National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for transportation applications eta

  1. Non-Tracial Free Transport and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Brent Andrew

    2015-01-01

    tracial transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .the transport element . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Free Transport . . . . . . . . . . . .

  2. IEEE-ETA KAPPA NU New Member Application Students and Graduate Students pay a one-time fee of US$60.00 to be inducted into IEEE-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobelman, Gerald E.

    IEEE-ETA KAPPA NU New Member Application Students and Graduate Students pay a one-time fee of US$60.00 to be inducted into IEEE- HKN. This includes a free one-year IEEE Student Membership for the year in which are required to pay their annual IEEE dues to remain active IEEE-HKN Members. Please fill out the information

  3. APPLICATIONS OF THE INTERNET IN THE TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-3 History of the InternetAPPLICATIONS OF THE INTERNET IN THE TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY by Jennifer Messick Professional The Internet is becoming an extremely popular resource in America and the transportation engineering profession

  4. Wireless Magnetic Sensor Applications in Transportation Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Rene Omar

    2012-01-01

    of wireless magnetic sensors in Intelligent Trans- portationof wireless magnetic sensors in Intelligent Transportationmagnetic sensors for different Intelligent Transportation

  5. Eta Kappa Nu 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Output from the Eta Model was used to examine the development of a cutoff cyclone, a low-level jet (LLJ), cyclogenesis, and the interaction of these phenomena during the period 16-18 October 1994. Formation of an upper-level low followed descent...

  6. Portal: Applications of New Technology to Transportation Data Archiving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    + Portal: Applications of New Technology to Transportation Data Archiving Kristin Tufte & the Portal Team NATMEC, July 1, 2014, Chicago, IL #12;+ Who is Kristin? ! 20 years Data Management System (1996-2014) ! S-Store ­ Streams + OLTP (2013-...) ! 10 years Transportation Data Management ! Portal

  7. A Study of Transport Protocols for Wide Area Scientific Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vishal Misra

    2011-03-01

    This is the final project report of award "A Study of Transport Protocols for Wide Area Scientific Applications", given by DOE in 2003 to Vishal Misra at Columbia University.

  8. Form factors of B, Bs -> eta, eta' and D, Ds -> eta, eta' transitions from QCD light-cone sum rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duplancic, Goran

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of the QCD light-cone sum rules (LCSRs) we present the analysis of all $B, B_{s}\\to \\eta^{(\\prime)}$ and $D, D_{s}\\to \\eta^{(\\prime)}$ form factors ($f^+, f^0$ and $f^T$) by including $m_{\\eta^{(\\prime)}}^2$ corrections in the leading (up to the twist-four) and next-to-leading order (up to the twist-three) in QCD, and two-gluon contributions to the form factors at the leading twist. The SU(3)-flavour breaking corrections and the axial anomaly contributions to the distribution amplitudes are also consistently taken into account. The complete results for the $f^0$ and $f^T$ form factors of $B,B_s \\to \\eta^{(\\prime)}$ and $D, D_{s} \\to \\eta^{(\\prime)}$ relevant for processes like $B \\to \\eta^{(\\prime)} \\tau \

  9. DS+ DECAYS TO ETA-PI+ AND ETA'PI+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.; Ro, S.

    1992-03-01

    Using the CLEO II detector, we have accurately measured D(s) decay branching ratios relative to the phi-pi+ mode for the eta-pi+ and eta'pi+ states, for which there are conflicting claims; our results are 0.54 +/- 0.09 +/- 0.06 and 1.20 +/- 0...

  10. Two-body B meson decays to eta and eta ': Observation of B ->eta ' K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

    1998-04-01

    In a sample of 6.6 x 10(6) produced B mesons we have observed decays B --> eta'K, with branching fractions B(B+ --> eta'K+)= (6.5(-1.4)(+1.5) +/- 0.9) X 10(-5) and B(B-0 --> eta'K-0) = (4.7(-2.0)(+2.7) +/- 0.9) X 10(-5). We have searched...

  11. Wireless Magnetic Sensor Applications in Transportation Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Rene Omar

    2012-01-01

    2.2 Wireless Magnetic Sensors Vehicle Detection2.3 Vehicle Re-Identification Using Wireless MagneticPerformance iv 6 Wireless Magnetic Sensor Applications for

  12. Fuel cell system for transportation applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL); Ahmed, Shabbir (Evanston, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Myles, Kevin M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1993-01-01

    A propulsion system for a vehicle having pairs of front and rear wheels and a fuel tank. An electrically driven motor having an output shaft operatively connected to at least one of said pair of wheels is connected to a fuel cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by an electrolyte for producing dc power to operate the motor. A partial oxidation reformer is connected both to the fuel tank and to the fuel cell receives hydrogen-containing fuel from the fuel tank and water and air and for partially oxidizing and reforming the fuel with water and air in the presence of an oxidizing catalyst and a reforming catalyst to produce a hydrogen-containing gas. The hydrogen-containing gas is sent from the partial oxidation reformer to the fuel cell negative electrode while air is transported to the fuel cell positive electrode to produce dc power for operating the electric motor.

  13. Fuel cell system for transportation applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

    1993-09-28

    A propulsion system is described for a vehicle having pairs of front and rear wheels and a fuel tank. An electrically driven motor having an output shaft operatively connected to at least one of said pair of wheels is connected to a fuel cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by an electrolyte for producing dc power to operate the motor. A partial oxidation reformer is connected both to the fuel tank and to the fuel cell and receives hydrogen-containing fuel from the fuel tank and uses water and air for partially oxidizing and reforming the fuel in the presence of an oxidizing catalyst and a reforming catalyst to produce a hydrogen-containing gas. The hydrogen-containing gas is sent from the partial oxidation reformer to the fuel cell negative electrode while air is transported to the fuel cell positive electrode to produce dc power for operating the electric motor. 3 figures.

  14. Application of the smart portal in transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercel, S.W.; Baylor, V.M.; Dress, W.B.; Hickerson, T.W.; Jatko, W.B.; Labaj, L.E.; Muhs, J.D.; Pack, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    Under a program sponsored by the Department of Energy, the Oak Ridge complex is developed a ``Portal-of-the-Future``, or ``smart portal``. This is a security portal for vehicular traffic which is intended to quickly detect explosives, hidden passengers, etc. It uses several technologies, including microwaves, weigh-in-motion, digital image processing, and electroacoustic wavelet-based heartbeat detection. A novel component of particular interest is the Enclosed Space Detection System (ESDS), which detects the presence of persons hiding in a vehicle. The system operates by detecting the presence of a human ballistocardiographic signature. Each time the heart beats, it generates a small but measurable shock wave that propagates through the body. The wave, whose graph is called a ballistocardiogram, is the mechanical analog of the electrocardiogram, which is routinely used for medical diagnosis. The wave is, in turn, coupled to any surface or object with which the body is in contact. If the body is located in an enclosed space, this will result in a measurable deflection of the surface of the enclosure. Independent testing has shown ESDS to be highly reliable. The technologies used in the smart portal operate in real time and allow vehicles to be checked through the portal in much less time than would be required for human inspection. Although not originally developed for commercial transportation, the smart portal has the potential to solve several transportation problems. It could relieve congestion at international highway border crossings by reducing the time required to inspect each vehicle while increasing the level of security. It can reduce highway congestion at the entrance of secure facilities such as prisons. Also, it could provide security at intermodal transfer points, such as airport parking lots and car ferry terminals.

  15. Enhancing the stability of kinesin motors for microscale transport applications{

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hancock, William O.

    Enhancing the stability of kinesin motors for microscale transport applications{ Maruti Uppalapati714989a Biomolecular motors, such as kinesins, have great potential for micro-actuation and micro life of these motor proteins and their associated protein filaments is a barrier

  16. Polymer Nanofibers and Nanotubes: Charge Transport and Device Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey N. Aleshin

    2007-01-31

    A critical analysis of recent advances in synthesis and electrical characterization of nanofibers and nanotubes made of different conjugated polymers is presented. The applicability of various theoretical models is considered in order to explain results on transport in conducting polymer nanofibers and nanotubes. The relationship between these results and the one-dimensional (1D) nature of the conjugated polymers is discussed in light of theories for tunneling in 1D conductors (e.g. Luttinger liquid, Wigner crystal). The prospects for nanoelectronic applications of polymer fibers and tubes as wires, nanoscale field-effect transistors (nanoFETs), and in other applications are analyzed.

  17. Diffusion in random velocity fields with applications to contaminant transport in groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suciu, Nicolae

    Diffusion in random velocity fields with applications to contaminant transport in groundwater is the mathematical object underlying cur- rently used stochastic models of transport in groundwater. The essential: Groundwater, Transport processes, Ergodicity, Random fields, Random walk, PDF methods 1. Introduction

  18. Eta-mesic nuclei: past, present, future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q. Haider; L. C. Liu

    2015-09-18

    Eta-mesic nucleus or the quasibound nuclear state of an eta ($\\eta$) meson in a nucleus is caused by strong-interaction force alone. This new type of nuclear species, which extends the landscape of nuclear physics, has been extensively studied since its prediction in 1986. In this paper, we review and analyze in great detail the models of the fundamental $\\eta$--nucleon interaction leading to the formation of an $\\eta$--mesic nucleus, the methods used in calculating the properties of a bound $\\eta$, and the approaches employed in the interpretation of the pertinent experimental data. In view of the successful observation of the $\\eta$--mesic nucleus $^{25}$Mg$_{\\eta}$ and other promising experimental results, future direction in searching for more $\\eta$--mesic nuclei is suggested.

  19. Eta-mesic nuclei: past, present, future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haider, Q

    2015-01-01

    Eta-mesic nucleus or the quasibound nuclear state of an eta ($\\eta$) meson in a nucleus is caused by strong-interaction force alone. This new type of nuclear species, which extends the landscape of nuclear physics, has been extensively studied since its prediction in 1986. In this paper, we review and analyze in great detail the models of the fundamental $\\eta$--nucleon interaction leading to the formation of an $\\eta$--mesic nucleus, the methods used in calculating the properties of a bound $\\eta$, and the approaches employed in the interpretation of the pertinent experimental data. In view of the successful observation of the $\\eta$--mesic nucleus $^{25}$Mg$_{\\eta}$ and other promising experimental results, future direction in searching for more $\\eta$--mesic nuclei is suggested.

  20. Experiments on eta-meson production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Following a review of some highlights of eta-meson characteristics, the status of eta-meson production experiments is reviewed. The physics motivations and first results of two LAMPF experiments on (..pi..,eta) reactions are discussed. Possible future experiments are also discussed. 42 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Framework Application for Core Edge Transport Simulation (FACETS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Pigarov, Alexander

    2011-10-15

    The FACETS (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) project of Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program was aimed at providing a high-fidelity whole-tokamak modeling for the U.S. magnetic fusion energy program and ITER through coupling separate components for each of the core region, edge region, and wall, with realistic plasma particles and power sources and turbulent transport simulation. The project also aimed at developing advanced numerical algorithms, efficient implicit coupling methods, and software tools utilizing the leadership class computing facilities under Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR). The FACETS project was conducted by a multi-discipline, multi-institutional teams, the Lead PI was J.R. Cary (Tech-X Corp.). In the FACETS project, the Applied Plasma Theory Group at the MAE Department of UCSD developed the Wall and Plasma-Surface Interaction (WALLPSI) module, performed its validation against experimental data, and integrated it into the developed framework. WALLPSI is a one-dimensional, coarse grained, reaction/advection/diffusion code applied to each material boundary cell in the common modeling domain for a tokamak. It incorporates an advanced model for plasma particle transport and retention in the solid matter of plasma facing components, simulation of plasma heat power load handling, calculation of erosion/deposition, and simulation of synergistic effects in strong plasma-wall coupling.

  2. Advanced fuel cells for transportation applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-10

    This Research and Development (R and D) contract was directed at developing an advanced technology compressor/expander for supplying compressed air to Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells in transportation applications. The objective of this project was to develop a low-cost high-efficiency long-life lubrication-free integrated compressor/expander utilizing scroll technology. The goal of this compressor/expander was to be capable of providing compressed air over the flow and pressure ranges required for the operation of 50 kW PEM fuel cells in transportation applications. The desired ranges of flow, pressure, and other performance parameters were outlined in a set of guidelines provided by DOE. The project consisted of the design, fabrication, and test of a prototype compressor/expander module. The scroll CEM development program summarized in this report has been very successful, demonstrating that scroll technology is a leading candidate for automotive fuel cell compressor/expanders. The objectives of the program are: develop an integrated scroll CEM; demonstrate efficiency and capacity goals; demonstrate manufacturability and cost goals; and evaluate operating envelope. In summary, while the scroll CEM program did not demonstrate a level of performance as high as the DOE guidelines in all cases, it did meet the overriding objectives of the program. A fully-integrated, low-cost CEM was developed that demonstrated high efficiency and reliable operation throughout the test program. 26 figs., 13 tabs.

  3. Eta Car and other LBVs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. F. Corcoran

    2007-02-17

    Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) are believed to be evolved, extremely massive stars close to the Eddington Limit and hence prone to bouts of large-scale, unstable mass loss. I discuss current understanding of the evolutionary state of these objects, the role duplicity may play and known physical characteristics of these stars using the X-ray luminous LBVs Eta Carinae and HD 5980 as test cases.

  4. Measurement of the Ds(+) -> eta l(+)nu and Ds(+) ? eta'l(+)nu branching ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

    1995-11-01

    Using the CLEO II detector we measure B(D-s(+) --> eta e(+)nu)/B(D-s(+) --> phi e(+)nu) = 1.24 +/- 0.12 +/- 0.15, B(D-s(+) --> eta'e(+)nu)/B(D-s(+) --> phi e(+)nu) = 0.43 +/- 0.11 +/- 0.07, and B(D-s(+) --> eta'e(+)nu)/B(D-s(+) --> eta e(+)nu) = 0...

  5. Is the $\\eta$ Meson a Goldstone Boson?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchbach, M

    1996-01-01

    The decoupling of the $\\eta$ meson from the nucleon, as recently deduced from analyzing $\\bar p p$ collisions and $\\eta$ photoproduction off the proton at threshold is shown to provide an argument against the Goldstone boson nature of the $\\eta $ meson. This argument depends neither on the mass of the $\\eta$ meson nor on its mixing to the $\\eta'$ meson but rather concerns the structure of the strong isoscalar axial vector current. In fact, a vanishing the hypercharge nucleon axial vector current. No partial conservation of the latter can be achieved therefore. This invalidates the Goldberger-Treiman type relation for the $\\eta N$ coupling constant within the context of the three-flavor quark model. We demonstrate that the suppressed $\\eta N$ coupling constant can be understood if the hypercharge and the singlet axial vector currents of the quark model are ideally mixed, as are those of the electroweak gauge theory. If so, the current algebra statement on the equal structure of the charged strong and weak curr...

  6. Phenomenology of some rare and forbidden. eta. -decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herczeg, P.

    1990-01-01

    We discuss the contribution from possible new physics to the decays {eta} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}, {eta} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, {eta} {yields} {mu}e and {eta} {pi}{mu}e, and assess the sensitivities required for experimental studies of these decays to extend our knowledge about the new interactions. 61 refs.

  7. Thermal Transport in Porous Media with Application to Fuel Cell Diffusion Media and Metal Foams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Thermal Transport in Porous Media with Application to Fuel Cell Diffusion Media and Metal Foams to Fuel Cell Diffusion Media and Metal Foams by Ehsan Sadeghi B.Sc., Sharif University of Technology, Iran of thermal transport phenomena in fuel cell gas diffusion layers (GDLs) and metal foams and describes new

  8. THERMAL EFFECTS ON DROPLET TRANSPORT IN DIGITIAL MICROFLUIDICS WITH APPLICATIONS TO CHIP COOLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    THERMAL EFFECTS ON DROPLET TRANSPORT IN DIGITIAL MICROFLUIDICS WITH APPLICATIONS TO CHIP COOLING, on a platform we call "digital microfluidics," where nanoliter-sized discrete liquid droplets immersed in oil-dependent system parameters on droplet transport in this digital microfluidic platform. We demonstrate

  9. Integration Of Locational Decisions with the Household Activity Pattern Problem and Its Applications in Transportation Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jee E

    2013-01-01

    hazardous materials transportation: risk analysis, routing/scheduling and facility location,locations, several papers present applications, such as medicine (Or and Pierskalla, 1979; Chan et al, 2001), waste/hazardous

  10. Integration of Locational Decisions with the Household Activity Pattern Problem and Its Applications in Transportation Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jee Eun

    2013-01-01

    hazardous materials transportation: risk analysis, routing/scheduling and facility location,locations, several papers present applications, such as medicine (Or and Pierskalla, 1979; Chan et al, 2001), waste/hazardous

  11. An Eta-model output study of frontogenesis conditions favoring development of a troposphere-spanning front 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Jeffrey Paul

    1999-01-01

    the formation of a troposphere spanning front, tilting, confluent and shear deformation terms of the Petterssen and other applicable frontogenesis equations were evaluated utilizing numerical model output of the Eta model. The outcome of this study indicates...

  12. Application of multidimensional analytical transport models to coal-tar derivatives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sim, Youn

    1992-01-01

    APPLICATION OF MULTIDIMENSIONAL ANALYTICAL TRANSPORT MODELS TO COAL-TAR DERIVATIVES A Thesis by YOUN SIM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1992 Major Subject: Geology APPLICATION OF MULTIDIMENSIONAL ANALYTICAL TRANSPORT MODELS TO COAL-TAR DERIVATIVES A Thesis by YOUN SIM Approved as to style and content by: Patrick A. Domenico (Chair of Committee) N man...

  13. Production and decay of eta-mesic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. I. L'vov

    1998-09-17

    Using the Green function method, binding effects on produced eta-mesons in the two-stage reaction \\gamma + A \\to N + \\eta + (A-1) \\to N + (\\pi N) + (A-2) are studied. The energy spectrum of the correlated pi-N pairs which arise from decays of etas inside the nucleus is strongly affected by an attractive eta-nucleus optical potential. Its resonant behavior gives a clear signal of formating intermediate eta-mesic nuclei.

  14. A New Algorithm for Supernova Neutrino Transport and Some Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Burrows; T. Young; P. A. Pinto; R. Eastman; T. Thompson

    2000-03-27

    We have developed an implicit, multi-group, time-dependent, spherical neutrino transport code based on the Feautrier variables, the tangent-ray method, and accelerated ${\\bf \\Lambda}$ iteration. The code achieves high angular resolution, is good to O($v/c$), is equivalent to a Boltzmann solver (without gravitational redshifts), and solves the transport equation at all optical depths with precision. In this paper, we present our formulation of the relevant numerics and microphysics and explore protoneutron star atmospheres for snapshot post-bounce models. Our major focus is on spectra, neutrino-matter heating rates, Eddington factors, angular distributions, and phase-space occupancies. In addition, we investigate the influence on neutrino spectra and heating of final-state electron blocking, stimulated absorption, velocity terms in the transport equation, neutrino-nucleon scattering asymmetry, and weak magnetism and recoil effects. Furthermore, we compare the emergent spectra and heating rates obtained using full transport with those obtained using representative flux-limited transport formulations to gauge their accuracy and viability. Finally, we derive useful formulae for the neutrino source strength due to nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung and determine bremsstrahlung's influence on the emergent $\

  15. FACETS: Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -institutional main project: Tech-X (Physics, CS/AM); LLNL (Physics, CS/AM); PPPL (Physics); ANL (CS/AM); UCSD (Physics); CSU (AM); ORNL (CS, perf); ParaTools (CS, perf) · Appended SAP: GA, ORNL · Advisory: Columbia transitions · Core is a collisionless, 1D transport system with local, only-cross-surface fluxes · Edge

  16. DS+ DECAYS TO ETA-RHO+, ETA'RHO+, AND PHI-RHO+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.; Ro, S.

    1992-03-01

    We have observed the previously unseen eta-rho+ and eta'rho+ decay modes of the D(s)+, and measured branching ratios relative to the phi-pi+ mode of 2.86 +/- 0.38(-0.38)+0.36 and 3.44 +/-0.62(-0.46)+0.44, respectively. In addition, the relative...

  17. Multimeson production in pp interactions as a background for eta and eta' decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kup??; P. Moskal; M. Zieli?ski

    2008-03-18

    Multimeson production in pp interactions comprises important background for eta, omega and eta' mesons production experiments and for the studies of their decays planned with WASA detector at COSY. The available information about the reactions is summarized and the need for efforts to describe the processes is stressed.

  18. Effect of $\\eta$--$\\eta'$ mixing on $D \\to PV$ decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Bhubanjyoti

    2010-01-01

    Charmed meson decays to a light pseudoscalar ($P$) and light vector ($V$) meson are analyzed taking account of $\\eta$--$\\eta'$ mixing. A frequently-used octet-singlet mixing angle of $19.5^\\circ$ is compared with a value of $11.7^\\circ$ favored by a recent analysis of $D \\to PP$ decays.

  19. Moment transport equations and their application to the perturbed universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    There are many inflationary models that allow the formation of the large-scale structure of the observable universe. The non-gaussianity parameter $f_{NL}$ is a useful tool to discriminate among these cosmological models when comparing the theoretical predictions with the satellite survey results like those from WMAP and Planck. The goal of this proceeding contribution is to review the moment transport equations methodology and the subsequent calculation of the $f_{NL}$ parameter.

  20. Comparison of CNG and LNG technologies for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinor, J.E. Consultants, Inc., Niwot, CO )

    1992-01-01

    This report provides a head-to-head comparison of compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) supplied to heavy-duty vehicles. The comparison includes an assessment of the overall efficiency of the fuel delivery system, the cost of the fuel supply system, the efficiency of use in heavy-duty vehicles, and the environmental impact of each technology. The report concludes that there are applications in which CNG will have the advantage, and applications in which LNG will be preferred.

  1. THE ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES ACCEPTANCE (ETA) PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christina B. Behr-Andres

    2001-10-01

    The objective of the Environmental Technologies Acceptance (ETA) Program at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is to advance the development, commercial acceptance, and timely deployment of selected private sector technologies for the cleanup of sites in the nuclear defense complex as well as the greater market. As a result of contract changes approved by National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) representatives to incorporate activities previously conducted under another NETL agreement, there are now an additional task and an expansion of activities within the stated scope of work of the ETA program. As shown in Table 1, this cooperative agreement, funded by NETL (No. DE-FC26-00NT40840), consists of four tasks: Technology Selection, Technology Development, Technology Verification, and System Engineering. As currently conceived, ETA will address the needs of as many technologies as appropriate under its current 3-year term. There are currently four technical subtasks: Long-Term Stewardship Initiative at the Mound Plant Site; Photocatalysis of Mercury-Contaminated Water; Subcritical Water Treatment of PCB and Metal-Contaminated Paint Waste; and Vegetative Covers for Low-Level Waste Repositories. This report covers activities during the second six months of the three-year ETA program.

  2. Search for rare and forbidden eta ' decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, X.

    2000-01-01

    We have searched for rare and forbidden decays of the eta' meson in hadronic events at the CLEO II detector. The search is conducted on 4.80 fb(-1) of e(+)e(-) collisions at 10.6 GeV center-of-mass energy at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. We...

  3. A renewed look at eta' in medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youngshin Kwon; Su Houng Lee; Kenji Morita; Gyuri Wolf

    2012-04-14

    We revisit the question of whether the U_A(1) symmetry is effectively restored in hot and dense medium. In particular, by generalizing the Witten-Veneziano formula to finite temperature, we investigate whether the mass of eta'-meson will change in medium due to the restoration of chiral symmetry.

  4. Old F-Area Seepage Basin Transport Analyses in Support of a SCDHEC Mixing Zone Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleman, S.E.

    1998-12-04

    This report documents the groundwater flow and transport results presented in the groundwater mixing zone application (GWMZ) for the Old F-Area Seepage Basin (OFASB) submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in March, 1997 (WSRC, 1997).

  5. Differential cross sections for the reactions gamma p-> p eta and gamma p -> p eta-prime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Williams; Z. Krahn; D. Applegate; M. Bellis; C. A. Meyer; for the CLAS Collaboration

    2009-10-19

    High-statistics differential cross sections for the reactions gamma p -> p eta and gamma p -> p eta-prime have been measured using the CLAS at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass energies from near threshold up to 2.84 GeV. The eta-prime results are the most precise to date and provide the largest energy and angular coverage. The eta measurements extend the energy range of the world's large-angle results by approximately 300 MeV. These new data, in particular the eta-prime measurements, are likely to help constrain the analyses being performed to search for new baryon resonance states.

  6. Eta-mesic nuclei: Past, present, future

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Haider, Q.; Liu, Lon -Chang

    2015-09-23

    Eta-mesic nucleus or the quasibound nuclear state of an eta (?) meson in a nucleus is caused by strong interaction force alone. This new type of nuclear species, which extends the landscape of nuclear physics, has been extensively studied since its prediction in 1986. We review and analyze in great detail the models of the fundamental ?–nucleon interaction leading to the formation of an ?–mesic nucleus, the methods used in calculating the properties of a bound ?, and the approaches employed in the interpretation of the pertinent experimental data. In view of the successful observation of the ?–mesic nucleus 25Mg?more »and other promising experimental results, future direction in searching for more ?–mesic nuclei is suggested.« less

  7. Constraints on the $\\eta \\eta'$ decay rate of a scalar glueball from gauge/gravity duality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brünner, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    Predictions of glueball decay rates in the holographic Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model for low-energy QCD can be uniquely extended to include finite quark masses up to an as yet undetermined parameter in the coupling of glueballs to the nonanomalous part of the pseudoscalar mass terms. The assumption of a universal coupling of glueballs to mass terms of the full nonet of pseudoscalar mesons leads to flavor asymmetries in the decay rates of scalar glueballs that agree well with experimental data for the glueball candidate $f_0(1710)$ and implies a vanishing decay rate into $\\eta\\eta'$ pairs, for which only upper bounds for the $f_0(1710)$ meson are known at present from experiment. Relaxing this assumption, the holographic model gives a tight correlation between the decay rates into pairs of pseudo-Goldstone bosons of same type and $\\eta\\eta'$ pairs. If $\\Gamma(G\\to KK)/\\Gamma(G\\to\\pi\\pi)$ is kept within the range reported currently by the Particle Data Group for the $f_0(1710)$ meson, the rate $\\Gamma(G\\to\\eta\\et...

  8. Physics and Outlook for Rare, All-neutral Eta Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mack, David J.

    2014-06-01

    The $\\eta$ meson provides a laboratory to study isospin violation and search for new flavor-conserving sources of C and CP violation with a sensitivity approaching $10^{-6}$ of the isospin-conserving strong amplitude. Some of the most interesting rare $\\eta$ decays are the neutral modes, yet the effective loss of photons from the relatively common decay $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\pi^0 \\rightarrow 6\\gamma$ (33$\\%$) has largely limited the sensitivity for decays producing 3-5$\\gamma$'s. Particularly important relevant branches include the highly suppressed $\\eta \\rightarrow \\pi^0 2\\gamma \\rightarrow 4\\gamma$, which provides a rare window on testing models of $O(p^6)$ contributions in ChPTh, and $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\gamma$ and $\\eta \\rightarrow 2\\pi^0 \\gamma \\rightarrow 5\\gamma$ which provide direct constraints on C violation in flavor-conserving processes. The substitution of lead tungstate in the forward calorimeter of the GluEx setup in Jefferson Lab's new Hall D would allow dramatically improved measurements. The main niche of this facility, which we call the JLab Eta Factory (JEF), would be $\\eta$ decay neutral modes. However, this could likely be expanded to rare $\\eta'(958)$ decays for low energy QCD studies as well as $\\eta$ decays involving muons for new physics searches.

  9. Flow visualization using momentum and energy transport tubes and applications to turbulent flow in wind farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Johan

    2012-01-01

    As a generalization of the mass-flux based classical stream-tube, the concept of momentum and energy transport tubes is discussed as a flow visualization tool. These transport tubes have the property, respectively, that no fluxes of momentum or energy exist over their respective tube mantles. As an example application using data from large-eddy simulation, such tubes are visualized for the mean-flow structure of turbulent flow in large wind farms, in fully developed wind-turbine-array boundary layers. The three-dimensional organization of energy transport tubes changes considerably when turbine spacings are varied, enabling the visualization of the path taken by the kinetic energy flux that is ultimately available at any given turbine within the array.

  10. Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout / Transforming Y-12Capacity-Forum Sign InTransportation

  11. THE ETA AS OUTCASTES AND SCAPEGOATS AMONG JAPANESE AMERICANS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wax, Rosalie H.

    1965-10-01

    THE ETA AS OUTCASTES AND SCAPEGOATS AMONG JAPANESE AMERICANS Rosalie H. Wax University of Kansas Introduction For manyhundreds of years the lowestposition in Japanese social structure has been occupied by the eta, a hereditary outcaste group which... performed necessary but despised work. The presence, in the United States, of a con siderable number of persons of eta descent was revealed rather dramatically when the American Government obliged the evacuated Japanese Americans to answer a questionnaire...

  12. The coupling of the neutron transport application RATTLESNAKE to the nuclear fuels performance application BISON under the MOOSE framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleicher, Frederick N.; Williamson, Richard L.; Ortensi, Javier; Wang, Yaqi; Spencer, Benjamin W.; Novascone, Stephen R.; Hales, Jason D.; Martineau, Richard C.

    2014-10-01

    The MOOSE neutron transport application RATTLESNAKE was coupled to the fuels performance application BISON to provide a higher fidelity tool for fuel performance simulation. This project is motivated by the desire to couple a high fidelity core analysis program (based on the self-adjoint angular flux equations) to a high fidelity fuel performance program, both of which can simulate on unstructured meshes. RATTLESNAKE solves self-adjoint angular flux transport equation and provides a sub-pin level resolution of the multigroup neutron flux with resonance treatment during burnup or a fast transient. BISON solves the coupled thermomechanical equations for the fuel on a sub-millimeter scale. Both applications are able to solve their respective systems on aligned and unaligned unstructured finite element meshes. The power density and local burnup was transferred from RATTLESNAKE to BISON with the MOOSE Multiapp transfer system. Multiple depletion cases were run with one-way data transfer from RATTLESNAKE to BISON. The eigenvalues are shown to agree well with values obtained from the lattice physics code DRAGON. The one-way data transfer of power density is shown to agree with the power density obtained from an internal Lassman-style model in BISON.

  13. COMPUTATIONAL STUDIES OF BEAM DYNAMICS IN THE ETA GUN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    OF BEAM DYNAMICS IN THE ETA GUN Arthur C. Paul, V. Kelvin10 cm at the end of the gun. A field equalizing electrode (

  14. Study of in-medium $\\eta^\\prime$ properties in the ($\\gamma$, ${\\eta^\\prime}p$) reaction on nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paryev, E Ya

    2015-01-01

    We study the near-threshold photoproduction of $\\eta^\\prime$ mesons from nuclei in coincidence with forward going protons in the kinematical conditions of the Crystal Barrel/TAPS experiment, recently performed at ELSA. The calculations have been performed within a collision model based on the nuclear spectral function. The model accounts for both the primary ${\\gamma}p \\to {\\eta^\\prime}p$ process and the two-step intermediate nucleon rescattering processes as well as the effect of the nuclear $\\eta^\\prime$ mean-field potential. We calculate the exclusive $\\eta^\\prime$ kinetic energy distributions for the $^{12}$C($\\gamma$, ${\\eta^\\prime}p$) reaction for different scenarios of $\\eta^\\prime$ in-medium modification. We find that the considered two-step rescattering mechanism plays an insignificant role in ${\\eta^\\prime}p$ photoproduction off the carbon target. We also demonstrate that the calculated $\\eta^\\prime$ kinetic energy distributions in primary photon--proton ${\\eta^\\prime}p$ production reveal strong sen...

  15. The Systemic Velocity of Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2004-06-23

    High-resolution spectra of molecular hydrogen in the Homunculus nebula allow for the first direct measurement of the systemic velocity of Eta Carinae. Near-infrared long-slit data for H2 1-0 S(1) lambda 21218 obtained with the Phoenix spectrometer on the Gemini South telescope give Vsys=-8.1pm1 km/s (heliocentric), or VLSR=-19.7pm1 km/s, from the average of the near and far sides of the Homunculus. This measurement considerably improves the precision for the value of -7pm10 km/s inferred from neighboring O-type stars in the Carina nebula. New near-infrared spectra also provide a high-resolution line profile of [Fe II] lambda 16435 emission from gas condensations known as the Weigelt objects without contamination from the central star, revealing a line shape with complex kinematic structure. Previously, uncertainty in the Weigelt knots' kinematics was dominated by the adopted systemic velocity of Eta Car.

  16. Irradiation of commercial, high-Tc superconducting tape for potential fusion applications: electromagnetic transport properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aytug, Tolga [ORNL; Gapud, Albert A. [University of South Alabama, Mobile; List III, Frederick Alyious [ORNL; Leonard, Keith J [ORNL; Rupich, Marty [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Greenwood, N T [University of South Alabama, Mobile; Alexander, J A [University of South Alabama, Mobile; Khan, A [University of South Alabama, Mobile

    2015-01-01

    Effects of low dose irradiation on the electrical transport current properties of commercially available high-temperature superconducting, coated-conductor tapes were investigated, in view of potential applications in the irradiative environment of fusion reactors. Three different tapes, each with unique as-grown flux-pinning structures, were irradiated with Au and Ni ions at energies that provide a range of damage effects, with accumulated damage levels near that expected for conductors in a fusion reactor environment. Measurements using transport current determined the pre- and post-irradiation resistivity, critical current density, and pinning force density, yielding critical temperatures, irreversibility lines, and inferred vortex creep rates. Results show that at the irradiation damage levels tested, any detriment to as-grown pre-irradiation properties is modest; indeed in one case already-superior pinning forces are enhanced, leading to higher critical currents.

  17. Unresolved issues in the search for eta-mesic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. G. Kelkar

    2015-01-19

    Even if the theoretical definition of an unstable state is straightforward, its experimental identification often depends on the method used in the analysis and extraction of data. A good example is the case of eta mesic nuclei where strong hints of their existence led to about three decades of extensive theoretical and experimental searches. Considering the still undecided status of these states and the limitations in the understanding of the eta-nucleon as well as the eta-nucleus interaction, the present article tries to look back at some unresolved problems in the production mechanism and final state interaction of the eta mesons and nuclei. An unconventional perspective which provides a physical insight into the nature of the eta-nucleus interaction is also presented using quantum time concepts.

  18. Unresolved issues in the search for eta-mesic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelkar, N G

    2015-01-01

    Even if the theoretical definition of an unstable state is straightforward, its experimental identification often depends on the method used in the analysis and extraction of data. A good example is the case of eta mesic nuclei where strong hints of their existence led to about three decades of extensive theoretical and experimental searches. Considering the still undecided status of these states and the limitations in the understanding of the eta-nucleon as well as the eta-nucleus interaction, the present article tries to look back at some unresolved problems in the production mechanism and final state interaction of the eta mesons and nuclei. An unconventional perspective which provides a physical insight into the nature of the eta-nucleus interaction is also presented using quantum time concepts.

  19. eta-Nucleon Scattering Length and Effective Range uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Green; S. Wycech

    2005-06-28

    The coupled eta-N, pi-N, gamma-N, 2pi-N system is described by a K-matrix method. The parameters in this model are adjusted to get an optimal fit to pi-N-->pi-N, pi-N-->eta-N, gamma-N-->pi-N and gamma-N-->eta-N data in an energy range of about 100 MeV or so each side of the eta-threshold. Compared with our earlier analysis, we now utilize recent Crystal Ball data. However, the outcome confirms our previous result that the eta-nucleon scattering length (a) is large with a value of 0.91(6)+i0.27(2) fm.

  20. Direct methanol fuel cells for transportation applications. Quarterly technical report, June 1996--September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, T.F.; Kunz, H.R.; Moore, R.

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this research and development effort is to advance the performance and viability of direct methanol fuel cell technology for light-duty transportation applications. For fuel cells to be an attractive alternative to conventional automotive power plants, the fuel cell stack combined with the fuel processor and ancillary systems must be competitive in terms of both performance and costs. A major advantage for the direct methanol fuel cell is that a fuel processor is not required. A direct methanol fuel cell has the potential of satisfying the demanding requirements for transportation applications, such as rapid start-up and rapid refueling. The preliminary goals of this effort are: (1) 310 W/l, (2) 445 W/kg, and (3) potential manufacturing costs of $48/kW. In the twelve month period for phase 1, the following critical areas will be investigated: (1) an improved proton-exchange membrane that is more impermeable to methanol, (2) improved cathode catalysts, and (3) advanced anode catalysts. In addition, these components will be combined to form membrane-electrode assemblies (MEA`s) and evaluated in subscale tests. Finally a conceptual design and program plan will be developed for the construction of a 5 kW direct methanol stack in phase II of the program.

  1. First measurement of the helicity asymmetry E in $\\eta$ photoproduction on the proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senderovich, I; Dugger, M; Ritchie, B G; Pasyuk, E; Tucker, R; Brock, J; Carlin, C; Keith, C D; Meekins, D G; Seely, M L; R, D; D, M; Collins, P; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Akbar, Z; Anderson, M D; Pereira, S Anefalos; Badui, R A; Ball, J; Baltzell, N A; Battaglieri, M; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Cortes, O; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Dupre, R; Egiyan, H; Alaoui, A El; Fassi, L El; Fradi, A; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Filippi, A; Fleming, J A; Garillon, B; Ghandilyan, Y; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F -X; Glazier, D I; Goetz, J T; Gohn, W; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hattawy, M; Hicks, K; Ho, D; Holtrop, M; Hughes, S M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Jenkins, D; Jiang, H; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Joosten, S; Keller, D; Khachatryan, G; Khandaker, M; Kim, A; Klein, F J; Kubarovsky, V; Kunkel, M C; Lenisa, P; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; Mattione, P; McKinnon, B; Meyer, C A; Mineeva, T; Mokeev, V; Montgomery, R A; Movsisyan, A; Camacho, C Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P; Net, L A; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Park, K; Park, S; Peng, P; Phelps, W; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Puckett, A J R; Ripani, M; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Roy, P; Sabatie, F; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Seder, E; Simonyan, A; Skorodumina, Iu; Smith, G D; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Sparveris, N; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Sytnik, V; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Wei, X; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, Z W; Zonta, I

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented for the first measurement of the double-polarization helicity asymmetry E for the $\\eta$ photoproduction reaction $\\gamma p \\rightarrow \\eta p$. Data were obtained using the FROzen Spin Target (FROST) with the CLAS spectrometer in Hall B at Jefferson Lab, covering a range of center-of-mass energy W from threshold to 2.15 GeV and a large range in center-of-mass polar angle. As an initial application of these data, the results have been incorporated into the J\\"ulich model to examine the case for the existence of a narrow $N^*$ resonance between 1.66 and 1.70 GeV. The addition of these data to the world database results in marked changes in the predictions for the E observable using that model. Further comparison with several theoretical approaches indicates these data will significantly enhance our understanding of nucleon resonances.

  2. Transport coefficients in non-quasiparticle systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Jakovac

    2011-01-11

    Transport coefficeints, in particular the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio is studied in systems where the small-width quasiparticle assumption is not valid. It is found that $\\eta/s$ has no unversal lower bound, the minimal value depends on the system and the temperature, and can be even zero. We construct models where the $1/4\\pi$ conjectured bound is violated.

  3. The [O III] Veil: Astropause of Eta Carinae's Wind?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith; Jon A. Morse; John Bally

    2005-07-07

    We present narrowband images of eta Carinae in the light of [O III] 5007 obtained with HST/WFPC2, as well as a ground-based image in the same emission line with a larger field of view. These images show a thin veil of [O III] emission around eta Car and its ejecta, confirming the existence of an oxygen-bearing ``cocoon'' inferred from spectra. This [O III] veil may be the remnant of the pre-outburst wind of eta Car, and its outer edge probably marks the interface where eta Car's ejecta meet the stellar wind of the nearby O4 V((f)) star HD303308 or other ambient material -- i.e., it marks the ``astropause'' in eta Car's wind. This veil is part of a more extensive [O III] shell that appears to be shaped and ionized by HD303308. A pair of HST images with a 10 yr baseline shows no proper motion, limiting the expansion speed away from eta Car to 12pm13 km/s, or an expansion age of a few times 10^4 yr. Thus, this is probably the decelerated pre-outburst LBV wind of eta Car. The [O III] morphology is very different from that seen in [N II], which traces young knots of CNO-processed material; this represents a dramatic shift in the chemical makeup of material recently ejected by eta Car. This change in the chemical abundances may have resulted from the sudden removal of the star's outer envelope during eta Car's 19th century outburst or an earlier but similar event.

  4. Photoproduction of eta-mesons from light nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Krusche

    2003-04-02

    In a series of experiments coherent and quasifree eta-photoproduction from light nuclei (4He, 3He, 2H) was investigated with the TAPS-detector at the Mainz MAMI-accelerator. The experiments were motivated by two different subjects: the determination of the isospin structure of the electromagnetic excitation of the S11(1535) resonance and the study of the eta-nucleon and eta-nucleus interaction at small momenta. The results for the deuteron and 4He are summarized and first preliminary results for 3He are presented.

  5. Towards an improved understanding of eta --> gamma^* gamma^*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, C W; Hanhart, C; Kubis, B; Meißner, U -G; Wirzba, A

    2015-01-01

    We argue that high-quality data on the reaction $e^+e^-\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\eta$ will allow one to determine the double off-shell form factor $\\eta \\to \\gamma^*\\gamma^*$ in a model-independent way with controlled accuracy. This is an important step towards a reliable evaluation of the hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. When analyzing the existing data for $e^+e^- \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\eta$ in the range of total energies $1\\text{GeV}^2off-shell form factor $F_{\\eta\\gamma^*\\gamma^*}(Q_1^2,Q_2^2)$ is consistent with the commonly employed factorization ansatz at least for $Q_1^2<1\\text{GeV}^2$, if the effect of the $a_2$ meson is taken into account. However, better data are needed to draw firm conclusions.

  6. The periodicity of the eta Carinae events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Damineli; M. F. Corcoran; D. J. Hillier; O. Stahl; R. S. Levenhagen; N. V. Leister; J. H. Groh; M. Teodoro; J. F. Albacete Colombo; F. Gonzalez; J. Arias; H. Levato; M. Grosso; N. Morrell; R. Gamen; G. Wallerstein; V. Niemela

    2007-11-27

    Extensive spectral observations of eta Carinae over the last cycle, and particularly around the 2003.5 low excitation event, have been obtained. The variability of both narrow and broad lines, when combined with data taken from two earlier cycles, reveal a common and well defined period. We have combined the cycle lengths derived from the many lines in the optical spectrum with those from broad-band X-rays, optical and near-infrared observations, and obtained a period length of 2022.7+-1.3 d. Spectroscopic data collected during the last 60 years yield an average period of 2020+-4 d, consistent with the present day period. The period cannot have changed by more than $\\Delta$P/P=0.0007 since 1948. This confirms the previous claims of a true, stable periodicity, and gives strong support to the binary scenario. We have used the disappearance of the narrow component of HeI 6678 to define the epoch of the Cycle 11 minimum, T_0=JD 2,452,819.8. The next event is predicted to occur on 2009 January 11 (+-2 days). The dates for the start of the minimum in other spectral features and broad-bands is very close to this date, and have well determined time delays from the HeI epoch.

  7. GROUNDWATER FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODELING Application to Submarine Groundwater Discharge, Coastal Wetland Hydrology, and Deep Well Injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukop, Mike

    GROUNDWATER FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODELING Application to Submarine Groundwater Discharge, Coastal, but is also lost to surface water drainage and potential submarine groundwater discharge. There are also to deal with issues such as submarine groundwater discharge and coastal wetland hydrology. SEAWAT also has

  8. Steady-State Gyrokinetics Transport Code (SSGKT), A Scientific Application Partnership with the Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fahey, Mark R.; Candy, Jeff

    2013-11-07

    This project initiated the development of TGYRO ? a steady-state Gyrokinetic transport code (SSGKT) that integrates micro-scale GYRO turbulence simulations into a framework for practical multi-scale simulation of conventional tokamaks as well as future reactors. Using a lightweight master transport code, multiple independent (each massively parallel) gyrokinetic simulations are coordinated. The capability to evolve profiles using the TGLF model was also added to TGYRO and represents a more typical use-case for TGYRO. The goal of the project was to develop a steady-state Gyrokinetic transport code (SSGKT) that integrates micro-scale gyrokinetic turbulence simulations into a framework for practical multi-scale simulation of a burning plasma core ? the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) in particular. This multi-scale simulation capability will be used to predict the performance (the fusion energy gain, Q) given the H-mode pedestal temperature and density. At present, projections of this type rely on transport models like GLF23, which are based on rather approximate fits to the results of linear and nonlinear simulations. Our goal is to make these performance projections with precise nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. The method of approach is to use a lightweight master transport code to coordinate multiple independent (each massively parallel) gyrokinetic simulations using the GYRO code. This project targets the practical multi-scale simulation of a reactor core plasma in order to predict the core temperature and density profiles given the H-mode pedestal temperature and density. A master transport code will provide feedback to O(16) independent gyrokinetic simulations (each massively parallel). A successful feedback scheme offers a novel approach to predictive modeling of an important national and international problem. Success in this area of fusion simulations will allow US scientists to direct the research path of ITER over the next two decades. The design of an efficient feedback algorithm is a serious numerical challenge. Although the power source and transport balance coding in the master are standard, it is nontrivial to design a feedback loop that can cope with outputs that are both intermittent and extremely expensive. A prototypical feedback scheme has already been successfully demonstrated for a single global GYRO simulation, although the robustness and efficiency are likely far from optimal. Once the transport feedback scheme is perfected, it could, in principle, be embedded into any of the more elaborate transport codes (ONETWO, TRANSP, and CORSICA), or adopted by other FSP-related multi-scale projects.

  9. Groundwater flow with energy transport and waterice phase change: Numerical simulations, benchmarks, and application to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

    Groundwater flow with energy transport and water­ice phase change: Numerical simulations saturated, coupled porewater-energy transport, with freezing and melting porewater, and includes propor for groundwater and energy transport with ice formation and melting are proposed that may be used by other

  10. Integration Of Locational Decisions with the Household Activity Pattern Problem and Its Applications in Transportation Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jee E

    2013-01-01

    California, Irvine. Through the collaboration, we were able to merge our expertise in transportation systems and energyCalifornia’s SB 32, achieving sustainable transportation system has never seemed more promising. Many recent assessments on energyCalifornia’s SB 32), achieving sustainable transportation system has never seemed more promising. Many recent assessments of energy

  11. Development and applications of GREET 2.7 -- The Transportation Vehicle-CycleModel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnham, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Wu, Y.

    2006-12-20

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a vehicle-cycle module for the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model. The fuel-cycle GREET model has been cited extensively and contains data on fuel cycles and vehicle operations. The vehicle-cycle model evaluates the energy and emission effects associated with vehicle material recovery and production, vehicle component fabrication, vehicle assembly, and vehicle disposal/recycling. With the addition of the vehicle-cycle module, the GREET model now provides a comprehensive, lifecycle-based approach to compare the energy use and emissions of conventional and advanced vehicle technologies (e.g., hybrid electric vehicles and fuel cell vehicles). This report details the development and application of the GREET 2.7 model. The current model includes six vehicles--a conventional material and a lightweight material version of a mid-size passenger car with the following powertrain systems: internal combustion engine, internal combustion engine with hybrid configuration, and fuel cell with hybrid configuration. The model calculates the energy use and emissions that are required for vehicle component production; battery production; fluid production and use; and vehicle assembly, disposal, and recycling. This report also presents vehicle-cycle modeling results. In order to put these results in a broad perspective, the fuel-cycle model (GREET 1.7) was used in conjunction with the vehicle-cycle model (GREET 2.7) to estimate total energy-cycle results.

  12. The processing of alcohols, hydrocarbons and ethers to produce hydrogen for a PEMFC for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dams, R.A.J.; Hayter, P.R.; Moore, S.C.

    1997-12-31

    Wellman CJB Limited is involved in a number of projects to develop fuel processors to provide a hydrogen-rich fuel in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) systems for transportation applications. This work started in 1990 which resulted in the demonstration of 10kW PEMFC system incorporating a methanol reformer and catalytic gas clean-up system. Current projects include: The development of a compact fast response methanol reformer and gas clean-up system for a motor vehicle; Reforming of infrastructure fuels including gasoline, diesel, reformulated fuel gas and LPG to produce a hydrogen rich gas for PEMFC; Investigating the potential of dimethylether (DME) as source of hydrogen rich gas for PEMFCs; The use of thin film palladium diffusers to produce a pure hydrogen stream from the hydrogen rich gas from a reformer; and Processing of naval logistic fuels to produce a hydrogen rich gas stream for PEMFC power system to replace diesel generators in surface ships. This paper outlines the background to these projects and reports their current status.

  13. Efficient linear-scaling quantum transport calculations on graphics processing units and applications on electron transport in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Zheyong; Siro, Topi; Harju, Ari

    2013-01-01

    We implement, optimize, and validate the linear-scaling Kubo-Greenwood quantum transport simulation on graphics processing units by examining resonant scattering in graphene. We consider two practical representations of the Kubo-Greenwood formula: a Green-Kubo formula based on the velocity auto-correlation and an Einstein formula based on the mean square displacement. The code is fully implemented on graphics processing units with a speedup factor of up to 16 (using double-precision) relative to our CPU implementation. We compare the kernel polynomial method and the Fourier transform method for the approximation of the Dirac delta function and conclude that the former is more efficient. In the ballistic regime, the Einstein formula can produce the correct quantized conductance of one-dimensional graphene nanoribbons except for an overshoot near the band edges. In the diffusive regime, the Green-Kubo and the Einstein formalisms are demonstrated to be equivalent. A comparison of the length-dependence of the con...

  14. Measurement of the Color-Suppressed B0->D(*)0 pi0 /omega/eta/eta Prime Branching Fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prudent, X

    2008-11-05

    The authors report results on the branching fraction (BF) measurement of the color-suppressed decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D{sup 0}{eta}, D*{sup 0}{eta}, D{sup 0}{omega}, D*{sup 0}{omega}, D{sup 0}{eta}{prime}, and D*{sup 0}{eta}{prime}. They measure the branching fractions BF(D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = (2.78 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.20) x 10{sup -4}, BF(D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = (1.78 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.23) x 10{sup -4}, BF(D{sup 0}{eta}) = (2.41 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.17) x 10{sup -4}, BF(D*{sup 0}{eta}) = (2.32 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.22) x 10{sup -4}, BF(D{sup 0}{omega}) = (2.77 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.22) x 10{sup -4}, BF(D*{sup 0}{omega}) = (4.44 {+-} 0.23 {+-} 0.61) x 10{sup -4}, BF(D{sup 0}{eta}{prime}) = (1.38 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.22) x 10{sup -4} and BF(D*{sup 0}{eta}{prime}) = (1.29 {+-} 0.23 {+-} 0.23) x 10{sup -4}, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The result is based on a sample of (454 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance from 1999 to 2007, with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The measurements are compared to theoretical predictions by factorization, SCET and pQCD. The presence of final state interactions predictions by factorization, SCET and pQCD. The presence of final state interactions is confirmed and the measurements seem to be more in favor of SCET compared to pQCD.

  15. Hadronic production of eta--mesons: recent results and open questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Hanhart

    2005-11-17

    I review recent insights and open questions connected with the production of eta--mesons from hadrons.

  16. eta' meson under partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclear medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daisuke Jido; Hideko Nagahiro; Satoru Hirenzaki; Shuntaro Sakai

    2012-08-05

    We shed light upon the eta' mass in nuclear matter in the context of partial restoration of chiral symmetry, pointing out that the U_{A}(1) anomaly effects causes the eta'-eta mass difference necessarily through the chiral symmetry breaking. As a consequence, it is expected that the eta' mass is reduced by order of 100 MeV in nuclear matter where partial restoration of chiral symmetry takes place. The discussion given here is based on Ref. [1].

  17. Conceptual design report for a Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell for transportation application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-05

    This report presents the conceptual design for a Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for transportation applications. The design is based on the initial selection of the Chrysler LH sedan as the target vehicle with a 50 kW (gross) PEM Fuel Cell Stack (FCS) as the primary power source, a battery-powered Load Leveling Unit (LLU) for surge power requirements, an on-board hydrogen storage subsystem containing high pressure gaseous storage, a Gas Management Subsystem (GMS) to manage the hydrogen and air supplies for the FCS, and electronic controllers to control the electrical system. The design process has been dedicated to the use of Design-to-Cost (DTC) principles. The Direct Hydrogen-Powered PEM Fuel Cell Stack Hybrid Vehicle (DPHV) system is designed to operate on the Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS) and Hiway Cycles. These cycles have been used to evaluate the vehicle performance with regard to range and hydrogen usage. The major constraints for the DPHV vehicle are vehicle and battery weight, transparency of the power system and drive train to the user, equivalence of fuel and life cycle costs to conventional vehicles, and vehicle range. The energy and power requirements are derived by the capability of the DPHV system to achieve an acceleration from 0 to 60 MPH within 12 seconds, and the capability to achieve and maintain a speed of 55 MPH on a grade of seven percent. The conceptual design for the DPHV vehicle is shown in a figure. A detailed description of the Hydrogen Storage Subsystem is given in section 4. A detailed description of the FCS Subsystem and GMS is given in section 3. A detailed description of the LLU, selection of the LLU energy source, and the power controller designs is given in section 5.

  18. Branching fractions and CP-violating asymmetries in radiative B decays to eta K gamma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, M.

    We present measurements of the CP-violation parameters S and C for the radiative decay B0-->etaKS0gamma; for B-->etaKgamma we also measure the branching fractions and for B+-->etaK+gamma the time-integrated charge asymmetry ...

  19. Deuterated polyethylene coatings for ultra-cold neutron applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altarev, I; Fierlinger, P; Geltenbort, P; Gutsmiedl, E; Kuchler, F; Lauer, T; Lins, T; Marino, M G; Niessen, B; Petzoldt, G; Ruhstorfer, D; Seeman, K M; Soltwedel, O; Stuiber, St; Taubenheim, B; Windmayer, D; Zechlau, T

    2015-01-01

    We report on the fabrication and use of deuterated polyethylene (dPE) as a coating material for ultra-cold neutron (UCN) storage and transport. The Fermi potential has been determined to be 214 neV and the wall loss coefficient $\\eta$ is 2$\\cdot$10$^4$ per wall collision. The coating technique allows for a wide range of applications and new possibilities in this field of physics. In particular, flexible and quasi-massless UCN guides with slit-less shutters and slit-less UCN storage volumes become possible. These properties enable the use in next-generation measurements of the electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  20. Measurement of tau-decays involving eta-mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

    1992-12-01

    The decay tau- --> nu(tau)pi-pi0eta has been observed for the first time using the CLEO-II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. The measured branching ratio (0.17 +/- 0.02 +/- 0.02)%, agrees with the CVC (conserved vector current...

  1. Final Report for Project "Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations (FACETS)"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estep, Donald [Colorado State University] [Colorado State University

    2014-01-17

    This is the final report for the Colorado State University Component of the FACETS Project. FACETS was focused on the development of a multiphysics, parallel framework application that could provide the capability to enable whole-device fusion reactor modeling and, in the process, the development of the modeling infrastructure and computational understanding needed for ITER. It was intended that FACETS be highly flexible, through the use of modern computational methods, including component technology and object oriented design, to facilitate switching from one model to another for a given aspect of the physics, and making it possible to use simplified models for rapid turnaround or high-fidelity models that will take advantage of the largest supercomputer hardware. FACETS was designed in a heterogeneous parallel context, where different parts of the application can take advantage through parallelism based on task farming, domain decomposition, and/or pipelining as needed and applicable. As with all fusion simulations, an integral part of the FACETS project was treatment of the coupling of different physical processes at different scales interacting closely. A primary example for the FACETS project is the coupling of existing core and edge simulations, with the transport and wall interactions described by reduced models. However, core and edge simulations themselves involve significant coupling of different processes with large scale differences. Numerical treatment of coupling is impacted by a number of factors including, scale differences, form of information transferred between processes, implementation of solvers for different codes, and high performance computing concerns. Operator decomposition involving the computation of the individual processes individually using appropriate simulation codes and then linking/synchronizing the component simulations at regular points in space and time, is the defacto approach to high performance simulation of multiphysics, multiscale systems. Various forms of operator decomposition are used in nearly all fusion simulations. However, operator decomposition generally has a complex effect on accuracy and stability of numerical simulations. Yet, these effects can be difficult to detect. The Colorado State University component of the FACETS team led by P. I. D. Estep was focused on analyzing the effects of operator decomposition on fusion simulations. The approach was based on a posteriori error analysis employing adjoint problems, computable residuals, and variational analysis to produce accurate computational error estimates for quantities of interest. Computable residuals are used to quantify the effects of various discretization choices. The generalized Greens function satisfying the adjoint problem quantities the effects of stability. Technical issues to be addressed included: (1) defining appropriate adjoint operators for operator decomposition discretizations; (2) determining the appropriate residuals for the multifaceted aspects involved with multiphysics discretizations; (3) producing the estimates within the computational framework of existing fusion codes; (4) carrying out the analysis for discretizations used in fusion simulations; and (5) devising efficient approaches to mitigating the effects of discretization. This report provides a summary of the accomplished research and a detailed description of personnel, activities, outcomes and achievements.

  2. Outsourcing transportation infrastructure maintenance : a theoretical approach with application to JR East

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirano, Jun, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    In transportation agencies, how to reduce maintenance and operation cost is one of the biggest and most common concerns, because their revenue is not expected to increase drastically in the future. One of the solutions ...

  3. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2012-01-01

    of the Fuel Cell in Transportation Applications Workshop,practical fuel cell for commercial or consumer applicationfuel cell system engineer- ing is made, vehicle applications

  4. First observation of tau->3 pi eta nu(tau) and tau->f(1)pi nu(tau) decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

    1997-09-01

    We have observed new channels for tau decays with an eta in the final state. We study 3-prong tau decays, using the eta --> gamma gamma and eta --> 3 pi(0) decay modes and 1-prong decays with two pi(0)'s using the eta --> ...

  5. Current-based detection of nonlocal spin transport in graphene for spin-based logic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, Hua; Amamou, Walid; Zhu, Tiancong; Luo, Yunqiu; Kawakami, Roland K.

    2014-05-07

    Graphene has been proposed for novel spintronic devices due to its robust and efficient spin transport properties at room temperature. Some of the most promising proposals require current-based readout for integration purposes, but the current-based detection of spin accumulation has not yet been developed. In this work, we demonstrate current-based detection of spin transport in graphene using a modified nonlocal geometry. By adding a variable shunt resistor in parallel to the nonlocal voltmeter, we are able to systematically cross over from the conventional voltage-based detection to current-based detection. As the shunt resistor is reduced, the output current from the spin accumulation increases as the shunt resistance drops below a characteristic value R*. We analyze this behavior using a one-dimensional drift-diffusion model, which accounts well for the observed behavior. These results provide the experimental and theoretical foundation for current-based detection of nonlocal spin transport.

  6. Kinematic studies of transport across an island wake, with application to the Canary islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathias Sandulescu; Emilio Hernandez-Garcia; Cristobal Lopez; Ulrike Feudel

    2006-05-29

    Transport from nutrient-rich coastal upwellings is a key factor influencing biological activity in surrounding waters and even in the open ocean. The rich upwelling in the North-Western African coast is known to interact strongly with the wake of the Canary islands, giving rise to filaments and other mesoscale structures of increased productivity. Motivated by this scenario, we introduce a simplified two-dimensional kinematic flow describing the wake of an island in a stream, and study the conditions under which there is a net transport of substances across the wake. For small vorticity values in the wake, it acts as a barrier, but there is a transition when increasing vorticity so that for values appropriate to the Canary area, it entrains fluid and enhances cross-wake transport.

  7. Transport coefficients of solid particles immersed in a viscous gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vicente Garzó; William D. Fullmer; Christine M. Hrenya; Xiaolong Yin

    2015-11-12

    Transport properties of a suspension of solid particles in a viscous gas are studied. The dissipation in such systems arises from two sources: inelasticity in particle collisions and viscous dissipation due to the effect of the gas phase on the particles. Here, we consider a simplified case in which the mean relative velocity between the gas and solid phases is taken to be zero, such that "thermal drag" is the only remaining gas-solid interaction. Unlike the previous more general treatment of the drag force [Garz\\'o \\emph{et al.}, J. Fluid Mech. \\textbf{712}, 129 (2012)], here we take into account contributions to the (scaled) transport coefficients $\\eta^*$ (shear viscosity), $\\kappa^*$ (thermal conductivity) and $\\mu^*$ (Dufour-like coefficient) coming from the temperature-dependence of the (dimensionless) friction coefficient $\\gamma^*$ characterizing the amplitude of the drag force. At moderate densities, the thermal drag model (which is based on the Enskog kinetic equation) is solved by means of the Chapman-Enskog method and the Navier-Stokes transport coefficients are determined in terms of the coefficient of restitution, the solid volume fraction and the friction coefficient. The results indicate that the effect of the gas phase on $\\eta^*$ and $\\mu^*$ is non-negligible (especially in the case of relatively dilute systems) while the form of $\\kappa^*$ is the same as the one obtained in the dry granular limit. Finally, as an application of these results, a linear stability analysis of the hydrodynamic equations is carried out to analyze the conditions for stability of the homogeneous cooling state. A comparison with direct numerical simulations shows a good agreement for conditions of practical interest.

  8. Eta Car and Its Surroundings: the X-ray Diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. F. Corcoran; K. Hamaguchi

    2007-03-02

    X-ray emission from the supermassive star Eta Carinae (\\ec) originates from hot shocked gas produced by current stellar mass loss as well as ejecta from prior eruptive events. Absorption of this emission by cool material allows the determination of the spatial and temporal distribution of this material. Emission from the shocked gas can provide important information about abundances through the study of thermal X-ray line emission. We discuss how studies of the X-ray emission from Eta Car at a variety of temporal, spatial and spectral scales and resolutions have helped refine our knowledge of both the continuous and discrete mass loss from the system, and its interactions with more extended material around the star.

  9. Final Report for the "Fusion Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations (FACETS)"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cary, John R; Kruger, Scott

    2014-10-02

    The FACETS project over its lifetime developed the first self-consistent core-edge coupled capabilities, a new transport solver for modeling core transport in tokamak cores, developed a new code for modeling wall physics over long time scales, and significantly improved the capabilities and performance of legacy components, UEDGE, NUBEAM, GLF23, GYRO, and BOUT++. These improved capabilities leveraged the team’s expertise in applied mathematics (solvers and algorithms) and computer science (performance improvements and language interoperability). The project pioneered new methods for tackling the complexity of simulating the concomitant complexity of tokamak experiments.

  10. DETECTION OF THE COMPRESSED PRIMARY STELLAR WIND IN {eta} CARINAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teodoro, M.; Madura, T. I.; Gull, T. R.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.

    2013-08-10

    A series of three Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph spectroscopic mappings, spaced approximately one year apart, reveal three partial arcs in [Fe II] and [Ni II] emissions moving outward from {eta} Carinae. We identify these arcs with the shell-like structures, seen in the three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, formed by compression of the primary wind by the secondary wind during periastron passages.

  11. Transport coefficients of a massive pion gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fernandez-Fraile; A. Gomez Nicola

    2009-12-20

    We review or main results concerning the transport coefficients of a light meson gas, in particular we focus on the case of a massive pion gas. Leading order results according to the chiral power-counting are presented for the DC electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, shear viscosity, and bulk viscosity. We also comment on the possible correlation between the bulk viscosity and the trace anomaly in QCD, as well as the relation between unitarity and a minimum of the quotient $\\eta/s$ near the phase transition.

  12. Thermal Transport in Porous Media with Application to Fuel Cell Diffusion Media and Metal Foams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    of thermal transport phenomena in fuel cell gas diffusion layers (GDLs) and metal foams and describes new transfer through the GDL is a key process in the design and operation of a proton exchange membrane (PEM program allows the separation of effective thermal conductivity and thermal contact resistance. For GDLs

  13. Applicability of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as biosensors: Effect of biomolecular adsorption on the transport properties of carbon and boron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandey, Ravi

    Applicability of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as biosensors: Effect of biomolecular;Applicability of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as biosensors: Effect of biomolecular adsorption transport- ers,10 biosensors,11 and field effect transistors12 (FET) have been reported. DNA has also been

  14. Reforming of Diesel Fuel for Transportation Applications J. P. Kopasz, S. Lottes, D-J. Liu, R. Ahluwalia, V. Novick and S. Ahmed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , steam and water prior to catalyst bed 3-fluid nozzle delivers a fine mist of fuel #12;ReformingReforming of Diesel Fuel for Transportation Applications J. P. Kopasz, S. Lottes, D-J. Liu, R. Ahluwalia, V. Novick and S. Ahmed Argonne National Laboratory Applications of diesel fuel reforming

  15. Transport in non-conformal holographic fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shailesh Kulkarni; Bum-Hoon Lee; Jae-Hyuk Oh; Chanyong Park; Raju Roychowdhury

    2013-03-06

    We have considered non-conformal fluid dynamics whose gravity dual is a certain Einstein dilaton system with Liouville type dilaton potential, characterized by an intrinsic parameter $\\eta$. We have discussed the Hawking-Page transition in this framework using hard-wall model and it turns out that the critical temperature of the Hawking-Page transition encapsulates a non-trivial dependence on $\\eta$. We also obtained transport coefficients such as AC conductivity, shear viscosity and diffusion constant in the hydrodynamic limit, which show non-trivial $\\eta$ dependent deviations from those in conformal fluids, although the ratio of the shear viscosity to entropy density is found to saturate the universal bound. Some of the retarded correlators are also computed in the high frequency limit for case study.

  16. Transport in unconventional superconductors: Application to liquid {sup 3}He in aerogel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einzel, Dietrich; Parpia, Jeevak M.

    2005-12-01

    We consider quite generally the transport of energy and momentum in unconventional superconductors and Fermi superfluids to which both impurity scattering (treated within the t-matrix approximation) and inelastic scattering contributes. A new interpolation scheme for the temperature dependence of the transport parameters is presented which preserves all analytical results available for T{yields}0 and T{yields}T{sub c} and allows for a particularly transparent physical representation of the results. The two scattering processes are combined using Matthiessen's rule coupling. This procedure is applied for the first time to {sup 3}He-B in aerogel. Here, at the lowest temperatures, a universal ratio of the thermal conductivity and the shear viscosity is found in the unitary limit, which is akin to the Wiedemann-Franz law.

  17. Eta Carinae and Nebulae Around Massive Stars: Similarities to Planetary Nebulae?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2008-02-13

    I discuss some observational properties of aspherical nebulae around massive stars, and conclusions inferred for how they may have formed. Whether or not these ideas are applicable to the shaping of planetary nebulae is uncertain, but the observed similarities between some PNe and bipolar nebulae around massive stars is compelling. In the well-observed case of Eta Carinae, several lines of observational evidence point to a scenario where the shape of its bipolar nebula resulted from an intrinsically bipolar explosive ejection event rather than an interacting winds scenario occurring after ejection from teh star. A similar conclusion has been inferred for some planetary nebulae. I also briefly mention bipolar nebulae around some other massive stars, such as the progenitor of SN 1987A and related blue supergiants.

  18. Nano-Scale Hydroxyapatite: Synthesis, Two-Dimensional Transport Experiments, and Application for Uranium Remediation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kanel, S. R.; Clement, T. P.; Barnett, M. O.; Goltz, M. N.

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic nano-scale hydroxyapatite (NHA) was prepared and characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods. The XRD data confirmed that the crystalline structure and chemical composition of NHA correspond to Ca 5 OH(PO 4 ) 3 . The SEM data confirmed the size of NHA to be less than 50?nm. A two-dimensional physical model packed with saturated porous media was used to study the transport characteristics of NHA under constant flow conditions. The data show that the transport patterns of NHA were almost identical to tracer transport patterns. This result indicates that the NHA material canmore »move with water like a tracer, and its movement was neither retarded nor influenced by any physicochemical interactions and/or density effects. We have also tested the reactivity of NHA with 1?mg/L hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) and found that complete removal of U(VI) is possible using 0.5?g/L NHA at pH?5 to 6. Our results demonstrate that NHA has the potential to be injected as a dilute slurry for in situ treatment of U(VI)-contaminated groundwater systems. « less

  19. Application of Chebyshev Formalism to Identify Nonlinear Magnetic Field Components in Beam Transport Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Spata

    2012-08-01

    An experiment was conducted at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility to develop a beam-based technique for characterizing the extent of the nonlinearity of the magnetic fields of a beam transport system. Horizontally and vertically oriented pairs of air-core kicker magnets were simultaneously driven at two different frequencies to provide a time-dependent transverse modulation of the beam orbit relative to the unperturbed reference orbit. Fourier decomposition of the position data at eight different points along the beamline was then used to measure the amplitude of these frequencies. For a purely linear transport system one expects to find solely the frequencies that were applied to the kickers with amplitudes that depend on the phase advance of the lattice. In the presence of nonlinear fields one expects to also find harmonics of the driving frequencies that depend on the order of the nonlinearity. Chebyshev polynomials and their unique properties allow one to directly quantify the magnitude of the nonlinearity with the minimum error. A calibration standard was developed using one of the sextupole magnets in a CEBAF beamline. The technique was then applied to a pair of Arc 1 dipoles and then to the magnets in the Transport Recombiner beamline to measure their multipole content as a function of transverse position within the magnets.

  20. Signature of the eta-NN configurations in coherent pi0 photoproduction on the deuteron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Fix

    2005-09-13

    The photoproduction of a neutral pion on the deuteron is considered in the energy region around the eta threshold, where a bump-like structure was observed at very backward pion angles. Different dynamical aspects which may be responsible for this phenomenon are analysed within a theoretical frame which includes intermediate eta-NN configurations. The results show in particular, that a three-body treatment of the eta-NN interaction is of special importance.

  1. Transepithelial transport of nanoparticles targeted to the neonatal Fc receptor for oral delivery applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pridgen, Eric M. (Eric Michael)

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are poised to have a tremendous impact on the treatment of many diseases, but their broad application is limited because currently they can only be administered by parenteral methods. Oral administration ...

  2. Adaptive control of media applications in best-effort networks using reliable transport protocols 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangan, John Wilford

    2002-01-01

    , along with adaptive predictive control at the application layer. The proposed algorithms are rooted in traditional process control. End-to-end delay measurements and predictions are used to compensate for the dynamic effects of time-varying time delays...

  3. Tuning the transport properties of layer-by-layer thin films for fuel cell applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashcraft, James Nathan

    2009-01-01

    The increasing global focus on alternative energy sources has led to a renewed interest in fuel cells. For low power, portable applications, direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are the most promising type of fuel cell. DMFCs ...

  4. Applications of Irreversible Thermodynamics: Bulk and Interfacial Electronic, Ionic, Magnetic, and Thermal Transport 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Matthew

    2012-10-19

    the parallels between ow in semiconductors and in spintronics devices. The wide applicability of irre- 6 versible thermodynamics to modern devices is demonstrated by consideration of three particular systems: a long-considered system involving particle ow...

  5. Search for $\\eta$-mesic helium via $dd\\to {}^3{\\rm He}\\,n\\pi^0$ reaction by means of the WASA-at-COSY facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skurzok, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    In November 2010, we performed a search for a $^{4}\\hspace{-0.03cm}\\mbox{He}$-$\\eta$ bound state by measuring the excitation function for the $dd\\rightarrow$ $^{3}\\hspace{-0.03cm}\\mbox{He} n \\pi{}^{0}$ and $dd\\rightarrow$ $^{3}\\hspace{-0.03cm}\\mbox{He} p \\pi{}^{-}$ reactions in the vicinity of the $\\eta$ production threshold with the WASA detector.~The experiment was carried out using a deuteron COSY beam and deuteron pellet target. The beam momentum varied continuously in each of acceleration cycle from 2.127 GeV/c to 2.422 GeV/c, which corresponds to a range of excess energy $Q$ $\\in$(-70,30)MeV. This dissertation is about the search for $^{4}\\hspace{-0.03cm}\\mbox{He}$-$\\eta$ bound state in $dd\\rightarrow$ $^{3}\\hspace{-0.03cm}\\mbox{He} n \\pi{}^{0}$ reaction. The excitation function for the process was determined after identification of all outgoing particles and the application of the selection conditions based on Monte Carlo simulations of $\\eta$-mesic helium production and its decay via excitation of the...

  6. Eta-mesic nuclei: Past, present, future Haider, Q. [Fordham Univ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Liu, Lon -Chang Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States) 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS Eta-mesic nuclei; final-state interaction; binding...

  7. Measurement of pi0 and eta Mesons with PHENIX in sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV Au+Au Collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Sahlmueller; for the PHENIX collaboration

    2008-06-02

    The pi0 meson has been a crucial proble for observing jet quenching in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC. Measurements of the eta meson in the same collisions have also shed light on a possible dependence of the observed suppression on the particle species. The preliminary pi0 nuclear modification factor R_AA from the 2004 RHIC run allowed a first systematic comparison between a precise measurement with high statistics and theoretical calculations, constraining model parameters such as the initial gluon density dN^g/dy, and the transport coefficient qhat. The final pi0 spectra and R_AA are shown as well as the first eta results obtained with both PHENIX electromagnetic calorimeters.

  8. Peristaltic Transport of a Couple Stress Fluid: Some Applications to Hemodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Maiti; J. C. Misra

    2012-01-30

    The present paper deals with a theoretical investigation of the peristaltic transport of a couple stress fluid in a porous channel. The study is motivated towards the physiological flow of blood in the micro-circulatory system, by taking account of the particle size effect. The velocity, pressure gradient, stream function and frictional force of blood are investigated, when the Reynolds number is small and the wavelength is large, by using appropriate analytical and numerical methods. Effects of different physical parameters reflecting porosity, Darcy number, couple stress parameter as well as amplitude ratio on velocity profiles, pumping action and frictional force, streamlines pattern and trapping of blood are studied with particular emphasis. The computational results are presented in graphical form. The results are found to be in good agreement with those of Shapiro et. al \\cite{r25} that was carried out for a non-porous channel in the absence of couple stress effect. The present study puts forward an important observation that for peristaltic transport of a couple stress fluid during free pumping when the couple stress effect of the fluid/Darcy permeability of the medium, flow reversal can be controlled to a considerable extent. Also by reducing the permeability it is possible to avoid the occurrence of trapping phenomenon.

  9. Comparison of CNG and LNG technologies for transportation applications. Final subcontract report, June 1991--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinor, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    This report provides a head-to-head comparison of compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) supplied to heavy-duty vehicles. The comparison includes an assessment of the overall efficiency of the fuel delivery system, the cost of the fuel supply system, the efficiency of use in heavy-duty vehicles, and the environmental impact of each technology. The report concludes that there are applications in which CNG will have the advantage, and applications in which LNG will be preferred.

  10. Elliptic Flow and Shear Viscosity within a Transport Approach from RHIC to LHC Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Plumari; V. Greco

    2011-10-11

    We have investigated the build up of anisotropic flows within a parton cascade approach at fixed shear viscosity to entropy density \\eta/s to study the generation of collective flows in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. We present a study of the impact of a temperature dependent \\eta/s(T) on the generation of the elliptic flow at both RHIC and LHC. Finally we show that the transport approach, thanks to its wide validity range, is able to describe naturally the rise - fall and saturation of the v_2(p_T) observed at LHC.

  11. A Blast Wave from the 1843 Eruption of Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2008-09-09

    Very massive stars shed much of their mass in violent precursor eruptions as luminous blue variables (LBVs) before reaching their most likely end as supernovae, but the cause of LBV eruptions is unknown. The 19th century eruption of Eta Carinae, the prototype of these events, ejected about 12 solar masses at speeds of 650 km/s, with a kinetic energy of almost 10^50 ergs. Some faster material with speeds up to 1000-2000 km/s had previously been reported but its full distribution was unknown. Here I report observations of much faster material with speeds up to 3500-6000 km/s, reaching farther from the star than the fastest material in earlier reports. This fast material roughly doubles the kinetic energy of the 19th century event, and suggests that it released a blast wave now propagating ahead of the massive ejecta. Thus, Eta Car's outer shell now mimics a low-energy supernova remnant. The eruption has usually been discussed in terms of an extreme wind driven by the star's luminosity, but fast material reported here suggests that it was powered by a deep-seated explosion rivalling a supernova, perhaps triggered by the pulsational pair instability. This may alter interpretations of similar events seen in other galaxies.

  12. Study of the production mechanism of the eta meson by means of analysing power measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Czyzykiewicz; P. Moskal; H. -H. Adam; A. Budzanowski; E. Czerwinski; D. Gil; D. Grzonka; M. Janusz; L. Jarczyk; B. Kamys; A. Khoukaz; P. Klaja; B. Lorentz; J. Majewski; W. Oelert; C. Piskor-Ignatowicz; J. Przerwa; J. Ritman; H. Rohdjess; T. Rozek; T. Sefzick; M. Siemaszko; J. Smyrski; A. Taeschner; K. Ulbrich; P. Winter; M. Wolke; P. Wuestner; W. Zipper

    2006-09-13

    Information about the production mechanism of the eta meson in proton-proton collisions can be inferred by confronting the experimental studies on the analysing power for the p(pol)p --> pp eta reaction with the theoretical predictions of this observable. Results show that the predictions of pure pseudoscalar- or vector meson exchange model are insufficient to describe the analysing powers.

  13. Study of the production mechanism of the eta meson by means of analysing power measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czyzykiewicz, R; Adam, H H; Budzanowski, A; Czerwinski, E; Gil, D; Grzonka, D; Janusz, M; Jarczyk, L; Kamys, B; Khoukaz, A; Klaja, P; Lorentz, B; Majewski, J; Oelert, W; Piskor-Ignatowicz, C; Przerwa, J; Ritman, J; Rohdjess, H; Rozek, T; Sefzick, T; Siemaszko, M; Smyrski, J; Täschner, A; Ulbrich, K; Winter, P; Wolke, M; Wüstner, P; Zipper, W

    2007-01-01

    Information about the production mechanism of the eta meson in proton-proton collisions can be inferred by confronting the experimental studies on the analysing power for the p(pol)p --> pp eta reaction with the theoretical predictions of this observable. Results show that the predictions of pure pseudoscalar- or vector meson exchange model are insufficient to describe the analysing powers.

  14. Eta photoproduction in a combined analysis of pion- and photon-induced reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Rönchen; M. Döring; H. Haberzettl; J. Haidenbauer; U. -G. Meißner; K. Nakayama

    2015-06-22

    The $\\eta N$ final state is isospin-selective and thus provides access to the spectrum of excited nucleons without being affected by excited $\\Delta$ states. To this end, the world database on eta photoproduction off the proton up to a center-of-mass energy of $E\\sim 2.3$ GeV is analyzed, including data on differential cross sections, and single and double polarization observables. The resonance spectrum and its properties are determined in a combined analysis of eta and pion photoproduction off the proton together with the reactions $\\pi N\\to \\pi N$, $\\eta N$, $K\\Lambda$ and $K\\Sigma$. For the analysis, the so-called J\\"ulich coupled-channel framework is used, incorporating unitarity, analyticity, and effective three-body channels. Parameters tied to photoproduction and hadronic interactions are varied simultaneously. The influence of recent MAMI $T$ and $F$ asymmetry data on the eta photoproduction amplitude is discussed in detail.

  15. Uncertainties in the eta-Nucleon Scattering Length and Effective Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Green; S. Wycech

    2000-09-20

    The coupled eta-N, pi-N, gamma-N system is described by a K-matrix method. The parameters in this model are adjusted to get an optimal fit to pi-N --->pi- N$, pi-N --->eta-N$, gamma-N--->pi-N and gamma-N --->eta-N data in an energy range of about 100MeV or so each side of the eta threshold. The outcome is the appearance of two solutions one which has an eta-nucleon scattering length (a) of about 1.0 fm and a second with a~0.2fm. However, the second solution has an unconventional non-Lorentian form for the T-matrix in the region of the 1535(20)MeV and 1650(30)MeV S-wave pi-N resonances.

  16. Using COSY-11 apparatus for the precise studies of the natural width of the eta prime meson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Czerwinski; P. Moskal

    2007-10-17

    We present preliminary results and motivation of measurement of the total width of the eta prime meson.

  17. A methodology for optimal MSW management, with an application in the waste transportation of Attica Region, Greece

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Economopoulou, M.A.; Economopoulou, A.A.; Economopoulos, A.P.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • A two-step (strategic and detailed optimal planning) methodology is used for solving complex MSW management problems. • A software package is outlined, which can be used for generating detailed optimal plans. • Sensitivity analysis compares alternative scenarios that address objections and/or wishes of local communities. • A case study shows the application of the above procedure in practice and demonstrates the results and benefits obtained. - Abstract: The paper describes a software system capable of formulating alternative optimal Municipal Solid Wastes (MSWs) management plans, each of which meets a set of constraints that may reflect selected objections and/or wishes of local communities. The objective function to be minimized in each plan is the sum of the annualized capital investment and annual operating cost of all transportation, treatment and final disposal operations involved, taking into consideration the possible income from the sale of products and any other financial incentives or disincentives that may exist. For each plan formulated, the system generates several reports that define the plan, analyze its cost elements and yield an indicative profile of selected types of installations, as well as data files that facilitate the geographic representation of the optimal solution in maps through the use of GIS. A number of these reports compare the technical and economic data from all scenarios considered at the study area, municipality and installation level constituting in effect sensitivity analysis. The generation of alternative plans offers local authorities the opportunity of choice and the results of the sensitivity analysis allow them to choose wisely and with consensus. The paper presents also an application of this software system in the capital Region of Attica in Greece, for the purpose of developing an optimal waste transportation system in line with its approved waste management plan. The formulated plan was able to: (a) serve 113 Municipalities and Communities that generate nearly 2 million t/y of comingled MSW with distinctly different waste collection patterns, (b) take into consideration several existing waste transfer stations (WTS) and optimize their use within the overall plan, (c) select the most appropriate sites among the potentially suitable (new and in use) ones, (d) generate the optimal profile of each WTS proposed, and (e) perform sensitivity analysis so as to define the impact of selected sets of constraints (limitations in the availability of sites and in the capacity of their installations) on the design and cost of the ensuing optimal waste transfer system. The results show that optimal planning offers significant economic savings to municipalities, while reducing at the same time the present levels of traffic, fuel consumptions and air emissions in the congested Athens basin.

  18. Solving a Dial-a-Ride Problem with a Hybrid Evolutionary Multi-objective Application to Demand Responsive Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to Demand Responsive Transport R´emy Chevrier,a , Arnaud Liefoogheb,c , Laetitia Jourdanb,c , Clarisse, 59650 Villeneuve d'Ascq, France Abstract Demand responsive transport allows customers to be carried to improve the quality of service, demand responsive transport needs more flexibility. This paper tries

  19. Photoproduction of eta-mesons off nuclei for Eg < 2.2 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Mertens; I. Jaegle; P. Muehlich; J. C. S. Bacelar; B. Bantes; O. Bartholomy; D. E. Bayadilov; R. Beck; Y. A. Beloglazov; R. Castelijns; V. Crede; H. Dutz; A. Ehmanns; D. Elsner; K. Essig; R. Ewald; I. Fabry; K. Fornet-Ponse; M. Fuchs; C. Funke; R. Gothe; R. Gregor; A. B. Gridnev; E. Gutz; S. Hoeffgen; P. Hoffmeister; I. Horn; J. Junkersfeld; H. Kalinowsky; S. Kammer; V. Kleber; Frank Klein; Friedrich Klein; E. Klempt; M. Konrad; M. Kotulla; B. Krusche; M. Lang; J. Langheinrich; H. Loehner; I. V. Lopatin; J. Lotz; S. Lugert; D. Menze; J. G. Messchendorp; V. Metag; C. Morales; U. Mosel; M. Nanova; D. V. Novinski; R. Novotny; M. Ostrick; L. M. Pant; H. van Pee; M. Pfeiffer; A. K. Radkov; A. Roy; S. Schadmand; C. Schmidt; H. Schmieden; B. Schoch; S. Shende; V. Sokhoyan; A. Suele; V. V. Sumachev; T. Szczepanek; U. Thoma; D. Trnka; R. Varma; D. Walther; C. Weinheimer; C. Wendel

    2008-10-15

    Photoproduction of $\\eta$ mesons off $^{12}$C, $^{40}$Ca, $^{93}$Nb, and $^{nat}$Pb nuclei has been measured with a tagged photon beam with energies between 0.6 and 2.2 GeV. The experiment was performed at the Bonn ELSA accelerator with the combined setup of the Crystal Barrel and TAPS calorimeters. It aimed at the in-medium properties of the S$_{11}$(1535) nucleon resonance and the study of the absorption properties of nuclear matter for $\\eta$ mesons. Careful consideration was given to contributions from $\\eta\\pi$ final states and secondary production mechanisms of $\\eta$-mesons e.g. from inelastic $\\pi N$ reactions of intermediate pions. The analysis of the mass number scaling shows that the nuclear absorption cross section $\\sigma_{N\\eta}$ for $\\eta$ mesons is constant over a wide range of the $\\eta$ momentum. The comparison of the excitation functions to data off the deuteron and to calculations in the framework of a BUU-model show no unexplained in-medium modifications of the S$_{11}$(1535).

  20. A Measurement of the B ---> Eta/C K Branching Fraction Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Frank; /Manchester U.

    2006-04-26

    The branching fraction is measured for the decay channels B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sub S}{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sup +} where {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{bar K}{pi}, using the BABAR detector. The {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decay channels are used, including non-resonant decays and possibly those through intermediate resonances.

  1. Evaluation of the Potential Environmental Impacts from Large-Scale Use and Production of Hydrogen in Energy and Transportation Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wuebbles, D.J.; Dubey, M.K., Edmonds, J.; Layzell, D.; Olsen, S.; Rahn, T.; Rocket, A.; Wang, D.; Jia, W.

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this project is to systematically identify and examine possible near and long-term ecological and environmental effects from the production of hydrogen from various energy sources based on the DOE hydrogen production strategy and the use of that hydrogen in transportation applications. This project uses state-of-the-art numerical modeling tools of the environment and energy system emissions in combination with relevant new and prior measurements and other analyses to assess the understanding of the potential ecological and environmental impacts from hydrogen market penetration. H2 technology options and market penetration scenarios will be evaluated using energy-technology-economics models as well as atmospheric trace gas projections based on the IPCC SRES scenarios including the decline in halocarbons due to the Montreal Protocol. Specifically we investigate the impact of hydrogen releases on the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, the long-term stability of the ozone layer due to changes in hydrogen emissions, the impact of hydrogen emissions and resulting concentrations on climate, the impact on microbial ecosystems involved in hydrogen uptake, and criteria pollutants emitted from distributed and centralized hydrogen production pathways and their impacts on human health, air quality, ecosystems, and structures under different penetration scenarios

  2. PKC{eta} is a negative regulator of AKT inhibiting the IGF-I induced proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahaf, Galit; Rotem-Dai, Noa; Koifman, Gabriela; Raveh-Amit, Hadas; Frost, Sigal A.; Livneh, Etta, E-mail: etta@bgu.ac.il

    2012-04-15

    The PI3K-AKT pathway is frequently activated in human cancers, including breast cancer, and its activation appears to be critical for tumor maintenance. Some malignant cells are dependent on activated AKT for their survival; tumors exhibiting elevated AKT activity show sensitivity to its inhibition, providing an Achilles heel for their treatment. Here we show that the PKC{eta} isoform is a negative regulator of the AKT signaling pathway. The IGF-I induced phosphorylation on Ser473 of AKT was inhibited by the PKC{eta}-induced expression in MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cancer cells. This was further confirmed in shRNA PKC{eta}-knocked-down MCF-7 cells, demonstrating elevated phosphorylation on AKT Ser473. While PKC{eta} exhibited negative regulation on AKT phosphorylation it did not alter the IGF-I induced ERK phosphorylation. However, it enhanced ERK phosphorylation when stimulated by PDGF. Moreover, its effects on IGF-I/AKT and PDGF/ERK pathways were in correlation with cell proliferation. We further show that both PKC{eta} and IGF-I confer protection against UV-induced apoptosis and cell death having additive effects. Although the protective effect of IGF-I involved activation of AKT, it was not affected by PKC{eta} expression, suggesting that PKC{eta} acts through a different route to increase cell survival. Hence, our studies show that PKC{eta} provides negative control on AKT pathway leading to reduced cell proliferation, and further suggest that its presence/absence in breast cancer cells will affect cell death, which could be of therapeutic value.

  3. A multispectral view of the periodic events in eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Damineli; D. J. Hillier; M. F. Corcoran; O. Stahl; J. H. Groh; J. Arias; M. Teodoro; N. Morrell; R. Gamen; F. Gonzalez; N. V. Leister; H. Levato; R. S. Levenhagen; M. Grosso; J. F. Albacete Colombo; G. Wallerstein

    2008-03-12

    A full description of the 5.5-yr low excitation events in Eta Carinae is presented. We show that they are not as simple and brief as previously thought, but a combination of two components. The first, the 'slow variation' component, is revealed by slow changes in the ionization level of circumstellar matter across the whole cycle and is caused by gradual changes in the wind-wind collision shock-cone orientation, angular opening and gaseous content. The second, the 'collapse' component, is restricted to around the minimum, and is due to a temporary global collapse of the wind-wind collision shock. High energy photons (E > 16 eV) from the companion star are strongly shielded, leaving the Weigelt objects at low ionization state for >6 months. High energy phenomena are sensitive only to the 'collapse', low energy only to the 'slow variation' and intermediate energies to both components. Simple eclipses and mechanisms effective only near periastron (e.g., shell ejection or accretion onto the secondary star) cannot account for the whole 5.5-yr cycle. We find anti-correlated changes in the intensity and the radial velocity of P Cygni absorption profiles in FeII 6455 and HeI 7065 lines, indicating that the former is associated to the primary and the latter to the secondary star. We present a set of light curves representative of the whole spectrum, useful for monitoring the next event (2009 January 11).

  4. The Source of the Helium Visible Lines in Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amit Kashi; Noam Soker

    2007-04-13

    We assume that the helium-I lines emitted by the massive binary system Eta Carinae are formed in the acceleration zone of the less-massive secondary star. We calculate the Doppler shift of the lines as a function of orbital phase and of several parameters of the binary system. We find that a good fit is obtained if the helium lines are formed in the region where the secondary wind speed is 430 km/sec. The acceptable binary eccentricity is in the range 0.9-0.95, and the inclination angle (the angle between a line perpendicular to the orbital plane and the line of sight) is in the range 40-55 degrees. Lower values of e require higher values of i, and vice versa. The binary system is oriented such that the secondary star is in our direction (closer to us) during periastron passage. The orbital motion can account in part to the Doppler shift of the peak in X-ray emission.

  5. The Source of the Helium Visible Lines in Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kashi, A; Kashi, Amit; Soker, Noam

    2007-01-01

    We assume that the helium-I lines emitted by the massive binary system Eta Carinae are formed in the acceleration zone of the less-massive secondary star. We calculate the Doppler shift of the lines as a function of orbital phase and of several parameters of the binary system. We find that a good fit is obtained if the helium lines are formed in the region where the secondary wind speed is 430 km/sec. The acceptable binary eccentricity is in the range 0.9-0.95, and the inclination angle (the angle between a line perpendicular to the orbital plane and the line of sight) is in the range 40-55 degrees. Lower values of e require higher values of i, and vice versa. The binary system is oriented such that the secondary star is in our direction (closer to us) during periastron passage. The orbital motion can account in part to the Doppler shift of the peak in X-ray emission.

  6. Giant Outbursts of the Eta Carinae-P Cygni Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2006-09-14

    I discuss the role of short-duration eruptive mass loss in the evolution of very massive stars. Giant eruptions of Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) like the 19th century event of $\\eta$ Carinae can remove large quantities of mass almost instantaneously, making them significant in stellar evolution. They can potentially remove more mass from the star than line-driven winds, especially if winds are clumped such that O star mass-loss rates need to be revised downward. When seen in other galaxies as ``supernova impostors'', these eruptions typically last for less than a decade, and they can remove of order 10 M$_{\\odot}$ as indicated by massive nebulae around LBVs. Such extreme mass-loss rates cannot be driven by radiation pressure on spectral lines. Instead, these outbursts must either be continuum-driven super-Eddington winds or outright hydrodynamic explosions, both of which are insensitive to metallicity. As such, this eruptive mode of mass loss could play a pivotal role for massive metal-poor stars in the early universe.

  7. Search for B decays to final states with the eta_c meson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belle collaboration; A. Vinokurova; A. Kuzmin; S. Eidelman; A. Abdesselam; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; K. Arinstein; D. M. Asner; T. Aushev; R. Ayad; A. M. Bakich; V. Bansal; V. Bhardwaj; B. Bhuyan; A. Bobrov; A. Bondar; A. Bozek; M. Bra?ko; T. E. Browder; V. Chekelian; B. G. Cheon; K. Chilikin; R. Chistov; K. Cho; S. -K. Choi; Y. Choi; D. Cinabro; J. Dingfelder; Z. Doležal; Z. Drásal; A. Drutskoy; D. Dutta; D. Epifanov; H. Farhat; J. E. Fast; T. Ferber; V. Gaur; N. Gabyshev; A. Garmash; R. Gillard; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; J. Haba; K. Hayasaka; H. Hayashii; X. H. He; W. -S. Hou; K. Inami; A. Ishikawa; R. Itoh; Y. Iwasaki; D. Joffe; T. Julius; K. H. Kang; E. Kato; C. Kiesling; D. Y. Kim; H. J. Kim; J. H. Kim; K. T. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. J. Kim; K. Kinoshita; B. R. Ko; P. Kodyš; S. Korpar; P. Križan; P. Krokovny; T. Kuhr; T. Kumita; Y. -J. Kwon; J. S. Lange; L. Li Gioi; J. Libby; D. Liventsev; P. Lukin; D. Matvienko; K. Miyabayashi; H. Miyake; H. Miyata; G. B. Mohanty; A. Moll; T. Mori; R. Mussa; E. Nakano; M. Nakao; Z. Natkaniec; C. Ng; N. K. Nisar; S. Nishida; S. Ogawa; S. Okuno; S. L. Olsen; P. Pakhlov; G. Pakhlova; C. W. Park; H. Park; T. K. Pedlar; R. Pestotnik; M. Petri?; L. E. Piilonen; E. Ribežl; M. Ritter; A. Rostomyan; Y. Sakai; S. Sandilya; D. Santel; L. Santelj; T. Sanuki; Y. Sato; V. Savinov; O. Schneider; G. Schnell; C. Schwanda; D. Semmler; K. Senyo; O. Seon; M. E. Sevior; V. Shebalin; C. P. Shen; T. -A. Shibata; J. -G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; A. Sibidanov; F. Simon; Y. -S. Sohn; A. Sokolov; E. Solovieva; S. Stani?; M. Stari?; M. Steder; M. Sumihama; T. Sumiyoshi; U. Tamponi; G. Tatishvili; Y. Teramoto; M. Uchida; T. Uglov; Y. Unno; S. Uno; C. Van Hulse; P. Vanhoefer; G. Varner; V. Vorobyev; M. N. Wagner; C. H. Wang; M. -Z. Wang; P. Wang; Y. Watanabe; K. M. Williams; E. Won; J. Yamaoka; S. Yashchenko; Y. Yook; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhulanov; A. Zupanc

    2015-06-17

    We report a search for $B$ decays to selected final states with the $\\eta_c$ meson: $B^{\\pm}\\to K^{\\pm}\\eta_c\\pi^+\\pi^-$, $B^{\\pm}\\to K^{\\pm}\\eta_c\\omega$, $B^{\\pm}\\to K^{\\pm}\\eta_c\\eta$ and $B^{\\pm}\\to K^{\\pm}\\eta_c\\pi^0$. The analysis is based on $772\\times 10^6$ $B\\bar{B}$ pairs collected at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ collider. We set 90\\% confidence level upper limits on the branching fractions of the studied $B$ decay modes, independent of intermediate resonances, in the range $(0.6-5.3)\\times 10^{-4}$. We also search for molecular-state candidates in the $D^0\\bar{D}^{*0}-\\bar{D}^0D^{*0}$, $D^0\\bar{D}^0+\\bar{D}^0D^0$ and $D^{*0}\\bar{D}^{*0}+\\bar{D}^{*0}D^{*0}$ combinations, neutral partners of the $Z(3900)^{\\pm}$ and $Z(4020)^{\\pm}$, and a poorly understood state $X(3915)$ as possible intermediate states in the decay chain, and set 90\\% confidence level upper limits on the product of branching fractions to the mentioned intermediate states and decay branching fractions of these states in the range $(0.6-6.9)\\times 10^{-5}$.

  8. ETA FORMS AND THE CHERN CHARACTER ABSTRACT: The semi-topological nature of the eta-invariant of a self-adjoint elliptic differential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, Colin J.

    and regularized traces on infinite-dimensional vector bundles realized as the limiting values of superconnection(D) = Ker(D+ ) Ker(D- ) on B. The eta-form Aodd(B) = i (B, 2i+1TB) of the Bismut superconnection-Simons form for superconnections. 1 #12;2 Extensions to compatible Dirac operators associated to a fibration

  9. On a search for the $\\eta \\rightarrow e^+ e^-$ decay at the VEPP-2000 $e^+e^-$ collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achasov, M N; Berdyugin, K I Beloborodov A V; Bogdanchikov, A G; Botov, A A; Dimova, T V; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kardapoltsev, L V; Kharlamov, A G; Koop, I A; Korneev, L A; Korol, A A; Kovrizhin, D P; Kupich, A S; Lysenko, A P; Martin, K A; Muchnoi, N Yu; Obrazovsky, A E; Pakhtusova, E V; Perevedentsev, E A; Rogovsky, Yu A; Senchenko, A I; Serednyakov, S I; Silagadze, Z K; Shatunov, Yu M; Shtol, D A; Shwartz, D B; Skrinsky, A N; Surin, I K; Tikhonov, Yu A; Usov, Yu V; Vasiljev, A V; Zemlyansky, I M

    2015-01-01

    A sensitivity of the VEPP-2000 $e^+e^-$ collider in a search for the rare decay $\\eta \\rightarrow e^+ e^-$ has been studied. The inverse reaction $e^+ e^- \\rightarrow \\eta$ is proposed for this search. We have analyzed a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 108 nb$^{-1}$ collected with the SND detector in the center-of-mass energy range 520-580 MeV and found no background events for the reaction $e^+ e^- \\rightarrow \\eta$ in the decay mode $\\eta\\to\\pi^0\\pi^0\\pi^0$. In the absence of background, a sensitivity to ${\\cal B}(\\eta \\rightarrow e^+ e^-)$ of $10^{-6}$ can be reached during two weeks of VEPP-2000 operation. Such a sensitivity is better than the current upper limit on ${\\cal B}(\\eta \\rightarrow e^+ e^-)$ by a factor of 2.3.

  10. Technology transition in the national air transportation system : market failure and game theoretic analysis with application to ADS-B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Xiaojie

    2008-01-01

    This research analyzes the problem of technology transition in the national air transportation system, focusing on the implementation of Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B). ADS-B is a key technology in the ...

  11. Possible relevance of softening of sigma meson to $\\eta$ decay into 3$\\pi$ in nuclear medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakai, Shuntaro

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the role for the softening of the scalar-isoscalar (sigma) meson in the $\\eta\\rightarrow\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ and $3\\pi^0$ decay widths in the symmetric nuclear medium using a linear sigma model. Our calculation shows that these decay widths in the nuclear medium increase by up to a factor of four to ten compared with those in the free space mainly depending on the mass of the sigma meson in the free space which is an input parameter of the model. The enhancements are considerable even at a half of the normal nuclear density. Thus, the $\\eta$ decay into $3\\pi$ can be a new possible probe for the chiral restoration in the nuclear medium. We find that the density dependence of the $\\eta\\rightarrow3\\pi^0$ decay is moderate in comparison with that of the $\\eta\\rightarrow\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ although the former width is greater than the latter one at a given density: This is because the softening of the sigma meson causes the cancellation of the terms appearing from the Bose symmetry in the $\\eta\\rightarrow3...

  12. Application of a data assimilation method via an ensemble Kalman filter to reactive urea hydrolysis transport modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juxiu Tong; Bill X. Hu; Hai Huang; Luanjin Guo; Jinzhong Yang

    2014-03-01

    With growing importance of water resources in the world, remediations of anthropogenic contaminations due to reactive solute transport become even more important. A good understanding of reactive rate parameters such as kinetic parameters is the key to accurately predicting reactive solute transport processes and designing corresponding remediation schemes. For modeling reactive solute transport, it is very difficult to estimate chemical reaction rate parameters due to complex processes of chemical reactions and limited available data. To find a method to get the reactive rate parameters for the reactive urea hydrolysis transport modeling and obtain more accurate prediction for the chemical concentrations, we developed a data assimilation method based on an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) method to calibrate reactive rate parameters for modeling urea hydrolysis transport in a synthetic one-dimensional column at laboratory scale and to update modeling prediction. We applied a constrained EnKF method to pose constraints to the updated reactive rate parameters and the predicted solute concentrations based on their physical meanings after the data assimilation calibration. From the study results we concluded that we could efficiently improve the chemical reactive rate parameters with the data assimilation method via the EnKF, and at the same time we could improve solute concentration prediction. The more data we assimilated, the more accurate the reactive rate parameters and concentration prediction. The filter divergence problem was also solved in this study.

  13. Sustainable Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, Melvin

    2006-01-01

    THOUGHT PIECE Sustainable Transport by Melvin M. Webberwant to sustain any mode of transport only if we judge it todraconian in rejecting transport modes that have failed in

  14. First observation of the hadronic transition $ \\Upsilon(4S) \\to \\eta h_{b}(1P)$ and new measurement of the $h_b(1P)$ and $\\eta_b(1S)$ parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamponi, U; Abdesselam, A; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Asner, D M; Atmacan, H; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Badhrees, I; Bakich, A M; Barberio, E; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Biswal, J; Bondar, A; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bra?ko, M; Browder, T E; ?ervenkov, D; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S -K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Danilov, M; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Fulsom, B G; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Getzkow, D; Gillard, R; Goh, Y M; Golob, B; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Hedges, M T; Hou, W -S; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Jaegle, I; Joffe, D; Julius, T; Kato, E; Katrenko, P; Kichimi, H; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kim, S H; Kinoshita, K; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumita, T; Kuzmin, A; Lange, J S; Lewis, P; Libby, J; Lukin, P; Matvienko, D; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Mori, T; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Natkaniec, Z; Nayak, M; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ostrowicz, W; Oswald, C; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Park, H; Pedlar, T K; Pesántez, L; Pestotnik, R; Petri?c, M; Piilonen, L E; Ribežl, E; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Ryu, S; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Stari?, M; Steder, M; Stypula, J; Tanida, K; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Uchida, M; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Vossen, A; Wagner, M N; Wang, M -Z; Wang, X L; Watanabe, Y; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yashchenko, S; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2015-01-01

    Using a sample of $771.6 \\times 10^{6}$ $\\Upsilon(4S)$ decays collected by the Belle experiment at the KEKB $e^+e^-$ collider, we observe for the first time the transition $\\Upsilon(4S) \\to \\eta h_b(1P)$ with the branching fraction ${\\cal B}[\\Upsilon(4S) \\to \\eta h_b(1P)]= (2.18 \\pm 0.11 \\pm 0.18) \\times 10^{-3}$ and we measure the $h_b(1P)$ mass $M_{h_{b}(1P)} = (9899.3 \\pm 0.4 \\pm 1.0)$ MeV/$c^{2}$, corresponding to the hyperfine splitting $\\Delta M_{\\mathrm HF}(1P) = (0.6 \\pm 0.4 \\pm 1.0)$ MeV/$c^{2}$. Using the transition $h_b(1P) \\to \\gamma \\eta_b(1S)$, we measure the $\\eta_b(1S)$ mass $M_{\\eta_{b}(1S)} = (9400.7 \\pm 1.7 \\pm 1.6)$ MeV/$c^{2}$, corresponding to $\\Delta M_{\\mathrm HF}(1S) = (59.6 \\pm 1.7 \\pm 1.6)$ MeV/$c^{2}$, the $\\eta_b(1S)$ width $\\Gamma_{\\eta_{b}(1S)} = (8 ^{+6}_{-5} \\pm 5)$ MeV/$c^{2}$ and the branching fraction ${\\cal B}[h_b(1P) \\to \\gamma \\eta_b(1S)]= (56 \\pm 8 \\pm 4) \\%$.

  15. An Eta Primer: Solving the U(1) Problem with AdS/QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuel Katz; Matthew D Schwartz

    2007-10-02

    Inspired by the AdS/CFT correspondence, we study the pseudoscalar mesons of QCD through a dual embedding in a strongly curved extra dimensional spacetime. This model incorporates the consequences of symmetry and has very few free parameters, due to constraints from five-dimensions and the operator product expansion of QCD. Using as inputs the pion, kaon, and rho masses and fpi, we compute the eta and eta prime masses to be 520 and 867 MeV, respectively. Their decay rates into photons are also computed and found to be in good agreement with data.

  16. Transport Layer Cornell University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Transport Layer Ao Tang Cornell University Ithaca, NY 14853 Lachlan L. H. Andrew California. Low California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91125 I. INTRODUCTION The Internet has evolved of the physical layer, the link layer, the network layer, the transport layer and the application layer1 . See

  17. Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, N.J.

    2010-01-01

    a critical role in combustion processes just as chemicalparameters are essential for combustion modeling; molecularwith Application to Combustion. Transport Theor Stat 2003;

  18. Measurement of the B -> Omega l Nu and B -> Eta l Nu Branching Fractions Using Neutrino Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, Vincent; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-09-09

    The authors present a study of the charmless semileptonic B-meson decays B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu} and B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}. The analysis is based on 383 million B{bar B} pairs recorded at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The {omega} mesons are reconstructed in the channel {omega} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and the {eta} mesons in the channels {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. They measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.14 {+-} 0.16{sub stat} {+-} 0.08{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (0.31 {+-} 0.06{sub stat} {+-} 0.08{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4}.

  19. Measurement of the B+--> omega l+ nu and B+--> eta l+ nu branching fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Peter H.

    We present a study of the charmless semileptonic B-meson decays B+-->omega?+? and B+-->eta?+nu. The analysis is based on 3.83×108 BB[over-bar] pairs recorded at the ?(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The ? mesons ...

  20. The X-ray Lightcurve of the Supermassive star eta Carinae, 1996--2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corcoran, M F; Liburd, J K; Morris, D; Gull, T R; Madura, T I; Teodoro, M; Moffat, A F J; Richardson, N D; Russell, C M P; Pollock, A M T; Owocki, S P

    2015-01-01

    Eta Carinae is the nearest example of a supermassive, superluminous, unstable star. Mass loss from the system is critical in shaping its circumstellar medium and in determining its ultimate fate. Eta Car currently loses mass via a dense, slow stellar wind and possesses one of the largest mass loss rates known. It is prone to episodes of extreme mass ejection via eruptions from some as-yet unspecified cause; the best examples of this are the large-scale eruptions which occurred in 19th century. Eta Car is a colliding wind binary in which strong variations in X-ray emission and in other wavebands are driven by the violent collision of the wind of eta Car-A and the fast, less dense wind of an otherwise hidden companion star. X-ray variations are the simplest diagnostic we have to study the wind-wind collision and allow us to measure the state of the stellar mass loss from both stars. We present the X-ray lightcurve over the last 20 years from ROSAT observations and monitoring with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer...

  1. Search for neutrinoless tau decays involving pi(0) or eta mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

    1997-08-01

    We have searched for lepton flavor violating decays of the tau lepton using final states with an electron Or a muon and one or two pi(0) or eta mesons but no neutrinos. The data used in the search were collected with the CLEO II detector...

  2. WASTE PACKAGE TRANSPORTER DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.C. Weddle; R. Novotny; J. Cron

    1998-09-23

    The purpose of this Design Analysis is to develop preliminary design of the waste package transporter used for waste package (WP) transport and related functions in the subsurface repository. This analysis refines the conceptual design that was started in Phase I of the Viability Assessment. This analysis supports the development of a reliable emplacement concept and a retrieval concept for license application design. The scope of this analysis includes the following activities: (1) Assess features of the transporter design and evaluate alternative design solutions for mechanical components. (2) Develop mechanical equipment details for the transporter. (3) Prepare a preliminary structural evaluation for the transporter. (4) Identify and recommend the equipment design for waste package transport and related functions. (5) Investigate transport equipment interface tolerances. This analysis supports the development of the waste package transporter for the transport, emplacement, and retrieval of packaged radioactive waste forms in the subsurface repository. Once the waste containers are closed and accepted, the packaged radioactive waste forms are termed waste packages (WP). This terminology was finalized as this analysis neared completion; therefore, the term disposal container is used in several references (i.e., the System Description Document (SDD)) (Ref. 5.6). In this analysis and the applicable reference documents, the term ''disposal container'' is synonymous with ''waste package''.

  3. BETR-world: A geographically explicit model of chemical fate: Application to transport of a-HCH to the arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toose, Liisa; Woodfine, David G.; MacLeod, Matthew; Mackay, Don; Gouin, Jenn

    2003-12-01

    The Berkeley Trent (BETR)-World model, a 25 compartment, geographically explicit fugacity-based model is described and applied to evaluate the transport of chemicals from temperate source regions to receptor regions (such as the Arctic). The model was parameterized using GIS and an array of digital data on weather, oceans, freshwater, vegetation and geo-political boundaries. This version of the BETR model framework includes modification of atmospheric degradation rates by seasonally variable hydroxyl radical concentrations and temperature. Degradation rates in all other compartments vary with seasonally changing temperature. Deposition to the deep ocean has been included as a loss mechanism. A case study was undertaken for a-HCH. Dynamic emission scenarios were estimated for each of the 25 regions. Predicted environmental concentrations showed good agreement with measured values for the northern regions in air , and fresh and oceanic water and with the results from a previous model of global chemical fate. Potential for long-range transport and deposition to the Arctic region was assessed using a Transfer Efficiency combined with estimated emissions. European regions and the Orient including China have a high potential to contribute a-HCH contamination in the Arctic due to high rates of emission in these regions despite low Transfer Efficiencies. Sensitivity analyses reveal that the performance and reliability of the model is strongly in sequenced by parameters controlling degradation rates.

  4. Global coherence of quantum evolutions based on decoherent histories: theory and application to photosynthetic quantum energy transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Allegra; Paolo Giorda; Seth Lloyd

    2015-03-18

    In this paper we address the problem of charaterizing coherence in dissipative (Markovian) quantum evolutions. We base our analysis on the decoherent histories formalism which is the most basic and proper approach to assess coherence properties of quantum evolutions. We introduce and test different quantifiers and we show how these are able to capture the (average) coherence of general quantum evolutions on various time scales and for different levels of environmentally induced decoherence. In order to show the effectiveness of the introduced tools, we thoroughly apply them to a paradigmatic instance of quantum process where the role of coherence is being hotly debated: exciton transport in the FMO photosynthetic complex and its most relevant trimeric subunit. Our analysis illustrates how the high efficiency of environmentally assisted transport can be traced back to the coherence properties of the evolution and the interference between pathways in the decoherent histories formalism. Indeed, we show that the bath essentially implements a quantum recoil avoiding effect on the exciton dynamics: the action of decoherence in the system is set at precisely the right level needed to preserve and sustain the benefits of the fast initial quantum delocalization of the exciton over the network, while preventing the subsequent recoil that would necessarily follow form a purely coherent dynamics. This picture becomes very clear when expressed in terms of pathways leading to the exit site: the action of the bath is seen to selectively kill the negative interference between pathways, while retaining the intial positive one.

  5. Combined Estimation of Hydrogeologic Conceptual Model, Parameter, and Scenario Uncertainty with Application to Uranium Transport at the Hanford Site 300 Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Philip D.; Ye, Ming; Rockhold, Mark L.; Neuman, Shlomo P.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2007-07-30

    This report to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) describes the development and application of a methodology to systematically and quantitatively assess predictive uncertainty in groundwater flow and transport modeling that considers the combined impact of hydrogeologic uncertainties associated with the conceptual-mathematical basis of a model, model parameters, and the scenario to which the model is applied. The methodology is based on a n extension of a Maximum Likelihood implementation of Bayesian Model Averaging. Model uncertainty is represented by postulating a discrete set of alternative conceptual models for a site with associated prior model probabilities that reflect a belief about the relative plausibility of each model based on its apparent consistency with available knowledge and data. Posterior model probabilities are computed and parameter uncertainty is estimated by calibrating each model to observed system behavior; prior parameter estimates are optionally included. Scenario uncertainty is represented as a discrete set of alternative future conditions affecting boundary conditions, source/sink terms, or other aspects of the models, with associated prior scenario probabilities. A joint assessment of uncertainty results from combining model predictions computed under each scenario using as weight the posterior model and prior scenario probabilities. The uncertainty methodology was applied to modeling of groundwater flow and uranium transport at the Hanford Site 300 Area. Eight alternative models representing uncertainty in the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties as well as the temporal variability were considered. Two scenarios represent alternative future behavior of the Columbia River adjacent to the site were considered. The scenario alternatives were implemented in the models through the boundary conditions. Results demonstrate the feasibility of applying a comprehensive uncertainty assessment to large-scale, detailed groundwater flow and transport modeling and illustrate the benefits of the methodology I providing better estimates of predictive uncertiay8, quantitative results for use in assessing risk, and an improved understanding of the system behavior and the limitations of the models.

  6. A new measurement of the rare decay eta -> pi^0 gamma gamma with the Crystal Ball/TAPS detectors at the Mainz Microtron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nefkens, B M; Prakhov, S; Aguar-Bartolom??, P; Annand, J R; Arends, H J; Bantawa, K; Beck, R; Bekrenev, V; Bergh??user, H; Braghieri, A; Briscoe, W J; Brudvik, J; Cherepnya, S; Codling, R F; Collicott, C; Costanza, S; Danilkin, I V; Denig, A; Demissie, B; Dieterle, M; Downie, E J; Drexler, P; Fil'kov, L V; Fix, A; Garni, S; Glazier, D I; Gregor, R; Hamilton, D; Heid, E; Hornidge, D; Howdle, D; Jahn, O; Jude, T C; Kashevarov, V L; K??ser, A; Keshelashvili, I; Kondratiev, R; Korolija, M; Kotulla, M; Koulbardis, A; Kruglov, S; Krusche, B; Lisin, V; Livingston, K; MacGregor, I J; Maghrbi, Y; Mancel, J; Manley, D M; McNicoll, E F; Mekterovic, D; Metag, V; Mushkarenkov, A; Nikolaev, A; Novotny, R; Oberle, M; Ortega, H; Ostrick, M; Ott, P; Otte, P B; Oussena, B; Pedroni, P; Polonski, A; Robinson, J; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, T; Schumann, S; Sikora, M H; Starostin, A; Strakovsky, I I; Strub, T; Suarez, I M; Supek, I; Tarbert, C M; Thiel, M; Thomas, A; Unverzagt, M; Watts, D P; Werthmueller, D; Witthauer, L

    2014-08-01

    A new measurement of the rare, doubly radiative decay eta->pi^0 gamma gamma was conducted with the Crystal Ball and TAPS multiphoton spectrometers together with the photon tagging facility at the Mainz Microtron MAMI. New data on the dependence of the partial decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma), on the two-photon invariant mass squared, m^2(gamma gamma), as well as a new, more precise value for the decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma) = (0.33+/-0.03_tot) eV, are based on analysis of 1.2 x 10^3 eta->pi^0 gamma gamma decays from a total of 6 x 10^7 eta mesons produced in the gamma p -> eta p reaction. The present results for dGamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma)/dm^2(gamma gamma) are in good agreement with previous measurements and recent theoretical calculations for this dependence.

  7. Thermal Issues in Emerging Technologies, ThETA 3, Cairo, Egypt, Dec 19-22nd 978-1-61284-266-0/10/$26.00 2010 IEEE ThETA3_056 283

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ]. There is a recent micropower demonstration by Amatya and Ram [8]. The incident solar energy flux is around 1000W/m2Thermal Issues in Emerging Technologies, ThETA 3, Cairo, Egypt, Dec 19-22nd 2010 978-1-61284-266-0/10/$26.00 ©2010 IEEE ThETA3_056 283 SYSTEM OPTIMIZTION OF HOT WATER CONCENTRATED SOLAR THERMOELECTRIC GENERATION

  8. IX Encontro de tecnologia em Acstica Submarina IX ETAS Instituto de Estudos do Mar Almirante Paulo Moreira

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesus, Sérgio M.

    IX Encontro de tecnologia em Acústica Submarina ­ IX ETAS Instituto de Estudos do Mar Almirante properties variability is analysed using the Doppler spread function. #12;IX Encontro de tecnologia em

  9. Diameters of delta Cephei and eta Aquilae Measured with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. T. Armstrong; Tyler E. Nordgren; M. E. Germain; Arsen R. Hajian; R. B. Hindsley; C. A. Hummel; D. Mozurkewich; R. N. Thessin

    2000-09-25

    We have measured the diameters of the Cepheid variables delta Cephei (18 nights) and eta Aquilae (11 nights) with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer. The primary results of these observations are the mean angular diameters of these Cepheids: 1.520 +/- 0.014 milliseconds of arc (mas) for delta Cep and 1.69 +/- 0.04 mas for eta Aql. We also report limb-darkened diameters for the check stars in this program: for beta Lac, theta(LD) = 1.909 +/- 0.011 mas, and for 12 Aql, theta(LD) = 2.418 +/- 0.010 mas. When combined with radius estimates from period-radius relations in the literature, the Cepheid angular diameters suggest distances slightly smaller than, but still consistent with, the Hipparcos distances. Pulsations are weakly detected at a level of about 1.5 sigma to 2 sigma for both Cepheids.

  10. New Insights into the Coupling of $\\eta $ and $f_1$ Mesons to the Nucleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchbach, M; Neumeier, S; Kamalov, S S

    1996-01-01

    We show that the contact couplings of neutral pseudoscalar and axial mesons to the nucleon are proportional to $\\Delta s$, the fraction of nucleon spin carried by the strange quark sea, and thus are strongly suppressed relative to the couplings of charged mesons to the nucleon. On the other side, recent high accuracy data on $\\eta $ photoproduction at threshold reveal the need for non--negligibile $\\eta NN$ vertices, while fitting $\\bar N N$ phase shifts by means of effective meson exchange potentials requires a substantial presence of $f_1$ mesons there. We here advocate the idea to attribute the couplings of neutral pseudoscalar and axial vector mesons to effective triangular diagrams containig non--strange mesons and demonstrate its usefulness in describing available data.

  11. Thermal Energy Storage Technology for Transportation and Other...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Storage Technology for Transportation and Other Applications D. Bank, M. Maurer, J. Penkala, K. Sehanobish, A. Soukhojak Thermal Energy Storage Technology for Transportation...

  12. Resonances in coupled pi K, eta K scattering from quantum chromodynamics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dudek, Jozef J; Edwards, Robert G; Thomas, Christopher E; Wilson, David J

    2014-10-01

    Using first-principles calculation within Quantum Chromodynamics, we are able to reproduce the pattern of experimental strange resonances which appear as complex singularities within coupled pi K, eta K scattering amplitudes. We make use of numerical computation within the lattice discretized approach to QCD, extracting the energy dependence of scattering amplitudes through their relation- ship to the discrete spectrum of the theory in a finite-volume, which we map out in unprecedented detail.

  13. Test of charge conjugation invariance in the decay of the eta meson into pi(+)pi(-)pi(0)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Zielinski; P. Moskal

    2012-10-05

    In this work we present the preliminary results of the analysis of the pp->pp eta(->pp pi(+)pi(-)pi(0) reaction aiming to test the charge conjugation symmetry C in strong interactions. Based on approximately $10^5$ identified eta->pi(+)pi(-)pi(0) decay events we have extracted asymmetry parameters sensitive to C symmetry violation for different isospin values of the final state and we have established that all are consistent with zero within the obtained accuracy.

  14. Measurement of th eta and etaprime Transition Form Factors at q^2 = 112 GeV^2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-05-16

    The authors report a study of the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {eta}{gamma} and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {eta}'{gamma} at a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV, using a 232 fb{sup -1} data sample collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider at SLAC.

  15. Was the nineteenth century giant eruption of Eta Carinae a merger event in a triple system?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zwart, Simon Portegies

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the events that led to the giant eruption of Eta Carinae, and find that the mid-nineteenth century (in 1838-1843) giant mass-loss outburst has the characteristics of being produced by the merger event of a massive close binary, triggered by the gravitational interaction with a massive third companion star, which is the current binary companion in the Eta Carinae system. We come to this conclusion by a combination of theoretical arguments supported by computer simulations using the Astrophysical Multipurpose Software Environment. According to this model the $\\sim 90$\\,\\MSun\\, present primary star of the highly eccentric Eta Carinae binary system is the product of this merger, and its $\\sim 30$\\,\\MSun\\, companion originally was the third star in the system. In our model the Homunculus nebula was produced by an extremely enhanced stellar wind, energized by tidal energy dissipation prior to the merger, which enormously boosted the radiation-driven wind mass-loss. The current orbital plane is then align...

  16. Dissecting the Homunculus nebula around Eta Carinae with spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2002-11-27

    Near-infrared emission lines provide unique diagnostics of the geometry, structure, kinematics, and excitation of eta Carinae's circumstellar ejecta, and give clues to the nature of its wind. The infrared spectrum is a strong function of position in eta Car's nebula, with a mix of intrinsic and reflected emission. Molecular hydrogen traces cool gas and dust in the polar lobes, while [Fe II] blankets their inner surfaces. These lines reveal the back wall of the SE polar lobe for the first time, and give the clearest picture yet of the 3-D geometry. Additionally, collisionally-excited [Fe II] reveals the kinematic structure of a recently discovered `Little Homunculus' expanding inside the larger one. Equatorial gas in the `Fan', on the other hand, shows a spectrum indicating recombination and fluorescent pumping. Some equatorial ejecta glow in the He I 10830 line, showing evidence for material ejected in the 1890 outburst of eta Car. Closer to the star, the compact `Weigelt blobs' are marginally resolved, allowing their infrared spectrum to be separated from the star for the first time. In general, infrared spectra reveal a coherent, directional dependence of excitation in the Homunculus: polar ejecta are collisionally excited, whereas equatorial ejecta are dominated by fluorescence and normal photoexcitation. These are important clues to the geometry of the central star's UV radiation field. Reflected near-infrared emission lines also reveal interesting latitudinal dependence in the stellar wind.

  17. Modeling of coupled heat transfer and reactive transport processesin porous media: Application to seepage studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Spycher, Nicolas

    2007-01-15

    When hot radioactive waste is placed in subsurface tunnels, a series of complex changes occurs in the surrounding medium. The water in the pore space of the medium undergoes vaporization and boiling. Subsequently, vapor migrates out of the matrix pore space, moving away from the tunnel through the permeable fracture network. This migration is propelled by buoyancy, by the increased vapor pressure caused by heating and boiling, and through local convection. In cooler regions, the vapor condenses on fracture walls, where it drains through the fracture network. Slow imbibition of water thereafter leads to gradual rewetting of the rock matrix. These thermal and hydrological processes also bring about chemical changes in the medium. Amorphous silica precipitates from boiling and evaporation, and calcite from heating and CO2 volatilization. The precipitation of amorphous silica, and to a much lesser extent calcite, results in long-term permeability reduction. Evaporative concentration also results in the precipitation of gypsum (or anhydrite), halite, fluorite and other salts. These evaporative minerals eventually redissolve after the boiling period is over, however, their precipitation results in a significant temporary decrease in permeability. Reduction of permeability is also associated with changes in fracture capillary characteristics. In short, the coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes dynamically alter the hydrological properties of the rock. A model based on the TOUGHREACT reactive transport software is presented here to investigate the impact of THC processes on flow near an emplacement tunnel at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We show how transient changes in hydrological properties caused by THC processes often lead to local flow channeling and saturation increases above the tunnel. For models that include only permeability changes to fractures, such local flow channeling may lead to seepage relative to models where THC effects are ignored. However, coupled THC seepage models that include both permeability and capillary changes to fractures may not show this additional seepage.

  18. Study of the production mechanism of the eta meson in proton-proton collisions by means of analysing power measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Czyzykiewicz

    2007-02-06

    The analysing power measurements for the p(pol)p -> pp eta reaction studied in this dissertation are used in the determination of the reaction mechanism of the eta meson production in nucleon-nucleon collisions. Measurements have been performed in the close-to-threshold energy region at beam momenta of p(beam)=2.010 and 2.085 GeV/c, corresponding to the excess energies of Q = 10 and 36 MeV, respectively. The experiments were realised by means of a cooler synchrotron and storage ring COSY along with a cluster jet target. For registration of the reaction products the COSY-11 facility has been used. The identification of the eta meson has been performed with the missing mass method. The results for the angular dependence of the analysing power combined with the hitherto determined isospin dependence of the total cross section for the $\\eta$ meson production in the nucleon-nucleon collisions, reveal a statistically significant indication that the excitation of the nucleon to the S_{11} resonance, the process which intermediates the production of the eta meson, is predominantly due to the exchange of a pi meson between the colliding nucleons. The determined values of the analysing power at both excess energies are consistent with zero implying that the eta meson is produced predominantly in the s-wave at both excess energies.

  19. Transport and charging mechanisms in Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films for capacitive RF MEMS switches application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persano, A.; Quaranta, F.; Martucci, M. C.; Creti, P.; Siciliano, P.; Cola, A. [IMM-CNR, Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems-Unit of Lecce, National Council of Research, Via Monteroni, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    The potential of sputtered Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films to be used as dielectric layers in capacitive radio frequency microelectromechanical system switches is evaluated by investigating two factors of crucial importance for the performance of these devices which are the transport mechanisms and the charging effects in the dielectric layer. We find that Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} films show good electrical and dielectrical properties for the considered application in terms of a low leakage current density of 4 nA/cm{sup 2} for E=1 MV/cm, a high breakdown field of 4 MV/cm and a high dielectric constant of 32. For electric fields lower than 1 MV/cm the conduction mechanism is found to be variable-range hopping in the temperature range 300-400 K, while nearest-neighbor hopping is observed at higher temperatures. For fields in the range 1-4 MV/cm Poole-Frenkel becomes the dominant conduction mechanism. Current and capacitance transients used to investigate the charging effects show a decay which is well described by the stretched-exponential law, thus providing further insights on capture and emission processes.

  20. Cross Section and Double Helicity Asymmetry for Eta Mesons and Their Comparison to Neutral Pion Production in p+p Collisions at s = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A. [University of Colorado, Boulder; Awes, Terry C [ORNL; Cianciolo, Vince [ORNL; Efremenko, Yuri [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Enokizono, Akitomo [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Read Jr, Kenneth F [ORNL; Silvermyr, David O [ORNL; Sorensen, Soren P [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Stankus, Paul W [ORNL; PHENIX, Collaboration [The

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of double-helicity asymmetries in inclusive hadron production in polarized p+p collisions are sensitive to helicity-dependent parton distribution functions, in particular to the gluon helicity distribution, {Delta}g. This study focuses on the extraction of hte double-helicity asymmetry in {eta} production (p+p{yields}{eta}+X), the {eta} cross section, and the {eta}/{pi}{sup 0} cross section ratio. The cross section and ratio measurements provide essential input for the extraction of fragmentation functions that are needed to acess the helicity-dependent parton distribution functions.

  1. Transport coefficients of gluonic fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santosh K Das; Jan-e Alam

    2011-06-14

    The shear ($\\eta$) and bulk ($\\zeta$) viscous coefficients have been evaluated for a gluonic fluid. The elastic, $gg \\rightarrow gg$ and the inelastic, number non-conserving, $gg\\rightarrow ggg$ processes have been considered as the dominant perturbative processes in evaluating the viscous co-efficients to entropy density ($s$) ratios. Recently the processes: $gg \\rightarrow ggg$ has been revisited and a correction to the widely used Gunion-Bertsch (GB) formula has been obtained. The $\\eta$ and $\\zeta$ have been evaluated for gluonic fluid with the formula derived recently. The sensitivity of the quantity, $\\eta/s$ on the running coupling constant is also discussed. At $\\alpha_s=0.3$ we get $\\eta/s=0.24$ which is close to the value obtained from the analysis of the elliptic flow at RHIC experiments.

  2. 3D radiative transfer simulations of Eta Carinae's inner colliding winds - II: Ionization structure of helium at periastron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clementel, Nicola; Kruip, Chael J H; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Spectral observations of the massive colliding wind binary Eta Carinae show phase-dependent variations, in intensity and velocity, of numerous helium emission and absorption lines throughout the entire 5.54-year orbit. Approaching periastron, the 3D structure of the wind-wind interaction region (WWIR) gets highly distorted due to the eccentric ($e \\sim 0.9$) binary orbit. The secondary star ($\\eta_{\\mathrm{B}}$) at these phases is located deep within the primary's dense wind photosphere. The combination of these effects is thought to be the cause of the particularly interesting features observed in the helium lines at periastron. We perform 3D radiative transfer simulations of $\\eta$ Car's interacting winds at periastron. Using the SimpleX radiative transfer algorithm, we post-process output from 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of the inner 150 au of the $\\eta$ Car system for two different primary star mass-loss rates ($\\dot{M}_{\\eta_{\\mathrm{A}}}$). Using previous results from simulations at ap...

  3. Nitrogen and Oxygen Abundance Variations in the Outer Ejecta of Eta Carinae: Evidence for Recent Chemical Enrichment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith; Jon A. Morse

    2004-02-20

    We present optical spectra of the ionized `Outer Ejecta' of Eta Carinae that reveal differences in chemical composition at various positions. In particular, young condensations just outside the dusty Homunculus Nebula show strong nitrogen lines and little or no oxygen -- but farther away, nitrogen lines weaken and oxygen lines become stronger. The observed variations in the apparent N/O ratio may signify either that the various blobs were ejected with different abundances, or more likely, that the more distant condensations are interacting with normal-composition material. The second hypothesis is supported by various other clues involving kinematics and X-ray emission, and would suggest that Eta Car is enveloped in a ``cocoon'' deposited by previous stellar-wind mass loss. In particular, all emission features where we detect strong oxygen lines are coincident with or outside the soft X-ray shell. In either case, the observed abundance variations suggest that Eta Car's ejection of nitrogen-rich material is a recent phenomenon -- taking place in just the last few thousand years. Thus, Eta Carinae may be at a critical stage of evolution when ashes of the CNO cycle have just appeared at its surface. Finally, these spectra reveal some extremely fast nitrogen-rich material, with Doppler velocities up to 3200 km/s, and actual space velocities that may be much higher. This is the fastest material yet seen in Eta Car's nebula, but with unknown projection angles its age is uncertain.

  4. Observation of a backward peak in the gamma d ---> pi0 d cross- section near the eta threshold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yordanka Ilieva; Barry Berman; Alexander Kudryavtsev; I.I. Strakovsky; V.E. Tarasov; Moscov Amaryan; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Marco Anghinolfi; G. Asryan; Harutyun Avakian; Hovhannes Baghdasaryan; Nathan Baillie; Jacques Ball; Nathan Baltzell; V. Batourine; Marco Battaglieri; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Matthew Bellis; Nawal Benmouna; Angela Biselli; Sylvain Bouchigny; Sergey Boyarinov; Robert Bradford; Derek Branford; William Briscoe; William Brooks; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Cornel Butuceanu; John Calarco; Sharon Careccia; Daniel Carman; Shifeng Chen; Philip Cole; Patrick Collins; Philip Coltharp; Donald Crabb; Volker Crede; R. De Masi; Enzo De Sanctis; Raffaella De Vita; Pavel Degtiarenko; Alexandre Deur; Richard Dickson; Chaden Djalali; Gail Dodge; Joseph Donnelly; David Doughty; Michael Dugger; Oleksandr Dzyubak; Hovanes Egiyan; Kim Egiyan; Latifa Elouadrhiri; Paul Eugenio; Gleb Fedotov; Gerald Feldman; Herbert Funsten; Michel Garcon; Gagik Gavalian; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Francois-Xavier Girod; John Goetz; Atilla Gonenc; Ralf Gothe; Keith Griffioen; Michel Guidal; Nevzat Guler; Lei Guo; Vardan Gyurjyan; Kawtar Hafidi; Rafael Hakobyan; F. Hersman; Kenneth Hicks; Ishaq Hleiqawi; Maurik Holtrop; Charles Hyde; Charles Hyde-Wright; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Eugeny Isupov; Mark Ito; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Henry Juengst; Narbe Kalantarians; James Kellie; Mahbubul Khandaker; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; Mikhail Kossov; Zebulun Krahn; Laird Kramer; V. Kubarovsky; Joachim Kuhn; Sebastian Kuhn; Sergey Kuleshov; Jeff Lachniet; Jean Laget; Jorn Langheinrich; David Lawrence; Kenneth Livingston; Haiyun Lu; Marion MacCormick; Nikolai Markov; Bryan McKinnon; Bernhard Mecking; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Marco Mirazita; Rory Miskimen; Viktor Mokeev; Kei Moriya; Steven Morrow; M. Moteabbed; E. Munevar; Gordon Mutchler; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Silvia Niccolai; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Bogdan Niczyporuk; Megh Niroula; Rustam Niyazov; Mina Nozar; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; K. Park; Evgueni Pasyuk; Craig Paterson; Joshua Pierce; Nikolay Pivnyuk; Oleg Pogorelko; S. Pozdniakov; John Price; Yelena Prok; Dan Protopopescu; Brian Raue; Giovanni Ricco; Marco Ripani; Barry Ritchie; Federico Ronchetti; Guenther Rosner; Patrizia Rossi; Franck Sabatie; Carlos Salgado; Joseph Santoro; Vladimir Sapunenko; Reinhard Schumacher; Vladimir Serov; Youri Sharabian; Nikolay Shvedunov; Elton Smith; Lee Smith; Daniel Sober; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Samuel Stepanyan; Stepan Stepanyan; Burnham Stokes; Paul Stoler; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; David Tedeschi; Ulrike Thoma; Avtandil Tkabladze; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Clarisse Tur; Maurizio Ungaro; Michael Vineyard; Alexander Vlassov; Lawrence Weinstein; Dennis Weygand; M. Williams; Elliott Wolin; Michael Wood; Amrit Yegneswaran; Lorenzo Zana; Jixie Zhang; Bo Zhao; Zhiwen Zhao

    2007-05-14

    High-quality cross sections for the reaction gamma+d->pi^0+d have been measured using the CLAS at Jefferson Lab over a wide energy range near and above the eta-meson photoproduction threshold. At backward c.m. angles for the outgoing pions, we observe a resonance-like structure near E_gamma=700 MeV. Our model analysis shows that it can be explained by eta excitation in the intermediate state. The effect is the result of the contribution of the N(1535)S_11 resonance to the amplitudes of the subprocesses occurring between the two nucleons and of a two-step process in which the excitation of an intermediate eta meson dominates.

  5. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications: Conceptual vehicle design report pure fuel cell powertrain vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oei, D.; Kinnelly, A.; Sims, R.; Sulek, M.; Wernette, D.

    1997-02-01

    In partial fulfillment of the Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC02-94CE50389, {open_quotes}Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell for Transportation Applications{close_quotes}, this preliminary report addresses the conceptual design and packaging of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle. Three classes of vehicles are considered in this design and packaging exercise, the Aspire representing the small vehicle class, the Taurus or Aluminum Intensive Vehicle (AIV) Sable representing the mid-size vehicle and the E-150 Econoline representing the van-size class. A fuel cell system spreadsheet model and Ford`s Corporate Vehicle Simulation Program (CVSP) were utilized to determine the size and the weight of the fuel cell required to power a particular size vehicle. The fuel cell power system must meet the required performance criteria for each vehicle. In this vehicle design and packaging exercise, the following assumptions were made: fuel cell power system density of 0.33 kW/kg and 0.33 kg/liter, platinum catalyst loading less than or equal to 0.25 mg/cm{sup 2} total and hydrogen tanks containing gaseous hydrogen under 340 atm (5000 psia) pressure. The fuel cell power system includes gas conditioning, thermal management, humidity control, and blowers or compressors, where appropriate. This conceptual design of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle will help in the determination of the propulsion system requirements for a vehicle powered by a PEMFC engine in lieu of the internal combustion (IC) engine. Only basic performance level requirements are considered for the three classes of vehicles in this report. Each vehicle will contain one or more hydrogen storage tanks and hydrogen fuel for 560 km (350 mi) driving range. Under these circumstances, the packaging of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle is increasingly difficult as the vehicle size diminishes.

  6. Sustainable Transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in transportation technologies, alternative fuels, and fuel cell technologies.

  7. 3D Printing Meets Computational Astrophysics: Deciphering the Structure of Eta Carinae's Inner Colliding Winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madura, Thomas I; Gull, Theodore R; Kruip, Chael J H; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter

    2015-01-01

    We present the first 3D prints of output from a supercomputer simulation of a complex astrophysical system, the colliding stellar winds in the massive (>120 M_Sun), highly eccentric (e ~ 0.9) binary star system Eta Carinae. We demonstrate the methodology used to incorporate 3D interactive figures into a PDF journal publication and the benefits of using 3D visualization and 3D printing as tools to analyze data from multidimensional numerical simulations. Using a consumer-grade 3D printer (MakerBot Replicator 2X), we successfully printed 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of Eta Carinae's inner (r ~ 110 au) wind-wind collision interface at multiple orbital phases. The 3D prints and visualizations reveal important, previously unknown 'finger-like' structures at orbital phases shortly after periastron (phi ~ 1.045) that protrude radially outward from the spiral wind-wind collision region. We speculate that these fingers are related to instabilities (e.g. thin-shell, Rayleigh-Taylor) that arise a...

  8. The Optical Wind Line Variability of $\\eta$ Carinae During the 2009.0 Event

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Noel D; Gull, Theodore R; Moffat, Anthony F J; St-Jean, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    We report on high-resolution spectroscopy of the 2009.0 spectroscopic event of $\\eta$ Carinae collected via SMARTS observations using the CTIO 1.5 m telescope and echelle spectrograph. Our observations were made almost every night over a two-month interval around the photometric minimum of $\\eta$ Car associated with the periastron passage of a hot companion. The photoionizing flux of the companion and heating related to colliding winds causes large changes in the wind properties of the massive primary star. Here we present an analysis of temporal variations in a sample of spectral lines that are clearly formed in the wind of the primary star. These lines are affected by a changing illumination of the flux of the secondary star during the periastron passage. We document the sudden onset of blue-shifted absorption that occurred in most of the lines near or slightly after periastron, and we argue that these absorption components are seen when we view the relatively undisturbed wind of the foreground primary star...

  9. He II 4686 in eta Carinae and the nature of the 5.538-yr cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teodoro, M; Arias, J I; de Araújo, F X; Barbá, R H; Corcoran, M F; Fernandes, M Borges; Fernández-Lajús, E; Fraga, L; Gamen, R C; González, J F; Groh, J H; Marshall, J L; McGregor, P J; Morrell, N; Nicholls, D C; Parkin, E R; Pereira, C B; Phillips, M M; Solivella, G R; Steiner, J E; Stritzinger, M; Thompson, I; Torres, C A O; Torres, M A P; Zevallos-Herencia, M I

    2011-01-01

    The periodic minima in eta Carinae are now well defined and interpreted as due to periastron passage of two massive stars in a very eccentric orbit. Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the light curve of different spectral features, such as eclipse, shell ejection, accretion and/or collapse of the primary wind onto the secondary star. All of them face difficulties to explain the observations in the full range of wavelengths. To better understand the nature of cyclic events, we performed a dense monitoring of eta Carinae along the 2009 spectroscopic event, focusing on the high-energy He II 4686 emission line. Our results indicate that the intensity curve of He II 4686 peaks at L~310 L_sun, has a phase-locked behaviour and shows a temporal correlation with the X-ray emission, ruling out many proposed sources of energy. The most suitable location for the He II 4686 emission region is the shocked primary wind, about 4-5 AU downstream from the apex. The 'collapse' component seen in light curves of X...

  10. On the origin of \\gamma-ray emission in \\eta\\ Carina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohm, S; Hinton, J A; Parkin, E R

    2015-01-01

    \\eta\\ Car is the only colliding-wind binary for which high-energy \\gamma\\ rays are detected. Although the physical conditions in the shock region change on timescales of hours to days, the variability seen at GeV energies is weak and on significantly longer timescales. The \\gamma-ray spectrum exhibits two features that can be interpreted as emission from the shocks on either side of the contact discontinuity. Here we report on the first time-dependent modelling of the non-thermal emission in \\eta\\ Car. We find that emission from primary electrons is likely not responsible for the \\gamma-ray emission, but accelerated protons interacting with the dense wind material can explain the observations. In our model, efficient acceleration is required at both shocks, with the primary side acting as a hadron calorimeter, whilst on the companion side acceleration is limited by the flow time out of the system, resulting in changing acceleration conditions. The system therefore represents a unique laboratory for the explor...

  11. 3D hydrodynamical and radiative transfer modeling of Eta Carinae's colliding winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madura, Thomas I; Gull, Theodore R; Kruip, Chael J H; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Icke, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    We present results of full 3D hydrodynamical and radiative transfer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in the massive binary system Eta Carinae. We accomplish this by applying the SimpleX algorithm for 3D radiative transfer on an unstructured Voronoi-Delaunay grid to recent 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the binary colliding winds. We use SimpleX to obtain detailed ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium, in 3D, at the resolution of the original SPH simulations. We investigate several computational domain sizes and Luminous Blue Variable primary star mass-loss rates. We furthermore present new methods of visualizing and interacting with output from complex 3D numerical simulations, including 3D interactive graphics and 3D printing. While we initially focus on Eta Car, the methods employed can be applied to numerous other colliding wind (WR 140, WR 137, WR 19) and dusty 'pinwheel' (WR 104, WR 98a) binary systems. Coupled with 3D hydrodynamical simulations, SimpleX simulatio...

  12. THE FREQUENCY OF LOW-MASS EXOPLANETS. III. TOWARD {eta}{sub +} AT SHORT PERIODS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Tinney, C. G.; Bailey, J.; Horner, J.; Butler, R. P.; O'Toole, Simon J.; Jones, H. R. A.; Carter, B. D.

    2011-09-01

    Determining the occurrence rate of 'super-Earth' planets (m sin i < 10 M{sub +}) is a critically important step on the path toward determining the frequency of Earth-like planets ({eta}{sub +}), and hence the uniqueness of our solar system. Current radial-velocity surveys, achieving precisions of 1 m s{sup -1}, are now able to detect super-Earths and provide meaningful estimates of their occurrence rate. We present an analysis of 67 solar-type stars from the Anglo-Australian Planet Search specifically targeted for very high precision observations. When corrected for incompleteness, we find that the planet occurrence rate increases sharply with decreasing planetary mass. Our results are consistent with those from other surveys: in periods shorter than 50 days, we find that 3.0% of stars host a giant (msin i > 100 M{sub +}) planet, and that 17.4% of stars host a planet with msin i < 10 M{sub +}. The preponderance of low-mass planets in short-period orbits is in conflict with formation simulations in which the majority of super-Earths reside at larger orbital distances. This work gives a hint as to the size of {eta}{sub +}, but to make meaningful predictions on the frequency of terrestrial planets in longer, potentially habitable orbits, low-mass terrestrial planet searches at periods of 100-200 days must be made an urgent priority for ground-based Doppler planet searches in the years ahead.

  13. Taylor-Couette turbulence at radius ratio $\\eta=0.5$: scaling, flow structures and plumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Veen, Roeland C A; Merbold, Sebastian; Harlander, Uwe; Egbers, Christoph; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Using high-resolution particle image velocimetry we measure velocity profiles, the wind Reynolds number and characteristics of turbulent plumes in Taylor-Couette flow for a radius ratio of 0.5 and Taylor number of up to $6.2\\cdot10^9$. The extracted angular velocity profiles follow a log-law more closely than the azimuthal velocity profiles due to the strong curvature of this $\\eta=0.5$ setup. The scaling of the wind Reynolds number with the Taylor number agrees with the theoretically predicted 3/7-scaling for the classical turbulent regime, which is much more pronounced than for the well-explored $\\eta=0.71$ case, for which the ultimate regime sets in at much lower Ta. By measuring at varying axial positions, roll structures are found for counter-rotation while no clear coherent structures are seen for pure inner cylinder rotation. In addition, turbulent plumes coming from the inner and outer cylinder are investigated. For pure inner cylinder rotation, the plumes in the radial velocity move away from the inn...

  14. FEBRUARY 1999 119O ' C O N N O R E T A L . Forecast Verification for Eta Model Winds Using Lake Erie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FEBRUARY 1999 119O ' C O N N O R E T A L . Forecast Verification for Eta Model Winds Using Lake Forecasting System (GLCFS) can be used to validate wind forecasts for the Great Lakes using observed weather prediction step-coordinate Eta Model are able to forecast winds for the Great Lakes region, using

  15. Transport properties in resonant tunneling heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presilla, Carlo

    Transport properties in resonant tunneling heterostructures Carlo Presillaa) Dipartimento di Fisica approximation in terms of instantaneous resonances to study the steady-state and time-dependent transport leads, in a natural way, to a transport model of large applicability consisting of reservoirs coupled

  16. Transport in Dynamical Astronomy and Multibody Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koon, Wang Sang

    Transport in Dynamical Astronomy and Multibody Problems Michael Dellnitz, Oliver Junge, Wang Sang key dynamical features, including almost invariant sets, resonance regions as well as transport rates of these different numerical tools and their applicability. In particular, we compute transport rates between two

  17. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

  18. Diagnosis of the Low-Level Jet using a sounding analysis scheme and the ETA model, a case study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wigginton, Scott Barrett

    2000-01-01

    studied using this analysis scheme during a case study from May 1995. The data set used consisted of 80-km Eta model output. When compared to other methods, the developed analysis scheme showed more LLJ detail and structure. The LLJ appeared with multiple...

  19. Dynamic downscaling of 22-year CFS winter seasonal hindcasts with the UCLA-ETA regional climate model over the United

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Yongkang

    Dynamic downscaling of 22-year CFS winter seasonal hindcasts with the UCLA-ETA regional climate for Environmental Prediction Climate Forecast System (NCEP CFS), winter season predictions over the contiguous in the study. CFS over-predicts the precipitation in eastern and western US by as much as 45 and 90

  20. Study of the production mechanism of the eta meson in proton-proton collisions by means of analysing power measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czyzykiewicz, R

    2006-01-01

    The analysing power measurements for the p(pol)p -> pp eta reaction studied in this dissertation are used in the determination of the reaction mechanism of the eta meson production in nucleon-nucleon collisions. Measurements have been performed in the close-to-threshold energy region at beam momenta of p(beam)=2.010 and 2.085 GeV/c, corresponding to the excess energies of Q = 10 and 36 MeV, respectively. The experiments were realised by means of a cooler synchrotron and storage ring COSY along with a cluster jet target. For registration of the reaction products the COSY-11 facility has been used. The identification of the eta meson has been performed with the missing mass method. The results for the angular dependence of the analysing power combined with the hitherto determined isospin dependence of the total cross section for the $\\eta$ meson production in the nucleon-nucleon collisions, reveal a statistically significant indication that the excitation of the nucleon to the S_{11} resonance, the process whic...

  1. Attoheat transport phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marciak-Kozlowska; M. Pelc; M. A. Kozlowski

    2009-06-09

    Fascinating developments in optical pulse engineering over the last 20 years lead to the generation of laser pulses as short as few femtosecond, providing a unique tool for high resolution time domain spectroscopy. However, a number of the processes in nature evolve with characteristic times of the order of 1 fs or even shorter. Time domain studies of such processes require at first place sub-fs resolution, offered by pulse depicting attosecond localization. The generation, characterization and proof of principle applications of such pulses is the target of the attoscience. In the paper the thermal processes on the attosecond scale are described. The Klein-Gordon and Proca equations are developed. The relativistic effects in the heat transport on nanoscale are discussed. It is shown that the standard Fourier equation can not be valid for the transport phenomena induced by attosecond laser pulses. The heat transport in nanoparticles and nanotubules is investigated.

  2. Transportation Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boreo, Andrea; Li, Wei; Wunnenbuger, Douglas; Giusti, Cecilia; Cooper, John T.; Masterson, Jaimie

    2015-01-01

    Mobility throughout a community ensures freedom of movement and enhances quality of life. Traffic congestion, pollution, urban sprawl, social exclusion, safety and health can decrease mobility and should be a part of a sustainable transportation...

  3. electrifyingthefuture transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    programme of electrification and the potential introduction of diesel hybrids. The Department for Transport vehicles Wind turbine systems Industrial equipment The lab has full ethernet capability which will enable

  4. Spatiotemporal Monte Carlo transport methods in x-ray semiconductor detectors: Application to pulse-height spectroscopy in a-Se

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang Yuan; Badal, Andreu; Allec, Nicholas; Karim, Karim S.; Badano, Aldo

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: The authors describe a detailed Monte Carlo (MC) method for the coupled transport of ionizing particles and charge carriers in amorphous selenium (a-Se) semiconductor x-ray detectors, and model the effect of statistical variations on the detected signal. Methods: A detailed transport code was developed for modeling the signal formation process in semiconductor x-ray detectors. The charge transport routines include three-dimensional spatial and temporal models of electron-hole pair transport taking into account recombination and trapping. Many electron-hole pairs are created simultaneously in bursts from energy deposition events. Carrier transport processes include drift due to external field and Coulombic interactions, and diffusion due to Brownian motion. Results: Pulse-height spectra (PHS) have been simulated with different transport conditions for a range of monoenergetic incident x-ray energies and mammography radiation beam qualities. Two methods for calculating Swank factors from simulated PHS are shown, one using the entire PHS distribution, and the other using the photopeak. The latter ignores contributions from Compton scattering and K-fluorescence. Comparisons differ by approximately 2% between experimental measurements and simulations. Conclusions: The a-Se x-ray detector PHS responses simulated in this work include three-dimensional spatial and temporal transport of electron-hole pairs. These PHS were used to calculate the Swank factor and compare it with experimental measurements. The Swank factor was shown to be a function of x-ray energy and applied electric field. Trapping and recombination models are all shown to affect the Swank factor.

  5. Application

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications TraditionalWithAntiferromagnetic Spins Do The TwistContract2Application

  6. Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications TraditionalWithAntiferromagnetic Spins Do TheApplication Portingboat ride on

  7. Survey and discussion of models applicable to the transport and fate thrust area of the Department of Energy Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    The availability and easy production of toxic chemical and biological agents by domestic and international terrorists pose a serious threat to US national security, especially to civilian populations in and around urban areas. To address this threat, the Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (CBNP) with the goal of focusing the DOE`s technical resources and expertise on capabilities to deny, deter, mitigate and respond to clandestine releases of chemical and biological agents. With the intent to build on DOE core competencies, the DOE has established six technology thrust areas within the CBNP Program: Biological Information Resources; Point Sensor Systems; Stand-off Detection; Transport and Fate; Decontamination; and Systems Analysis and Integration. The purpose of the Transport and Fate Thrust is to accurately predict the dispersion, concentration and ultimate fate of chemical and biological agents released into the urban and suburban environments and has two major goals: (1) to develop an integrated and validated state-of-the-art atmospheric transport and fate modeling capability for chemical and biological agent releases within the complex urban environment from the regional scale down to building and subway interiors, and (2) to apply this modeling capability in a broad range of simulation case studies of chemical and biological agent release scenarios in suburban, urban and confined (buildings and subways) environments and provide analysis for the incident response user community. Sections of this report discuss subway transport and fate models; buildings interior transport and fate modeling; models for flow and transport around buildings; and local-regional meteorology and dispersion models.

  8. ReaxFF Reactive Force Field for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems with Application to Oxygen Ion Transport in Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    ReaxFF Reactive Force Field for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems with Application to Oxygen Ion through yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) membranes. All parameters for Reax and cluster systems. We validated the use of ReaxFF for fuel cell applications by using it in molecular

  9. Exploring transport and phase behavior in nanoporous carbon materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shimizu, Steven (Steven Franklin Esau)

    2015-01-01

    Understanding transport and phase behavior in nanopores has a substantial impact on applications involving membrane fabrication, single-molecule detection, oil reservoir modeling, and drug delivery. While transport and ...

  10. Space and Ground Based Pulsation Data of Eta Bootis Explained with Stellar Models Including Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian W. Straka; Pierre Demarque; D. B. Guenther; Linghuai Li; Frank J. Robinson

    2005-09-14

    The space telescope MOST is now providing us with extremely accurate low frequency p-mode oscillation data for the star Eta Boo. We demonstrate in this paper that these data, when combined with ground based measurements of the high frequency p-mode spectrum, can be reproduced with stellar models that include the effects of turbulence in their outer layers. Without turbulence, the l=0 modes of our models deviate from either the ground based or the space data by about 1.5-4.0 micro Hz. This discrepancy can be completely removed by including turbulence in the models and we can exactly match 12 out of 13 MOST frequencies that we identified as l=0 modes in addition to 13 out of 21 ground based frequencies within their observational 2 sigma tolerances. The better agreement between model frequencies and observed ones depends for the most part on the turbulent kinetic energy which was taken from a 3D convection simulation for the Sun.

  11. Orbital Parameters for the $250 M_\\odot$ Eta Carinae Binary System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kashi, Amit

    2015-01-01

    We show that recent observations of He I and N II lines of Eta Carinae support an orbital orientation where the secondary star is closest to us at periastron passages. This conclusion is valid both for the commonly assumed masses of the two stars, and for the higher stellar masses model where the very massive evolved primary star mass is $M_1=170 M_\\odot$ and its hot secondary star mass is $M_2 = 80 M_\\odot$. The later model better explains the change in the orbital period assuming that the ninetieth century Great Eruption was powered by accretion onto the secondary star. Adopting the commonly used high eccentricity $e \\simeq 0.9$ and inclination $i=41^\\circ$, we obtain a good fit to newly released Doppler shift observations of He I emission and absorption lines assuming they are emitted and absorbed in the acceleration zone of the secondary stellar wind. Our conclusion that the secondary star is in the foreground at periastron reverses an opposite view presented recently in the literature.

  12. The Eta Chamaeleontis Cluster Origin in the Sco-Cen OB Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamajek, E E; Feigelson, E D; Mamajek, Eric E.; Lawson, Warrick A.; Feigelson, Eric D.

    2000-01-01

    A young, nearby compact aggregate of X-ray emitting pre-main sequence stars was recently discovered in the vicinity of eta Cha (B8V). In this paper, we further investigate this cluster: its membership, its environs and origins. ROSAT HRI X-ray data for the cluster's T Tauri stars show high levels of magnetic activity and variability. The cluster has an anomalous X-ray luminosity function compared to other young clusters, deficient in stars with low, but detectable X-ray luminosities. This suggests that many low-mass members have escaped the surveyed core region. Photographic photometry from the USNO-A2.0 catalog indicates that additional, X-ray-quiet members exist in the cluster core region. The components of the eclipsing binary RS Cha, previously modeled in the literature as post-MS with discordant ages, are shown to be consistent with being coeval pre-MS stars. We compute the Galactic motion of the cluster from Hipparcos data, and compare it to other young stars and associations in the fourth Galactic quad...

  13. Doppler tomography of the Little Homunculus: High resolution spectra of [Fe II] 16435 around Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2004-12-21

    High-resolution spectra of [Fe II] 16435 around eta Carinae provide powerful diagnostics of the geometry and kinematics of the ``Little Homunculus'' (LH) growing inside the larger Homunculus nebula. The LH expansion is not perfectly homologous: while low-latitudes are consistent with linear expansion since 1910, the polar caps imply ejection dates around 1920--1930. However, the expansion speed of the LH is slower than the post-eruption wind, so the star's powerful wind may accelerate it. With an initial ejection speed of 200 km/s in 1890, the LH would have been accelerated to its present speed if the mass is roughly 0.1 Msun. This agrees with an independent estimate of the LH mass based on its density and volume. In any case, an ejection after 1930 is ruled out. Using the LH as a probe of the 1890 event, then, it is evident that its most basic physical parameters (total mass and kinetic energy; 0.1 Msun and 10^46.9 ergs, respectively) are orders of magnitude less than during the giant eruption in the 1840s. Thus, the ultimate energy sources were different for these two events -- yet their ejecta have the same bipolar geometry. This clue may point toward a collimation mechanism separate from the underlying causes of the outbursts.

  14. Preface: Nonclassical Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolshov, L.

    2010-01-01

    models of solute transport in highly heterogeneous geologicSemenov. 2008b. Nonclassical transport processes in geologicand L. Matveev. 2008. Transport regimes and concentration

  15. Intelligent Transport Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deakin, Elizabeth; Frick, Karen Trapenberg; Skabardonis, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    in Sustainable Urban Transport: City Interview Synthesis (of Leeds, Institute for Transport Studies, forthcoming.I NTELLIGENT TRANSPORT SYSTEMS LINKING TECHNOLOGY AND

  16. Sustainability and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Gilbert is a Toronto-based transport and energy consultantof the forthcoming book Transport Revolutions: Making theand substantial transition to transport systems based on

  17. Sandia Energy - Transportation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Safety Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Nuclear Energy Safety Technologies Risk and Safety Assessment Transportation Safety Transportation SafetyTara...

  18. TRANSPORTATION Objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koopman, Philip

    -the-shelf networks l Apply to specially designed safety-critical embedded networks l Lightweight mechanisms for safe (automotive application reference protocol) CAN (automotive application non-critical reference protocol) Mechanisms to provide basic safety building blocks (should be in hardware/firmware) Policies to manage

  19. A spatial multigrid iterative method for two-dimensional discrete-ordinates transport problems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lansrud, Brian David

    2005-08-29

    Introduction to Chapter I............................................................ 1 The Discrete Transport Equation ............................................... 2 Examples of Current Iterative Transport Methods..................... 5................................................................... 16 Current Applications of Spatial-Multigrid Methods to SN Transport Problems........................................................... 17 Krylov Subspace Methods ......................................................... 21 Goals...

  20. Ordered transport and identification of particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shera, E.B.

    1993-05-11

    A method and apparatus are provided for application of electrical field gradients to induce particle velocities to enable particle sequence and identification information to be obtained. Particle sequence is maintained by providing electroosmotic flow for an electrolytic solution in a particle transport tube. The transport tube and electrolytic solution are selected to provide an electroosmotic radius of >100 so that a plug flow profile is obtained for the electrolytic solution in the transport tube. Thus, particles are maintained in the same order in which they are introduced in the transport tube. When the particles also have known electrophoretic velocities, the field gradients introduce an electrophoretic velocity component onto the electroosmotic velocity. The time that the particles pass selected locations along the transport tube may then be detected and the electrophoretic velocity component calculated for particle identification. One particular application is the ordered transport and identification of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a strand of DNA.

  1. SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan Ogden and Lorraine Anderson #12;SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS #12;SUSTAINABLE;6 SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS #12;1 SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS

  2. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation. Radionuclides irreversibly sorbed onto this fraction of colloids also transport without retardation. The transport times for these radionuclides will be the same as those for nonsorbing radionuclides. The fraction of nonretarding colloids developed in this analysis report is used in the abstraction of SZ and UZ transport models in support of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This analysis report uses input from two Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) analysis reports. This analysis uses the assumption from ''Waste Form and In-Drift Colloids-Associated Radionuclide Concentrations: Abstraction and Summary'' that plutonium and americium are irreversibly sorbed to colloids generated by the waste degradation processes (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025]). In addition, interpretations from RELAP analyses from ''Saturated Zone In-Situ Testing'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170010]) are used to develop the retardation factor distributions in this analysis.

  3. [TiII] and [NiII] emission from the strontium filament of eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Bautista; H. Hartman; T. R. Gull; N. Smith; K. Lodders

    2006-06-12

    We study the nature of the [TiII] and [NiII] emission from the so-called strontium filament found in the ejecta of eta Carinae. To this purpose we employ multilevel models of the TiII and NiII systems which are used to investigate the physical condition of the filament and the excitation mechanisms of the observed lines. For the TiII ion, for which no atomic data was previously available, we carry out ab initio calculations of radiative transition rates and electron impact excitation rate coefficients. It is found that the observed spectrum is consistent with the lines being excited in a mostly neutral region with an electron density of the order of $10^7$ cm$^{-3}$ and a temperature around 6000 K. In analyzing three observations with different slit orientations recorded between March~2000 and November~2001 we find line ratios that change among various observations, in a way consistent with changes of up to an order of magnitude in the strength of the continuum radiation field. These changes result from different samplings of the extended filament, due to the different slit orientations used for each observation, and yield clues on the spatial extent and optical depth of the filament. The observed emission indicates a large Ti/Ni abundance ratio relative to solar abundances. It is suggested that the observed high Ti/Ni ratio in gas is caused by dust-gas fractionation processes and does not reflect the absolute Ti/Ni ratio in the ejecta of \\etacar. We study the condensation chemistry of Ti, Ni and Fe within the filament and suggest that the observed gas phase overabundance of Ti

  4. Beam Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara McClintockSecurityBeam Transport Beam

  5. Stochastic Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3X-rays3 Prepared by:'!Transport in PPCD Discharges by

  6. Greening Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSC GettingGraphene's 3DGreenGreenTransportation

  7. Carbon Dioxide Transportation and Sequestration Act (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act applies to the application process for the issuance of a certificate of authority by an owner or operator of a pipeline designed, constructed, and operated to transport and to sequester...

  8. Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-10-26

    Establishes Department of Energy (DOE) policies and requirements to supplement applicable laws, rules, regulations, and other DOE Orders for materials transportation and packaging operations. Cancels: DOE 1540.1A, DOE 1540.2, and DOE 1540.3A.

  9. Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-27

    Establishes Department of Energy (DOE) policies and requirements to supplement applicable laws, rules, regulations, and other DOE Orders for materials transportation and packaging operations. Cancels DOE 1540.1A, DOE 1540.2, DOE 1540.3A.

  10. UVA Hydraulic and Transport Engineering Lab for Sustainable River Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    #12;UVA Hydraulic and Transport Engineering Lab for Sustainable River Resources Some Applications: Small and Large Dam Removal River Restoration / Rehabilitation In Stream Flow Calculation Stormwater

  11. PhD Graduate Assistantship in Environmental Management/Applied Mathematics Mathematical and computational modeling of ocean transport with application to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billings, Lora

    PhD Graduate Assistantship in Environmental Management/Applied Mathematics Mathematical. Applications are invited for a PhD graduate research assistant in Environmental Management at Montclair State University (MSU), Montclair, NJ, USA. The goal of the PhD research will be to combine computer models

  12. Structures and Transport Properties of Hydrated Water-Soluble Dendrimer-Grafted Polymer Membranes for Application to Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    for application to polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). Using full-atomistic molecular dynamics materials for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC).1-6 This has led to a number of new materials or above). Recently, we proposed a strategy for improving the perfor- mance of PEMFC by utilizing

  13. Current status, research needs, and opportunities in applications of surface processing to transportation and utilities technologies. Proceedings of a December 1991 workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czanderna, A.W.; Landgrebe, A.R.

    1992-09-01

    Goal of surface processing is to develop innovative methods of surface modification and characterization for optimum performance and environmental protection for cost-effective operational lifetimes of systems, materials, and components used in transportation and utilities. These proceedings document the principal discussions and conclusions reached at the workshop; they document chapters about the current status of surface characterization with focus on composition, structure, bonding, and atomic-scale topography of surfaces. Also documented are chapters on the current status of surface modification techniques: electrochemical, plasma-aided, reactive and nonreactive physical vapor deposition, sol-gel coatings, high-energy ion implantation, ion-assisted deposition, organized molecular assemblies, solar energy. Brief chapters in the appendices document basic research in surface science by NSF, Air Force, and DOE. Participants at the workshop were invited to serve on 10 working groups. Separate abstracts were prepared for the data base where appropriate.

  14. Transport coefficients, membrane couplings and universality at extremality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel F. Paulos

    2009-11-20

    We present an efficient method for computing the zero frequency limit of transport coefficients in strongly coupled field theories described holographically by higher derivative gravity theories. Hydrodynamic parameters such as shear viscosity and conductivity can be obtained by computing residues of poles of the off-shell lagrangian density. We clarify in which sense these coefficients can be thought of as effective couplings at the horizon, and present analytic, Wald-like formulae for the shear viscosity and conductivity in a large class of general higher derivative lagrangians. We show how to apply our methods to systems at zero temperature but finite chemical potential. Our results imply that such theories satisfy $\\eta/s=1/4\\pi$ universally in the Einstein-Maxwell sector. Likewise, the zero frequency limit of the real part of the conductivity for such systems is shown to be universally zero, and we conjecture that higher derivative corrections in this sector do not modify this result to all orders in perturbation theory.

  15. Final Technical Report - Stochastic Analysis of Advection-Diffusion-reaction Systems with Applications to Reactive Transport in Porous Media - DE-FG02-07ER24818

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karniadakis, George Em

    2014-03-11

    The main objective of this project is to develop new computational tools for uncertainty quantifica- tion (UQ) of systems governed by stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) with applications to advection-diffusion-reaction systems. We pursue two complementary approaches: (1) generalized polynomial chaos and its extensions and (2) a new theory on deriving PDF equations for systems subject to color noise. The focus of the current work is on high-dimensional systems involving tens or hundreds of uncertain parameters.

  16. (12) INTERNATIONAL APPLICATION PUBLISHED UNDER THE PATENT COOPERATION TREATY (PCT) (19) World Intellectual Property Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    ) INTERNATIONAL APPLICATION PUBLISHED UNDER THE PATENT COOPERATION TREATY (PCT) (19) World Intellectual Property.11.2003) PCT WO 03/097291 Al (51) International Patent Classification7: B23K 26/00 (74) Agents: TANG, Henry eta, SD, SE, SG, SK, SL, TJ, TM, TN, TR, TT, TZ, UA, UG, US, UZ, VC, VN, YU, ZA, ZM, ZW. (84) Designated

  17. (12) INTERNATIONAL APPLICATION PUBLISHED UNDER THE PATENT COOPERATION TREATY (PCT) (19) World Intellectual Property

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    ---- (12) INTERNATIONAL APPLICATION PUBLISHED UNDER THE PATENT COOPERATION TREATY (PCT) (19) World.01.2005) PCT WO 2005/005069 A2 (51) International Patent Classification7: B21D (74) Agents: TANG, Henry eta, SG, SK, SL, TJ, TM, TN, TR, TT, TZ, UA, UG, US, UZ, VC, VN, YU, ZA, ZM, ZW. (84) Designated States

  18. Transporting particulate material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldred, Derek Leslie (North Hollywood, CA); Rader, Jeffrey A. (North Hollywood, CA); Saunders, Timothy W. (North Hollywood, CA)

    2011-08-30

    A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

  19. MELTER: A model of the thermal response of cargos transported in the Safe-Secure Trailer subject to fire environments for risk assessment applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, M.E.

    1994-08-01

    MELTER is an analysis of cargo responses inside a fire-threatened Safe-Secure Trailer (SST) developed for the Defense Program Transportation Risk Assessment (DPTRA). Many simplifying assumptions are required to make the subject problem tractable. MELTER incorporates modeling which balances the competing requirements of execution speed, generality, completeness of essential physics, and robustness. Input parameters affecting the analysis include those defining the fire scenario, those defining the cargo loaded in the SST, and those defining properties of the SST. For a specified fire, SST, and cargo geometry MELTER predicts the critical fire duration that will lead to a failure. The principal features of the analysis include: (a) Geometric considerations to interpret fire-scenario descriptors in terms of a thermal radiation boundary condition, (b) a simple model of the SST`s wall combining the diffusion model for radiation through optically-thick media with an endothermic reaction front to describe the charring of dimensional, rigid foam in the SST wall, (c) a transient radiation enclosure model, (d) a one-dimensional, spherical idealization of the shipped cargos providing modularity so that cargos of interest can be inserted into the model, and (e) associated numerical methods to integrate coupled, differential equations and find roots.

  20. Heights integrated model as instrument for simulation of hydrodynamic, radiation transport, and heat conduction phenomena of laser-produced plasma in EUV applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sizyuk, V.; Hassanein, A.; Morozov, V.; Sizyuk, T.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2007-01-16

    The HEIGHTS integrated model has been developed as an instrument for simulation and optimization of laser-produced plasma (LPP) sources relevant to extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. The model combines three general parts: hydrodynamics, radiation transport, and heat conduction. The first part employs a total variation diminishing scheme in the Lax-Friedrich formulation (TVD-LF); the second part, a Monte Carlo model; and the third part, implicit schemes with sparse matrix technology. All model parts consider physical processes in three-dimensional geometry. The influence of a generated magnetic field on laser plasma behavior was estimated, and it was found that this effect could be neglected for laser intensities relevant to EUV (up to {approx}10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}). All applied schemes were tested on analytical problems separately. Benchmark modeling of the full EUV source problem with a planar tin target showed good correspondence with experimental and theoretical data. Preliminary results are presented for tin droplet- and planar-target LPP devices. The influence of three-dimensional effects on EUV properties of source is discussed.

  1. Vapor Transport in Dry Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2001-11-16

    Water-vapor movement in soils is a complex process, controlled by both diffusion and advection and influenced by pressure and thermal gradients acting across tortuous flow paths. Wide-ranging interest in water-vapor transport includes both theoretical and practical aspects. Just how pressure and thermal gradients enhance water-vapor flow is still not completely understood and subject to ongoing research. Practical aspects include dryland farming (surface mulching), water harvesting (aerial wells), fertilizer placement, and migration of contaminants at waste-sites. The following article describes the processes and practical applications of water-vapor transport, with emphasis on unsaturated (dry) soil systems.

  2. Transportation Data Programs:Transportation Energy Data Book...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Data Programs:Transportation Energy Data Book,Vehicle Technologies Market Report, and VT Fact of the Week Transportation Data Programs:Transportation Energy Data...

  3. Transport Processes in a Salt-Dome Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kornhuber, Ralf

    Transport Processes in a Salt-Dome Environment Sylvia Rockel Sebastian Sklorz Maurizio Vaccaro Summerschool in Modelling of Mass and Energy Transport in Porous Media With Practical Applications Berlin, 15 october 2010 #12;Problem · Subsurface flow and transport within a vertical cross section of a sedimentary

  4. System-Scale Model of Aquifer, Vadose Zone, and River Interactions for the Hanford 300 Area - Application to Uranium Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Bacon, Diana H.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Parker, Kyle R.; Waichler, Scott R.; Williams, Mark D.

    2013-10-01

    This report represents a synthesis and integration of basic and applied research into a system-scale model of the Hanford 300 Area groundwater uranium plume, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Richland Operations (DOE-RL) office. The report integrates research findings and data from DOE Office of Science (DOE-SC), Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), and DOE-RL projects, and from the site remediation and closure contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, LLC (WCH). The three-dimensional, system-scale model addresses water flow and reactive transport of uranium for the coupled vadose zone, unconfined aquifer, and Columbia River shoreline of the Hanford 300 Area. The system-scale model of the 300 Area was developed to be a decision-support tool to evaluate processes of the total system affecting the groundwater uranium plume. The model can also be used to address “what if” questions regarding different remediation endpoints, and to assist in design and evaluation of field remediation efforts. For example, the proposed cleanup plan for the Hanford 300 Area includes removal, treatment, and disposal of contaminated sediments from known waste sites, enhanced attenuation of uranium hot spots in the vadose and periodically rewetted zone, and continued monitoring of groundwater with institutional controls. Illustrative simulations of polyphosphate infiltration were performed to demonstrate the ability of the system-scale model to address these types of questions. The use of this model in conjunction with continued field monitoring is expected to provide a rigorous basis for developing operational strategies for field remediation and for defining defensible remediation endpoints.

  5. Task 3: PNNL Visit by JAEA Researchers to Participate in TODAM Code Applications to Fukushima Rivers and to Evaluate the Feasibility of Adaptation of FLESCOT Code to Simulate Radionuclide Transport in the Pacific Ocean Coastal Water Around Fukushima

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Yasuo

    2013-03-29

    Four JAEA researchers visited PNNL for two weeks in February, 2013 to learn the PNNL-developed, unsteady, one-dimensional, river model, TODAM and the PNNL-developed, time-dependent, three dimensional, coastal water model, FLESCOT. These codes predict sediment and contaminant concentrations by accounting sediment-radionuclide interactions, e.g., adsorption/desorption and transport-deposition-resuspension of sediment-sorbed radionuclides. The objective of the river and coastal water modeling is to simulate • 134Cs and 137Cs migration in Fukushima rivers and the coastal water, and • their accumulation in the river and ocean bed along the Fukushima coast. Forecasting the future cesium behavior in the river and coastal water under various scenarios would enable JAEA to assess the effectiveness of various on-land remediation activities and if required, possible river and coastal water clean-up operations to reduce the contamination of the river and coastal water, agricultural products, fish and other aquatic biota. PNNL presented the following during the JAEA visit to PNNL: • TODAM and FLESCOT’s theories and mathematical formulations • TODAM and FLESCOT model structures • Past TODAM and FLESCOT applications • Demonstrating these two codes' capabilities by applying them to simple hypothetical river and coastal water cases. • Initial application of TODAM to the Ukedo River in Fukushima and JAEA researchers' participation in its modeling. PNNL also presented the relevant topics relevant to Fukushima environmental assessment and remediation, including • PNNL molecular modeling and EMSL computer facilities • Cesium adsorption/desorption characteristics • Experiences of connecting molecular science research results to macro model applications to the environment • EMSL tour • Hanford Site road tour. PNNL and JAEA also developed future course of actions for joint research projects on the Fukushima environmental and remediation assessments.

  6. Eta Carinae's 2014.6 Spectroscopic Event: Clues to the Long-term Recovery from its Great Eruption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehner, A; Humphreys, R M; Walter, F M; Baade, D; de Wit, W J; Martin, J; Ishibashi, K; Rivinius, T; Martayan, C; Ruiz, M T; Weis, K

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Every 5.5 years eta Car's light curve and spectrum change remarkably across all observed wavelength bands. We compare the recent spectroscopic event in mid-2014 to the events in 2003 and 2009 and investigate long-term trends. Methods. Eta Car was observed with HST STIS, VLT UVES, and CTIO 1.5m CHIRON for a period of more than two years in 2012-2015. Archival observations with these instruments cover three orbital cycles. Results. Important spectroscopic diagnostics show significant changes in 2014 compared to previous events. While the timing of the first HeII 4686 flash was remarkably similar to previous events, the HeII equivalent widths were slightly larger and the line flux increased compared to 2003. The second HeII peak occurred at about the same phase as in 2009, but was stronger. The HeI line flux grew in 2009-2014 compared to 1998-2003. On the other hand, Halpha and FeII lines show the smallest emission strengths ever observed. Conclusions. The basic character of the spectroscopic events has ch...

  7. Erosion and Optimal Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birnir, Bjorn; Rowlett, Julie

    2010-01-01

    383 pp. EROSION AND OPTIMAL TRANSPORT [23] I. Ekeland and T.and D. Simons, Sediment transport capacity of overland ?ow,measure spaces via optimal transport, Ann. of Math. (2),

  8. Branching fractions for chi_cJ -> p p-bar pi^0, p p-bar eta, and p p-bar omega

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLEO Collaboration; P. U. E. Onyisi; J. L. Rosner; J. P. Alexander; D. G. Cassel; S. Das; R. Ehrlich; L. Fields; L. Gibbons; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; J. M. Hunt; D. L. Kreinick; V. E. Kuznetsov; J. Ledoux; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; D. Riley; A. Ryd; A. J. Sadoff; X. Shi; W. M. Sun; J. Yelton; P. Rubin; N. Lowrey; S. Mehrabyan; M. Selen; J. Wiss; S. Adams; M. Kornicer; R. E. Mitchell; M. R. Shepherd; C. M. Tarbert; D. Besson; T. K. Pedlar; J. Xavier; D. Cronin-Hennessy; J. Hietala; P. Zweber; S. Dobbs; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; T. Xiao; A. Tomaradze; S. Brisbane; J. Libby; L. Martin; A. Powell; P. Spradlin; G. Wilkinson; H. Mendez; J. Y. Ge; D. H. Miller; I. P. J. Shipsey; B. Xin; G. S. Adams; D. Hu; B. Moziak; J. Napolitano; K. M. Ecklund; J. Insler; H. Muramatsu; C. S. Park; E. H. Thorndike; F. Yang; S. Ricciardi; C. Thomas; M. Artuso; S. Blusk; R. Mountain; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; J. C. Wang; L. M. Zhang; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; A. Lincoln; M. J. Smith; P. Zhou; J. Zhu; P. Naik; J. Rademacker; D. M. Asner; K. W. Edwards; J. Reed; K. Randrianarivony; A. N. Robichaud; G. Tatishvili; E. J. White; R. A. Briere; H. Vogel

    2010-05-28

    Using a sample of 25.9 million psi(2S) decays acquired with the CLEO-c detector at the CESR e^+e^- collider, we report branching fractions for the decays chi_cJ -> p p-bar pi^0, p p-bar eta, and p p-bar omega, with J=0,1,2. Our results for B(chi_cJ-> p p-bar pi^0) and B(chi_cJ-> p p-bar eta) are consistent with, but more precise than, previous measurements. Furthermore, we include the first measurement of B(chi_cJ-> p p-bar omega).

  9. Photon and Eta Production in p+Pb and p+C Collisions at sqrt{sNN} = 17.4 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WA98 Collaboration

    2012-11-02

    Measurements of direct photon production in p+Pb and p+C collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}} = 17.4\\mathrm{GeV}$ are presented. Upper limits on the direct photon yield as a function of $p_\\mathrm{T}$ are derived and compared to the results for Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}} = 17.3$ GeV. The production of the $\\eta$ meson, which is an important input to the direct photon signal extraction, has been determined in the $\\eta \\rightarrow 2\\gamma$ channel for p+C collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}} = 17.4\\mathrm{GeV}$.

  10. Quantum transport in ultracold atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chih-Chun Chien; Sebastiano Peotta; Massimiliano Di Ventra

    2015-04-11

    Ultracold atoms confined by engineered magnetic or optical potentials are ideal systems for studying phenomena otherwise difficult to realize or probe in the solid state because their atomic interaction strength, number of species, density, and geometry can be independently controlled. This review focuses on quantum transport phenomena in atomic gases that mirror and oftentimes either better elucidate or show fundamental differences with those observed in mesoscopic and nanoscopic systems. We discuss significant progress in performing transport experiments in atomic gases, contrast similarities and differences between transport in cold atoms and in condensed matter systems, and survey inspiring theoretical predictions that are difficult to verify in conventional setups. These results further demonstrate the versatility offered by atomic systems in the study of nonequilibrium phenomena and their promise for novel applications.

  11. Transporting Hazardous Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transporting Hazardous Materials The procedures given below apply to all materials that are considered to be hazardous by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Consult your...

  12. Sustainability and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard

    2006-01-01

    2005. Integrating Sustainability into the Trans- portationTHOUGHT PIECE Sustainability and Transport by Richardof the concept of sustainability to transport planning. In

  13. SATURATED ZONE FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODEL ABSTRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.W. ARNOLD

    2004-10-27

    The purpose of the saturated zone (SZ) flow and transport model abstraction task is to provide radionuclide-transport simulation results for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) calculations. This task includes assessment of uncertainty in parameters that pertain to both groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in the models used for this purpose. This model report documents the following: (1) The SZ transport abstraction model, which consists of a set of radionuclide breakthrough curves at the accessible environment for use in the TSPA-LA simulations of radionuclide releases into the biosphere. These radionuclide breakthrough curves contain information on radionuclide-transport times through the SZ. (2) The SZ one-dimensional (I-D) transport model, which is incorporated in the TSPA-LA model to simulate the transport, decay, and ingrowth of radionuclide decay chains in the SZ. (3) The analysis of uncertainty in groundwater-flow and radionuclide-transport input parameters for the SZ transport abstraction model and the SZ 1-D transport model. (4) The analysis of the background concentration of alpha-emitting species in the groundwater of the SZ.

  14. FRP for Transportation and Civil Engineering Infrastructure: Reality and Vision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FRP for Transportation and Civil Engineering Infrastructure: Reality and Vision S. Rizkalla and M polymer (FRP) composite materials in civil engineering and transportation infrastructure applications. Due in infrastructure applications. While the use of FRP composites has become common practice in civil engineering

  15. Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hengbing

    2013-01-01

    Applications of Natural Gas as Transportation Engine Fuel,duty vehicle transportation sector, but current natural gasnatural gas to displace fossil diesel fuel in the freight transportation

  16. Air transport of plutonium metal: content expansion initiative for the plutonium air transportable (PAT01) packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caviness, Michael L; Mann, Paul T

    2010-01-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has submitted an application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the air shipment of plutonium metal within the Plutonium Air Transportable (PAT-1) packaging. The PAT-1 packaging is currently authorized for the air transport of plutonium oxide in solid form only. The INMM presentation will provide a limited overview of the scope of the plutonium metal initiative and provide a status of the NNSA application to the NRC.

  17. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oei, D.

    1995-08-03

    This is the fourth Technical Progress Report for DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-94CE50389 awarded to Ford Motor Company on July 1, 1994. The overall objective of this contract is to advance the Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology for automotive applications. Specifically, the objectives resulting from this contract are to: (1) Develop and demonstrate on a laboratory propulsion system within 2-1/2 years a fully functional PEM Fuel Cell Power System (including fuel cell peripherals, peak power augmentation and controls). This propulsion system will achieve, or will be shown to have the growth potential to achieve, the weights, volumes, and production costs which are competitive with those same attributes of equivalently performing internal combustion engine propulsion systems; (2) Select and demonstrate a baseline onboard hydrogen storage method with acceptable weight, volume, cost, and safety features and analyze future alternatives; and (3) Analyze the hydrogen infrastructure components to ensure that hydrogen can be safely supplied to vehicles at geographically widespread convenient sites and at prices which are less than current gasoline prices per vehicle-mile; (4) Identify any future R&D needs for a fully integrated vehicle and for achieving the system cost and performance goals.

  18. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairns, Elton J.; Hietbrink, Earl H.

    1981-01-01

    This section includes some historical background of the rise and fall and subsequent rebirth of the electric vehicle; and a brief discussion of current transportation needs, and environmental and energy utilization issues that resulted in the renewed interest in applying electrochemical energy conversion technology to electric vehicle applications. Although energy utilization has evolved to be the most significant and important issue, the environmental issue will be discussed first in this section only because of its chronological occurrence. The next part of the chapter is a review of passenger and commercial electric vehicle technology with emphasis on vehicle design and demonstrated performance of vehicles with candidate power sources being developed. This is followed by a discussion of electrochemical power source requirements associated with future electric vehicles that can play a role in meeting modern transportation needs. The last part of the chapter includes first a discussion of how to identify candidate electrochemical systems that might be of interest in meeting electric vehicle power source requirements. This is then followed by a review of the current technological status of these systems and a discussion of the most significant problems that must be resolved before each candidate system can be a viable power source.

  19. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  20. Triangular flow in hydrodynamics and transport theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alver, Burak Han [Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States); Gombeaud, Clement; Luzum, Matthew; Ollitrault, Jean-Yves [CNRS, URA2306, IPhT, Institut de physique theorique de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2010-09-15

    In ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions, the Fourier decomposition of the relative azimuthal angle, {Delta}{phi}, distribution of particle pairs yields a large cos(3{Delta}{phi}) component, extending to large rapidity separations {Delta}{eta}>1. This component captures a significant portion of the ridge and shoulder structures in the {Delta}{phi} distribution, which have been observed after contributions from elliptic flow are subtracted. An average finite triangularity owing to event-by-event fluctuations in the initial matter distribution, followed by collective flow, naturally produces a cos(3{Delta}{phi}) correlation. Using ideal and viscous hydrodynamics and transport theory, we study the physics of triangular (v{sub 3}) flow in comparison to elliptic (v{sub 2}), quadrangular (v{sub 4}), and pentagonal (v{sub 5}) flow. We make quantitative predictions for v{sub 3} at RHIC and LHC as a function of centrality and transverse momentum. Our results for the centrality dependence of v{sub 3} show a quantitative agreement with data extracted from previous correlation measurements by the STAR collaboration. This study supports previous results on the importance of triangular flow in the understanding of ridge and shoulder structures. Triangular flow is found to be a sensitive probe of initial geometry fluctuations and viscosity.

  1. Transport Equations Thomas Hillen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hillen, Thomas

    Transport Equations Thomas Hillen supported by NSERC University of Alberta, Edmonton Transport V , V compact and symmetric. Transport Equations ­ p.2/33 #12;Directed Movement The equation pt(t, x of v. Transport Equations ­ p.3/33 #12;With Directional Changes µ: turning rate. T(v, v ): probability

  2. Motor Transport Co. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    METROPOLITAN TRANSPORTATION PLAN Prepared by: The Longview Metropolitan Planning Organization In cooperation with: o City of Longview o City of White Oak o Gregg County o Harrison County o Texas Department of Transportation o U.S. Department... of Transportation o Federal Highway Administration o Federal Transit Administration Adopted November 12, 2009 TRANSPORTATION 2035 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION...

  3. What happens to the Upsilon and eta_b in the quark-gluon plasma? Bottomonium spectral functions from lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gert Aarts; Chris Allton; Seyong Kim; Maria Paola Lombardo; Mehmet B. Oktay; Sinead M. Ryan; D. K. Sinclair; Jon-Ivar Skullerud

    2011-11-21

    We study bottomonium spectral functions in the quark-gluon plasma in the Upsilon and eta_b channels, using lattice QCD simulations with two flavours of light quark on highly anisotropic lattices. The bottom quark is treated with nonrelativistic QCD (NRQCD). In the temperature range we consider, 0.42 MEM), used to construct the spectral functions, are discussed in some detail.

  4. Thermal Issues in Emerging Technologies, ThETA 1, Cairo, Egypt, Jan 3-6 Graceful Operation of Disk Drives under Thermal Emergencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    Thermal Issues in Emerging Technologies, ThETA 1, Cairo, Egypt, Jan 3-6 ¢¡ 2007 Graceful Operation. This is increasingly important due to the growing power density at all the granularity of the system architecture in a rack/room, cause a large amount of power to be dissipated in a much smaller footprint. Since

  5. An Infinite Family in $\\pi_\\ast S^0$ Derived from Mahowald's $\\eta_j$ Family Author(s): Robert R. Bruner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruner, Robert R.

    An Infinite Family in $\\pi_\\ast S^0$ Derived from Mahowald's $\\eta_j$ Family Author(s): Robert R & Conditions of Use, available at . http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp . JSTOR is a not@jstor.org. . American Mathematical Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access

  6. Introduction Transport in disordered graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Ballistic transport in disordered graphene P, Gornyi, Mirlin Ballistic transport in disordered graphene #12;Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Outline 1 Introduction Model Experimental motivation Transport in clean graphene 2

  7. Ridge Structure associated with the Near-Side Jet in the (Delta phi)-(Delta eta) Correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheuk-Yin Wong

    2007-10-15

    In the (Delta phi)-(Delta eta) correlation associated with a near-side jet observed by the STAR Collaboration in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC [Ref. 1-6], the ridge structure can be explained by the momentum kick model in which the ridge particles are identified as medium partons which suffer a collision with the jet and acquire a momentum kick along the jet direction. If this is indeed the correct mechanism, the ridge structure associated with the near-side jet may be used to probe the parton momentum distribution at the moment of the jet-parton collision, leading to the result that at that instant the parton temperature is slightly higher and the rapidity width substantially greater than corresponding quantities of their evolution product inclusive particles at the end point of the nucleus-nucleus collision.

  8. NearCoM-TVD --A quasi-3D nearshore circulation and sediment transport model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    NearCoM-TVD -- A quasi-3D nearshore circulation and sediment transport model Jia-Lin Chen , Fengyan: Nearshore community model TVD-scheme Sediment transport Sandbar migration The newly developed nearshore). For sediment transport applications, two sediment transport models are applied to pre- dict three sandbar

  9. Fast transport of Bose-Einstein condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Torrontegui; Xi Chen; M. Modugno; S. Schmidt; A. Ruschhaupt; J. G. Muga

    2011-03-13

    We propose an inverse method to accelerate without final excitation the adiabatic transport of a Bose Einstein condensate. The method, applicable to arbitrary potential traps, is based on a partial extension of the Lewis-Riesenfeld invariants, and provides transport protocols that satisfy exactly the no-excitation conditions without constraints or approximations. This inverse method is complemented by optimizing the trap trajectory with respect to different physical criteria and by studying the effect of noise.

  10. Investigating transport pathways in the ocean Annalisa Griffa a,b,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgökmen, Tamay M.

    of kilometers to the dissipation scales. Transport by ocean currents plays an important role in many practical is relevant to a number of important applications. Ocean currents transport physical properties to understand and predict transport by ocean currents is crucial for climatic applications, for instance

  11. Effective Potential Energy Expression for Membrane Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert W. Finkel

    2007-02-11

    All living cells transport molecules and ions across membranes, often against concentration gradients. This active transport requires continual energy expenditure and is clearly a nonequilibrium process for which standard equilibrium thermodynamics is not rigorously applicable. Here we derive a nonequilibrium effective potential that evaluates the per particle transport energy invested by the membrane. A novel method is used whereby a Hamiltonian function is constructed using particle concentrations as generalized coordinates. The associated generalized momenta are simply related to the individual particle energy from which we identify the effective potential. Examples are given and the formalism is compared with the equilibrium Gibb's free energy.

  12. Nonequilibrium Spin Magnetization Quantum Transport Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buot, F A; Otadoy, R E S; Villarin, D L

    2011-01-01

    The classical Bloch equations of spin magnetization transport is extended to fully time-dependent and highly-nonlinear nonequilibrium quantum distribution function (QDF) transport equations. The leading terms consist of the Boltzmann kinetic equation with spin-orbit coupling in a magnetic field together with spin-dependent scattering terms which do not have any classical analogue, but should incorporate the spatio-temporal-dependent phase-space dynamics of Elliot-Yafet and D'yakonov-Perel scatterings. The resulting magnetization QDF transport equation serves as a foundation for computational spintronic and nanomagnetic device applications, in performing simulation of ultrafast-switching-speed/low-power performance and reliability analyses.

  13. In-facility transport code review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spore, J.W.; Boyack, B.E.; Bohl, W.R.

    1996-07-01

    The following computer codes were reviewed by the In-Facility Transport Working Group for application to the in-facility transport of radioactive aerosols, flammable gases, and/or toxic gases: (1) CONTAIN, (2) FIRAC, (3) GASFLOW, (4) KBERT, and (5) MELCOR. Based on the review criteria as described in this report and the versions of each code available at the time of the review, MELCOR is the best code for the analysis of in-facility transport when multidimensional effects are not significant. When multi-dimensional effects are significant, GASFLOW should be used.

  14. Secure Transportation Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, P. W.

    2014-10-15

    Secure Transport Management Course (STMC) course provides managers with information related to procedures and equipment used to successfully transport special nuclear material. This workshop outlines these procedures and reinforces the information presented with the aid of numerous practical examples. The course focuses on understanding the regulatory framework for secure transportation of special nuclear materials, identifying the insider and outsider threat(s) to secure transportation, organization of a secure transportation unit, management and supervision of secure transportation units, equipment and facilities required, training and qualification needed.

  15. Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE...

  16. Branching Fraction Measurements of the Color-Suppressed Decays B0bar to D(*)0 pi0, D(*)0 eta, D(*)0 omega, and D(*)0 eta_prime and Measurement of the Polarization in the Decay B0bar to D*0 omega

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; ,

    2012-02-14

    We report updated branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D{sup 0}{eta}, D*{sup 0}{eta}, D{sup 0}{omega}, D*{sup 0}{omega}, D{sup 0}{eta}', and D*{sup 0}{eta}'. We measure the branching fractions (x10{sup -4}): {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.13, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 3.05 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.28, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.53 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.11, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.23, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{omega}) = 2.57 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.14, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{omega}) = 4.55 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.39, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.48 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.07, and {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.49 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.15. We also present the first measurement of the longitudinal polarization fraction of the decay channel D*{sup 0}{omega}, f{sub L} = (66.5 {+-} 4.7 {+-} 1.5)%. In the above, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The results are based on a sample of (454 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. The measurements are the most precise determinations of these quantities from a single experiment. They are compared to theoretical predictions obtained by factorization, Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and perturbative QCD (pQCD). We find that the presence of final state interactions is favored and the measurements are in better agreement with SCET than with pQCD.

  17. Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation...

  18. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-27

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Canceled by DOE 460.1A

  19. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-05-14

    The order establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE, including NNSA, offsite shipments and onsite transfers of radioactive and other hazardous materials and for modal transportation. Supersedes DOE O 460.1B.

  20. Sustainability and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard

    2006-01-01

    also known there as sustainable mobility. This de?nition wasfor De?ning Sustainable Transport and Mobility. [cited 13Sustainable transporta- tion is de?ned as a means to satisfy current transport and mobility

  1. Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification.

  2. Linear Motor Powered Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Richard D.

    This special issue on linear-motor powered transportation covers both supporting technologies and innovative transport systems in various parts of the World, as this technology moves from the lab to commercial operations. ...

  3. Transportation Conference Speakers - 4 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Laboratory experiments were performed to study and improve longshore sediment transport rate predictions. Measured total longshore transport in the laboratory was approximately three times greater for plunging breakers than spilling breakers. Three...

  4. Transportation Energy Futures Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Transportation accounts for 71% of total U.S. petroleum consumption and 33% of total greenhouse gas emissions. The Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) study examines underexplored oil-savings and...

  5. Transportation Market Distortions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litman, Todd

    2006-01-01

    roads and parking facilities is exempt from rent and taxes,road transport relative to rail (which pays rent and taxesroad tolls, parking fees, and Litman, Transportation Market Distortions higher fuel taxes

  6. Introduction to Transportation Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Introduction to Transportation Planning CMP 4710/6710 Fall 2012 3 Credit Hours Room: ARCH 229 of City & Metropolitan Planning; Associate Dean, College of Architecture + Planning; former associate, social equity, fiscal health, and public health. Unfortunately, most transportation planning processes

  7. Transportation Conference Speakers - 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Thiamin transport in Escherichia coli is a model system to establish the tolerance of derivatives for transport into the cell. Since little is known about what types of thiamin derivatives may be successfully taken into the cell through...

  8. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-27

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials andor modal transport. Cancels DOE 1540.2 and DOE 5480.3

  9. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-10-02

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1.

  10. Biofuels and Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Biofuels and Transportation Impacts and Uncertainties Some Observations of a Reformed Ethanol and Logistics Symposium 3 Topics · Why Biofuels · Ethanol Economics · Ethanol Transportation Equipment Biofuels? · National Security · Reduce Imports of oil · Peak Oil · Replace Fossil Resources

  11. Wireless Magnetic Sensor Applications in Transportation Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Rene Omar

    2012-01-01

    v List of Figures Upstream and downstream middle sensor raw2.2 Upstream and downstream middle sensor signature2.3 Third vehicle upstream and downstream signatures (five

  12. Non-Tracial Free Transport and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Brent Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In Operator algebras and math- ematical physics (Constant¸a,planar algebras and subfactors. ” In Quanta of maths, volumematrices and planar algebras. ” Comm. Math. Phys. , 316(1):

  13. Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-12-01

    Fact sheet describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's evaluation of Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation's (IndyGo's) hybrid electric buses.

  14. Parking & Transportation Services Sustainability &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    : 2011 #12;As a long-time leader in the areas of waste abatement, pollution reduction, energy management Metro Commuter Services Infinity Award ­ in recognition of alternative transportation programs. · 1996 to maintaining impressive and viable alternative transportation programs. TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM DESIGNS

  15. Vibration-enhanced quantum transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. L. Semião; K. Furuya; G. J. Milburn

    2010-08-17

    In this paper, we study the role of collective vibrational motion in the phenomenon of electronic energy transfer (EET) along a chain of coupled electronic dipoles with varying excitation frequencies. Previous experimental work on EET in conjugated polymer samples has suggested that the common structural framework of the macromolecule introduces correlations in the energy gap fluctuations which cause coherent EET. Inspired by these results, we present a simple model in which a driven nanomechanical resonator mode modulates the excitation energy of coupled quantum dots and find that this can indeed lead to an enhancement in the transport of excitations across the quantum network. Disorder of the on-site energies is a key requirement for this to occur. We also show that in this solid state system phase information is partially retained in the transfer process, as experimentally demonstrated in conjugated polymer samples. Consequently, this mechanism of vibration enhanced quantum transport might find applications in quantum information transfer of qubit states or entanglement.

  16. Generic principles of active transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauro Mobilia; Tobias Reichenbach; Hauke Hinsch; Thomas Franosch; Erwin Frey

    2006-12-20

    Nonequilibrium collective motion is ubiquitous in nature and often results in a rich collection of intringuing phenomena, such as the formation of shocks or patterns, subdiffusive kinetics, traffic jams, and nonequilibrium phase transitions. These stochastic many-body features characterize transport processes in biology, soft condensed matter and, possibly, also in nanoscience. Inspired by these applications, a wide class of lattice-gas models has recently been considered. Building on the celebrated {\\it totally asymmetric simple exclusion process} (TASEP) and a generalization accounting for the exchanges with a reservoir, we discuss the qualitative and quantitative nonequilibrium properties of these model systems. We specifically analyze the case of a dimeric lattice gas, the transport in the presence of pointwise disorder and along coupled tracks.

  17. Q^2 Dependence of the S_{11}(1535) Photocoupling and Evidence for a P-wave resonance in eta electroproduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haluk Denizli; James Mueller; Steven Dytman; M.L. Leber; R.D. Levine; J. Miles; Kui Kim; Gary Adams; Moscov Amaryan; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Marco Anghinolfi; Burin Asavapibhop; G. Asryan; Harutyun Avakian; Hovhannes Baghdasaryan; Nathan Baillie; Jacques Ball; Nathan Baltzell; Steve Barrow; V. Batourine; Marco Battaglieri; Kevin Beard; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Mehmet Bektasoglu; Matthew Bellis; Nawal Benmouna; Nicola Bianchi; Angela Biselli; Billy Bonner; Sylvain Bouchigny; Sergey Boyarinov; Robert Bradford; Derek Branford; William Briscoe; William Brooks; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Cornel Butuceanu; John Calarco; Sharon Careccia; Daniel Carman; Catalina Cetina; Shifeng Chen; Philip Cole; Alan Coleman; Patrick Collins; Philip Coltharp; Dieter Cords; Pietro Corvisiero; Donald Crabb; Volker Crede; John Cummings; Natalya Dashyan; Raffaella De Vita; Enzo De Sanctis; Pavel Degtiarenko; Lawrence Dennis; Alexandre Deur; Kalvir Dhuga; Richard Dickson; Chaden Djalali; Gail Dodge; Joseph Donnelly; David Doughty; P. Dragovitsch; Michael Dugger; Oleksandr Dzyubak; Hovanes Egiyan; Kim Egiyan; Lamiaa Elfassi; Latifa Elouadrhiri; A. Empl; Paul Eugenio; Laurent Farhi; Renee Fatemi; Gleb Fedotov; Gerald Feldman; Robert Feuerbach; Tony Forest; Valera Frolov; Herbert Funsten; Sally Gaff; Michel Garcon; Gagik Gavalian; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Pascal Girard; Francois-Xavier Girod; John Goetz; Atilla Gonenc; Ralf Gothe; Keith Griffioen; Michel Guidal; Matthieu Guillo; Nevzat Guler; Lei Guo; Vardan Gyurjyan; Kawtar Hafidi; Hayk Hakobyan; Rafael Hakobyan; John Hardie; David Heddle; F. Hersman; Kenneth Hicks; Ishaq Hleiqawi; Maurik Holtrop; Jingliang Hu; Charles Hyde; Charles Hyde-Wright; Yordanka Ilieva; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Eugeny Isupov; Mark Ito; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Henry Juengst; Narbe Kalantarians; J.H. Kelley; James Kellie; Mahbubul Khandaker; K. Kim; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; Mike Klusman; Mikhail Kossov; Laird Kramer; V. Kubarovsky; Joachim Kuhn; Sebastian Kuhn; Sergey Kuleshov; Jeff Lachniet; Jean Laget; Jorn Langheinrich; David Lawrence; Kenneth Livingston; Haiyun Lu; K. Lukashin; Marion MacCormick; Joseph Manak; Nikolai Markov; Simeon McAleer; Bryan McKinnon; John McNabb; Bernhard Mecking; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Ralph Minehart; Marco Mirazita; Rory Miskimen; Viktor Mokeev; Kei Moriya; Steven Morrow; M. Moteabbed; Valeria Muccifora; Gordon Mutchler; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; James Napolitano; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Steve Nelson; Silvia Niccolai; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Bogdan Niczyporuk; Megh Niroula; Rustam Niyazov; Mina Nozar; Grant O'Rielly; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; Kijun Park; Evgueni Pasyuk; Craig Paterson; Gerald Peterson; Sasha Philips; Joshua Pierce; Nikolay Pivnyuk; Dinko Pocanic; Oleg Pogorelko; Ermanno Polli; S. Pozdniakov; Barry Preedom; John Price; Yelena Prok; Dan Protopopescu; Liming Qin; Brian Raue; Gregory Riccardi; Giovanni Ricco; Marco Ripani; Barry Ritchie; Federico Ronchetti; Guenther Rosner; Patrizia Rossi; David Rowntree; Philip Rubin; Franck Sabatie; Konstantin Sabourov; Julian Salamanca; Carlos Salgado; Joseph Santoro; Vladimir Sapunenko; Reinhard Schumacher; Vladimir Serov; Aziz Shafi; Youri Sharabian; Jeremiah Shaw; Nikolay Shvedunov; Sebastio Simionatto; Alexander Skabelin; Elton Smith; Lee Smith; Daniel Sober; Daria Sokhan; M. Spraker; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Samuel Stepanyan; Stepan Stepanyan; Burnham Stokes; Paul Stoler; I.I. Strakovsky; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; Simon Taylor; David Tedeschi; Ulrike Thoma; R. Thompson; Avtandil Tkabladze; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Clarisse Tur; Maurizio Ungaro; Michael Vineyard; Alexander Vlassov; Kebin Wang; Daniel Watts; Lawrence Weinstein; Henry Weller; Dennis Weygand; M. Williams; Elliott Wolin; Michael Wood; Amrit Yegneswaran; Junho Yun; Lorenzo Zana; Jixie Zhang; Bo Zhao; Zhiwen Zhao

    2007-07-01

    New cross sections for the reaction $ep \\to e'\\eta p$ are reported for total center of mass energy $W$=1.5--2.3 GeV and invariant squared momentum transfer $Q^2$=0.13--3.3 GeV$^2$. This large kinematic range allows extraction of new information about response functions, photocouplings, and $\\eta N$ coupling strengths of baryon resonances. A sharp structure is seen at $W\\sim$ 1.7 GeV. The shape of the differential cross section is indicative of the presence of a $P$-wave resonance that persists to high $Q^2$. Improved values are derived for the photon coupling amplitude for the $S_{11}$(1535) resonance. The new data greatly expands the $Q^2$ range covered and an interpretation of all data with a consistent parameterization is provided.

  18. Photoproduction of eta mesons off protons for photon energies from 0.75 GeV to 3 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volker Crede; Olivia Bartholomy; for the CB-ELSA Collaboration

    2004-10-20

    Total and differential cross sections for the reaction p(gamma, eta)p have been measured for photon energies in the range from 750 MeV to 3 GeV. The low-energy data are dominated by the S11 wave which has two poles in the energy region below 2 GeV. Eleven nucleon resonances are observed in their decay into p eta. At medium energies we find evidence for a new resonance N(2070)D15 with (mass, width) = (2068+-22, 295+-40) MeV. At photon energies above 1.5 GeV, a strong peak in forward direction develops, signalling the exchange of vector mesons in the t channel.

  19. Interlayer Water Regulates the Bio-nano Interface of a \\b{eta}-sheet Protein stacking on Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenping Lv; Guiju Xu; Hongyan Zhang; Xin Li; Shengju Liu; Huan Niu; Dongsheng Xu; Renan Wu

    2014-12-03

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated an integrated bio-nano interface consisting of a \\b{eta}-sheet protein stacked onto graphene. We found that the stacking assembly of the model protein on graphene could be controlled by water molecules. The interlayer water filled within interstices of the bio-nano interface could suppress the molecular vibration of surface groups on protein, and could impair the CH...{\\pi} interaction driving the attraction of the protein and graphene. The intermolecular coupling of interlayer water would be relaxed by the relative motion of protein upon graphene due to the interaction between water and protein surface. This effect reduced the hindrance of the interlayer water against the assembly of protein on graphene, resulting an appropriate adsorption status of protein on graphene with a deep free energy trap. Thereby, the confinement and the relative sliding between protein and graphene, the coupling of protein and water, and the interaction between graphene and water all have involved in the modulation of behaviors of water molecules within the bio-nano interface, governing the hindrance of interlayer water against the protein assembly on hydrophobic graphene. These results provide a deep insight into the fundamental mechanism of protein adsorption onto graphene surface in water.

  20. Spitzer Evidence for a Late Heavy Bombardment and the Formation of Urelites in {\\eta} Corvi at ~1 Gyr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisse, C M; Chen, C H; Morlok, A; Watson, D M; Manoj, P; Sheehan, P; Currie, T M; Thebault, P; Sitko, M L

    2011-01-01

    We have analyzed Spitzer and NASA/IRTF 2 - 35 \\mum spectra of the warm, ~350 K circumstellar dust around the nearby MS star {\\eta} Corvi (F2V, 1.4 \\pm 0.3 Gyr). The spectra show clear evidence for warm, water- and carbon-rich dust at ~3 AU from the central star, in the system's Terrestrial Habitability Zone. Spectral features due to ultra-primitive cometary material were found, in addition to features due to impact produced silica and high temperature carbonaceous phases. At least 9 x 10^18 kg of 0.1 - 100 \\mum warm dust is present in a collisional equilibrium distribution with dn/da ~ a^-3.5, the equivalent of a 130 km radius KBO of 1.0 g/cm^3 density and similar to recent estimates of the mass delivered to the Earth at 0.6 - 0.8 Gyr during the Late Heavy Bombardment. We conclude that the parent body was a Kuiper-Belt body or bodies which captured a large amount of early primitive material in the first Myrs of the system's lifetime and preserved it in deep freeze at ~150 AU. At ~1.4 Gyr they were prompted by...

  1. Information Technology and Intelligent Transportation: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yehudai, Amiram

    ­ Will develop novel classes of applications · Colleges: engineering, business, urban planning Transportation ·Environmental: ­ > 50% of hazardous air pollutants in U.S., ­ up to 90% of the carbon monoxide in urban air #12 Motorization Growth: Road Vehicle Populations by Region, 1996 and 2020 Source: EIA, International Energy

  2. Overview of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    Overview of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Program Venkat Srinivasan of the DOE/EERE FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program to develop batteries for vehicular applications double the energy density of presently available Li batteries · HEV: low-T operation, cost, and abuse

  3. Multibounce light transport analysis using ultrafast imaging for material acquisition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naik, Nikhil, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    This thesis introduces a novel framework for analysis of multibounce light transport using time-of-flight imaging for the applications of ultrafast reflectance acquisition and imaging through scattering media. Using ultrafast ...

  4. Assistant Deputy Administrator for the Office of Secure Transportation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    **This is a re-advertisement for the position of Assistant Deputy Administrator for the Office of Secure Transportation. Those applicants that previously applied to NA-15-ES-003 MUST RE-APPLY to...

  5. Simulation of filtration for suspension transport in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yun Sung, 1974-

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and application of a novel method for analyzing the filtration of particles transported through a granular porous medium. The proposed analysis considers the deposition of particles ...

  6. Concepts studies for future intracity air transportation systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joint DOT-NASA Civil Aviation Research and Development Policy Study.; United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration; Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Flight Transportation Laboratory

    1970-01-01

    Summary: This report is concerned with describing the possible application of future air transportation systems within urban areas of the United States. The planning horizon extends to 1995 and the report focuses on the ...

  7. Computerized schedule construction for an airbus transportation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, R. W.

    1966-01-01

    As part of a continuing study of the application of V/STOL aircraft to the transportation problems of the Northeast Corridor, the U.S. Department of Commerce has requested that detailed data be developed on schedules, ...

  8. Systematic studies of the centrality and root S(NN) dependence of the dE(T)/d eta and dN(ch)/d eta in heavy ion collisions at midrapidity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, SS; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, NN; Akiba, Y.; Alexander, J.; Amirikas, R.; Aphecetche, L.; Aronson, SH; Averbeck, R.; Awes, TC; Azmoun, R.; Babintsev, V.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, KN; Barnes, PD; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhagavatula, S.; Boissevain, JG; Borel, H.; Borenstein, S.; Brooks, ML; Brown, DS; Bruner, N.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, JM; Butsyk, S.; Camard, X.; Chai, JS; Chand, P.; Chang, WC; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, CY; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, IJ; Choi, J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, BA; Constantin, P.; d'Enterria, DG; David, G.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, EJ; Dietzsch, O.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; du Rietz, R.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Efremenko, YV; El Chenawi, K.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Ewell, L.; Fields, DE; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, SL; Fox, BD; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, JE; Franz, A.; Frawley, AD; Fung, SY; Garpman, S.; Ghosh, TK; Glenn, A.; Gogiberidze, G.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; de Cassagnac, RG; Grau, N.; Greene, SV; Perdekamp, MG; Guryn, W.; Gustafsson, HA; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, JS; Hamagaki, H.; Hansen, AG; Hartouni, EP; Harvey, M.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, TK; Heuser, JM; Hibino, M.; Hill, JC; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Ichihara, T.; Ikonnikov, VV; Imai, K.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Jacak, BV; Jang, WY; Jeong, Y.; Jia, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, BM; Johnson, SC; Joo, KS; Jouan, D.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kang, JH; Kapoor, SS; Katou, K.; Kelly, S.; Khachaturov, B.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, DH; Kim, DJ; Kim, DW; Kim, E.; Kim, GB; Kim, HJ; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Kiyoyama, K.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kobayashi, H.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Koehler, D.; Kohama, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Kroon, PJ; Kuberg, CH; Kurita, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Kweon, MJ; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, GS; Lacey, R.; Ladygin, V.; Lajoie, JG; Lebedev, A.; Leckey, S.; Lee, DM; Lee, S.; Leitch, MJ; Li, XH; Lim, H.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, MX; Liu, Y.; Maguire, CF; Makdisi, YI; Malakhov, A.; Manko, VI; Mao, Y.; Martinez, G.; Marx, MD; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; Matsumoto, T.; McGaughey, PL; Melnikov, E.; Mendenhall, M.; Messer, F.; Miake, Y.; Milan, J.; Miller, TE; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, RE; Mishra, GC; Mitchell, JT; Mohanty, AK; Morrison, DP; Moss, JM; Muhlbacher, F.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Muniruzzaman, M.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, JL; Nakamura, T.; Nandi, BK; Nara, M.; Newby, J.; Nilsson, P.; Nyanin, AS; Nystrand, J.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, CA; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, ID; Okada, K.; Ono, M.; Onuchin, V.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pal, D.; Palounek, APT; Pantuev, VS; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J.; Parmar, A.; Pate, SF; Peitzmann, T.; Peng, JC; Peresedov, V.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, RP; Plasil, F.; Purschke, ML; Purwar, AK; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, KF; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Roche, G.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosnet, P.; Ryu, SS; Sadler, ME; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, M.; Sakai, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanfratello, L.; Santo, R.; Sato, HD; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schutz, Y.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Shaw, MR; Shea, TK; Shibata, TA; Shigaki, K.; Shiina, T.; Silva, CL; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, KS; Singh, CP; Singh, V.; Sivertz, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, RA; Sondheim, WE; Sorensen, SP; Sourikova, IV; Staley, F.; Stankus, PW; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, SP; Sugitate, T.; Sullivan, J. P.; Takagui, EM; Taketani, A.; Tamai, M.; Tanaka, KH; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, MJ; Tarjan, P.; Tepe, JD; Thomas, TL; Tojo, J.; Torii, H.; Towell, RS; Tserruya, I.; Tsuruoka, H.; Tuli, SK; Tydesjo, H.; Tyurin, N.; van Hecke, HW; Velkovska, J.; Velkovsky, M.; Villatte, L.; Vinogradov, AA; Volkov, MA; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, XR; Watanabe, Y.; White, SN; Wohn, FK; Woody, CL; Xie, W.; Yang, Y.; Yanovich, A.; Yokkaichi, S.; Young, GR; Yushmanov, IE; Zajc, WA; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zhou, SJ; Zolin, L.; PHENIX Collaboration.

    2005-01-01

    Within a relativistic transport model for heavy-ion collisions, we show that the recently observed characteristic change from out-of-plane to in-plane elliptic flow of protons in midcentral Au+Au collisions as the incident ...

  9. Measurements of Time-Dependent CP-Asymmetry Parameters in B Meson Decays to \\eta^{\\prime} K^0 and of Branching Fractions of SU(3) Related Modes with BaBar Experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biassoni, Pietro; /Milan U.

    2009-01-22

    In this thesis work we have measured the following upper limits at 90% of confidence level, for B meson decays (in units of 10{sup -6}), using a statistics of 465.0 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}) < 1.6 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{eta}) < 1.4 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{eta}{prime}) < 2.1 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{phi}) < 0.52 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{omega}) < 1.6 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{phi}) < 1.2 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{omega}) < 1.7 We have no observation of any decay mode, statistical significance for our measurements is in the range 1.3-3.5 standard deviation. We have a 3.5{sigma} evidence for B {yields} {eta}{omega} and a 3.1 {sigma} evidence for B {yields} {eta}{prime}{omega}. The absence of observation of the B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0} open an issue related to the large difference compared to the charged mode B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +} branching fraction, which is measured to be 3.7 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.1 [118]. Our results represent substantial improvements of the previous ones [109, 110, 111] and are consistent with theoretical predictions. All these results were presented at Flavor Physics and CP Violation (FPCP) 2008 Conference, that took place in Taipei, Taiwan. They will be soon included into a paper to be submitted to Physical Review D. For time-dependent analysis, we have reconstructed 1820 {+-} 48 flavor-tagged B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0} events, using the final BABAR statistic of 467.4 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs. We use these events to measure the time-dependent asymmetry parameters S and C. We find S = 0.59 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02, and C = -0.06 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.02. A non-zero value of C would represent a directly CP non-conserving component in B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}, while S would be equal to sin2{beta} measured in B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} [108], a mixing-decay interference effect, provided the decay is dominated by amplitudes of a single weak phase. The new measured value of S can be considered in agreement with the expectations of the 'Standard Model', inside the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Inconsistency of our result for S with CP conservation (S = 0) has a significance of 7.1 standard deviations (statistical and systematics included). Our result for the direct-CP violation parameter C is 0.9 standard deviations from zero (statistical and systematics included). Our results are in agreement with the previous ones [18]. Despite the statistics is only 20% larger than the one used in previous measurement, we improved of 20% the error on S and of 14% the error on C. This error is the smaller ever achieved, by both BABAR and Belle, in Time-Dependent CP Violation Parameters measurement is a b {yields} s transition.

  10. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

  11. Regional Transportation Coordination Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden Crescent Regional Planning Commission

    2006-01-01

    stream_source_info Golden Crescent Regional Transportation Coordination Study.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 357268 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Golden Crescent Regional Transportation Coordination... Study.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Golden Crescent Regional Transit i Regional Transportation Coordination Study: 7-County Golden Crescent Region Regional...

  12. FUEL CELLS FOR TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Fuel Cells for Transportation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation............................................................................................. 101 A. R&D of a 50-kW, High-Efficiency, High-Power-Density, CO-Tolerant PEM Fuel Cell Stack SystemFUEL CELLS FOR TRANSPORTATION 2 0 0 1 A N N U A L P R O G R E S S R E P O R T U.S. Department

  13. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Fuel Grand BC and High-Level Radioactive Waste - Jeff Williams, Director, Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Planning Project, DOEOffice of Nuclear Energy National...

  14. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-09-23

    Establishes standard transportation practices for Departmental programs to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials including radioactive waste. Does not cancel other directives.

  15. Transportation Energy Futures Snapshot

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This snapshot is a summary of the EERE reports that provide a detailed analysis of opportunities and challenges along the path to a more sustainable transportation energy future.

  16. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    gas vehicles Annual road tax differentiated by vintageand charges for road transport Tax/pricing measure Optimalannual circulation taxes, tolls and road charges and parking

  17. Transportation Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    TRANSPORTATION ment of Oil Shale Technology. Washing- ton,interest and investments in oil shale, ethanol, coal liquidsbiomass materials, coal, oil shale, tar sands, natural gas,

  18. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. McGraw

    2000-04-13

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

  19. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    of reduction options/ AERO. Ministry of Transport, Publicfrom aviation with the AERO modeling system Part I.from aviation with the AERO modeling system. Montreal,

  20. Natural Gas Transportation Resiliency

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Transportation Resiliency Anders Johnson Director Pipeline System Design April 29, 2014 Confidential and Illustrative for discussion purposes only. The views expressed in this...

  1. Transportation Energy Futures Snapshot

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    modes, manage the demand for transportation, and shift the fuel mix to more sustainable sources necessary to reach these significant outcomes. Coordinating a...

  2. Sustainable Transportation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in transportation technologies, alternative fuels, and fuel cell technologies.

  3. CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES UNIVERSITY Investigator CCIT Research Report UCB-ITS-CWP-2011-2 The California Center for Innovative Transportation works;CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

  4. SPITZER EVIDENCE FOR A LATE-HEAVY BOMBARDMENT AND THE FORMATION OF UREILITES IN {eta} CORVI At {approx}1 Gyr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisse, C. M. [JHU-APL, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Wyatt, M. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Chen, C. H. [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Morlok, A. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, The Open University, Milton-Keynes (United Kingdom); Watson, D. M.; Manoj, P.; Sheehan, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Currie, T. M. [NASA-GSFC, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Thebault, P. [Observatoire de Paris, F-92195 Meudon Principal Cedex (France); Sitko, M. L., E-mail: carey.lisse@jhuapl.edu, E-mail: wyatt@ast.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: cchen@stsci.edu, E-mail: a.morlok@open.ac.uk, E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: manoj@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: psheeha2@mail.rochester.edu, E-mail: thayne.m.currie@nasa.gov, E-mail: philippe.thebault@obspm.fr, E-mail: sitko@spacescience.org [Space Science Institute, 475 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    We have analyzed Spitzer and NASA/IRTF 2-35 {mu}m spectra of the warm, {approx}350 K circumstellar dust around the nearby MS star {eta} Corvi (F2V, 1.4 {+-} 0.3 Gyr). The spectra show clear evidence for warm, water- and carbon-rich dust at {approx}3 AU from the central star, in the system's terrestrial habitability zone. Spectral features due to ultra-primitive cometary material were found, in addition to features due to impact produced silica and high-temperature carbonaceous phases. At least 9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} kg of 0.1-100 {mu}m warm dust is present in a collisional equilibrium distribution with dn/da {approx} a{sup -3.5}, the equivalent of a 130 km radius Kuiper Belt object (KBO) of 1.0 g cm{sup 3} density and similar to recent estimates of the mass delivered to the Earth at 0.6-0.8 Gyr during the late-heavy bombardment. We conclude that the parent body was a Kuiper Belt body or bodies which captured a large amount of early primitive material in the first megayears of the system's lifetime and preserved it in deep freeze at {approx}150 AU. At {approx}1.4 Gyr they were prompted by dynamical stirring of their parent Kuiper Belt into spiraling into the inner system, eventually colliding at 5-10 km s{sup -1} with a rocky planetary body of mass {<=}M{sub Earth} at {approx}3 AU, delivering large amounts of water (>0.1% of M{sub Earth'sOceans}) and carbon-rich material. The Spitzer spectrum also closely matches spectra reported for the Ureilite meteorites of the Sudan Almahata Sitta fall in 2008, suggesting that one of the Ureilite parent bodies was a KBO.

  5. NaSt1: A Wolf-Rayet star cloaked by an eta Car--like nebula?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul A. Crowther; Linda J. Smith

    1999-03-26

    We present a study of the peculiar Galactic emission line object NaSt1 (WR122, IRAS 18497+0056) which has previously been classified as a Wolf-Rayet (WR) star. Our spectroscopic dataset comprises Keck I-HIRES, WHT-ISIS and UKIRT-CGS4 observations which show that NaSt1 has a highly reddened nebular spectrum with extremely strong permitted and forbidden lines covering a wide range in excitation. [OII-III] is unusually weak, with HeI-II and [NII] very strong, and carbon absent, suggestive of chemical peculiarities. Narrow-band WHT imaging reveals an elliptical nebula with an average diameter of 6.8arcsec. We measure an interstellar extinction of E(B-V)=2.1mag and estimate a distance of 1-3kpc, suggesting that NaSt1 is a luminous object, with 40.64, N enhanced by a factor of 20, O deficient by a factor of 140, while Ne, Ar and S are normal compared to average HII region abundances. This unusual abundance pattern suggests that the nebula consists of fully CNO-processed material. We compare the spectral appearance of NaSt1 with other luminous emission objects, and conclude that it is not an Ofpe/WN9, B[e] star or symbiotic nova although it does share several characteristics of these systems. We suggest instead that NaSt1 contains a massive evolved star that ejected its heavily CNO-processed outer layers a few thousand years ago. Although the stellar remnant is completely hidden from view by the dense nebula, we argue that the star must be an early-type WR star. The only object that shares some of the peculiarities of NaSt1 is eta Carinae. Whatever its true nature, NaSt1 should no longer be considered as a late-WN classification standard in the near-IR.

  6. Transportation Todd Litman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    consumer cost savings. #12;11 Per Capita Transport EnergyPer Capita Transport Energy 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 D Problem? · Traffic congestion? · Road construction costs? · Parking congestion or costs? · Excessive costs to consumers? · Government costs? · Traffic crashes? · Lack of mobility for non-drivers? · Poor freight

  7. Expert systems in transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, K.P.

    1988-01-01

    The 5 papers in the report deal with the following areas: Knowledge representation and software selection for expert-systems design; Expert-system architecture for retaining-wall design; Development of expert-systems technology in the California Department of Transportation; Development of an expert system to assist in the interactive graphic transit system design process; Expert systems development for contingency transportation planing.

  8. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-04-04

    To establish safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1A. Canceled by DOE O 460.1C.

  9. TRANSPORTATION ENERGY RESEARCH PIER Transportation Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The project also tested a Caterpillar C15 engine certified to 2007 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.energy.ca.gov/research/ transportation/ January 2011 Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions and Fuel Consumption Improvement Illustration of a heavy-duty tractor-trailer modified to meet the SmartWayTM Equipment Standards for lower fuel

  10. Transport coefficients in Chiral Perturbation Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fernandez-Fraile; A. Gomez Nicola

    2006-10-16

    We present recent results on the calculation of transport coefficients for a pion gas at zero chemical potential in Chiral Perturbation Theory using Linear Response Theory. More precisely, we show the behavior of DC conductivity and shear viscosity at low temperatures. To compute transport coefficients, the standard power counting of ChPT has to be modified. The effects derived from imposing unitarity are also analyzed. As physical applications in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions, we show the relation of the DC conductivity to soft-photon production and phenomenological effects related to a nonzero shear viscosity. In addition, our values for the shear viscosity to entropy ratio satisfy the KSS bound.

  11. STRUCTURAL REQUIREMENTS OF ORGANIC ANION TRANSPORTING POLYPEPTIDE MEDIATED TRANSPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Yi Miao

    2010-04-12

    The organic anion transporting polypeptides (human: OATP; other: Oatp) form a mammalian transporter superfamily that mediates the transport of structurally unrelated compounds across the cell membrane. Members in this superfamily participate...

  12. Essays on Urban Transportation and Transportation Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chun Kon

    2008-01-01

    and Transportation Energy Policy Chun Kon Kim University of California,California Goyang, KOREA viii P???????????? ??? W?????? P????? The Impacts of Transportation EnergyCalifornia Transportation Center (UCTC) Regents’ Dissertation Fellowship University of California, Irvine California Energy

  13. An Energy-conscious Transport Protocol for Multi-hop Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Energy-conscious Transport Protocol for Multi-hop Wireless Networks Technical Report BUCS-2007 delivery requirements of applications. To meet its goal of energy efficiency, our transport protocol (1 We present a transport protocol whose goal is to reduce power consumption without compromising

  14. OIM 413 Logistics and Transportation Class Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays: 10:00-11:15AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    OIM 413 ­ Logistics and Transportation Fall 2015 Class Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays: 10:00-11:15AM success and application is transportation and logistics. The timely distribution of goods and services and algorithms for problems in transportation and logistics. The course covers some of the fundamental

  15. OIM 413 Logistics and Transportation Class Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays: 10:00-11:15AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    OIM 413 ­ Logistics and Transportation Fall 2014 Class Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays: 10:00-11:15AM and operations management techniques have had wide success and application is transportation and logistics models and algorithms for problems in transportation and logistics. The course covers some

  16. Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies More...

  17. Transportation Storage Interface | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Storage Interface Transportation Storage Interface Regulation of Future Extended Storage and Transportation. Transportation Storage Interface More Documents & Publications Gap...

  18. Automated Transportation Logistics and Analysis System (ATLAS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Packaging and Transportation Automated Transportation Logistics and Analysis System (ATLAS) Automated Transportation Logistics and Analysis System (ATLAS) The Department of...

  19. Auxiliary analyses in support of performance assessment of a hypothetical low-level waste facility: Two-phase flow and contaminant transport in unsaturated soils with application to low-level radioactive waste disposal. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binning, P. [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia); Celia, M.A.; Johnson, J.C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Operations Research

    1995-05-01

    A numerical model of multiphase air-water flow and contaminant transport in the unsaturated zone is presented. The multiphase flow equations are solved using the two-pressure, mixed form of the equations with a modified Picard linearization of the equations and a finite element spatial approximation. A volatile contaminant is assumed to be transported in either phase, or in both phases simultaneously. The contaminant partitions between phases with an equilibrium distribution given by Henry`s Law or via kinetic mass transfer. The transport equations are solved using a Galerkin finite element method with reduced integration to lump the resultant matrices. The numerical model is applied to published experimental studies to examine the behavior of the air phase and associated contaminant movement under water infiltration. The model is also used to evaluate a hypothetical design for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. The model has been developed in both one and two dimensions; documentation and computer codes are available for the one-dimensional flow and transport model.

  20. Transport Services (TAPS) BOF plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welzl, Michael

    Transport Services (TAPS) BOF plan T. Moncaster, M. Welzl, D. Ros: dra5-moncaster-tsvwg-transport-services-00 h Reducing Internet Transport Latency Michael Welzl, with help from (alphabe/cal): Anna

  1. Improving Efficiency and Equity in Transportation Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Fueling Transportation Finance. ” Ian W. H. Parry andFueling Transportation Finance. ” Transportation ResearchFueling Transportation Finance: A Primer on the Gas Tax •

  2. Study of psi(2S) Decays to gamma p bar{p}, pi^0 p bar{p} and eta p bar{p} and Search for p bar{p} Threshold Enhancements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLEO Collaboration; J. P. Alexander; D. G. Cassel; S. Das; R. Ehrlich; L. Fields; L. Gibbons; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; D. L. Kreinick; V. E. Kuznetsov; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; D. Riley; A. Ryd; A. J. Sadoff; X. Shi; W. M. Sun; J. Yelton; P. Rubin; N. Lowrey; S. Mehrabyan; M. Selen; J. Wiss; S. Adams; M. Kornicer; R. E. Mitchell; M. R. Shepherd; C. M. Tarbert; D. Besson; T. K. Pedlar; J. Xavier; D. Cronin-Hennessy; J. Hietala; P. Zweber; S. Dobbs; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; A. Tomaradze; T. Xiao; S. Brisbane; J. Libby; L. Martin; A. Powell; P. Spradlin; G. Wilkinson; H. Mendez; J. Y. Ge; D. H. Miller; I. P. J. Shipsey; B. Xin; G. S. Adams; D. Hu; B. Moziak; J. Napolitano; K. M. Ecklund; J. Insler; H. Muramatsu; C. S. Park; L. J. Pearson; E. H. Thorndike; F. Yang; S. Ricciardi; C. Thomas; M. Artuso; S. Blusk; R. Mountain; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; J. C. Wang; L. M. Zhang; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; A. Lincoln; M. J. Smith; P. Zhou; J. Zhu; P. Naik; J. Rademacker; D. M. Asner; K. W. Edwards; K. Randrianarivony; G. Tatishvili; R. A. Briere; H. Vogel; P. U. E. Onyisi; J. L. Rosner

    2010-10-12

    The decays of psi(2S) into gamma p bar{p}, pi^0 p bar{p} and eta p bar{p} have been studied with the CLEO-c detector using a sample of 24.5 million psi(2S) events obtained from e^+e^- annihilations at sqrt{s} = 3686 MeV. The data show evidence for the excitation of several N^* resonances in p pi^0 and p eta channels in pi^0 p bar{p} and eta p bar{p} decays, and f_2 states in gamma p bar{p} decay. Branching fractions for decays of psi(2S) to gamma p bar{p}, pi^0 p bar{p} and eta p bar{p} have been determined. No evidence for p bar{p} threshold enhancements was found in the reactions psi(2S)-> X p bar{p}, where X = gamma, pi^0, eta. We do, however, find confirming evidence for a p bar{p} threshold enhancement in J/psi-> gamma p bar{p} as previously reported by BES.

  3. Superconnections and Parallel Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumitrescu, Florin

    2007-01-01

    This note addresses the construction of a notion of parallel transport along superpaths arising from the concept of a superconnection on a vector bundle over a manifold $M$. A superpath in $M$ is, loosely speaking, a path in $M$ together with an odd vector field in $M$ along the path. We also develop a notion of parallel transport associated with a connection (a.k.a. covariant derivative) on a vector bundle over a \\emph{supermanifold} which is a direct generalization of the classical notion of parallel transport for connections over manifolds.

  4. Momentum Kick Model Description of the Ridge in (Delta-phi)-(Delta eta) Correlation in pp Collisions at 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheuk-Yin Wong

    2011-07-08

    The near-side ridge structure in the (Delta phi)-(Delta eta) correlation observed by the CMS Collaboration for pp collisions at 7 TeV at LHC can be explained by the momentum kick model in which the ridge particles are medium partons that suffer a collision with the jet and acquire a momentum kick along the jet direction. Similar to the early medium parton momentum distribution obtained in previous analysis for nucleus-nucleus collisions at 0.2 TeV, the early medium parton momentum distribution in pp collisions at 7 TeV exhibits a rapidity plateau as arising from particle production in a flux tube.

  5. Dephasing-assisted selective incoherent quantum transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naghi Behzadi; Bahram Ahansaz; Hadi Kasani

    2015-03-17

    Selective energy transport throughout a quantum network connected to more than one reaction center can play an important role in many natural and technological considerations in photo-systems. In this work, we propose a method in which an excitation can be transported from the original site of the network to one of the reaction centers arbitrarily using independent sources of dephasing noises. We demonstrate a situation that in the absence of dephasing noises the coherent evolution of the system has no role in the energy transport in the network. Therefore, incoherent evolution via application of dephasing noises throughout a selected path of the network leads to transfer the excitation completely to a desired reaction center.

  6. Model for assessing bronchial mucus transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnew, J.E.; Bateman, J.R.M.; Pavia, D.; Clarke, S.W.

    1984-02-01

    The authors propose a scheme for the assessment of regional mucus transport using inhaled Tc-99m aerosol particles and quantitative analysis of serial gamma-camera images. The model treats input to inner and intermediate lung regions as the total of initial deposition there plus subsequent transport into these regions from more peripheral airways. It allows for interregional differences in the proportion of particles deposited on the mucus-bearing conducting airways, and does not require a gamma image 24 hr after particle inhalation. Instead, distribution of particles reaching the respiratory bronchioles or alveoli is determined from a Kr-81m ventilation image, while the total amount of such deposition is obtained from 24-hr Tc-99m retention measured with a sensitive counter system. The model is applicable to transport by mucociliary action or by cough, and has been tested in ten normal and ten asthmatic subjects.

  7. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01

    natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas have continued to make small contributions to transportation,transportation actions include electric power sector actions, eg coal to natural gas

  8. Office of Secure Transportation Activities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6th, 2012 WIPP Knoxville, TN OFFICE OF SECURE TRANSPORTATION Agency Integration Briefing Our Mission To provide safe and secure ground and air transportation of nuclear weapons,...

  9. Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment (SFTRA) Draft NUREG-2125 Overview for National Transportation Stakeholders Forum John Cook Division of Spent Fuel Storage and...

  10. UbiGreen: Investigating a Mobile Tool for Tracking and Supporting Green Transportation Habits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    green transportation behavior, and reactions to early mobile phone "green" application design concepts activity, a visual design capable of engaging users in the goal of increasing green transportation, and the results of our studies, which have implications for the design of future green applications. Author

  11. Dilepton production and off-shell transport dynamics at SIS energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. L. Bratkovskaya; W. Cassing

    2008-04-15

    Dilepton production in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 1-2 A GeV as well as in elementary pp and pd reactions is studied within the microscopic HSD transport approach which includes the off-shell dynamics of vector mesons explicitly. The study addresses additionally the production of $\\pi^0$ and $\\eta$ mesons since their Dalitz decays provide a sizeable contribution to the dilepton invariant mass spectra up to about 0.5 GeV. Our transport results agree with the TAPS experimental data on $\\pi$ and $\\eta$ multiplicities in C+C collisions from 0.8 to 2 A GeV. We find that the 'DLS-puzzle' - which addresses an underestimation of the $e^+e^-$ yield in the mass range from 0.2 to 0.5 GeV in C+C and Ca+Ca collisions - may be solved when incorporating a stronger bremsstrahlung contribution in line with recent OBE calculations. Moreover, the HSD results with 'enhanced' bremsstrahlung cross sections agree very well with the HADES experimental data for the dilepton mass spectra for C+C at 1 and 2 A GeV, especially when including a collisional broadening in the vector-meson spectral functions. Detailed predictions for dilepton spectra from pp and pn/pd reactions at 1.25 GeV, 2.2 GeV and 3.5 GeV are presented which will allow to verify/falsify the larger bremsstrahlung contributions from the experimental side in the near future.

  12. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    IEA personnel (WBCSD, 2004b), the WEO 2004 and Mobility 2030are quite similar. The WEO 2006 (IEA, 2006b) includes higherwhile the IEA’s more recent WEO 2006 projects transport

  13. Optimization of Maritime Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    and Technology Management Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway Enterprise and D. Ronen (2007). Maritime transportation. Handbooks in Operations Research and Management Science (consolidation in the manufacturing sector, increasing competition, profit margins reduced, mergers and pooling

  14. Accident resistant transport container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andersen, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Cole, James K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  15. Transportation Baseline Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fawcett, Ricky Lee; Kramer, George Leroy Jr.

    1999-12-01

    The National Transportation Program 1999 Transportation Baseline Report presents data that form a baseline to enable analysis and planning for future Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) waste and materials transportation. In addition, this Report provides a summary overview of DOE’s projected quantities of waste and materials for transportation. Data presented in this report were gathered as a part of the IPABS Spring 1999 update of the EM Corporate Database and are current as of July 30, 1999. These data were input and compiled using the Analysis and Visualization System (AVS) which is used to update all stream-level components of the EM Corporate Database, as well as TSD System and programmatic risk (disposition barrier) information. Project (PBS) and site-level IPABS data are being collected through the Interim Data Management System (IDMS). The data are presented in appendices to this report.

  16. Atmospheric Transport of Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, T.V.

    2003-03-03

    The purpose of atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations is to provide estimates of concentration and surface deposition from routine and accidental releases of pollutants to the atmosphere. This paper discusses this topic.

  17. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    next webinar is scheduled to occur in June 2013 TRIBAL NATIONS CAUCUS UPDATE WIKI AND NTSF WEB SITES ntsf.wikidot.com www.em.doe.govPagesNationalTransportationForum.aspx...

  18. Transport in granular systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wendell, Dawn M. (Dawn Marie), 1983-

    2011-01-01

    There are many situations in which a continuum view of granular systems does not fully capture the relevant mechanics. In order for engineers to be able to design systems for transporting granular materials, there needs ...

  19. Transportation Storage Interface

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in above- ground bunkers, each of which is about the size of a one-car garage. Spent Fuel Storage: Dual Purpose Cask Systems 8 Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation: Framework...

  20. PBA Transportation Websites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PBA Transportation Websites presented to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

  1. ARM - Instrument - eta

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? WeDatastreamstpsgovInstrumentsclap Documentation ARM Data

  2. ARM - Campaign Instrument - eta

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday,air Comments? We would love togovInstrumentsecor Comments? We

  3. Fluid transport container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeRoos, B.G.; Downing, J.P. Jr.; Neal, M.P.

    1995-11-14

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitting for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container. 13 figs.

  4. Transportation fuels from wood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.; Stevens, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    The various methods of producing transportation fuels from wood are evaluated in this paper. These methods include direct liquefaction schemes such as hydrolysis/fermentation, pyrolysis, and thermochemical liquefaction. Indirect liquefaction techniques involve gasification followed by liquid fuels synthesis such as methanol synthesis or the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The cost of transportation fuels produced by the various methods are compared. In addition, three ongoing programs at Pacific Northwest Laboratory dealing with liquid fuels from wood are described.

  5. Membrane Transport Chloride Transport Across Vesicle and Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Bradley D.

    Membrane Transport Chloride Transport Across Vesicle and Cell Membranes by Steroid-Based Receptors-established that molecules which transport cations across cell membranes (cationophores) can have potent biological effects of biological activity. Indeed, chloride transporters have direct medical potential as treatments for cystic

  6. Parking and Transport Policy Page 1 Parking and Transport Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mucina, Ladislav

    Parking and Transport Policy Page 1 Parking and Transport Policy Category: Facilities, Campus Life 1. PURPOSE To standardise and manage parking and transport on the Curtin Bentley campus including that support both State Government and University objectives in a manner that encourages public transport use

  7. CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES UNIVERSITY-ITS-CWP-2010-4 This work was performed by the California Center for Innovative Transportation, a research group at the University of California, Berkeley, in cooperation with the State of California Business, Transportation

  8. CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES UNIVERSITY-ITS-CWP-2011-6 ISSN 1557-2269 The California Center for Innovative Transportation works with researchers that improve the efficiency, safety, and security of the transportation system. #12;#12;CALIFORNIA CENTER

  9. Spin Transport in Semiconductor heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Domnita Catalina Marinescu

    2011-02-22

    The focus of the research performed under this grant has been the investigation of spin transport in magnetic semiconductor heterostructures. The interest in these systems is motivated both by their intriguing physical properties, as the physical embodiment of a spin-polarized Fermi liquid, as well as by their potential applications as spintronics devices. In our work we have analyzed several different problems that affect the spin dynamics in single and bi-layer spin-polarized two-dimensional (2D) systems. The topics of interests ranged from the fundamental aspects of the electron-electron interactions, to collective spin and charge density excitations and spin transport in the presence of the spin-orbit coupling. The common denominator of these subjects is the impact at the macroscopic scale of the spin-dependent electron-electron interaction, which plays a much more subtle role than in unpolarized electron systems. Our calculations of several measurable parameters, such as the excitation frequencies of magneto-plasma modes, the spin mass, and the spin transresistivity, propose realistic theoretical estimates of the opposite-spin many-body effects, in particular opposite-spin correlations, that can be directly connected with experimental measurements.

  10. MSIV leakage airborne iodine transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cline, J.E. (Cline Associates Inc., Rockville, MD (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Gaseous iodine deposits on surfaces exposed to vapors. Basic chemical and physical principles predict this behavior, and several laboratory and in-plant measurements demonstrate the characteristic. An empirical model was developed that describes the deposition, resuspension, and transformation of airborne radioiodine molecular species as a stream containing these forms moves along its pathway. The model uses a data base of measured values of deposition and resuspension rates in its application and describes the conversion of the more reactive inorganic iodine species I[sub 2] to the less reactive organic species CH[sub 3]I as the iodine deposits and resuspends along the path. It also considers radioactive decay and chemical surface bonding during residence on surfaces. For the 8-day [sup 131]I, decay during the airborne portion of the transport is negligible. Verification of the model included measurement tests of long gaseous-activity sampling lines of different diameters, operated at different flow rates and stream temperatures. The model was applied to the streams at a boiling water reactor nuclear power plant to describe the transport through leaking main steam isolation valves (MSIVs), following a loss-of-coolant accident.

  11. Transverse Single-Spin Asymmetry and Cross-Section for pi0 and eta Mesons at Large Feynman-x in Polarized p+p Collisions at sqrt(s)=200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; C. D. Anson; D. Arkhipkin; E. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; A. Bannerjee; Z. Barnovska; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Y. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; P. Chung; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; L. Didenko; F. Ding; A. Dion; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; F. Geurts; S. Gliske; Y. N. Gorbunov; O. G. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; C. Jena; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; V. Kizka; S. R. Klein; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; L. Kumar; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; L. M. Lima; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; Y. Lu; X. Luo; A. Luszczak; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; S. Mioduszewski; M. K. Mitrovski; Y. Mohammed; B. Mohanty; B. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. K. Mustafa; M. Naglis; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; L. V. Nogach; J. Novak; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; R. A. N. Oliveira; D. Olson; P. Ostrowski; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; B. Sharma; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; U. G. deSouza; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; S. G. Steadman; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; W. Witzke; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; Y. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva

    2012-05-30

    Measurements of the differential cross-section and the transverse single-spin asymmetry, A_N, vs. x_F for pi0 and eta mesons are reported for 0.4 < x_F < 0.75 at an average pseudorapidity of 3.68. A data sample of approximately 6.3 pb^{-1} was analyzed, which was recorded during p+p collisions at sqrt{s} = 200 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The average transverse beam polarization was 56%. The cross-section for pi0 is consistent with a perturbative QCD prediction, and the eta/pi0 cross-section ratio agrees with previous mid-rapidity measurements. For 0.55 < x_F < 0.75, A_N for eta (0.210 +- 0.056) is 2.2 standard deviations larger than A_N for pi0 (0.081 +- 0.016).

  12. Observation of the Exclusive Reaction e^+e^-\\ to \\phi\\eta at \\sqrt{s}=10.58 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-11-17

    The authors report the observation of e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {phi}{eta} near {radical}s = 10.58 GeV with 6.5 {sigma} significance in the K{sup +}K{sup -}{gamma}{gamma} final state in a data sample of 224 fb{sup -1} collected by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. They measure the restricted radiation-corrected cross section to be {sigma}(e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {phi}{eta}) = 2.1 {+-} 0.4(stat) {+-} 0.1(syst) fb within the range |cos{theta}*| < 0.8, where {theta}* is the center-of-mass polar angle of the {phi} meson. The {phi} meson is required to be in the invariant mass range of 1.008 < m{sub {phi}} < 1.035 GeV/c{sup 2}. The radiation corrected cross section in the full cos {theta}* range is extrapolated to be 2.9 {+-} 0.5(stat) {+-} 0.1(syst) fb.

  13. Parametric study on maximum transportable distance and cost for thermal energy transportation using various coolants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su-Jong Yoon; Piyush Sabharwall

    2014-07-01

    The operation temperature of advanced nuclear reactors is generally higher than commercial light water reactors and thermal energy from advanced nuclear reactor can be used for various purposes such as district heating, desalination, hydrogen production and other process heat applications, etc. The process heat industry/facilities will be located outside the nuclear island due to safety measures. This thermal energy from the reactor has to be transported a fair distance. In this study, analytical analysis was conducted to identify the maximum distance that thermal energy could be transported using various coolants such as molten-salts, helium and water by varying the pipe diameter and mass flow rate. The cost required to transport each coolant was also analyzed. The coolants analyzed are molten salts (such as: KClMgCl2, LiF-NaF-KF (FLiNaK) and KF-ZrF4), helium and water. Fluoride salts are superior because of better heat transport characteristics but chloride salts are most economical for higher temperature transportation purposes. For lower temperature water is a possible alternative when compared with He, because low pressure He requires higher pumping power which makes the process very inefficient and economically not viable for both low and high temperature application.

  14. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation Deployment Support

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTSWorking WithSuccess StoriesTransportation

  15. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation Secure Data Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTSWorking WithSuccessTransportation Secure Data

  16. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTSWorking WithSuccessTransportation Secure

  17. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTSWorking WithSuccessTransportation

  18. Thermal and Electrical Transport in Oxide Heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravichandran, Jayakanth

    2011-01-01

    of thermal conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.4 Thermal transport in2.3.2 Thermal transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  19. Transportation megaproject procurement : benefits and challenges for PPPs and alternative delivery strategies, and the resulting implications for Crossrail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Michael A. (Michael Adam)

    2009-01-01

    This thesis evaluates the applicability of public-private partnerships (PPPs) and alternative delivery strategies to transportation megaprojects. There has been tremendous expansion of innovative procurement and financing ...

  20. Stochastic webs and quantum transport in superlattices: an introductory review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Soskin; P. V. E. McClintock; T. M. Fromhold; I. A. Khovanov; R. Mannella

    2009-11-11

    Stochastic webs were discovered, first by Arnold for multi-dimensional Hamiltonian systems, and later by Chernikov et al. for the low-dimensional case. Generated by weak perturbations, they consist of thread-like regions of chaotic dynamics in phase space. Their importance is that, in principle, they enable transport from small energies to high energies. In this introductory review, we concentrate on low-dimensional stochastic webs and on their applications to quantum transport in semiconductor superlattices subject to electric and magnetic fields. We also describe a recently-suggested modification of the stochastic web to enhance chaotic transport through it and we discuss its possible applications to superlattices. keywords: stochastic webs; quantum transport; superlattices; separatrix chaos

  1. Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operat and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operations pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian

  2. Transport mechanisms in nanopores and nanochannels: Can we mimic nature?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Szleifer, Igal

    2014-11-03

    The last few years have witnessed major advancements in the synthesis, modification, characterization and modeling of nanometer-size solid-state channels and pores. Future applications in sensing, energy conversion and purification technologies will critically rely on qualitative improvements in the control over the selectivity, directionality and responsiveness of these nanochannels and nanopores. It is not surprising, therefore, that researchers in the field seek inspiration in biological ion channels and ion pumps, paradigmatic examples of transport selectivity. This work reviews our current fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of transport of ions and larger cargoes through nanopores and nanochannels by examining recent experimental andmore »theoretical work. It is argued that that structure and transport in biological channels and polyelectrolyte-modified synthetic nanopores are strongly coupled: the structure dictates transport and transport affects the structure. We compare synthetic and biological systems throughout this review to conclude that while they present interesting similarities, they also have striking differences.« less

  3. Transport mechanisms in nanopores and nanochannels: Can we mimic nature?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tagliazucchi, Mario [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Szleifer, Igal [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2014-11-03

    The last few years have witnessed major advancements in the synthesis, modification, characterization and modeling of nanometer-size solid-state channels and pores. Future applications in sensing, energy conversion and purification technologies will critically rely on qualitative improvements in the control over the selectivity, directionality and responsiveness of these nanochannels and nanopores. It is not surprising, therefore, that researchers in the field seek inspiration in biological ion channels and ion pumps, paradigmatic examples of transport selectivity. This work reviews our current fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of transport of ions and larger cargoes through nanopores and nanochannels by examining recent experimental and theoretical work. It is argued that that structure and transport in biological channels and polyelectrolyte-modified synthetic nanopores are strongly coupled: the structure dictates transport and transport affects the structure. We compare synthetic and biological systems throughout this review to conclude that while they present interesting similarities, they also have striking differences.

  4. Beam transport and monitoring for laser plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, K.; Sokollik, T.; Tilborg, J. van; Gonsalves, A. J.; Shaw, B.; Shiraishi, S.; Mittal, R.; De Santis, S.; Byrd, J. M.; Leemans, W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States) and University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    The controlled transport and imaging of relativistic electron beams from laser plasma accelerators (LPAs) are critical for their diagnostics and applications. Here we present the design and progress in the implementation of the transport and monitoring system for an undulator based electron beam diagnostic. Miniature permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQs) are employed to realize controlled transport of the LPA electron beams, and cavity based electron beam position monitors for non-invasive beam position detection. Also presented is PMQ calibration by using LPA electron beams with broadband energy spectrum. The results show promising performance for both transporting and monitoring. With the proper transport system, XUV-photon spectra from THUNDER will provide the momentum distribution of the electron beam with the resolution above what can be achieved by the magnetic spectrometer currently used in the LOASIS facility.

  5. Heavy-flavor transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Beraudo

    2015-10-29

    The formation of a hot deconfined medium (Quark-Gluon Plasma) in high-energy nuclear collisions affects heavy-flavor observables. In the low/moderate-pT range transport calculations allow one to simulate the propagation of heavy quarks in the plasma and to evaluate the effect of the medium on the final hadronic spectra: results obtained with transport coefficients arising from different theoretical approaches can be compared to experimental data. Finally, a discussion of possible effects on heavy-flavor observables due to the possible formation of a hot-medium in small systems (like in p-A collisions) is presented.

  6. Mass Transport within Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-03-01

    Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

  7. Lagrangian transport through surfaces in volume-preserving flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Karrasch

    2015-07-24

    Advective transport of scalar quantities through surfaces is of fundamental importance in many scientific applications. From the Eulerian perspective of the surface it can be quantified by the well-known integral of the flux density. The recent development of highly accurate semi-Lagrangian methods for solving scalar conservation laws and of Lagrangian approaches to coherent structures in turbulent (geophysical) fluid flows necessitate a new approach to transport from the (Lagrangian) material perspective. We present a Lagrangian framework for calculating transport of conserved quantities through a given surface in $n$-dimensional, fully aperiodic, volume-preserving flows. Our approach does not involve any dynamical assumptions on the surface or its boundary.

  8. Transportation Secure Data Center: Real-World Data for Transportation Planning and Land Use Analysis (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) have launched the free, web-based Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC). The TSDC (www.nrel.gov/tsdc) preserves respondent anonymity while making vital transportation data available to a broad group of users through secure, online access. The TSDC database provides free-of-charge web-based access to valuable transportation data that can be used for: Transit planning, Travel demand modeling, Homeland Security evacuation planning, Alternative fuel station planning, and Validating transportation data from other sources. The TSDC's two levels of access make composite data available with simple online registration, and allow researchers to use detailed spatial data after completing a straight forward application process.

  9. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira

    2000-10-30

    This is the first quarterly progress report for Year 2 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in Flow Loop development and research during the period of time between July 14, 2000 and September 30, 2000. This report presents information on the following specific tasks: (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development (Task 2), (b) Progress on research project (Task 8): ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress on research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress on research project (Task 7): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress on research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Initiate research on project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (g) Progress on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution (Tasks 11), and Foam properties (Task 12), (h) Initiate a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. Since the previous Task 1 has been completed, we will now designate this new task as: (Task 1S). (i) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  10. Spin Transport Shingo Katsumoto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iye, Yasuhiro

    -1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581, Japan According to DARPA's definition, "Spintronics"[1] means "Spin Transport Electronics". The issue "Spin Trans- port" thus covers all the fields of spintronics and one devices. In semiconductor spintronics devices, we therefore utilize the differences in n, , m for up

  11. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).

  12. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  13. Storing and transporting energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClaine, Andrew W. (Lexington, MA); Brown, Kenneth (Reading, MA)

    2010-09-07

    Among other things, hydrogen is released from water at a first location using energy from a first energy source; the released hydrogen is stored in a metal hydride slurry; and the metal hydride slurry is transported to a second location remote from the first location.

  14. "Educating transportation professionals."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    @virginia.edu http://cts.virginia.edu/Demetsky.htm Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 434.924.7464 Transportation Engineering & Management Research Our group works and Operations The mobility of freight is vital to the national economy. The growth in demand for freight

  15. Ionic (Proton) Transport Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environments - #12;Technology Options -- Ionic Transport Separation Systems Central, Semi-Central (coal/Semi-Central Systems Coal is the cheapest fuel, but requires the greatest pre-conditioning Clean-up of syngas requires Energy Systems ChevronTexaco SRI Consulting SAIC ChevronTexaco Technology Ventures #12;Performance

  16. Climate Change and Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    1 Climate Change and Transportation Addressing Climate Change in the Absence of Federal Guidelines;6 WSDOT Efforts · Climate Change Team · Project Level GHG Approach · Planning Level GHG Approach · Alternative Fuels Corridor · Recent legislation and research #12;7 WSDOT Efforts: Climate Change Team

  17. A Transport Synthetic Acceleration method for transport iterations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramone, Gilles Lionel

    1996-01-01

    We present a family of Transport Synthetic Acceleration (TSA) methods to iteratively solve within-group scattering problems. A single iteration in these schemes consists of a transport sweep followed by a low-order calculation ...

  18. Cepheid distances from the SpectroPhoto-Interferometry of Pulsating Stars (SPIPS) - Application to the prototypes delta Cep and eta Aql

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merand, Antoine; Breitfelder, Joanne; Gallenne, Alexandre; Foresto, Vincent Coude du; Brummelaar, Theo A ten; McAlister, Harold A; Ridgway, Stephen; Sturmann, Laszlo; Sturmann, Judit; Turner, Nils H

    2015-01-01

    The parallax of pulsation, and its implementations such as the Baade-Wesselink method and the infrared surface bright- ness technique, is an elegant method to determine distances of pulsating stars in a quasi-geometrical way. However, these classical implementations in general only use a subset of the available observational data. Freedman & Madore (2010) suggested a more physical approach in the implementation of the parallax of pulsation in order to treat all available data. We present a global and model-based parallax-of-pulsation method that enables including any type of observational data in a consistent model fit, the SpectroPhoto-Interferometric modeling of Pulsating Stars (SPIPS). We implemented a simple model consisting of a pulsating sphere with a varying effective temperature and a combina- tion of atmospheric model grids to globally fit radial velocities, spectroscopic data, and interferometric angular diameters. We also parametrized (and adjusted) the reddening and the contribution of the cir...

  19. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    criteria. Alternative fuels for aviation Kerosene is thefuel for civil aviation, but alternative fuels have beenBox 5.4 Alternative fuels for aviation The applicability of

  20. The neutron anomaly in the gamma N --> eta N cross section through the looking glass of the flavour SU(3) symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Boika; V. Kuznetsov; M. V. Polyakov

    2014-11-17

    We study the implications of the flavour SU(3) symmetry for various interpretations of the neutron anomaly in the $\\gamma N\\to\\eta N$ cross section. We show that the explanation of the neutron anomaly due to interference of known N(1535) and N(1650) resonances implies that N(1650) resonance should have a huge coupling to $\\phi$-meson -- at least 5 times larger than the corresponding $\\rho^0$ coupling. In terms of quark degrees of freedom this means that the well-known N(1650) resonance must be a "cryptoexotic pentaquark"-- its wave function should contain predominantly an $s\\bar s$ component. It turns out that the "conventional" interpretation of the neutron anomaly by the interference of known resonances metamorphoses into unconventional physics picture of N(1650).

  1. Transport-theoretical Description of Nuclear Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Buss; T. Gaitanos; K. Gallmeister; H. van Hees; M. Kaskulov; O. Lalakulich; A. B. Larionov; T. Leitner; J. Weil; U. Mosel

    2012-02-02

    In this review we first outline the basics of transport theory and its recent generalization to off-shell transport. We then present in some detail the main ingredients of any transport method using in particular the Giessen Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) implementation of this theory as an example. We discuss the potentials used, the ground state initialization and the collision term, including the in-medium modifications of the latter. The central part of this review covers applications of GiBUU to a wide class of reactions, starting from pion-induced reactions over proton and antiproton reactions on nuclei to heavy-ion collisions (up to about 30 AGeV). A major part concerns also the description of photon-, electron- and neutrino-induced reactions (in the energy range from a few 100 MeV to a few 100 GeV). For this wide class of reactions GiBUU gives an excellent description with the same physics input and the same code being used. We argue that GiBUU is an indispensable tool for any investigation of nuclear reactions in which final-state interactions play a role. Studies of pion-nucleus interactions, nuclear fragmentation, heavy ion reactions, hyper nucleus formation, hadronization, color transparency, electron-nucleus collisions and neutrino-nucleus interactions are all possible applications of GiBUU and are discussed in this article.

  2. 35 Alternative Transportation Fuels in California ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    potential means for diversifying an energy resource base for the transportation sector. Largely as a result, there is a potential for the entrance of an estimated one million alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) into the California35 Alternative Transportation Fuels in California Chapter 4 ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION FUELS

  3. The Structure of the Homunculus: I. Shape and Latitude Dependence from H2 and [Fe II] Velocity Maps of Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2006-02-21

    High resolution long-slit spectra obtained with the Phoenix spectrograph on Gemini South provide our most accurate probe of the three dimensional structure of the Homunculus around eta Car. The new near-infrared spectra dramatically confirm the double-shell structure inferred previously from thermal dust emission, resolving the nebula into a very thin outer shell seen in H2 21218, and a warmer, thicker inner layer seen in [Fe II] 16435. The thin H2 skin hints that the most important mass loss during the 19th century eruption had a very short duration of less than 5 yr. H2 emission traces the majority of the mass in the nebula, and has an average density of order 10^6.5 cm-3. This emission, in turn, yields our first definitive picture of the exact shape of the nebula, plus a distance of 2350pm50 pc and an inclination angle of 41deg (the polar axis is tilted 49deg from the plane of the sky). The distribution of the H2 emission provides the first measure of the latitude dependence of the speed, mass loss, and kinetic energy associated with eta Car's 19th century explosion. Almost 75 percent of the total mass and more than 90 percent of the kinetic energy in the ejecta were released at high latitudes. This rules out a model for the bipolar shape wherein an otherwise spherical explosion was pinched at the waist by a circumstellar torus. Also, the ejecta could not have been deflected toward polar trajectories by a companion star, since the kinetic energy of the polar ejecta is greater than the binding energy of the putative binary system. Instead, most of the mass appears to have been directed poleward by the explosion itself. [abridged

  4. Integrated transportation system design optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Christine P. (Christine Pia), 1979-

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, the design of a transportation system has focused on either the vehicle design or the network flow, assuming the other as given. However, to define a system level architecture for a transportation system, ...

  5. Transport Properties of Bilayer Graphene Nanoribbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Minsheng

    2013-01-01

    Electrical spin injection and transport in germanium”. Phys.P. , Temperature- Dependent Transport in Suspended Graphene.Y. M. , Quantum Transport: Introduction to Nanoscience.

  6. Contaminant Transport in the Southern California Bight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Idica, Eileen Y.

    2010-01-01

    1987). The California Current transports Pacific Subarctic1987). The California Current transports Pacific Subarcticthe dynamics and transport of Southern California stormwater

  7. Transforming California's Freight Transport System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Transforming California's Freight Transport System Policy Forum on the Role of Freight Transport in Achieving Clean Air, Climate Goals, Economic Growth and Healthy Communities in California Jack Kitowski April 19, 2013 1 #12;Freight Impacts at Many Levels 2 #12;Freight Transport Today: Contribution

  8. Parallel Transports in Webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Fleischhack

    2003-07-17

    For connected reductive linear algebraic structure groups it is proven that every web is holonomically isolated. The possible tuples of parallel transports in a web form a Lie subgroup of the corresponding power of the structure group. This Lie subgroup is explicitly calculated and turns out to be independent of the chosen local trivializations. Moreover, explicit necessary and sufficient criteria for the holonomical independence of webs are derived. The results above can even be sharpened: Given an arbitrary neighbourhood of the base points of a web, then this neighbourhood contains some segments of the web whose parameter intervals coincide, but do not include 0 (that corresponds to the base points of the web), and whose parallel transports already form the same Lie subgroup as those of the full web do.

  9. Fuel cell water transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Hedstrom, James C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    The moisture content and temperature of hydrogen and oxygen gases is regulated throughout traverse of the gases in a fuel cell incorporating a solid polymer membrane. At least one of the gases traverses a first flow field adjacent the solid polymer membrane, where chemical reactions occur to generate an electrical current. A second flow field is located sequential with the first flow field and incorporates a membrane for effective water transport. A control fluid is then circulated adjacent the second membrane on the face opposite the fuel cell gas wherein moisture is either transported from the control fluid to humidify a fuel gas, e.g., hydrogen, or to the control fluid to prevent excess water buildup in the oxidizer gas, e.g., oxygen. Evaporation of water into the control gas and the control gas temperature act to control the fuel cell gas temperatures throughout the traverse of the fuel cell by the gases.

  10. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segal, Dvira

    2015-01-01

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects, are factors that interplay to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good) and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques which incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with...

  11. Transport properties of a meson gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fernandez-Fraile; A. Gomez Nicola

    2007-07-09

    We present recent results on a systematic method to calculate transport coefficients for a meson gas (in particular, we analyze a pion gas) at low temperatures in the context of Chiral Perturbation Theory. Our method is based on the study of Feynman diagrams with a power counting which takes into account collisions in the plasma by means of a non-zero particle width. In this way, we obtain results compatible with analysis of Kinetic Theory with just the leading order diagram. We show the behavior with temperature of electrical and thermal conductivities and shear and bulk viscosities, and we discuss the fundamental role played by unitarity. We obtain that bulk viscosity is negligible against shear viscosity near the chiral phase transition. Relations between the different transport coefficients and bounds on them based on different theoretical approximations are also discussed. We also comment on some applications to heavy-ion collisions.

  12. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  13. Rail transportation update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-01-15

    Record western coal shipments and lucrative export traffic lead America's railroad to their fourth most profitable year in history. But with the coal boom going bust, higher rates, and a new administration and congress, what sort of transportation year can coal mines and shippers expect in 2009? The article gives the opinions of company executives and discusses findings of the recent so-called Christenson Report which investigated growing railroad market power. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  14. Multiscale thermal transport.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Samuel Jr. (; .); Wong, C. C.; Piekos, Edward Stanley

    2004-02-01

    A concurrent computational and experimental investigation of thermal transport is performed with the goal of improving understanding of, and predictive capability for, thermal transport in microdevices. The computational component involves Monte Carlo simulation of phonon transport. In these simulations, all acoustic modes are included and their properties are drawn from a realistic dispersion relation. Phonon-phonon and phonon-boundary scattering events are treated independently. A new set of phonon-phonon scattering coefficients are proposed that reflect the elimination of assumptions present in earlier analytical work from the simulation. The experimental component involves steady-state measurement of thermal conductivity on silicon films as thin as 340nm at a range of temperatures. Agreement between the experiment and simulation on single-crystal silicon thin films is excellent, Agreement for polycrystalline films is promising, but significant work remains to be done before predictions can be made confidently. Knowledge gained from these efforts was used to construct improved semiclassical models with the goal of representing microscale effects in existing macroscale codes in a computationally efficient manner.

  15. Transportation of medical isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, D.L.

    1997-11-19

    A Draft Technical Information Document (HNF-1855) is being prepared to evaluate proposed interim tritium and medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This assessment examines the potential health and safety impacts of transportation operations associated with the production of medical isotopes. Incident-free and accidental impacts are assessed using bounding source terms for the shipment of nonradiological target materials to the Hanford Site, the shipment of irradiated targets from the FFTF to the 325 Building, and the shipment of medical isotope products from the 325 Building to medical distributors. The health and safety consequences to workers and the public from the incident-free transportation of targets and isotope products would be within acceptable levels. For transportation accidents, risks to works and the public also would be within acceptable levels. This assessment is based on best information available at this time. As the medical isotope program matures, this analysis will be revised, if necessary, to support development of a final revision to the Technical Information Document.

  16. Transportation Energy Futures Analysis Snapshot

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transportation currently accounts for 71% of total U.S. petroleum use and 33% of the nation's total carbon emissions. The TEF project explores how combining multiple strategies could reduce GHG emissions and petroleum use by 80%. Researchers examined four key areas – lightduty vehicles, non-light-duty vehicles, fuels, and transportation demand – in the context of the marketplace, consumer behavior, industry capabilities, technology and the energy and transportation infrastructure. The TEF reports support DOE long-term planning. The reports provide analysis to inform decisions about transportation energy research investments, as well as the role of advanced transportation energy technologies and systems in the development of new physical, strategic, and policy alternatives.

  17. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan Miska; Troy Reed; Ergun Kuru

    2004-09-30

    The Advanced Cuttings Transport Study (ACTS) was a 5-year JIP project undertaken at the University of Tulsa (TU). The project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and JIP member companies. The objectives of the project were: (1) to develop and construct a new research facility that would allow three-phase (gas, liquid and cuttings) flow experiments under ambient and EPET (elevated pressure and temperature) conditions, and at different angle of inclinations and drill pipe rotation speeds; (2) to conduct experiments and develop a data base for the industry and academia; and (3) to develop mechanistic models for optimization of drilling hydraulics and cuttings transport. This project consisted of research studies, flow loop construction and instrumentation development. Following a one-year period for basic flow loop construction, a proposal was submitted by TU to the DOE for a five-year project that was organized in such a manner as to provide a logical progression of research experiments as well as additions to the basic flow loop. The flow loop additions and improvements included: (1) elevated temperature capability; (2) two-phase (gas and liquid, foam etc.) capability; (3) cuttings injection and removal system; (4) drill pipe rotation system; and (5) drilling section elevation system. In parallel with the flow loop construction, hydraulics and cuttings transport studies were preformed using drilling foams and aerated muds. In addition, hydraulics and rheology of synthetic drilling fluids were investigated. The studies were performed under ambient and EPET conditions. The effects of temperature and pressure on the hydraulics and cuttings transport were investigated. Mechanistic models were developed to predict frictional pressure loss and cuttings transport in horizontal and near-horizontal configurations. Model predictions were compared with the measured data. Predominantly, model predictions show satisfactory agreements with the measured data. As a part of this project, instrumentation was developed to monitor cuttings beds and characterize foams in the flow loop. An ultrasonic-based monitoring system was developed to measure cuttings bed thickness in the flow loop. Data acquisition software controls the system and processes the data. Two foam generating devices were designed and developed to produce foams with specified quality and texture. The devices are equipped with a bubble recognition system and an in-line viscometer to measure bubble size distribution and foam rheology, respectively. The 5-year project is completed. Future research activities will be under the umbrella of Tulsa University Drilling Research Projects. Currently the flow loop is being used for testing cuttings transport capacity of aqueous and polymer-based foams under elevated pressure and temperature conditions. Subsequently, the effect of viscous sweeps on cuttings transport under elevated pressure and temperature conditions will be investigated using the flow loop. Other projects will follow now that the ''steady state'' phase of the project has been achieved.

  18. Transport optimization in stellaratorsa... H. E. Mynickb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mynick, Harry E.

    Transport optimization in stellaratorsa... H. E. Mynickb Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton transport in stellarators is presented. A primary deficiency of stellarators has been elevated transport this difficulty, developing a range of techniques for reducing transport, both neoclassical and, more recently

  19. Parallel heat transport in integrable and chaotic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B [ORNL; Chacon, Luis [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The study of transport in magnetized plasmas is a problem of fundamental interest in controlled fusion, space plasmas, and astrophysics research. Three issues make this problem particularly chal- lenging: (i) The extreme anisotropy between the parallel (i.e., along the magnetic field), , and the perpendicular, , conductivities ( / may exceed 1010 in fusion plasmas); (ii) Magnetic field lines chaos which in general complicates (and may preclude) the construction of magnetic field line coordinates; and (iii) Nonlocal parallel transport in the limit of small collisionality. Motivated by these issues, we present a Lagrangian Green s function method to solve the local and non-local parallel transport equation applicable to integrable and chaotic magnetic fields in arbitrary geom- etry. The method avoids by construction the numerical pollution issues of grid-based algorithms. The potential of the approach is demonstrated with nontrivial applications to integrable (magnetic island chain), weakly chaotic (devil s staircase), and fully chaotic magnetic field configurations. For the latter, numerical solutions of the parallel heat transport equation show that the effective radial transport, with local and non-local closures, is non-diffusive, thus casting doubts on the appropriateness of the applicability of quasilinear diffusion descriptions. General conditions for the existence of non-diffusive, multivalued flux-gradient relations in the temperature evolution are derived.

  20. Update on EM Transportation Program Activities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Organizations * DOE Orders, Policy, Guidance Transportation Risk Reduction * Motor Carrier Evaluations * Physical Protection * Transportation Compliance Reviews * Safety...

  1. Supertruck - Improving Transportation Efficiency through Integrated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improving Transportation Efficiency through Integrated Vehicle, Engine and Powertrain Research Supertruck - Improving Transportation Efficiency through Integrated Vehicle, Engine...

  2. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities...

  3. Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and Management Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Africa's Transport Infrastructure...

  4. Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Session...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Agenda, October 27, 2008, Phoenix, Arizonia Transportation and Stationary Power Integration: Workshop Proceedings...

  5. Enhancing Transportation Energy Security through Advanced Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Energy Security through Advanced Combustion and Fuels Technologies Enhancing Transportation Energy Security through Advanced Combustion and Fuels Technologies 2005...

  6. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Andy L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Daily, William D.; Fink, James B.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Hoversten, Gary M.; Keller, Jason M.; Majer, Ernest L.; Murray, Christopher J.; White, Mark D.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2006-07-31

    From FY 2000 through FY 2003, a series of vadose zone transport field experiments were conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Project, now known as the Remediation and Closure Science Project, and managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The series of experiments included two major field campaigns, one at a 299-E24-11 injection test site near PUREX and a second at a clastic dike site off Army Loop Road. The goals of these experiments were to improve our understanding of vadose zone transport processes; to develop data sets to validate and calibrate vadose zone flow and transport models; and to identify advanced monitoring techniques useful for evaluating flow-and-transport mechanisms and delineating contaminant plumes in the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. This report summarizes the key findings from the field studies and demonstrates how data collected from these studies are being used to improve conceptual models and develop numerical models of flow and transport in Hanford’s vadose zone. Results of these tests have led to a better understanding of the vadose zone. Fine-scale geologic heterogeneities, including grain fabric and lamination, were observed to have a strong effect on the large-scale behavior of contaminant plumes, primarily through increased lateral spreading resulting from anisotropy. Conceptual models have been updated to include lateral spreading and numerical models of unsaturated flow and transport have revised accordingly. A new robust model based on the concept of a connectivity tensor was developed to describe saturation-dependent anisotropy in strongly heterogeneous soils and has been incorporated into PNNL’s Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator. Application to field-scale transport problems have led to a better understanding plume behavior at a number of sites where lateral spreading may have dominated waste migration (e.g. BC Cribs and Trenches). The improved models have been also coupled with inverse models and newly-developed parameter scaling techniques to allow estimation of field-scale and effective transport parameters for the vadose zone. The development and utility of pedotransfer functions for describing fine-scale hydrogeochemical heterogeneity and for incorporating this heterogeneity into reactive transport models was explored. An approach based on grain-size statistics appears feasible and has been used to describe heterogeneity in hydraulic properties and sorption properties, such as the cation exchange capacity and the specific surface area of Hanford sediments. This work has also led to the development of inverse modeling capabilities for time-dependent, subsurface, reactive transport with transient flow fields using an automated optimization algorithm. In addition, a number of geophysical techniques investigated for their potential to provide detailed information on the subtle changes in lithology and bedding surfaces; plume delineation, leak detection. High-resolution resistivity is now being used for detecting saline plumes at several waste sites at Hanford, including tank farms. Results from the field studies and associated analysis have appeared in more than 46 publications generated over the past 4 years. These publications include test plans and status reports, in addition to numerous technical notes and peer reviewed papers.

  7. Vertical Transport of Subwavelength Localized Surface Electromagnetic Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Fei; Zhang, Youming; Shi, Xihang; Yang, Zhaoju; Zhang, Baile

    2015-01-01

    Transport of subwavelength electromagnetic (EM) energy has been achieved through near-field coupling of highly confined surface EM modes supported by plasmonic nanoparticles, in a configuration usually staying on a two-dimensional (2D) substrate. Vertical transport of similar modes along the third dimension, on the other hand, can bring more flexibility in designs of functional photonic devices, but this phenomenon has not been observed in reality. In this paper, designer (or spoof) surface plasmon resonators (plasmonic meta-atoms) are stacked in the direction vertical to their individual planes in demonstrating vertical transport of subwavelength localized surface EM modes. Dispersion relation of this vertical transport is determined from coupled mode theory and is verified with near-field transmission spectrum and field mapping with a microwave near-field scanning stage. This work extends the near-field coupled resonator optical waveguide (CROW) theory into the vertical direction, and may find applications ...

  8. New Multi-group Transport Neutronics (PHISICS) Capabilities for RELAP5-3D and its Application to Phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom; Cristian Rabiti; Andrea Alfonsi

    2012-10-01

    PHISICS is a neutronics code system currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Its goal is to provide state of the art simulation capability to reactor designers. The different modules for PHISICS currently under development are a nodal and semi-structured transport core solver (INSTANT), a depletion module (MRTAU) and a cross section interpolation (MIXER) module. The INSTANT module is the most developed of the mentioned above. Basic functionalities are ready to use, but the code is still in continuous development to extend its capabilities. This paper reports on the effort of coupling the nodal kinetics code package PHISICS (INSTANT/MRTAU/MIXER) to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D, to enable full core and system modeling. This will enable the possibility to model coupled (thermal-hydraulics and neutronics) problems with more options for 3D neutron kinetics, compared to the existing diffusion theory neutron kinetics module in RELAP5-3D (NESTLE). In the second part of the paper, an overview of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW benchmark is given. This benchmark has been approved by the OECD, and is based on the General Atomics 350 MW Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR) design. The benchmark includes coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics exercises that require more capabilities than RELAP5-3D with NESTLE offers. Therefore, the MHTGR benchmark makes extensive use of the new PHISICS/RELAP5-3D coupling capabilities. The paper presents the preliminary results of the three steady state exercises specified in Phase I of the benchmark using PHISICS/RELAP5-3D.

  9. Control of chaotic transport in Hamiltonian systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guido Ciraolo; Cristel Chandre; Ricardo Lima; Michel Vittot; Marco Pettini; Charles Figarella; Philippe Ghendrih

    2003-06-24

    It is shown that a relevant control of Hamiltonian chaos is possible through suitable small perturbations whose form can be explicitly computed. In particular, it is possible to control (reduce) the chaotic diffusion in the phase space of a Hamiltonian system with 1.5 degrees of freedom which models the diffusion of charged test particles in a ``turbulent'' electric field across the confining magnetic field in controlled thermonuclear fusion devices. Though still far from practical applications, this result suggests that some strategy to control turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas, in particular tokamaks, is conceivable.

  10. Diffusion and transport coefficients in synthetic opals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sofo, J. O.; Mahan, G. D.; Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1200

    2000-07-15

    Opals are structures composed of close-packed spheres in the size range of nano to micrometers. They are sintered to create small necks at the points of contact. We have solved the diffusion problem in such structures. The relation between the diffusion coefficient and the thermal and electrical conductivity is used to estimate the transport coefficients of opal structures as a function of the neck size and the mean free path of the carriers. The theory presented is also applicable to the diffusion problem in other periodic structures. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  11. Membranes for nanometer-scale mass fast transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bakajin, Olgica (San Leandro, CA); Holt, Jason (Berkeley, CA); Noy, Aleksandr (Belmont, CA); Park, Hyung Gyu (Oakland, CA)

    2011-10-18

    Nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material were fabricated for fluid mechanics and mass transfer studies on the nanometer scale and commercial applications. Average pore size can be 2 nm to 20 nm, or seven nm or less, or two nanometers or less. The membrane can be free of large voids spanning the membrane such that transport of material such as gas or liquid occurs exclusively through the tubes. Fast fluid, vapor, and liquid transport are observed. Versatile micromachining methods can be used for membrane fabrication. A single chip can comprise multiple membranes. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  12. CANE: A Controlled Application Environment for Privacy Protection in ITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freytag, Johann-Christoph

    --Many of the applications proposed for intelligent transportation systems (ITS) need to process and communicate detailed transportation systems (ITS), information and communication technologies are added to traffic systems in order, the application of privacy-by-design requires novel privacy-enhancing tech- nologies (PETs) that help to fulfill

  13. MCNP APPLICATIONS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. MCKINNEY; T. BOOTH; ET AL

    2000-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP, has become an international standard for a wide spectrum of neutron, photon, and electron radiation transport applications. The latest version of the code, MCNP 4C, was released to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) in February 2000. This paper describes the code development philosophy, new features and capabilities, applicability to various problems, and future directions.

  14. MCNP application for the 21 century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinney, M.C.

    2000-08-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP, has become an international standard for a wide spectrum of neutron, photon, and electron radiation transport applications. The latest version of the code, MCNP 4C, was released to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) in February 2000. This paper describes the code development philosophy, new features and capabilities, applicability to various problems, and future directions.

  15. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira; Neelima Godugu

    2000-07-30

    ACTS flow loop is now operational under elevated pressure and temperature. Currently, experiments with synthetic based drilling fluids under pressure and temperature are being conducted. Based on the analysis of Fann 70 data, empirical correlations defining the shear stress as a function of temperature, pressure and the shear rate have been developed for Petrobras synthetic drilling fluids. PVT equipment has been modified for testing Synthetic oil base drilling fluids. PVT tests with Petrobras Synthetic base mud have been conducted and results are being analyzed Foam flow experiments have been conducted and the analysis of the data has been carried out to characterize the rheology of the foam. Comparison of pressure loss prediction from the available foam hydraulic models and the test results has been made. Cuttings transport experiments in horizontal annulus section have been conducted using air, water and cuttings. Currently, cuttings transport tests in inclined test section are being conducted. Foam PVT analysis tests have been conducted. Foam stability experiments have also been conducted. Effects of salt and oil concentration on the foam stability have been investigated. Design of ACTS flow loop modification for foam and aerated mud flow has been completed. A flow loop operation procedure for conducting foam flow experiments under EPET conditions has been prepared Design of the lab-scale flow loop for dynamic foam characterization and cuttings monitoring instrumentation tests has been completed. The construction of the test loop is underway. As part of the technology transport efforts, Advisory Board Meeting with ACTS-JIP industry members has been organized on May 13, 2000.

  16. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mengjiao Yu; Ramadan Ahmed; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Aimee Washington; Crystal Redden

    2003-09-30

    The Quarter began with installing the new drill pipe, hooking up the new hydraulic power unit, completing the pipe rotation system (Task 4 has been completed), and making the SWACO choke operational. Detailed design and procurement work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. The prototype Foam Generator Cell has been completed by Temco and delivered. Work is currently underway to calibrate the system. Literature review and preliminary model development for cuttings transportation with polymer foam under EPET conditions are in progress. Preparations for preliminary cuttings transport experiments with polymer foam have been completed. Two nuclear densitometers were re-calibrated. Drill pipe rotation system was tested up to 250 RPM. Water flow tests were conducted while rotating the drill pipe up to 100 RPM. The accuracy of weight measurements for cuttings in the annulus was evaluated. Additional modifications of the cuttings collection system are being considered in order to obtain the desired accurate measurement of cuttings weight in the annular test section. Cutting transport experiments with aerated fluids are being conducted at EPET, and analyses of the collected data are in progress. The printed circuit board is functioning with acceptable noise level to measure cuttings concentration at static condition using ultrasonic method. We were able to conduct several tests using a standard low pass filter to eliminate high frequency noise. We tested to verify that we can distinguish between different depths of sand in a static bed of sand. We tested with water, air and a mix of the two mediums. Major modifications to the DTF have almost been completed. A stop-flow cell is being designed for the DTF, the ACTF and Foam Generator/Viscometer which will allow us to capture bubble images without the need for ultra fast shutter speeds or microsecond flash system.

  17. Electromagnetic fields and transport coefficients in a hot pion gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gomez Nicola; D. Fernandez-Fraile

    2006-08-24

    We present recent results on finite temperature electromagnetic form factors and the electrical conductivity in a pion gas. The standard Chiral Perturbation Theory power counting needs to be modified for transport coefficients. We pay special attention to unitarity and to possible applications for dilepton and photon production.

  18. SDRT: A Reliable Data Transport Protocol for Underwater Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Jun-Hong

    activities such as scientific exploration and commercial exploitation, underwater sensor networks empower us networks, for mission critical applications, reliable data transport is demanded in under- water sensor channels is limited and depends on both transmission range and frequency [8], [24], [5], [6]. According

  19. Resolving the mystery of transport within internal transport barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staebler, G. M.; Belli, E. A.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.; Greenfield, C. M.; Lao, L. L.; Smith, S. P.; Kinsey, J. E.; Grierson, B. A.; Chrystal, C.

    2014-05-15

    The Trapped Gyro-Landau Fluid (TGLF) quasi-linear model [G. M. Staebler, et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 102508 (2005)], which is calibrated to nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations, is now able to predict the electron density, electron and ion temperatures, and ion toroidal rotation simultaneously for internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges. This is a strong validation of gyrokinetic theory of ITBs, requiring multiple instabilities responsible for transport in different channels at different scales. The mystery of transport inside the ITB is that momentum and particle transport is far above the predicted neoclassical levels in apparent contradiction with the expectation from the theory of suppression of turbulence by E×B velocity shear. The success of TGLF in predicting ITB transport is due to the inclusion of ion gyro-radius scale modes that become dominant at high E×B velocity shear and to improvements to TGLF that allow momentum transport from gyrokinetic turbulence to be faithfully modeled.

  20. Transportation | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout / Transforming Y-12Capacity-ForumTransportation

  1. Transportation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown ofTransportToolkit Prototype Jump

  2. Transportation Fuel Supply | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >Transportation currently accounts for

  3. Transportation Representation | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >Transportation currently

  4. Transportation and Parking

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >Transportation

  5. Electron Heat Transport Measured

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear ProfileMultiferroicAward |Electron CorrelationHeat Transport

  6. Sandia Energy - Transportation Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel MagnetizationTransportation Energy Home Analysis Final

  7. Sandia Energy - Transportation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel MagnetizationTransportation Energy Home

  8. Using hydraulic equivalences to discriminate transport processes1 of volcanic flows1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    G21942 Using hydraulic equivalences to discriminate transport processes1 of volcanic flows1 2 Alain of hydraulic equivalence, we determined that deposits resulted from a combination of suspended-12 load fallout between transport mechanisms, hydraulic18 equivalences have a general applicability in geophysical flows

  9. Achieving High Throughput Ground-to-UAV Transport via Parallel Links

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kung, H. T.

    Achieving High Throughput Ground-to-UAV Transport via Parallel Links Chit-Kwan Lin, H. T. Kung in unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) applications, is a challenge due to varying channel quality and extended link diversity; 802.11; link layer; transport layer; UAV; network coding I. INTRODUCTION In this paper, we focus

  10. ERTP: Energy-Efficient and Reliable Transport Protocol for Data Streaming in Wireless Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    ERTP: Energy-Efficient and Reliable Transport Protocol for Data Streaming in Wireless Sensor and Engineering The University of New South Wales Sydney 2052, Australia #12;Abstract Emerging data streaming applications in Wireless Sensor Networks require re- liable and energy-efficient transport protocols [17] [18

  11. Transportation Center Seminar........ "An efficient data-driven approach to static and dynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    , and multi-agent systems; with applications in airline, logistics, emergency management and sharedD in Transportation Systems from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She develops models and algorithms for large-scale transportation and logistics systems, using tools from optimization, statistics, simulation

  12. OIM 413 Logistics and Transportation Class Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays: 9:30-10:45AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    OIM 413 ­ Logistics and Transportation Fall 2013 Class Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays: 9:30-10:45AM success and application is transportation and logistics. Indeed, the timely distribution of goods and logistics. The course covers some of the fundamental methodologies and analytical tools. The course consists

  13. A Fast Multigrid Algorithm for Isotropic Transport Problems I: Pure Scattering \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliveira, Suely

    geometry. These problems are important in many application such as nuclear reactor design, radiation techniques traditionally used in numerical transport theory (e.g., see Morel and Manteuffel [15]). Since

  14. Using Smart Card Fare Payment Data To Analyze Multi-Modal Public Transport Journeys in London

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seaborn, Catherine

    This paper contributes to the emerging literature on the application of smart card fare payment data to public transportation planning. The research objective is to identify and assess complete, multimodal journeys using ...

  15. Computational study of the transport mechanisms of molecules and ions in solid materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yingchun

    2009-06-02

    Transport of ions and molecules in solids is a very important process in many technological applications, for example, in drug delivery, separation processes, and in power sources such as ion diffusion in electrodes or in ...

  16. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

    2003-07-30

    This Quarter has been divided between running experiments and the installation of the drill-pipe rotation system. In addition, valves and piping were relocated, and three viewports were installed. Detailed design work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. Design of the first prototype version of a Foam Generator has been finalized, and fabrication is underway. This will be used to determine the relationship between surface roughness and ''slip'' of foams at solid boundaries. Additional cups and rotors are being machined with different surface roughness. Some experiments on cuttings transport with aerated fluids have been conducted at EPET. Theoretical modeling of cuttings transport with aerated fluids is proceeding. The development of theoretical models to predict frictional pressure losses of flowing foam is in progress. The new board design for instrumentation to measure cuttings concentration is now functioning with an acceptable noise level. The ultrasonic sensors are stable up to 190 F. Static tests with sand in an annulus indicate that the system is able to distinguish between different sand concentrations. Viscometer tests with foam, generated by the Dynamic Test Facility (DTF), are continuing.

  17. Transportation Statistics Annual Report 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenn, M.

    1997-01-01

    This document is the fourth Transportation Statistics Annual Report (TSAR) prepared by the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) for the President and Congress. As in previous years, it reports on the state of U.S. transportation system at two levels. First, in Part I, it provides a statistical and interpretive survey of the system—its physical characteristics, its economic attributes, aspects of its use and performance, and the scale and severity of unintended consequences of transportation, such as fatalities and injuries, oil import dependency, and environment impacts. Part I also explores the state of transportation statistics, and new needs of the rapidly changing world of transportation. Second, Part II of the report, as in prior years, explores in detail the performance of the U.S. transportation system from the perspective of desired social outcomes or strategic goals. This year, the performance aspect of transportation chosen for thematic treatment is “Mobility and Access,” which complements past TSAR theme sections on “The Economic Performance of Transportation” (1995) and “Transportation and the Environment” (1996). Mobility and access are at the heart of the transportation system’s performance from the user’s perspective. In what ways and to what extent does the geographic freedom provided by transportation enhance personal fulfillment of the nation’s residents and contribute to economic advancement of people and businesses? This broad question underlies many of the topics examined in Part II: What is the current level of personal mobility in the United States, and how does it vary by sex, age, income level, urban or rural location, and over time? What factors explain variations? Has transportation helped improve people’s access to work, shopping, recreational facilities, and medical services, and in what ways and in what locations? How have barriers, such as age, disabilities, or lack of an automobile, affected these accessibility patterns? How are commodity flows and transportation services responding to global competition, deregulation, economic restructuring, and new information technologies? How do U.S. patterns of personal mobility and freight movement compare with other advanced industrialized countries, formerly centrally planned economies, and major newly industrializing countries? Finally, how is the rapid adoption of new information technologies influencing the patterns of transportation demand and the supply of new transportation services? Indeed, how are information technologies affecting the nature and organization of transportation services used by individuals and firms?

  18. Application of Smart Card fare payment data to bus network planning in London, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seaborn, Catherine Whitney

    2008-01-01

    This research contributes to an emerging body of literature on the application of smart card data to public transportation planning. It also addresses interchange planning, a key component of public transportation network ...

  19. Nanoengineered membranes for controlled transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; McKnight, Timothy E. (Greenback, TN) [Greenback, TN; Melechko, Anatoli V. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Lowndes, Douglas H. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael A. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Merkulov, Vladimir I. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-01-05

    A nanoengineered membrane for controlling material transport (e.g., molecular transport) is disclosed. The membrane includes a substrate, a cover definining a material transport channel between the substrate and the cover, and a plurality of fibers positioned in the channel and connected to an extending away from a surface of the substrate. The fibers are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the substrate, and have a width of 100 nanometers or less. The diffusion limits for material transport are controlled by the separation of the fibers. In one embodiment, chemical derivitization of carbon fibers may be undertaken to further affect the diffusion limits or affect selective permeability or facilitated transport. For example, a coating can be applied to at least a portion of the fibers. In another embodiment, individually addressable carbon nanofibers can be integrated with the membrane to provide an electrical driving force for material transport.

  20. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Summary of transportation greenhouse gas mitigation optionsof alternative fuels. Low greenhouse gas fuels Mixing ofMAC) refrigerant replacement. Greenhouse gas budgets for

  1. Heat transport within the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herndon, J Marvin

    2011-01-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to interpret Earth's dynamic processes based upon heat transport concepts derived from ordinary experience. But, ordinary experience can be misleading, especially when underlain by false assumptions. Geodynamic considerations traditionally have embraced three modes of heat transport: conduction, convection, and radiation. Recently, I introduced a fourth, "mantle decompression thermal tsunami" that, I submit, is responsible for emplacing heat at the base of the Earth's crust. Here, I review thermal transport within the Earth and speculate that there might be a fifth mode: "heat channeling", involving heat transport from the core to "hot-spots" such as those that power the Hawaiian Islands and Iceland.

  2. Transportation Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    share of petroleum use, carbon dioxide (a primary greenhouse gas) emissions, and air pollution, advances in fuel cell power systems for transportation could substantially improve...

  3. TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY DATA EXPANSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    in Transportation August 2007 #12;Table of Contents 1. Introduction and trip data associated with the households in that geographic area. The UTM coordinates belonging to each

  4. Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug-in...

  5. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01

    thereby contributing to energy security. Most also reducesuch as improved energy security, many transport GHGincluding energy cost savings, oil security, and pollution

  6. Innovative technology summary report: Transportable vitrification system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    At the end of the cold war, many of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) major nuclear weapons facilities refocused their efforts on finding technically sound, economic, regulatory compliant, and stakeholder acceptable treatment solutions for the legacy of mixed wastes they had produced. In particular, an advanced stabilization process that could effectively treat the large volumes of settling pond and treatment sludges was needed. Based on this need, DOE and its contractors initiated in 1993 the EM-50 sponsored development effort required to produce a deployable mixed waste vitrification system. As a consequence, the Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) effort was undertaken with the primary requirement to develop and demonstrate the technology and associated facility to effectively vitrify, for compliant disposal, the applicable mixed waste sludges and solids across the various DOE complex sites. After 4 years of development testing with both crucible and pilot-scale melters, the TVS facility was constructed by Envitco, evaluated and demonstrated with surrogates, and then successfully transported to the ORNL ETTP site and demonstrated with actual mixed wastes in the fall of 1997. This paper describes the technology, its performance, the technology applicability and alternatives, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

  7. Institute of Transport Studies PSU Transportation Seminar, 21 May 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    of Electric Bicycles Assoc. Prof. Geoff Rose Director, ITS (Monash) Transport Theme Leader, Monash expand the role of the bicycle in the context of urban transportation · This seminar examines electric Battery technology · Sealed lead acid (SLA) ­ Well understood and cheapest ­ Heavy ­ Modest life · Nickel

  8. Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

    2010-01-01

    on Transportation, Energy and Policy convened in 1988. Oilon Transportation, Energy and Policy has been held at theon Transportation, Energy and Policy in July 2009 was the

  9. Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

    2010-01-01

    cials (AASHTO), Transport Canada, the California DepartmentA case study of California. ” Transport. Res. Part D. West,smaller transport-related carbon footprint than California,

  10. Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

    2010-01-01

    California Department of Transportation, the California EnergyCalifornia Energy Commission Climate and TransportationTransportation and Energy Policy, at Paci?c Grove, California.

  11. Transport in holographic superfluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher P. Herzog; Nir Lisker; Piotr Surowka; Amos Yarom

    2011-01-17

    We construct a slowly varying space-time dependent holographic superfluid and compute its transport coefficients. Our solution is presented as a series expansion in inverse powers of the charge of the order parameter. We find that the shear viscosity associated with the motion of the condensate vanishes. The diffusion coefficient of the superfluid is continuous across the phase transition while its third bulk viscosity is found to diverge at the critical temperature. As was previously shown, the ratio of the shear viscosity of the normal component to the entropy density is 1/(4 pi). As a consequence of our analysis we obtain an analytic expression for the backreacted metric near the phase transition for a particular type of holographic superfluid.

  12. Heat transport system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harkness, Samuel D. (McMurray, PA)

    1982-01-01

    A falling bed of ceramic particles receives neutron irradiation from a neutron-producing plasma and thereby transports energy as heat from the plasma to a heat exchange location where the ceramic particles are cooled by a gas flow. The cooled ceramic particles are elevated to a location from which they may again pass by gravity through the region where they are exposed to neutron radiation. Ceramic particles of alumina, magnesia, silica and combinations of these materials are contemplated as high-temperature materials that will accept energy from neutron irradiation. Separate containers of material incorporating lithium are exposed to the neutron flux for the breeding of tritium that may subsequently be used in neutron-producing reactions. The falling bed of ceramic particles includes velocity partitioning between compartments near to the neutron-producing plasma and compartments away from the plasma to moderate the maximum temperature in the bed.

  13. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment are begun. The studies are to be in parallel with LSFCO composition to characterize the segregation of cations and slow crack growth in environmental conditions. La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} has also been characterized for paramagnetic ordering at room temperature and the evolution of magnetic moments as a function of temperature are investigated. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport.

  14. Hydrogen transport membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mundschau, Michael V.

    2005-05-31

    Composite hydrogen transport membranes, which are used for extraction of hydrogen from gas mixtures are provided. Methods are described for supporting metals and metal alloys which have high hydrogen permeability, but which are either too thin to be self supporting, too weak to resist differential pressures across the membrane, or which become embrittled by hydrogen. Support materials are chosen to be lattice matched to the metals and metal alloys. Preferred metals with high permeability for hydrogen include vanadium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, palladium, and alloys thereof. Hydrogen-permeable membranes include those in which the pores of a porous support matrix are blocked by hydrogen-permeable metals and metal alloys, those in which the pores of a porous metal matrix are blocked with materials which make the membrane impervious to gases other than hydrogen, and cermets fabricated by sintering powders of metals with powders of lattice-matched ceramic.

  15. The NASA-UC-UH Eta-Earth program. IV. A low-mass planet orbiting an M dwarf 3.6 PC from Earth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Fischer, Debra A.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Becker, Juliette C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Von Braun, Kaspar; Wright, Jason T.; Johnson, John Asher

    2014-10-10

    We report the discovery of a low-mass planet orbiting Gl 15 A based on radial velocities from the Eta-Earth Survey using HIRES at Keck Observatory. Gl 15 Ab is a planet with minimum mass Msin i = 5.35 ± 0.75 M {sub ?}, orbital period P = 11.4433 ± 0.0016 days, and an orbit that is consistent with circular. We characterize the host star using a variety of techniques. Photometric observations at Fairborn Observatory show no evidence for rotational modulation of spots at the orbital period to a limit of ?0.1 mmag, thus supporting the existence of the planet. We detect a second RV signal with a period of 44 days that we attribute to rotational modulation of stellar surface features, as confirmed by optical photometry and the Ca II H and K activity indicator. Using infrared spectroscopy from Palomar-TripleSpec, we measure an M2 V spectral type and a sub-solar metallicity ([M/H] = –0.22, [Fe/H] = –0.32). We measure a stellar radius of 0.3863 ± 0.0021 R {sub ?} based on interferometry from CHARA.

  16. Transportation System Concept of Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Slater-Thompson

    2006-08-16

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, authorized the DOE to develop and manage a Federal system for the disposal of SNF and HLW. OCRWM was created to manage acceptance and disposal of SNF and HLW in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. This responsibility includes managing the transportation of SNF and HLW from origin sites to the Repository for disposal. The Transportation System Concept of Operations is the core high-level OCRWM document written to describe the Transportation System integrated design and present the vision, mission, and goals for Transportation System operations. By defining the functions, processes, and critical interfaces of this system early in the system development phase, programmatic risks are minimized, system costs are contained, and system operations are better managed, safer, and more secure. This document also facilitates discussions and understanding among parties responsible for the design, development, and operation of the Transportation System. Such understanding is important for the timely development of system requirements and identification of system interfaces. Information provided in the Transportation System Concept of Operations includes: the functions and key components of the Transportation System; system component interactions; flows of information within the system; the general operating sequences; and the internal and external factors affecting transportation operations. The Transportation System Concept of Operations reflects OCRWM's overall waste management system policies and mission objectives, and as such provides a description of the preferred state of system operation. The description of general Transportation System operating functions in the Transportation System Concept of Operations is the first step in the OCRWM systems engineering process, establishing the starting point for the lower level descriptions. of subsystems and components, and the Transportation System Requirements Document. Other program and system documents, plans, instructions, and detailed designs will be consistent with and informed by the Transportation System Concept of Operations. The Transportation System Concept of Operations is a living document, enduring throughout the OCRWM systems engineering lifecycle. It will undergo formal approval and controlled revisions as appropriate while the Transportation System matures. Revisions will take into account new policy decisions, new information available through system modeling, engineering investigations, technical analyses and tests, and the introduction of new technologies that can demonstrably improve system performance.

  17. A Microfluidic Pore Network Approach to Investigate Water Transport in Fuel Cell Porous Transport Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazylak, A; Markicevic, B; Sinton, D; Djilali, N

    2008-01-01

    Pore network modelling has traditionally been used to study displacement processes in idealized porous media related to geological flows, with applications ranging from groundwater hydrology to enhanced oil recovery. Very recently, pore network modelling has been applied to model the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Discrete pore network models have the potential to elucidate transport phenomena in the GDL with high computational efficiency, in contrast to continuum or molecular dynamics modelling that require extensive computational resources. However, the challenge in studying the GDL with pore network modelling lies in defining the network parameters that accurately describe the porous media as well as the conditions of fluid invasion that represent realistic transport processes. In this work, we discuss the first stage of developing and validating a GDL-representative pore network model. We begin with a two-dimensional pore network model with a single mobile pha...

  18. Assessing the transport and fate of bioengineered microorganisms in the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    We review the methods currently available for quantifying the transport and fate of microbes in atmospheric and aqueous media and assess their adequacy for purposes of risk assessment. We review the literature on transport and fate of microorganisms, including studies of: (1) pathways of migration, (2) the survival of microorganisms during transport and fate. In addition, we review the transport and fate models that have been used in environmental risk assessments for radionuclides and toxic chemicals and evaluate their applicability to the problem of assessing environmental risks of bioengineered microorganisms.

  19. Preliminary Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A Kouts

    2006-11-22

    This document provides specifications for selected system components of the Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system. A list of system specified components and ancillary components are included in Section 1.2. The TAD canister, in conjunction with specialized overpacks will accomplish a number of functions in the management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Some of these functions will be accomplished at purchaser sites where commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) is stored, and some will be performed within the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) transportation and disposal system. This document contains only those requirements unique to applications within Department of Energy's (DOE's) system. DOE recognizes that TAD canisters may have to perform similar functions at purchaser sites. Requirements to meet reactor functions, such as on-site dry storage, handling, and loading for transportation, are expected to be similar to commercially available canister-based systems. This document is intended to be referenced in the license application for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). As such, the requirements cited herein are needed for TAD system use in OCRWM's disposal system. This document contains specifications for the TAD canister, transportation overpack and aging overpack. The remaining components and equipment that are unique to the OCRWM system or for similar purchaser applications will be supplied by others.

  20. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-06-04

    This Manual establishes standard transportation practices for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials and waste. The revision reflects ongoing collaboration of DOE and outside organizations on the transportation of radioactive material and waste. Supersedes DOE M 460.2-1.

  1. A Least-Squares Transport Equation Compatible with Voids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Jon [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Peterson, Jacob [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Morel, Jim [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Ragusa, Jean [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Wang, Yaqi [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Standard second-order self-adjoint forms of the transport equation, such as the even-parity, odd-parity, and self-adjoint angular flux equation, cannot be used in voids. Perhaps more important, they experience numerical convergence difficulties in near-voids. Here we present a new form of a second-order self-adjoint transport equation that has an advantage relative to standard forms in that it can be used in voids or near-voids. Our equation is closely related to the standard least-squares form of the transport equation with both equations being applicable in a void and having a nonconservative analytic form. However, unlike the standard least-squares form of the transport equation, our least-squares equation is compatible with source iteration. It has been found that the standard least-squares form of the transport equation with a linear-continuous finite-element spatial discretization has difficulty in the thick diffusion limit. Here we extensively test the 1D slab-geometry version of our scheme with respect to void solutions, spatial convergence rate, and the intermediate and thick diffusion limits. We also define an effective diffusion synthetic acceleration scheme for our discretization. Our conclusion is that our least-squares Sn formulation represents an excellent alternative to existing second-order Sn transport formulations

  2. Coal Transportation Rate Sensitivity Analysis

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    On December 21, 2004, the Surface Transportation Board (STB) requested that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) analyze the impact of changes in coal transportation rates on projected levels of electric power sector energy use and emissions. Specifically, the STB requested an analysis of changes in national and regional coal consumption and emissions resulting from adjustments in railroad transportation rates for Wyoming's Powder River Basin (PRB) coal using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). However, because NEMS operates at a relatively aggregate regional level and does not represent the costs of transporting coal over specific rail lines, this analysis reports on the impacts of interregional changes in transportation rates from those used in the Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO2005) reference case.

  3. Memory Effects and Transport Coefficients for Non-Newtonian Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Kodama; T. Koide

    2008-12-22

    We discuss the roles of viscosity in relativistic fluid dynamics from the point of view of memory effects. Depending on the type of quantity to which the memory effect is applied, different terms appear in higher order corrections. We show that when the memory effect applies on the extensive quantities, the hydrodynamic equations of motion become non-singular. We further discuss the question of memory effect in the derivation of transport coefficients from a microscopic theory. We generalize the application of the Green-Kubo-Nakano (GKN) to calculate transport coefficients in the framework of projection operator formalism, and derive the general formula when the fluid is non-Newtonian.

  4. Energy Intensity Indicators: Transportation Energy Consumption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section contains an overview of the aggregate transportation sector, combining both passenger and freight segments of this sector. The specific energy intensity indicators for passenger and freight can be obtained from the links, passenger transportation, or freight transportation. For further detail within the transportation sector, download the appropriate Trend Data worksheet containing detailed data and graphics for specific transportation modes.

  5. Transportes em Revista.com Pas: Portugal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    Transportes em Revista.com País: Portugal Period.: Diária Âmbito: Online Pag.: 1 de 2ID: 41904396 22-05-2012 Receba gr átis a Transportes Online | Assinar a Transportes em Revista | Fazer da TR a sua Transport Rodas de mudança Et si nos villes #12;Transportes em Revista.com País:

  6. Impact of Wireless Power Transfer in Transportation: Future Transportation Enabler, or Near Term Distraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onar, Omer C; Jones, Perry T

    2014-01-01

    While the total liquid fuels consumed in the U.S. for transportation of goods and people is expected to hold steady, or decline slightly over the next few decades, the world wide consumption is projected to increase of over 30% according to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 [1]. The balance of energy consumption for transportation between petroleum fuels and electric energy, and the related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions produced consuming either, is of particular interest to government administrations, vehicle OEMs, and energy suppliers. The market adoption of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) appears to be inhibited by many factors relating to the energy storage system (ESS) and charging infrastructure. Wireless power transfer (WPT) technologies have been identified as a key enabling technology to increase the acceptance of EVs. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in many research areas related to understanding the impacts, opportunities, challenges and costs related to various deployments of WPT technology for transportation use. Though the initial outlook for WPT deployment looks promising, many other emerging technologies have met unfavorable market launches due to unforeseen technology limitations, sometimes due to the complex system in which the new technology was placed. This paper will summarize research and development (R&D) performed at ORNL in the area of Wireless Power Transfer (WPT). ORNL s advanced transportation technology R&D activities provide a unique set of experienced researchers to assist in the creation of a transportation system level view. These activities range from fundamental technology development at the component level to subsystem controls and interactions to applicable system level analysis of impending market and industry responses and beyond.

  7. Intracellular transport driven by cytoskeletal motors: General mechanisms and defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cecile Appert-Rolland; Maximilian Ebbinghaus; Ludger Santen

    2015-07-22

    Cells are strongly out-of-equilibrium systems driven by continuous energy supply. They carry out many vital functions requiring active transport of various ingredients and organelles, some being small, others being large. The cytoskeleton, composed of three types of filaments, determines the shape of the cell and plays a role in cell motion. It also serves as a road network for the so-called cytoskeletal motors. These molecules can attach to a cytoskeletal filament, perform directed motion, possibly carrying along some cargo, and then detach. It is a central issue to understand how intracellular transport driven by molecular motors is regulated, in particular because its breakdown is one of the signatures of some neuronal diseases like the Alzheimer. We give a survey of the current knowledge on microtubule based intracellular transport. We first review some biological facts obtained from experiments, and present some modeling attempts based on cellular automata. We start with background knowledge on the original and variants of the TASEP (Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process), before turning to more application oriented models. After addressing microtubule based transport in general, with a focus on in vitro experiments, and on cooperative effects in the transportation of large cargos by multiple motors, we concentrate on axonal transport, because of its relevance for neuronal diseases. It is a challenge to understand how this transport is organized, given that it takes place in a confined environment and that several types of motors moving in opposite directions are involved. We review several features that could contribute to the efficiency of this transport, including the role of motor-motor interactions and of the dynamics of the underlying microtubule network. Finally, we discuss some still open questions.

  8. Uphill transport and the probabilistic transport model B. Ph. van Milligen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Milligen, Boudewijn

    Uphill transport and the probabilistic transport model B. Ph. van Milligen Asociacio´n EURATOM-CIEMAT

  9. Transport Survey 2008 (Staff and student)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Transport Survey 2008 (Staff and student) April 2008 Ramon Arigoni Ortiz Wan-Jung Chou Department................................................................................................6 2. Transport use and travel behaviour......................................................................10 2.1. Modes of transport

  10. co2-transport | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transport Cost Model FENETL CO2 Transport Cost Model About the model: This model was developed to estimate the cost of transporting a user-specified mass rate of CO2 by pipeline...

  11. Anomalous transport through porous and fractured media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Peter Kyungchul

    2014-01-01

    Anomalous transport, understood as the nonlinear scaling with time of the mean square displacement of transported particles, is observed in many physical processes, including contaminant transport through porous and fractured ...

  12. Transportes em Revista.com Pas: Portugal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    Transportes em Revista.com País: Portugal Period.: Diária Âmbito: Online Pag.: 1 de 2ID: 44168021 10-10-2012 Receba gr átis a Transportes Online | Assinar a Transportes em Revista | Fazer da TR a sua

  13. Transport Protocol Services (TAPS) Problem: more and more transport protocols available, with various features,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welzl, Michael

    Transport Protocol Services (TAPS) · Problem: more and more transport protocols that would not offer "TCP or UDP" but "transport services" ­ A transport system: transport-services@ifi.uio.no hXps://sympa.uio.no/ifi.uio.no/info/transport-services · Problem

  14. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    truck activity in California. Transport Policy. Volume 16,in California Travel Demand Reductions Decreasing transportCalifornia, USA. Transportation Research, Part D: Transport

  15. Application of the Java Message Service in mobile monitoring environments Martin Kuehnhausen , Victor S. Frost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    Application of the Java Message Service in mobile monitoring environments Martin Kuehnhausen à on trains. The Java Message Service (JMS) presents a flexible transport layer for asynchronous communication

  16. Essays on Urban Transportation and Transportation Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chun Kon

    2008-01-01

    E?ects of Transportation Energy policy on Tra?c Crashes .e?ciency standards. Energy Policy, 33(3), 407–419. Blincoe,what’s necessary? Energy Policy, 34(9), 971–974. Bose, R.

  17. Environment-Assisted Quantum Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Rebentrost; Masoud Mohseni; Ivan Kassal; Seth Lloyd; Alán Aspuru-Guzik

    2009-02-10

    Transport phenomena at the nanoscale are of interest due to the presence of both quantum and classical behavior. In this work, we demonstrate that quantum transport efficiency can be enhanced by a dynamical interplay of the system Hamiltonian with pure dephasing induced by a fluctuating environment. This is in contrast to fully coherent hopping that leads to localization in disordered systems, and to highly incoherent transfer that is eventually suppressed by the quantum Zeno effect. We study these phenomena in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein complex as a prototype for larger photosynthetic energy transfer systems. We also show that disordered binary tree structures exhibit enhanced transport in the presence of dephasing.

  18. Momentum Transport in Granular Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregg Lois; Anael Lemaitre; Jean M. Carlson

    2006-02-10

    We investigate the error induced by only considering binary collisions in the momentum transport of hard-sphere granular materials, as is done in kinetic theories. In this process, we first present a general microscopic derivation of the momentum transport equation and compare it to the kinetic theory derivation, which relies on the binary collision assumption. These two derivations yield different microscopic expressions for the stress tensor, which we compare using simulations. This provides a quantitative bound on the regime where binary collisions dominate momentum transport and reveals that most realistic granular flows occur in the region of phase space where the binary collision assumption does not apply.

  19. Quantum transport through aromatic molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojeda, J. H.; Rey-González, R. R.; Laroze, D.

    2013-12-07

    In this paper, we study the electronic transport properties through aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. The molecules are in different geometrical configurations including arrays. Using a nearest neighbor tight-binding approach, the transport properties are analyzed into a Green's function technique within a real-space renormalization scheme. We calculate the transmission probability and the Current-Voltage characteristics as a function of a molecule-leads coupling parameter. Our results show different transport regimes for these systems, exhibiting metal-semiconductor-insulator transitions and the possibility to employ them in molecular devices.

  20. Turbulence Induced Transport in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldas, I. L.; Marcus, F. A.; Heller, M. V. A. P.; Guimaraes-Filho, Z. O. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, 05315-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Batista, A. M. [Departamento de Matematica e Estatistica, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Viana, R. L.; Lopes, S. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Morrison, P. J.; Horton, W. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, 78712 (United States); Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, 78712 (United States)

    2006-12-04

    This report is concerned with plasma edge turbulence and its relation to anomalous particle transport in tokamaks. First, experimental evidence of turbulence driven particle transport and measurements of the gradients of the equilibrium profiles in the Brazilian tokamaks TBR and TCABR are presented. Next, diffusion in a two drift-wave system is discussed. In this nonintegrable system, particle transport is associated with the onset of chaotic orbits. Finally, numerical evidence suggesting that a nonlinear three-mode interaction could contribute to the intermittent plasma fluctuations observed in tokamaks is presented.

  1. UFD Storage and Transportation - Transportation Working Group Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maheras, Steven J.; Ross, Steven B.

    2011-08-01

    The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Transportation Task commenced in October 2010. As its first task, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) compiled a list of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) of transportation systems and their possible degradation mechanisms during extended storage. The list of SSCs and the associated degradation mechanisms [known as features, events, and processes (FEPs)] were based on the list of used nuclear fuel (UNF) storage system SSCs and degradation mechanisms developed by the UFD Storage Task (Hanson et al. 2011). Other sources of information surveyed to develop the list of SSCs and their degradation mechanisms included references such as Evaluation of the Technical Basis for Extended Dry Storage and Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel (NWTRB 2010), Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification, Revision 1 (OCRWM 2008), Data Needs for Long-Term Storage of LWR Fuel (EPRI 1998), Technical Bases for Extended Dry Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel (EPRI 2002), Used Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Extended Storage Collaboration Program (EPRI 2010a), Industry Spent Fuel Storage Handbook (EPRI 2010b), and Transportation of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel, Issues Resolution (EPRI 2010c). SSCs include items such as the fuel, cladding, fuel baskets, neutron poisons, metal canisters, etc. Potential degradation mechanisms (FEPs) included mechanical, thermal, radiation and chemical stressors, such as fuel fragmentation, embrittlement of cladding by hydrogen, oxidation of cladding, metal fatigue, corrosion, etc. These degradation mechanisms are discussed in Section 2 of this report. The degradation mechanisms have been evaluated to determine if they would be influenced by extended storage or high burnup, the need for additional data, and their importance to transportation. These categories were used to identify the most significant transportation degradation mechanisms. As expected, for the most part, the transportation importance was mirrored by the importance assigned by the UFD Storage Task. A few of the more significant differences are described in Section 3 of this report

  2. Texarkana Urban Transportation Study 2035 Metropolitan Transportation Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texarkana Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2009-10-01

    And Local Resource Agencies 1-7 Inclusion of Indian Tribes in the Transportation Process 1-8 2 SOCIO-ECONOMIC DATA 5 ROADS & BRIDGES Population Data 2-1 Road Performance 5-1 Housing Data 2... to increased motor fuels taxes or alternative revenue sources 4. Decaying infrastructure 5. Increasing demand for new infrastructure and access to alternative modes Starting with the Intermodal Surface Transportation Act of 1991 (ISTEA), the regulatory...

  3. Centrifuge Techniques and Apparatus for Transport Experiments in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earl D. Mattson; Carl D. Paler; Robert W. Smith; Markus Flury

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes experimental approaches and apparatus that we have developed to study solute and colloid transport in porous media using Idaho National Laboratory's 2-m radius centrifuge. The ex-perimental techniques include water flux scaling with applied acceleration at the top of the column and sub-atmospheric pressure control at the column base, automation of data collection, and remote experimental con-trol over the internet. These apparatus include a constant displacement piston pump, a custom designed liquid fraction collector based on switching valve technology, and modified moisture monitoring equipment. Suc-cessful development of these experimental techniques and equipment is illustrated through application to transport of a conservative tracer through unsaturated sand column, with centrifugal acceleration up to 40 gs. Development of such experimental equipment that can withstand high accelerations enhances the centrifuge technique to conduct highly controlled unsaturated solute/colloid transport experiments and allows in-flight liquid sample collection of the effluent.

  4. Active transport: A kinetic description based on thermodynamic grounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kjelstrup; J. M. Rubi; D. Bedeaux

    2004-12-17

    We show that active transport processes in biological systems can be understood through a local equilibrium description formulated at the mesoscale, the scale to describe stochastic processes. This new approach uses the method established by nonequilibrium thermodynamics to account for the irreversible processes occurring at this scale and provides nonlinear kinetic equations for the rates in terms of the driving forces. The results show that the application domain of nonequilibrium thermodynamics method to biological systems goes beyond the linear domain. A model for transport of Ca$^{2+}$ by the Ca$^{2+}$-ATPase, coupled to the hydrolysis of adenosine-triphosphate is analyzed in detail showing that it depends on the reaction Gibbs energy in a non-linear way. Our results unify thermodynamic and kinetic descriptions, thereby opening new perspectives in the study of different transport phenomena in biological systems.

  5. Transportation Issues and Resolutions Compilation of Laboratory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of cladding (embrittled, high burnup cladding, loads applied to cladding during transport), criticality analyses of failed UNF within transport packages, moderator exclusion...

  6. Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator superconductor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator superconductor junctions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator...

  7. Coal Gasification and Transportation Fuels Magazine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coal Gasification and Transportation Fuels Magazine Current Edition: Coal Gasification and Transportation Fuels Quarterly News, Vol.1, Issue 4 (July 2015) Archived Editions: Coal...

  8. Nearly 200 Attend National Transportation Stakeholders Forum...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    national transportation coordination. BUFFALO, N.Y. - In his keynote address at the fourth-annual DOE National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) meeting, EM Senior...

  9. Spring 2015 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Spring 2015 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New Mexico The Spring 2015 meeting of the National Transportation Stakeholders Forum will be held on May 12-14, 2015...

  10. Transportation Equipment (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Equipment (2010 MECS) Transportation Equipment (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Transportation Equipment Sector (NAICS 336) Energy use data source:...

  11. Transportation Safeguards & Security Test Bed (TSSTB) | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Safeguards and Security Test Bed May 30, 2013 The Transportation Safeguards and Security Test Bed consists of a test-bed vehicle and a monitoringlaboratorytraining...

  12. Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal Energy Agency (IEA-AMT) Annex on Thermoelectric Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal Energy...

  13. We're All Transportation Planners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curry, Melanie

    2006-01-01

    transportation ment, has had some success in London’sLondon, offering our individual contribution to them. obser vations on current transportation

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Transportation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Energy Data Book, Vehicle Technologies Market Report, and VT Fact of the Week Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Transportation Energy Data Book, Vehicle...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Transportation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Energy Data Book, Vehicle Technologies Market Report, and VT Fact of the Week Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Transportation Energy Data Book, Vehicle...

  16. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Conroy U S Department of Transportation - 1 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety...

  17. QER - Comment of Electric Drive Transportation Association |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Drive Transportation Association QER - Comment of Electric Drive Transportation Association From: Genevieve Cullen gcullen@electricdrive.org Sent: Friday, October 10, 2014 11:58...

  18. EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    On Closure Success 1 EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Chicago, Illinois May 26, 2010 Frank Marcinowski Acting Chief...

  19. Assembly and electrical transport characterization of nanostructures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Assembly and electrical transport characterization of nanostructures. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Assembly and electrical transport characterization of...

  20. EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Transportation EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation DOE's Radioactive Waste Management Priorities: Continue to manage waste inventories in a safe and compliant...