Transportation Coordinator is responsible for the oversight of rodent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    1 Guidelines for NIH Rodent Transportation A. General 1. The IC Veterinarian or IC Animal Transportation Coordinator is responsible for the oversight of rodent transportation within their program and assurance that all transportation is handled in accordance with all applicable laws, policies and guidelines

  10. AURORA Program Overview Topic 4A. Transport within the PEM Stack / Transport Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AURORA Program Overview Topic 4A. Transport within the PEM Stack / Transport all fuel cell applications. AURORA #12;C. Performance Technical Barriers Premise: DOE cost targets will do the opposite. AURORA #12;0.6 DCEfficiency(% Performance(voltcell) Technical Target Target

  11. System-Scale Model of Aquifer, Vadose Zone, and River Interactions for the Hanford 300 Area - Application to Uranium Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Bacon, Diana H.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Parker, Kyle R.; Waichler, Scott R.; Williams, Mark D.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report represents a synthesis and integration of basic and applied research into a system-scale model of the Hanford 300 Area groundwater uranium plume, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Richland Operations (DOE-RL) office. The report integrates research findings and data from DOE Office of Science (DOE-SC), Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), and DOE-RL projects, and from the site remediation and closure contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, LLC (WCH). The three-dimensional, system-scale model addresses water flow and reactive transport of uranium for the coupled vadose zone, unconfined aquifer, and Columbia River shoreline of the Hanford 300 Area. The system-scale model of the 300 Area was developed to be a decision-support tool to evaluate processes of the total system affecting the groundwater uranium plume. The model can also be used to address “what if” questions regarding different remediation endpoints, and to assist in design and evaluation of field remediation efforts. For example, the proposed cleanup plan for the Hanford 300 Area includes removal, treatment, and disposal of contaminated sediments from known waste sites, enhanced attenuation of uranium hot spots in the vadose and periodically rewetted zone, and continued monitoring of groundwater with institutional controls. Illustrative simulations of polyphosphate infiltration were performed to demonstrate the ability of the system-scale model to address these types of questions. The use of this model in conjunction with continued field monitoring is expected to provide a rigorous basis for developing operational strategies for field remediation and for defining defensible remediation endpoints.

  12. Hadronization geometry and charge-dependent two-particlecorrelation on momentum subspace (eta, phi) in Au-Au collisions atsqrt(sNN) = 130 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson,B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski,J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar,A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de laBarca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; De Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip,P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Foley, K.J.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Guiterrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry,T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann,G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones,P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrv,V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov,A.I.; et al.

    2004-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first measurements of charge-dependent two-particle correlations on momentum-space difference variables {eta}{sub 1}-{eta}{sub 2} (pseudorapidity) and {phi}{sub 1}-{phi}{sub 2} (azimuth) for primary charged hadrons with transverse momentum 0.15 {le} p{sub t} {le} 2 GeV/c and |{eta}| {le} 1.3 from Au-Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 130 GeV. We observe correlation structures not predicted by theory but consistent with evolution of hadron emission geometry with increasing centrality from one-dimensional fragmentation of color strings to higher-dimensional fragmentation of a hadron-opaque bulk medium.

  13. "Educating transportation professionals."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    "Educating transportation professionals." Michael Demetsky Henry L. Kinnier Professor mjd of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 434.924.7464 Transportation Engineering & Management Research Our group works closely with the Virginia Center for Transportation Innovation and Research (VCTIR), located

  14. SATURATED ZONE FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODEL ABSTRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.W. ARNOLD

    2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the saturated zone (SZ) flow and transport model abstraction task is to provide radionuclide-transport simulation results for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) calculations. This task includes assessment of uncertainty in parameters that pertain to both groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in the models used for this purpose. This model report documents the following: (1) The SZ transport abstraction model, which consists of a set of radionuclide breakthrough curves at the accessible environment for use in the TSPA-LA simulations of radionuclide releases into the biosphere. These radionuclide breakthrough curves contain information on radionuclide-transport times through the SZ. (2) The SZ one-dimensional (I-D) transport model, which is incorporated in the TSPA-LA model to simulate the transport, decay, and ingrowth of radionuclide decay chains in the SZ. (3) The analysis of uncertainty in groundwater-flow and radionuclide-transport input parameters for the SZ transport abstraction model and the SZ 1-D transport model. (4) The analysis of the background concentration of alpha-emitting species in the groundwater of the SZ.

  15. Quantum transport in ultracold atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chih-Chun Chien; Sebastiano Peotta; Massimiliano Di Ventra

    2015-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultracold atoms confined by engineered magnetic or optical potentials are ideal systems for studying phenomena otherwise difficult to realize or probe in the solid state because their atomic interaction strength, number of species, density, and geometry can be independently controlled. This review focuses on quantum transport phenomena in atomic gases that mirror and oftentimes either better elucidate or show fundamental differences with those observed in mesoscopic and nanoscopic systems. We discuss significant progress in performing transport experiments in atomic gases, contrast similarities and differences between transport in cold atoms and in condensed matter systems, and survey inspiring theoretical predictions that are difficult to verify in conventional setups. These results further demonstrate the versatility offered by atomic systems in the study of nonequilibrium phenomena and their promise for novel applications.

  16. The Search for eta(1440) --> K^0_S K^pm ?^mp in Two-Photon Fusion at CLEO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Ahohe; CLEO Collaboration

    2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze 13.8 \\rm fb^{-1} of the integrated e^+e^- luminosity collected at 10.6 GeV center-of-mass energy with the CLEO II and CLEO II.V detectors to study exclusive two-photon production of hadrons with masses below 1.7{\\rm \\ GeV/c^2} decaying into the K^0_S K^\\pm \\pi^\\mp final state. We observe two statistically significant enhancements in the \\eta(1440) mass region. These enhancements have large transverse momentum which rules them out as being due to pseudoscalar resonances but is consistent with the production of axial-vector mesons. We use tagged two-photon events to study the properties of the observed enhancements and associate them with the production of f_1(1285) and f_1(1420). Our non-observation of \\eta(1440) is inconsistent by more than two standard deviations with the first observation of this resonance in two-photon collisions by the L3 experiment. We present our estimates for 90% confidence level upper limits on the products of two-photon partial widths of pseudoscalar hadrons and their branching fractions into K^0_S(\\pi^+\\pi^-)K^\\pm\\pi^\\mp.

  17. Sustainability and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005. Integrating Sustainability into the Trans- portationTHOUGHT PIECE Sustainability and Transport by Richardof the concept of sustainability to transport planning. In

  18. Chapter 12 Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2-1 November 2012 Words in bold and acronyms are defined in Chapter 32, Glossary and Acronyms. Chapter 12 Transportation This chapter describes existing transportation resources in...

  19. Transportation | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation From modeling and simulation programs to advanced electric powertrains, engines, biofuels, lubricants, and batteries, Argonne's transportation research is vital to...

  20. Transporting Hazardous Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transporting Hazardous Materials The procedures given below apply to all materials that are considered to be hazardous by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Consult your...

  1. Branching fractions for chi_cJ -> p p-bar pi^0, p p-bar eta, and p p-bar omega

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLEO Collaboration; P. U. E. Onyisi; J. L. Rosner; J. P. Alexander; D. G. Cassel; S. Das; R. Ehrlich; L. Fields; L. Gibbons; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; J. M. Hunt; D. L. Kreinick; V. E. Kuznetsov; J. Ledoux; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; D. Riley; A. Ryd; A. J. Sadoff; X. Shi; W. M. Sun; J. Yelton; P. Rubin; N. Lowrey; S. Mehrabyan; M. Selen; J. Wiss; S. Adams; M. Kornicer; R. E. Mitchell; M. R. Shepherd; C. M. Tarbert; D. Besson; T. K. Pedlar; J. Xavier; D. Cronin-Hennessy; J. Hietala; P. Zweber; S. Dobbs; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; T. Xiao; A. Tomaradze; S. Brisbane; J. Libby; L. Martin; A. Powell; P. Spradlin; G. Wilkinson; H. Mendez; J. Y. Ge; D. H. Miller; I. P. J. Shipsey; B. Xin; G. S. Adams; D. Hu; B. Moziak; J. Napolitano; K. M. Ecklund; J. Insler; H. Muramatsu; C. S. Park; E. H. Thorndike; F. Yang; S. Ricciardi; C. Thomas; M. Artuso; S. Blusk; R. Mountain; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; J. C. Wang; L. M. Zhang; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; A. Lincoln; M. J. Smith; P. Zhou; J. Zhu; P. Naik; J. Rademacker; D. M. Asner; K. W. Edwards; J. Reed; K. Randrianarivony; A. N. Robichaud; G. Tatishvili; E. J. White; R. A. Briere; H. Vogel

    2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a sample of 25.9 million psi(2S) decays acquired with the CLEO-c detector at the CESR e^+e^- collider, we report branching fractions for the decays chi_cJ -> p p-bar pi^0, p p-bar eta, and p p-bar omega, with J=0,1,2. Our results for B(chi_cJ-> p p-bar pi^0) and B(chi_cJ-> p p-bar eta) are consistent with, but more precise than, previous measurements. Furthermore, we include the first measurement of B(chi_cJ-> p p-bar omega).

  2. A study of the eta etaprime and etaprime etaprime channels produced in central pp interactions at 450 GeV/c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The WA102 Collaboration; D. Barberis

    1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The reactions pp -> pf (X0) ps, where X0 is observed decaying to eta etaprime and etaprime etaprime, have been studied at 450 GeV/c. This is the first time that these channels have been observed in central production and only the second time that the etaprime etaprime channel has been observed in any production mechanism. In the eta etaprime channel there is evidence for the f0(1500) and a peak at 1.95 GeV. The etaprime etaprime channel shows a peak at threshold which is compatible with having JPC = 2++ and spin projection JZ = 0.

  3. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oei, D.

    1995-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the fourth Technical Progress Report for DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-94CE50389 awarded to Ford Motor Company on July 1, 1994. The overall objective of this contract is to advance the Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology for automotive applications. Specifically, the objectives resulting from this contract are to: (1) Develop and demonstrate on a laboratory propulsion system within 2-1/2 years a fully functional PEM Fuel Cell Power System (including fuel cell peripherals, peak power augmentation and controls). This propulsion system will achieve, or will be shown to have the growth potential to achieve, the weights, volumes, and production costs which are competitive with those same attributes of equivalently performing internal combustion engine propulsion systems; (2) Select and demonstrate a baseline onboard hydrogen storage method with acceptable weight, volume, cost, and safety features and analyze future alternatives; and (3) Analyze the hydrogen infrastructure components to ensure that hydrogen can be safely supplied to vehicles at geographically widespread convenient sites and at prices which are less than current gasoline prices per vehicle-mile; (4) Identify any future R&D needs for a fully integrated vehicle and for achieving the system cost and performance goals.

  4. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairns, Elton J.; Hietbrink, Earl H.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This section includes some historical background of the rise and fall and subsequent rebirth of the electric vehicle; and a brief discussion of current transportation needs, and environmental and energy utilization issues that resulted in the renewed interest in applying electrochemical energy conversion technology to electric vehicle applications. Although energy utilization has evolved to be the most significant and important issue, the environmental issue will be discussed first in this section only because of its chronological occurrence. The next part of the chapter is a review of passenger and commercial electric vehicle technology with emphasis on vehicle design and demonstrated performance of vehicles with candidate power sources being developed. This is followed by a discussion of electrochemical power source requirements associated with future electric vehicles that can play a role in meeting modern transportation needs. The last part of the chapter includes first a discussion of how to identify candidate electrochemical systems that might be of interest in meeting electric vehicle power source requirements. This is then followed by a review of the current technological status of these systems and a discussion of the most significant problems that must be resolved before each candidate system can be a viable power source.

  5. Minijet Deformation and Charge-independent Two-particleCorrelations on Momentum Subspace (eta,phi) In Au-Au Collisions atsqrt(sNN) = 130 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson,B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski,J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth,C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la BarcaSanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip,P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Foley, K.J.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry,T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann,G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein,S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda,L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; et al.

    2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present first measurements of charge-independent correlations on momentum-space difference variables {eta}{sub 1}-{eta}{sub 2} (pseudorapidity) and {phi}{sub 1}-{phi}{sub 2} (azimuth) for charged primary hadrons with transverse momentum within 0.15 {le} p{sub t} {le} 2 GeV/c and |{eta}| {le} 1.3 from Au-Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 130 GeV. We observe strong charge-independent correlations associated with minijets and elliptic flow. The width of the minijet peak on {eta}{sub 1}-{eta}{sub 2} increases by a factor 2.3 from peripheral to central collisions, suggesting strong coupling of partons to a longitudinally-expanding colored medium. New methods of jet analysis introduced here reveal nonperturbative medium effects in heavy ion collisions.

  6. Inclusive pi^0, eta, and direct photon production at high transverse momentum in p+p and d+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a measurement of high-p{sub T} inclusive {pi}{sup 0}, {eta}, and direct photon production in p + p and d + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV at midrapidity (0 < {eta} < 1). Photons from the decay {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} were detected in the Barrel Electromagnetic Calorimeter of the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} decay was also observed and constituted the first {eta} measurement by STAR. The first direct photon cross section measurement by STAR is also presented, the signal was extracted statistically by subtracting the {pi}{sup 0}, {eta}, and {omega}(782) decay background from the inclusive photon distribution observed in the calorimeter. The analysis is described in detail, and the results are found to be in good agreement with earlier measurements and with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations.

  7. Application APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papautsky, Ian

    in the CCM Bulletin which can be downloaded from ccm.uc.edu/admissions/ application. You will automatically be considered for a talent-based scholarship when you audition/ interview for entrance into CCM. These awards would also like to invite you to tour CCM's excellent facilities and observe some classes and ensemble

  8. Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operat

  9. Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freig pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freig pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation ope

  10. Graduate Certificate in Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Graduate Certificate in Transportation Nohad A. Toulan School of Urban Studies and Planning of Engineering and Computer Science integrated transportation systems. The Graduate Certificate in Transportation their capabilities. Students in the program can choose among a wide range of relevant courses in transportation

  11. TRANSPORTATION Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    2003 CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION STUDIES Annual Report #12;Center for Transportation Studies University of Minnesota 200 Transportation and Safety Building 511 Washington Avenue S.E. Minneapolis, MN publication is a report of transportation research, education, and outreach activities for the period July

  12. Minnesota's Transportation Economic Development (TED)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Minnesota's Transportation Economic Development (TED) Pilot Program Center for Transportation Studies Transportation Research Conference May 24-25, 2011 #12;Transportation Role in Economic Development · Carefully targeted transportation infrastructure improvements will: ­ Stimulate new economic development

  13. Introduction Transport in disordered graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Ballistic transport in disordered graphene P, Gornyi, Mirlin Ballistic transport in disordered graphene #12;Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Outline 1 Introduction Model Experimental motivation Transport in clean graphene 2

  14. FEBRUARY 1999 119O ' C O N N O R E T A L . Forecast Verification for Eta Model Winds Using Lake Erie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FEBRUARY 1999 119O ' C O N N O R E T A L . Forecast Verification for Eta Model Winds Using Lake. The in- crease in computer power in recent years and advances in numerical mesoscale models of both ocean Forecasting System (GLCFS) can be used to validate wind forecasts for the Great Lakes using observed

  15. Precision voltage regulation on the 5 kHz, 3. 125 MW ETA-II pulsed power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, J.A.; Payne, A.N.; Sampayan, S.E.; Ollis, C.W.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each of four pulsed power units (PPUs) for the Experimental Test Accelerator 2 (ETA-2) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory delivers a 25kV, 20kA, 4{mu}S pulse at a 5kHz repetition rate into a magnetic pulse compression modulator (MAG-1D). In our present configuration, we are capable of producing a 50 pulse burst using a 1000{mu}F capacitor bank. In this configuration, the input voltage to the PPU droops 22% during the burst. Accelerator operating requirements, however, dictate {plus minus}0.1% regulation of the PPU output voltage during the burst. We are employing a de-Qing network to achieve this regulation goal. In this paper, we describe an output voltage predict-ahead scheme that we are using to generate de-Q trigger pulses at the proper time to insure accurate regulations. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  16. In-facility transport code review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spore, J.W.; Boyack, B.E.; Bohl, W.R. [and others

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following computer codes were reviewed by the In-Facility Transport Working Group for application to the in-facility transport of radioactive aerosols, flammable gases, and/or toxic gases: (1) CONTAIN, (2) FIRAC, (3) GASFLOW, (4) KBERT, and (5) MELCOR. Based on the review criteria as described in this report and the versions of each code available at the time of the review, MELCOR is the best code for the analysis of in-facility transport when multidimensional effects are not significant. When multi-dimensional effects are significant, GASFLOW should be used.

  17. Energy transport using natural convection boundary layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection is one of the major modes of energy transport in passive solar buildings. There are two primary mechanisms for natural convection heat transport through an aperture between building zones: (1) bulk density differences created by temperature differences between zones; and (2) thermosyphon pumping created by natural convection boundary layers. The primary objective of the present study is to compare the characteristics of bulk density driven and boundary layer driven flow, and discuss some of the advantages associated with the use of natural convection boundary layers to transport energy in solar building applications.

  18. He II {lambda}4686 IN {eta} CARINAE: COLLAPSE OF THE WIND-WIND COLLISION REGION DURING PERIASTRON PASSAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teodoro, M.; Damineli, A. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil); Arias, J. I. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de La Serena, Av. Cisternas 1200 Norte, La Serena (Chile); De Araujo, F. X.; Borges Fernandes, M.; Pereira, C. B. [Observatorio Nacional, Rua General Jose Cristino 77, Sao Cristovao, Rio de Janeiro 20921-400 (Brazil); Barba, R. H.; Gonzalez, J. F. [Instituto de Ciencias Astronomicas, de la Tierra, y del Espacio (ICATE-CONICET), Avenida Espana Sur 1512, J5402DSP San Juan (Argentina); Corcoran, M. F. [CRESST and X-ray Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Fernandez-Lajus, E.; Gamen, R. C.; Solivella, G. R. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, La Plata, BA, B1900FWA (Argentina); Fraga, L. [Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research, Colina El Pino s/n, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Groh, J. H. [Max-Planck-Institute fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Marshall, J. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States); McGregor, P. J.; Nicholls, D. C.; Parkin, E. R. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics (RSAA), Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Morrell, N.; Phillips, M. M., E-mail: mairan@astro.iag.usp.br [Las Campanas Observatory, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); and others

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The periodic spectroscopic events in {eta} Carinae are now well established and occur near the periastron passage of two massive stars in a very eccentric orbit. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the variations of different spectral features, such as an eclipse by the wind-wind collision (WWC) boundary, a shell ejection from the primary star or accretion of its wind onto the secondary. All of them have problems explaining all the observed phenomena. To better understand the nature of the cyclic events, we performed a dense monitoring of {eta} Carinae with five Southern telescopes during the 2009 low-excitation event, resulting in a set of data of unprecedented quality and sampling. The intrinsic luminosity of the He II {lambda}4686 emission line (L {approx} 310 L{sub Sun }) just before periastron reveals the presence of a very luminous transient source of extreme UV radiation emitted in the WWC region. Clumps in the primary's wind probably explain the flare-like behavior of both the X-ray and He II {lambda}4686 light curves. After a short-lived minimum, He II {lambda}4686 emission rises again to a new maximum, when X-rays are still absent or very weak. We interpret this as a collapse of the WWC onto the 'surface' of the secondary star, switching off the hard X-ray source and diminishing the WWC shock cone. The recovery from this state is controlled by the momentum balance between the secondary's wind and the clumps in the primary's wind.

  19. Measurements of J/{psi} and {psi}(2S) decays into {lambda}{lambda}{pi}{sup 0} and {lambda}{lambda}{eta}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; Bai, J. Z.; Cai, X.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. X.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, Jin; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Deng, Z. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Gao, C. S.; Gu, S. D.; Guo, Y. N.; He, K. L.; Heng, Y. K.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, T. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049 (China)] (and others)

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using 58x10{sup 6} J/{psi} and 14x10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) events collected by the BESII detector at the BEPC, branching fractions or upper limits for the decays J/{psi} and {psi}(2S){yields}{lambda}{lambda}{pi}{sup 0} and {lambda}{lambda}{eta} are measured. For the isospin violating decays, the upper limits are determined to be B(J/{psi}{yields}{lambda}{lambda}{pi}{sup 0})<6.4x10{sup -5} and B[{psi}(2S){yields}{lambda}{lambda}{pi}{sup 0}]<4.9x10{sup -5} at the 90% confidence level. The isospin conserving process J/{psi}{yields}{lambda}{lambda}{eta} is observed for the first time, and its branching fraction is measured to be B(J/{psi}{yields}{lambda}{lambda}{eta})=(2.62{+-}0.60{+-}0.44)x10{sup -4}, where the first error is statistical and the second one is systematic. No {lambda}{lambda}{eta} signal is observed in {psi}(2S) decays, and B[{psi}(2S){yields}{lambda}{lambda}{eta}]<1.2x10{sup -4} is set at the 90% confidence level. Branching fractions of J/{psi} decays into {sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{lambda} and {sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{lambda} are also reported, and the sum of these branching fractions is determined to be B(J/{psi}{yields}{sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{lambda}+c.c.)=(1.52{+-}0.08{+-}0.16)x10{sup -3}.

  20. Application ApplicAtion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papautsky, Ian

    in the CCM Bulletin which can be downloaded from http://ccm.uc.edu/ admissions/application.html. You will automatically be considered for a talent-based scholarship when you audition/ interview for entrance into CCM is made. We would also like to invite you to tour CCM's excellent facilities and observe some classes

  1. A general performance model for parallel sweeps on orthogonal grids for particle transport calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Mark Michael

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    particle transport calculations is an important problem in many applications targeted by the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative of the United States Department of Energy. One common approach to deterministic particle transport calculations...

  2. Secure Transportation Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, P. W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Secure Transport Management Course (STMC) course provides managers with information related to procedures and equipment used to successfully transport special nuclear material. This workshop outlines these procedures and reinforces the information presented with the aid of numerous practical examples. The course focuses on understanding the regulatory framework for secure transportation of special nuclear materials, identifying the insider and outsider threat(s) to secure transportation, organization of a secure transportation unit, management and supervision of secure transportation units, equipment and facilities required, training and qualification needed.

  3. Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE...

  4. Transportation Infrastructure and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boarnet, Marlon G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Better Forecasting Tool for Transportation Decision-making,” Mineta Transportation Institute, San Jose Stateat the 2008 meeting of the Transportation Research Board and

  5. Transportation Analysis | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Analysis SHARE Transportation Analysis Transportation Analysis efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory contribute to the efficient, safe, and free movement of...

  6. Branching Fraction Measurements of the Color-Suppressed Decays B0bar to D(*)0 pi0, D(*)0 eta, D(*)0 omega, and D(*)0 eta_prime and Measurement of the Polarization in the Decay B0bar to D*0 omega

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Bari; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison; ,

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report updated branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D{sup 0}{eta}, D*{sup 0}{eta}, D{sup 0}{omega}, D*{sup 0}{omega}, D{sup 0}{eta}', and D*{sup 0}{eta}'. We measure the branching fractions (x10{sup -4}): {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.13, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 3.05 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.28, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.53 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.11, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.23, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{omega}) = 2.57 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.14, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{omega}) = 4.55 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.39, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.48 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.07, and {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.49 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.15. We also present the first measurement of the longitudinal polarization fraction of the decay channel D*{sup 0}{omega}, f{sub L} = (66.5 {+-} 4.7 {+-} 1.5)%. In the above, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The results are based on a sample of (454 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. The measurements are the most precise determinations of these quantities from a single experiment. They are compared to theoretical predictions obtained by factorization, Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and perturbative QCD (pQCD). We find that the presence of final state interactions is favored and the measurements are in better agreement with SCET than with pQCD.

  7. Transportation Investment and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    Transportation Investment and Economic Development: Has the TIED turned? David Levinson University Transportation Investments was Historically Concomitant with Land and Economic Development #12;Canals Railways Surfaced Roads Crude Oil Pipelines Gas Pipelines Telegraph 1825 1985 Proportion of Maximum Extent Growth

  8. Transportation Management Research Collection /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    , Peterbilt Motors, and General Electric. He was a national panel member of the American Arbitration, Noise and Environmental Pollution, Transportation Co-ordination and Consolidation, Transportation -- Docket 8613 1957 Civil Aeronautics Board ­ General passenger fare investigation -- Docket 8008 et al

  9. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials andor modal transport. Cancels DOE 1540.2 and DOE 5480.3

  10. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Canceled by DOE 460.1A

  11. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1.

  12. Biofuels and Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Biofuels and Transportation Impacts and Uncertainties Some Observations of a Reformed Ethanol and Logistics Symposium 3 Topics · Why Biofuels · Ethanol Economics · Ethanol Transportation Equipment Biofuels? · National Security · Reduce Imports of oil · Peak Oil · Replace Fossil Resources

  13. Linear Motor Powered Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Richard D.

    This special issue on linear-motor powered transportation covers both supporting technologies and innovative transport systems in various parts of the World, as this technology moves from the lab to commercial operations. ...

  14. Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification.

  15. Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's evaluation of Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation's (IndyGo's) hybrid electric buses.

  16. Lubbock Metropolitan Transportation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubbock Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    for Users (SAFETEA-LU) and its predecessors, the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21) and the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) of 1991, specified the transportation systems on which certain federal funds can... in Chapter 5 ? Streets and Highways; Chapter 6 ? Public Transportation; Chapter 7 ? Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan; Chapter 8 ? Lubbock International Airport and Chapter 9 ? Railroads and Trucking. Federally funded transit projects were developed...

  17. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    subsidies on fossil transport fuels, subsidies on commutingC. , 2003: Subsidies that encourage fossil fuel use in

  18. SUMMER TRANSPORTATION INTERNSHIP PROGRAM APPLICATION (MNDOT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    and Testing Unit O ce of Environmental Stewardship, Environmental Assessment Unit and Roadside Vegetation further in your statement of interest. O ce of Environmental Stewardship, Environmental Modeling

  19. Wireless Magnetic Sensor Applications in Transportation Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Rene Omar

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and fourth vehicle downstream signature (five vehicleof Figures Upstream and downstream middle sensor raw signals2.2 Upstream and downstream middle sensor signature

  20. Northwestern University Transportation Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    Northwestern University Transportation Center 2011 Business Advisory Committee NUTC #12;#12;I have the pleasure of presenting our Business Advisory Committee members--a distinguished group of transportation industry lead- ers who have partnered with the Transportation Center in advancing the state of knowledge

  1. PalladianDigest Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    PalladianDigest CONNECT. EMPOWER. GROW. Tackling Transportation Challenges Nebraska has been a vital link in the nation's transportation system since the days when carts, wagons to University of Nebraska­Lincoln research. That's fine with UNL transportation researchers, said Larry Rilett

  2. TRANSPORTATION: THE POTENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    INTERMODAL TRANSPORTATION: THE POTENTIAL AND THE CHALLENGE A Summary Report 2003 #12;June 2003 To the Reader This report summarizes the second James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology. Over two days, we explored the chal- lenges and opportunities in intermodal transportation, addressing

  3. Louisiana Transportation Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    Louisiana Transportation Research Center LTRC www.ltrc.lsu.edu 2012-13 ANNUALREPORT #12;The Louisiana Transportation Research Center (LTRC) is a research, technology transfer, and training center administered jointly by the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (DOTD) and Louisiana State

  4. Introduction to Transportation Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Introduction to Transportation Planning CMP 4710/6710 Fall 2012 3 Credit Hours Room: ARCH 229 on a Saturday night, transportation is not an objective in and of itself, but a means to carry out the functions of daily living (i.e., it's a "derived good"). As a consequence, the transportation systems we build

  5. Rural Intelligent Transportation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Rural Intelligent Transportation Systems In a technical session at the 2011 NACE conference, Dennis Foderberg of SEH Inc. discussed intelligent transportation systems (ITS) developed by SEH in collaboration with Network Transportation Technologies, Inc. These systems address the problem of crashes on low-volume roads

  6. Contaminant Transport in the Southern California Bight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Idica, Eileen Y.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generation Penn Staie/NCAS mesoscale model ! MM5). NCART.L. , 1994. The new NMC mesoscale Eta Model: Description3.3. Eddy varitibttity Mesoscale eddies are the largest type

  7. Transportation YOU 2013 DC Youth Summit WTS Transportation YOU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Transportation YOU 2013 DC Youth Summit WTS Transportation YOU CTS Research Conference May 21, 2014 Lisa Rasmussen, WTS / Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc #12;Transportation YOU 2013 DC Youth SummitTransportation YOU 2013 DC Youth Summit Agenda What is Transportation YOU? Transportation YOU ­ WTS Local Chapter

  8. Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Panagiotis Scarlatos, Ph.D., Director Transportation Safety and Security #12;Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Partners #12 evacuations · Tracking systems for hazardous materials Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety

  9. Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City of Lakes Minneapolis Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study #12;Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City of Lakes Background: · Currently, funding

  10. Structure-dynamics relationship in coherent transport through disordered systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Mostarda; Federico Levi; Diego Prada-Gracia; Florian Mintert; Francesco Rao

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum transport is strongly influenced by interference with phase relations that depend sensitively on the scattering medium. Since even small changes in the geometry of the medium can turn constructive interference to destructive, a clear relation between structure and fast, efficient transport is difficult to identify. Here we present a complex network analysis of quantum transport through disordered systems to elucidate the relationship between transport efficiency and structural organization. Evidence is provided for the emergence of structural classes with different geometries but similar high efficiency. Specifically, a structural motif characterised by pair sites which are not actively participating to the dynamics renders transport properties robust against perturbations. Our results pave the way for a systematic rationalization of the design principles behind highly efficient transport which is of paramount importance for technological applications as well as to address transport robustness in natural light harvesting complexes.

  11. Q^2 Dependence of the S_{11}(1535) Photocoupling and Evidence for a P-wave resonance in eta electroproduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haluk Denizli; James Mueller; Steven Dytman; M.L. Leber; R.D. Levine; J. Miles; Kui Kim; Gary Adams; Moscov Amaryan; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Marco Anghinolfi; Burin Asavapibhop; G. Asryan; Harutyun Avakian; Hovhannes Baghdasaryan; Nathan Baillie; Jacques Ball; Nathan Baltzell; Steve Barrow; V. Batourine; Marco Battaglieri; Kevin Beard; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Mehmet Bektasoglu; Matthew Bellis; Nawal Benmouna; Nicola Bianchi; Angela Biselli; Billy Bonner; Sylvain Bouchigny; Sergey Boyarinov; Robert Bradford; Derek Branford; William Briscoe; William Brooks; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Cornel Butuceanu; John Calarco; Sharon Careccia; Daniel Carman; Catalina Cetina; Shifeng Chen; Philip Cole; Alan Coleman; Patrick Collins; Philip Coltharp; Dieter Cords; Pietro Corvisiero; Donald Crabb; Volker Crede; John Cummings; Natalya Dashyan; Raffaella De Vita; Enzo De Sanctis; Pavel Degtiarenko; Lawrence Dennis; Alexandre Deur; Kalvir Dhuga; Richard Dickson; Chaden Djalali; Gail Dodge; Joseph Donnelly; David Doughty; P. Dragovitsch; Michael Dugger; Oleksandr Dzyubak; Hovanes Egiyan; Kim Egiyan; Lamiaa Elfassi; Latifa Elouadrhiri; A. Empl; Paul Eugenio; Laurent Farhi; Renee Fatemi; Gleb Fedotov; Gerald Feldman; Robert Feuerbach; Tony Forest; Valera Frolov; Herbert Funsten; Sally Gaff; Michel Garcon; Gagik Gavalian; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Pascal Girard; Francois-Xavier Girod; John Goetz; Atilla Gonenc; Ralf Gothe; Keith Griffioen; Michel Guidal; Matthieu Guillo; Nevzat Guler; Lei Guo; Vardan Gyurjyan; Kawtar Hafidi; Hayk Hakobyan; Rafael Hakobyan; John Hardie; David Heddle; F. Hersman; Kenneth Hicks; Ishaq Hleiqawi; Maurik Holtrop; Jingliang Hu; Charles Hyde; Charles Hyde-Wright; Yordanka Ilieva; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Eugeny Isupov; Mark Ito; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Henry Juengst; Narbe Kalantarians; J.H. Kelley; James Kellie; Mahbubul Khandaker; K. Kim; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; Mike Klusman; Mikhail Kossov; Laird Kramer; V. Kubarovsky; Joachim Kuhn; Sebastian Kuhn; Sergey Kuleshov; Jeff Lachniet; Jean Laget; Jorn Langheinrich; David Lawrence; Kenneth Livingston; Haiyun Lu; K. Lukashin; Marion MacCormick; Joseph Manak; Nikolai Markov; Simeon McAleer; Bryan McKinnon; John McNabb; Bernhard Mecking; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Ralph Minehart; Marco Mirazita; Rory Miskimen; Viktor Mokeev; Kei Moriya; Steven Morrow; M. Moteabbed; Valeria Muccifora; Gordon Mutchler; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; James Napolitano; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Steve Nelson; Silvia Niccolai; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Bogdan Niczyporuk; Megh Niroula; Rustam Niyazov; Mina Nozar; Grant O'Rielly; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; Kijun Park; Evgueni Pasyuk; Craig Paterson; Gerald Peterson; Sasha Philips; Joshua Pierce; Nikolay Pivnyuk; Dinko Pocanic; Oleg Pogorelko; Ermanno Polli; S. Pozdniakov; Barry Preedom; John Price; Yelena Prok; Dan Protopopescu; Liming Qin; Brian Raue; Gregory Riccardi; Giovanni Ricco; Marco Ripani; Barry Ritchie; Federico Ronchetti; Guenther Rosner; Patrizia Rossi; David Rowntree; Philip Rubin; Franck Sabatie; Konstantin Sabourov; Julian Salamanca; Carlos Salgado; Joseph Santoro; Vladimir Sapunenko; Reinhard Schumacher; Vladimir Serov; Aziz Shafi; Youri Sharabian; Jeremiah Shaw; Nikolay Shvedunov; Sebastio Simionatto; Alexander Skabelin; Elton Smith; Lee Smith; Daniel Sober; Daria Sokhan; M. Spraker; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Samuel Stepanyan; Stepan Stepanyan; Burnham Stokes; Paul Stoler; I.I. Strakovsky; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; Simon Taylor; David Tedeschi; Ulrike Thoma; R. Thompson; Avtandil Tkabladze; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Clarisse Tur; Maurizio Ungaro; Michael Vineyard; Alexander Vlassov; Kebin Wang; Daniel Watts; Lawrence Weinstein; Henry Weller; Dennis Weygand; M. Williams; Elliott Wolin; Michael Wood; Amrit Yegneswaran; Junho Yun; Lorenzo Zana; Jixie Zhang; Bo Zhao; Zhiwen Zhao

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New cross sections for the reaction $ep \\to e'\\eta p$ are reported for total center of mass energy $W$=1.5--2.3 GeV and invariant squared momentum transfer $Q^2$=0.13--3.3 GeV$^2$. This large kinematic range allows extraction of new information about response functions, photocouplings, and $\\eta N$ coupling strengths of baryon resonances. A sharp structure is seen at $W\\sim$ 1.7 GeV. The shape of the differential cross section is indicative of the presence of a $P$-wave resonance that persists to high $Q^2$. Improved values are derived for the photon coupling amplitude for the $S_{11}$(1535) resonance. The new data greatly expands the $Q^2$ range covered and an interpretation of all data with a consistent parameterization is provided.

  12. Overview of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    Overview of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Program Venkat Srinivasan of the DOE/EERE FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program to develop batteries for vehicular applications double the energy density of presently available Li batteries · HEV: low-T operation, cost, and abuse

  13. Nanostructures and alloys : multiple scattering and nonlinearities in phonon transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendoza, Jonathan Michael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding how thermal transport is affected by disorder is crucial to the prediction and engineering of novel materials suitable for thermoelectric and device applications. Ab initio methods have demonstrated accurate ...

  14. Simulation of filtration for suspension transport in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yun Sung, 1974-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the development and application of a novel method for analyzing the filtration of particles transported through a granular porous medium. The proposed analysis considers the deposition of particles ...

  15. Transportation Science and the Dynamics of Critical Infrastructure Networks with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Inequalities · A New Network Performance/Efficiency Measure with Applications to Critical Infrastructure, and Energy Networks #12;Components of Common Physical Networks Network System Nodes Links Flows Transportation Intersections, Homes, Workplaces, Airports, Railyards Roads, Airline Routes, Railroad Track

  16. StationaryEnvironment ResidentialTransportation Premium Power Advanced High Efficiency, Quick Start Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Premium Power Agenda STARTM (1999-2003) ­ Substrate based Transportation application Autothermal ReformerEnvironment Residential Stationary Premium Power STAR Fuel Processor · Autothermal reformer · Substrate-based catalysts

  17. Spitzer Evidence for a Late Heavy Bombardment and the Formation of Urelites in {\\eta} Corvi at ~1 Gyr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisse, C M; Chen, C H; Morlok, A; Watson, D M; Manoj, P; Sheehan, P; Currie, T M; Thebault, P; Sitko, M L

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed Spitzer and NASA/IRTF 2 - 35 \\mum spectra of the warm, ~350 K circumstellar dust around the nearby MS star {\\eta} Corvi (F2V, 1.4 \\pm 0.3 Gyr). The spectra show clear evidence for warm, water- and carbon-rich dust at ~3 AU from the central star, in the system's Terrestrial Habitability Zone. Spectral features due to ultra-primitive cometary material were found, in addition to features due to impact produced silica and high temperature carbonaceous phases. At least 9 x 10^18 kg of 0.1 - 100 \\mum warm dust is present in a collisional equilibrium distribution with dn/da ~ a^-3.5, the equivalent of a 130 km radius KBO of 1.0 g/cm^3 density and similar to recent estimates of the mass delivered to the Earth at 0.6 - 0.8 Gyr during the Late Heavy Bombardment. We conclude that the parent body was a Kuiper-Belt body or bodies which captured a large amount of early primitive material in the first Myrs of the system's lifetime and preserved it in deep freeze at ~150 AU. At ~1.4 Gyr they were prompted by...

  18. Interlayer Water Regulates the Bio-nano Interface of a \\b{eta}-sheet Protein stacking on Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenping Lv; Guiju Xu; Hongyan Zhang; Xin Li; Shengju Liu; Huan Niu; Dongsheng Xu; Renan Wu

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated an integrated bio-nano interface consisting of a \\b{eta}-sheet protein stacked onto graphene. We found that the stacking assembly of the model protein on graphene could be controlled by water molecules. The interlayer water filled within interstices of the bio-nano interface could suppress the molecular vibration of surface groups on protein, and could impair the CH...{\\pi} interaction driving the attraction of the protein and graphene. The intermolecular coupling of interlayer water would be relaxed by the relative motion of protein upon graphene due to the interaction between water and protein surface. This effect reduced the hindrance of the interlayer water against the assembly of protein on graphene, resulting an appropriate adsorption status of protein on graphene with a deep free energy trap. Thereby, the confinement and the relative sliding between protein and graphene, the coupling of protein and water, and the interaction between graphene and water all have involved in the modulation of behaviors of water molecules within the bio-nano interface, governing the hindrance of interlayer water against the protein assembly on hydrophobic graphene. These results provide a deep insight into the fundamental mechanism of protein adsorption onto graphene surface in water.

  19. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

  20. Measurements of Time-Dependent CP-Asymmetry Parameters in B Meson Decays to \\eta^{\\prime} K^0 and of Branching Fractions of SU(3) Related Modes with BaBar Experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biassoni, Pietro; /Milan U.

    2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis work we have measured the following upper limits at 90% of confidence level, for B meson decays (in units of 10{sup -6}), using a statistics of 465.0 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}) < 1.6 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{eta}) < 1.4 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{eta}{prime}) < 2.1 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{phi}) < 0.52 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{omega}) < 1.6 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{phi}) < 1.2 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{omega}) < 1.7 We have no observation of any decay mode, statistical significance for our measurements is in the range 1.3-3.5 standard deviation. We have a 3.5{sigma} evidence for B {yields} {eta}{omega} and a 3.1 {sigma} evidence for B {yields} {eta}{prime}{omega}. The absence of observation of the B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0} open an issue related to the large difference compared to the charged mode B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +} branching fraction, which is measured to be 3.7 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.1 [118]. Our results represent substantial improvements of the previous ones [109, 110, 111] and are consistent with theoretical predictions. All these results were presented at Flavor Physics and CP Violation (FPCP) 2008 Conference, that took place in Taipei, Taiwan. They will be soon included into a paper to be submitted to Physical Review D. For time-dependent analysis, we have reconstructed 1820 {+-} 48 flavor-tagged B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0} events, using the final BABAR statistic of 467.4 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs. We use these events to measure the time-dependent asymmetry parameters S and C. We find S = 0.59 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02, and C = -0.06 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.02. A non-zero value of C would represent a directly CP non-conserving component in B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}, while S would be equal to sin2{beta} measured in B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} [108], a mixing-decay interference effect, provided the decay is dominated by amplitudes of a single weak phase. The new measured value of S can be considered in agreement with the expectations of the 'Standard Model', inside the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Inconsistency of our result for S with CP conservation (S = 0) has a significance of 7.1 standard deviations (statistical and systematics included). Our result for the direct-CP violation parameter C is 0.9 standard deviations from zero (statistical and systematics included). Our results are in agreement with the previous ones [18]. Despite the statistics is only 20% larger than the one used in previous measurement, we improved of 20% the error on S and of 14% the error on C. This error is the smaller ever achieved, by both BABAR and Belle, in Time-Dependent CP Violation Parameters measurement is a b {yields} s transition.

  1. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes standard transportation practices for Departmental programs to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials including radioactive waste. Does not cancel other directives.

  2. Alternative Fuel Transportation Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets "Alternative Fuel Transportation Program" Dana O'Hara, DOE Ted Sears, NREL Vehicle Technologies Program June 20,...

  3. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Options for Liquid Biofuels Development in Ireland. SEI, 562006: Outlook for advanced biofuels. Energy Policy, 34(17),40 pp. IEA, 2004c: Biofuels for Transport: An International

  4. Transportation Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLuchi, Mark A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRANSPORTATION ment of Oil Shale Technology. Washing- ton,interest and investments in oil shale, ethanol, coal liquidsbiomass materials, coal, oil shale, tar sands, natural gas,

  5. Sustainable Transportation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in transportation technologies, alternative fuels, and fuel cell technologies.

  6. Anomalous transport and confinement scaling studies in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, W.M.; Cheng, C.Z.; Krommes, J.A.; Lee, W.W.; Oberman, C.R.; Perkins, F.W.; Rewoldt, G.; Smith, R.; Bonoli, P.; Coppi, B.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In addressing the general issue of anomalous energy transport, this paper reports on results of theoretical studies concerning: (1) the characteristics and relative strength of the dominant kinetic instabilities likely to be present under realistic tokamak operating conditions; (2) specific nonlinear processes relevant to the saturation and transport properties of drift-type instabilities; (3) the construction of semiempirical models for electron thermal transport and the scaling trends inferred from them; and (4) the application of specific anomalous transport models to simulate recent large-scale confinement experiments (TFTR and JET) and current drive experiments.

  7. 2006 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    2006 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2006 Transportation Tomorrow Survey Data Presentation #12;2006 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO City of Hamilton City of Kawartha Lakes City of Guelph City of Brantford

  8. Molecular Level Assessment of Thermal Transport and Thermoelectricity in Materials: From Bulk Alloys to Nanostructures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinaci, Alper

    2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    applications. Carbon- and boron nitride-based nanomaterials also offer new opportunities in many applications from thermoelectrics to fast heat removers. For these materials, molecular dynamics calculations are used to evaluate lattice thermal transport. To do...

  9. OIM 413 Logistics and Transportation Class Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays: 10:00-11:15AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    OIM 413 ­ Logistics and Transportation Fall 2014 Class Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays: 10:00-11:15AM and operations management techniques have had wide success and application is transportation and logistics models and algorithms for problems in transportation and logistics. The course covers some

  10. Electron transport through single carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenkel, Thomas; Chai, G.; Heinrich, H.; Chow, L.; Schenkel, T.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the transport of energetic electrons through single, well aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT). Embedding of CNTs in a protective carbon fiber coating enables the application of focused ion beam based sample preparation techniques for the non-destructive isolation and alignment of individual tubes. Aligned tubes with lengths of 0.7 to 3 mu m allow transport of 300 keV electrons in a transmission electron microscope through their hollow cores at zero degree incident angles and for a misalignment of up to 1 degree.

  11. http://tti.tamu.edu Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    http://tti.tamu.edu Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation >>> Transportation operat > Freight traffic > Commodities > Travel time > Travel demand > http

  12. INLAND PORT TRANSPORTATION EVALUATION GUIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    INLAND PORT TRANSPORTATION EVALUATION GUIDE by Robert Harrison, Center for Transportation Research Transportation Institute, The Texas A&M University System; and Jolanda Prozzi, Center for Transportation Research, The University of Texas at Austin CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH Bureau of Engineering Research

  13. MAESTRAEN TRANSPORTE ESPECIALIZACINEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vásquez, Carlos

    investigaciones que permitan la comprensión de distintos componentes delsistema del transporte así como para Investigación de Operaciones y Redes de transporte Medidas y Administración del Tránsito Tecnologías de

  14. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1A. Canceled by DOE O 460.1C.

  15. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE, including NNSA, offsite shipments and onsite transfers of radioactive and other hazardous materials and for modal transportation. Cancels DOE O 460.1B, 5-14-10

  16. Expert systems in transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, K.P.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 5 papers in the report deal with the following areas: Knowledge representation and software selection for expert-systems design; Expert-system architecture for retaining-wall design; Development of expert-systems technology in the California Department of Transportation; Development of an expert system to assist in the interactive graphic transit system design process; Expert systems development for contingency transportation planing.

  17. NaSt1: A Wolf-Rayet star cloaked by an eta Car--like nebula?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul A. Crowther; Linda J. Smith

    1999-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the peculiar Galactic emission line object NaSt1 (WR122, IRAS 18497+0056) which has previously been classified as a Wolf-Rayet (WR) star. Our spectroscopic dataset comprises Keck I-HIRES, WHT-ISIS and UKIRT-CGS4 observations which show that NaSt1 has a highly reddened nebular spectrum with extremely strong permitted and forbidden lines covering a wide range in excitation. [OII-III] is unusually weak, with HeI-II and [NII] very strong, and carbon absent, suggestive of chemical peculiarities. Narrow-band WHT imaging reveals an elliptical nebula with an average diameter of 6.8arcsec. We measure an interstellar extinction of E(B-V)=2.1mag and estimate a distance of 1-3kpc, suggesting that NaSt1 is a luminous object, with 40.64, N enhanced by a factor of 20, O deficient by a factor of 140, while Ne, Ar and S are normal compared to average HII region abundances. This unusual abundance pattern suggests that the nebula consists of fully CNO-processed material. We compare the spectral appearance of NaSt1 with other luminous emission objects, and conclude that it is not an Ofpe/WN9, B[e] star or symbiotic nova although it does share several characteristics of these systems. We suggest instead that NaSt1 contains a massive evolved star that ejected its heavily CNO-processed outer layers a few thousand years ago. Although the stellar remnant is completely hidden from view by the dense nebula, we argue that the star must be an early-type WR star. The only object that shares some of the peculiarities of NaSt1 is eta Carinae. Whatever its true nature, NaSt1 should no longer be considered as a late-WN classification standard in the near-IR.

  18. COMPUTING APPLICATIONS APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bader, David A.

    COMPUTING APPLICATIONS APPLICATIONS APPLICATIONS David A. Bader NEW MEXICO, USA Robert Pennington of the interconnect net- work and related software is shown by comparing the same application running on a large

  19. Improving Efficiency and Equity in Transportation Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, Michael

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fueling Transportation Finance. ” Ian W. H. Parry andFueling Transportation Finance. ” Transportation ResearchFueling Transportation Finance: A Primer on the Gas Tax •

  20. Sandia Energy - Transportation Energy Systems Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Energy Systems Analysis Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Transportation Energy Systems Analysis Transportation Energy Systems AnalysisTara...

  1. Auxiliary analyses in support of performance assessment of a hypothetical low-level waste facility: Two-phase flow and contaminant transport in unsaturated soils with application to low-level radioactive waste disposal. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binning, P. [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia); Celia, M.A.; Johnson, J.C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Operations Research

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical model of multiphase air-water flow and contaminant transport in the unsaturated zone is presented. The multiphase flow equations are solved using the two-pressure, mixed form of the equations with a modified Picard linearization of the equations and a finite element spatial approximation. A volatile contaminant is assumed to be transported in either phase, or in both phases simultaneously. The contaminant partitions between phases with an equilibrium distribution given by Henry`s Law or via kinetic mass transfer. The transport equations are solved using a Galerkin finite element method with reduced integration to lump the resultant matrices. The numerical model is applied to published experimental studies to examine the behavior of the air phase and associated contaminant movement under water infiltration. The model is also used to evaluate a hypothetical design for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. The model has been developed in both one and two dimensions; documentation and computer codes are available for the one-dimensional flow and transport model.

  2. Transportation activity analysis using smartphones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Yu

    Transportation activity surveys investigate when, where and how people travel in urban areas to provide information necessary for urban transportation planning. In Singapore, the Land Transport Authority (LTA) carries out ...

  3. PSFQ: A Reliable Transport Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Richard Y.

    PSFQ: A Reliable Transport Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks Chieh-Yih Wan Dept. of Electrical class of reliable data applications emerging in wireless sensor networks. For example, currently sensor of sensors in wireless sensor networks on the fly (e.g., during disaster recovery). Due to the application

  4. Model for assessing bronchial mucus transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnew, J.E.; Bateman, J.R.M.; Pavia, D.; Clarke, S.W.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors propose a scheme for the assessment of regional mucus transport using inhaled Tc-99m aerosol particles and quantitative analysis of serial gamma-camera images. The model treats input to inner and intermediate lung regions as the total of initial deposition there plus subsequent transport into these regions from more peripheral airways. It allows for interregional differences in the proportion of particles deposited on the mucus-bearing conducting airways, and does not require a gamma image 24 hr after particle inhalation. Instead, distribution of particles reaching the respiratory bronchioles or alveoli is determined from a Kr-81m ventilation image, while the total amount of such deposition is obtained from 24-hr Tc-99m retention measured with a sensitive counter system. The model is applicable to transport by mucociliary action or by cough, and has been tested in ten normal and ten asthmatic subjects.

  5. Transportation Economic Assistance Program (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Transportation Economic Assistance Program provides state grants to private business and local governments to improve transportation to projects improving economic conditions and creating or...

  6. Transportation Resources | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Resources The following means of transportation are available for getting to Argonne. Airports Argonne is located within 25 miles of two major Chicago airports:...

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Transportation Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E. Coli Bacteria Engineered to Eat Switchgrass and Make Transportation Fuels On December 7, 2011, in Energy, JBEI, News, Renewable Energy, Transportation Energy A milestone has...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Transportation Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JBEI, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Systems Analysis, Transportation Energy Biofuels hold great promise for the future of transportation energy, but...

  9. Subsurface Flow and Transport | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subsurface related to contaminant transport, carbon cycling, enhanced oil recovery and carbon dioxide sequestration. See a complete list of Subsurface Flow and Transport...

  10. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas have continued to make small contributions to transportation,transportation actions include electric power sector actions, eg coal to natural gas

  11. Superconnections and Parallel Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumitrescu, Florin

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note addresses the construction of a notion of parallel transport along superpaths arising from the concept of a superconnection on a vector bundle over a manifold $M$. A superpath in $M$ is, loosely speaking, a path in $M$ together with an odd vector field in $M$ along the path. We also develop a notion of parallel transport associated with a connection (a.k.a. covariant derivative) on a vector bundle over a \\emph{supermanifold} which is a direct generalization of the classical notion of parallel transport for connections over manifolds.

  12. Study of psi(2S) Decays to gamma p bar{p}, pi^0 p bar{p} and eta p bar{p} and Search for p bar{p} Threshold Enhancements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLEO Collaboration; J. P. Alexander; D. G. Cassel; S. Das; R. Ehrlich; L. Fields; L. Gibbons; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; D. L. Kreinick; V. E. Kuznetsov; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; D. Riley; A. Ryd; A. J. Sadoff; X. Shi; W. M. Sun; J. Yelton; P. Rubin; N. Lowrey; S. Mehrabyan; M. Selen; J. Wiss; S. Adams; M. Kornicer; R. E. Mitchell; M. R. Shepherd; C. M. Tarbert; D. Besson; T. K. Pedlar; J. Xavier; D. Cronin-Hennessy; J. Hietala; P. Zweber; S. Dobbs; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; A. Tomaradze; T. Xiao; S. Brisbane; J. Libby; L. Martin; A. Powell; P. Spradlin; G. Wilkinson; H. Mendez; J. Y. Ge; D. H. Miller; I. P. J. Shipsey; B. Xin; G. S. Adams; D. Hu; B. Moziak; J. Napolitano; K. M. Ecklund; J. Insler; H. Muramatsu; C. S. Park; L. J. Pearson; E. H. Thorndike; F. Yang; S. Ricciardi; C. Thomas; M. Artuso; S. Blusk; R. Mountain; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; J. C. Wang; L. M. Zhang; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; A. Lincoln; M. J. Smith; P. Zhou; J. Zhu; P. Naik; J. Rademacker; D. M. Asner; K. W. Edwards; K. Randrianarivony; G. Tatishvili; R. A. Briere; H. Vogel; P. U. E. Onyisi; J. L. Rosner

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The decays of psi(2S) into gamma p bar{p}, pi^0 p bar{p} and eta p bar{p} have been studied with the CLEO-c detector using a sample of 24.5 million psi(2S) events obtained from e^+e^- annihilations at sqrt{s} = 3686 MeV. The data show evidence for the excitation of several N^* resonances in p pi^0 and p eta channels in pi^0 p bar{p} and eta p bar{p} decays, and f_2 states in gamma p bar{p} decay. Branching fractions for decays of psi(2S) to gamma p bar{p}, pi^0 p bar{p} and eta p bar{p} have been determined. No evidence for p bar{p} threshold enhancements was found in the reactions psi(2S)-> X p bar{p}, where X = gamma, pi^0, eta. We do, however, find confirming evidence for a p bar{p} threshold enhancement in J/psi-> gamma p bar{p} as previously reported by BES.

  13. Transportation 2035 Longview Metropolitan Transportation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longview Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Owen, MPO Director Melissa Bechtold, Transportation Planner Nalora Moser, Planning Technician MPO TECHNICAL COMMITTEE Karen Owen, City of Longview Fred Marquez, TXDOT-Austin Dale Spitz, TXDOT-Tyler District Debbie Sadler, City of White... Oak Will Buskell, TXDOT-Longview Area Rea Donna Jones, TXDOT-Atlanta District Margie McAllister, TCEQ-Austin Randy Redmond, TXDOT-Tyler District John Paul Jones, Harrison County Keith Bonds, City of Longview Steve Juneau, TXDOT-Marshall...

  14. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation Secure Data Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReportTransmissionResearchNewsTransportation

  15. PBA Transportation Websites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PBA Transportation Websites presented to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

  16. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be generated from coal and nuclear energy in contrast to 7%in the use of coal and nuclear energy for transportation andparticularly for coal and nuclear energy utilization, would

  17. Atmospheric Transport of Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, T.V.

    2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations is to provide estimates of concentration and surface deposition from routine and accidental releases of pollutants to the atmosphere. This paper discusses this topic.

  18. Clean Transportation Internship Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clean Transportation Internship Description The NC Solar Center at North Carolina State University to other ongoing projects by focusing on time-sensitive tasks. While the main thrust of this internship

  19. Alternative Fuel Transportation Program

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    federal register Monday May 17, 1999 Part II Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 10 CFR Part 490 Alternative Fuel Transportation Program; P-series...

  20. Accident resistant transport container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andersen, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Cole, James K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  1. B. TRANSPORTATION, CIRCULATION AND PARKING B. TRANSPORTATION, CIRCULATION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullins, Dyche

    B. TRANSPORTATION, CIRCULATION AND PARKING 231 B. TRANSPORTATION, CIRCULATION AND PARKING on transportation and connectivity issues common to UCSF as a whole. Please refer to Chapter 5, Plans for Existing characteristics specific to each individual UCSF site. DETERMINANTS OF THE 1996 LRDP The transportation

  2. Metropolitan Transportation Plan 2035

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyler Area Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Adopted by the Tyler Area MPO Policy Committee December 4, 2009 METROPOLITAN TRANSPORTATION PLAN 2035 Revised April 22, 2010 Adopted by the Tyler Area MPO Policy Committee December 4, 2009 Amended/Revised April 22, 2010 Prepared by: Bucher..., Willis, and Ratliff Corporation 1828 East Southeast Loop 323, Suite 202 Tyler, Texas 75701 903.581.7844 This Document Serves as an Update to the Tyler Area Metropolitan Transportation Plan 2030. Portions of that Document were Unchanged and Appear...

  3. Thermoelectric transport in superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinecke, T.L.; Broido, D.A.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermoelectric transport properties of superlattices have been studied using an exact solution of the Boltzmann equation. The role of heat transport along the barrier layers, of carrier tunneling through the barriers, of valley degeneracy and of the well width and energy dependences of the carrier-phonon scattering rates on the thermoelectric figure of merit are given. Calculations are given for Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and for PbTe, and the results of recent experiments are discussed.

  4. Interactive Transportable Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver Irschitz; Priam Givord; Newyork Exit Newyork; Flavia Sparacino

    Transportable architecture which embeds the means to communicate with real or imaginary digital information spaces in a natural fashion offers unprecedented opportunities to make multimedia experiences available to the public almost everywhere. This installation demonstrates an example of interactive transportable architecture which incorporates unencumebered real-time body tracking and gesture recognition to explore a 3-D cityscape and a brain-like web-based information space.

  5. Campus Village Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, Emmanuel

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Emmanuel Hernandez THE CAMPUS V ILLAGE : TRANSPORTATION Objective The Campus Village is a new community being constructed in northwest Lawrence with a intergenerational focus in mind. The site will be equipped with housing for students, athletes..., retirement community members, and families. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the city’s current transportation network and make recommendations on that network to better accommodate the needs of the new property. Specifically, the goal...

  6. Regional Transportation Coordination Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden Crescent Regional Planning Commission

    Committee for this study. ? Develop a coordination public transportation plan ? Identify resources required to develop the plan ? Provide policy guidance to lead the planning and coordination effort Golden Crescent Regional Transit 1... of Texas. This resource will be relied upon for further development of the Intermodal Transportation Terminal. ? FTA Section 5309 (Bus) Discretionary Support ? To assist in meeting the GCRPC?s capital replacement needs. This resource...

  7. Spin Transport in Semiconductor heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Domnita Catalina Marinescu

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of the research performed under this grant has been the investigation of spin transport in magnetic semiconductor heterostructures. The interest in these systems is motivated both by their intriguing physical properties, as the physical embodiment of a spin-polarized Fermi liquid, as well as by their potential applications as spintronics devices. In our work we have analyzed several different problems that affect the spin dynamics in single and bi-layer spin-polarized two-dimensional (2D) systems. The topics of interests ranged from the fundamental aspects of the electron-electron interactions, to collective spin and charge density excitations and spin transport in the presence of the spin-orbit coupling. The common denominator of these subjects is the impact at the macroscopic scale of the spin-dependent electron-electron interaction, which plays a much more subtle role than in unpolarized electron systems. Our calculations of several measurable parameters, such as the excitation frequencies of magneto-plasma modes, the spin mass, and the spin transresistivity, propose realistic theoretical estimates of the opposite-spin many-body effects, in particular opposite-spin correlations, that can be directly connected with experimental measurements.

  8. MSIV leakage airborne iodine transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cline, J.E. (Cline Associates Inc., Rockville, MD (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gaseous iodine deposits on surfaces exposed to vapors. Basic chemical and physical principles predict this behavior, and several laboratory and in-plant measurements demonstrate the characteristic. An empirical model was developed that describes the deposition, resuspension, and transformation of airborne radioiodine molecular species as a stream containing these forms moves along its pathway. The model uses a data base of measured values of deposition and resuspension rates in its application and describes the conversion of the more reactive inorganic iodine species I[sub 2] to the less reactive organic species CH[sub 3]I as the iodine deposits and resuspends along the path. It also considers radioactive decay and chemical surface bonding during residence on surfaces. For the 8-day [sup 131]I, decay during the airborne portion of the transport is negligible. Verification of the model included measurement tests of long gaseous-activity sampling lines of different diameters, operated at different flow rates and stream temperatures. The model was applied to the streams at a boiling water reactor nuclear power plant to describe the transport through leaking main steam isolation valves (MSIVs), following a loss-of-coolant accident.

  9. Particle transport in plasma reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rader, D.J.; Geller, A.S.; Choi, Seung J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kushner, M.J. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEMATECH and the Department of Energy have established a Contamination Free Manufacturing Research Center (CFMRC) located at Sandia National Laboratories. One of the programs underway at the CFMRC is directed towards defect reduction in semiconductor process reactors by the application of computational modeling. The goal is to use fluid, thermal, plasma, and particle transport models to identify process conditions and tool designs that reduce the deposition rate of particles on wafers. The program is directed toward defect reduction in specific manufacturing tools, although some model development is undertaken when needed. The need to produce quantifiable improvements in tool defect performance requires the close cooperation among Sandia, universities, SEMATECH, SEMATECH member companies, and equipment manufacturers. Currently, both plasma (e.g., etch, PECVD) and nonplasma tools (e.g., LPCVD, rinse tanks) are being worked on under this program. In this paper the authors summarize their recent efforts to reduce particle deposition on wafers during plasma-based semiconductor manufacturing.

  10. Transportation megaproject procurement : benefits and challenges for PPPs and alternative delivery strategies, and the resulting implications for Crossrail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Michael A. (Michael Adam)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis evaluates the applicability of public-private partnerships (PPPs) and alternative delivery strategies to transportation megaprojects. There has been tremendous expansion of innovative procurement and financing ...

  11. ARM - Campaign Instrument - eta

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492air Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call usgovInstrumentsecor

  12. ARM - Instrument - eta

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9,govInstrumentsdl Documentation DL :

  13. Parametric study on maximum transportable distance and cost for thermal energy transportation using various coolants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su-Jong Yoon; Piyush Sabharwall

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The operation temperature of advanced nuclear reactors is generally higher than commercial light water reactors and thermal energy from advanced nuclear reactor can be used for various purposes such as district heating, desalination, hydrogen production and other process heat applications, etc. The process heat industry/facilities will be located outside the nuclear island due to safety measures. This thermal energy from the reactor has to be transported a fair distance. In this study, analytical analysis was conducted to identify the maximum distance that thermal energy could be transported using various coolants such as molten-salts, helium and water by varying the pipe diameter and mass flow rate. The cost required to transport each coolant was also analyzed. The coolants analyzed are molten salts (such as: KClMgCl2, LiF-NaF-KF (FLiNaK) and KF-ZrF4), helium and water. Fluoride salts are superior because of better heat transport characteristics but chloride salts are most economical for higher temperature transportation purposes. For lower temperature water is a possible alternative when compared with He, because low pressure He requires higher pumping power which makes the process very inefficient and economically not viable for both low and high temperature application.

  14. Transverse Single-Spin Asymmetry and Cross-Section for pi0 and eta Mesons at Large Feynman-x in Polarized p+p Collisions at sqrt(s)=200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; C. D. Anson; D. Arkhipkin; E. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; A. Bannerjee; Z. Barnovska; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Y. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; P. Chung; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; L. Didenko; F. Ding; A. Dion; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; F. Geurts; S. Gliske; Y. N. Gorbunov; O. G. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; C. Jena; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; V. Kizka; S. R. Klein; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; L. Kumar; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; L. M. Lima; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; Y. Lu; X. Luo; A. Luszczak; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; S. Mioduszewski; M. K. Mitrovski; Y. Mohammed; B. Mohanty; B. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. K. Mustafa; M. Naglis; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; L. V. Nogach; J. Novak; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; R. A. N. Oliveira; D. Olson; P. Ostrowski; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; B. Sharma; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; U. G. deSouza; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; S. G. Steadman; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; W. Witzke; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; Y. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva

    2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the differential cross-section and the transverse single-spin asymmetry, A_N, vs. x_F for pi0 and eta mesons are reported for 0.4 < x_F < 0.75 at an average pseudorapidity of 3.68. A data sample of approximately 6.3 pb^{-1} was analyzed, which was recorded during p+p collisions at sqrt{s} = 200 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The average transverse beam polarization was 56%. The cross-section for pi0 is consistent with a perturbative QCD prediction, and the eta/pi0 cross-section ratio agrees with previous mid-rapidity measurements. For 0.55 < x_F < 0.75, A_N for eta (0.210 +- 0.056) is 2.2 standard deviations larger than A_N for pi0 (0.081 +- 0.016).

  15. Texas Transportation Poll Final report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Transportation Poll Final report PRC 14-16-F #12;2 Texas Transportation Poll Texas A&M Transportation Institute PRC 14-16-F September 2014 Authors Chris Simek Tina Geiselbrecht #12;3 Table of Contents .......................................................................................................................... 8 Transportation Funding

  16. Transportation Systems Engineering GRADUATE STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuhang

    Transportation Systems Engineering GRADUATE STUDIES TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS are the building blocks and provides for an improved quality of life. However, transportation systems by their very nature also affect the environment through physical construction and operation of transportation facilities, and through the travel

  17. Stochastic webs and quantum transport in superlattices: an introductory review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Soskin; P. V. E. McClintock; T. M. Fromhold; I. A. Khovanov; R. Mannella

    2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Stochastic webs were discovered, first by Arnold for multi-dimensional Hamiltonian systems, and later by Chernikov et al. for the low-dimensional case. Generated by weak perturbations, they consist of thread-like regions of chaotic dynamics in phase space. Their importance is that, in principle, they enable transport from small energies to high energies. In this introductory review, we concentrate on low-dimensional stochastic webs and on their applications to quantum transport in semiconductor superlattices subject to electric and magnetic fields. We also describe a recently-suggested modification of the stochastic web to enhance chaotic transport through it and we discuss its possible applications to superlattices. keywords: stochastic webs; quantum transport; superlattices; separatrix chaos

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: power-to-gas applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    power-to-gas applications Storing Hydrogen Underground Could Boost Transportation, Energy Security On February 26, 2015, in Capabilities, Center for Infrastructure Research and...

  19. JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2001 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY of Transportation, Ontario Additions in 1996 Regional Municipalities of Niagara, Waterloo Counties of Peterborough not to participate) #12;JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2001 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY

  20. Director Position Center for Urban Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, Hüseyin

    Director Position Center for Urban Transportation The Center for Urban Transportation Research for state policymakers, transportation agencies, transportation professionals and the public. CUTR conducts of Transportation's Federal Transit Administration and Federal Highway Administration, the Florida Department

  1. Delaware Transportation Infrastructure Forum Problem Identification Statements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    2013 Delaware Transportation Infrastructure Forum Problem Identification Statements Sponsored by The Delaware Center for Transportation and the Delaware Department of Transportation Delaware Center for Transportation Your main resource for transportation education and research Identifying Important Issues Related

  2. Inclusive pi(0), eta, and direct photon production at high transverse momentum in p plus p and d plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A. Davila; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Han, L. -X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Rehberg, J. M.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a measurement of high-p(T) inclusive pi(0), eta, and direct photon production in p + p and d + Au collisions at root s(NN) = 200 GeV at midrapidity (0 gamma gamma were detected in the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter of the STAR...the signal was extracted statistically by subtracting the pi(0), eta, and omega(782) decay background from the inclusive photon distribution observed in the calorimeter. The analysis is described in detail, and the results are found to be in good...

  3. Nonlinear Acceleration Methods for Even-Parity Neutron Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. J. Martin; C. R. E. De Oliveira; H. Park

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Convergence acceleration methods for even-parity transport were developed that have the potential to speed up transport calculations and provide a natural avenue for an implicitly coupled multiphysics code. An investigation was performed into the acceleration properties of the introduction of a nonlinear quasi-diffusion-like tensor in linear and nonlinear solution schemes. Using the tensor reduced matrix as a preconditioner for the conjugate gradients method proves highly efficient and effective. The results for the linear and nonlinear case serve as the basis for further research into the application in a full three-dimensional spherical-harmonics even-parity transport code. Once moved into the nonlinear solution scheme, the implicit coupling of the convergence accelerated transport method into codes for other physics can be done seamlessly, providing an efficient, fully implicitly coupled multiphysics code with high order transport.

  4. MC++: Parallel, portable, Monte Carlo neutron transport in C++

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.R.; Cummings, J.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nolen, S.D. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an implicit Monte Carlo neutron transport code in C++ using the Parallel Object-Oriented Methods and Applications (POOMA) class library. MC++ runs in parallel on and is portable to a wide variety of platforms, including MPPs, clustered SMPs, and individual workstations. It contains appropriate classes and abstractions for particle transport and parallelism. Current capabilities of MC++ are discussed, along with future plans and physics and performance results on many different platforms.

  5. Efficient Transportation Decision Public Web Site: Bridging the Gap Between Transportation Planning and the Public

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roaza, Ruth

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for accomplishing transportation planning and projectprocess – the Efficient Transportation Decision Making (Process - is to make transportation decisions more quickly

  6. Procurement of a fully licensed radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, H.E.; Bearden, T.E. (Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, N1-42, Richland, Washington 99352 (US))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully licensed transportation system for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Units is currently being designed and built. The system will comply with all applicable U.S. Department of Transportation regulations without the use of a DOE Alternative.'' The U.S. Department of Transportation has special double containment'' requirements for plutonium. The system packaging uses a doubly contained bell jar'' concept. A refrigerated trailer is used for cooling the high-heat payloads. The same packaging is used for both high- and low-heat payloads. The system is scheduled to be available for use by mid-1992.

  7. Procurement of a fully licensed radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, H.E.; Bearden, T.E.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully licensed transportation system for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Units is currently being designed and built. The system will comply with all applicable US Department of Transportation regulations without the use of a DOE Alternative.'' The US Department of Transportation has special double containment'' requirements for plutonium. The system packaging uses a doubly contained bell jar'' concept. A refrigerated trailer is used for cooling the high-heat payloads. The same packaging is used for both high- and low-heat payloads. The system is scheduled to be available for use by mid-1992. 4 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Transportation Secure Data Center: Real-World Data for Transportation Planning and Land Use Analysis (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) have launched the free, web-based Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC). The TSDC (www.nrel.gov/tsdc) preserves respondent anonymity while making vital transportation data available to a broad group of users through secure, online access. The TSDC database provides free-of-charge web-based access to valuable transportation data that can be used for: Transit planning, Travel demand modeling, Homeland Security evacuation planning, Alternative fuel station planning, and Validating transportation data from other sources. The TSDC's two levels of access make composite data available with simple online registration, and allow researchers to use detailed spatial data after completing a straight forward application process.

  9. Transportation Institutional Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Institutional Plan is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 provides background information, discusses the purposes of the Plan and the policy guidance for establishing the transportation system, and describes the projected system and the plans for its integrated development. Chapter 2 discusses the major participants who must interact to build the system. Chapter 3 suggests mechanisms for interaction that will foster wide participation in program planning and implementation and provides a framework for managing and resolving the issues related to development and operation of the transportation system. A list of acronyms and a glossary are included for the reader's convenience. Also included in this Plan are four appendices. Of particular importance is Appendix A, which includes detailed discussion of specific transportation issues. Appendices B, C, and D provide supporting material to assist the reader in understanding the roles of the involved institutions.

  10. Intermodal Transportation, USACE Style

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grumski, K. M.; Coutts, P. W.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has developed project management techniques with a proven track record for safe and successful results for constructing large scale and massive projects such as improving our nations water transportation systems, flood control, bridges and dams. Applying many of these techniques to the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) managed by USACE to remediate the environment is achieving the same safe and successful results as their construction projects. This paper examines the additional economics and improved safety results of using intermodal containers and a combination of rail and truck transportation conveyances to transport the contaminated soil and debris from the Linde FUSRAP site, located in Tonawanda, New York.

  11. Smart vehicular transportation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, C.Q.; Wilson, C.W.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work builds upon established Sandia intelligent systems technology to develop a unique approach for the integration of intelligent system control into the US Highway and urban transportation systems. The Sandia developed concept of the COPILOT controller integrates a human driver with computer control to increase human performance while reducing reliance on detailed driver attention. This research extends Sandia expertise in sensor based, real-time control of robotics systems to high speed transportation systems. Knowledge in the form of maps and performance characteristics of vehicles provides the automatic decision making intelligence needed to plan optimum routes, maintain safe driving speeds and distances, avoid collisions, and conserve fuel.

  12. TRANSPORT...18 SHOPPING...22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    of renewable energy sources, paying attention to the environmental impact of our activities, and setting, while changes are made here on the ground through campaigns around transport, food and ethical targets for the reduction of energy consumption, and the attainment of carbon neutrality. I am delighted

  13. Storing and transporting energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClaine, Andrew W. (Lexington, MA); Brown, Kenneth (Reading, MA)

    2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Among other things, hydrogen is released from water at a first location using energy from a first energy source; the released hydrogen is stored in a metal hydride slurry; and the metal hydride slurry is transported to a second location remote from the first location.

  14. Policy Research TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to attract businesses and jobs to Texas, as the state has become increasingly dependent on the efficient will continue to be an important part of the 21st century transportation model, more efficient use of available and innovation; and · Serve as an independent resource to the Texas Legislature, providing analyses of the state

  15. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  16. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

    2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second quarterly progress report for Year-4 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between October 1, 2002 and December 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks. (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System, Task 4: Addition of a Pipe Rotation System. (b) New research project (Task 9b): ''Development of a Foam Generator/Viscometer for Elevated Pressure and Elevated Temperature (EPET) Conditions''. (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b). (f) New Research project (Task 13): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (g) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (h) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  17. Parking & Transportation Services Sustainability &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    responsibility. Embracing the policies of the larger university, Parking and Transportation Services has institution, to take a leadership role in encouraging environmental responsibility on a statewide level Development at the U of M ­ for purchasing practices from diverse suppliers · 2010 Transit System of the Year

  18. 21st Annual Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    would cost more than $40 billion over next 20 years ·! If used alone, state gas tax would need more than Investment Plan ·! Mn/DOT Statewide Transportation Plan #12;MHSIS goals ·! Develop a long range vision expansions ·!Fiscally-constrained approach #12;New investment strategy ·! Realistic ·! Innovative ·! Focuses

  19. Peristaltic particle transport using the Lattice Boltzmann method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connington, Kevin William [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kang, Qinjun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Viswanathan, Hari S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abdel-fattah, Amr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Shiyi [JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peristaltic transport refers to a class of internal fluid flows where the periodic deformation of flexible containing walls elicits a non-negligible fluid motion. It is a mechanism used to transport fluid and immersed solid particles in a tube or channel when it is ineffective or impossible to impose a favorable pressure gradient or desirous to avoid contact between the transported mixture and mechanical moving parts. Peristaltic transport occurs in many physiological situations and has myriad industrial applications. We focus our study on the peristaltic transport of a macroscopic particle in a two-dimensional channel using the lattice Boltzmann method. We systematically investigate the effect of variation of the relevant dimensionless parameters of the system on the particle transport. We find, among other results, a case where an increase in Reynolds number can actually lead to a slight increase in particle transport, and a case where, as the wall deformation increases, the motion of the particle becomes non-negative only. We examine the particle behavior when the system exhibits the peculiar phenomenon of fluid trapping. Under these circumstances, the particle may itself become trapped where it is subsequently transported at the wave speed, which is the maximum possible transport in the absence of a favorable pressure gradient. Finally, we analyze how the particle presence affects stress, pressure, and dissipation in the fluid in hopes of determining preferred working conditions for peristaltic transport of shear-sensitive particles. We find that the levels of shear stress are most hazardous near the throat of the channel. We advise that shear-sensitive particles should be transported under conditions where trapping occurs as the particle is typically situated in a region of innocuous shear stress levels.

  20. auxiliary propulsion applications: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the application of APUs for on-road vehicles. The USDOE Vehicle designs for 3 fuel cellAPU systems for on-road transportation applications. Analysis Update 5 Identify...

  1. Institute of Transport Studies PSU Transportation Seminar, 21 May 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    comparison · Market size and segments · Emerging issues · Conclusions #12;3 Institute of Transport Studies profession #12;4 Institute of Transport Studies E-Bike Fundamentals · E-bike physics 101 ­ Kinetic energy ­ Power required for movement #12;5 Institute of Transport Studies Kinetic energy · Kinetic energy

  2. 35 Alternative Transportation Fuels in California ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    35 Alternative Transportation Fuels in California Chapter 4 ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION FUELS IN CALIFORNIA INTRODUCTION The introduction of alternative fuels into California's transportation market has supply at low prices. But, with an uncertain long-term future for oil supplies and prices, alternative

  3. Self-Consistent Screening Approximation for Flexible Membranes: Application to Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. V. Zakharchenko; R. Roldan; A. Fasolino; M. I. Katsnelson

    2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystalline membranes at finite temperatures have an anomalous behavior of the bending rigidity that makes them more rigid in the long wavelength limit. This issue is particularly relevant for applications of graphene in nano- and micro-electromechanical systems. We calculate numerically the height-height correlation function $G(q)$ of crystalline two-dimensional membranes, determining the renormalized bending rigidity, in the range of wavevectors $q$ from $10^{-7}$ \\AA$^{-1}$ till 10 \\AA$^{-1}$ in the self-consistent screening approximation (SCSA). For parameters appropriate to graphene, the calculated correlation function agrees reasonably with the results of atomistic Monte Carlo simulations for this material within the range of $q$ from $10^{-2}$ \\AA$^{-1}$ till 1 \\AA$^{-1}$. In the limit $q\\rightarrow 0$ our data for the exponent $\\eta$ of the renormalized bending rigidity $\\kappa_R(q)\\propto q^{-\\eta}$ is compatible with the previously known analytical results for the SCSA $\\eta\\simeq 0.82$. However, this limit appears to be reached only for $q<10^{-5}$ \\AA$^{-1}$ whereas at intermediate $q$ the behavior of $G(q)$ cannot be described by a single exponent.

  4. We're All Transportation Planners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curry, Melanie

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of facts that global warming is real, that transportationCalifornia Transportation Center, with help is a majorresearch on compelling transportation can both reduce the

  5. Essays on Transportation Safety, Economics, and Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scholl, Patricia Lynn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2002. TCF, 2000, “Widening the Transportation Divide: HowGovernor Davis’ Transportation Plan Leaves Transit-People Stranded”, Transportation Choices Forum, 2000.

  6. Integrated transportation system design optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Christine P. (Christine Pia), 1979-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, the design of a transportation system has focused on either the vehicle design or the network flow, assuming the other as given. However, to define a system level architecture for a transportation system, ...

  7. Transforming California's Freight Transport System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Transforming California's Freight Transport System Policy Forum on the Role of Freight Transport Standard #12;2050 Vision- Key Conceptual Outcomes Technology Transformation Early Action Cleaner Combustion Multiple Strategies Federal Action Efficiency Gains Energy Transformation 9 #12;Further reduce localized

  8. The neutron anomaly in the gamma N --> eta N cross section through the looking glass of the flavour SU(3) symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Boika; V. Kuznetsov; M. V. Polyakov

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the implications of the flavour SU(3) symmetry for various interpretations of the neutron anomaly in the $\\gamma N\\to\\eta N$ cross section. We show that the explanation of the neutron anomaly due to interference of known N(1535) and N(1650) resonances implies that N(1650) resonance should have a huge coupling to $\\phi$-meson -- at least 5 times larger than the corresponding $\\rho^0$ coupling. In terms of quark degrees of freedom this means that the well-known N(1650) resonance must be a "cryptoexotic pentaquark"-- its wave function should contain predominantly an $s\\bar s$ component. It turns out that the "conventional" interpretation of the neutron anomaly by the interference of known resonances metamorphoses into unconventional physics picture of N(1650).

  9. An economic analysis of the production of hydrogen from wind-generated electricity for use in transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in transport applications Paper published in : Energy Policy, vol. 39, n° 5, May 2011, pp. 2957-2965 Authors P in the framework of the HyFrance 3 project concerns hydrogen for transport applications. Different technical-generation biofuels production which present contrasted hydrogen use characteristics. This analysis reveals

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Transportation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experimental Testing Phenomenological Modeling Risk and Safety Assessment Cyber-Based Vulnerability Assessments Uncertainty Analysis Transportation Safety Fire Science Human...

  11. Transporting export coal from Appalachia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication is part of a series titled Market Guide for Steam Coal Exports from Appalachia. It focuses on the transportation link in the steam-coal supply chain, enabling producers to further assess their transportation options and their ability to compete in the export-coal marketplace. Transportation alternatives and handling procedures are discussed, and information is provided on the costs associated with each element in the transportation network.

  12. The Structure of the Homunculus: I. Shape and Latitude Dependence from H2 and [Fe II] Velocity Maps of Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution long-slit spectra obtained with the Phoenix spectrograph on Gemini South provide our most accurate probe of the three dimensional structure of the Homunculus around eta Car. The new near-infrared spectra dramatically confirm the double-shell structure inferred previously from thermal dust emission, resolving the nebula into a very thin outer shell seen in H2 21218, and a warmer, thicker inner layer seen in [Fe II] 16435. The thin H2 skin hints that the most important mass loss during the 19th century eruption had a very short duration of less than 5 yr. H2 emission traces the majority of the mass in the nebula, and has an average density of order 10^6.5 cm-3. This emission, in turn, yields our first definitive picture of the exact shape of the nebula, plus a distance of 2350pm50 pc and an inclination angle of 41deg (the polar axis is tilted 49deg from the plane of the sky). The distribution of the H2 emission provides the first measure of the latitude dependence of the speed, mass loss, and kinetic energy associated with eta Car's 19th century explosion. Almost 75 percent of the total mass and more than 90 percent of the kinetic energy in the ejecta were released at high latitudes. This rules out a model for the bipolar shape wherein an otherwise spherical explosion was pinched at the waist by a circumstellar torus. Also, the ejecta could not have been deflected toward polar trajectories by a companion star, since the kinetic energy of the polar ejecta is greater than the binding energy of the putative binary system. Instead, most of the mass appears to have been directed poleward by the explosion itself. [abridged

  13. Transport properties of a meson gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fernandez-Fraile; A. Gomez Nicola

    2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present recent results on a systematic method to calculate transport coefficients for a meson gas (in particular, we analyze a pion gas) at low temperatures in the context of Chiral Perturbation Theory. Our method is based on the study of Feynman diagrams with a power counting which takes into account collisions in the plasma by means of a non-zero particle width. In this way, we obtain results compatible with analysis of Kinetic Theory with just the leading order diagram. We show the behavior with temperature of electrical and thermal conductivities and shear and bulk viscosities, and we discuss the fundamental role played by unitarity. We obtain that bulk viscosity is negligible against shear viscosity near the chiral phase transition. Relations between the different transport coefficients and bounds on them based on different theoretical approximations are also discussed. We also comment on some applications to heavy-ion collisions.

  14. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  15. Integrated Transportation System Design Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Transportation System Design Optimization by Christine Taylor B.S. Cornell University by . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Professor Jaime Peraire Chairman, Department Graduate Committee #12;2 #12;Integrated Transportation System Abstract Traditionally, the design of a transportation system has focused on either the vehicle design

  16. Council of University Transportation Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Council of University Transportation Centers 13th Anniversary CUTC Awards Banquet January 9, 2010 Omni Shoreham Hotel Washington, D.C. #12;Council of University Transportation Centers 13th Anniversary Awards Banquet Saturday, January 9, 2010 Welcome Stephen Albert, CUTCVice-President WesternTransportation

  17. Transportation Center Seminar........ Patrice Marcotte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    Transportation Center Seminar........ Patrice Marcotte Professor and Acting Director Computer on a Transportation Network With Rigid Capacities" Abstract: Static network equilibrium is a well transportation network, taking into account that users behave selfishly, i.e., only travel on shortest paths

  18. PROTECTING APPLICATIONS AGAINST MALICE USING ADAPTIVE MIDDLEWARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Douglas C.

    that protect critical infrastructure, such as power grids, telecommunications, air transportation, fwebber, ppal, jloyall}@bbn.com Douglas C. Schmidt Electrical & Computer Engineering Department Henry dependent on the common information technology (IT) infrastructure used to build distributed applications

  19. Fuel cell water transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Hedstrom, James C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The moisture content and temperature of hydrogen and oxygen gases is regulated throughout traverse of the gases in a fuel cell incorporating a solid polymer membrane. At least one of the gases traverses a first flow field adjacent the solid polymer membrane, where chemical reactions occur to generate an electrical current. A second flow field is located sequential with the first flow field and incorporates a membrane for effective water transport. A control fluid is then circulated adjacent the second membrane on the face opposite the fuel cell gas wherein moisture is either transported from the control fluid to humidify a fuel gas, e.g., hydrogen, or to the control fluid to prevent excess water buildup in the oxidizer gas, e.g., oxygen. Evaporation of water into the control gas and the control gas temperature act to control the fuel cell gas temperatures throughout the traverse of the fuel cell by the gases.

  20. Parallel Transports in Webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Fleischhack

    2003-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    For connected reductive linear algebraic structure groups it is proven that every web is holonomically isolated. The possible tuples of parallel transports in a web form a Lie subgroup of the corresponding power of the structure group. This Lie subgroup is explicitly calculated and turns out to be independent of the chosen local trivializations. Moreover, explicit necessary and sufficient criteria for the holonomical independence of webs are derived. The results above can even be sharpened: Given an arbitrary neighbourhood of the base points of a web, then this neighbourhood contains some segments of the web whose parameter intervals coincide, but do not include 0 (that corresponds to the base points of the web), and whose parallel transports already form the same Lie subgroup as those of the full web do.

  1. Rail transportation update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Record western coal shipments and lucrative export traffic lead America's railroad to their fourth most profitable year in history. But with the coal boom going bust, higher rates, and a new administration and congress, what sort of transportation year can coal mines and shippers expect in 2009? The article gives the opinions of company executives and discusses findings of the recent so-called Christenson Report which investigated growing railroad market power. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  2. Multiscale thermal transport.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Samuel Jr. (; .); Wong, C. C.; Piekos, Edward Stanley

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A concurrent computational and experimental investigation of thermal transport is performed with the goal of improving understanding of, and predictive capability for, thermal transport in microdevices. The computational component involves Monte Carlo simulation of phonon transport. In these simulations, all acoustic modes are included and their properties are drawn from a realistic dispersion relation. Phonon-phonon and phonon-boundary scattering events are treated independently. A new set of phonon-phonon scattering coefficients are proposed that reflect the elimination of assumptions present in earlier analytical work from the simulation. The experimental component involves steady-state measurement of thermal conductivity on silicon films as thin as 340nm at a range of temperatures. Agreement between the experiment and simulation on single-crystal silicon thin films is excellent, Agreement for polycrystalline films is promising, but significant work remains to be done before predictions can be made confidently. Knowledge gained from these efforts was used to construct improved semiclassical models with the goal of representing microscale effects in existing macroscale codes in a computationally efficient manner.

  3. Transportation of medical isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, D.L.

    1997-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A Draft Technical Information Document (HNF-1855) is being prepared to evaluate proposed interim tritium and medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This assessment examines the potential health and safety impacts of transportation operations associated with the production of medical isotopes. Incident-free and accidental impacts are assessed using bounding source terms for the shipment of nonradiological target materials to the Hanford Site, the shipment of irradiated targets from the FFTF to the 325 Building, and the shipment of medical isotope products from the 325 Building to medical distributors. The health and safety consequences to workers and the public from the incident-free transportation of targets and isotope products would be within acceptable levels. For transportation accidents, risks to works and the public also would be within acceptable levels. This assessment is based on best information available at this time. As the medical isotope program matures, this analysis will be revised, if necessary, to support development of a final revision to the Technical Information Document.

  4. Implementation of Benchmarking Transportation Logistics Practices and Future Benchmarking Organizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thrower, A.W. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States); Patric, J. [Booz Allen Hamilton, Washington, DC (United States); Keister, M. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) Logistics Benchmarking Project is to identify established government and industry practices for the safe transportation of hazardous materials which can serve as a yardstick for design and operation of OCRWM's national transportation system for shipping spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The project will present logistics and transportation practices and develop implementation recommendations for adaptation by the national transportation system. This paper will describe the process used to perform the initial benchmarking study, highlight interim findings, and explain how these findings are being implemented. It will also provide an overview of the next phase of benchmarking studies. The benchmarking effort will remain a high-priority activity throughout the planning and operational phases of the transportation system. The initial phase of the project focused on government transportation programs to identify those practices which are most clearly applicable to OCRWM. These Federal programs have decades of safe transportation experience, strive for excellence in operations, and implement effective stakeholder involvement, all of which parallel OCRWM's transportation mission and vision. The initial benchmarking project focused on four business processes that are critical to OCRWM's mission success, and can be incorporated into OCRWM planning and preparation in the near term. The processes examined were: transportation business model, contract management/out-sourcing, stakeholder relations, and contingency planning. More recently, OCRWM examined logistics operations of AREVA NC's Business Unit Logistics in France. The next phase of benchmarking will focus on integrated domestic and international commercial radioactive logistic operations. The prospective companies represent large scale shippers and have vast experience in safely and efficiently shipping spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive materials. Additional business processes may be examined in this phase. The findings of these benchmarking efforts will help determine the organizational structure and requirements of the national transportation system. (authors)

  5. MCNP APPLICATIONS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. MCKINNEY; T. BOOTH; ET AL

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP, has become an international standard for a wide spectrum of neutron, photon, and electron radiation transport applications. The latest version of the code, MCNP 4C, was released to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) in February 2000. This paper describes the code development philosophy, new features and capabilities, applicability to various problems, and future directions.

  6. MCNP application for the 21 century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinney, M.C. [and others

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP, has become an international standard for a wide spectrum of neutron, photon, and electron radiation transport applications. The latest version of the code, MCNP 4C, was released to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) in February 2000. This paper describes the code development philosophy, new features and capabilities, applicability to various problems, and future directions.

  7. PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION STUDIES DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL & ENVIRONMENTAL Transportation System Performance Report December 27, 2005 #12;2Second Annual Portland Metropolitan Region Transportation System Performance Report Portland State University Center for Transportation Studies 2005

  8. Evolution of the Oligopeptide Transporter (OPT) family

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomolplitinant, Kenny Matee

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jr. 2007. The bile/arsenite/riboflavin transporter (BART)and 3) the Bile acid/Arsenite/Riboflavin Transporter (BART)

  9. Enhancing Transportation Energy Security through Advanced Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Energy Security through Advanced Combustion and Fuels Technologies Enhancing Transportation Energy Security through Advanced Combustion and Fuels Technologies 2005...

  10. Transportation and Stationary Power Integration: Workshop Proceedings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integration: Workshop Proceedings Transportation and Stationary Power Integration: Workshop Proceedings Proceedings for the Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop...

  11. Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Presentation made by Kevin...

  12. Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrificati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Transportation Sector Electrification Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrification 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies...

  13. Spring 2014 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meeting...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Spring 2014 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meeting, Minnesota Spring 2014 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meeting, Minnesota NTSF 2014 Meeting Agenda...

  14. PROCEEDINGS: Conference on Transportation in Developing Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervero, Robert; Sperling, Daniel; Mason, Jonathan

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environment, and Ecology Enhancing Mobility: Transportation Technologies, Operations, Design Non-Motorized Transportation: Mobility and Safety Economics, Financing,

  15. Transportation functions of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shappert, L.B. [ed.; Attaway, C.R.; Pope, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Best, R.E.; Danese, F.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dixon, L.D. [Dixon (L.D.), Martinez, GA (United States); Jones, R.H. [Jones (R.H.), Los Gatos, CA (United States); Klimas, M.J. [USDOE Chicago Operations Office, Argonne, IL (United States); Peterson, R.W. [Bentz (E.J.) and Associates, Inc., Alexandria, VA (United States)

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the framework of Public Law 97.425 and provisions specified in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10 Part 961, the US Department of Energy has the responsibility to accept and transport spent fuel and high-level waste from various organizations which have entered into a contract with the federal government in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and workers. In implementing these requirements, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has, among other things, supported the identification of functions that must be performed by a transportation system (TS) that will accept the waste for transport to a federal facility for storage and/or disposal. This document, through the application of system engineering principles, identifies the functions that must be performed to transport waste under this law.

  16. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Andy L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Daily, William D.; Fink, James B.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Hoversten, Gary M.; Keller, Jason M.; Majer, Ernest L.; Murray, Christopher J.; White, Mark D.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    From FY 2000 through FY 2003, a series of vadose zone transport field experiments were conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Project, now known as the Remediation and Closure Science Project, and managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The series of experiments included two major field campaigns, one at a 299-E24-11 injection test site near PUREX and a second at a clastic dike site off Army Loop Road. The goals of these experiments were to improve our understanding of vadose zone transport processes; to develop data sets to validate and calibrate vadose zone flow and transport models; and to identify advanced monitoring techniques useful for evaluating flow-and-transport mechanisms and delineating contaminant plumes in the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. This report summarizes the key findings from the field studies and demonstrates how data collected from these studies are being used to improve conceptual models and develop numerical models of flow and transport in Hanford’s vadose zone. Results of these tests have led to a better understanding of the vadose zone. Fine-scale geologic heterogeneities, including grain fabric and lamination, were observed to have a strong effect on the large-scale behavior of contaminant plumes, primarily through increased lateral spreading resulting from anisotropy. Conceptual models have been updated to include lateral spreading and numerical models of unsaturated flow and transport have revised accordingly. A new robust model based on the concept of a connectivity tensor was developed to describe saturation-dependent anisotropy in strongly heterogeneous soils and has been incorporated into PNNL’s Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator. Application to field-scale transport problems have led to a better understanding plume behavior at a number of sites where lateral spreading may have dominated waste migration (e.g. BC Cribs and Trenches). The improved models have been also coupled with inverse models and newly-developed parameter scaling techniques to allow estimation of field-scale and effective transport parameters for the vadose zone. The development and utility of pedotransfer functions for describing fine-scale hydrogeochemical heterogeneity and for incorporating this heterogeneity into reactive transport models was explored. An approach based on grain-size statistics appears feasible and has been used to describe heterogeneity in hydraulic properties and sorption properties, such as the cation exchange capacity and the specific surface area of Hanford sediments. This work has also led to the development of inverse modeling capabilities for time-dependent, subsurface, reactive transport with transient flow fields using an automated optimization algorithm. In addition, a number of geophysical techniques investigated for their potential to provide detailed information on the subtle changes in lithology and bedding surfaces; plume delineation, leak detection. High-resolution resistivity is now being used for detecting saline plumes at several waste sites at Hanford, including tank farms. Results from the field studies and associated analysis have appeared in more than 46 publications generated over the past 4 years. These publications include test plans and status reports, in addition to numerous technical notes and peer reviewed papers.

  17. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan Miska; Troy Reed; Ergun Kuru

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Cuttings Transport Study (ACTS) was a 5-year JIP project undertaken at the University of Tulsa (TU). The project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and JIP member companies. The objectives of the project were: (1) to develop and construct a new research facility that would allow three-phase (gas, liquid and cuttings) flow experiments under ambient and EPET (elevated pressure and temperature) conditions, and at different angle of inclinations and drill pipe rotation speeds; (2) to conduct experiments and develop a data base for the industry and academia; and (3) to develop mechanistic models for optimization of drilling hydraulics and cuttings transport. This project consisted of research studies, flow loop construction and instrumentation development. Following a one-year period for basic flow loop construction, a proposal was submitted by TU to the DOE for a five-year project that was organized in such a manner as to provide a logical progression of research experiments as well as additions to the basic flow loop. The flow loop additions and improvements included: (1) elevated temperature capability; (2) two-phase (gas and liquid, foam etc.) capability; (3) cuttings injection and removal system; (4) drill pipe rotation system; and (5) drilling section elevation system. In parallel with the flow loop construction, hydraulics and cuttings transport studies were preformed using drilling foams and aerated muds. In addition, hydraulics and rheology of synthetic drilling fluids were investigated. The studies were performed under ambient and EPET conditions. The effects of temperature and pressure on the hydraulics and cuttings transport were investigated. Mechanistic models were developed to predict frictional pressure loss and cuttings transport in horizontal and near-horizontal configurations. Model predictions were compared with the measured data. Predominantly, model predictions show satisfactory agreements with the measured data. As a part of this project, instrumentation was developed to monitor cuttings beds and characterize foams in the flow loop. An ultrasonic-based monitoring system was developed to measure cuttings bed thickness in the flow loop. Data acquisition software controls the system and processes the data. Two foam generating devices were designed and developed to produce foams with specified quality and texture. The devices are equipped with a bubble recognition system and an in-line viscometer to measure bubble size distribution and foam rheology, respectively. The 5-year project is completed. Future research activities will be under the umbrella of Tulsa University Drilling Research Projects. Currently the flow loop is being used for testing cuttings transport capacity of aqueous and polymer-based foams under elevated pressure and temperature conditions. Subsequently, the effect of viscous sweeps on cuttings transport under elevated pressure and temperature conditions will be investigated using the flow loop. Other projects will follow now that the ''steady state'' phase of the project has been achieved.

  18. Membranes for nanometer-scale mass fast transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bakajin, Olgica (San Leandro, CA); Holt, Jason (Berkeley, CA); Noy, Aleksandr (Belmont, CA); Park, Hyung Gyu (Oakland, CA)

    2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material were fabricated for fluid mechanics and mass transfer studies on the nanometer scale and commercial applications. Average pore size can be 2 nm to 20 nm, or seven nm or less, or two nanometers or less. The membrane can be free of large voids spanning the membrane such that transport of material such as gas or liquid occurs exclusively through the tubes. Fast fluid, vapor, and liquid transport are observed. Versatile micromachining methods can be used for membrane fabrication. A single chip can comprise multiple membranes. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  19. The Lattice Boltzmann Method applied to neutron transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erasmus, B.; Van Heerden, F. A. [South African Nuclear Energy Corporation - Necsa, Building P-1900, PO Box 582, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the applicability of the Lattice Boltzmann Method to neutron transport is investigated. One of the main features of the Lattice Boltzmann method is the simultaneous discretization of the phase space of the problem, whereby particles are restricted to move on a lattice. An iterative solution of the operator form of the neutron transport equation is presented here, with the first collision source as the starting point of the iteration scheme. A full description of the discretization scheme is given, along with the quadrature set used for the angular discretization. An angular refinement scheme is introduced to increase the angular coverage of the problem phase space and to mitigate lattice ray effects. The method is applied to a model problem to investigate its applicability to neutron transport and the results are compared to a reference solution calculated, using MCNP. (authors)

  20. MC++: A parallel, portable, Monte Carlo neutron transport code in C++

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.R.; Cummings, J.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nolen, S.D. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MC++ is an implicit multi-group Monte Carlo neutron transport code written in C++ and based on the Parallel Object-Oriented Methods and Applications (POOMA) class library. MC++ runs in parallel on and is portable to a wide variety of platforms, including MPPs, SMPs, and clusters of UNIX workstations. MC++ is being developed to provide transport capabilities to the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). It is also intended to form the basis of the first transport physics framework (TPF), which is a C++ class library containing appropriate abstractions, objects, and methods for the particle transport problem. The transport problem is briefly described, as well as the current status and algorithms in MC++ for solving the transport equation. The alpha version of the POOMA class library is also discussed, along with the implementation of the transport solution algorithms using POOMA. Finally, a simple test problem is defined and performance and physics results from this problem are discussed on a variety of platforms.

  1. ERTP: Energy-Efficient and Reliable Transport Protocol for Data Streaming in Wireless Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    ERTP: Energy-Efficient and Reliable Transport Protocol for Data Streaming in Wireless Sensor applications in Wireless Sensor Networks require re- liable and energy-efficient transport protocols [17] [18 of minutes or hours), energy-efficiency is. Long-term operation and reliable delivery of the sensed data

  2. OIM 413 Logistics and Transportation Class Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays: 9:30-10:45AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    OIM 413 ­ Logistics and Transportation Fall 2013 Class Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays: 9:30-10:45AM success and application is transportation and logistics. Indeed, the timely distribution of goods and logistics. The course covers some of the fundamental methodologies and analytical tools. The course consists

  3. Addressing model bias and uncertainty in three dimensional groundwater transport forecasts for a physical aquifer experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Addressing model bias and uncertainty in three dimensional groundwater transport forecasts, and D. M. Rizzo (2008), Addressing model bias and uncertainty in three dimensional groundwater transport. Introduction [2] Eigbe et al. [1998] provide an excellent review of groundwater applications of the linear

  4. Theory of asymmetry-induced transport in a non-neutral plasma D. L. Eggleston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Theory of asymmetry-induced transport in a non-neutral plasma D. L. Eggleston Occidental College. A theoretical model of such transport is presented which is appropriate for long, thin plasmas. The theory that move in resonance with the asymmetry. Possible applications of the theory to several experiments

  5. Application of Smart Card fare payment data to bus network planning in London, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seaborn, Catherine Whitney

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research contributes to an emerging body of literature on the application of smart card data to public transportation planning. It also addresses interchange planning, a key component of public transportation network ...

  6. Emergence of Straight-Line Trajectory in Cooperative Object Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudsang, Attawith

    was among a few earliest applications in robotics. A large number of industrial robots today are involved be accomplished by a single robot working in isolation. Obvious examples include transportation of large objects. Multiple robot coop- eration is therefore a natural choice for overcoming limited capabilities

  7. A Transportation Network Efficiency Measure that Captures Flows, Behavior,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Guire, and Winsten (1956), that electric power generation and distribution networks can be reformulated and solved Transportation Network Equilibrium Reformulation of Electric Power Supply Chain Networks Electric Power Supply with Applications to Network Component Importance Identification and Vulnerability Anna NagurneyAnna Nagurney Qiang

  8. A Survey on Trust Management for Intelligent Transportation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfson, Ouri E.

    A Survey on Trust Management for Intelligent Transportation System Shuo Ma, Ouri Wolfson Department@uic.edu ABSTRACT Trust management is a fundamental and critical aspect of any serious application in ITS. However, only a few studies have addressed this important problem. In this paper, we present a survey on trust

  9. A Fast Multigrid Algorithm for Isotropic Transport Problems I: Pure Scattering \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliveira, Suely

    geometry. These problems are important in many application such as nuclear reactor design, radiation techniques traditionally used in numerical transport theory (e.g., see Morel and Manteuffel [15]). Since

  10. Review of the facile (F/sub N/) method in particle transport theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, R.D.M.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The facile (F/sub N/) method for solving particle transport problems is reviewed. The fundamentals of the method are summarized, recent developments are discussed and several applications of the method are described in detail.

  11. Using Smart Card Fare Payment Data To Analyze Multi-Modal Public Transport Journeys in London

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seaborn, Catherine

    This paper contributes to the emerging literature on the application of smart card fare payment data to public transportation planning. The research objective is to identify and assess complete, multimodal journeys using ...

  12. New Multi-group Transport Neutronics (PHISICS) Capabilities for RELAP5-3D and its Application to Phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom; Cristian Rabiti; Andrea Alfonsi

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHISICS is a neutronics code system currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Its goal is to provide state of the art simulation capability to reactor designers. The different modules for PHISICS currently under development are a nodal and semi-structured transport core solver (INSTANT), a depletion module (MRTAU) and a cross section interpolation (MIXER) module. The INSTANT module is the most developed of the mentioned above. Basic functionalities are ready to use, but the code is still in continuous development to extend its capabilities. This paper reports on the effort of coupling the nodal kinetics code package PHISICS (INSTANT/MRTAU/MIXER) to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D, to enable full core and system modeling. This will enable the possibility to model coupled (thermal-hydraulics and neutronics) problems with more options for 3D neutron kinetics, compared to the existing diffusion theory neutron kinetics module in RELAP5-3D (NESTLE). In the second part of the paper, an overview of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW benchmark is given. This benchmark has been approved by the OECD, and is based on the General Atomics 350 MW Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR) design. The benchmark includes coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics exercises that require more capabilities than RELAP5-3D with NESTLE offers. Therefore, the MHTGR benchmark makes extensive use of the new PHISICS/RELAP5-3D coupling capabilities. The paper presents the preliminary results of the three steady state exercises specified in Phase I of the benchmark using PHISICS/RELAP5-3D.

  13. Transport Model with Quasipions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiong, L.; Ko, Che Ming; Koch, V.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the transport model that takes into account both nucleon-nucleon collisions and the nuclear mean-field po- tential (normally called the Ulasov-Uehling-Uhlenbeck or Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck model [3]) have been ex- tended to include the pion degree... equation, the pion collision term is obtained from the imaginary part of its self-energy. In nuclear medium, the pion self-energy is modified by the strong p-wave pion- nucleon interaction. This not only afFects the production and absorption of the pion...

  14. Transportation Politics and Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003ToolsearchTransportation Equipment

  15. Sandia Energy - Transportation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home DistributionTransportation Safety Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle

  16. Natural Gas Transportation Resiliency

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDyn NOPRNancyNationalNatural GasImports byTransportation

  17. Transportation Storage Interface

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergyTransportation Work Package Reports | DepartmentAT THE

  18. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartment of EnergyofPROTECTING ENERGYGrid Study U.S.TRANSPORTATION

  19. Transportation Statistics Annual Report 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenn, M.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the fourth Transportation Statistics Annual Report (TSAR) prepared by the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) for the President and Congress. As in previous years, it reports on the state of U.S. transportation system at two levels. First, in Part I, it provides a statistical and interpretive survey of the system—its physical characteristics, its economic attributes, aspects of its use and performance, and the scale and severity of unintended consequences of transportation, such as fatalities and injuries, oil import dependency, and environment impacts. Part I also explores the state of transportation statistics, and new needs of the rapidly changing world of transportation. Second, Part II of the report, as in prior years, explores in detail the performance of the U.S. transportation system from the perspective of desired social outcomes or strategic goals. This year, the performance aspect of transportation chosen for thematic treatment is “Mobility and Access,” which complements past TSAR theme sections on “The Economic Performance of Transportation” (1995) and “Transportation and the Environment” (1996). Mobility and access are at the heart of the transportation system’s performance from the user’s perspective. In what ways and to what extent does the geographic freedom provided by transportation enhance personal fulfillment of the nation’s residents and contribute to economic advancement of people and businesses? This broad question underlies many of the topics examined in Part II: What is the current level of personal mobility in the United States, and how does it vary by sex, age, income level, urban or rural location, and over time? What factors explain variations? Has transportation helped improve people’s access to work, shopping, recreational facilities, and medical services, and in what ways and in what locations? How have barriers, such as age, disabilities, or lack of an automobile, affected these accessibility patterns? How are commodity flows and transportation services responding to global competition, deregulation, economic restructuring, and new information technologies? How do U.S. patterns of personal mobility and freight movement compare with other advanced industrialized countries, formerly centrally planned economies, and major newly industrializing countries? Finally, how is the rapid adoption of new information technologies influencing the patterns of transportation demand and the supply of new transportation services? Indeed, how are information technologies affecting the nature and organization of transportation services used by individuals and firms?

  20. Nanoengineered membranes for controlled transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; McKnight, Timothy E. (Greenback, TN) [Greenback, TN; Melechko, Anatoli V. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Lowndes, Douglas H. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael A. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Merkulov, Vladimir I. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A nanoengineered membrane for controlling material transport (e.g., molecular transport) is disclosed. The membrane includes a substrate, a cover definining a material transport channel between the substrate and the cover, and a plurality of fibers positioned in the channel and connected to an extending away from a surface of the substrate. The fibers are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the substrate, and have a width of 100 nanometers or less. The diffusion limits for material transport are controlled by the separation of the fibers. In one embodiment, chemical derivitization of carbon fibers may be undertaken to further affect the diffusion limits or affect selective permeability or facilitated transport. For example, a coating can be applied to at least a portion of the fibers. In another embodiment, individually addressable carbon nanofibers can be integrated with the membrane to provide an electrical driving force for material transport.

  1. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

    2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quarter has been divided between running experiments and the installation of the drill-pipe rotation system. In addition, valves and piping were relocated, and three viewports were installed. Detailed design work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. Design of the first prototype version of a Foam Generator has been finalized, and fabrication is underway. This will be used to determine the relationship between surface roughness and ''slip'' of foams at solid boundaries. Additional cups and rotors are being machined with different surface roughness. Some experiments on cuttings transport with aerated fluids have been conducted at EPET. Theoretical modeling of cuttings transport with aerated fluids is proceeding. The development of theoretical models to predict frictional pressure losses of flowing foam is in progress. The new board design for instrumentation to measure cuttings concentration is now functioning with an acceptable noise level. The ultrasonic sensors are stable up to 190 F. Static tests with sand in an annulus indicate that the system is able to distinguish between different sand concentrations. Viscometer tests with foam, generated by the Dynamic Test Facility (DTF), are continuing.

  2. Spent fuel integrity during transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Funk, C.W.; Jacobson, L.D.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conditions of recent shipments of light water reactor spent fuel were surveyed. The radioactivity level of cask coolant was examined in an attempt to find the effects of transportation on LWR fuel assemblies. Discussion included potential cladding integrity loss mechanisms, canning requirements, changes of radioactivity levels, and comparison of transportation in wet or dry media. Although integrity loss or degradation has not been identified, radioactivity levels usually increase during transportation, especially for leaking assemblies.

  3. Anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations for Au + Au at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV in a multiphase transport model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Ma; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma

    2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Anisotropic flow coefficients and their fluctuations are investigated for Au+Au collisions at center of mass energy $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV by using a multi-phase transport model with string melting scenario. Experimental results of azimuthal anisotropies by means of the two- and four-particle cumulants are generally well reproduced by the model including both parton cascade and hadronic rescatterings. Event-by-event treatments of the harmonic flow coefficients $v_n$ (for n = 2, 3 and 4) are performed, in which event distributions of $v_n$ for different orders are consistent with Gaussian shapes over all centrality bins. Systematic studies on centrality, transverse momentum ($p_{T}$) and pseudo-rapidity ($\\eta$) dependencies of anisotropic flows and quantitative estimations of the flow fluctuations are presented. The $p_{T}$ and $\\eta$ dependencies of absolute fluctuations for both $v_2$ and $v_3$ follow similar trends as their flow coefficients. Relative fluctuation of triangular flow $v_3$ is slightly centrality-dependent, which is quite different from that of elliptic flow $v_2$. It is observed that parton cascade has a large effect on the flow fluctuations, but hadronic scatterings make little contribution to the flow fluctuations, which indicates flow fluctuations are mainly modified during partonic evolution stage.

  4. Modeling Radionuclide Transport in Clays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, L.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclide Transport in Clays May 2012 Zheng, L. , J.a single sample of Opalinus Clay. Geochimica et Cosmochimicaadsorption onto kaolinite based clay minerals using FITEQL

  5. Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Results of two Reports from the National Research Council...

  6. Inverse Problems in Transport Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The inverse scattering problem for (2.1) is the following: Does S determine ...... J. Voigt, Spectral properties of the neutron transport equation, J. Math. Anal. Appl.

  7. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thereby contributing to energy security. Most also reducesuch as improved energy security, many transport GHGincluding energy cost savings, oil security, and pollution

  8. OVERVIEW OF PROPOSED TRANSPORTATION ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ......................................................................................................................12 California Freight Energy Demand Model..............................................................................................13 California Transit Energy Demand ModelOVERVIEW OF PROPOSED TRANSPORTATION ENERGY ANALYSES FOR THE 2007 INTEGRATED ENERGY POLICY REPORT

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Transportation Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News, News & Events, Research & Capabilities, Sensors & Optical Diagnostics, Transportation Energy Allowing single-shot measurements of all major species in nonsooting flames...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Transportation Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities, News, News & Events, Research & Capabilities, Systems Analysis, Transportation Energy By combining advanced theory and high-fidelity large eddy simulation,...

  11. Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transportation of hazardous wastes into or through the State of Connecticut requires a permit. Some exceptions apply. The regulations provide information about obtaining permits and other permit...

  12. Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy Light Duty Vehicle...

  13. Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 2 Climate and Transportation Solutions Chapter 3:Gas Emissions in the Transportation Sector by John Conti,Chase, and John Maples Transportation is the single largest

  14. Infrared spectroscopic studies on the photocatalytic hydrogenation of norbornadiene by group 6 metal carbonyls. 1. The role of H sub 2 and the characterization of nonclassical dihydrogen complexes, (. eta. sup 4 -norbornadiene)M(CO) sub 3 (. eta. sup 2 -H sub 2 )

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, S.A.; Hodges, P.M.; Poliakoff, M.; Turner, J.J. (Univ. of Nottingham (England)); Grevels, F. (Max Planck Institute fuer Strahlenchemie, Muelheim (West Germany))

    1990-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the IR characterization of nonclassical H{sub 2} complexes where ethene or norbornadiene (NBD) is coordinated to the same d{sup 6} metal center as the {sup eta}{sup 2}-H{sub 2} and discusses the role of such complexes in the photocatalytic hydrogenation of NBD by group 6 metal carbonyl compounds. The dihydrogen complexes are generated in solution by the photolysis of alkene and diene carbonyl complexes in the presence of an overpressure of H{sub 2} or D{sub 2}. Photolysis of trans-(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}M(CO){sub 4} (M = Cr, Mo, and W) (1) in liquefied xenon (LXe) doped with H{sub 2} or D{sub 2} at {minus}90{degree}C leads to the formation of mer-(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}M(CO){sub 3}(H{sub 2}) (2) (with trans C{sub 2}H{sub 4} groups) and cis-(C{sub 2}H{sub 4})M(CO){sub 4}(H{sub 2}) (3). These species have been characterized by FTIR, and the v(H-H) IR band of the coordinated {eta}{sup 2}-H{sub 2} has been detected for the W complexes. All of these compounds react thermally with N{sub 2} to yield the corresponding dinitrogen complexes. Fast (microsecond) time-resolved IR (TRIR) is used to identify fac- and mer-(NBD)M(CO){sub 3}(n-hept) as the primary photoproducts of the photolysis of (NBD)M(CO){sub 4} (M = Cr, Mo, and W) in n-heptane at room temperature. Detailed studies with Mo show that these intermediates react stereospecifically with N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} to give fac- and mer-(NBD)Mo(CO){sub 3}(X{sub 2}X{sub 2} - N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}). These species can also be generated in LXe by photolysis of either (NBD)Mo(CO){sub 4} or mer-NBD(Mo(CO){sub 3}(C{sub 2}H{sub 4})). In addition, photolysis of (NBD)M(CO){sub 4} (M = Mo or W) in LXe yields products apparently containing {eta}{sup 2}-NBD, which are not observed in the photolysis at room temperature, probably as a result of differences in temperature and photolysis sources.

  15. Assessing the transport and fate of bioengineered microorganisms in the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the methods currently available for quantifying the transport and fate of microbes in atmospheric and aqueous media and assess their adequacy for purposes of risk assessment. We review the literature on transport and fate of microorganisms, including studies of: (1) pathways of migration, (2) the survival of microorganisms during transport and fate. In addition, we review the transport and fate models that have been used in environmental risk assessments for radionuclides and toxic chemicals and evaluate their applicability to the problem of assessing environmental risks of bioengineered microorganisms.

  16. Innovative technology summary report: Transportable vitrification system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the end of the cold war, many of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) major nuclear weapons facilities refocused their efforts on finding technically sound, economic, regulatory compliant, and stakeholder acceptable treatment solutions for the legacy of mixed wastes they had produced. In particular, an advanced stabilization process that could effectively treat the large volumes of settling pond and treatment sludges was needed. Based on this need, DOE and its contractors initiated in 1993 the EM-50 sponsored development effort required to produce a deployable mixed waste vitrification system. As a consequence, the Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) effort was undertaken with the primary requirement to develop and demonstrate the technology and associated facility to effectively vitrify, for compliant disposal, the applicable mixed waste sludges and solids across the various DOE complex sites. After 4 years of development testing with both crucible and pilot-scale melters, the TVS facility was constructed by Envitco, evaluated and demonstrated with surrogates, and then successfully transported to the ORNL ETTP site and demonstrated with actual mixed wastes in the fall of 1997. This paper describes the technology, its performance, the technology applicability and alternatives, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

  17. A Microfluidic Pore Network Approach to Investigate Water Transport in Fuel Cell Porous Transport Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazylak, A; Markicevic, B; Sinton, D; Djilali, N

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pore network modelling has traditionally been used to study displacement processes in idealized porous media related to geological flows, with applications ranging from groundwater hydrology to enhanced oil recovery. Very recently, pore network modelling has been applied to model the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Discrete pore network models have the potential to elucidate transport phenomena in the GDL with high computational efficiency, in contrast to continuum or molecular dynamics modelling that require extensive computational resources. However, the challenge in studying the GDL with pore network modelling lies in defining the network parameters that accurately describe the porous media as well as the conditions of fluid invasion that represent realistic transport processes. In this work, we discuss the first stage of developing and validating a GDL-representative pore network model. We begin with a two-dimensional pore network model with a single mobile pha...

  18. Ionic (Proton) Transport Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the syngas is (application specific). Tolerance to contaminants 200 scfh/ft2 (100 ml/cm2/m) upper limit/Semi-Central Systems Coal is the cheapest fuel, but requires the greatest pre-conditioning Clean-up of syngas requires

  19. Transportation System Concept of Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Slater-Thompson

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, authorized the DOE to develop and manage a Federal system for the disposal of SNF and HLW. OCRWM was created to manage acceptance and disposal of SNF and HLW in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. This responsibility includes managing the transportation of SNF and HLW from origin sites to the Repository for disposal. The Transportation System Concept of Operations is the core high-level OCRWM document written to describe the Transportation System integrated design and present the vision, mission, and goals for Transportation System operations. By defining the functions, processes, and critical interfaces of this system early in the system development phase, programmatic risks are minimized, system costs are contained, and system operations are better managed, safer, and more secure. This document also facilitates discussions and understanding among parties responsible for the design, development, and operation of the Transportation System. Such understanding is important for the timely development of system requirements and identification of system interfaces. Information provided in the Transportation System Concept of Operations includes: the functions and key components of the Transportation System; system component interactions; flows of information within the system; the general operating sequences; and the internal and external factors affecting transportation operations. The Transportation System Concept of Operations reflects OCRWM's overall waste management system policies and mission objectives, and as such provides a description of the preferred state of system operation. The description of general Transportation System operating functions in the Transportation System Concept of Operations is the first step in the OCRWM systems engineering process, establishing the starting point for the lower level descriptions. of subsystems and components, and the Transportation System Requirements Document. Other program and system documents, plans, instructions, and detailed designs will be consistent with and informed by the Transportation System Concept of Operations. The Transportation System Concept of Operations is a living document, enduring throughout the OCRWM systems engineering lifecycle. It will undergo formal approval and controlled revisions as appropriate while the Transportation System matures. Revisions will take into account new policy decisions, new information available through system modeling, engineering investigations, technical analyses and tests, and the introduction of new technologies that can demonstrably improve system performance.

  20. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment are begun. The studies are to be in parallel with LSFCO composition to characterize the segregation of cations and slow crack growth in environmental conditions. La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} has also been characterized for paramagnetic ordering at room temperature and the evolution of magnetic moments as a function of temperature are investigated. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport.