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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material The purpose of this User's Guide is to provide instructors with an overview of the key points covered in the video. The Student Handout portion of this Guide is designed to assist the instructor in reviewing those points with students. The Student Handout should be distributed to students after the video is shown and the instructor should use the Guide to facilitate a discussion on how the decontamination dressdown process is implemented. During this discussion, the instructor can present various scenarios, each of which would discuss decontamination at the accident scene. The purpose of this discussion would be to cover how responders

2

EMERGENCY RESPONSE TO A TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emer Emer Emer Emer Emer Emergency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a Transportation ransportation ransportation ransportation ransportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond the scope of this video and requires either additional

3

DECONTAMINATION DRESSDOWN AT A TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Video User' s Guide Video User' s Guide DECONTAMINATION DRESSDOWN AT A TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond

4

Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material The purpose of this User's Guide is to provide instructors with an overview of the key points covered in the video. The Student Handout portion of this Guide is designed to assist the instructor in reviewing those points with students. The Student Handout should be distributed to students after the video is shown and the instructor should use the Guide to facilitate a discussion on each response disciplines' activities or duties at the scene. During this discussion, the instructor can present response scenarios, each of which would have a different discipline arriving first at the accident scene. The purpose of this discussion

5

Report on a workshop on transportation-accident scenarios involving spent fuel  

SciTech Connect

Much confusion and skepticism resulted from the scenarios for transportation accidents involving spent fuel that have been presented in environmental impact statements because the supporting assumptions and conclusions from the scenarios did not always appear to be consistent. As a result, the Transportation Technology Center gathered a group whose participants were experts in disciplines related to the transport of spent fuel to consider the scenarios. The group made a number of recommendations about scenario development and about areas in need of further study. This report documents the discussions held and the recommendations and conclusions of the group.

Wilmot, E.L.; McClure, J.D.; Luna, R.E.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Accident resistant transport container  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

Andersen, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Cole, James K. (Albuquerque, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Accidents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Risks » Accidents Health Risks » Accidents DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Accidents A discussion of accidents involving depleted UF6 storage cylinders, including possible health effects, accident risk, and accident history. Potential Health Effects from Cylinder Accidents Accidents involving depleted UF6 storage cylinders are a concern because they could result in an uncontrolled release of UF6 to the environment, which could potentially affect the health of workers and members of the public living downwind of the accident site. Accidental release of UF6 from storage cylinders or during processing activities could result in injuries or fatalities. The most immediate hazard after a release would be from inhalation of hydrogen fluoride (HF), a highly corrosive gas formed when

8

Audit of the Department of Energy's Transportation Accident Resistant...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Accident Resistant Container Program, IG-0380 Audit of the Department of Energy's Transportation Accident Resistant Container Program, IG-0380 Audit of the...

9

FAQ 30-Have there been accidents involving uranium hexafluoride...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UF6 was released, which reacted with steam from the process and created HF and uranyl fluoride. This accident resulted in two deaths from HF inhalation and three individuals...

10

Rail transportation risk and accident severity: A statistical analysis of variables in FRA's accident/incident data base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal Railroad Administration (US DOT) maintains a file of carrier-reported railroad accidents and incidents that meet stipulated threshold criteria for damage cost and/or casualties. A thoroughly-cleaned five-year time series of this data base was subjected to unbiased statistical procedures to discover (a) important causative variables in severe (high damage cost) accidents and (b) other key relationships between objective accident conditions and frequencies. Just under 6000 records, each representing a single event involving rail freight shipments moving on mainline track, were subjected to statistical frequency analysis, then included in the construction of classification and regression trees as described by Breimann et al. (1984). Variables related to damage cost defined the initial splits,'' or branchings of the tree. An interesting implication of the results of this analysis with respect to transportation of hazardous wastes by rail is that movements should be avoided when ambient temperatures are extreme (significantly 80{degrees}F), but that there should be no a priori bias against shipping wastes in longer train consists. 2 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

Saricks, C.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Energy Systems Div.); Janssen, I. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Biological and Medical Research Div.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Review of ARAC's involvement in the Titan II missile accident  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) response to the Titan II accident near Damascus, Arkansas on 19 September 1980 entailed 12 personnel for periods ranging from 2 to 12 hours. The first call was a NEST Standby alert at 0415L (PCT), followed by a request for dispersal calculations at 0615L, personnel callout at 0630L, crude estimates of plausible source term scenarios at 0845-0900L, first model calculations at 1130L and final model calculations at 1500L. While several new firsts were recorded for ARAC, demonstrating expanded capabilities for NEST-type responses, time lines were very long, essential information was very scant to non-existent, and useful communication of final calculations to the accident site impossible. A detailed chronology is found in Appendix A and a list of acronyms and abbreviations is contained in Appendix B.

Sullivan, T.J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Spent Fuel Transportation Applications: Longitudinal Tearing Resulting from Transportation Accidents--A Probabilistic Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a probabilistic treatment of longitudinal tearing of spent fuel rods subjected to dynamic forces that could result from hypothetical spent fuel transportation accidents. Longitudinal tearing represents the failure configuration with the highest potential for occurring during transport because of the effects of radial hydrides on cladding resistance to fracture. Accurate assessment of this failure mode constitutes an important part of a general failure analysis methodology to quantify...

2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

13

Audit of the Department of Energy's Transportation Accident Resistant Container Program, IG-0380  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 1995 1, 1995 IG-1 INFORMATION: Report on "Audit of the Department of Energy's Transportation Accident Resistant Container Program" The Secretary BACKGROUND: The U.S. Department of Energy (Department) has ultimate responsibility for the safety of all nuclear explosives and weapons operations conducted by the Department and its contractors. The Department also has joint responsibility for the safety of nuclear weapons in the custody of the Armed Services. Since the 1970s, the Department has designed, developed, and produced accident resistant containers to promote safety when transporting certain types of nuclear weapons by air. DISCUSSION: After successfully developing and modifying accident resistant containers for

14

Co-relation of Variables Involved in the Occurrence of Crane Accidents in U.S. through Logit Modeling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the primary reasons of the escalating rates of injuries and fatalities in the construction industry is the ever so complex, dynamic and continually changing nature of construction work. Use of cranes has become imperative to overcome technical challenges, which has lead to escalation of danger on a construction site. Data from OSHA show that crane accidents have increased rapidly from 2000 to 2004. By analyzing the characteristics of all the crane accident inspections, we can better understand the significance of the many variables involved in a crane accident. For this research, data were collected from the U.S. Department of Labor website via the OSHA database. The data encompass crane accident inspections for all the states. The data were divided into categories with respect to accident types, construction operations, degree of accident, fault, contributing factors, crane types, victims occupation, organs affected and load. Descriptive analysis was performed to compliment the previous studies, the only difference being that both fatal and non-fatal accidents have been considered. Multinomial regression has been applied to derive probability models and correlation between different accident types and the factors involved for each crane accident type. A log likelihood test as well as chi-square test was performed to validate the models. The results show that electrocution, crane tip over and crushed during assembly/disassembly have more probability of occurrence than other accident types. Load is not a significant factor for the crane accidents, and manual fault is more probable a cause for crane accident than is technical fault. Construction operations identified in the research were found to be significant for all the crane accident types. Mobile crawler crane, mobile truck crane and tower crane were found to be more susceptible. These probability models are limited as far as the inculcation of unforeseen variables in construction accidents are concerned. In fact, these models utilize the past to portray the future, and therefore significant change in the variables involved is required to be added to attain correct and expedient results.

Bains, Amrit Anoop Singh

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

An Analysis on the Characteristics of Boiling Liquid Expanding Vapor Explosion Accidents in Marine Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BLEVE is a kind of disaster that may cause serious consequences in the process of maritime transportation of liquefied petroleum gas, liquefied natural gas. To analyze the accident characteristics of both the external environment and the internal causes ... Keywords: BLEVE, boiler, characteristics analysis, liquefied gas storage tank

Sining Chen; Yinquan Duo; Lijun Wei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Severe Accident Studies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Severe Accident Studies Severe Accident Studies Christopher S. Bajwa Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards USNRC 2012 U.S. DOE National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) May 15 - 17, 2012 Knoxville, TN * Going The Distance? - The Safe Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste in the United States * Released February 9, 2006 * Conclusions: * NRC safety regulations are adequate to ensure package containment effectiveness over a wide range of transport conditions, including most credible accident conditions. * The radiological risks are well understood and are generally low, with the possible exception of risks from releases in extreme accidents involving long duration, fully engulfing fires.

17

Severe Accident Studies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Severe Accident Studies Severe Accident Studies Powerpoint discussing studies and conclusions on transportation accidents and safety. Severe Accident Studies More Documents &...

18

Risks From Severe Accidents Involving Steam Generator Tube Leaks or Ruptures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The various types of corrosion observed in PWR steam generator tubes prompted the nuclear industry to initiate a program of Steam Generator Degradation Specific Management (SGDSM). This program's objective is to develop a cost-effective means to maintain plant safety while improving steam generator reliability. Critical to this program is an assessment of the impact of steam generator tube leakage or rupture during severe accidents. This study determined the contributions of these types of severe acciden...

1998-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

19

Multi-component gas transport in CANDU fuel rods during severe accidents.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The multi-component transport of steam, hydrogen and stable fission gas in the fuel-to-clad gap of defective CANDU fuel rods, during severe accident conditions, is investigated. Based on a general Stefan-Maxwell treatment this work considers how incoming steam will diffuse into a breached rod against a counter-current flow of non-condensable fission gases and out-flowing hydrogen that is produced from the internal reaction of steam with the Zircaloy cladding or urania. The ability of the oxidized clad to act as a physical barrier to either hydrogen or oxygen diffusion was further investigated in the current work with a molecular-dynamics approach, with the interactions between atoms represented by a Modified Embedded Atom Method. During the initial Zircaloy oxidation phase in the CRL experiments, the model was able to predict the reduced fission product release kinetics as well as the timing for the completion of the clad-oxidation process. In this simulation, the model (with an effective gap size of 20 {micro}m) was able to successfully predict whether singlesided or double-sided oxidation had occurred in accordance with the metallographic examination. However, in order to account for the observed release kinetics after the completion of clad oxidation, it was necessary to assume a greater atmospheric exchange due to possible cracking of the brittle oxide layer. With the assumption of cracking (by assuming a reduced path length for gas transport), the model was successfully able to reproduce the fission product release kinetics and the final fuel stoichiometry as determined from end-of-test weight gain measurements. This analysis particularly shows that local hydrogen production (from the internal fuel oxidation process) will result in a reduced local oxygen potential in the fuel-to-clad gap compared to that which occurs in the bulk coolant.

Szpunar, B; Lewis, B. J.; Arimescu, V. I.; Dickson, R. S.; Dickson, L. W.; Baskes, M. I. (Michael I.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Potential health risks from postulated accidents involving the Pu-238 RTG (radioisotope thermoelectric generator) on the Ulysses solar exploration mission  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potential radiation impacts from launch of the Ulysses solar exploration experiment were evaluated using eight postulated accident scenarios. Lifetime individual dose estimates rarely exceeded 1 mrem. Most of the potential health effects would come from inhalation exposures immediately after an accident, rather than from ingestion of contaminated food or water, or from inhalation of resuspended plutonium from contaminated ground. For local Florida accidents (that is, during the first minute after launch), an average source term accident was estimated to cause a total added cancer risk of up to 0.2 deaths. For accidents at later times after launch, a worldwide cancer risk of up to three cases was calculated (with a four in a million probability). Upper bound estimates were calculated to be about 10 times higher. 83 refs.

Goldman, M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA)); Nelson, R.C. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Bollinger, L. (Air Force Inspection and Safety Center, Kirtland AFB, NM (USA)); Hoover, M.D. (Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (USA). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.); Templeton, W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Anspaugh, L. (Lawren

1990-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Development of an Ontology to Assist the Modeling of Accident Scenarii "Application on Railroad Transport "  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a world where communication and information sharing are at the heart of our business, the terminology needs are most pressing. It has become imperative to identify the terms used and defined in a consensual and coherent way while preserving linguistic diversity. To streamline and strengthen the process of acquisition, representation and exploitation of scenarii of train accidents, it is necessary to harmonize and standardize the terminology used by players in the security field. The research aims to significantly improve analytical activities and operations of the various safety studies, by tracking the error in system, hardware, software and human. This paper presents the contribution of ontology to modeling scenarii for rail accidents through a knowledge model based on a generic ontology and domain ontology. After a detailed presentation of the state of the art material, this article presents the first results of the developed model.

Maalel, Ahmed; Mejri, Lassad; Ghezela, Henda Hajjami Ben

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Using Software Development Standards to Analyse Accidents Involving Electrical, Electronic or Programmable Electronic Systems: The Blade Mill Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Johnson,C.W. Bowell,M. In C.J. Hayhurst, C.M.Holloway and B. Strauch (eds), Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on the Investigation and Reporting of Incidents and Accidents, Published as NASA Technical Report NASA/CP-2003-212642 pp 111-128

Johnson, C.W.

23

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Risks » Transportation Health Risks » Transportation DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Transportation A discussion of health risks associated with transport of depleted UF6. Transport Regulations and Requirements In the future, it is likely that depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinders will be transported to a conversion facility. For example, it is currently anticipated that the cylinders at the ETTP Site in Oak Ridge, TN, will be transported to the Portsmouth Site, OH, for conversion. Uranium hexafluoride has been shipped safely in the United States for over 40 years by both truck and rail. Shipments of depleted UF6 would be made in accordance with all applicable transportation regulations. Shipment of depleted UF6 is regulated by the

24

Intelligent Transportation Systems - Center for Transportation Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intelligent Transportation Systems Intelligent Transportation Systems The Center for Transportation Analysis does specialty research and development in intelligent transportation systems. Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) are part of the national strategy for improving the operational safety, efficiency, and security of our nation's highways. Since the early 1990s, ITS has been the umbrella under which significant efforts have been conducted in research, development, testing, deployment and integration of advanced technologies to improve the measures of effectiveness of our national highway network. These measures include level of congestion, the number of accidents and fatalities, delay, throughput, access to transportation, and fuel efficiency. A transportation future that includes ITS will involve a significant improvement in these

25

Nuclear criticality accidents  

SciTech Connect

Criticality occurs when a sufficient quantity of fissionable material is accumulated, and it results in the liberation of nuclear energy. All process accidents have involved plutonium or highly enriched uranium, as have most of the critical experiment accidents. Slightly enriched uranium systems require much larger quantities of material to achieve criticality. An appreciation of criticality accidents should be based on an understanding of factors that influence criticality, which are discussed in this article. 11 references.

Smith, D.R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico (Unites States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Low-level radioactive waste transportation safety history  

SciTech Connect

The Radioactive Materials Incident Report (RMIR) database was developed fin 1981 at the Transportation Technology Center of Sandia National Laboratories to support its research and development activities for the US department of Energy (DOE). This database contains information about radioactive material (RAM) transportation incidents that have occurred in the US since 1971. These data were drawn from the US Department of Transportation`s (DOT) Hazardous Materials Incident Report system, from Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) files, and from various agencies including state radiological control offices. Support for the RMIR data base is funded by the US DOE National Transportation Program (NTP). Transportation events in RMIR are classified in one of the following ways: as a transportation accident, as a handling accident, or as a reported incident. This presentation will provide definitions for these classifications and give examples of each. The primary objective of this presentation is to provide information on nuclear materials transportation accident/incident events involving low-level waste (LLW) that have occurred in the US for the period 1971 through 1996. Among the areas to be examined are: transportation accidents by mode, package response during accidents, and an examination of accidents where release of contents has occurred. Where information is available, accident and incident history and package response for LLW packages in transportation accidents will be described.

McClure, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Transportation Systems Analysis Dept.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

LPG land transportation and storage safety. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains an analytical examination of fatal accidents involving liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) releases during transportation and/or transportation related storage. Principal emphasis was on accidents during the nine-year period 1971 through 1979. Fatalities to members of the general public (i.e., those at the scene of the accident through coincidence or curiosity) were of special interest. Transportation accidents involving railroad tank cars, trucks, and pipelines were examined as were accidents at storage facilities, including loading and unloading at such facilities. The main sources of the necessary historical accident data were the accident reports submitted to the Department of Transportation by LPG carriers, National Transportation Safety Board accident reports, articles in the National Fire Protection Association journals, other literature, and personal interviews with firemen, company personnel, and others with knowledge of certain accidents. The data indicate that, on the average, releases of LPG during transportation and intermediate storage cause approximately six fatalities per year to members of the general public. The individual risk is about 1 death per 37,000,000 persons; about the same as the risk of a person on the ground being killed by an airplane crash, and much less than the risk of death by lightning, tornadoes, or dam failures.

Martinsen, W.E.; Cavin, W.D.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

LPG land transportation and storage safety. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains an analytical examination of fatal accidents involving liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) releases during transportation and/or transportation related storage. Principal emphasis was on accidents during the nine-year period 1971 to 1979. Fatalities to members of the general public (i.e., those at the scene of the accident through coincidence or curiosity) were of special interest. Transportation accidents involving railroad tank cars, trucks, and pipelines were examined as were accidents at storage facilities, including loading and unloading at such facilities. The main sources of the necessary historical accident data were the accident reports submitted to the Department of Transportation by LPG carriers, National Transportation Safety Board accident reports, articles in the National Fire Protection Association journals, other literature, and personal interviews with firemen, company personnel, and others with knowledge of certain accidents. The data indicate that, on the average, releases of LPG during transportation and intermediate storage cause approximately six fatalities per year to members of the general public. The individual risk is about 1 death per 37,000,000 persons; about the same as the risk of a person on the ground being killed by an airplane crash, and much less than the risk of death by lightning, tornadoes, or dam failures.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Accident Investigation and Materials Failure Analysis at the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both are independent federal agencies charged with investigating transportation accidents in all modes, including aviation, railroad, highway, marine, pipeline,...

30

Microsoft Word - Unrelated Accident  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Immediate Release For Immediate Release Truck Accident Did Not Involve WIPP Shipment CARLSBAD, N.M., October 1, 2009 - A Wednesday night truck accident north of Albuquerque on Highway 165 that involved an 18-wheeler is not related to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) transuranic waste shipments. Involved in the accident was a load of new, unused 55-gallon drums manufactured in Carlsbad that was en route to Richland, Washington. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is a U.S. Department of Energy facility designed to safely isolate defense-related transuranic waste from people and the environment. Waste temporarily stored at sites around the country is shipped to WIPP and permanently disposed in rooms mined out of an ancient salt formation 2,150 feet below the surface. WIPP, which began waste

31

A SUMMARY OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS IN USAEC FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

The summary includes descriptions of serious accidents for l959 and 1960, AEC industrial injury frequency rates, criticality accidents, radiation exposures, accidents involving radioactive materials in AEC activities during 1959 and 1960, and accidents involving fatalities in AEC activities during l959 and 1960. (B.O.G.)

1961-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

A model of hyphal tip growth involving microtubule-based transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a simple model for mass transport within a fungal hypha and its subsequent growth. Inspired by the role of microtubule-transported vesicles, we embody the internal dynamics of mass inside a hypha with mutually excluding particles progressing stochastically along a growing one-dimensional lattice. The connection between long range transport of materials for growth, and the resulting extension of the hyphal tip has not previously been addressed in the modelling literature. We derive and analyse mean-field equations for the model and present a phase diagram of its steady state behaviour, which we compare to simulations. We discuss our results in the context of the filamentous fungus, Neurospora crassa.

K. E. P. Sugden; M. R. Evans; W. C. K. Poon; N. D. Read

2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

33

Nuclear Reactor Accidents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor Accidents The accidents at the Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl nuclear reactors have triggered particularly intense concern about radiation hazards. The TMI accident,...

34

FAQ 37-What are the potential health risks from transportation of depleted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depleted uranium metal or oxide? depleted uranium metal or oxide? What are the potential health risks from transportation of depleted uranium metal or oxide? In the PEIS, risks associated with transportation of depleted uranium oxide and metal were estimated for transport by either rail or truck. Normal transport of oxide or metal would result in low-level external exposure to radiation for persons in the vicinity of a shipment. Based on estimates in the PEIS, the levels of exposure would result in negligible increased cancer risks. Risks from material released in an accident were also estimated. For a hypothetical railcar accident involving powder U3O8 that was assumed to occur in a highly-populated urban area under stable (nighttime) weather conditions, it was estimated that up to 20 people might experience irreversible adverse effects from chemical toxicity, with no fatalities expected. Approximately 2 potential latent cancer fatalities from radiological hazards are estimated for an accident under the same conditions. The probability of such an accident occurring is very low. The consequences from a truck accident would be lower, because trucks have a smaller shipment capacity. The consequences of transportation accidents involving depleted uranium metal would be much smaller than those involving uranium oxide because uranium metal would be in the form of solid blocks and would not be easily dispersed in an accident.

35

Barriers to Switching Accidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Switching Safety & Reliability Project Steering Committee sponsored development of a self-study based training program for personnel who perform switching. Some of the earlier EPRI Switching Safety & Reliability research projects that focused on the causes of switching errors, highlighted a need to reduce the 'complacency' that tends to develop as switching activities are performed over and over again and become 'routine.' Most switching accidents or incidents involve personnel who were trained ...

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

36

Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies could provide an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. This analysis, however, does not take credit for the additional barrier and establishes only the total release fractions for bare unconfined intact commercial SNF assemblies, which may be conservatively applied to confined intact commercial I SNF assemblies.

J. Schulz

2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

37

Land Transport Emergency Response Technology Report  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories was tasked by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) to provide assistance in developing an emergency response plan for radioactive material transportation activities. Those tasks included compiling radioactive materials (RAM) transportation accident data from the open literature and databases, investigating emergency response plans for radioactive materials transport in the United States, and developing specific recommendations for the JNC' nuclear material transport emergency response plan, based on information gathered during the first two tasks. These recommendations include developing a RAM database, a public transparency Internet website, an emergency response infrastructure designed specifically for transportation needs, and a clear set of directives to provide authority in the case of transportation accidents or incidents involving RAM.

DOTSON, LORI J.; PIERCE, JIM D.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

An analysis of factors contributing to train-involved crashes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A railroad-highway grade crossing is a unique intersection in that two different modes of transportation (trains and vehicles) use the same physical space. Many factors can contribute to collisions between trains and vehicles at these crossings. Crashes involving trains and vehicles are a significant safety problem in Texas each year. This research attempts to identify and analyze contributing factors to train-involved accidents in Texas. Three years of accident data (1328 total accidents) were analyzed for the contributing factors. The contributing factors were classified into four categories: railroad factors, environmental factors, roadway factors, and driver/passenger factors. The accident data was analyzed using one and two-way classification tables. The frequency distributions for the accidents included in this study were compared to the corresponding frequency distributions for national or statewide accidents using a Chi-Square statistical test. Finally, research hypotheses were formulated based on a literature review of driver behavior and previous accident studies and then tested using population proportion tests. The results of the identification of contributing factors showed that tried to beat train, impaired driver, stuck, stalled, or stopped on tracks, driving around gates, and driver inattention were the five most frequent primary contributing factors. The Chi-Square comparison of frequency distributions for accidents included in this study showed that the protection type, time of day, light conditions, driver race and sex, accident severity, location type, and roadway class were statistically different compared to the corresponding national and statewide frequency distributions. The analysis of the research hypotheses showed that hypotheses 3, 8, and 10 were supported according to the population proportion testing.

Cooner, Scott Allen

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Accident Investigation Handbook  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improvement (HPI). The recommended techniques apply equally well to DOE Federal-led accident investigations conducted under DOE Order (O) 225.1B, Accident Investigations,...

40

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation banner Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration T-Shirt Contest Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Print banner Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration T-Shirt Contest Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive...

42

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Transportation and Air Quality Transportation Energy Policy Analysis Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Appliance Energy...

43

Simulation of transportation of low enriched uranium solutions  

SciTech Connect

A simulation of the transportation by truck of low enriched uranium solutions has been completed for NEPA purposes at the Savannah River Site. The analysis involves three distinct source terms, and establishes the radiological risks of shipment to three possible destinations. Additionally, loading accidents were analyzed to determine the radiological consequences of mishaps during handling and delivery. Source terms were developed from laboratory measurements of chemical samples from low enriched uranium feed materials being stored at SRS facilities, and from manufacturer data on transport containers. The transportation simulations were accomplished over the INTERNET using the DOE TRANSNET system at Sandia National Laboratory. The HIGHWAY 3.3 code was used to analyze routing scenarios, and the RADTRAN 4 code was used to analyze incident free and accident risks of transporting radiological materials. Loading accidents were assessed using the Savannah River Site AXAIR89Q and RELEASE 2 codes.

Hope, E.P.; Ades, M.J.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Transportation of Depleted Uranium Materials in Support of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Program Issues associated with transport of depleted UF6 cylinders and conversion products. Conversion Plan Transportation Requirements The DOE has prepared two Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) for the proposal to build and operate depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6) conversion facilities at its Portsmouth and Paducah gaseous diffusion plant sites, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The proposed action calls for transporting the cylinder at ETTP to Portsmouth for conversion. The transportation of depleted UF6 cylinders and of the depleted uranium conversion products following conversion was addressed in the EISs.

45

Assessment of the risk of transporting propane by truck and train  

SciTech Connect

The risk of shipping propane is discussed and the risk assessment methodology is summarized. The risk assessment model has been constructed as a series of separate analysis steps to allow the risk to be readily reevaluated as additional data becomes available or as postulated system characteristics change. The transportation system and accident environment, the responses of the shipping system to forces in transportation accidents, and release sequences are evaluated to determine both the likelihood and possible consequences of a release. Supportive data and analyses are given in the appendices. The risk assessment results are related to the year 1985 to allow a comparison with other reports in this series. Based on the information presented, accidents involving tank truck shipments of propane will be expected to occur at a rate of 320 every year; accidents involving bobtails would be expected at a rate of 250 every year. Train accidents involving propane shipments would be expected to occur at a rate of about 60 every year. A release of any amount of material from propane trucks, under both normal transportation and transport accident conditions, is to be expected at a rate of about 110 per year. Releases from propane rail tank cars would occur about 40 times a year. However, only those releases that occur during a transportation accident or involve a major tank defect will include sufficient propane to present the potential for danger to the public. These significant releases can be expected at the lower rate of about fourteen events per year for truck transport and about one event every two years for rail tank car transport. The estimated number of public fatalities resulting from these significant releases in 1985 is fifteen. About eleven fatalities per year result from tank truck operation, and approximately half a death per year stems from the movement of propane in rail tank cars.

Geffen, C.A.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

REAC/TS Radiation Accident Registry: An Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past four years, REAC/TS has presented a number of case reports from its Radiation Accident Registry. Victims of radiological or nuclear incidents must meet certain dose criteria for an incident to be categorized as an accident and be included in the registry. Although the greatest numbers of accidents in the United States that have been entered into the registry involve radiation devices, the greater percentage of serious accidents have involved sealed sources of one kind or another. But if one looks at the kinds of accident scenarios that have resulted in extreme consequence, i.e., death, the greater share of deaths has occurred in medical settings.

Doran M. Christensen, DO, REAC /TS Associate Director and Staff Physician Becky Murdock, REAC/TS Registry and Health Physics Technician

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

47

Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transportation systems are an often overlooked critical infrastructure component. These systems comprise a widely diverse elements whose operation impact all aspects of society today. This chapter introduces the key transportation sectors and illustrates ...

Mark Hartong; Rajn Goel; Duminda Wijesekera

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) In an effort to address responder concerns, the Department retooled its approach to emergency responder preparedness and implemented the more simplified and responder-friendly Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP). TEPP is a component of the overall comprehensive emergency management system established by DOE Order (DOE O) 151.1, Comprehensive Emergency Management System. TEPP integrates a basic approach to transportation emergency planning and preparedness activities under a single program with the goal to ensure DOE, its operating contractors, and state, tribal, and local emergency responders are prepared to respond promptly, efficiently, and effectively to accidents involving DOE

49

Radionuclide release calculations for selected severe accident scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the results of source term calculations that were performed in support of the NUREG-1150 study. Severe Accident Risks: An Assessment for Five US Nuclear Power Plants.'' This is the sixth volume of a series of reports. It supplements results presented in the earlier volumes. Analyses were performed for three of the NUREG-1150 plants: Peach Bottom, a Mark I, boiling water reactor; Surry, a subatmospheric containment, pressurized water reactor; and Sequoyah, an ice condenser containment, pressurized water reactor. Complete source term results are presented for the following sequences: short term station blackout with failure of the ADS system in the Peach Bottom plant; station blackout with a pump seal LOCA for the Surry plant; station blackout with a pump seal LOCA in the Sequoyah plant; and a very small break with loss of ECC and spray recirculation in the Sequoyah plant. In addition, some partial analyses were performed which did not require running all of the modules of the Source Term Code Package. A series of MARCH3 analyses were performed for the Surry and Sequoyah plants to evaluate the effects of alternative emergency operating procedures involving primary and secondary depressurization on the progress of the accident. Only thermal-hydraulic results are provided for these analyses. In addition, three accident sequences were analyzed for the Surry plant for accident-induced failure of steam generator tubes. In these analyses, only the transport of radionuclides within the primary system and failed steam generator were examined. The release of radionuclides to the environment is presented for the phase of the accident preceding vessel meltthrough. 17 refs., 176 figs., 113 tabs.

Denning, R.S.; Leonard, M.T.; Cybulskis, P.; Lee, K.W.; Kelly, R.F.; Jordan, H.; Schumacher, P.M.; Curtis, L.A. (Battelle Columbus Div., OH (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Does Daylight Savings Time Affect Traffic Accidents?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper studies the effect of changes in accident pattern due to Daylight Savings Time (DST). The extension of the DST in 2007 provides a natural experiment to determine whether the number of traffic accidents is affected by shifts in hours of daylight using the year as control group. Using data on traffic accidents in Texas based on crash reports provided by the Texas Transportation Institute, and a difference in differences technique, this study creates a regression model to determine how significant this factor is in affecting traffic accident patterns as observed in the data. Results show that DST has no statistically significant effect on traffic accidents of all categories including (but not limited to) highway, non-highway, and accidents, accidents with injuries and no injuries, and accidents by drivers of all age-groups. This implies that the federal governments policy of DST (and its extension) has no costs incurred by a rise in motor vehicle crashes when it gets dark early.

Deen, Sophia 1988-

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Comparison of approaches for simulating reactive solute transport involving organic degradation reactions by multiple terminal electron acceptors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive solute transport models are useful tools for analyzing complex geochemical behavior resulting from biodegradation of organic compounds by multiple terminal electron acceptors (TEAPs). The usual approach of simulating the reactions of multiple ... Keywords: biogeochemistry, groundwater, hydrogen, monod kinetics, thermodynamics

Gary P. Curtis

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meier AKMeier@lbl.gov (510) 486-4740 Links Transportation and Air Quality Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

53

A SUMMARY OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS IN USAEC FACILITIES, 1961-1962  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented on accidents andd incidents occurring during 1961 and 1962 in plants owned and operated by the AEC. Revised reporting requirements established by the AEC in April 1962 are outlined. Data are summarized on radiation exposure of AEC contractor personnel, accidents involving radioactive materials, andd accidents involving fatalities. (C.H.)

1964-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

Accidents, engineering and history at NASA: 1967-2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The manned spaceflight program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has suffered three fatal accidents: one in the Apollo program and two in the Space Transportation System (the Shuttle). These were ...

Brown, Alexander F. G. (Alexander Frederic Garder), 1970-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Chernobyl accident: A comprehensive risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The authors, all of whom are Ukrainian and Russian scientists involved with Chernobyl nuclear power plant since the April 1986 accident, present a comprehensive review of the accident. In addition, they present a risk assessment of the remains of the destroyed reactor and its surrounding shelter, Chernobyl radioactive waste storage and disposal sites, and environmental contamination in the region. The authors explore such questions as the risks posed by a collapse of the shelter, radionuclide migration from storage and disposal facilities in the exclusion zone, and transfer from soil to vegetation and its potential regional impact. The answers to these questions provide a scientific basis for the development of countermeasures against the Chernobyl accident in particular and the mitigation of environmental radioactive contamination in general. They also provide an important basis for understanding the human health and ecological risks posed by the accident.

Vargo, G.J.; Poyarkov, V.; Baryakhtar, V.; Kukhar, V.; Los, I.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Due to limited parking, all visitors are strongly encouraged to: Due to limited parking, all visitors are strongly encouraged to: 1) car-pool, 2) take the Lab's special conference shuttle service, or 3) take the regular off-site shuttle. If you choose to use the regular off-site shuttle bus, you will need an authorized bus pass, which can be obtained by contacting Eric Essman in advance. Transportation & Visitor Information Location and Directions to the Lab: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is located in Berkeley, on the hillside directly above the campus of University of California at Berkeley. The address is One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720. For comprehensive directions to the lab, please refer to: http://www.lbl.gov/Workplace/Transportation.html Maps and Parking Information: On Thursday and Friday, a limited number (15) of barricaded reserved parking spaces will be available for NON-LBNL Staff SNAP Collaboration Meeting participants in parking lot K1, in front of building 54 (cafeteria). On Saturday, plenty of parking spaces will be available everywhere, as it is a non-work day.

57

A review of the technical issues of air ingression during severe reactor accidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Severe reactor accident scenarios involving air ingression into the reactor coolant system are described. Evidence from modem reactor accident analyses and from the accident at Three Mile Island show residual fuel will be present in the core region when air ingression is possible. This residual fuel can interact with the air. Exploratory calculations with the MELCOR code of station blackout accidents during shutdown conditions and during operations are used to examine clad oxidation by air and ruthenium release from fuel in air. Extensive ruthenium release is predicted when air ingression rates exceed about 10 moles/s. Past studies of air interactions with irradiated reactor fuel are reviewed. Effects air ingression may have on fission product release, transport, deposition and revaporization are discussed. Perhaps the most important effects of air ingression are expected to be enhanced release of ruthenium from the fuel and the formation of copious amounts of aerosol from uranium oxide vapors. Revaporization of iodine and tellurium retained in the reactor coolant system might be expected.

Powers, D.A.; Kmetyk, L.N.; Schmidt, R.C.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Low level waste shipment accident lessons learned  

SciTech Connect

On October 1, 1994 a shipment of low-level waste from the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio, was involved in an accident near Rolla, Missouri. The accident did not result in the release of any radioactive material. The accident did generate important lessons learned primarily in the areas of driver and emergency response communications. The shipment was comprised of an International Standards Organization (ISO) container on a standard flatbed trailer. The accident caused the low-level waste package to separate from the trailer and come to rest on its top in the median. The impact of the container with the pavement and median inflicted relatively minor damage to the container. The damage was not substantial enough to cause failure of container integrity. The success of the package is attributable to the container design and the packaging procedures used at the Fernald Environmental Management Project for low-level waste shipments. Although the container survived the initial wreck, is was nearly breached when the first responders attempted to open the ISO container. Even though the container was clearly marked and the shipment documentation was technically correct, this information did not identify that the ISO container was the primary containment for the waste. The lessons learned from this accident have DOE complex wide applicability. This paper is intended to describe the accident, subsequent emergency response operations, and the lessons learned from this incident.

Rast, D.M.; Rowe, J.G.; Reichel, C.W.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

A framework for the assessment of severe accident management strategies  

SciTech Connect

Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or altemative resources, systems and actors to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of severe accident management strategies, there may be several options available to the operator, and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainties include operator, system and instrumentation behavior during an accident. A framework based on decision trees and influence diagrams has been developed which incorporates such criteria as feasibility, effectiveness, and adverse effects, for evaluating potential severe accident management strategies. The framework is also capable of propagating both data and model uncertainty. It is applied to several potential strategies including PWR cavity flooding, BWR drywell flooding, PWR depressurization and PWR feed and bleed.

Kastenberg, W.E. [ed.; Apostolakis, G.; Dhir, V.K. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering] [and others

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

LP-Gas transport safety claims confirmed  

SciTech Connect

According to data compiled by the National LPG Association and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), the majority of accidents involving LPG transport are not caused by the LPG or by malfunction of the container. In a 34 yr period, only 14 incidents occurred in which permanent storage tanks larger than 500 gal were ruptured. Fewer than 600 of the 44,432 railroad derailments between 1969 and 1975 involved uninsulated pressure-tank cars (generally but not entirely cars containing LPG), and of these derailed cars, only 170 lost some or all of their lading. Over 70% of the derailments were caused by track or equipment problems. LPG trucks in the last five years were involved in only 192 highway and bulk plant incidents; of these, 50 involved tank trucks with leakage which was controlled, and 32 involved fire or container rupture. Most fire or rupture accidents occurred in bulk plant facilities during loading operations, but the installation of new emergency shutoff valves, required by NFPA 58, should diminish this type of accident.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Review of cladding-coolant interactions during LWR accident transients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some of the coolant-cladding interactions that can take place during the design basis loss-of-coolant accident and the Three Mile Island loss-of-coolant accident are analyzed. The physical manifestations of the interactions are quite similar, but the time sequences involved can cause very different end results. These results are described and a listing is given of the main research programs that are involved in coolant-cladding interaction research.

Hobson, D.O.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and 25 years of transportation experience and documented accident data by demonstrating RAM information, regulations, requirements, safety issues, emergency response, regulatory...

63

Accident Investigation Handbook  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SENSI NOT MEAS UREMENT TIVE D DOE-HDBK-1 1208-2012 July 2012 DOE E HA ANDBOOK K Ac ccide ent and d Op pera ational Sa afety y An naly ysis Volume e I: Ac ccide ent A Analy ysis Tec chniq ques U.S. Depar rtmen nt of En nergy Was shingto on, D.C C. 205 85 DOE-HDBK-1208-2012 INTRODUCTION - HANDBOOK APPLICATION AND SCOPE Accident Investigations (AI) and Operational Safety Reviews (OSR) are valuable for evaluating technical issues, safety management systems and human performance and environmental conditions to prevent accidents, through a process of continuous organizational learning. This Handbook brings together the strengths of the experiences gained in conducting Department of Energy (DOE) accident investigations over the past many years. That experience encourages us

64

TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXASTRANS TEXAS TRANSPORTATION HALL HONOR OF HALL HONOR OF TEXASTRAN HALL HONOR OF TEXASTRAN HALL HONOR OF Inductees #12;2 TEXAS TRANSPORTATION HALL HONOR OF L NOR OF Texas is recognized as having one of the finest multimodal transportation systems in the world. The existence of this system has been key

65

Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NAVAL SPENT FUEL RAIL SHIPMENT NAVAL SPENT FUEL RAIL SHIPMENT ACCIDENT EXERCISE OBJECTIVES * Familiarize stakeholders with the Naval spent fuel ACCIDENT EXERCISE OBJECTIVES Familiarize stakeholders with the Naval spent fuel shipping container characteristics and shipping practices * Gain understanding of how the NNPP escorts who accompany the spent fuel shipments will interact with civilian emergency services representatives g y p * Allow civilian emergency services agencies the opportunity to evaluate their response to a pp y p simulated accident * Gain understanding of how the communications links that would be activated in an accident involving a Naval spent fuel shipment would work 1 NTSF May 11 ACCIDENT EXERCISE TYPICAL TIMELINE * Conceptual/Organizational Meeting - April 6 E R T i d it t t d TYPICAL TIMELINE

66

Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System is a database used to collect and analyze DOE and DOE contractor reports of injuries, illnesses, and other accidents that occur during DOE...

67

Longitudinal review of state-level accident statistics for carriers of interstate freight  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-level accident rates by mode of freight transport have been developed and refined for application to the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) environmental mitigation program, which may involve large-quantity shipments of hazardous and mixed wastes from DOE facilities. These rates reflect multi-year data for interstate-registered highway earners, American Association of Railroads member carriers, and coastal and internal waterway barge traffic. Adjustments have been made to account for the share of highway combination-truck traffic actually attributable to interstate-registered carriers and for duplicate or otherwise inaccurate entries in the public-use accident data files used. State-to-state variation in rates is discussed, as is the stability of rates over time. Computed highway rates have been verified with actual carriers of high- and low-level nuclear materials, and the most recent truck accident data have been used, to ensure that the results are of the correct order of magnitude. Study conclusions suggest that DOE use the computed rates for the three modes until (1) improved estimation techniques for highway combination-truck miles by state become available; (2) continued evolution of the railroad industry significantly increases the consolidation of interstate rail traffic onto fewer high-capacity trunk lines; or (3) a large-scale off-site waste shipment campaign is imminent.

Saricks, C.; Kvitek, T.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Fukushima Daiichi Accident -- Technical Causal Factor Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant experienced a seismic event and subsequent tsunami. The accident and the ensuing mitigation and recovery activities occurred over several days, involved a number of incidents, and might provide several opportunities for lessons learned. The objective of this report is to determine the fundamental causative factors for the loss of critical systems at the Fukushima Daiichi reactors that resulted in core damage and subsequent radioactive release. ...

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

69

Severe accident analysis using dynamic accident progression event trees.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In present, the development and analysis of Accident Progression Event Trees (APETs) are performed in a manner that is computationally time consuming, difficult to reproduce (more)

Hakobyan, Aram P

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Safety Analysis: Evaluation of Accident Risks in the Transporation of Hazardous Materials by Truck and Rail at the Savannah River Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an analysis of the consequences and risks of accidents resulting from hazardous material transportation at the Savannah River Plant.

Blanchard, A.

1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Meteorological Factors Influencing the Radioactive Deposition in Finland after the Chernobyl Accident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear plant on 26 April 1986, much of Europe was affected by radioactive pollution. The first releases were transported toward Scandinavia, where most of the fallout was attributable to wet deposition. This ...

Timo Puhakka; Kirsti Jylh; Pirkko Saarikivi; Jarmo Koistinen; Janne Koivukoski

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The lived experience of post-traumatic stress disorder as described by motor vehicle accident victims in Jordan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Aim: To explore the lived experience of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as described by individuals who have been involved in a motor vehicle accident (MVA) (more)

Al-Kofahy, Lilibeth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Thermo-fluid-dynamics analysis of the unit 3 Fukushima Daiichi Accident with the RELAP5\\SCDAP code.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this thesis is the analysis of the physical phenomena involved in the nuclear accident at Fukushima NPP. This study has been articulated (more)

VENTURI, FRANCESCO LINO

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Determination of influence factors and accident rates for the Armored Tractor/Safe Secure Trailer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operating environments, such as road type, road location, and time of day, play an important role in the observed accident rates of heavy trucks used in general commerce. These same factors influence the accident rate of the Armored Tractor/Safe Secure Trailer (AT/SST) used by the Department of Energy to transport hazardous cargos within the continental United States. This report discusses the development of accident rate influence factors. These factors, based on heavy trucks used in general commerce, are used to modify the observed overall AT/SST accident rate to account for the different operating environments.

Phillips, J.S.; Clauss, D.B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Blower, D.F. [Univ. of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Center for National Truck Statistics

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

APS Guideline for Accident Investigations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

occurring in CATXSDs facilities at the APS. Definitions Accident: an unexpected event that produces personal injury, illness, or death; damage to or loss of property or...

76

Stress in accident and post-accident management at Chernobyl ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The effects of the Chernobyl nuclear accident on the psychology of the affected population have been much discussed. The psychological dimension has been advanced as a factor explaining the emergence, from 1990 onwards, of a post-accident crisis in the main CIS countries affected. This article presents the conclusions of a series of European studies, which focused on the consequences of the Chernobyl accident. These studies show that the psychological and social effects associated with the post-accident situation arise from the interdependency of a number of complex factors exerting a deleterious effect on the population. We shall first attempt to characterise the stress phenomena observed among the population affected by the accident. Secondly, we will be presenting an analysis of the various factors that have contributed to the emerging psychological and social features of population reaction to the accident and in post-accident phases, while not neglecting the effects of the pre-accident situation on the target population. Thirdly, we shall devote some initial consideration to the conditions that might be conducive to better management of postaccident stress. In conclusion, we shall emphasise the need to restore confidence among the population generally. 1.

Gilles Heriard Dubreuil

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Clean Slate transportation and human health risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

Public concern regarding activities involving radioactive material generally focuses on the human health risk associated with exposure to ionizing radiation. This report describes the results of a risk analysis conducted to evaluate risk for excavation, handling, and transport of soil contaminated with transuranics at the Clean Slate sites. Transportation risks were estimated for public transport routes from the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) to the Envirocore disposal facility or to the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for both radiological risk and risk due to traffic accidents. Human health risks were evaluated for occupational and radiation-related health effects to workers. This report was generated to respond to this public concern, to provide an evaluation of the risk, and to assess feasibility of transport of the contaminated soil for disposal.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Secure Transportation_final_print-ready  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A A History of Secure Transportation * The transportation of the CEUSP material in casks will be made by Hittman Transport, a commercial carrier * Hittman Transport is a specialty company whose primary mission is transporting hazardous materials * Transport method meets all of the requirements of the Department of Energy, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Department of Transportation for shipment of hazardous radioactive material * Hittman Transport maintains drivers with DOE security clearances and all shipments will be escorted by armed Federal officers Hittman Transport drivers' average number of years experience 26 Completed Hittman Transport shipments without significant accident or loss of material 196K Hittman Transport began supporting the nuclear industry

79

Accurate accident reconstruction in VANET  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a forensic VANET application to aid an accurate accident reconstruction. Our application provides a new source of objective real-time data impossible to collect using existing methods. By leveraging inter-vehicle communications, we compile ... Keywords: EDR, VANET, accident reconstruction, in-vehicle applications

Yuliya Kopylova; Csilla Farkas; Wenyuan Xu

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Analysis of the risk of transporting uranium ore concentrates by truck  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the risks involved with shipping uranium ore concentrates by truck in an attempt to provide some perspective on the system safety issues. The basic probabilistic risk evaluation methodology used in this study is similar to that employed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in a series of risk analyses on the transportation of potentially hazardous energy materials. The risk model has been constructed as a series of separate analysis steps to allow the system risk to be readily reevaluated as additional data become available or as postulated system characteristics change. The reslts of this analysis show that the risks to the public health and safety from yellowcake releases during a transportation accident are insignificant. Accidents involving truck shipments of yellowcake are expected to occur at a rate of about ten a year. However, only one-fifth of these accidents, or about two a year, are expected to cause a release of yellowcake to the environment. None of these accidents was estimated to produce any potential fatalities. The low concentration of radioactivity distributed throughout the material resulted in no significant increase in radiation doses above normal background levels to members of the general public.

Geffen, C.A.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis Overview Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments MAX NSTF SNAKE Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 We perform experiments simulating reactor core melt phenomena in which molten core debris ("corium") erodes the concrete floor of a containment building. This occurred during the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident though the extent of concrete damage is yet unknown. This video shows the top view of a churning molten pool of uranium oxide at 2000°C (3600°F) seen during an experiment at Argonne. Corium behaves much like lava.

82

A SUMMARY OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS IN USAEC FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

The accident experience of the AEC contractor operation for 1959 and 1960 is reported. Incidents involving radio active materials are described. A table of inadvertent criticality was included to supplement other tables. A tabulation of exposure records at values from 0 to 15 r is given. (M.C.G.)

1962-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Thermal-Hydraulic Modeling of the Primary Coolant System of Light Water Reactors During Severely Degraded Core Accidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transport of fission-product vapors and aerosols that would be released from an LWR primary system in postulated severe accidents depends on the prevalent thermal-hydraulic conditions. The analytic models developed in this study are incorporated in the PSAAC modular computer program, which can help predict more realistic estimates of accident consequences.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Accident Investigation at the Idaho National Laboratory Engineering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accident Investigation at the Idaho National Laboratory Engineering Accident Investigation at the Idaho National Laboratory Engineering Demonstration Facility, February 2013 Accident Investigation at the Idaho National Laboratory Engineering Demonstration Facility, February 2013 On Monday, February 12, 2013, a principal investigator at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Engineering Demonstration Facility (IEDF) was testing the system configuration of experimental process involving liquid sodium carbonate. An unanticipated event occurred that resulted in the ejection of the 900° C liquid sodium carbonate from the system. The ejected liquid came into contact with the principal investigator and caused multiple second and third degree burn injuries to approximately 10 percent of his body. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Site Lead for

85

Going the Distance? NRC's Response to the National Academy of Science's Transportation Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In February 2006, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) published the results of a 3 1/2-year study, titled Going the Distance, that examined the safety of transporting spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) in the United States. NAS initiated this study to address what it perceived to be a national need for an independent, objective, and authoritative analysis of SNF and HLW transport in the United States. The study was co-sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), the Electric Power Research Institute and the National Cooperative Highway Research Program. This paper addresses some of the recommendations made in the NAS study related to the performance of SNF transportation casks in long duration fires, the use of full-scale package testing, and the need for an independent review of transportation security prior to the commencement of large scale shipping campaigns to an interim storage site or geologic repository. In conclusion: The NRC believes that the current regulations in 10 CFR Part 71 for the design of SNF and HLW transportation packages provide a very high level of protection to the public for very severe accidents and credible threat scenarios. As recommended by the NAS study, additional studies of accidents involving severe fires have been completed. These studies have confirmed that spent fuel casks would be expected to withstand very severe fires without the release of any fission products from the spent fuel. Additionally, changes in rail operating procedures such as the use of dedicated trains and prohibition on the co-location of SNF and flammable liquids in rail tunnels can further reduce the already low probability of severe rail accident fires involving SNF and HLW. (authors)

Easton, E.P.; Bajwa, C.S. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Summary of the SRS Severe Accident Analysis Program, 1987--1992  

SciTech Connect

The Severe Accident Analysis Program (SAAP) is a program of experimental and analytical studies aimed at characterizing severe accidents that might occur in the Savannah River Site Production Reactors. The goals of the Severe Accident Analysis Program are: To develop an understanding of severe accidents in SRS reactors that is adequate to support safety documentation for these reactors, including the Safety Analysis Report (SAR), the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), and other studies evaluating the safety of reactor operation; To provide tools and bases for the evaluation of existing or proposed safety related equipment in the SRS reactors; To provide bases for the development of accident management procedures for the SRS reactors; To develop and maintain on the site a sufficient body of knowledge, including documents, computer codes, and cognizant engineers and scientists, that can be used to authoritatively resolve questions or issues related to reactor accidents. The Severe Accident Analysis Program was instituted in 1987 and has already produced a substantial amount of information, and specialized calculational tools. Products of the Severe Accident Analysis Program (listed in Section 9 of this report) have been used in the development of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), and in the development of technical specifications for the SRS reactors. A staff of about seven people is currently involved directly in the program and in providing input on severe accidents to other SRS activities.

Long, T.A.; Hyder, M.L.; Britt, T.E.; Allison, D.K.; Chow, S.; Graves, R.D.; DeWald, A.B. Jr.; Monson, P.R. Jr.; Wooten, L.A.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

A CANDU Severe Accident Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As interest in severe accident studies has increased in the last years, we have developed a set of simple models to analyze severe accidents for CANDU reactors that should be integrated in the EU codes. The CANDU600 reactor uses natural uranium fuel and heavy water (D2O) as both moderator and coolant, with the moderator and coolant in separate systems. We chose to analyze accident development for a LOCA with simultaneous loss of moderator cooling and the loss of emergency core cooling system (ECCS). This type of accident is likely to modify the reactor geometry and will lead to a severe accident development. When the coolant temperatures inside a pressure tube reaches 10000 deg C, a contact between pressure tube and calandria tube occurs and the residual heat is transferred to the moderator. Due to the lack of cooling, the moderator eventually begins to boil and is expelled, through the calandria vessel relief ducts, into the containment. Therefore the calandria tubes (fuel channels) will be uncovered, then will disintegrate and fall down to the calandria vessel bottom. After all the quantity of moderator is vaporized and expelled, the debris will heat up and eventually boil. The heat accumulated in the molten debris will be transferred through the calandria vessel wall to the shield tank water, which normally surrounds the calandria vessel. The phenomena described above are modelled, analyzed and compared with the existing data. The results are encouraging. (authors)

Negut, Gheorghe; Catana, Alexandru [Institute for Nuclear Research, 1, Compului Str., Mioveni, PO Box 78, 0300 Pitesti (Romania); Prisecaru, Ilie [University Politehnica Bucharest (Romania)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Statistical description of heavy truck accidents on representative segments of interstate highway  

SciTech Connect

Any quantitative analysis of the risk of transportation accidents requires the use of many different statistical distributions. Included among these are the types of accidents which occur and the severity of these when they do occur. Several previous studies have derived this type of information for truck traffic over U. S. highways in general; these data are not necessarily applicable for the anticipated LMFBR spent fuel cask routes. This report presents data for highway segments representative of the specific LMFBR cask routes which are anticipated. These data are based upon a detailed record-by-record review of filed reports for accidents which occurred along the specified route segments.

Hartman, W.F.; Davidson, C.A.; Foley, J.T.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Assessment of the risk of transporting spent nuclear fuel by truck  

SciTech Connect

The assessment includes the risks from release of spent fuel materials and radioactive cask cavity cooling water due to transportation accidents. The contribution to the risk of package misclosure and degradation during normal transport was also considered. The results of the risk assessment have been related to a time in the mid-1980's, when it is projected that nuclear plants with an electrical generating capacity of 100 GW will be operating in the U.S. For shipments from reactors to interim storage facilities, it is estimated that a truck carrying spent fuel will be involved in an accident that would not be severe enough to result in a release of spent fuel material about once in 1.1 years. It was estimated that an accident that could result in a small release of radioactive material (primarily contaminated cooling water) would occur once in about 40 years. The frequency of an accident resulting in one or more latent cancer fatalities from release of radioactive materials during a truck shipment of spent fuel to interim storage was estimated to be once in 41,000 years. No accidents were found that would result in acute fatalities from releases of radioactive material. The risk for spent fuel shipments from reactors to reprocessing plants was found to be about 20% less than the risk for shipments to interim storage. Although the average shipment distance for the reprocessing case is larger, the risk is somewhat lower because the shipping routes, on average, are through less populated sections of the country. The total risk from transporting 180-day cooled spent fuel by truck in the reference year is 4.5 x 10/sup -5/ fatalities. An individual in the population at risk would have one chance in 6 x 10/sup 11/ of suffering a latent cancer fatality from a release of radioactive material from a truck carrying spent fuel in the reference year. (DLC)

Elder, H.K.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives...

91

OSSA - An optimized approach to severe accident management: EPR application  

SciTech Connect

There is a recognized need to provide nuclear power plant technical staff with structured guidance for response to a potential severe accident condition involving core damage and potential release of fission products to the environment. Over the past ten years, many plants worldwide have implemented such guidance for their emergency technical support center teams either by following one of the generic approaches, or by developing fully independent approaches. There are many lessons to be learned from the experience of the past decade, in developing, implementing, and validating severe accident management guidance. Also, though numerous basic approaches exist which share common principles, there are differences in the methodology and application of the guidelines. AREVA/Framatome-ANP is developing an optimized approach to severe accident management guidance in a project called OSSA ('Operating Strategies for Severe Accidents'). There are still numerous operating power plants which have yet to implement severe accident management programs. For these, the option to use an updated approach which makes full use of lessons learned and experience, is seen as a major advantage. Very few of the current approaches covers all operating plant states, including shutdown states with the primary system closed and open. Although it is not necessary to develop an entirely new approach in order to add this capability, the opportunity has been taken to develop revised full scope guidance covering all plant states in addition to the fuel in the fuel building. The EPR includes at the design phase systems and measures to minimize the risk of severe accident and to mitigate such potential scenarios. This presents a difference in comparison with existing plant, for which severe accidents where not considered in the design. Thought developed for all type of plants, OSSA will also be applied on the EPR, with adaptations designed to take into account its favourable situation in that field. This revised approach will incorporate a number of new features which will simplify and streamline the guidance material while ensuring comprehensive guidance for response to any severe accident. Examples of such features include : - Identification of severe accident challenges based on plant specific studies. - Revision of the split of responsibilities between operations and technical support center staff. - Fixed setpoint entry conditions, ensuring that the transition from emergency procedures takes place at a consistent core/fuel condition (regardless of scenario), and which fixes the time window available to attempt ultimate preventive measures. - A safety function concept for monitoring plant conditions (in the control room). - An integrated graphic-based diagnostic tool including entry condition, challenge prioritization, and exit condition monitoring to be used by the technical support team. This paper describes the basic features of OSSA, and project status. (authors)

Sauvage, E. C.; Prior, R.; Coffey, K. [AREVA, FRAMATOME-ANP SAS, Paris, 92084 La Defense (France); Mazurkiewicz, S. M. [AREVA, FRAMATOME-ANP Inc, Lynchburg, VA 24506-0935 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Severe Accident Management Guidance Technical Basis Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Guidance to aid operating crews in responding to a severe core damage accident was first developed as a response to the 1979 accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2. This guidance encompasses those actions that could be considered to arrest the progression of a core damage accident or to limit the extent of resulting releases of fission products. The original guidance was developed in a logical manner, starting with compiling the best information regarding severe-accident phenomena available at that ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

94

Evolvable neural networks ensembles for accidents diagnosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prediction and diagnosis of nuclear accidents is one of the most important tasks for nuclear safety. Since accurate diagnosis of nuclear accident is a very important issue for avoidance of disastrous outcomes, it is more desirable to make a decision ... Keywords: ensembles, neuroevolution, nuclear accidents

Hany Sallam; Carlo S. Regazzoni; Ihab Talkhan; Amir Atiya

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Office of Inspector General report on inspection of selected issues regarding the Department of Energy accident investigation program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One method used by the Department of Energy (DOE) to promote worker safety is through the Department`s accident investigation program. The objectives of the program are, among other things, to enhance safety and health of employees, to prevent the recurrence of accidents, and to reduce accident fatality rates and promote a downward trend in the number and severity of accidents. The Assistant Secretary, Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH), through the EH Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oversight, is responsible for implementation of the Department`s accident investigation program. As part of the inspection, the authors reviewed an April 1997 EH accident investigation report regarding an accident involving a Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) welder, who suffered fatal burns when his clothing caught fire while he was using a cutting torch at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. They also reviewed reports of other accident investigations conducted by EH and DOE field organizations. Based on the review of these reports, the authors identified issues concerning the adequacy of the examination and reporting by accident investigation boards of specific management systems and organizations as a possible accident root cause. The inspection also identified issues concerning worker safety that they determined required immediate management attention, such as whether occurrences were being reported in the appropriate management systems and whether prompt consideration was being given to implementing revisions of national standards when the revisions increased worker safety.

NONE

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The Nevada railroad system: Physical, operational, and accident characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a description of the operational and physical characteristics of the Nevada railroad system. To understand the dynamics of the rail system, one must consider the system`s physical characteristics, routing, uses, interactions with other systems, and unique operational characteristics, if any. This report is presented in two parts. The first part is a narrative description of all mainlines and major branchlines of the Nevada railroad system. Each Nevada rail route is described, including the route`s physical characteristics, traffic type and volume, track conditions, and history. The second part of this study provides a more detailed analysis of Nevada railroad accident characteristics than was presented in the Preliminary Nevada Transportation Accident Characterization Study (DOE, 1990).

NONE

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Community emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents: A selected and partially annotated bibliography  

SciTech Connect

The role of responding to emergencies at nuclear power plants is often considered the responsibility of the personnel onsite. This is true for most, if not all, of the incidents that may happen during the course of the plant`s operating lifetime. There is however, the possibility of a major accident occurring at anytime. Major nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island have taught their respective countries and communities a significant lesson in local emergency preparedness and response. Through these accidents, the rest of the world can also learn a great deal about planning, preparing and responding to the emergencies unique to nuclear power. This bibliography contains books, journal articles, conference papers and government reports on emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents. It does not contain citations for ``onsite`` response or planning, nor does it cover the areas of radiation releases from transportation accidents. The compiler has attempted to bring together a sampling of the world`s collective written experience on dealing with nuclear reactor accidents on the sate, local and community levels. Since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, that written experience has grown enormously.

Youngen, G.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Accident management for indian pressurized heavy water reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indian nuclear power program as of now is mainly based on Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). Operating Procedures for normal power operation and Emergency Operating Procedures for operational transients and accidents within design basis exist for all Indian PHWRs. In addition, on-site and off-site emergency response procedures are also available for these NPPs. The guidelines needed for severe accidents mitigation are now formally being documented for Indian PHWRs. Also, in line with International trend of having symptom based emergency handling, the work is in advanced stage for preparation of symptom-based emergency operating procedures. Following a plant upset condition; a number of alarms distributed in different information systems appear in the control room to aid operator to identify the nature of the event. After identifying the event, appropriate intervention in the form of event based emergency operating procedure is put into use by the operating staff. However, if the initiating event cannot be unambiguously identified or after the initial event some other failures take place, then the selected event based emergency operating procedure will not be optimal. In such a case, reactor safety is ensured by monitoring safety functions (depicted by selected plant parameters grouped together) throughout the event handling so that the barriers to radioactivity release namely, fuel and fuel cladding, primary heat transport system integrity and containment remain intact. Simultaneous monitoring of all these safety functions is proposed through status trees and this concept will be implemented through a computer-based system. For beyond design basis accidents, event sequences are identified which may lead to severe core damage. As part of this project, severe accident mitigation guidelines are being finalized for the selected event sequences. The paper brings out the details of work being carried out for Indian PHWRs for symptom based event handling and severe accident management. (authors)

Hajela, S.; Grover, R.; Ghadge, S.G.; Bajaj, S.S. [Directorate of Safety, Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited Nabhikiya Urja Bhawan, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai-400 094 (India)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment (SFTRA) Draft NUREG-2125 Overview for National Transportation Stakeholders Forum John Cook Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation 1 SFTRA Overview Contents * Project and review teams * Purpose and goals * Basic methodology * Improvements relative to previous studies * Draft NUREG structure and format * Routine shipment analysis and results * Accident condition analysis and results * Findings and conclusions * Schedule 2 SFTRA Research and Review Teams * Sandia National Laboratory Research Team [$1.8M; 9/06-9/12] - Doug Ammerman - principal investigator - Carlos Lopez - thermal - Ruth Weiner - RADTRAN * NRC's SFTRA Technical Review Team - Gordon Bjorkman - structural

100

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Immersion Comparison Demonstrating target hardness. Comparison of the Fire Test to a Gasoline Tanker and Sedan collision under an Overpass Fire Test [FIRE test] Click to view picture Real-life Accident Comparison [FIRE scenario] Click to view picture Real-life scenarios that the above test is designed to protect against include being involved in an accident with a gasoline tanker truck, causing the gasoline contents to burn the package. The amount of fuel being burned is approximately 5000 gallons in a pool 30 feet in diameter. During this test, the package is fully engulfed in the fire and is not protected by a transporting vehicle. On October 9, 1997, a truck tractor pulling a cargo tank semitrailer was going under an overpass of the New York State Thruway in Yonkers, New York when it was struck by a sedan. The car hit the right side of the cargo tank in the area of the tank's external loading/unloading lines, releasing the 8800 gallons of gasoline they contained.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Free Drop Comparison Crush Comparison Puncture Comparison Fire Comparison Immersion Comparison Demonstrating target hardness. Hypothetical Accident Conditions: Six tests as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.73 of the NRC transportation regulations were established to provide repeatable and definable conditions that encompass most real-life accidents. The real-life accidents on this page are comparisons to the environments that the regulatory hypothetical accidents protect against. The collision forces or fire temperature and duration that were present in each accident are similar to the conditions that spent fuel casks are designed to survive. Passenger Train and Semi-truck Trailer Collision [DROP scenario] Mack Truck and Subaru Collision [CRUSH scenario] Freight Train and Freight Train Collision

102

Criticality Risks During Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a best-estimate probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) to quantify the frequency of criticality accidents during railroad transportation of spent nuclear fuel casks. The assessment is of sufficient detail to enable full scrutiny of the model logic and the basis for each quantitative parameter contributing to criticality accident scenario frequencies.

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

103

Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accident Recordkeeping and Reporting Accident Recordkeeping and Reporting Accident/Incident Recordkeeping and Reporting CAIRS logo Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System CAIRS Database The Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System is a database used to collect and analyze DOE and DOE contractor reports of injuries, illnesses, and other accidents that occur during DOE operations. Injury and Illness Dashboard The Dashboard provides an alternate interface to CAIRS information. The initial release of the Dashboard allows analysis of composite DOE-wide information and summary information by Program Office, and site. Additional data feature are under development. CAIRS Registration Form CAIRS is a Government computer system and, as such, has security requirements that must be followed. Access to the

104

VEACON: A Vehicular Accident Ontology designed to improve safety on the roads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vehicles are nowadays provided with a variety of new sensors capable of gathering information about themselves and from their surroundings. In a near future, these vehicles will also be capable of sharing all the harvested information, with the surrounding ... Keywords: Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), Ontologies, VANETs, Vehicular Networks, Vehicular accidents

Javier Barrachina; Piedad Garrido; Manuel Fogue; Francisco J. Martinez; Juan-Carlos Cano; Carlos T. Calafate; Pietro Manzoni

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Compendium of information on hydrogen behavior during LWR accidents  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A manual has been written which attempts to present, in a simple and understandable way, information concerning the generation, transport, detection and combustion of hydrogen which might occur during serious accidents in light water reactors. More than a thousand documents were surveyed over a three month period. Of these, several hundred documents were extensively reviewed. The manual summarizes the results of this review. The manual is divided into four major sections covering hydrogen generation, detection, combustion, and existing schemes for mitigating the effects of combustion.

Berman, M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Recommendations for Analyzing Accidents Under NEPA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This DOE guidance clarifies and supplements "Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements." It focuses on principles of accident analyses under NEPA.

107

Accident Tolerant Fuels for Light Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Accident Tolerant Fuels for Light Water Reactors. Author(s), Steven J. Zinkle, Kurt A. Terrani, Lance L. Snead. On-Site Speaker (Planned)...

108

Systematics of Reconstructed Process Facility Criticality Accidents  

SciTech Connect

The systematics of the characteristics of twenty-one criticality accidents occurring in nuclear processing facilities of the Russian Federation, the United States, and the United Kingdom are examined. By systematics the authors mean the degree of consistency or agreement between the factual parameters reported for the accidents and the experimentally known conditions for criticality. The twenty-one reported process criticality accidents are not sufficiently well described to justify attempting detailed neutronic modeling. However, results of classic hand calculations confirm the credibility of the reported accident conditions.

Pruvost, N.L.; McLaughlin, T.P.; Monahan, S.P.

1999-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

109

ORISE: REAC/TS Radiation Accident Registries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accident Registries The Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) maintains a number of radiation...

110

Accident Investigation Report Plutonium Contamination in the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accident Investigation Report Plutonium Contamination in the Zero Power Physics Reactor Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory, November 8, 2011 January 2012 Disclaimer...

111

Projecting Fatalities in Crashes involving Older Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crashes Crashes Projecting Fatalities in Crashes Involving Older Drivers Involving Older Drivers Oak Oak Ridge Ridge National Laboratory National Laboratory, USA USA Presented at Presented at the the 17th 17th World Congress of the International World Congress of the International Association Association for Accident and Traffic Medicine for Accident and Traffic Medicine May May 30, 30, 2000, 2000, Stockholm, Sweden Stockholm, Sweden ORNL ORNL P. P. Hu Hu D. D. Jones Jones T. T. Reuscher Reuscher R. R. Schmoyer Schmoyer T. T. Truett Truett General General Motors Motors Annette Annette Irwin Irwin U.S. U.S. DOTransportation DOTransportation Jesse Jesse Blatt Blatt Acknowledgements Acknowledgements Objective Objective This This research research is is funded funded by by a a Cooperative Cooperative Research

112

Accident Analysis for the NIST Research Reactor Before and After Fuel Conversion  

SciTech Connect

Postulated accidents have been analyzed for the 20 MW D2O-moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analysis has been carried out for the present core, which contains high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel and for a proposed equilibrium core with low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations were performed with the MCNPX code to determine homogenized fuel compositions in the lower and upper halves of each fuel element and to determine the resulting neutronic properties of the core. The accident analysis employed a model of the primary loop with the RELAP5 code. The model includes the primary pumps, shutdown pumps outlet valves, heat exchanger, fuel elements, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow accident resulting from loss of electrical power with an assumption of failure of shutdown cooling pumps, (4) loss-of-flow accident resulting from a primary pump seizure, and (5) loss-of-flow accident resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve. In addition, natural circulation cooling at low power operation was analyzed. The analysis shows that the conversion will not lead to significant changes in the safety analysis and the calculated minimum critical heat flux ratio and maximum clad temperature assure that there is adequate margin to fuel failure.

Baek J.; Diamond D.; Cuadra, A.; Hanson, A.L.; Cheng, L-Y.; Brown, N.R.

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

113

The Hartford Life and Accident Insurance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Hartford Life and Accident Insurance Company Group Numbers Basic Group Term Life AD&D-677984 Life and Accident Insurance Company. (Referred to as The Hartford or Hartford.) General information industry. Europ Assist has been helping customers in times of crisis for more than 46 years. They have

114

Accident states simulation: process fluids release  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seveso II Directive imposes for high hazardous plants quantitative risk evaluation of the major accident. In a general context the risk is defined as product between frequency and consequences of accident state. There are five steps in quantitative risk ... Keywords: hazard, hydrogen sulphide, mathematical model, release, risk, safety system, simulation

Cornelia Croitoru; Mihai Anghel; Floarea Pop; Ioan Stefanescu; Gheorghe Titescu; Mihai Patrascu; Ervin Watzlawek; Dorin Cheresdi

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The Fukushima Daiichi Accident Study Information Portal  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a description of The Fukushima Daiichi Accident Study Information Portal. The Information Portal was created by the Idaho National Laboratory as part of joint NRC and DOE project to assess the severe accident modeling capability of the MELCOR analysis code. The Fukushima Daiichi Accident Study Information Portal was created to collect, store, retrieve and validate information and data for use in reconstructing the Fukushima Daiichi accident. In addition to supporting the MELCOR simulations, the Portal will be the main DOE repository for all data, studies and reports related to the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station. The data is stored in a secured (password protected and encrypted) repository that is searchable and accessible to researchers at diverse locations.

Shawn St. Germain; Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

SILENE Benchmark Critical Experiments for Criticality Accident Alarm Systems  

SciTech Connect

In October 2010 a series of benchmark experiments was conducted at the Commissariat a Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA) Valduc SILENE [1] facility. These experiments were a joint effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the French CEA. The purpose of these experiments was to create three benchmarks for the verification and validation of radiation transport codes and evaluated nuclear data used in the analysis of criticality accident alarm systems (CAASs). This presentation will discuss the geometric configuration of these experiments and the quantities that were measured and will present some preliminary comparisons between the measured data and calculations. This series consisted of three single-pulsed experiments with the SILENE reactor. During the first experiment the reactor was bare (unshielded), but during the second and third experiments it was shielded by lead and polyethylene, respectively. During each experiment several neutron activation foils and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed around the reactor, and some of these detectors were themselves shielded from the reactor by high-density magnetite and barite concrete, standard concrete, and/or BoroBond. All the concrete was provided by CEA Saclay, and the BoroBond was provided by Y-12 National Security Complex. Figure 1 is a picture of the SILENE reactor cell configured for pulse 1. Also included in these experiments were measurements of the neutron and photon spectra with two BICRON BC-501A liquid scintillators. These two detectors were provided and operated by CEA Valduc. They were set up just outside the SILENE reactor cell with additional lead shielding to prevent the detectors from being saturated. The final detectors involved in the experiments were two different types of CAAS detectors. The Babcock International Group provided three CIDAS CAAS detectors, which measured photon dose and dose rate with a Geiger-Mueller tube. CIDAS detectors are currently in use at Y-12 in the newly constructed Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility. The second CAAS detector used a {sup 6}LiF TLD to absorb neutrons and a silicon detector to count the charge particles released by these absorption events. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory provided four of these detectors, which had formerly been used at the Rocky Flats facility in the United States.

Miller, Thomas Martin [ORNL; Reynolds, Kevin H. [Y-12 National Security Complex

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Web Based Course: SAF-230DE, Accident Investigation Overview...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Web Based Course: SAF-230DE, Accident Investigation Overview Promotional Video Web Based Course: SAF-230DE, Accident Investigation Overview Promotional Video September 20, 2013 -...

118

ORISE: The Medical Basis for Radiation-Accident Preparedness...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Medical Basis for Radiation-Accident Preparedness: Medical Management Proceedings of the Fifth International REACTS Symposium on the Medical Basis for Radiation-Accident...

119

Derivation of Accident-Specific Material-at-Risk Equivalency Factors  

SciTech Connect

A novel method for calculating material at risk (MAR) dose equivalency developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) now allows for increased utilization of dose equivalency for facility MAR control. This method involves near-real time accounting for the use of accident and material specific release and transport. It utilizes all information from the committed effective dose equation and the five factor source term equation to derive dose equivalency factors which can be used to establish an overall facility or process MAR limit. The equivalency factors allow different nuclide spectrums to be compared for their respective dose consequences by relating them to a specific quantity of an identified reference nuclide. The ability to compare spectrums to a reference limit ensures that MAR limits are in fact bounding instead of attempting to establish a representative or bounding spectrum which may lead to unintended or unanalyzed configurations. This methodology is then coupled with a near real time material tracking system which allows for accurate and timely material composition information and corresponding MAR equivalency values. The development of this approach was driven by the complex nature of processing operations in some INL facilities. This type of approach is ideally suited for facilities and processes where the composition of the MAR and possible release mechanisms change frequently but in well defined fashions and in a batch-type nature.

Jason P. Andrus; Dr. Chad L. Pope

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

A review of the Melcor Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS): Capabilities and applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MACCS was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship to estimate the offsite consequences of potential severe accidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs). MACCS was publicly released in 1990. MACCS was developed to support the NRC`s probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) efforts. PSA techniques can provide a measure of the risk of reactor operation. PSAs are generally divided into three levels. Level one efforts identify potential plant damage states that lead to core damage and the associated probabilities, level two models damage progression and containment strength for establishing fission-product release categories, and level three efforts evaluate potential off-site consequences of radiological releases and the probabilities associated with the consequences. MACCS was designed as a tool for level three PSA analysis. MACCS performs probabilistic health and economic consequence assessments of hypothetical accidental releases of radioactive material from NPPs. MACCS includes models for atmospheric dispersion and transport, wet and dry deposition, the probabilistic treatment of meteorology, environmental transfer, countermeasure strategies, dosimetry, health effects, and economic impacts. The computer systems MACCS is designed to run on are the 386/486 PC, VAX/VMS, E3M RISC S/6000, Sun SPARC, and Cray UNICOS. This paper provides an overview of MACCS, reviews some of the applications of MACCS, international collaborations which have involved MACCS, current developmental efforts, and future directions.

Young, M.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

THERMAL ANALYSIS OF A 9975 PACKAGE IN A FACILITY FIRE ACCIDENT  

SciTech Connect

Surplus plutonium bearing materials in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex are stored in the 3013 containers that are designed to meet the requirements of the DOE standard DOE-STD-3013. The 3013 containers are in turn packaged inside 9975 packages that are designed to meet the NRC 10 CFR Part 71 regulatory requirements for transporting the Type B fissile materials across the DOE complex. The design requirements for the hypothetical accident conditions (HAC) involving a fire are given in 10 CFR 71.73. The 9975 packages are stored at the DOE Savannah River Site in the K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) facility for long term of up to 50 years. The design requirements for safe storage in KAMS facility containing multiple sources of combustible materials are far more challenging than the HAC requirements in 10 CFR 71.73. While the 10 CFR 71.73 postulates an HAC fire of 1475 F and 30 minutes duration, the facility fire calls for a fire of 1500 F and 86 duration. This paper describes a methodology and the analysis results that meet the design limits of the 9975 component and demonstrate the robustness of the 9975 package.

Gupta, N.

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

122

Texas AgriLife Research Procedure 24.01.01.A1.02 Motor Vehicle Accident Reports Page 1 of 2 Texas AgriLife Research Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas AgriLife Research Procedure 24.01.01.A1.02 Motor Vehicle Accident Reports Page 1 of 2 Texas Revised: November 13, 2010 Next Scheduled Review: November 13, 2012 PROCEDURE STATEMENT The Texas A vehicle operators in the event of a vehicle accident involving a Texas AgriLife Research (Agri

123

A methodology for estimating the residual contamination contribution to the source term in a spent-fuel transport cask  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the ranges of the residual contamination that may build up in spent-fuel transport casks. These contamination ranges are calculated based on data taken from published reports and from previously unpublished data supplied by cask transporters. The data involve dose rate measurements, interior smear surveys, and analyses of water flushed out of cask cavities during decontamination operations. A methodology has been developed to estimate the effect of residual contamination on spent-fuel cask containment requirements. Factors in estimating the maximum permissible leak rates include the form of the residual contamination; possible release modes; internal gas-borne depletion; and the temperature, pressure, and vibration characteristics of the cask during transport under normal and accident conditions. 12 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

Sanders, T.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Jordan, H. (EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant); Pasupathi, V. (Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)); Mings, W.J. (USDOE Idaho Field Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Reardon, P.C. (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A systems approach to food accident analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food borne illnesses lead to 3000 deaths per year in the United States. Some industries, such as aviation, have made great strides increasing safety through careful accident analysis leading to changes in industry practices. ...

Helferich, John D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Three Mile Island accident and post-accident recovery: what did we learn  

SciTech Connect

A description of the accident at Three Mile Island-2 reactor is presented. Activities related to the cleanup and decontamination of the reactor are described.

Collins, E.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Sustainable Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THOUGHT PIECE Sustainable Transport by Melvin M. Webberwant to sustain any mode of transport only if we judge it todraconian in rejecting transport modes that have failed in

Webber, Melvin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

WIPP transportation exercise to test emergency response capablities for Midland-Odessa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Exercise to Test Transportation Exercise to Test Emergency Response Capabilities for Midland-Odessa CARLSBAD, N.M., January 10, 2000 - Emergency response agencies from Midland and Odessa, Texas, will take part in a 1 p.m. (CST) training exercise Jan. 12 at the Ector County Coliseum. The graded exercise will help agencies determine whether emergency personnel are prepared to respond to a possible accident involving a shipment of transuranic radioactive waste headed for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). "This is an excellent opportunity for emergency responders to test the skills they've learned," said Dale Childers, assistant chief of the Odessa Fire Department and emergency management coordinator for Ector County. "It will also help us determine what improvements,

128

Accident sequence precursor events with age-related contributors  

SciTech Connect

The Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) Program at ORNL analyzed about 14.000 Licensee Event Reports (LERs) filed by US nuclear power plants 1987--1993. There were 193 events identified as precursors to potential severe core accident sequences. These are reported in G/CR-4674. Volumes 7 through 20. Under the NRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research program, the authors evaluated these events to determine the extent to which component aging played a role. Events were selected that involved age-related equipment degradation that initiated an event or contributed to an event sequence. For the 7-year period, ORNL identified 36 events that involved aging degradation as a contributor to an ASP event. Except for 1992, the percentage of age-related events within the total number of ASP events over the 7-year period ({approximately}19%) appears fairly consistent up to 1991. No correlation between plant ape and number of precursor events was found. A summary list of the age-related events is presented in the report.

Murphy, G.A.; Kohn, W.E.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are full-scale tests? What are scale-model tests? What is computer analysis? What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. A packaging is certified when it can survive a sequence of impact, crush, puncture, fire, and immersion tests designed to replicate transport accident conditions. Type B Packages must meet the testing requirements of: Compliance Testing, as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.85 and 10 CFR Part 71.87 Normal Conditions of Transport, Ten tests as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.71 Hypothetical Accident Conditions, Six tests as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.73 The ability of radioactive material packages to withstand testing environments can be demonstrated by full-scale testing, scale-model

130

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are examples of severe testing? What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. These full-scale tests, conducted at Sandia National Laboratories Transportation Programs, demonstrate how spent fuel casks perform in accident environments that are more similar to what may happen during actual shipments. Each of the tests included the transportation vehicle as well as the cask. The damage to the casks from these tests was less than the damage during the regulatory hypothetical accident tests, demonstrating that the regulatory tests are more severe. DESCRIPTION PHOTO DURING TEST PHOTO AFTER TEST PHOTO OF PACKAGE AFTER TEST VIDEO OF TEST CRASH TEST Cask rail car with a 74 ton Type B Package on it crashing into a 690 ton concrete block at 81 miles per hour [photo]

131

Spent Fuel Transportation Package Performance Study - Experimental Design Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous studies of spent nuclear fuel transportation accident risks have been performed since the late seventies that considered shipping container design and performance. Based in part on these studies, NRC has concluded that the level of protection provided by spent nuclear fuel transportation package designs under accident conditions is adequate. [1] Furthermore, actual spent nuclear fuel transport experience showcase a safety record that is exceptional and unparalleled when compared to other hazardous materials transportation shipments. There has never been a known or suspected release of the radioactive contents from an NRC-certified spent nuclear fuel cask as a result of a transportation accident. In 1999 the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated a study, the Package Performance Study, to demonstrate the performance of spent fuel and spent fuel packages during severe transportation accidents. NRC is not studying or testing its current regulations, a s the rigorous regulatory accident conditions specified in 10 CFR Part 71 are adequate to ensure safe packaging and use. As part of this study, NRC currently plans on using detailed modeling followed by experimental testing to increase public confidence in the safety of spent nuclear fuel shipments. One of the aspects of this confirmatory research study is the commitment to solicit and consider public comment during the scoping phase and experimental design planning phase of this research.

Snyder, A. M.; Murphy, A. J.; Sprung, J. L.; Ammerman, D. J.; Lopez, C.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

132

Instrument Performance Under Severe Accident Conditions: Ways to Acquire Information From Instrumentation Affected by an Accident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under accident conditions, information is needed for diagnosing plant status and confirming plant responses to mitigative actions. This makes it important to understand how instruments behave in severe accident environments and to find ways to obtain information from the instruments under conditions that can be more severe than their design bases.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

SAF-230DE - Web Based Course: Accident Investigation Overview | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SAF-230DE - Web Based Course: Accident Investigation Overview SAF-230DE - Web Based Course: Accident Investigation Overview SAF-230DE - Web Based Course: Accident Investigation Overview September 18, 2013 - 10:52am Addthis SAF-230DE - Web Based Course: Accident Investigation Overview The Office of Health Safety and Security (HSS) National Training Center (NTC) in collaboration with the HSS Accident Investigation Program (HS-24) has developed and released a course that provides an overview of the fundamentals of accident investigation. This course is intended to meet the every five year refresher training requirement for DOE Federal Accident Investigators under DOE Order 225.1B "Accident Investigations", and serves as an orientation to other DOE Federal Accident Investigation Board Members who need a basic knowledge of

134

A POTENTIAL APPLICATION OF UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS TO DOE-STD-3009-94 ACCIDENT ANALYSIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to assess proposed transuranic waste accident analysis guidance and recent software improvements in a Windows-OS version of MACCS2 that allows the inputting of parameter uncertainty. With this guidance and code capability, there is the potential to perform a quantitative uncertainty assessment of unmitigated accident releases with respect to the 25 rem Evaluation Guideline (EG) of DOE-STD-3009-94 CN3 (STD-3009). Historically, the classification of safety systems in a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facility's safety basis has involved how subject matter experts qualitatively view uncertainty in the STD-3009 Appendix A accident analysis methodology. Specifically, whether consequence uncertainty could be larger than previously evaluated so the site-specific accident consequences may challenge the EG. This paper assesses whether a potential uncertainty capability for MACCS2 could provide a stronger technical basis as to when the consequences from a design basis accident (DBA) truly challenges the 25 rem EG.

Palmrose, D E; Yang, J M

2007-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

135

Office of Secure Transportation Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16th, 2012 16th, 2012 WIPP Knoxville, TN OFFICE OF SECURE TRANSPORTATION Agency Integration Briefing Our Mission To provide safe and secure ground and air transportation of nuclear weapons, nuclear weapons components, and special nuclear materials and conduct other missions supporting the national security of the United States of America. 3 5 OST's Commitment to Transportation Safety and Security Over three decades of safe, secure transport of nuclear weapons and special nuclear material to and from military locations and DOE facilities More than 140 million miles traveled Over three decades and 240,000 flight hours of accident-free flying Professionalism We conduct ourselves and our operations with the highest standards of professionalism and integrity.

136

Development of hydrogeological modelling approaches for assessment of consequences of hazardous accidents at nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces some modeling approaches for predicting the influence of hazardous accidents at nuclear reactors on groundwater quality. Possible pathways for radioactive releases from nuclear power plants were considered to conceptualize boundary conditions for solving the subsurface radionuclides transport problems. Some approaches to incorporate physical-and-chemical interactions into transport simulators have been developed. The hydrogeological forecasts were based on numerical and semi-analytical scale-dependent models. They have been applied to assess the possible impact of the nuclear power plants designed in Russia on groundwater reservoirs.

Rumynin, V.G.; Mironenko, V.A.; Konosavsky, P.K.; Pereverzeva, S.A. [St. Petersburg Mining Inst. (Russian Federation)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Severe accident testing of a personnel airlock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is investigating the leakage potential of mechanical penetrations as part of a research program on containment integrity under severe accident loads for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Barnes et al. (1984) and Shackelford et al. (1985) identified leakage from personnel airlocks as an important failure mode of containments subject to severe accident loads. However, these studies were based on relatively simple analysis methods. The complex structural interaction between the door, gasket, and bulkhead in personnel airlocks makes analytical evaluation of leakage difficult. In order to provide data to validate methods for evaluating the leakage potential, a full-size personnel airlock was subject to simulated severe accident loads consisting of pressure and temperature up to 300 psig and 800/degree/F. The test was conducted at Chicago Bridge and Iron under contract to Sandia. Julien and Peters (1989) provide a detailed report on the test program. 6 refs., 5 figs.

Clauss, D.B.; Parks, M.B.; Julien, J.T.; Peters, S.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Assessment of CRBR core disruptive accident energetics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of an independent assessment of core disruptive accident energetics for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor are presented in this document. This assessment was performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission under the direction of the CRBR Program Office within the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. It considered in detail the accident behavior for three accident initiators that are representative of three different classes of events; unprotected loss of flow, unprotected reactivity insertion, and protected loss of heat sink. The primary system's energetics accommodation capability was realistically, yet conservatively, determined in terms of core events. This accommodation capability was found to be equivalent to an isentropic work potential for expansion to one atmosphere of 2550 MJ or a ramp rate of about 200 $/s applied to a classical two-phase disassembly.

Theofanous, T.G.; Bell, C.R.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A Review of Criticality Accidents 2000 Revision  

SciTech Connect

Criticality accidents and the characteristics of prompt power excursions are discussed. Sixty accidental power excursions are reviewed. Sufficient detail is provided to enable the reader to understand the physical situation, the chemistry and material flow, and when available the administrative setting leading up to the time of the accident. Information on the power history, energy release, consequences, and causes are also included when available. For those accidents that occurred in process plants, two new sections have been included in this revision. The first is an analysis and summary of the physical and neutronic features of the chain reacting systems. The second is a compilation of observations and lessons learned. Excursions associated with large power reactors are not included in this report.

Thomas P. McLaughlin; Shean P. Monahan; Norman L. Pruvost; Vladimir V. Frolov; Boris G. Ryazanov; Victor I. Sviridov

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Accident progression event tree analysis for postulated severe accidents at N Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A Level II/III probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been performed for N Reactor, a Department of Energy (DOE) production reactor located on the Hanford reservation in Washington. The accident progression analysis documented in this report determines how core damage accidents identified in the Level I PRA progress from fuel damage to confinement response and potential releases the environment. The objectives of the study are to generate accident progression data for the Level II/III PRA source term model and to identify changes that could improve plant response under accident conditions. The scope of the analysis is comprehensive, excluding only sabotage and operator errors of commission. State-of-the-art methodology is employed based largely on the methods developed by Sandia for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in support of the NUREG-1150 study. The accident progression model allows complex interactions and dependencies between systems to be explicitly considered. Latin Hypecube sampling was used to assess the phenomenological and systemic uncertainties associated with the primary and confinement system responses to the core damage accident. The results of the analysis show that the N Reactor confinement concept provides significant radiological protection for most of the accident progression pathways studied.

Wyss, G.D.; Camp, A.L.; Miller, L.A.; Dingman, S.E.; Kunsman, D.M. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Medford, G.T. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

LESSONS LEARNED FROM A RECENT LASER ACCIDENT  

SciTech Connect

A graduate student received a laser eye injury from a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser beam while adjusting a polarizing beam splitter optic. The direct causes for the accident included failure to follow safe alignment practices and failure to wear the required laser eyewear protection. Underlying root causes included inadequate on-the-job training and supervision, inadequate adherence to requirements, and inadequate appreciation for dimly visible beams outside the range of 400-700nm. This paper describes how the accident occurred, discusses causes and lessons learned, and describes corrective actions being taken.

Woods, Michael; /SLAC

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

142

Criticality Risks During Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a best-estimate probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) to quantify the frequency of criticality accidents during railroad transportation of spent nuclear fuel casks. The assessment is of sufficient detail to enable full scrutiny of the model logic and the basis for each quantitative parameter contributing to criticality accident scenario frequencies. The report takes into account the results of a 2007 peer review of the initial version of this probabilistic risk assessment, which was pu...

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

143

The relationship between truck accidents and geometric design of road sections: Poisson versus negative binomial regressions  

SciTech Connect

This paper evaluates the performance of Poisson and negative binomial (NB) regression models in establishing the relationship between truck accidents and geometric design of road sections. Three types of models are considered. Poisson regression, zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) regression, and NB regression. Maximum likelihood (ML) method is used to estimate the unknown parameters of these models. Two other feasible estimators for estimating the dispersion parameter in the NB regression model are also examined: a moment estimator and a regression-based estimator. These models and estimators are evaluated based on their (1) estimated regression parameters, (2) overall goodness-of-fit, (3) estimated relative frequency of truck accident involvements across road sections, (4) sensitivity to the inclusion of short mad sections, and (5) estimated total number of truck accident involvements. Data from the highway Safety Information System (HSIS) are employed to examine the performance of these models in developing such relationships. The evaluation results suggest that the NB regression model estimated using the moment and regression-based methods should be used with caution. Also, under the ML method, the estimated regression parameters from all three models are quite consistent and no particular model outperforms the other two models in terms of the estimated relative frequencies of truck accident involvements across road sections. It is recommended that the Poisson regression model be used as an initial model for developing the relationship. If the overdispersion of accident data is found to be moderate or high, both the NB and ZIP regression model could be explored. Overall, the ZIP regression model appears to be a serious candidate model when data exhibit excess zeros due, e.g., to underreporting.

Miaou, Shaw-Pin

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Report on electrocutions, electric shock, and electric burn injuries involving consumer products. final report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides direction to a project to reduce the number of electrocution, electric shock and electric burn injuries. The first section uses CPSC data to rank the consumer products involved in these accidents on the basis of frequency, severity, and number of products in use. It also analyzes demographic and accident characteristics. The second section contains a technical review of accidents occurring in eight product groups: Portable Power Tools; Welders, Battery Chargers and Inverters; Personal Hygiene Products; Entertainment Products; Lawn and Garden Tools; Installed Stoves, Ranges and Cook Tops; Refrigerators and Freezers; and Fans. This section also includes a review of the relevant Underwriters Laboratories (UL) standards and suggestions for potential action to reduce the accidents involving these eight product groups.

Not Available

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Accident Investigation of the Fall Injury at the Savannah River...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Accident Investigation Report Fall Injury Accident at the Savannah River Site on July 1, 2011 August 8, 2011 Disclaimer...

146

Uncertainty Assessments in Severe Nuclear Accident Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Managing uncertainties in industrial systems is a daily challenge to ensure improved design, robust operation, accountable performance and responsive risk control. This paper aims to illustrate the different depth analyses that the uncertainty software ... Keywords: Monte Carlo simulation, nuclear power plant, sensitivity analysis, severe accident, uncertainty

Bertrand Iooss; Fabrice Gaudier; Michel Marques; Bertrand Spindler; Bruno Tourniaire

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Blasting practices and explosives accidents in Utah coal mines  

SciTech Connect

Practices in use in Utah are commended and accidents incident to blasting are reviewed with suggestions as to future avoidance.

Parker, D.J.

1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

RECENT LASER ACCIDENTS AT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LABORATORIES  

SciTech Connect

Recent laser accidents and incidents at research laboratories across the Department of Energy complex are reviewed in this paper. Factors that contributed to the accidents are examined. Conclusions drawn from the accident reports are summarized and compared. Control measures that could have been implemented to prevent the accidents will be summarized and compared. Recommendations for improving laser safety programs are outlined and progress toward achieving them are summarized.

ODOM, CONNON R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

149

DOE O 225.1B, Accident Investigations  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Order prescribes organizational responsibilities, authorities, and requirements for conducting investigations of certain accidents occurring at DOE sites, ...

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

150

Transportation risk assessment for ethanol transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research is aimed at assessing the quantitative risks involved with an ethanol pipeline. Pipelines that run from the Midwest, where the vast majority of ethanol is produced, to the target areas where reformulated gasoline is required (California, Texas Gulf Coast, New England Atlantic Coast) will be of particular interest. The goal is to conduct a quantitative risk assessment on the pipeline, truck, and rail transportation modes to these areas. As a result of the quantitative risk assessment, we are able to compare the risk associated with the different modes of transportation for ethanol. In order to perform and compare the quantitative risk assessment, the following challenges are addressed: 1) Identify target areas requiring reformulated gasoline 2) Map detailed route for each transportation mode to all three target areas 3) Perform a quantitative risk assessment for each transportation mode 4) Compare quantitative risk assessment results for each route and transportation mode The focus is on California, Texas Gulf Coast, and New England Atlantic Coast because of the large volume. It is beneficial to look at these areas as opposed to the smaller areas because pipeline transportation requires very large volumes. In order to find a meaningful comparison between all three transportation modes, only the areas with the three large volumes were evaluated. Since the risk assessment is completed using historical data, each route is segmented in a way that is consistent with the data that is available. All of the curves support the hypothesis that pipeline transportation poses the least societal risk when transporting ethanol from the Midwest to target areas. Rail transportation poses the largest amount of societal risk. While overall rail incidents are not as frequent as road incidents, the frequency of a fatality is much higher when an incident does occur.

Shelton Davis, Anecia Delaine

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Transportation risk assessment for ethanol transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research is aimed at assessing the quantitative risks involved with an ethanol pipeline. Pipelines that run from the Midwest, where the vast majority of ethanol is produced, to the target areas where reformulated gasoline is required (California, Texas Gulf Coast, New England Atlantic Coast) will be of particular interest. The goal is to conduct a quantitative risk assessment on the pipeline, truck, and rail transportation modes to these areas. As a result of the quantitative risk assessment, we are able to compare the risk associated with the different modes of transportation for ethanol. In order to perform and compare the quantitative risk assessment, the following challenges are addressed: Identify target areas requiring reformulated gasoline Map detailed route for each transportation mode to all three target areas Perform a quantitative risk assessment for each transportation mode Compare quantitative risk assessment results for each route and transportation mode The focus is on California, Texas Gulf Coast, and New England Atlantic Coast because of the large volume. It is beneficial to look at these areas as opposed to the smaller areas because pipeline transportation requires very large volumes. In order to find a meaningful comparison between all three transportation modes, only the areas with the three large volumes were evaluated. Since the risk assessment is completed using historical data, each route is segmented in a way that is consistent with the data that is available. All of the curves support the hypothesis that pipeline transportation poses the least societal risk when transporting ethanol from the Midwest to target areas. Rail transportation poses the largest amount of societal risk. While overall rail incidents are not as frequent as road incidents, the frequency of a fatality is much higher when an incident does occur.

Shelton Davis, Anecia Delaine

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Documents: Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Transportation PDF Icon Transportation Impact Assessment for Shipment of Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) Cylinders...

153

Trends status: Post-accident fission product chemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is important to understand and model the chemical and physical behavior of vapor iodine species in containment environments for the following reasons: This behavior can contribute significantly to severe accident source terms; the development of accident mitigation or management strategies (e.g., an effective filter system); for long-term clean-up and recovery following an accident; regulatory requirements (e.g., spray or pool additives); and design basis accidents (i.e., steam generator tube rupture). This document discusses the Oak Ridge National Laboratory ''Post-Accident'' Chemistry Program.

Kress, T.S.; Beahm, E.C.; Shockley, W.C.; Weber, C.F.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Monthly Accident Statistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monthly Accident Statistics Monthly Accident Statistics Latest Accident Statistics Accident Statistics (through December 2013) Archived Accident Statistics 2013 Through November Through October Through September Through August Through July Through June Through May Through April Through March Through February Through January 2012 Through December Through November Through October Through September Through August Through July Through June Through May Through February Through January 2011 Through December Through November Through October Through September Through August Through July Through June Through May Through April Through March Through February Through January 2010 Through December Through November Through October Through September Through August Through July Through June Through May Through April Through March Through February

155

A probabilistic risk assessment of the LLNL Plutonium facility`s evaluation basis fire operational accident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Plutonium Facility conducts numerous involving plutonium to include device fabrication, development of fabrication techniques, metallurgy research, and laser isotope separation. A Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the building 332 Plutonium Facility was completed rational safety and acceptable risk to employees, the public, government property, and the environment. This paper outlines the PRA analysis of the Evaluation Basis Fire (EDF) operational accident. The EBF postulates the worst-case programmatic impact event for the Plutonium Facility.

Brumburgh, G.

1994-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

Thermodynamic analysis of spent pyrochemical salts in the stored condition and in viable accident scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study involves examining ``spent`` electrorefining (ER) salts in the form present after usage (as stored), and then after exposure to water in a proposed accident scenario. Additionally, the equilibrium composition of the salt after extended exposure to air was also calculated by computer modeling and those results are also presented herein. It should be noted that these salts are extremely similar to spent MSE salts from the Rocky Flats MSE campaigns using NaCl-KCl- MgCl{sub 2}.

Axler, K.M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Emergency response planning for railroad transportation related spills of oil or other hazardous materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In December 1984 an unintentional release of poison gas from a chemical plant in Bhopal, India killed over 2,500 people. Thousands of others were injured. Although this material was not in transportation at the time, this accident raised public awareness. Americans began to ask, "What if something similar happened here?" Chemicals with hazardous properties have become part of daily life. Industry, government, and the public have become aware of the need to respond to problems involving hazardous materials. Safe transportation of hazardous materials is very important. Union Pacific Railroad transports more hazardous material shipments than any other carrier. Early on they realized the benefits to having a dedicated team of personnel to respond to incidents involving hazardous materials. In order to remain the safest carrier of these commodities, an emergency response plan utilizing in house response personnel was needed. This document describes how that plan was created and includes a copy of the plan for the Union Pacific Railroad's Settegast Yard in Houston, Texas. Other carriers may use this as a template to establish their own in house response teams or emergency response plans.

Reeder, Geoffrey Benton

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Severe accident approach - final report. Evaluation of design measures for severe accident prevention and consequence mitigation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important goal of the US DOE reactor development program is to conceptualize advanced safety design features for a demonstration Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). The treatment of severe accidents is one of the key safety issues in the design approach for advanced SFR systems. It is necessary to develop an in-depth understanding of the risk of severe accidents for the SFR so that appropriate risk management measures can be implemented early in the design process. This report presents the results of a review of the SFR features and phenomena that directly influence the sequence of events during a postulated severe accident. The report identifies the safety features used or proposed for various SFR designs in the US and worldwide for the prevention and/or mitigation of Core Disruptive Accidents (CDA). The report provides an overview of the current SFR safety approaches and the role of severe accidents. Mutual understanding of these design features and safety approaches is necessary for future collaborations between the US and its international partners as part of the GEN IV program. The report also reviews the basis for an integrated safety approach to severe accidents for the SFR that reflects the safety design knowledge gained in the US during the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) and Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) programs. This approach relies on inherent reactor and plant safety performance characteristics to provide additional safety margins. The goal of this approach is to prevent development of severe accident conditions, even in the event of initiators with safety system failures previously recognized to lead directly to reactor damage.

Tentner, A. M.; Parma, E.; Wei, T.; Wigeland, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division; SNL; INL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Development of Onsite Transportation Safety Documents for Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Department of Energy (DOE) Orders require each DOE site to develop onsite transportation safety documents (OTSDs). The Nevada Test Site approach divided all onsite transfers into two groups with each group covered by a standalone OTSD identified as Non-Nuclear and Nuclear. The Non-Nuclear transfers involve all radioactive hazardous material in less than Hazard Category (HC)-3 quantities and all chemically hazardous materials. The Nuclear transfers involve all radioactive material equal to or greater than HC-3 quantities and radioactive material mated with high explosives regardless of quantity. Both OTSDs comply with DOE O 460.1B requirements. The Nuclear OTSD also complies with DOE O 461.1A requirements and includes a DOE-STD-3009 approach to hazard analysis (HA) and accident analysis as needed. All Nuclear OTSD proposed transfers were determined to be non-equivalent and a methodology was developed to determine if equivalent safety to a fully compliant Department of Transportation (DOT) transfer was achieved. For each HA scenario, three hypothetical transfers were evaluated: a DOT-compliant, uncontrolled, and controlled transfer. Equivalent safety is demonstrated when the risk level for each controlled transfer is equal to or less than the corresponding DOT-compliant transfer risk level. In this comparison the typical DOE-STD-3009 risk matrix was modified to reflect transportation requirements. Design basis conditions (DBCs) were developed for each non-equivalent transfer. Initial DBCs were based solely upon the amount of material present. Route-, transfer-, and site-specific conditions were evaluated and the initial DBCs revised as needed. Final DBCs were evaluated for each transfers packaging and its contents.

Frank Hand, Willard Thomas, Frank Sciacca, Manny Negrete, Susan Kelley

2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

160

Accident, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Accident, Maryland: Energy Resources Accident, Maryland: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.628696°, -79.319759° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.628696,"lon":-79.319759,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Less than severe worst case accidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many systems can provide tremendous benefit if operating correctly, produce only an inconvenience if they fail to operate, but have extreme consequences if they are only partially disabled such that they operate erratically or prematurely. In order to assure safety, systems are often tested against the most severe environments and accidents that are considered possible to ensure either safe operation or safe failure. However, it is often the less severe environments which result in the ``worst case accident`` since these are the conditions in which part of the system may be exposed or rendered unpredictable prior to total system failure. Some examples of less severe mechanical, thermal, and electrical environments which may actually be worst case are described as cautions for others in industries with high consequence operations or products.

Sanders, G.A.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Characterization of a nuclear accident dosimeter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 23rd nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison was held during the week of June 12-16, 1995 at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This report presents the results of this event, referred to as NAD 23, as related to the performance of Sandia National Laboratories' (SNL) personal nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD). Two separate critical assemblies, SHEBA and Godiva, were used to generate seven separate neutron spectra for use in dose comparisons. SNL's PNAD measured absorbed doses that were within +16 to +26 percent of the reference doses. In addition, a preliminary investigation was undertaken to determine the feasibility of using the data obtained from an irradiated PNAD to correct for body orientation. This portion of the experiment was performed with a TRIGA reactor at the Nuclear Science Center at Texas A&M University.

Burrows, Ronald Allen

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

EPR Severe Accident Threats and Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

Despite the extremely low EPR core melt frequency, an improved defence-in-depth approach is applied in order to comply with the EPR safety target: no stringent countermeasures should be necessary outside the immediate plant vicinity like evacuation, relocation or food control other than the first harvest in case of a severe accident. Design provisions eliminate energetic events and maintain the containment integrity and leak-tightness during the entire course of the accident. Based on scenarios that cover a broad range of physical phenomena and which provide a sound envelope of boundary conditions associated with each containment challenge, a selection of representative loads has been done, for which mitigation measures have to cope with. This paper presents the main critical threats and the approach used to mitigate those threats. (authors)

Azarian, G. [Framatome ANP SAS, Tour Areva, Place de la Coupole 92084 Paris la Defense (France); Kursawe, H.M.; Nie, M.; Fischer, M.; Eyink, J. [Framatome ANP GmbH, Freyeslebenstrasse, 1, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Stoudt, R.H. [Framatome ANP Inc. - 3315 Old Forest Rd, Lynchburgh, VA 24501 (United States)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Characterization of a nuclear accident dosimeter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 23rd nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison was held during the week of June 12--16, 1995 at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This report presents the results of this event, referred to as NAD 23, as related to the performance of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) personal nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD). Two separate critical assemblies, SHEBA and Godiva, were used to generate seven separate neutron spectra for use in dose comparisons. SNL`s PNAD measured absorbed doses that were within +16 to +26% of the reference doses. In addition, a preliminary investigation was undertaken to determine the feasibility of using the data obtained from an irradiated PNAD to correct for body orientation. This portion of the experiment was performed with a TRIGA reactor at the Nuclear Science Center at Texas A and M University.

Burrows, R.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

US Department of Energy Chernobyl accident bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research to provide bibliographic information in a usable format for research studies relating to the Chernobyl nuclear accident that occurred in the Ukrainian Republic, USSR in 1986. This report is a product of the Chernobyl Database Management project. The purpose of this project is to produce and maintain an information system that is the official United States repository for information related to the accident. Two related products prepared for this project are the Chernobyl Bibliographic Search System (ChernoLit{trademark}) and the Chernobyl Radiological Measurements Information System (ChernoDat). This report supersedes the original release of Chernobyl Bibliography (Carr and Mahaffey, 1989). The original report included about 2200 references. Over 4500 references and an index of authors and editors are included in this report.

Kennedy, R.A.; Mahaffey, J.A.; Carr, F. Jr.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

SARNET: Integrating Severe Accident Research in Europe - Safety Issues in the Source Term Area  

SciTech Connect

SARNET (Severe Accident Research Network) is a Network of Excellence of the EU 6. Framework Programme that integrates in a sustainable manner the research capabilities of about fifty European organisations to resolve important remaining uncertainties and safety issues concerning existing and future nuclear plant, especially water-cooled reactors, under hypothetical severe accident conditions. It emphasises integrating activities, spreading of excellence (including knowledge transfer) and jointly-executed research. This paper summarises the main results obtained at the middle of the current 4-year term, highlighting those concerning radioactive release to the environment. Integration is pursued through different methods: the ASTEC integral computer code for severe accident modelling, development of PSA level 2 methods, a means for definition, updating and resolution of safety issues, and development of a web database for storing experimental results. These activities are helped by an evolving Advanced Communication Tool, easing communication amongst partners. Concerning spreading of excellence, educational courses covering severe accident analysis methodology and level 2 PSA have been organised for early 2006. A text book on Severe Accident Phenomenology is being written. A mobility programme for students and young researchers has started. Results are disseminated mainly through open conference proceedings, with journal publications planned. The 1. European Review Meeting on Severe Accidents in November 2005 covered SARNET activities during its first 18 months. Jointly executed research activities concern key issues grouped in the Corium, Containment and Source Term areas. In Source Term, behaviour of the highly radio-toxic ruthenium under oxidising conditions, including air ingress, is investigated. Models are proposed for fuel and ruthenium oxidation. Experiments on transport of oxide ruthenium species are performed. Reactor scenario studies assist in defining conditions for new experiments. Regarding predictability of iodine species exiting the Reactor Coolant System (RCS), which affects the amount entering the containment, iodine behaviour in the circuit and silver-indium-cadmium (SIC) release have been reviewed. New experiments are being discussed and performed, and SIC degradation and release models are being improved. For the radioactive aerosol source term, work is conducted in the risk-relevant areas of steam generator (SG) tube rupture, transport through cracks in containment walls and revaporization from previous deposits in the RCS that could lead to a delayed source term. Models for aerosol retention in containment cracks and interpretation of data on retention in the SG secondary side are proposed. For radioactive iodine release to the environment, many physical and chemical processes affect the iodine concentration in the containment atmosphere; of these effects, mass transfer phenomena and radiolytic oxidation are being investigated first. (authors)

Haste, T. [Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Giordano, P.; Micaelli, J.-C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de S et Nucl ire, IRSN, BP 3 13115 St Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Herranz, L. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medio Ambientales y Tecnologica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 3: Fission-Product Transport and Dose PIRTs  

SciTech Connect

This Fission Product Transport (FPT) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) report briefly reviews the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) FPT mechanisms and then documents the step-by-step PIRT process for FPT. The panel examined three FPT modes of operation: (1) Normal operation which, for the purposes of the FPT PIRT, established the fission product circuit loading and distribution for the accident phase. (2) Anticipated transients which were of less importance to the panel because a break in the pressure circuit boundary is generally necessary for the release of fission products. The transients can change the fission product distribution within the circuit, however, because temperature changes, flow perturbations, and mechanical vibrations or shocks can result in fission product movement. (3) Postulated accidents drew the majority of the panel's time because a breach in the pressure boundary is necessary to release fission products to the confinement. The accidents of interest involved a vessel or pipe break, a safety valve opening with or without sticking, or leak of some kind. Two generic scenarios were selected as postulated accidents: (1) the pressurized loss-of-forced circulation (P-LOFC) accident, and (2) the depressurized loss-of-forced circulation (D-LOFC) accidents. FPT is not an accident driver; it is the result of an accident, and the PIRT was broken down into a two-part task. First, normal operation was seen as the initial starting point for the analysis. Fission products will be released by the fuel and distributed throughout the reactor circuit in some fashion. Second, a primary circuit breach can then lead to their release. It is the magnitude of the release into and out of the confinement that is of interest. Depending on the design of a confinement or containment, the impact of a pressure boundary breach can be minimized if a modest, but not excessively large, fission product attenuation factor can be introduced into the release path. This exercise has identified a host of material properties, thermofluid states, and physics models that must be collected, defined, and understood to evaluate this attenuation factor. The assembled PIRT table underwent two iterations with extensive reorganization between meetings. Generally, convergence was obtained on most issues, but different approaches to the specific physics and transport paths shade the answers accordingly. The reader should be cautioned that merely selecting phenomena based on high importance and low knowledge may not capture the true uncertainty of the situation. This is because a transport path is composed of several serial linkages, each with its own uncertainty. The propagation of a chain of modest uncertainties can lead to a very large uncertainty at the end of a long path, resulting in a situation that is of little regulatory guidance.

Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Lessons Learned from Three Mile Island Packaging, Transportation and Disposition that Apply to Fukushima Daiichi Recovery  

SciTech Connect

Following the massive earthquake and resulting tsunami damage in March of 2011 at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, interest was amplified for what was done for recovery at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) in the United States following its meltdown in 1979. Many parallels could be drawn between to two accidents. This paper presents the results of research done into the TMI-2 recovery effort and its applicability to the Fukushima Daiichi cleanup. This research focused on three topics: packaging, transportation, and disposition. This research work was performed as a collaboration between Japans Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Hundreds of TMI-2 related documents were searched and pertinent information was gleaned from these documents. Other important information was also obtained by interviewing employees who were involved first hand in various aspects of the TMI-2 cleanup effort. This paper is organized into three main sections: (1) Transport from Three Mile Island to Central Facilities Area at INL, (2) Transport from INL Central Receiving Facility to INL Test Area North (TAN) and wet storage at TAN, and (3) Transport from TAN to INL Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) and Dry Storage at INTEC. Within each of these sections, lessons learned from performing recovery activities are presented and their applicability to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant cleanup are outlined.

Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze; Dr. Koji Shirai

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

FAQ 29-What are the risks from accidents involving depleted uranium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The most immediate hazard after a release would be from inhalation of hydrogen fluoride (HF), a highly corrosive gas formed when UF6 reacts with moisture in air. Exposure to...

170

Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidently exposed to fallout radiation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical Team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Noteworthy has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

Conard, R.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

NRC ISSUES REPORT FOR COMMENT ON SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL TRANSPORTATION CASK RESPONSE TO CALDECOTT TUNNEL FIRE SCENARIO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is seeking public comment on a study of how a truck cask for transporting spent nuclear fuel might perform in a severe tunnel fire. The report models the performance of the NAC International Model LWT (NAC) spent fuel cask under the conditions of the April 1982 fire in the Caldecott highway tunnel near Oakland, Calif., when a gasoline tanker carrying 8,800 gallons of gasoline overturned and caught fire. Severe, intense fires such as the Caldecott fire are extremely rare. However, they provide an opportunity to study how transportation packages might perform under very severe accident conditions. The results of this study strongly indicate that any radioactive release from the NAC model or a similar spent fuel shipping cask involved in a severe tunnel fire such as that of the Caldecott highway tunnel accident would be within regulatory limits. The peak internal temperatures predicted for the NAC cask in the analysis of the Caldecott fire scenario were not high enough to result in rupture of the fuel cladding (protective metal tubing around the fuel). Therefore, it would not be expected that any radioactive material (including spent nuclear fuel particles or fission products) would be released from the fuel rods. The maximum cask temperatures experienced around the lid, vent and drain ports exceeded the

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Transportation Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to systematically identify and examine possible near and long-term ecological and environmental effects from the production of hydrogen from various energy sources based on the DOE hydrogen production strategy and the use of that hydrogen in transportation applications. This project uses state-of-the-art numerical modeling tools of the environment and energy system emissions in combination with relevant new and prior measurements and other analyses to assess the understanding of the potential ecological and environmental impacts from hydrogen market penetration. H2 technology options and market penetration scenarios will be evaluated using energy-technology-economics models as well as atmospheric trace gas projections based on the IPCC SRES scenarios including the decline in halocarbons due to the Montreal Protocol. Specifically we investigate the impact of hydrogen releases on the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, the long-term stability of the ozone layer due to changes in hydrogen emissions, the impact of hydrogen emissions and resulting concentrations on climate, the impact on microbial ecosystems involved in hydrogen uptake, and criteria pollutants emitted from distributed and centralized hydrogen production pathways and their impacts on human health, air quality, ecosystems, and structures under different penetration scenarios

Wuebbles, D.J.; Dubey, M.K., Edmonds, J.; Layzell, D.; Olsen, S.; Rahn, T.; Rocket, A.; Wang, D.; Jia, W.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Severe Accident Studies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment Technical Standards, Guidance on MACCS2 Computer Code - June 30, 2004 Technical Standards, DOE-STD-101-92 - June 24, 1996...

174

Radionuclide deposition and exposure in the Federal Republic of Germany after the Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect

Analyses of air, water, and foodstuff samples, together with in situ gamma spectrometric measurements in the Federal Republic of Germany, have documented the deposition and exposure consequences of the Chernobyl accident. In some cases, exposure values are significantly higher than background levels. Data compiled for the period from the initial identification of excess atmospheric radioactivity to the present, represent a unique resource for testing and validating models of environmental transport and human exposure. These data will serve as the bases for future studies of organism response, both somatic and genetic, to nuclear radiation. They will also prove useful in suggesting modifications to environmental sampling and monitoring systems. 14 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

Winkelmann, I.; Haubelt, R.; Neumann, P.; Fields, D.E. (Bundesgesundheitsamt, Neuherberg (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Strahlenhygiene; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

TMI-2 accident: core heat-up analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes NSAC study of reactor core thermal conditions during the accident at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. The study focuses primarily on the time period from core uncovery (approximately 113 minutes after turbine trip) through the initiation of sustained high pressure injection (after 202 minutes). The transient analysis is based upon established sequences of events; plant data; post-accident measurements; interpretation or indirect use of instrument responses to accident conditions.

Ardron, K.H.; Cain, D.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Chernobyl Studies Project: Working group 7.0, Environmental transport and health effects. Progress report, March--September 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In April 1988, the US and the former-USSR signed a Memorandum of Cooperation (MOC) for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety; this MOC was a direct result of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit 4 and the following efforts by the two countries to implement a joint program to improve the safety of nuclear power plants and to understand the implications of environmental releases. A Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS) was formed to implement the MOC. The JCCCNRS established many working groups; most of these were the responsibility of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, as far as the US participation was concerned. The lone exception was Working Group 7 on Environmental Transport and Health Effects, for which the US participation was the responsibility of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of Working Group 7 was succintly stated to be, ``To develop jointly methods to project rapidly the health effects of any future nuclear reactor accident.`` To implement the work DOE then formed two subworking groups: 7.1 to address Environmental Transport and 7.2 to address Health Effects. Thus, the DOE-funded Chernobyl Studies Project began. The majority of the initial tasks for this project are completed or near completion. The focus is now turned to the issue of health effects from the Chernobyl accident. Currently, we are involved in and making progress on the case-control and co-hort studies of thyroid diseases among Belarussian children. Dosimetric aspects are a fundamental part of these studies. We are currently working to implement similar studies in Ukraine. A major part of the effort of these projects is supporting these studies, both by providing methods and applications of dose reconstruction and by providing support and equipment for the medical teams.

Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M. [eds.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Preliminary dose assessment of the Chernobyl accident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the major accident at Unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power station, a plume of airborne radioactive fission products was initially carried northwesterly toward Poland, thence toward Scandinavia and into Central Europe. Reports of the levels of radioactivity in a variety of media and of external radiation levels were collected in the Department of Energy's Emergency Operations Center and compiled into a data bank. Portions of these and other data which were obtained directly from published and official reports were utilized to make a preliminary assessment of the extent and magnitude of the external dose to individuals downwind from Chernobyl. Radioactive /sup 131/I was the predominant fission product. The time of arrival of the plume and the maximum concentrations of /sup 131/I in air, vegetation and milk and the maximum reported depositions and external radiation levels have been tabulated country by country. A large amount of the total activity in the release was apparently carried to a significant elevation. The data suggest that in areas where rainfall occurred, deposition levels were from ten to one-hundred times those observed in nearby ''dry'' locations. Sufficient spectral data were obtained to establish average release fractions and to establish a reference spectra of the other nuclides in the release. Preliminary calculations indicated that the collective dose equivalent to the population in Scandinavia and Central Europe during the first year after the Chernobyl accident would be about 8 x 10/sup 6/ person-rem. From the Soviet report, it appears that a first year population dose of about 2 x 10/sup 7/ person-rem (2 x 10/sup 5/ Sv) will be received by the population who were downwind of Chernobyl within the U.S.S.R. during the accident and its subsequent releases over the following week. 32 refs., 14 figs., 20 tabs.

Hull, A.P.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RMIR (Radioactive Materials Incident Report) Database Transportation RMIR (Radioactive Materials Incident Report) Database Transportation Accident and Incident Experience,1971-1999 Access Hazardous Materials Information System (HMIS) the primary source of national data for the Federal, state, and local governmental agencies responsible for the safety of hazardous materials transportation. Rail Transport Highway Transport Air Transport The Radioactive Material Incident Report (RMIR) Database was developed in 1981 at the Transportation Technology Center of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to support its research and development activities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This database contains information about radioactive materials transportation incidents that have occurred in the U.S. from 1971 through 1999. These data were drawn from the U.S.

179

TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Waste Management » Packaging and Transportation » Services » Waste Management » Packaging and Transportation » Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program » TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) Once the jurisdiction has completed an evaluation of their plans and procedures, they will need to address any gaps in training. To assist, TEPP has developed the Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) program. MERRTT provides fundamental knowledge for responding to transportation incidents involving radiological material and builds on training in existing hazardous materials curricula. MERRTT satisfies the training requirements outlined in the Waste Isolation Pilot

180

Accident source terms for boiling water reactors with high burnup cores.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this report is to provide the technical basis for development of recommendations for updates to the NUREG-1465 Source Term for BWRs that will extend its applicability to accidents involving high burnup (HBU) cores. However, a secondary objective is to re-examine the fundamental characteristics of the prescription for fission product release to containment described by NUREG-1465. This secondary objective is motivated by an interest to understand the extent to which research into the release and behaviors of radionuclides under accident conditions has altered best-estimate calculations of the integral response of BWRs to severe core damage sequences and the resulting radiological source terms to containment. This report, therefore, documents specific results of fission product source term analyses that will form the basis for the HBU supplement to NUREG-1465. However, commentary is also provided on observed differences between the composite results of the source term calculations performed here and those reflected NUREG-1465 itself.

Gauntt, Randall O.; Powers, Dana Auburn; Leonard, Mark Thomas

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Bounding Radionuclide Inventory and Accident Consequence Calculation for the 1L Target  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bounding radionuclide inventory for the tungsten of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) IL Target is calculated. Based on the bounding inventory, the dose resulting from the maximum credible incident (MCI) is calculated for the maximally exposed offsite individual (MEOl). The design basis accident involves tungsten target oxidation following a loss of cooling accident. Also calculated for the bounding radionuclide inventory is the ratio to the LANSCE inventory threshold for purposes of inventory control as described in the target inventory control policy. A bounding radionuclide inventory calculation for the lL Target was completed using the MCNPX and CINDER'90 codes. Continuous beam delivery at 200 {micro}A to 2500 mA{center_dot}h was assumed. The total calculated activity following this irradiation period is 205,000 Ci. The dose to the MEOI from the MCI is 213 mrem for the bounding inventory. The LANSCE inventory control threshold ratio is 132.

Kelsey, Charles T. IV [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Severe Accident Analysis for PHEBUS FPT0 Experiment with Code ICARE2  

SciTech Connect

The PHEBUS Fission Product (FP) program was initiated to understand the phenomena involved in LWR severe accidents and validation of severe accident physical models. The code ICARE2 was developed at IRSN and validation program of this code against several tests has been carried out over the years. In continuation to the validation exercises for further improvement of the code understanding and predictions, a series of sensitivity study has been carried out for FPT0 test. The study has been carried out with an ICARE2 specific reference model. With the understanding gained from this study, a best estimate model has been developed for a better code prediction. The best estimate model predicts well the key parameters and degradation in the upper part is predicted well than the reference model. (authors)

Mukhopadhyay, D. [Reactor Safety Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Engg. Hall-7, Mumbai 400085 (India); Repetto, G.; Luez, O. De.; Chatelard, P. [Institut de Radioprotection et Surete Nucleaire, 13115 Saint Paul Les Durance, Cadarache (France)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Sec. Herrington Leads Delegation in Response to Chernobyl Accident...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sec. Herrington Leads Delegation in Response to Chernobyl Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

184

Median Light Rail Crossing: Accident Causation And Countermeasures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integration of Light Rail Transit Into City Streets. TCRPInfluencing Safety at Highway-Rail Grade Crossings. InK. , W. Hucke and W. Berg. Rail Highway Crossing Accident

Coifman, Benjamin; Bertini, Robert L.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Next-generation nuclear fuel withstands high-temperature accident...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(more than 200 degrees Celsius greater than postulated accident conditions) most fission products remained inside the fuel particles, which each boast their own primary...

186

HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In) Symposium on Nuclear Reactor Safety: Perspective. Ahealth effects of the nuclear reactor accident at Three Mile50-mile radius of the nuclear reactor site, approximately

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Baseline requirements of the proposed action for the Transportation Management Division routing models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential impacts associated with the transportation of hazardous materials are important to shippers, carriers, and the general public. This is particularly true for shipments of radioactive material. The shippers are primarily concerned with safety, security, efficiency, and equipment requirements. The carriers are concerned with the potential impact that radioactive shipments may have on their operations--particularly if such materials are involved in an accident. The general public has also expressed concerns regarding the safety of transporting radioactive and other hazardous materials through their communities. Because transportation routes are a central concern in hazardous material transport, the prediction of likely routes is the first step toward resolution of these issues. In response to these routing needs, several models have been developed over the past fifteen years at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The HIGHWAY routing model is used to predict routes for truck transportation, the INTERLINE routing model is used to predict both rail and barge routes, and the AIRPORT locator model is used to determine airports with specified criteria near a specific location. As part of the ongoing improvement of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Management Transportation Management Division`s (EM-261) computer systems and development efforts, a Baseline Requirements Assessment Session on the HIGHWAY, INTERLINE, and AIRPORT models was held at ORNL on April 27, 1994. The purpose of this meeting was to discuss the existing capabilities of the models and data bases and to review enhancements of the models and data bases to expand their usefulness. The results of the Baseline Requirements Assessment Section will be discussed in this report. The discussions pertaining to the different models are contained in separate sections.

Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Preliminary analysis of loss-of-coolant accident in Fukushima nuclear accident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) especially on Fukushima Nuclear Accident will be discussed in this paper. The Tohoku earthquake triggered the shutdown of nuclear power reactors at Fukushima Nuclear Power station. Though shutdown process has been completely performed, cooling process, at much smaller level than in normal operation, is needed to remove decay heat from the reactor core until the reactor reach cold-shutdown condition. If LOCA happen at this condition, it will cause the increase of reactor fuel and other core temperatures and can lead to reactor core meltdown and exposure of radioactive material to the environment such as in the Fukushima Dai Ichi nuclear accident case. In this study numerical simulation has been performed to calculate pressure composition, water level and temperature distribution on reactor during this accident. There are two coolant regulating system that operational on reactor unit 1 at this accident, Isolation Condensers (IC) system and Safety Relief Valves (SRV) system. Average mass flow of steam to the IC system in this event is 10 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 3,2 hours and fully uncovered in 4,7 hours later. There are two coolant regulating system at operational on reactor unit 2, Reactor Core Isolation Condenser (RCIC) System and Safety Relief Valves (SRV). Average mass flow of coolant that correspond this event is 20 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 73 hours and fully uncovered in 75 hours later. There are three coolant regulating system at operational on reactor unit 3, Reactor Core Isolation Condenser (RCIC) system, High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) system and Safety Relief Valves (SRV). Average mass flow of water that correspond this event is 15 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 37 hours and fully uncovered in 40 hours later.

Su'ud, Zaki; Anshari, Rio [Nuclear and Biophysics Research Group, Dept. of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl.Ganesha 10, Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

189

MELCOR Simulation of the TMI-2 Severe Accident and Initial Recovery Phases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MELCOR has become the preferred code package within the Swiss nuclear community for severe accident analysis of nuclear power plants, on account of its integrated systems-level approach and validation against experiments and more detailed codes. The present work extends previous MELCOR analysis at PSI from when a site emergency was declared, 18000 s, through to 70000 s, a point where recovery actions were initiated that eventually proved sufficient to restore the reactor to a safe and stable state. It arises out of a programme to assess MELCOR independently using empirical data consistent with the recommendations of the OECD/CSNI validation matrix for core degradation codes. It is the first successful attempt to simulate the whole plant sequence through to the recovery phase. The calculations were performed with code version 1.8.5RD, starting with the model for phases 1 to 4 reported at ICAPP-05. This was extended with a representation of the fission product release and transport pathways, and of the containment, as well as for the extended time period analysed, the so-called phase 5. Reference was made to original sources to obtain the appropriate time-dependent boundary conditions. This paper compares the results of the calculations with observed and deduced data for major accident signatures such as primary system pressure, hot leg temperatures; liquid levels in the vessel and in the pressurizer, and fission product release. The results show that the code can give a credible account of the accident, when reasonable assumptions are made regarding the input where uncertainties exist. The analysis therefore supports the use of the MELCOR-based strategy for severe accident plant transient analysis in Switzerland. Finally, observations are made regarding recent improvements in the code, on which further assessment will concentrate. (authors)

Haste, T.; Birchley, J. [Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Cazzoli, E.; Vitazkova, J. [Cazzoli Consulting, Wiesenweg 14, 5415 Nussbaumen (Switzerland)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Analysis of the risk of transporting spent nuclear fuel by train  

SciTech Connect

This report uses risk analyses to analyze the safety of transporting spent nuclear fuel for commercial rail shipping systems. The rail systems analyzed are those expected to be used in the United States when the total electricity-generating capacity by nuclear reactors is 100 GW in the late 1980s. Risk as used in this report is the product of the probability of a release of material to the environment and the consequences resulting from the release. The analysis includes risks in terms of expected fatalities from release of radioactive materials due to transportation accidents involving PWR spent fuel shipped in rail casks. The expected total risk from such shipments is 1.3 x 10/sup -4/ fatalities per year. Risk spectrums are developed for shipments of spent fuel that are 180 days and 4 years out-of-reactor. The risk from transporting spent fuel by train is much less (by 2 to 4 orders of magnitude) than the risk to society from other man-caused events such as dam failure.

Elder, H.K.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight and passenger rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous

192

Variable selection and ranking for analyzing automobile traffic accident data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variable ranking and feature selection are important concepts in data mining and machine learning. This paper introduces a new variable ranking technique named Sum Max Gain Ratio (SMGR). The new technique is evaluated within the domain of traffic accident ... Keywords: decision tree, traffic accident data, variable and feature selection, variable ranking

Huanjing Wang; Allen Parrish; Randy K. Smith; Susan Vrbsky

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Evaluation of Accident Frequencies at the Canister Storage Bldg (CSB)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By using simple frequency calculations and fault tree logic, an evaluation of the design basis accident frequencies at the Canister Storage Building has been performed. The following are the design basis accidents: Mechanical damage of MCO; Gaseous release from the MCO; MCO internal hydrogen deflagration; MCO external hydrogen deflagration; Thermal runaway reactions inside the MCO; and Violation of design temperature criteria.

POWERS, T.B.

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

194

Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provided the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report''. All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.

CROWE, R.D.; PIEPHO, M.G.

2000-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

195

Assessment of Existing Plant Instrumentation for Severe Accident Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During an accident, information would be needed for diagnosing a plant's status and confirming its response to mitigative actions. It is important to determine the information necessary for severe accident management and to ensure that this information could be derived from plant instrumentation.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Web Based Course: SAF-230DE, Accident Investigation Overview Promotional Video  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This course that provides an overview of the fundamentals of accident investigation. The course is intended to meet the every five year refresher training requirement for DOE Federal Accident Investigators under DOE O 225.1B, Accident Investigations.

197

Road Transportation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The recession of the early 1990s marked the starting point for a transformation of the Swedish transportation industry. Cost oriented production techniques by the (more)

Gudmundsson, Erik

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Transportation Revolution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To transform the vehicle sector, the U.S. auto manufacturing industry is actively developing new technologies and products. This transportation revolution will also affect...

199

Transportation Security  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

For Review Only 1 Transportation Security Draft Annotated Bibliography Review July 2007 Preliminary Draft - For Review Only 2 Work Plan Task * TEC STG Work Plan, dated 8206,...

200

WIPP Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transuranic Waste Transportation Container Documents Documents related to transuranic waste containers and packages. CBFO Tribal Program Information about WIPP shipments across...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

UNEP-Low Carbon Transport in India | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in India in India Jump to: navigation, search Name UNEP-Low Carbon Transport in India Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Transportation Topics Low emission development planning Website http://www.unep.org/transport/ Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country India Southern Asia References Low Carbon Transport in India[1] UNEP-Low Carbon Transport in India Screenshot "India is currently the fourth largest greenhouse gas (GHG) emitter in the world, with its transport sector being the second largest contributor of CO2 emissions. The sector also provokes road congestion, local air pollution, noise and accidents, particularly in urban areas. Opportunities exist to make India's transport growth more sustainable by

202

MELCOR accident analysis for ARIES-ACT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We model a loss of flow accident (LOFA) in the ARIES-ACT1 tokamak design. ARIES-ACT1 features an advanced SiC blanket with LiPb as coolant and breeder, a helium cooled steel structural ring and tungsten divertors, a thin-walled, helium cooled vacuum vessel, and a room temperature water-cooled shield outside the vacuum vessel. The water heat transfer system is designed to remove heat by natural circulation during a LOFA. The MELCOR model uses time-dependent decay heats for each component determined by 1-D modeling. The MELCOR model shows that, despite periodic boiling of the water coolant, that structures are kept adequately cool by the passive safety system.

Paul W. Humrickhouse; Brad J. Merrill

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Angular dependence of a simple accident dosimeter  

SciTech Connect

A simple dosimeter made of a sulfur tablet, bare and cadmium covered indium foils and a cadmium covered copper foil has been modeled using MCNP5. Studies of the model without phantom or other confounding factors have shown that the cross sections and fluence-to-dose factors generated by the Monte Carlo method agree with those generated by analytic expressions for the high energy component. The threshold cross sections for the detectors on a phantom were calculated. The resulting doses assigned agree well with exposures made to three critical assemblies. In this study the angular dependence on a phantom is studied and compared with measurements taken on the GODIVA reactor. The dosimeter positions on the phantom are facing the source, on the back and the side. In previous papers the modeling of a simple dosimeter made of a sulfur tablet, bare and cadmium covered indium foils and a cadmium covered copper foil has been modeled using MCNP5. The conclusion made was that most of the neutron dose from criticality assemblies results from the high energy neutron fluences determined by the sulfur and indium detectors. The results using doses measured from the GODIVA, SHEBA, and bare and lead shielded SILENE reactors confirmed this. The angular dependence of an accident dosemeter is of interest in evaluating the exposure of personnel. To investigate this effect accident dosemeters were placed on a phantom and exposed to the GODIVA reactor at phantom orientations of 0{sup o}, 45{sup o}, 90{sup o}, 135{sup o}, and 180{sup o} to the assembly center line.

Devine, R. T. (Robert T.); Romero, L. L. (Leonard L.); Olsher, R. H. (Richard H.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace system for high temperature performance testing of VHTR fuel  

SciTech Connect

The AGR-1 irradiation of TRISO-coated particle fuel specimens was recently completed and represents the most successful such irradiation in US history, reaching peak burnups of greater than 19% FIMA with zero failures out of 300,000 particles. An extensive post-irradiation examination (PIE) campaign will be conducted on the AGR-1 fuel in order to characterize the irradiated fuel properties, assess the in-pile fuel performance in terms of coating integrity and fission metals release, and determine the fission product retention behavior during high temperature safety testing. A new furnace system has been designed, built, and tested to perform high temperature accident tests. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system is designed to heat fuel specimens at temperatures up to 2000 degrees C in helium while monitoring the release of volatile fission metals (e.g. Cs, Ag, Sr, and Eu), iodine, and fission gases (Kr, Xe). Fission gases released from the fuel to the sweep gas are monitored in real time using dual cryogenic traps fitted with high purity germanium detectors. Condensable fission products are collected on a plate attached to a water-cooled cold finger that can be exchanged periodically without interrupting the test. Analysis of fission products on the condensation plates involves dry gamma counting followed by chemical analysis of selected isotopes. This paper will describe design and operational details of the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system and the associated fission gas monitoring system, as well as preliminary system calibration results.

Paul A. Demkowicz; David V. Laug; Dawn M. Scates; Edward L. Reber; Lyle G. Roybal; John B. Walter; Jason M. Harp; Robert N. Morris

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Transportation Institutional Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Institutional Plan is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 provides background information, discusses the purposes of the Plan and the policy guidance for establishing the transportation system, and describes the projected system and the plans for its integrated development. Chapter 2 discusses the major participants who must interact to build the system. Chapter 3 suggests mechanisms for interaction that will foster wide participation in program planning and implementation and provides a framework for managing and resolving the issues related to development and operation of the transportation system. A list of acronyms and a glossary are included for the reader's convenience. Also included in this Plan are four appendices. Of particular importance is Appendix A, which includes detailed discussion of specific transportation issues. Appendices B, C, and D provide supporting material to assist the reader in understanding the roles of the involved institutions.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Calculation notes in support of TWRS FSAR spray leak accident analysis  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the detailed calculations that support the spray leak accident analysis in the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The consequence analyses in this document form the basis for the selection of controls to mitigate or prevent spray leaks throughout TWRS. Pressurized spray leaks can occur due to a breach in containment barriers along transfer routes, during waste transfers. Spray leaks are of particular safety concern because, depending on leak dimensions, and waste pressure, they can be relatively efficient generators of dispersible sized aerosols that can transport downwind to onsite and offsite receptors. Waste is transferred between storage tanks and between processing facilities and storage tanks in TWRS through a system of buried transfer lines. Pumps for transferring waste and jumpers and valves for rerouting waste are located inside below grade pits and structures that are normally covered. Pressurized spray leaks can emanate to the atmosphere due to breaches in waste transfer associated equipment inside these structures should the structures be uncovered at the time of the leak. Pressurized spray leaks can develop through holes or cracks in transfer piping, valve bodies or pump casings caused by such mechanisms as corrosion, erosion, thermal stress, or water hammer. Leaks through degraded valve packing, jumper gaskets, or pump seals can also result in pressurized spray releases. Mechanisms that can degrade seals, packing and gaskets include aging, radiation hardening, thermal stress, etc. An1782other common cause for spray leaks inside transfer enclosures are misaligned jumpers caused by human error. A spray leak inside a DST valve pit during a transfer of aging waste was selected as the bounding, representative accident for detailed analysis. Sections 2 through 5 below develop this representative accident using the DOE- STD-3009 format. Sections 2 describes the unmitigated and mitigated accident scenarios evaluated to determine the need for safety class SSCs or TSR controls. Section 3 develops the source terms associated with the unmitigated and mitigated accident scenarios. Section 4 estimates the radiological and toxicological consequences for the unmitigated and mitigated scenarios. Section 5 compares the radiological and toxicological consequences against the TWRS evaluation guidelines. Section 6 extrapolates from the representative accident case to other represented spray leak sites to assess the conservatism in using the representative case to define controls for other postulated spray leak sites throughout TWRS. Section 7 discusses the sensitivities of the consequence analyses to the key parameters and assumptions used in the analyses. Conclusions are drawn in Section 8. The analyses herein pertain to spray leaks initiated due to internal mechanisms (e.g., corrosion, erosion, thermal stress, etc). External initiators of spray leaks (e.g., excavation accidents), and natural phenomena initiators (e.g., seismic events) are to be covered in separate accident analyses.

Hall, B.W.

1996-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

207

Status of ANL out-of-pile investigations of severe accident phenomena for liquid metal reactors  

SciTech Connect

Research addressing LMFBR whole core accidents has been terminated, and there is now emphasis on quantifying reactivity feedbacks, and in particular enhancing negative feedback, so that advanced LMR designs will provide inherently safe operation. The status of recent HCDA-related laboratory research performed at ANL, up to the time that such activities were no longer needed to support CRBR licensing, is described. Included are descriptions of programs addressing sodium channel voiding, fuel sweepout, fuel dispersal and plugging, boiled-up pool, UO/sub 2//sodium FCI, and debris coolability. Descriptions of recent investigations involving the metal fuel/sodium system are also included.

Spencer, B.W.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Anderson, R.P.; Armstrong, D.R.; Baker, L.; Cho, D.H.; Gabor, J.D.; Pedersen, D.R.; Sienicki, J.J.; Stein, R.P.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Social aspects of transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The social costs and benefits of roads are not evident. They will undoubtedly vary by gender, age, occupation and location of the road user. Thus, before measurement procedures can be considered, the range of social costs and benefits of roads have to be identified and categorised. In the Scoping Paper provided for authors, a number of key questions and issues are identified, to be probed. PART ONE Before addressing those, however, it is important, I suggest, to go back to basics and ask ourselves what is transport for? and how best can the economic, social and other objectives identified be achieved, before we proceed to more specific questions as to the identification and appraisal of social benefits and costs of road transport. Then I consider briefly a range of specific issues which seem to me to be worth commenting on, before turning to the specific questions and issues raised by the Scoping Paper. 1. Why transport? Transport is a means to specific ends. It is ultimately to improve peoples lives and livelihoods of people. The essential feature of transport development should be: to reduce the time and energy spent on- and thus the cost of- travel and the transport of goods; and thereby to improve peoples access to resources, people, goods, opportunities, markets and services including the provision of information- they value. The issue of identifying and assessing costs and benefits should, therefore, be framed within this broader framework: what are the costs and benefits of different means of improving access to whatever it is that people value. This suggests, immediately two important points: first, that improving access may not involve improving road transport it may imply other means of transport, other means of transmitting information, or even other development interventions; and second, that one crucial component of any form of assessment of costs and benefits must be what people themselves value. Before we become deeply involved in identifying and appraising the costs and benefits of road transport or more appropriately of various alternative 1

David Seddon

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Transportation Market Distortions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Highways, Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Evaluating Criticism of Transportation Costing, VictoriaFrom Here: Evaluating Transportation Diversity, Victoria

Litman, Todd

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Defense Transportation - Center for Transportation Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Defense Transportation The Center for Transportation Analysis provides analytical, planning, and operational support to defense transportation related projects. This includes the...

211

Investigation of Strategies for Mitigating Radiological Releases in Severe Accidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fukushima Dai-ichi accident highlights the need to reduce the magnitude of radioactive fission product releases from BWR Mark I and II containments following beyond-design-basis events. There is no evidence that this accident has a long-term effect on public health and safety; however, the Fukushima Dai-ichi accident did result in widespread contamination of surrounding areas, both on-site and off-site. This report assesses various strategies that can be used to maintain BWR Mark I and II ...

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

212

Severe accident sequences analyzed for a two-loop PWR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Different severe accident sequences have been analyzed for a two-loop Westinghouse pressurized water reactor (PWR) using the MELCOR code, version 1.8.4. The purpose of this study was to calculate source terms and the timing of events for severe accident sequences at this type of PWR to be used in the HAS-CAL code .The results calculated by MELCOR have been compared to results from the individual plant examination (IPE) of the Kewaunee nuclear power plant, also a two-loop Westinghouse PWR. The results of the Kewaunee IPE were obtained with the severe accident code MAAP.

Carbajo, J.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Thermal testing of packages for transport of radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect

Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be shown capable of surviving tests specified by regulations such as Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (called 10CFR71 in this paper) within the United States. Equivalent regulations hold for other countries such as Safety Series 6 issued by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The containers must be shown to be capable of surviving, in order, drop tests, puncture tests, and thermal tests. Immersion testing in water is also required, but must be demonstrated for undamaged packages. The thermal test is intended to simulate a 30 minute exposure to a fully engulfing pool fire that could occur if a transport accident involved the spill of large quantities of hydrocarbon fuels. Various qualification methods ranging from pure analysis to actual pool fire tests have been used to prove regulatory compliance. The purpose of this paper is to consider the alternatives for thermal testing, point out the strengths and weaknesses of each approach, and to provide the designer with the information necessary to make informed decisions on the proper test program for the particular shipping container under consideration. While thermal analysis is an alternative to physical testing, actual testing is often emphasized by regulators, and this report concentrates on these testing alternatives.

Koski, J.A.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Dose to man from a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident at the Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the request of the Sacramento Municipal Utilities District, we used our computer codes, MATHEW and ADPIC, to assess the environmental impact of a loss-of-coolant accident at the Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Plant, about 40 kilometres southeast of Sacramento, California. Meteorological input was selected so that the effluent released by the accident would be transported over the Sacramento metropolitan area. With the release rates provided by the Sacramento Municipal Utilities District, we calculated the largest total dose for a 24-hour release as 70 rem about one kilometre northwest of the reactor. The largest total dose in the Sacramento metropolitan area is 780 millirem. Both doses are from iodine-131, via the forage-cow-milk pathway to an infant's thyroid. The largest dose near the nuclear plant can be minimized by replacing contaminated milk and by giving the cows dry feed. To our knowledge, there are no milk cows within the Sacramento metropolitan area.

Peterson, K.R.; Greenly, G.D.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Sustainable Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) leads U.S. researchers and other partners in making transportation cleaner and more efficient through solutions that put electric drive...

216

electrifyingthefuture transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

programme of electrification and the potential introduction of diesel hybrids. The Department for Transport vehicles Wind turbine systems Industrial equipment The lab has full ethernet capability which will enable

Birmingham, University of

217

Transportation Network Modeling in Passenger Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Summary & Future work 2 #12;NETPLAN Energy and Transportation Integration model A modeling frameworkTransportation Network Modeling in NETPLAN Passenger Transportation Venkat Krishnan Eirini;Outline 1. Introduction to NETPLAN 2. Transportation modeling- A review Freight Passenger 3. Developed

Daniels, Thomas E.

218

Failsafe : living with man-made disaster and accident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"There is no progress with out progress of the catastrophe." Virilio. This thesis project proposes that technological solutions in the design of our systems are not enough to prevent 'man-made' accident. Social, organisational ...

Higgins, Saoirse, 1966-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Environment/Health/Safety/Security (EHSS): Report an Accident...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report an Accident or Incident car and foot The law and DOE require prompt notification of all work-related EHS incidentsaccidents. Report all such events immediately to your...

220

HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

within 50 miles of the nuclear power plant was estimated tothe radiation from the nuclear power plant accident. From anand the Peach Bottom nuclear power plants, like the general

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Advanced Steels for Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding in Commercial ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or ... Analysis of the Fragmentation of AlON and Three MgAl2O4 Spinels under...

222

Structural evaluation of electrosleeved tubes under severe accident transients.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A flow stress model was developed for predicting failure of Electrosleeved PWR steam generator tubing under severe accident transients. The Electrosleeve, which is nanocrystalline pure nickel, loses its strength at temperatures greater than 400 C during severe accidents because of grain growth. A grain growth model and the Hall-Petch relationship were used to calculate the loss of flow stress as a function of time and temperature during the accident. Available tensile test data as well as high temperature failure tests on notched Electrosleeved tube specimens were used to derive the basic parameters of the failure model. The model was used to predict the failure temperatures of Electrosleeved tubes with axial cracks in the parent tube during postulated severe accident transients.

Majumdar, S.

1999-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

223

Analysis of containment performance and radiological consequences under severe accident conditions for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A severe accident study was conducted to evaluate conservatively scoped source terms and radiological consequences to support the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Conceptual Safety Analysis Report (CSAR). Three different types of severe accident scenarios were postulated with a view of evaluating conservatively scoped source terms. The first scenario evaluates maximum possible steaming loads and associated radionuclide transport, whereas the next scenario is geared towards evaluating conservative containment loads from releases of radionuclide vapors and aerosols with associated generation of combustible gases. The third scenario follows the prescriptions given by the 10 CFR 100 guidelines. It was included in the CSAR for demonstrating site-suitability characteristics of the ANS. Various containment configurations are considered for the study of thermal-hydraulic and radiological behaviors of the ANS containment. Severe accident mitigative design features such as the use of rupture disks were accounted for. This report describes the postulated severe accident scenarios, methodology for analysis, modeling assumptions, modeling of several severe accident phenomena, and evaluation of the resulting source term and radiological consequences.

Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Geometry features measurement of traffic accident for reconstruction based on close-range photogrammetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the feasibility of investigating a traffic accident and offering initial data for traffic accident reconstruction (TAR) using a photogrammetric technique. Compared with the conventional roller tape applied by the traffic police of ... Keywords: Accident reconstruction, Close-range photogrammetry, Direct linear transformation, Traffic accident scene, Vehicle deformation

Xinguang Du; Xianlong Jin; Xiaoyun Zhang; Jie Shen; Xinyi Hou

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are the requirements? What are the requirements? Safety Record Radioactive material has been shipped in the U. S. for more than 50 years with no occurrences of death or serious injury from exposure of the contents of these shipments. Hazardous Material Shipments for 1 Year Internationally 300 million United States 3 million DOE <1% or 5,000 (out of 3 million) [U.S. DOE NTP, 1999, Transporting Radioactive Materials] All radioactive shipments are regulated by the Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Since transport accidents cannot be prevented, the regulations are primarily designed to: Insure safety in routine handling situations for minimally hazardous material Insure integrity under all circumstances for highly dangerous materials

226

submitted to Transportation Quarterly corresponding author:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study evaluates the full cost of three modes of intercity transportation: air, highway, and high speed rail for the California Corridor, connecting the Los Angeles Basin and the San Francisco Bay Area in order to compare the economic implications of investment in, or expansion of, any of these three modes. In this study we include estimates of four types of external, social costs: accidents, congestion, noise, and air pollution. Based on the results, we find that the full cost of air transportation for the California Corridor ($0.1315 per passenger-kilometer traveled (pkt)) is significantly less costly than the other two modes. High speed rail and highway transportation have approximately the same full cost; rail costs $0.2350/pkt and highway costs $0.2302/pkt. However, the modes have a different distribution of internal and external costs, automobiles have the highest external costs while high speed rail has the highest internal costs.

David Levinson; Adib Kanafani; David Gillen; David Levinson

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Evaluation of Accident Frequencies at the Canister Storage Bldg (CSB)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By using the fault tree logic, an evaluation of the design basis accident frequencies at the Canister Storage Building has been performed. The evaluation demonstrates that due to low frequency of occurrences, the following design basis accidents are considered not credible (annual frequency of less than 10{sup -6}): Rearrangement of multidster overpack (MCO) internals; Gaseous release from the MCO; MCO internal hydrogen explosion; MCO external hydrogen explosion; Thermal runaway reactions inside the MCO; and Violation of design temperature criteria.

LIU, Y.J.

1999-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

228

Fallen conductor accidents: The challenge to improve safety  

SciTech Connect

What is the worst nightmare of an electric utility manager or engineer Many respond that it is an electrocution resulting from a fallen conductor accident. Few subjects in the operation of an electric utility are more emotional and sobering than this. Traditionally, a utility could do little to prevent such accidents, but some answers from research are emerging, calling for a new look at this old problem.

Aucoin, B.M.; Russell, B.D.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Trees as Filters of Radioactive Fallout from the Chernobyl Accident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is a copy of an unpublished study of the filtering effect of red maple trees (acer rubrum) on fission product fallout near Binghamton, NY, USA following the 1986 Chernobyl accident. The conclusions of this work may offer some insight into what is happening in the forests exposed to fallout from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant accident. This posting is in memory of Noel K. Yeh.

Brownridge, James D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP5) Applications Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP) is widely used throughout North America, Europe, and the Far East to analyze plant responses over a broad spectrum of potential accident conditions. The use of MAAP continues to increase because its representation of integral plant response and short run times make this program ideal for supporting engineering evaluations. With greater use, however, the level of detail to be represented within the reactor core, reactor coolant system (RCS), and containment has...

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

231

Study on drywell cooler applicability to severe accident management  

SciTech Connect

This paper concerns applicability of drywell cooler (DWC) heat removal under severe accident condition in BWR plants. Newly developed heat removal models based on DWC heat removal experiments were built into the MAAP3 code. And then, two types of Japanese BWR were selected to evaluate DWC heat removal performance under typical severe accident scenarios. According to the results of the evaluation, DWC delays or prevents containment failure or venting. (authors)

Nakagawa, Takahiro [Information and manufacturing systems division, Toshiba Plant Systems and Services Corporation, 8, Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama, 235-8523 (Japan); Akinaga, Makoto [Power and Industrial Systems R and D Center, Toshiba Corporation, 4-1 Ukishima-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki, 210-0862 (Japan); Hamazaki, Ryoichi [Isogo Nuclear Engineering Center, Toshiba Corporation, 8, Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama, 235-8523 (Japan); Matsuo, Toshihiro [Nuclear Power Engineering Department, Tokyo Electric Power Company, 1-3 Uchisaiwai-cho 1-chome, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0011 (Japan); Hashimoto, Kouji [Nuclear Plant Engineering Department, HITACHI, Ltd., 1-1, Saiwai-cho, 3-chome, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken, 317-8511 (Japan)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Evaluation of accident frequencies at the canister storage building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By using the fault tree logic, an evaluation of the design basis accident frequencies at the Canister Storage Building has been performed. The evaluation demonstrates that due to low frequency of occurrences, the following design basis accidents are considered not credible (annual frequency of less than 10{sup -6}): Rearrangement of multi-canister overpack (MCO) internals; Gaseous release from the MCO; MCO internal hydrogen explosion; MCO external hydrogen explosion; Thermal runaway reactions inside the MCO; and Violation of design temperature criteria.

LIU, Y.J.

1999-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

233

Pretreatment of coal during transport  

SciTech Connect

Many available coals are "caking coals" which possess the undesirable characteristic of fusing into a solid mass when heated through their plastic temperature range (about 400.degree. C.) which temperature range is involved in many common treatment processes such as gasification, hydrogenation, carbonization and the like. Unless the caking properties are first destroyed, the coal cannot be satisfactorily used in such processes. A process is disclosed herein for decaking finely divided coal during its transport to the treating zone by propelling the coal entrained in an oyxgen-containing gas through a heated transport pipe whereby the separate transport and decaking steps of the prior art are combined into a single step.

Johnson, Glenn E. (Pittsburgh, PA); Neilson, Harry B. (Clairton, PA); Forney, Albert J. (Coraopolis, PA); Haynes, William P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1977-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

234

Industry approach to seismic severe accident policy implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued a severe reactor accident policy for existing plants on August 8, 1985 which describes the formal basis by which the NRC intends to resolve issues related to potential severe reactor accidents. Examination of plant-specific vulnerabilities due to seismic and other externally initiated events was considered on a later schedule and is addressed in Supplement 4 of the NRC Generic Letter No. 88-20 and a NRC guidance document, NUREG-1407, issued in June 1991. This report was prepared to provide a coherent and effective approach for seismic severe accident review which meets the intent of Generic Letter No. 88-20, Supplement 4. The recommendations in this report provide guidance on plant review types and review implementations which is consistent with the limited-scope'' intent of systematic evaluations as described in the NRC's Severe Accident Policy Statement. In addition, to assist in implementing cost-effective modifications that reduce vulnerabilities, this report also presents specific guidelines for identification and treatment of vulnerabilities that may be used as a basis for defining closure of earthquake-related severe-accident issues. This report provides procedural instructions and guidance to support resolution of earthquake-related severe accident issues. More detailed background and technical justifications for the methods are documented elsewhere, and are referenced throughout this report as appropriate.

Reed, J.W. (Benjamin (Jack R.) and Associates, Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States)); O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)); Sewell, R.T.; Cornell, C.A. (Risk Engineering, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)); Buttemer, D.R. (Pickard, Lowe and Garrick, Inc., Encinitas, CA (United States)); Schmidt, W.R.; Freed, D.A. (MPR Associates, Inc., Washington, D

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Significant factors in rail freight accidents: A statistical analysis of predictive and severity indices in the FRA accident/incident data base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal Railroad Association maintains a file of carrier-reported accidents and incidents that meet threshold criteria for damage cost and/or casualties. Using a five year period from this data base, an investigation was conducted into the relationship between quantifiable risk factors and accident frequency and severity. Specific objectives were to identify key variables in accidents, formulate a model to predict future accidents, and assess the relative importance of these variables from the perspective of routing and shipping decision making. The temporal factors YEAR and MONTH were found to be significant predictors of risk; accident severity was greatest for accidents caused by track and roadbed defects. Train speed was an indicator of accident severity; track class and training tonnage were inversely proportional to accident severity. Investigation of the data base is continuing, with a final report expected by late summer. 15 refs., 1 fig., 10 tabs.

Lee, Tze-San; Saricks, C.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Workshop on Evaluation of uncertainties in Relation to severe accidents and level 2 PSA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The PSA2 work package (PSA2 WP) is a part of the Joined Programme Activity of the European Severe Accident Network (SARNET) related to level 2 PSA methodologies. The general objectives of this work package is to provide a comparison of the different methodologies used or under development for level 2 PSA application by the partners involved in the work package and to promote their harmonization. The PSA2 WP is organized into three main topics: methodologies in general, methodologies for uncertainties assessment, and dynamic reliability methods. The different tasks initially defined for these three topics are shortly described and the partners involved identified. Attention is then paid on the methodologies used so far by the different partners to assess the

Arges Romania

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Draft Transportation Institutional Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy recognizes that the success of its program to develop and implement a national system for nuclear waste management and disposal depends on broad-based public understanding and acceptance. While each program element has its particular sensitivity, the transportation of the waste may potentially affect the greatest number of people, and accordingly is highly visible and potentially issue-laden. Therefore, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has developed this Transportation Institutional Plan to lay the foundation for interaction among all interested parties for the purpose of identifying and resolving issues of concern. The Plan is divided into four chapters. Chapter 1 provides bachground information and discusses the purpose of the Plan and the policy guidance for establishing the transportation system. Chapter 2 introduces the major participants who must interact to build both the system itself and the consensus philosophy that is essential for effective operations. Chapter 3 suggests mechanisms for interaction that will ensure wide participation in program planning and implementation. And, finally, Chapter 4 suggests a framework for managing and resolving the issues related to development and operation of the transportation system. A list of acronyms and a glossary are included for the reader's convenience. The Plan's appendices provide supporting material to assist the reader in understanding the roles of the involved institutions. 4 figs., 1 tab.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Tobacco Industry Involvement in Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accessed May 25, 2004) Industry Summary. 1992 (est. ).11 May 2004) Tobacco Industry Involvement in Colorado Pageor (800) LUNG-USA. Tobacco Industry Involvement in Colorado

Landman, BA, Anne; Bialick, Peter

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

External costs of intercity truck freight transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From a societal perspective, it is desirable for all transportation users to pay their full social (private and external) costs. We estimate four general types of external costs for intercity freight trucking and compare them with the private costs incurred by carriers. Estimated external costs include: accidents (fatalities, injuries, and property damage); emissions (air pollution and greenhouse gases); noise; and unrecovered costs associated with the provision, operation, and maintenance of public facilities. The analysis reveals that external costs are equal to 13.2 % of private costs and user fees would need to be increased about

David J. Forkenbrock

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Transportation needs assessment: Emergency response section  

SciTech Connect

The transportation impacts of moving high level nuclear waste (HLNW) to a repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada are of concern to the residents of the State as well as to the residents of other states through which the nuclear wastes might be transported. The projected volume of the waste suggests that shipments will occur on a daily basis for some period of time. This will increase the risk of accidents, including a catastrophic incident. Furthermore, as the likelihood of repository construction and operation and waste shipments increase, so will the attention given by the national media. This document is not to be construed as a willingness to accept the HLNW repository on the part of the State. Rather it is an initial step in ensuring that the safety and well-being of Nevada residents and visitors and the State`s economy will be adequately addressed in federal decision-making pertaining to the transportation of HLNW into and across Nevada for disposal in the proposed repository. The Preferred Transportation System Needs Assessment identifies critical system design elements and technical and social issues that must be considered in conducting a comprehensive transportation impact analysis. Development of the needs assessment and the impact analysis is especially complex because of the absence of information and experience with shipping HLNW and because of the ``low probability, high consequence`` aspect of the transportation risk.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crush Comparison Puncture Comparison Fire Comparison Immersion Comparison Demonstrating target hardness. Comparison of the Free Drop Test to a Passenger Train and Semi-truck Trailer Collision Free Drop Test 3,000,000 lbs of force present in this package certification test. [DROP test] Click to view picture Real-life Accident Comparison 1,000,000 lbs of force present in this real-life accident. [DROP scenario] Click to view picture Real-life scenarios that are encompassed by the above test include: the package being struck by a train traveling 60 MPH the package falling off of a 30-foot high bridge onto solid rock or from a higher bridge onto a highway or railroad the package running into a bridge support or rock slope at 45 MPH. Packages are transported onboard trucks or rail cars, which absorb some of the impact energy, reducing the resulting damage to the packages from the accident. On May 2, 1995, an O&J Gordon Trucking Company truck consisting of a tractor and a lowbed semitrailer became lodged on a high-profile (hump) railroad grade crossing near Sycamore, South Carolina. About 35 minutes later, the truck was struck by southbound Amtrak train No. 81, Silver Star, en route from New York City to Tampa, Florida.

242

PNNL Results from 2010 CALIBAN Criticality Accident Dosimeter Intercomparison Exercise  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results of the Hanford personnel nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD) and fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD) during a criticality accident dosimeter intercomparison exercise at the CEA Valduc Center on September 20-23, 2010. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) participated in a criticality accident dosimeter intercomparison exercise at the Commissariat a Energie Atomique (CEA) Valduc Center near Dijon, France on September 20-23, 2010. The intercomparison exercise was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nuclear Criticality Safety Program, with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as the lead Laboratory. PNNL was one of six invited DOE Laboratory participants. The other participating Laboratories were: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Savannah River Site (SRS), the Y-12 National Security Complex at Oak Ridge, and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The goals of PNNL's participation in the intercomparison exercise were to test and validate the procedures and algorithm currently used for the Hanford personnel nuclear accident dosimeters (PNADs) on the metallic reactor, CALIBAN, to test exposures to PNADs from the side and from behind a phantom, and to test PNADs that were taken from a historical batch of Hanford PNADs that had varying degrees of degradation of the bare indium foil. Similar testing of the PNADs was done on the Valduc SILENE test reactor in 2009 (Hill and Conrady, 2010). The CALIBAN results are reported here.

Hill, Robin L.; Conrady, Matthew M.

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

243

Abrupt structural transitions involving functionally optimal networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show analytically that abrupt structural transitions can arise in functionally optimal networks, driven by small changes in the level of transport congestion. Our findings are based on an exactly solvable model system which mimics a variety of biological and social networks. Our results offer an explanation as to why such diverse sets of network structures arise in Nature (e.g. fungi) under essentially the same environmental conditions. As a by-product of this work, we introduce a novel renormalization scheme involving `cost motifs' which describes analytically the average shortest path across multiple-ring-and-hub networks.

Jarrett, T C; Fricker, M; Johnson, N F; Jarrett, Timothy C.; Ashton, Douglas J.; Fricker, Mark; Johnson, Neil F.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Abrupt structural transitions involving functionally optimal networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show analytically that abrupt structural transitions can arise in functionally optimal networks, driven by small changes in the level of transport congestion. Our findings are based on an exactly solvable model system which mimics a variety of biological and social networks. Our results offer an explanation as to why such diverse sets of network structures arise in Nature (e.g. fungi) under essentially the same environmental conditions. As a by-product of this work, we introduce a novel renormalization scheme involving `cost motifs' which describes analytically the average shortest path across multiple-ring-and-hub networks.

Timothy C. Jarrett; Douglas J. Ashton; Mark Fricker; Neil F. Johnson

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

Pomes, R.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Preliminary Design Report for Modeling of Hydrogen Uptake in Fuel Rod Cladding During Severe Accidents  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary designs are described for models of hydrogen and oxygen uptake in fuel rod cladding during severe accidents. Calculation of the uptake involves the modeling of seven processes: (1) diffusion of oxygen from the bulk gas into the boundary layer at the external cladding surface, (2) diffusion from the boundary layer into the oxide layer, (3) diffusion from the inner surface of the oxide layer into the metallic part of the cladding, (4) uptake of hydrogen in the event that the clad-ding oxide layer is dissolved in a steam-starved region, (5) embrittlement of cladding due to hydrogen uptake, (6) cracking of cladding during quenching due to its embrittlement and (7) release of hydrogen from the cladding after cracking of the cladding. An integral diffusion method is described for calculating the diffusion processes in the cladding. Experimental results are presented that show a rapid uptake of hydrogen in the event of dissolution of the oxide layer and a rapid release of hydrogen in the event of cracking of the oxide layer. These experimental results are used as a basis for calculating the rate of hydrogen uptake and the rate of hydrogen release. The uptake of hydrogen is limited to the equilibrium solubility calculated by applying Sievert's law. The uptake of hydrogen is an exothermic reaction that accelerates the heatup of a fuel rod. An embrittlement criteria is described that accounts for hydrogen and oxygen concentration and the extent of oxidation. A design is described for implementing the models for hydrogen and oxygen uptake and cladding embrittlement into the programming framework of the SCDAP/RELAP5 code. A test matrix is described for assessing the impact of the proposed models on the calculated behavior of fuel rods in severe accident conditions. This report is a revision and reissue of the report entitled; "Preliminary Design Report for Modeling of Hydrogen Uptake in Fuel Rod Cladding During Severe Accidents."

Siefken, Larry James

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

A DOE-STD-3009 hazard and accident analysis methodology for non-reactor nuclear facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates the use of appropriate consequence evaluation criteria in conjunction with generic likelihood of occurrence data to produce consistent hazard analysis results for nonreactor nuclear facility Safety Analysis Reports (SAR). An additional objective is to demonstrate the use of generic likelihood of occurrence data as a means for deriving defendable accident sequence frequencies, thereby enabling the screening of potentially incredible events (<10{sup {minus}6} per year) from the design basis accident envelope. Generic likelihood of occurrence data has been used successfully in performing SAR hazard and accident analyses for two nonreactor nuclear facilities at Sandia National Laboratories. DOE-STD-3009-94 addresses and even encourages use of a qualitative binning technique for deriving and ranking nonreactor nuclear facility risks. However, qualitative techniques invariably lead to reviewer requests for more details associated with consequence or likelihood of occurrence bin assignments in the test of the SAR. Hazard analysis data displayed in simple worksheet format generally elicits questions about not only the assumptions behind the data, but also the quantitative bases for the assumptions themselves (engineering judgment may not be considered sufficient by some reviewers). This is especially true where the criteria for qualitative binning of likelihood of occurrence involves numerical ranges. Oftentimes reviewers want to see calculations or at least a discussion of event frequencies or failure probabilities to support likelihood of occurrence bin assignments. This may become a significant point of contention for events that have been binned as incredible. This paper will show how the use of readily available generic data can avoid many of the reviewer questions that will inevitably arise from strictly qualitative analyses, while not significantly increasing the overall burden on the analyst.

MAHN,JEFFREY A.; WALKER,SHARON ANN

2000-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

248

Prediction of Severe Accident Counter Current Natural Circulation Flows in the Hot Leg of a Pressurized Water Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During certain phases of a severe accident in a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the core becomes uncovered and steam carries heat to the steam generators through natural circulation. For PWR's with U-tube steam generators and loop seals filled with water, a counter current flow pattern is established in the hot leg. This flow pattern has been experimentally observed and has been predicted using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Predictions of severe accident behavior are routinely carried out using severe accident system analysis codes such as SCDAP/RELAP5 or MELCOR. These codes, however, were not developed for predicting the three-dimensional natural circulation flow patterns during this phase of a severe accident. CFD, along with a set of experiments at 1/7. scale, have been historically used to establish the flow rates and mixing for the system analysis tools. One important aspect of these predictions is the counter current flow rate in the nearly 30 inch diameter hot leg between the reactor vessel and steam generator. This flow rate is strongly related to the amount of energy that can be transported away from the reactor core. This energy transfer plays a significant role in the prediction of core failures as well as potential failures in other reactor coolant system piping. CFD is used to determine the counter current flow rate during a severe accident. Specific sensitivities are completed for parameters such as surge line flow rates, hydrogen content, as well as vessel and steam generator temperatures. The predictions are carried out for the reactor vessel upper plenum, hot leg, a portion of the surge line, and a steam generator blocked off at the outlet plenum. All predictions utilize the FLUENT V6 CFD code. The volumetric flow in the hot leg is assumed to be proportional to the square root of the product of normalized density difference, gravity, and hydraulic diameter to the 5. power. CFD is used to determine the proportionality constant in the range from 0.11 to 0.13 and termed a discharge coefficient. The value is relatively unchanged for typical surge line flow rates as well as the hydrogen content in the flow. Over a significant range of expected temperature differences for the steam generator and reactor vessel upper plenum, the discharge coefficient also remained consistent. The discharge coefficient is a suitable model for determining the hot leg counter current flow rates during this type of severe accident. (author)

Boyd, Christopher F. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transport and its infrastructure Coordinating Lead Authors:5 Transport and its infrastructure Chandler, K. , E. Eberts,5 Transport and its infrastructure Sausen, R. , I. Isaksen,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Intelligent Transport Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Sustainable Urban Transport: City Interview Synthesis (of Leeds, Institute for Transport Studies, forthcoming.I NTELLIGENT TRANSPORT SYSTEMS LINKING TECHNOLOGY AND

Deakin, Elizabeth; Frick, Karen Trapenberg; Skabardonis, Alexander

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Preface: Nonclassical Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

models of solute transport in highly heterogeneous geologicSemenov. 2008b. Nonclassical transport processes in geologicand L. Matveev. 2008. Transport regimes and concentration

Bolshov, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Sustainability and Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gilbert is a Toronto-based transport and energy consultantof the forthcoming book Transport Revolutions: Making theand substantial transition to transport systems based on

Gilbert, Richard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Transportation Energy Futures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Comparative Analysis of Future Transportation Fuels. ucB-prominentlyin our transportation future, powering electricTransportation Energy Futures Daniel Sperling Mark A.

DeLuchi, Mark A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Achieving Sustainable Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a serious concern for future transportation planning, but itplanning for the future. Transportation should be at the topsustainable transportation look like? Again, the future will

Mason, Jonathan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

An application of probabilistic safety assessment methods to model aircraft systems and accidents  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A case study modeling the thrust reverser system (TRS) in the context of the fatal accident of a Boeing 767 is presented to illustrate the application of Probabilistic Safety Assessment methods. A simplified risk model consisting of an event tree with supporting fault trees was developed to represent the progression of the accident, taking into account the interaction between the TRS and the operating crew during the accident, and the findings of the accident investigation. A feasible sequence of events leading to the fatal accident was identified. Several insights about the TRS and the accident were obtained by applying PSA methods. Changes proposed for the TRS also are discussed.

Martinez-Guridi, G.; Hall, R.E.; Fullwood, R.R.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Sec. Herrington Leads Delegation in Response to Chernobyl Accident |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Sec. Herrington Leads Delegation in Response to Chernobyl Accident | Sec. Herrington Leads Delegation in Response to Chernobyl Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Sec. Herrington Leads Delegation in Response to ... Sec. Herrington Leads Delegation in Response to Chernobyl Accident

257

Transportation Issues  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issues Issues and Resolutions - Compilation of Laboratory Transportation Work Package Reports Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Compiled by Paul McConnell Sandia National Laboratories September 30, 2012 FCRD-UFD-2012-000342 Transportation Issues and Resolutions ii September 2012 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any

258

Transportation Security  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

For Review Only 1 Transportation Security Draft Annotated Bibliography Review July 2007 Preliminary Draft - For Review Only 2 Work Plan Task * TEC STG Work Plan, dated 8/2/06, Product #16, stated: "Develop an annotated bibliography of publicly-available documents related to security of radioactive material transportation." * Earlier this year, a preliminary draft annotated bibliography on this topic was developed by T-REX , UNM, to initially address this STG Work Plan Task. Preliminary Draft - For Review Only 3 Considerations in Determining Release of Information * Some "Publicly-available" documents could potentially contain inappropriate information according to standards set by DOE information security policy and DOE Guides. - Such documents would not be freely

259

LNG transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the beginning of 1965, the participants to the starting up of first French LNG transportation system between ARZEW and LE HAVRE were indeed pioneers when they started the cool-down of the three tanks of LE HAVRE, with a LNG freight delivered by old liberty-ship ''BEAUVAIS''. Could they forecast the development of LNG industry in FRANCE and in the world and imagine that modest 'JULES VERNE' and his two english brothers would have, 25 years later, 80 successors - more than five times as big, for the main part of them, that 12 liquefaction plants would be running in the world, supplying about twenty LNG terminals. For the first time, a country - FRANCE - can draw the lessons from the exploitation of the 3 LNG transportation systems during a long period. That is the subject of the present paper.

Picard, J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Comparison of fusedose and MACCS2 accident dose codes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to present and document the differences discovered when comparing the two accident dose codes FUSEDOSE and MACCS2. Each code`s methodology is first discussed. With this background, the important comparison parameters are discussed and the resulting differences are presented. It is not the purpose of this paper to draw conclusions as to which code is more reliable but, it is hoped that the data presented will help in deciding upon further actions to be taken, if at all, to improve accident dose calculations. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Sevigny, L.M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Transportation Planning & Decision Science Group Transportation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poster Presentations: Stacy Davis - "Transportation Data Programs: Transportation Energy Data Book, Vehicle Technologies Market Report, and the Vehicle Technologies Fact of...

262

Transportation Research Internship Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Research Internship Program Civil & Coastal Engineering Overview The Transportation Research Internship Program (TRIP) is conducted by the Transportation Research Center (TRC) and the Center is to provide undergraduates an exciting opportunity to learn about transportation engineering

Slatton, Clint

263

Thesis Title- Wireless Sensor Networking for Intelligent Transportation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

o My research area is Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) that are computing systems interacting with physical, real environments. My research includes (i) CPS supporting the safe and efficient driving in transportation systems (e.g., road networks) in real life and (ii) CPS protecting and monitoring efficiently transportation systems (e.g., road networks and subways) and people (e.g., drivers, passengers, and pedestrians) in emergency situations (e.g., wars, accidents, and disasters). o I am leading CPS Laboratory at Sungkyunkwan University:

Advisor Prof; David H. C. Du; Prof Tian He; Advisor Prof; Yanghee Choi; Advisor Prof; Youngik Eom

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Three dimensional effects in analysis of PWR steam line break accident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A steam line break accident is one of the possible severe abnormal transients in a pressurized water reactor. It is required to present an analysis of a steam line break accident in the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) ...

Tsai, Chon-Kwo

265

Report on the Scope of the Accident Investigation of the Tristan...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report on the Scope of the Accident Investigation of the Tristan Fire at the DOE Brookhaven National Laboratory, IG-0386 Report on the Scope of the Accident Investigation of the...

266

Substantiation of Thermodynamic Criteria of Explosion Safety in Process of Severe Accidents in Pressure Vessel Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper represents original development of thermodynamic criteria of occurrence conditions of steam-gas explosions in the process of severe accidents. The received results can be used for modelling of processes of severe accidents in pressure vessel reactors.

Skalozubov, V I; Jarovoj, S S; Kochnyeva, V Yu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Substantiation of Thermodynamic Criteria of Explosion Safety in Process of Severe Accidents in Pressure Vessel Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper represents original development of thermodynamic criteria of occurrence conditions of steam-gas explosions in the process of severe accidents. The received results can be used for modelling of processes of severe accidents in pressure vessel reactors.

V. I. Skalozubov; V. N. Vashchenko; S. S. Jarovoj; V. Yu. Kochnyeva

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

268

Combining neural methods and knowledge-based methods in accident management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accident management became a popular research issue in the early 1990s. Computerized decision support was studied from many points of view. Early fault detection and information visualization are important key issues in accident management also today. ...

Miki Sirola, Jaakko Talonen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

DOE Safety Metrics Indicator Program (SMIP) Fiscal Year 2001 Fourth Quarter Report of Packaging- and Transportation-related Occurrences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Safety Metrics Indicator Program (SMIP) retrieved 44 packaging- or transportation-related occurrences from the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) during the period from July 1 through September 30, 2001. Only those incidents that occur in preparation for transport, during transport, and during unloading of hazardous material are considered as packaging- or transportation-related occurrences. Other incidents with packaging and transportation (P and T) significance but not involving hazardous material (such as vehicle accidents or empty packagings) are not rated to the SMIP criteria, but are archived in the SMIP Subsidiary Database of occurrences, a sub-database of the main SMIP P and T Occurrence Database. Thirty-two of the originally-selected 44 occurrences were appropriate for classification to the SMIP criteria, only 7 of which have offsite applicability. Eight of the original 44 reports are archived in a subsidiary database because they either do not involve the transport of hazardous material or do not involve transport by vehicle, plane, boat, or rail. The others either were deleted because more thorough review revealed that they were not strictly related to P and T or were canceled by the reporting site and removed from the ORPS. These occurrences have not been normalized as in the Annual Report of Occurrences because the necessary information is not yet available. The number and severity of the selected occurrence reports (ORs) are consistent with historical reporting. Contamination events continue to be among the most common type of occurrences; however, ''Shipping Preparation'' events decreased this quarter to only 4 events from the 21 reported last quarter. None of the 32 ORs that were rated had event consequence measures (W{sub EC}) greater than 2; 14 of them were categorized as having a W{sub EC} of 1. This means that all of the fourth-quarter FY 2001 ORs had only slight consequences at worst (i.e., resulting in minimal safety consequences with little potential for ultimately leading to suspected endangerment of people or environmental contamination). Because the event consequence measure is low, the overall hazard significance ratings (HSRs) are relatively low, indicating that the actual risks posed by the occurrences are not highly threatening. In fact, even the one reported emergency OR and the two unusual ORs had HSRs of 24 or less. The ORs are summarized in the appendix and listed along with their HSRs and stakeholder interest [currently termed the stakeholder and publicity rating (SPR)]. This enables one to get a feel for how the nature of an occurrence and its P and T significance translate into a severity rating. During the quarter, it was noticed that the number of events pertaining to either dropping packages or damaging packages while moving material by forklift had increased from previous years. Only four such events were reported in FY 1999 and seven events reported during FY 2000. However, 13 events have been reported during this fiscal year. Therefore a lessons learned (LL) pertaining to minimizing accidents while moving material by forklift was developed and posted to the U.S. Department of Energy LL list server to mitigate this trend.

Dickerson, L.S.

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance on how to calculate the characteristics of releases of radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from nonreactor nuclear facilities. In addition, the Handbook provides guidance on how to calculate the consequences of those releases. There are four major chapters: Hazard Evaluation and Scenario Development; Source Term Determination; Transport Within Containment/Confinement; and Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequences Modeling. These chapters are supported by Appendices, including: a summary of chemical and nuclear information that contains descriptions of various fuel cycle facilities; details on how to calculate the characteristics of source terms for releases of hazardous chemicals; a comparison of NRC, EPA, and OSHA programs that address chemical safety; a summary of the performance of HEPA and other filters; and a discussion of uncertainties. Several sample problems are presented: a free-fall spill of powder, an explosion with radioactive release; a fire with radioactive release; filter failure; hydrogen fluoride release from a tankcar; a uranium hexafluoride cylinder rupture; a liquid spill in a vitrification plant; and a criticality incident. Finally, this Handbook includes a computer model, LPF No.1B, that is intended for use in calculating Leak Path Factors. A list of contributors to the Handbook is presented in Chapter 6. 39 figs., 35 tabs.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Normal accidents: Data quality problems in ERP-enabled manufacturing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The efficient operation of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems largely depends on data quality. ERP can improve data quality and information sharing within an organization. It can also pose challenges to data quality. While it is well known that ... Keywords: Data quality, ERP, complexity, enterprise resource planning, normal accident, tight coupling

Lan Cao, Hongwei Zhu

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Hanford Waste Tank Bump Accident and Consequence Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a new evaluation of the Hanford tank bump accident analysis and consequences for incorporation into the Authorization Basis. The analysis scope is for the safe storage of waste in its current configuration in single-shell and double-shell tanks.

BRATZEL, D.R.

2000-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

273

Criticality accident alarm system at the Fernald Environmental Management Project  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to give a description of the Criticality Accident Alarm System (CAAS) presently installed at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) for monitoring areas requiring criticality controls, and some of the concerns associated with the operation of this system. The system at the FEMP is known as the Radiation Detection Alarm (RDA) System.

Marble, R.C.; Brown, T.D.; Wooldridge, J.C.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

THE ANALYSIS OF FATAL ACCIDENTS IN INDIAN D. Sengupta1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE ANALYSIS OF FATAL ACCIDENTS IN INDIAN COAL MINES A. Mandal D. Sengupta1 Indian Statistical of Indian coal mines from April 1989 to March 1998. It is found that Indian mines have considerably higher over 600,000 miners and other workers. Safety in the Indian coal mines is therefore a very important

Mandal, Abhyuday

275

Test Data for USEPR Severe Accident Code Validation  

SciTech Connect

This document identifies data that can be used for assessing various models embodied in severe accident analysis codes. Phenomena considered in this document, which were limited to those anticipated to be of interest in assessing severe accidents in the USEPR developed by AREVA, include: Fuel Heatup and Melt Progression Reactor Coolant System (RCS) Thermal Hydraulics In-Vessel Molten Pool Formation and Heat Transfer Fuel/Coolant Interactions during Relocation Debris Heat Loads to the Vessel Vessel Failure Molten Core Concrete Interaction (MCCI) and Reactor Cavity Plug Failure Melt Spreading and Coolability Hydrogen Control Each section of this report discusses one phenomenon of interest to the USEPR. Within each section, an effort is made to describe the phenomenon and identify what data are available modeling it. As noted in this document, models in US accident analysis codes (MAAP, MELCOR, and SCDAP/RELAP5) differ. Where possible, this report identifies previous assessments that illustrate the impact of modeling differences on predicting various phenomena. Finally, recommendations regarding the status of data available for modeling USEPR severe accident phenomena are summarized.

J. L. Rempe

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Getting to necessary and sufficient-developing accident scenarios for risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a simple, systematic approach for developing accident scenarios using generic accident types. Result is a necessary and sufficient set of accident scenarios that can be used to establish the safety envelope for a facility or operation. Us of this approach along with the methodology of SAND95-0320 will yield more consistent accident analyses between facilities and provide a sound basis for allocating limited risk reduction resources.

Mahn, J.A.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS Transportation systems are the building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS Transportation systems are the building blocks of modern society. Efficient mobility improves the quality of life. However, transportation systems by their very nature also affect quality. The transportation systems graduate pro- gram provides in-depth knowledge on the design

Wang, Yuhang

278

Tree transport system  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tree transport system Tree transport system Name: Paul K Harding Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How can trees get that tall? How can the transport of water function that good? Normally one could think that trees can get only 10 m high because then the pressure of the air would be to weak to transport the water and a vacuum would occur. Or do trees use a system of one pump-system after another to solve that problem? Replies: Okay, the answer is two-fold. One, the column of water travelling up the trunk of the tree is only a couple of molecules wide, moving up from cell to cell. You can think of each cell as a "valve" if you will, holding the water and keeping it from flowing down the trunk (unless you WANT it to go that way, in the case of sugar laden water moving to storage areas in the roots) until it can be moved to the next cell up, and so on and so on. The second part involves diffusion. Cells can diffuse certain chemical compounds through their cell walls while simultaneously holding onto others. By having a gradient of increasing chemical concentration as you go up the trunk, you can cause a gradual diffusion of water up the trunk (since water travels relatively freely through the cell walls) and thereby creates and exception to the rule of 10 meters being the maximum height for a column of water -- you've effectively added energy to the system to "pump" water up the trunk.

279

K West Basin Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) E-F Annular Filter Vessel Accident Calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three bounding accidents postdated for the K West Basin integrated water treatment system are evaluated against applicable risk evaluation guidelines. The accidents are a spray leak during fuel retrieval, spray leak during backflushing, and a hydrogen explosion. Event trees and accident probabilities are estimated. In all cases, the unmitigated dose consequences are below the risk evaluation guidelines.

RITTMANN, P.D.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

280

K West Basin Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) E-F Annular Filter Vessel Accident Calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four bounding accidents postulated for the K West Basin integrated water treatment system are evaluated against applicable risk evaluation guidelines. The accidents are a spray leak during fuel retrieval, spray leak during backflushing a hydrogen explosion, and a fire breaching filter vessel and enclosure. Event trees and accident probabilities are estimated. In all cases, the unmitigated dose consequences are below the risk evaluation guidelines.

PIEPHO, M.G.

2000-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The Savannah River National Laboratory's Response to the Graniteville, SC Train Accident  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Weather INformation and Display (WIND) System was used to provide meteorological and atmospheric modeling/consequence assessment support to state and local agencies following the collision of two Norfolk Southern freight trains on the morning of January 6, 2005. This collision resulted in the release of several toxic chemicals to the environment, including chlorine. The dense and highly toxic cloud of chlorine gas that formed in the vicinity of the accident was responsible for nine fatalities and injuries to more than five hundred others. Transport model results depicting the forecast path of the ongoing release were made available to emergency managers in the county's Unified Command Center shortly after SRNL received a request for assistance. Support continued over the ensuing two days of the active response. The SRNL also provided weather briefings and transport/consequence assessment model results to responders from South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental control (SCDHEC), the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Emergency Operations Center (EOC), DOE Headquarters, and hazmat teams dispatched from the SRS.

Hunter, C. H.; Parker, M. J.; Buckley, R. L.; Weber, A. H.; Addis, R. P.

2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

282

Investigations on Hydrogen Distribution and Mitigation Measures in the Containment Under Severe Accident  

SciTech Connect

During severe accident oxidation of the metallic components of the reactor core and the core-concrete interaction will produce hydrogen which may threaten the integrity of the containment. It is important to predict hydrogen transport and mixing in the containment, in order to determine whether the mixture can locally reach flammability limits, and install the hydrogen mitigation devices at a reasonable and suitable position. Several turbulence models in FLUENT and GASFLOW were adopted in this paper to investigate hydrogen transport and mixing in the containment, and the results were compared. The study indicates that RNG k -- {epsilon} model can obtain better simulation in parameter fluctuation, velocity field, and hydrogen concentration field than the other models'. The results calculated by algebraic model in GASFLOW are largely different from the other results in the simulation of mass diffusion, momentum diffusion, and parameter fluctuation. The results of k -- {epsilon} model in GASFLOW have the similar trend as the results of FLUENT in velocity field and concentration field. Three hydrogen mitigation measures were also studied in a simple closed room using the code GASFLOW. The results indicate that the combination of recombiners and igniters is a safe and effective way to reduce the risk of hydrogen combustion. (authors)

Jian-Jun Xiao; Zhi-Wei Zhou; Xing-Qing Jing [Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Comparison of Average Transport and Dispersion Among a Gaussian, a  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Comparison of Average Transport and Dispersion Among a Gaussian, a Comparison of Average Transport and Dispersion Among a Gaussian, a Two-Dimensional, and a Three-Dimensional Model Comparison of Average Transport and Dispersion Among a Gaussian, a Two-Dimensional, and a Three-Dimensional Model The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) code for predicting off-site consequences, MACCS2 (Chanin, et al. 1998) (MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2), uses a simplified model for atmospheric transport and d ispersion (ATD), that is, a straight-line Gaussian model. The MACCS2 calculations are used by the NRC for planning purposes, for cost-benefit analyses, and in level-3 probabilistic risk analyses (PRAs). The MACCS2 ATD model has been criticized as being overly simplistic, even for its purposes. The justification for its use has been

284

Criticality safety criteria for the handling, storage, and transportation of LWR fuel outside reactors: ANS-8.17-1984  

SciTech Connect

The potential for criticality accidents during the handling, storage, and transportation of fuel for nuclear reactors represents a health and safety risk to personnel involved in these activities, as well as to the general public. Appropriate design of equipment and facilities, handling procedures, and personnel training can minimize this risk. Even though the focus of the American National Standard, `Nuclear Criticality Safety in Operations with Fissionable Materials Outside Reactors,` ANSI/ANS-8.1-1983, is general criteria for the ensurance of criticality safety, ANS-8.17-1984, provides additional guidance applicable to handling, storage, and transportation of light-water- reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel units in any phase of the fuel cycle outside the reactor core. ANS-8.17 had its origin in the late 1970s when a work group consisting of representatives from private industry, personnel from government contractor facilities, and scientists and engineers from the national laboratories was established. The work of this group resulted in the issuance of ANSI/ANS-8.17 in January 1984. This document provides a discussion of this standard.

Whitesides, G.E.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Transportation Energy Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

transportation.gif (5350 bytes) transportation.gif (5350 bytes) Transportation energy use is projected to constitute more than half of the world’s oil consumption in 2020. Developing nations account for more than half the expected growth in transportation energy use in the IEO99 forecast. The International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99) presents a more detailed analysis than in previous years of the underlying factors conditioning long-term growth prospects for worldwide transportation energy demand. A nation’s transportation system is generally an excellent indicator of its level of economic development. In many countries, personal travel still means walking or bicycling, and freight movement often involves domesticated animals. High rates of growth from current levels in developing countries such as China and India still leave their populations

286

LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit < LEDSGP(Redirected from Transportation Toolkit) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Transportation Toolkit Home Tools Training Contacts Developing Strategies for Clean, Efficient Transportation The Transportation LEDS Toolkit supports development planners, technical experts, and decision makers at national and local levels to plan and implement low emission transportation systems that support economic growth. This toolkit website helps users navigate a variety of resources in order to identify the most effective tools necessary to build and implement low

287

LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit < LEDSGP Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Transportation Toolkit Home Tools Training Contacts Developing Strategies for Clean, Efficient Transportation The Transportation Toolkit supports development planners, technical experts, and decision makers at national and local levels to plan and implement low-emission transportation systems that support economic growth. This toolkit helps users navigate a variety of resources to identify the most effective tools to build and implement low emission development strategies (LEDS) for the transport sector. Learn more in the report on

288

Category:Transportation Toolkits | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Transportation Toolkits Jump to: navigation, search Add a new Transportation Toolkit Pages in category "Transportation Toolkits" The following 86 pages are in this category, out of 86 total. A A Report on Worldwide Hydrogen Bus Demonstrations, 2002-2007 A Review of HOV Lane Performance and Policy Options in the United States - Final Report A Roadmap to Funding Infrastructure Development Adapting Urban Transport to Climate Change- Module 5f - Sustainable transport: a sourcebook for policy-makers in developing cities Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and Management

289

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of a fire-induced accident scenario involving binary variables and mechanistic codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In response to the transition by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to a risk-informed, performance-based fire protection rulemaking standard, Fire Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) methods have been ...

Minton, Mark A. (Mark Aaron)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Mitigation of Severe Accident Consequences Using Inherent Safety Principles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sodium-cooled fast reactors are designed to have a high level of safety. Events of high probability of occurrence are typically handled without consequence through reliable engineering systems and good design practices. For accidents of lower probability, the initiating events are characterized by larger and more numerous challenges to the reactor system, such as failure of one or more major engineered systems and can also include a failure to scram the reactor in response. As the initiating conditions become more severe, they have the potential for creating serious consequences of potential safety significance, including fuel melting, fuel pin disruption and recriticality. If the progression of such accidents is not mitigated by design features of the reactor, energetic events and dispersal of radioactive materials may result. For severe accidents, there are several approaches that can be used to mitigate the consequences of such severe accident initiators, which typically include fuel pin failures and core disruption. One approach is to increase the reliability of the reactor protection system so that the probability of an ATWS event is reduced to less than 1 x 10-6 per reactor year, where larger accident consequences are allowed, meeting the U.S. NRC goal of relegating such accident consequences as core disruption to these extremely low probabilities. The main difficulty with this approach is to convincingly test and guarantee such increased reliability. Another approach is to increase the redundancy of the reactor scram system, which can also reduce the probability of an ATWS event to a frequency of less than 1 x 10-6 per reactor year or lower. The issues with this approach are more related to reactor core design, with the need for a greater number of control rod positions in the reactor core and the associated increase in complexity of the reactor protection system. A third approach is to use the inherent reactivity feedback that occurs in a fast reactor to automatically respond to the change in reactor conditions and to result in a benign response to these events. This approach has the advantage of being relatively simple to implement, and does not face the issue of reliability since only fundamental physical phenomena are used in a passive manner, not active engineered systems. However, the challenge is to present a convincing case that such passive means can be implemented and used. The purpose of this paper is to describe this third approach in detail, the technical basis and experimental validation for the approach, and the resulting reactor performance that can be achieved for ATWS events.

R. A. Wigeland; J. E. Cahalan

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Dualmode transportation - impact on the electric grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continual increase in transport demand and uneven road capacity results in chaotic traffic congestion, brings with it high levels of air pollution, an elevated number of accidents, and an insatiable demand for oil to satisfy the motorized vehicles on roads. The dualmode transportation system is a transformational solution to address all of these problems simultaneously. This project will quantify the amount of energy needed to electrify a portion of the actual ground transportation (personal vehicle and freight) in a specific electric region grid and analyze the impact that it represents. A model that gives a close approximation of the electric energy demand that would be generated by converting existing traffic data into electricity demand was developed. This model allows for sensitivity testing of all conversion factors, data variation and variations in the different types of propulsion technology that may be used in the new system. Results show that inclusion of the new transportation system into the electric grid of Texas will not require significantly more energy than the current available resource.

Azcarate Lara, Francisco Javier

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Portsmouth Site Plant Surpasses Five Years Without Lost-Time Accident |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant Surpasses Five Years Without Lost-Time Plant Surpasses Five Years Without Lost-Time Accident Portsmouth Site Plant Surpasses Five Years Without Lost-Time Accident November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis BWCS employees from all departments of the DUF6 project at the Portsmouth site come together to mark five years without a lost-time accident. BWCS employees from all departments of the DUF6 project at the Portsmouth site come together to mark five years without a lost-time accident. Russ Hall, environment, safety and health supervisor, changes the DUF6 project sign to mark five years without a lost-time accident. Russ Hall, environment, safety and health supervisor, changes the DUF6 project sign to mark five years without a lost-time accident. BWCS employees from all departments of the DUF6 project at the Portsmouth site come together to mark five years without a lost-time accident.

293

Order Module--DOE Order 225.1B, ACCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Order 225.1B, ACCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS Order 225.1B, ACCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS Order Module--DOE Order 225.1B, ACCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS DOE O 225.1B prescribes organizational responsibilities, authorities, and requirements for conducting investigations of certain accidents occurring at DOE sites, facilities, areas, operations, and activities. The purpose of the accident investigation is to understand and identify the causes that contributed to the accident so those deficiencies can be addressed and corrected. This, in turn, is intended to prevent recurrence and promote improved environmental protection and safety and health of DOE employees, contractors, and the public. Moreover, accident investigations are used to promote the values and concepts of a learning organization. The department's integrated safety management (ISM) feedback and improvement

294

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas Safety Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident on AddThis.com... More in this section... Natural Gas Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Conversions Emissions

295

Risk assessment of storage and transport of liquefied natural gas and LP-gas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A method for assessing the societal risk of transporting liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) is described, and is illustrated by application to the transport of LPG by tank truck and LNG by tanker ship in the U.S. Data on past experience and projected future handling of these liquefied gases are used with analysis of flammable plume formation and ignition, and population distributions, to estimate the risks of fatalities from tank truck and tanker ship accidents. From an estimated 52 significant accidents per year with LPG tank trucks at the present truck-associated transportation rate of 20 billion gallons of LPG per year, a fatality rate of 1.2 per year is calculated. For the projected 1980 importation of 33 billion gallons by tanker ship, a fatality rate of 0.4 per year is calculated, using a conservatively high one chance in 20,000 of a significant accident per trip. Comparison with fires and explosions from all causes in the U.S. and Canada leading to 10 or more fatalities shows that these are 100 times more frequent than the predicted frequency of comparable LPG and LNG accidents. Tabulations of experience with spills of flammable volatile liquids are included. (GRA)

Simmons, J.A.

1974-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

296

Volume II - Accident and Operational Safety Analysis Handbook  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

208-2012 208-2012 July 2012 DOE HANDBOOK Accident and Operational Safety Analysis Volume II: Operational Safety Analysis Techniques U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1208-2012 i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Department of Energy (DOE) Accident and Operational Safety Analysis Handbook was prepared under the sponsorship of the DOE Office of Health Safety and Security (HSS), Office of Corporate Safety Programs, and the Energy Facility Contractors Operating Group (EFCOG), Industrial Hygiene and Safety Sub-group of the Environmental Health and Safety Working Group. The preparers would like to gratefully acknowledge the authors whose works are referenced in this document, and the individuals who provided valuable technical insights and/or specific

297

Enhanced Accident Tolerant LWR Fuels National Metrics Workshop Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), in collaboration with the nuclear industry, has been conducting research and development (R&D) activities on advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels for the last few years. The emphasis for these activities was on improving the fuel performance in terms of increased burnup for waste minimization and increased power density for power upgrades, as well as collaborating with industry on fuel reliability. After the events at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan in March 2011, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. In the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Conference Report 112-75, the U.S. Congress directed DOE-NE to: Give priority to developing enhanced fuels and cladding for light water reactors to improve safety in the event of accidents in the reactor or spent fuel pools. Give special technical emphasis and funding priorityto activities aimed at the development and near-term qualification of meltdown-resistant, accident-tolerant nuclear fuels that would enhance the safety of present and future generations of light water reactors. Report to the Committee, within 90 days of enactment of this act, on its plan for development of meltdown-resistant fuels leading to reactor testing and utilization by 2020. Fuels with enhanced accident tolerance are those that, in comparison with the standard UO2-zirconium alloy system currently used by the nuclear industry, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, and operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. The overall draft strategy for development and demonstration is comprised of three phases: Feasibility Assessment and Down-selection; Development and Qualification; and Commercialization. The activities performed during the feasibility assessment phase include laboratory scale experiments; fuel performance code updates; and analytical assessment of economic, operational, safety, fuel cycle, and environmental impacts of the new concepts. The development and qualification stage will consist of fuel fabrication and large scale irradiation and safety basis testing, leading to qualification and ultimate NRC licensing of the new fuel. The commercialization phase initiates technology transfer to industry for implementation. Attributes for fuels with enhanced accident tolerance include improved reaction kinetics with steam and slower hydrogen generation rate, while maintaining acceptable cladding thermo-mechanical properties; fuel thermo-mechanical properties; fuel-clad interactions; and fission-product behavior. These attributes provide a qualitative guidance for parameters that must be considered in the development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. However, quantitative metrics must be developed for these attributes. To initiate the quantitative metrics development, a Light Water Reactor Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels Metrics Development Workshop was held October 10-11, 2012, in Germantown, Maryland. This document summarizes the structure and outcome of the two-day workshop. Questions regarding the content can be directed to Lori Braase, 208-526-7763, lori.braase@inl.gov.

Lori Braase

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Evironmental health policy in ukraine after the Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect

The 1986 accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine produced severe environmental health problems. This paper reports on the environmental health conditions in Ukraine after the accident and the health policy approaches employed to respond to the environmental conditions and health problems. Crisis conditions and a period of rapid change in Ukraine contributed to the difficulties of developing and implementing policy to address serious environmental health problems. Despite these difficulties, Ukraine is taking effective action. The paper describes the primary environmental health problem areas and the efforts taken to solve them. The effect of intense public fear of radiation on policymaking is described. The paper discusses the ability of public fear to distort health policy towards certain problems, leaving problems of greater importance with fewer resources. 35 refs., 1 fig.

Page, G.W.; Bobyleva, O.A.; Naboka, M.V. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Public involvement in radioactive waste management decisions  

SciTech Connect

Current repository siting efforts focus on Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is conducting exploratory studies to determine if the site is suitable. The state of Nevada has resisted these efforts: it has denied permits, brought suit against DOE, and publicly denounced the federal government`s decision to study Yucca Mountain. The state`s opposition reflects public opinion in Nevada, and has considerably slowed DOE`s progress in studying the site. The Yucca Mountain controversy demonstrates the importance of understanding public attitudes and their potential influence as DOE develops a program to manage radioactive waste. The strength and nature of Nevada`s opposition -- its ability to thwart if not outright derail DOE`s activities -- indicate a need to develop alternative methods for making decisions that affect the public. This report analyzes public participation as a key component of this openness, one that provides a means of garnering acceptance of, or reducing public opposition to, DOE`s radioactive waste management activities, including facility siting and transportation. The first section, Public Perceptions: Attitudes, Trust, and Theory, reviews the risk-perception literature to identify how the public perceives the risks associated with radioactivity. DOE and the Public discusses DOE`s low level of credibility among the general public as the product, in part, of the department`s past actions. This section looks at the three components of the radioactive waste management program -- disposal, storage, and transportation -- and the different ways DOE has approached the problem of public confidence in each case. Midwestern Radioactive Waste Management Histories focuses on selected Midwestern facility-siting and transportation activities involving radioactive materials.

NONE

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Markov Model of Severe Accident Progression and Management  

SciTech Connect

The earthquake and tsunami that hit the nuclear power plants at the Fukushima Daiichi site in March 2011 led to extensive fuel damage, including possible fuel melting, slumping, and relocation at the affected reactors. A so-called feed-and-bleed mode of reactor cooling was initially established to remove decay heat. The plan was to eventually switch over to a recirculation cooling system. Failure of feed and bleed was a possibility during the interim period. Furthermore, even if recirculation was established, there was a possibility of its subsequent failure. Decay heat has to be sufficiently removed to prevent further core degradation. To understand the possible evolution of the accident conditions and to have a tool for potential future hypothetical evaluations of accidents at other nuclear facilities, a Markov model of the state of the reactors was constructed in the immediate aftermath of the accident and was executed under different assumptions of potential future challenges. This work was performed at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy to explore 'what-if' scenarios in the immediate aftermath of the accident. The work began in mid-March and continued until mid-May 2011. The analysis had the following goals: (1) To provide an overall framework for describing possible future states of the damaged reactors; (2) To permit an impact analysis of 'what-if' scenarios that could lead to more severe outcomes; (3) To determine approximate probabilities of alternative end-states under various assumptions about failure and repair times of cooling systems; (4) To infer the reliability requirements of closed loop cooling systems needed to achieve stable core end-states and (5) To establish the importance for the results of the various cooling system and physical phenomenological parameters via sensitivity calculations.

Bari, R.A.; Cheng, L.; Cuadra,A.; Ginsberg,T.; Lehner,J.; Martinez-Guridi,G.; Mubayi,V.; Pratt,W.T.; Yue, M.

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Transportation Security | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Security SHARE Global Threat Reduction Initiative Transportation Security Cooperation Secure Transport Operations (STOP) Box Security of radioactive material while...

302

Erosion and Optimal Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

383 pp. EROSION AND OPTIMAL TRANSPORT [23] I. Ekeland and T.and D. Simons, Sediment transport capacity of overland ?ow,measure spaces via optimal transport, Ann. of Math. (2),

Birnir, Bjorn; Rowlett, Julie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

AQUATIC ASSESSMENT OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AND ITS REMEDIATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This modeling study evaluated aquatic environment affected by the Chernobyl nuclear accident and the effectiveness of remediation efforts. Study results indicate that radionuclide concentrations in the Pripyat and Dnieper rivers were well above the drinking water limits immediately after the Chernobyl accident, but have decreased significantly in subsequent years due to flashing, burying, and decay. Because high concentrations of 90Sr and 137Cs, the major radionuclides affecting human health through aquatic pathways, are associated with flooding, an earthen dike was constructed along the Pripyat River in its most contaminated floodplain. The dike was successful in reducing the 90Sr influx to the river by half. A 100-m-high movable dome called the New Safe Confinement is planned to cover the Chernobyl Shelter (formally called the sarcophagus) that was erected shortly after the accident. The NSC will reduce radionuclide contamination further in these rivers and nearby groundwater; however, even if the Chernobyl Shelter collapses before the NSC is built, the resulting peak concentrations of 90Sr and 137Cs in the Dnieper River would still be below the drinking water limits.

Onishi, Yasuo; Kivva, Sergey L.; Zheleznyak, Mark J.; Voitsekhovitch, Oleg V.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Cold Vacuum Drying facility design basis accident analysis documentation  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Annex B, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), ''Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the FSAR. The calculations in this document address the design basis accidents (DBAs) selected for analysis in HNF-3553, ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report'', Annex B, ''Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Final Safety Analysis Report.'' The objective is to determine the quantity of radioactive particulate available for release at any point during processing at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and to use that quantity to determine the amount of radioactive material released during the DBAs. The radioactive material released is used to determine dose consequences to receptors at four locations, and the dose consequences are compared with the appropriate evaluation guidelines and release limits to ascertain the need for preventive and mitigative controls.

CROWE, R.D.

2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

305

Internally deposited fallout from the Chernobyl reactor accident  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of fallout radioactivity were made in the thyroid region, abdomen, whole body, or urine of 96 persons who were in eastern Europe at the time of the Chernobyl reactor accident or who went there shortly afterward. The most frequently encountered radionuclides were /sup 131/I, /sup 134,137/Cs, and /sup 103/Ru//sup 103/Rh. The median /sup 131/I activity in the thyroids of 42 subjects in whom radioiodine was detected and who were in Europe when the accident began was projected as 42 nCi the day the accident began. The median total body activity of /sup 134/Cs in 40 subjects in which it was detected was 1.7 nCi upon arrival in the US. For 51 subjects with detectable /sup 137/Cs burdens, the total body activity was 4.6 nCi. The risk of fatal thyroid cancer is less than 3 x 10/sup -6/ for nearly all subjects in this series. The risk of fatal cancer from /sup 134,137/Cs for subjects with cesium exposures similar to the ones observed by us, but who remained in Europe, is estimated as 1.4 x 10/sup -6/ to 4.2 x 10/sup -5/ with 95% of the risk attributable to /sup 137/Cs. 5 refs., 4 tabs.

Schlenker, R.A.; Oltman, B.G.; Lucas, H.F.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

ANS-8. 23: Criticality accident emergency planning and response  

SciTech Connect

A study group has been formed under the auspices of ANS-8 to examine the need for a standard on nuclear criticality accident emergency planning and response. This standard would be ANS-8.23. ANSI/ANS-8.19-1984, Administrative Practices for Nuclear Criticality Safety, provides some guidance on the subject in Section 10 titled -- Planned Response to Nuclear Criticality Accidents. However, the study group has formed a consensus that Section 10 is inadequate in that technical guidance in addition to administrative guidance is needed. The group believes that a new standard which specifically addresses emergency planning and response to a perceived criticality accident is needed. Plans for underway to request the study group be designated a writing group to create a draft of such a new standard. The proposed standard will divide responsibility between management and technical staff. Generally, management will be charged with providing the necessary elements of emergency planning such as a criticality detection and alarm system, training, safe evacuation routes and assembly areas, a system for timely accountability of personnel, and an effective emergency response organization. The technical staff, on the other hand, will be made responsible for establishing specific items such as safe and clearly posted evacuation evacuation routes and dose criteria for personnel assembly areas. The key to the question of responsibilities is that management must provide the resources for the technical staff to establish the elements of an emergency response effort.

Pruvost, N.L.

1991-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

307

Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRS - A Preliminary Systems Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The severe accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plants illustrates the need for continuous improvements through developing and implementing technologies that contribute to safe, reliable and cost-effective operation of the nuclear fleet. Development of enhanced accident tolerant fuel contributes to this effort. These fuels, in comparison with the standard zircaloy UO2 system currently used by the LWR industry, should be designed such that they tolerate loss of active cooling in the core for a longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, and design-basis events. This report presents a preliminary systems analysis related to most of these concepts. The potential impacts of these innovative LWR fuels on the front-end of the fuel cycle, on the reactor operation and on the back-end of the fuel cycle are succinctly described without having the pretension of being exhaustive. Since the design of these various concepts is still a work in progress, this analysis can only be preliminary and could be updated as the designs converge on their respective final version.

Gilles Youinou; R. Sonat Sen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Health effects of the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island  

SciTech Connect

Between March 28 and April 15, 1979 the collective dose resulting from the radioactivity released to the population living within a 50-mile radius of the Three Mile Island nuclear plant was about 2000 person-rems, less than 1% of the annual natural background level. The average dose to a person living within 5 miles of the nuclear plant was less than 10% of annual background radiation. The maximum estimated radiation dose received by any one individual in the general population (excluding the nuclear plant workers) during the accident was 70 mrem. The doses received by the general population as a result of the accident were so small that there will be no detectable additional cases of cancer, developmental abnormalities, or genetic ill-health. Three Three Mile Island nuclear workers received radiation doses of about 3 to 4 rem, exceeding maximum permissible quarterly dose of 3 rem. The major health effect of the accident at Three Mile Island was that of a pronounced demoralizing effect on the general population in the Three Mile Island area, including teenagers and mothers of preschool children and the nuclear plant workers. However, this effect proved transient in all groups studied except the nuclear workers.

Fabrikant, J.I.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Analysis of PWR RCS Injection Strategy During Severe Accident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactor coolant system (RCS) injection is an important strategy for severe accident management of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) system. Maanshan is a typical Westinghouse PWR nuclear power plant (NPP) with large, dry containment. The severe accident management guideline (SAMG) of Maanshan NPP is developed based on the Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG) SAMG.The purpose of this work is to analyze the RCS injection strategy of PWR system in an overheated core condition. Power is assumed recovered as the vessel water level drops to the bottom of active fuel. The Modular Accident Analysis Program version 4.0.4 (MAAP4) code is chosen as a tool for analysis. A postulated station blackout sequence for Maanshan NPP is cited as a reference case for this analysis. The hot leg creep rupture occurs during the mitigation action with immediate injection after power recovery according to WOG SAMG, which is not desired. This phenomenon is not considered while developing the WOG SAMG. Two other RCS injection methods are analyzed by using MAAP4. The RCS injection strategy is modified in the Maanshan SAMG. These results can be applied for typical PWR NPPs.

Wang, S.-J. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan (China); Chiang, K.-S. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan (China); Chiang, S.-C. [Taiwan Power Company, Taiwan (China)

2004-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Transportation Market Distortions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transport Prices and Markets, Victoria Transport PolicySurvey: Survey Suggests Market-Based Vision of Smart Growth,G. 1996. Roads in a Market Economy, Avebury (Aldershot).

Litman, Todd

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Sustainability and Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005. Integrating Sustainability into the Trans- portationTHOUGHT PIECE Sustainability and Transport by Richardof the concept of sustainability to transport planning. In

Gilbert, Richard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Transportation Demand This  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates...

313

Transportation / Field Trips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In the event that a child misses the transportation, parents may choose the ... their child's class on an outing and possibly transport themselves or their ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

314

PBA Transportation Websites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Useful Websites for Transportation from PBA From: Patterson, Philip (DOE HQ) Subject: Useful Websites for Transportation from PBA Here are some websites you might want to check...

315

Process hazards analysis (PrHA) program, bridging accident analyses and operational safety  

SciTech Connect

Recently the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 55 (TA-55) was revised and submitted to the US. Department of Energy (DOE). As a part of this effort, over seventy Process Hazards Analyses (PrHAs) were written and/or revised over the six years prior to the FSAR revision. TA-55 is a research, development, and production nuclear facility that primarily supports US. defense and space programs. Nuclear fuels and material research; material recovery, refining and analyses; and the casting, machining and fabrication of plutonium components are some of the activities conducted at TA-35. These operations involve a wide variety of industrial, chemical and nuclear hazards. Operational personnel along with safety analysts work as a team to prepare the PrHA. PrHAs describe the process; identi fy the hazards; and analyze hazards including determining hazard scenarios, their likelihood, and consequences. In addition, the interaction of the process to facility systems, structures and operational specific protective features are part of the PrHA. This information is rolled-up to determine bounding accidents and mitigating systems and structures. Further detailed accident analysis is performed for the bounding accidents and included in the FSAR. The FSAR is part of the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) that defines the safety envelope for all facility operations in order to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. The DSA is in compliance with the US. Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management and is approved by DOE. The DSA sets forth the bounding conditions necessary for the safe operation for the facility and is essentially a 'license to operate.' Safely of day-to-day operations is based on Hazard Control Plans (HCPs). Hazards are initially identified in the PrI-IA for the specific operation and act as input to the HCP. Specific protective features important to worker safety are incorporated so the worker can readily identify the safety parameters of the their work. System safety tools such as Preliminary Hazard Analysis, What-If Analysis, Hazard and Operability Analysis as well as other techniques as necessary provide the groundwork for both determining bounding conditions for facility safety, operational safety, and day-to-clay worker safety.

Richardson, J. A. (Jeanne A.); McKernan, S. A. (Stuart A.); Vigil, M. J. (Michael J.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Certification challenges in the development of an innovative high payload capacity spent fuel transportation cask  

SciTech Connect

The design approach and certification strategy used in the development of an innovative transportation cask for legal weight truck shipments of spent nuclear fuel is presented. The proposed approach represents a significant departure from conventional cask designs in that it uses titanium alloy, a material with a high strength-to-weight ratio which has no precedent in transportation cask certification. The significant increase in payload obtainable with the proposed approach, and the associated benefits such as reduced life cycle costs, lower personnel exposure, and lower transportation accident risks are discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Mair, B.R.; Severson, M.J.; Ciez, A.P. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

TRANSPORT CHARACTERISTICS OF SELECTED PWR LOCA GENERATED DEBRIS.  

SciTech Connect

In the unlikely event of a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor (PWR), break jet impingement would dislodge thermal insulation from nearby piping, as well as other materials within the containment, such as paint chips, concrete dust, and fire barrier materials. Steam/water flows induced by the break and by the containment sprays would transport debris to the containment floor. Subsequently, debris would likely transport to and accumulate on the suction sump screens of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) pumps, thereby potentially degrading ECCS performance and possibly even failing the ECCS. In 1998, the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated a generic study (Generic Safety Issue-191) to evaluate the potential for the accumulation of LOCA related debris on the PWR sump screen and the consequent loss of ECCS pump net positive suction head (NPSH). Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), supporting the resolution of GSI-191, was tasked with developing a method for estimating debris transport in PWR containments to estimate the quantity of debris that would accumulate on the sump screen for use in plant specific evaluations. The analytical method proposed by LANL, to predict debris transport within the water that would accumulate on the containment floor, is to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) combined with experimental debris transport data to predict debris transport and accumulation on the screen. CFD simulations of actual plant containment designs would provide flow data for a postulated accident in that plant, e.g., three-dimensional patterns of flow velocities and flow turbulence. Small-scale experiments would determine parameters defining the debris transport characteristics for each type of debris. The containment floor transport methodology will merge debris transport characteristics with CFD results to provide a reasonable and conservative estimate of debris transport within the containment floor pool and subsequent accumulation of debris on the sump screen. The complete methodology will, of course, include a means of estimating debris generation, transport to the containment floor, transport to the sump screen, and the resulting loss of NPSH.

A. K. MAJI; B. MARSHALL; ET AL

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Appendix V Public Involvement Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

V V Public Involvement Plan Revision No.: 6 February 2008 Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) FFACO, Appendix V February 2008 i FFACO Public Involvement Plan U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Las Vegas, Nevada U.S. Department of Defense Defense Threat Reduction Agency Detachment 1, Nevada Operations Mercury, Nevada U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado FFACO, Appendix V February 2008 ii Preface The Public Involvement Plan serves two purposes: it provides a broad public involvement strategy, and fulfills requirements contained in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) relating to public awareness and participation. Under the FFACO, agreed to by

319

Public Involvment Plan - Rifle, Colorado  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

4-TAR 4-TAR MAC-GWRIF 7.1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Public Involvement Plan for the Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the New and Old Rifle, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Sites May 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Public Involvement Plan for the Rifle UMTRA Sites Page 2 Introduction This Public Involvement Plan is tiered to the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project Public Participation Plan dated October 1997. This Public Involvement Plan applies to both the Old and New Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project sites and details the activities that have been or will be carried out to meet the public participation requirements of the

320

Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis: Dispersion and deposition uncertainty assessment, main report  

SciTech Connect

The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the risks presented by nuclear installations based on postulated frequencies and magnitudes of potential accidents. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) began a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of the joint effort was to develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the input variables of the codes. Expert elicitation was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for the selected consequence parameters. The study was formulated jointly and was limited to the current code models and to physical quantities that could be measured in experiments. Experts developed their distributions independently. To validate the distributions generated for the wet deposition input variables, samples were taken from these distributions and propagated through the wet deposition code model. Resulting distributions closely replicated the aggregated elicited wet deposition distributions. To validate the distributions generated for the dispersion code input variables, samples from the distributions and propagated through the Gaussian plume model (GPM) implemented in the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Project teams from the NRC and CEC cooperated successfully to develop and implement a unified process for the elaboration of uncertainty distributions on consequence code input parameters. Formal expert judgment elicitation proved valuable for synthesizing the best available information. Distributions on measurable atmospheric dispersion and deposition parameters were successfully elicited from experts involved in the many phenomenological areas of consequence analysis. This volume is the first of a three-volume document describing the project.

Harper, F.T.; Young, M.L.; Miller, L.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States); Lui, C.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Goossens, L.H.J.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Paesler-Sauer, J. [Research Center, Karlsruhe (Germany); Helton, J.C. [and others

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Transport Co-benefits Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transport Co-benefits Calculator Transport Co-benefits Calculator Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Transport Co-benefits Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies Sector: Climate, Energy Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/archive/cp/activity20101108.html Cost: Free Related Tools Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Benefit Tool SimCLIM SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook ... further results Characterizes co-benefits in terms of accidents, emissions, travel time, and vehicle operating costs. Approach A co-benefits approach capitalizes on synergies between current local

322

On the Driving Mechanism of the Annual Cycle of the Florida Current Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanisms involved in setting the annual cycle of the Florida Current transport are revisited using an adjoint model approach. Adjoint sensitivities of the Florida Current transport to wind stress reproduce a realistic seasonal cycle with an ...

Lars Czeschel; Carsten Eden; Richard J. Greatbatch

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Graduate Certificate in Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graduate Certificate in Transportation Nohad A. Toulan School of Urban Studies and Planning of Engineering and Computer Science integrated transportation systems. The Graduate Certificate in Transportation their capabilities. Students in the program can choose among a wide range of relevant courses in transportation

Bertini, Robert L.

324

TRANSPORTATION Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and educate the future transportation workforce. An example of what we can accomplish is shown2003 CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION STUDIES Annual Report #12;Center for Transportation Studies University of Minnesota 200 Transportation and Safety Building 511 Washington Avenue S.E. Minneapolis, MN

Minnesota, University of

325

Transportation Organization and Functions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Office of Packaging and Transportation list of organizations and functions, with a list of acronyms.

326

DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 225.1B, Accident Investigation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

225.1B 225.1B ACCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS DOE O 225.1B Accident Investigations Familiar Level June 2011 1 June 2011 DOE ORDER O 225.1B ACCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS FAMILIAR LEVEL OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources listed below, you will be able to: 1. State the purpose of implementing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) O 225.1B. 2. Discuss the responsibilities of the heads of field elements for accident investigations. 3. Discuss the responsibilities of the appointing official in an accident investigation. 4. Discuss the responsibilities of the Accident Investigation Board Chairperson. 5. Discuss the criteria identified in appendix A of DOE O 225.1B. Note: If you think that you can complete the practice at the end of this level without

327

Median Light Rail Crossing: Accident Causation And Countermeasures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooperative Research Program. Integration of Light RailRail Grade Crossings. In National Cooperative Highway ResearchLight Rail Safety Issues. In Transportation Research Record

Coifman, Benjamin; Bertini, Robert L.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Annotated bibliography of literature relating to wind transport of plutonium-contaminated soils at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

During the period from 1954 through 1963, a number of tests were conducted on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and Tonopah Test Range (TTR) to determine the safety of nuclear devices with respect to storage, handling, transport, and accidents. These tests were referred to as ``safety shots.`` ``Safety`` in this context meant ``safety against fission reaction.`` The safety tests were comprised of chemical high explosive detonations with components of nuclear devices. The conduct of these tests resulted in the dispersion of plutonium, and some americium over areas ranging from several tens to several hundreds of hectares. Of the various locations used for safety tests, the site referred to as ``Plutonium Valley`` was subject to a significant amount of plutonium contamination. Plutonium Valley is located in Area 11 on the eastern boundary of the NTS at an elevation of about 1036 m (3400 ft). Plutonium Valley was the location of four safety tests (A,B,C, and D) conducted during 1956. A major environmental, health, and safety concern is the potential for inhalation of Pu{sup 239,240} by humans as a result of airborne dust containing Pu particles. Thus, the wind transport of Pu{sup 239,240} particles has been the subject of considerable research. This annotated bibliography was created as a reference guide to assist in the better understanding of the environmental characteristics of Plutonium Valley, the safety tests performed there, the processes and variables involved with the wind transport of dust, and as an overview of proposed clean-up procedures.

Lancaster, N.; Bamford, R.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Descriptions of selected accidents that have occurred at nuclear reactor facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared at the request of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island to provide the members of the Commission with some insight into the nature and significance of accidents that have occurred at nuclear reactor facilities in the past. Toward that end, this report presents a brief description of 44 accidents which have occurred throughout the world and which meet at least one of the severity criteria that were established.

Bertini, H.W.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Descriptions of selected accidents that have occurred at nuclear reactor facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared at the request of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island to provide the members of the Commission with some insight into the nature and significance of accidents that have occurred at nuclear reactor facilities in the past. Toward that end, this report presents a brief description of 44 accidents which have occurred throughout the world and which meet at least one of the severity criteria that were established.

Bertini, H.W.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

MACCS usage at Rocky Flats Plant for consequence analysis of postulated accidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS) has been applied to the radiological consequence assessment of potential accidents from a non-reactor nuclear facility. MACCS has been used in a variety of applications to evaluate radiological dose and health effects to the public from postulated plutonium releases and from postulated criticalities. These applications were conducted to support deterministic and probabilistic accident analyses for safety analyses for safety analysis reports, radiological sabotage studies, and other regulatory requests.

Foppe, T.L.; Peterson, V.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

MAAP5 Simulation of Accidents at Fukushima Dai-ichi Units 1, 2, and 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original MAAP4 code functional design specification (circa 1989) was defined to address the full extent of degraded core accidents with the potential for reflooding of a badly damaged core. It was intended to support probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and severe accident management guideline (SAMG) applications that previously were limited by the relatively rudimentary design for MAAP3.0B, the predecessor code.The accidents at Fukushima Dai-ichi Units 1, 2, and 3 prompted a ...

2013-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

333

Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operat

334

Safety evaluation of MHTGR licensing basis accident scenarios  

SciTech Connect

The safety potential of the Modular High-Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR) was evaluated, based on the Preliminary Safety Information Document (PSID), as submitted by the US Department of Energy to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The relevant reactor safety codes were extended for this purpose and applied to this new reactor concept, searching primarily for potential accident scenarios that might lead to fuel failures due to excessive core temperatures and/or to vessel damage, due to excessive vessel temperatures. The design basis accident scenario leading to the highest vessel temperatures is the depressurized core heatup scenario without any forced cooling and with decay heat rejection to the passive Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). This scenario was evaluated, including numerous parametric variations of input parameters, like material properties and decay heat. It was found that significant safety margins exist, but that high confidence levels in the core effective thermal conductivity, the reactor vessel and RCCS thermal emissivities and the decay heat function are required to maintain this safety margin. Severe accident extensions of this depressurized core heatup scenario included the cases of complete RCCS failure, cases of massive air ingress, core heatup without scram and cases of degraded RCCS performance due to absorbing gases in the reactor cavity. Except for no-scram scenarios extending beyond 100 hr, the fuel never reached the limiting temperature of 1600/degree/C, below which measurable fuel failures are not expected. In some of the scenarios, excessive vessel and concrete temperatures could lead to investment losses but are not expected to lead to any source term beyond that from the circulating inventory. 19 refs., 56 figs., 11 tabs.

Kroeger, P.G.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Markov Model of Accident Progression at Fukushima Daiichi  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On March 11, 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake followed by a tsunami caused loss of offsite power and disabled the emergency diesel generators, leading to a prolonged station blackout at the Fukushima Daiichi site. After successful reactor trip for all operating reactors, the inability to remove decay heat over an extended period led to boil-off of the water inventory and fuel uncovery in Units 1-3. A significant amount of metal-water reaction occurred, as evidenced by the quantities of hydrogen generated that led to hydrogen explosions in the auxiliary buildings of the Units 1 & 3, and in the de-fuelled Unit 4. Although it was assumed that extensive fuel damage, including fuel melting, slumping, and relocation was likely to have occurred in the core of the affected reactors, the status of the fuel, vessel, and drywell was uncertain. To understand the possible evolution of the accident conditions at Fukushima Daiichi, a Markov model of the likely state of one of the reactors was constructed and executed under different assumptions regarding system performance and reliability. The Markov approach was selected for several reasons: It is a probabilistic model that provides flexibility in scenario construction and incorporates time dependence of different model states. It also readily allows for sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of different failure and repair rates of cooling systems. While the analysis was motivated by a need to gain insight on the course of events for the damaged units at Fukushima Daiichi, the work reported here provides a more general analytical basis for studying and evaluating severe accident evolution over extended periods of time. This work was performed at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy to explore 'what-if' scenarios in the immediate aftermath of the accidents.

Cuadra A.; Bari R.; Cheng, L-Y; Ginsberg, T.; Lehner, J.; Martinez-Guridi, G.; Mubayi, V.; Pratt, T.; Yue, M.

2012-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

336

Assessment of ICARE/CATHARE V1 Severe Accident Code  

SciTech Connect

The ICARE/CATHARE code system has been developed by the French 'Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire' (IRSN) in the last decade for the detailed evaluation of Severe Accident (SA) consequences in a primary system. It is composed of the coupling of the core degradation IRSN code ICARE2 and of the thermal-hydraulics French code CATHARE2. It has been extensively used to support the level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA-2) of the 900 MWe PWR. This paper presents the synthesis of the ICARE/CATHARE V1 assessment which was conducted in the frame of the 'International ICARE/CATHARE Users' Club', under the management of IRSN. The ICARE/CATHARE V1 validation matrix is composed of more than 60 experiments, distributed in few thermal-hydraulics non-regression tests (to handle the front end phase of a severe accident), numerous Separate-Effect Tests, about 30 Integral Tests covering both the early and the late degradation phases, as well as a 'circuit' experiment including hydraulics loops. Finally, the simulation of the TMI-2 accident was also added to assess the code against real conditions. This validation task was aimed at assessing the ICARE/CATHARE V1 capabilities (including the stand-alone ICARE2 V3mod1 version) and also at proposing recommendations for an optimal use of this version ('Users' Guidelines'). Thus, with a correct account for the recommended guidelines, it appeared that the last ICARE/CATHARE V1 version could be reasonably used to perform best-estimate reactor studies up to a large corium slumping into the lower head. (authors)

Chatelard, Patrick; Fleurot, Joelle; Marchand, Olivier; Drai, Patrick [IRSN, 31, avenue de la Division Leclerc, BP 17 - 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY TRANSPORTATION TASK REPORT ON ACHIEVING MODERATOR EXCLUSION AND SUPPORTING STANDARDIZED TRANSPORTATION  

SciTech Connect

Following the defunding of the Yucca Mountain Project, it is reasonable to assume that commercial used fuel will remain in storage for the foreseeable future. This report proposes supplementing the ongoing research and development work related to potential degradation of used fuel, baskets, poisons, and storage canisters during an extended period of storage with a parallel path. This parallel path can assure criticality safety during transportation by implementing a concept that achieves moderator exclusion (no in-leakage of moderator into the used fuel cavity). Using updated risk assessment insights for additional technical justification and relying upon a component inside of the transportation cask that provides a watertight function, a strong argument can be made that moderator intrusion is not credible and should not be a required assumption for criticality evaluations during normal conditions of transportation. A demonstrating testing program supporting a detailed analytical effort as well as updated risk assessment insights can provide the basis for moderator exclusion during hypothetical accident conditions. This report also discusses how this engineered concept can support the goal of standardized transportation.

D.K. Morton

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Accident analysis and safety review of DOE Category B reactors  

SciTech Connect

DOE is employing the principle of comparability with the NRC requirements to guide its safety program. Since the safety record of research reactors licensed by the NRC has been established and accepted, the comparison of DOE Orders applicable to DOE research reactors with the NRC regulations applicable to research reactors would identify strengths and weaknesses of the DOE Orders. The comparison was made in 14 general topics of safety which are labeled Areas of Safety Concerns. This paper focuses on the Area of accident analysis and safety review and presents recommendations in these areas. 12 refs.

Kimura, C.Y.

1990-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

339

Advance plant severe accident/thermal hydraulic issues for ACRS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ACRS has been reviewing various advance plant designs for certification. The most active reviews have been for the ABWR, AP600, and System 80+. We have completed the reviews for ABWR and System 80+ and are presently concentrating on AP600. The ACRS gave essentially unqualified certification approval for the two completed reviews, yet,,during the process of review a number of issues arose and the plant designs changed somewhat to accommodate some of the ACRS concerns. In this talk, I will describe some of the severe accident and thermal hydraulic related issues we discussed in our reviews.

Kress, T.S.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement - The Operator Viewpoints Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement - The Operator Viewpoints September 19, 2012 Presenter: Akira Kawano, General Manager, Nuclear International Relations and Strategy Group, Nuclear Power and Plant Siting Administrative Department, Tokyo Electric Power Company Topics Covered: How Tsunami Struck Fukushima Sites Tsunami Height Estimation How we responded in the Recovery Process Safety Improvement and Further Enhancement of Nuclear Safety Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement - The Operator Viewpoints More Documents & Publications January2005 NNSANews Meeting Materials: June 15, 2011

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

Order Module--DOE Order 225.1B, ACCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE O 225.1B prescribes organizational responsibilities, authorities, and requirements for conducting investigations of certain accidents occurring at DOE sites, facilities, areas, operations, and...

342

A comparative analysis of accident risks in fossil, hydro, and nuclear energy chains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents a comparative assessment of severe accident risks in the energy sector, based on the historical experience of fossil (coal, oil, natural gas, and LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas)) and hydro chains contained in the comprehensive Energy-related Severe Accident Database (ENSAD), as well as Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for the nuclear chain. Full energy chains were considered because accidents can take place at every stage of the chain. Comparative analyses for the years 1969-2000 included a total of 1870 severe ({>=} 5 fatalities) accidents, amounting to 81,258 fatalities. Although 79.1% of all accidents and 88.9% of associated fatalities occurred in less developed, non-OECD countries, industrialized OECD countries dominated insured losses (78.0%), reflecting their substantially higher insurance density and stricter safety regulations. Aggregated indicators and frequency-consequence (F-N) curves showed that energy-related accident risks in non-OECD countries are distinctly higher than in OECD countries. Hydropower in non-OECD countries and upstream stages within fossil energy chains are most accident-prone. Expected fatality rates are lowest for Western hydropower and nuclear power plants; however, the maximum credible consequences can be very large. Total economic damages due to severe accidents are substantial, but small when compared with natural disasters. Similarly, external costs associated with severe accidents are generally much smaller than monetized damages caused by air pollution.

Burgherr, P.; Hirschberg, S. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Severe Accident Phenomenology Analyses and Fission Gas Release in Advanced Nuclear Reactors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this work is to contribute to qualify a model in order to simulate the progression of a severe accident (SA), evaluating the (more)

MAZZINI, GUIDO

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Strategies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Strategies < LEDSGP‎ | Transportation Toolkit(Redirected from Transportation Toolkit/Strategies) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Transportation Toolkit Home Tools Training Contacts Avoid, Shift, Improve Framework The avoid, shift, improve (ASI) framework enables development stakeholders to holistically design low emissions transport strategies by assessing opportunities to avoid the need for travel, shift to less carbon-intensive modes, and improve on conventional technologies, infrastructure, and policies. Avoid Trips and Reduce Travel Demand

345

LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Strategies/Improve | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Strategies/Improve < LEDSGP‎ | Transportation Toolkit‎ | Strategies(Redirected from Transportation Toolkit/Strategies/Improve) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Transportation Toolkit Home Tools Training Contacts Avoid, Shift, Improve Framework The avoid, shift, improve (ASI) framework enables development stakeholders to holistically design low-emission transport strategies by assessing opportunities to avoid the need for travel, shift to less carbon-intensive modes, and improve on conventional technologies, infrastructure, and

346

Transportation Assessment Toolkit/Home | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Transportation Assessment Toolkit/Home < Transportation Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Home Transport Topics Ask an Expert Training Contact us What are the key actions necessary to implementing a transportation system LEDS? Action 1: Evaluate the existing transport system Action 2: Develop BAU scenario Action 3: Assess opportunities Avoid-Shift-Improve framework of strategies Action 4: Develop alternative scenarios Action 5: Prioritize and plan Action 6: Implement and monitor Transportation Assessment Toolkit Train licensed.png Transportation Assessment Toolkit Information licensed.png Transportation Assessment Toolkit Learning licensed.png

347

Transportation Planning & Decision Science Group Transportation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award on January 16, 2013, during the Chairman's Luncheon at the 92nd Annual Transportation Research Board (TRB) Meeting in Washington, DC. Dr. Greene was honored for his...

348

Community Involvement Fund | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Community Involvement Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Overview The success of EM's legacy waste cleanup mission depends largely on the support of informed and engaged stakeholders. Cleanup activities have the potential to affect the health of the public, the environment, and the future of the communities that either host or are located near EM sites. Therefore, it is critical that EM receive public input from local citizens and community organizations prior to making cleanup decisions. In December 2010, EM partnered with the New Mexico Community Foundation

349

Alternative Transportation ExpoAlternative Transportation ExpoAlternative Transportation Expo SPONSORED BY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alternative Transportation ExpoAlternative Transportation ExpoAlternative Transportation Expo providers,Exhibits and vehicles from auto manufacturers, energy providers, entrepreneurs, transportation providers, and an art contest.entrepreneurs, transportation providers, and an art contest

de Lijser, Peter

350

LARGEST EVER CASTOR TRANSPORT TO GORLEBEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from 11-14 November. Thousands of protesters took part in actions against the transport. As with previous transports, protests delayed the transport by several hours, although the massive police presence ensured that the transport eventually reached Gorleben. (577.5459) WISE Amsterdam The idea behind transporting 12 Castor nuclear waste casks at the same time was essentially to save money. Instead of transporting 6 nuclear waste casks twice a year, the authorities decided to transport 12 casks once a year, so that the authorities only need to organize one massive police operation, involving around 15,000 police and border guards, per year. For the authorities, there are other advantages: only one international outcry per year about the repression that occurs during every transport, only once per year this time conveniently after the elections that the Gorleben transport highlights yet again the inconsistency of the consensus agreement on nuclear phaseout. And, of course, only once per year that protesters, despite being massively outnumbered by the police, succeed in blocking the transport, at least temporarily, in several places along its route. This time, the transport was blocked 11 times by non-violent direct actions at several locations on its route through Germany (1). The largest of these was when over 1,200 people sat down in the road for over 5 hours near Laase, on the final part of the waste convoys journey. And this time, police actions left 13 people seriously injured (2). Hundreds of people were arrested, of which at least 180 were detained in bad conditions for longer than German law permits (3). At one point, police took their time with processing documents a trick to keep people detained for longer by delaying the work of the judges who needed to approve their detentions (4). The police even banned a head teacher from his own school when he pointed out that they did not have the correct papers to occupy his

unknown authors

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Analysis Doug Ammerman, (505) 845-8158 Structural analysis utilizes computer design and analysis tools to provide package designers and certifiers with the most accurate method of determining package response to transportation environments. Computer analysis is an application of known engineering principles that take advantage of high-power computing capabilities in solving the response of computer models to various environments with complex mathematical calculations. It can be used for package certification by generating a computer model of a test object (package) and subjecting it to an accident environment to understand its response. A computer model must be constructed with the same weights, dimensions, hardnesses, specific heat, conduction, etc. as an

352

Accident Fault Trees for Defense Waste Processing Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document fault tree analyses which have been completed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) safety analysis. Logic models for equipment failures and human error combinations that could lead to flammable gas explosions in various process tanks, or failure of critical support systems were developed for internal initiating events and for earthquakes. These fault trees provide frequency estimates for support systems failures and accidents that could lead to radioactive and hazardous chemical releases both on-site and off-site. Top event frequency results from these fault trees will be used in further APET analyses to calculate accident risk associated with DWPF facility operations. This report lists and explains important underlying assumptions, provides references for failure data sources, and briefly describes the fault tree method used. Specific commitments from DWPF to provide new procedural/administrative controls or system design changes are listed in the ''Facility Commitments'' section. The purpose of the ''Assumptions'' section is to clarify the basis for fault tree modeling, and is not necessarily a list of items required to be protected by Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs).

Sarrack, A.G.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

353

An analysis of evacuation options for nuclear accidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report we consider the threat posed by the accidental release of radionuclides from a nuclear power plant. The objective is to establish relationships between radiation dose and the cost of evacuation under a wide variety of conditions. The dose can almost always be reduced by evacuating the population from a larger area. However, extending the evacuation zone outward will cause evacuation costs to increase. The purpose of this analysis was to provide the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) a data base for evaluating whether implementation costs and risks averted could be used to justify evacuation at lower doses. The procedures used and results of these analyses are being made available as background information for use by others. We develop cost/dose relationships for 54 scenarios that are based upon the severity of the reactor accident, meteorological conditions during the release of radionuclides into the environment, and the angular width of the evacuation zone. The 54 scenarios are derived from combinations of three accident severity levels, six meteorological conditions and evacuation zone widths of 70{degree}, 90{degree}, and 180{degree}.

Tawil, J.J.; Strenge, D.L.; Schultz, R.W. [Battelle Memorial Inst., Richland, WA (United States)

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

PERSPECTIVES ON A DOE CONSEQUENCE INPUTS FOR ACCIDENT ANALYSIS APPLICATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Department of Energy (DOE) accident analysis for establishing the required control sets for nuclear facility safety applies a series of simplifying, reasonably conservative assumptions regarding inputs and methodologies for quantifying dose consequences. Most of the analytical practices are conservative, have a technical basis, and are based on regulatory precedent. However, others are judgmental and based on older understanding of phenomenology. The latter type of practices can be found in modeling hypothetical releases into the atmosphere and the subsequent exposure. Often the judgments applied are not based on current technical understanding but on work that has been superseded. The objective of this paper is to review the technical basis for the major inputs and assumptions in the quantification of consequence estimates supporting DOE accident analysis, and to identify those that could be reassessed in light of current understanding of atmospheric dispersion and radiological exposure. Inputs and assumptions of interest include: Meteorological data basis; Breathing rate; and Inhalation dose conversion factor. A simple dose calculation is provided to show the relative difference achieved by improving the technical bases.

(NOEMAIL), K; Jonathan Lowrie, J; David Thoman (NOEMAIL), D; Austin Keller (NOEMAIL), A

2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

Advanced sodium fast reactor accident source terms : research needs.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An expert opinion elicitation has been used to evaluate phenomena that could affect releases of radionuclides during accidents at sodium-cooled fast reactors. The intent was to identify research needed to develop a mechanistic model of radionuclide release for licensing and risk assessment purposes. Experts from the USA, France, the European Union, and Japan identified phenomena that could affect the release of radionuclides under hypothesized accident conditions. They qualitatively evaluated the importance of these phenomena and the need for additional experimental research. The experts identified seven phenomena that are of high importance and have a high need for additional experimental research: High temperature release of radionuclides from fuel during an energetic eventEnergetic interactions between molten reactor fuel and sodium coolant and associated transfer of radionuclides from the fuel to the coolantEntrainment of fuel and sodium bond material during the depressurization of a fuel rod with breached claddingRates of radionuclide leaching from fuel by liquid sodiumSurface enrichment of sodium pools by dissolved and suspended radionuclidesThermal decomposition of sodium iodide in the containment atmosphereReactions of iodine species in the containment to form volatile organic iodides. Other issues of high importance were identified that might merit further research as development of the mechanistic model of radionuclide release progressed.

Powers, Dana Auburn; Clement, Bernard [IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France; Denning, Richard [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH] Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Ohno, Shuji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan] Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan; Zeyen, Roland [Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Advanced sodium fast reactor accident source terms : research needs.  

SciTech Connect

An expert opinion elicitation has been used to evaluate phenomena that could affect releases of radionuclides during accidents at sodium-cooled fast reactors. The intent was to identify research needed to develop a mechanistic model of radionuclide release for licensing and risk assessment purposes. Experts from the USA, France, the European Union, and Japan identified phenomena that could affect the release of radionuclides under hypothesized accident conditions. They qualitatively evaluated the importance of these phenomena and the need for additional experimental research. The experts identified seven phenomena that are of high importance and have a high need for additional experimental research: High temperature release of radionuclides from fuel during an energetic eventEnergetic interactions between molten reactor fuel and sodium coolant and associated transfer of radionuclides from the fuel to the coolantEntrainment of fuel and sodium bond material during the depressurization of a fuel rod with breached claddingRates of radionuclide leaching from fuel by liquid sodiumSurface enrichment of sodium pools by dissolved and suspended radionuclidesThermal decomposition of sodium iodide in the containment atmosphereReactions of iodine species in the containment to form volatile organic iodides. Other issues of high importance were identified that might merit further research as development of the mechanistic model of radionuclide release progressed.

Powers, Dana Auburn; Clement, Bernard [IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France; Denning, Richard [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH] Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Ohno, Shuji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan] Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan; Zeyen, Roland [Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Worldwide health effects of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study quantifies worldwide health effects of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident on 11 March 2011. Effects are quantified with a 3-D global atmospheric model driven by emission estimates and evaluated against daily worldwide Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) measurements and observed deposition rates. Inhalation exposure, ground-level external exposure, and atmospheric external exposure pathways of radioactive iodine-131, cesium-137, and cesium-134 released from Fukushima are accounted for using a linear no-threshold (LNT) model of human exposure. Exposure due to ingestion of contaminated food and water is estimated by extrapolation. We estimate an additional 130 (151100) cancer-related mortalities and 180 (241800) cancer-related morbidities incorporating uncertainties associated with the exposuredose and doseresponse models used in the study. We also discuss the LNT models uncertainty at low doses. Sensitivities to emission rates, gas to particulate I-131 partitioning, and the mandatory evacuation radius around the plant are also explored, and may increase upper bound mortalities and morbidities in the ranges above to 1300 and 2500, respectively. Radiation exposure to workers at the plant is projected to result in 2 to 12 morbidities. An additional 600 mortalities have been reported due to non-radiological causes such as mandatory evacuations. Lastly, a hypothetical accident at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant in

John E. Ten Hoeve A; Mark Z. Jacobson B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Efficient Schemes for Reducing Numerical Dispersion in Modeling Multiphase Transport through Porous and Fractured Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

involved. These heat-transfer processes are complicated byprocesses of multiphase flow, chemical transport, and heat transfertransport, and heat transfer, we assume that these processes

Wu, Yu-Shu; Forsyth, Peter A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Transportation | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Fuels, Engines, Emissions Transportation Analysis Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Propulsion Materials Lightweight Materials Bioenergy Fuel Cell Technologies Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Areas | Transportation SHARE Transportation Research ORNL researcher Jim Szybist uses a variable valve-train engine to evaluate different types of fuels, including ethanol blends, and their effects on the combustion process in an internal combustion engine. Oak Ridge National Laboratory brings together science and technology experts from across scientific disciplines to partner with government and industry in addressing transportation challenges. Research objectives are

360

A Compositional Mathematical Model of Machines Transporting Rigid Objects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present models of various elements of a plant that involves the transportation of lumped material. An application context is provided by a project on diagnosing disturbances in food packaging plants and, more specifically, bottling plants. While there ...

Peter Struss; Axel Kather; Dominik Schneider; Tobias Voigt

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Safety philosophy in the transportation of radioactive material  

SciTech Connect

From Winter meeting of American Society of Mechanical Engineers; Detroit, Michigan, USA (11 Nov 1973). The radiological'' and common cause risks'' involved in transporting radioactive materials are briefly discussed. (TFD)

Langhaar, J.W.

1974-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

362

Rate Adjustments and Public Involvement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rate Adjustments and Public Involvement Documents Rate Adjustments and Public Involvement Documents CRSP Transmission 9/16/2013 WAPA-161 FRN, CRSP transmission and ancillary services rates extension Letter announcing two-year extension to CRSP transmission and ancillary services rates Letter announcing revised CRSP transmission rates for FY 2014 Accompanying calculation table for FY 2014 CRSP transmission rate letter Letter announcing revised CRSP transmission rates for FY 2013 Letter announcing revised CRSP transmission rates for FY 2012 Letter announcing revised CRSP transmission rates for FY 2011 Letter announcing revised CRSP transmission rates for FY 2010 SLCA/IP 9/16/2013 WAPA-161 FRN, SLCA/IP firm power rate extension Letter announcing two-year extension to SLCA/IP firm power rate SLCA/IP Tentative Rate Adjustment Schedule

363

A SUMMARY OF INCIDENTS INVOLVING USAEC SHIPMENTS OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL, 1957-1961  

SciTech Connect

Data are summarized on incidents that have been sustained by the AEC in the transport of radioactive materials from 1957 through 1981. In the period covered by this report there were 47 incidents reported. Twenty-nine did not result in the release of radioactive materials. Of the remaining 18 cases there was none that involved any serious radiological consequences or involved costly cleanup. Six of the incidents involved onsite movements of materials. The incidents are classified in accordance with the type of radiation release that occurred, mode of transport, and type of incident. Photographs are included for a number of the incidents. (C.H.)

Patterson, D.E.; DeFatta, V.P.

1963-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Local Transportation Sales Taxes: California's Experiment in Transportation Finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Section 131051, County Transportation Expenditure Plans. Fresno County Transportation Authority, Annual Report (1994-D.A. Niemeier, Comparing Transportation Project Development

Crabbe, Amber E.; Hiatt, Rachel; Poliwka, Susan D.; Wachs, Martin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Intelligent Transportation Systems Deployment Statistics Database  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, transportation agencies in 108 metropolitan areas involved with freeway, arterial, and transit management, public to insights regarding future program changes, redefinition of goals, or maintenance of current program Aviation Safety Air Traffic Management Analysis Data, Statistical Analysis Geo-Spatial Information Tools

366

Analysis of Accidents at the Pakistan Research Reactor-1 Using Proposed Mixed-Fuel (HEU and LEU) Core  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) was converted from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel in 1991. The reactor is running successfully, with an upgraded power level of 10 MW. To save money on the purchase of costly fresh LEU fuel elements, the use of less burnt HEU spent fuel elements along with the present LEU fuel elements is being considered. The proposal calls for the HEU fuel elements to be placed near the thermal column to gain the required excess reactivity. In the present study the safety analysis of a proposed mixed-fuel core has been carried out at a calculated steady-state power level of 9.8 MW. Standard computer codes and correlations were employed to compute various parameters. Initiating events in reactivity-induced accidents involve various modes of reactivity insertion, namely, start-up accident, accidental drop of a fuel element on the core, flooding of a beam tube with water, and removal of an in-pile experiment during reactor operation. For each of these transients, time histories of reactor power, energy released, temperature, and reactivity were determined.

Bokhari, Ishtiaq H. [Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (Pakistan)

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Automated container transport system between inland port and terminals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we propose a new concept called automated container transportation system between inland port and terminals (ACTIPOT) which involves the use of automated trucks to transfer containers between an inland port and container terminals. The ... Keywords: Automated container transportation system, Petri nets, automated truck, supervisory control, vehicle control

Jianlong Zhang; Petros A. Ioannou; Anastasios Chassiakos

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Analysis of traffic accident severity using Decision Rules via Decision Trees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Decision Tree (DT) is a potential method for studying traffic accident severity. One of its main advantages is that Decision Rules (DRs) can be extracted from its structure. And these DRs can be used to identify safety problems and establish certain ... Keywords: Decision Rules, Decision Trees, Road safety, Severity, Traffic accident

JoaquN AbellN, Griselda LPez, Juan De OA

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Recommendations for Analyzing Accidents under the National Environmental Policy Act (July 2002)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National National Environmental Policy Act RECOMMENDATIONS for ANALYZING ACCIDENTS under the NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT N E P A July 2002 U.S. Department of Energy Environment, Safety and Health Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance Recommendations for Analyzing Accidents under NEPA Contents 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Definition............................................................................................................................ 1 1.2 Purpose.............................................................................................................................. 1 1.3 Sliding Scale ......................................................................................................................

370

SD-GIS-based temporal-spatial simulation of water quality in sudden water pollution accidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

System dynamics (SD) is well suited for studying dynamic nonlinear complex systems. In this paper, SD is applied to a rapid-onset water pollution accident using a 1-D water quality model and a conceptual GIS-SD framework is constructed to simulate the ... Keywords: System dynamics, Temporal-spatial simulation, Water pollution accidents

Bo Zhang; Yu Qin; Mingxiang Huang; Qiang Sun; Shun Li; Liqiang Wang; Chaohui Yu

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

A novel approach for traffic accidents sanitary resource allocation based on multi-objective genetic algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of communication technologies integrated in vehicles allows creating new protocols and applications to improve assistance in traffic accidents. Combining this technology with intelligent systems will permit to automate most of the decisions ... Keywords: Multi-objective genetic algorithms, Resource allocation, Traffic accidents assistance

Manuel Fogue; Piedad Garrido; Francisco J. Martinez; Juan-Carlos Cano; Carlos T. Calafate; Pietro Manzoni

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

transportation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

transportation transportation Dataset Summary Description The 2009 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) provides information to assist transportation planners and policy makers who need comprehensive data on travel and transportation patterns in the United States. The 2009 NHTS updates information gathered in the 2001 NHTS and in prior Nationwide Personal Transportation Surveys (NPTS) conducted in 1969, 1977, 1983, 1990, and 1995. Source U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration Date Released February 28th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords NHTS TEF transportation Transportation Energy Futures travel trip Data application/zip icon Travel Day Trip File (zip, 42.6 MiB) application/zip icon Household File (zip, 5 MiB) application/zip icon Person File (zip, 17.4 MiB)

373

Linear Motor Powered Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This special issue on linear-motor powered transportation covers both supporting technologies and innovative transport systems in various parts of the World, as this technology moves from the lab to commercial operations. ...

Thornton, Richard D.

374

Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Cross-Gyre Transports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

What is the fate of surface Ekman transport entering a subtropical gyre through its zonal boundaries? This question is investigated by resolving interior transport of a deep surface layer into nonvortical (potential flow) and nondivergent (...

G. T. Csanady

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

WIPP Transportation (FINAL)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant U.S. Department Of Energy The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established an elaborate system for safely transporting...

377

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prices and alternative transport fuels; R&D outcomes in several areas, especially biomassprices and the economic viability of alternative transport fuels; R&D outcomes in several areas, especially biomass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Transportation Demand This  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation Demand Transportation Demand This page inTenTionally lefT blank 75 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific and associated technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight

379

Anomalous radial transport in tokamak edge plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.2 Transport in tokamakAnomalous radial transport model for edge plasma . . . . . .Anomalous transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Bodi, Vasudeva Raghavendra Kowsik

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Transportation and packaging resource guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this resource guide is to provide a convenient reference document of information that may be useful to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractor personnel involved in packaging and transportation activities. An attempt has been made to present the terminology of DOE community usage as it currently exists. DOE`s mission is changing with emphasis on environmental cleanup. The terminology or nomenclature that has resulted from this expanded mission is included for the packaging and transportation user for reference purposes. Older terms still in use during the transition have been maintained. The Packaging and Transportation Resource Guide consists of four sections: Sect. 1, Introduction; Sect. 2, Abbreviations and Acronyms; Sect. 3, Definitions; and Sect. 4, References for packaging and transportation of hazardous materials and related activities, and Appendices A and B. Information has been collected from DOE Orders and DOE documents; U.S Department of Transportation (DOT), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations; and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standards and other international documents. The definitions included in this guide may not always be a regulatory definition but are the more common DOE usage. In addition, the definitions vary among regulatory agencies. It is, therefore, suggested that if a definition is to be used in a regulatory or a legal compliance issue, the definition should be verified with the appropriate regulation. To assist in locating definitions in the regulations, a listing of all definition sections in the regulations are included in Appendix B. In many instances, the appropriate regulatory reference is indicated in the right-hand margin.

Arendt, J.W.; Gove, R.M.; Welch, M.J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Argonne Transportation Current News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

materials (pdf) clean cities logo Clean Cities Transportation Workshop for Almaty, Kazakhstan Jeff Chamberlain Jeff Chamberlain discusses Argonne's breakthrough cathode...

383

NIST Transportation to NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transportation to NIST. The National Institute of Standards and Technology is located approximately 25 miles north of Washington ...

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

384

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy. OECD, 2004b: Current international shipping market trends -trends continue. In contrast, transport energy use in the mature market

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Transportation Security Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) final rules issued in 2003 required persons who offer for transportation or transport certain hazardous materials to develop and implement security plans. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed a Transportation Security Implementation Working Group, which included representation from the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI), to identify key projects, which were documented in the original report in 2005. This report updates information in the original rep...

2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

386

Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRACTICE FOR CALCULATING TRANSPORT PROPERTIES V. 1. T HEcases; (4) performing more transport property measurementsFOR THE CALCULATION OF TRANSPORT PROPERTIES: III. EVALUATION

Brown, N.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Transportation Infrastructure and Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Better Forecasting Tool for Transportation Decision-making, Mineta Transportation Institute, San Jose Stateat the 2008 meeting of the Transportation Research Board and

Boarnet, Marlon G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Transportation Analysis | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Analysis SHARE Transportation Analysis Transportation Analysis efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory contribute to the efficient, safe, and free movement of...

389

FCT Technology Validation: Transportation Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Projects to someone by E-mail Share FCT Technology Validation: Transportation Projects on Facebook Tweet about FCT Technology Validation: Transportation Projects on...

390

FINAL Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC) January 28-30, 2002 New Orleans, Louisiana Meeting Summary The Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC) held its 20 th semi-annual meeting January 28-30, 2002, in New Orleans, Louisiana. This was the tenth anniversary of TEC, and 102 attendees from national, State, Tribal, and local government organizations; industry and professional groups and other interested parties in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs, met to address a variety of issues related to DOE's radioactive materials transportation activities. The TEC process includes the involvement of these key stakeholders in developing solutions to DOE transportation issues through their actual participation in the work product. These members provide continuing and improved

391

Fast Transient And Spatially Non-Homogenous Accident Analysis Of Two-Dimensional Cylindrical Nuclear Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research about fast transient and spatially non-homogenous nuclear reactor accident analysis of two-dimensional nuclear reactor has been done. This research is about prediction of reactor behavior is during accident. In the present study, space-time diffusion equation is solved by using direct methods which consider spatial factor in detail during nuclear reactor accident simulation. Set of equations that obtained from full implicit finite-difference discretization method is solved by using iterative methods ADI (Alternating Direct Implicit). The indication of accident is decreasing macroscopic absorption cross-section that results large external reactivity. The power reactor has a peak value before reactor has new balance condition. Changing of temperature reactor produce a negative Doppler feedback reactivity. The reactivity will reduce excess positive reactivity. Temperature reactor during accident is still in below fuel melting point which is in secure condition.

Yulianti, Yanti [Dept. of Physics, Universitas Lampung (UNILA), Jl. Sumantri Brojonegor No.1 Bandar Lampung (Indonesia); Dept. of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB), Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung (Indonesia); Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Khotimah, S. N. [Dept. of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB), Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung (Indonesia); Shafii, M. Ali [Dept. of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB), Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung (Indonesia); Dept. of Physics, Universitas Andalas (UNAND), Kampus Limau Manis, Padang, Sumatera Barat (Indonesia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

392

Transportation Research and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Transportation Research and Analysis to supercomputers, we can simulate how individual bridges interact with sediment transport, local topography the bridge. Computer-based research at this highly detailed level promises to prevent future bridge disasters

Kemner, Ken

393

Nevada University Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

illnesses and disabilities · Development of professionals and future leaders in the area of transportationNUTC Nevada University Transportation Center University of Nevada, Las Vegas Sustainable Transporation in Arid Regions 2007-2009 Biennial Report 5 #12;2007-2009 Nevada University Transportation Center

Ahmad, Sajjad

394

PalladianDigest Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PalladianDigest CONNECT. EMPOWER. GROW. Tackling Transportation Challenges Nebraska has been a vital link in the nation's transportation system since the days when carts, wagons to University of Nebraska­Lincoln research. That's fine with UNL transportation researchers, said Larry Rilett

Farritor, Shane

395

Northwestern University Transportation Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Northwestern University Transportation Center 2011 Business Advisory Committee NUTC #12;#12;I have the pleasure of presenting our Business Advisory Committee members--a distinguished group of transportation industry lead- ers who have partnered with the Transportation Center in advancing the state of knowledge

Bustamante, Fabián E.

396

Introduction to Transportation Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction to Transportation Planning CMP 4710/6710 Fall 2012 3 Credit Hours Room: ARCH 229 on a Saturday night, transportation is not an objective in and of itself, but a means to carry out the functions of daily living (i.e., it's a "derived good"). As a consequence, the transportation systems we build

Tipple, Brett

397

Louisiana Transportation Research Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Louisiana Transportation Research Center LTRC www.ltrc.lsu.edu 2012-13 ANNUALREPORT #12;The Louisiana Transportation Research Center (LTRC) is a research, technology transfer, and training center administered jointly by the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (DOTD) and Louisiana State

Harms, Kyle E.

398

TRANSPORTATION: THE POTENTIAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERMODAL TRANSPORTATION: THE POTENTIAL AND THE CHALLENGE A Summary Report 2003 #12;June 2003 To the Reader This report summarizes the second James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology. Over two days, we explored the chal- lenges and opportunities in intermodal transportation, addressing

Minnesota, University of

399

Transportation Demand Management Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Demand Management Plan FALL 2009 #12;T r a n s p o r t a t i o n D e m a n d M a n the transportation impacts the expanded enrollment will have. Purpose and Goal The primary goal of the TDM plan is to ensure that adequate measures are undertaken and maintained to minimize the transportation impacts

400

FY 2012 USED FUEL DISPOSITION CAMPAIGN TRANSPORTATION TASK REPORT ON INL EFFORTS SUPPORTING THE MODERATOR EXCLUSION CONCEPT AND STANDARDIZED TRANSPORTATION  

SciTech Connect

Following the defunding of the Yucca Mountain Project, it is reasonable to assume that commercial used fuel will remain in storage for a longer time period than initially assumed. Previous transportation task work in FY 2011, under the Department of Energys Office of Nuclear Energy, Used Fuel Disposition Campaign, proposed an alternative for safely transporting used fuel regardless of the structural integrity of the used fuel, baskets, poisons, or storage canisters after an extended period of storage. This alternative assures criticality safety during transportation by implementing a concept that achieves moderator exclusion (no in-leakage of moderator into the used fuel cavity). By relying upon a component inside of the transportation cask that provides a watertight function, a strong argument can be made that moderator intrusion is not credible and should not be a required assumption for criticality evaluations during normal or hypothetical accident conditions of transportation. This Transportation Task report addresses the assigned FY 2012 work that supports the proposed moderator exclusion concept as well as a standardized transportation system. The two tasks assigned were to (1) promote the proposed moderator exclusion concept to both regulatory and nuclear industry audiences and (2) advance specific technical issues in order to improve American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Division 3 rules for storage and transportation containments. The common point behind both of the assigned tasks is to provide more options that can be used to resolve current issues being debated regarding the future transportation of used fuel after extended storage.

D. K. Morton

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Application of accident progression event tree technology to the Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility SAR analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Accident Analysis in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has recently undergone an upgrade. Non-reactor SARs at SRS (and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites) use probabilistic techniques to assess the frequency of accidents at their facilities. This paper describes the application of an extension of the Accident Progression Event Tree (APET) approach to accidents at the SRS DWPF. The APET technique allows an integrated model of the facility risk to be developed, where previous probabilistic accident analyses have been limited to the quantification of the frequency and consequences of individual accident scenarios treated independently. Use of an APET allows a more structured approach, incorporating both the treatment of initiators that are common to more than one accident, and of accident progression at the facility.

Brandyberry, M.D.; Baker, W.H.; Wittman, R.S. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Amos, C.N. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

The Accident Sequence Precursor program: Methods improvements and current results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in the US NRC Accident Sequence Precursor program methods since the initial program evaluations of 1969-81 operational events are described, along with insights from the review of 1984-85 events. For 1984-85, the number of significant precursors was consistent with the number observed in 1980-81, dominant sequences associated with significant events were reasonably consistent with PRA estimates for BWRs, but lacked the contribution due to small-break LOCAs previously observed and predicted in PWRs, and the frequency of initiating events and non-recoverable system failures exhibited some reduction compared to 1980-81. Operational events which provide information concerning additional PRA modeling needs are also described.

Minarick, J.W.; Manning, F.M.; Harris, J.D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Down syndrome clusters in Germany after the Chernobyl accident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In two independent studies using different approaches and covering West Berlin and Bavaria, respectively, highly significant temporal clusters of Down syndrome were found. Both sharp increases occurred in areas receiving relatively low Chernobyl fallout and concomitant radiation exposures. Only for the Berlin cluster was fallout present at the time of the affected meiosis, whereas the Nuremberg cluster preceded the radioactive contamination by 1 month. Hypotheses on possible causal relationships are compared. Radiation from the Chernobyl accident is an unlikely factor, because the associated cumulative dose was so low in comparison with natural background. Microdosimetric considerations would indicate that fewer than 1 in 200 oocyte nuclei would have experienced an ionizing event from Chernobyl radioactivity. Given the lack of understanding of what causes Down syndrome, other than factors associated with increased maternal age, additional research into environmental and infectious risk factors is warranted. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Burkart, W.; Grosche, B.; Schoetzau, A. [Institute for Radiation Hygiene, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The role of chemical reactions in the Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that chemical reactions played an essential role in the Chernobyl accident at all of its stages. It is important that the reactor before the explosion was at maximal xenon poisoning, and its reactivity, apparently, was not destroyed by the explosion. The reactivity release due to decay of Xe-235 on the second day after the explosion led to a reactor power of 80-110 MW. Owing to this power, the chemical reactions of reduction of uranium, plutonium, and other metals at a temperature of about 2000 Degree-Sign C occurred in the core. The yield of fission products thus sharply increased. Uranium and other metals flew down in the bottom water communications and rooms. After reduction of the uranium and its separation from the graphite, the chain reaction stopped, the temperature of the core decreased, and the activity yield stopped.

Grishanin, E. I., E-mail: egrishanin@orexovo.net [Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Hypothetical accident conditions thermal analysis of the 5320 package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An axisymmetric model of the 5320 package was created to perform hypothetical accident conditions (HAC) thermal calculations. The analyses assume the 5320 package contains 359 grams of plutonium-238 (203 Watts) in the form of an oxide powder at a minimum density of 2.4 g/cc or at a maximum density of 11.2 g/cc. The solution from a non-solar 100 F ambient steady-state analysis was used as the initial conditions for the fire transient. A 30 minute 1,475 F fire transient followed by cooling via natural convection and thermal radiation to a 100 F non-solar environment was analyzed to determine peak component temperatures and vessel pressures. The 5320 package was considered to be horizontally suspended within the fire during the entire transient.

Hensel, S.J.; Gromada, R.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

Probabilistic Accident Consequence Uncertainty - A Joint CEC/USNRC Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The joint USNRC/CEC consequence uncertainty study was chartered after the development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS in the U.S. and COSYMA in Europe. Both the USNRC and CEC had a vested interest in expanding the knowledge base of the uncertainty associated with consequence modeling, and teamed up to co-sponsor a consequence uncertainty study. The information acquired from the study was expected to provide understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of current models as well as a basis for direction of future research. This paper looks at the elicitation process implemented in the joint study and discusses some of the uncertainty distributions provided by eight panels of experts from the U.S. and Europe that were convened to provide responses to the elicitation. The phenomenological areas addressed by the expert panels include atmospheric dispersion and deposition, deposited material and external doses, food chain, early health effects, late health effects and internal dosimetry.

Gregory, Julie J.; Harper, Frederick T.

1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

407

MACCS2: An improved code for assessing nuclear accident consequences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MACCS computer code was developed to predict probabilistic assessments of the consequences from severe accidents at nuclear power plants.For DOE applications and sensitivity studies of emergency response actions at nuclear power plants, MACCS2 represents a significant improvement in modeling flexibility over MACCS 1.5. This increased flexibility is obtained with an approximate doubling of the code`s run time and memory requirements. The software can be adapted to most computers. An executable is included in the code package for 386/486 IBM-compatible personal computers with 8 megabytes of random access memory (RAM). MACCS2 is being benchmarked against the RSAC-5 code developed by INEL. A new set of code documentation is being prepared that describes the use of the code, the models implemented, and the code benchmarking. Current plans are to have the code package (including source code) available to the public at the end of fiscal year 1994.

Chanin, D.I.; Banjac, V.; Miller, L.A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

Corium Physical Properties for Severe Accident R and D  

SciTech Connect

Corium is a mixture formed - in the hypothetical case of a severe accident - of molten core and products from the decomposition of the internal structures, the vessel and the concrete. Before any calculation, any modelling, any experimental interpretation can be made, it is necessary to estimate the corium physical properties. Corium being a multicomponent mixture, special attention has been given at CEA to the mixing laws for multi-phase, multi-constituent mixtures. Compared to the previous database, considerable progress in characterizing of corium constituents physical properties has been achieved. The thermo-physical data of corium constituents for pure components and mixtures and the different physical laws that are recommended by experts are now implemented in the CORPRO (Corium Properties) database. (authors)

Journeau, C.; Piluso, P.; Frolov, K.N. [CEA Cadarache, Severe Accident Mastering Laboratory (DEN/DTN/STRI/LMA), 13108 St Paul lez Durance (France)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Tools | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Tools < LEDSGP‎ | Transportation Toolkit(Redirected from Transportation Toolkit/Tools) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Transportation Toolkit Home Tools Training Contacts Tools for Low Emission Development Strategies in Transportation Use one of the search methods below to find tools for building sustainable, low emission development strategies (LEDS) for your country's transportation system. These resources focus on strategies to limit air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions. Learn more in the report on LEDS for transportation. If you are aware of a relevant technical resource not

410

LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Training | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Training < LEDSGP‎ | Transportation Toolkit(Redirected from Transportation Toolkit/Training) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Transportation Toolkit Home Tools Training Contacts Training for Low Emission Development Strategies in Transportation The LEDS GP Transport Working Group provides technical training and resources in the form of webinars, e-learning, live/recorded presentation videos, presentation files, and other knowledge exchange formats relevant to low emission development strategies in the transport sector. Below are

411

The issue of stress state during mechanical tests to assess cladding performance during a reactivity-initiated accident (RIA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Materials Properties for Light Water Reactor Accident Analysis", NUREG/CR-6150, INEL-96.0422, chapter 4

Motta, Arthur T.

412

Technical evaluation: 300 Area steam line valve accident  

SciTech Connect

On June 7, 1993, a journeyman power operator (JPO) was severely burned and later died as a result of the failure of a 6-in. valve that occurred when he attempted to open main steam supply (MSS) valve MSS-25 in the U-3 valve pit. The pit is located northwest of Building 331 in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. Figure 1-1 shows a layout of the 300 Area steam piping system including the U-3 steam valve pit. Figure 1-2 shows a cutaway view of the approximately 10- by 13- by 16-ft-high valve pit with its various steam valves and connecting piping. Valve MSS-25, an 8-in. valve, is located at the bottom of the pit. The failed 6-in. valve was located at the top of the pit where it branched from the upper portion of the 8-in. line at the 8- by 8- by 6-in. tee and was then ``blanked off`` with a blind flange. The purpose of this technical evaluation was to determine the cause of the accident that led to the failure of the 6-in. valve. The probable cause for the 6-in. valve failure was determined by visual, nondestructive, and destructive examination of the failed valve and by metallurgical analysis of the fractured region of the valve. The cause of the accident was ultimately identified by correlating the observed failure mode to the most probable physical phenomenon. Thermal-hydraulic analyses, component stress analyses, and tests were performed to verify that the probable physical phenomenon could be reasonably expected to produce the failure in the valve that was observed.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Transportation Business Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Transportation Business Plan is a step in the process of procuring the transportation system. It sets the context for business strategy decisions by providing pertinent background information, describing the legislation and policies governing transportation under the NWPA, and describing requirements of the transportation system. Included in the document are strategies for procuring shipping casks and transportation support services. In the spirit of the NWPA directive to utilize the private sector to the maximum extent possible, opportunities for business ventures are obvious throughout the system development cycle.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Transportation Planning & Decision Science Group Transportation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Viewer Unveiled at ITS-America Meeting in Nashville At the Annual Intelligent Transportation Association of America (ITS-A) meeting held in Nashville on April 22 - 24, the...

415

DOE Safety Metrics Indicator Program (SMIP) Fiscal Year 2000 Annual Report of Packaging- and Transportation-related Occurrences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been charged by the DOE National Transportation Program (NTP) with the responsibility of retrieving reports and information pertaining to packaging and transportation (P&T) incidents from the centralized Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database. These selected reports have been analyzed for trends, impact on P&T operations and safety concerns, and lessons learned (LL) in P&T operations. This task is designed not only to keep the NTP aware of what is occurring at DOE sites on a periodic basis, but also to highlight potential P&T problems that may need management attention and allow dissemination of LL to DOE Operations Offices, with the subsequent flow of information to contractors. The Safety Metrics Indicator Program (SMIP) was established by the NTP in fiscal year (FY) 1998 as an initiative to develop a methodology for reporting occurrences with the appropriate metrics to show rates and trends. One of its chief goals has been to augment historical reporting of occurrence-based information and present more meaningful statistics for comparison of occurrences. To this end, the SMIP established a severity weighting system for the classification of the occurrences, which would allow normalization of the data and provide a basis for trending analyses. The process for application of this methodology is documented in the September 1999 report DOE Packaging and Transportation Measurement Methodology for the Safety Metrics Indicator Program (SMIP). This annual report contains information on those P&T-related occurrences reported to the ORPS during the period from October 1, 1999, through September 30, 2000. Only those incidents that occur in preparation for transport, during transport, and during unloading of hazardous material are considered as packaging- or transportation-related occurrences. Other incidents with P&T significance, but not involving hazardous material (such as vehicle accidents or empty packagings), are not rated by the SMIP criteria but are archived in the SMIP Subsidiary Database of occurrences, a sub-database of the main SMIP P&T Occurrence Database. A total of 146 reports were classified by the SMIP criteria, of which 144 have been finalized. Trending comparisons were made with these reports and the 851 other occurrence reports (ORs) accumulated in the SMIP P&T Occurrence Database since FY 1994, all of which were also evaluated according to the SMIP criteria. Additionally, information on the number of shipments made by DOE carriers and the types of materials transported was obtained from the Enterprise Transportation Analysis System (ETAS), formerly the Shipment Mobility Accountability Collection. This information was used in conjunction with the Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System (TRAGIS, a GIS-based transportation and analysis model that replaces the older HIGHWAY and INTERLINE models) to estimate point-to-point mileage, yielding a metric of vehicle-miles or package-miles. This information was subsequently used to develop indicators for (1) determining the relative safety of DOE contractors who package and ship hazardous materials and (2) comparing of DOE P&T safety with that of private industry.

Dickerson, L.S.

2001-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

416

Study of Air Ingress Across the Duct During the Accident Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to study the fundamental physical phenoena associated with air ingress in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). Air ingress may occur due to a nupture of primary piping and a subsequent breach in the primary pressure boundary in helium-cooled and graphite-moderated VHTRs. Significant air ingress is a concern because it introduces potential to expose the fuel, graphite support rods, and core to a risk of severe graphite oxidation. Two of the most probable air ingress scenarios involve rupture of a control rod or fuel access standpipe, and rupture in the main coolant pipe on the lower part of the reactor pressure vessel. Therefor, establishing a fundamental understanding of air ingress phenomena is critical in order to rationally evaluate safety of existing VHTRs and develop new designs that mimimize these risks. But despite this importance, progress toward development these predictive capabilities has been slowed by the complex nature of the underlaying phenomena. The combination of interdiffusion among multiple species, molecular diffusion, natural convection, and complex geometries, as well as the multiple chemical reactions involved, impose significant roadblocks to both modeling and experiment design. The project team will employ a coordinated experimental and computational effort that will help gain a deeper understanding of multiphased air ingress phenomena. THis project will enhance advanced modeling and simulation methods, enabling calculation of nuclear power plant transients and accident scenarios with a high degree of confidence. The following are the project tasks: Perform particle image velocimetry measurement of multiphase air ingresses Perform computational fluid dynamics analysis of air ingress phenomena

Hassan, Yassin

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

417

National Transportation Stakeholders Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Stakeholders Forum Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 14-16, 2013 Tuesday, May 14 7:00 am - 5:00 pm Registration Niagara Foyer 7:00 am - 7:45 am Breakfast and Networking Grand A 8:00 am - 10:00 am National Updates for Transportation Stakeholder Groups and Guests - Panel Grand BC Moderator: John Giarrusso Jr., MA Emergency Management Agency / Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Co-Chair US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management - Steve O'Connor, Director, Office of Packaging & Transportation US Nuclear Regulatory Commission - Earl P. Easton, Senior Level Advisor (retired) and David W. Pstrak, Transportation and Storage Specialist, Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation

418

Transportation System Requirements Document  

SciTech Connect

This Transportation System Requirements Document (Trans-SRD) describes the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of this document is to define the system-level requirements for Transportation consistent with the CRWMS Requirement Document (CRD). These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presents an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. The interface identification and description are published in the CRWMS Interface Specification.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City of Lakes Minneapolis Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study #12;Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City of Lakes Background: · Currently, funding

Minnesota, University of

420

Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Panagiotis Scarlatos, Ph.D., Director Transportation Safety and Security #12;Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Partners #12 evacuations · Tracking systems for hazardous materials Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety

Fernandez, Eduardo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Arrival condition of spent fuel after storage, handling, and transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study conducted to determine the probable arrival condition of spent light-water reactor (LWR) fuel after handling and interim storage in spent fuel storage pools and subsequent handling and accident-free transport operations under normal or slightly abnormal conditions. The objective of this study was to provide information on the expected condition of spent LWR fuel upon arrival at interim storage or fuel reprocessing facilities or at disposal facilities if the fuel is declared a waste. Results of a literature survey and data evaluation effort are discussed. Preliminary threshold limits for storing, handling, and transporting unconsolidated spent LWR fuel are presented. The difficulty in trying to anticipate the amount of corrosion products (crud) that may be on spent fuel in future shipments is also discussed, and potential areas for future work are listed. 95 references, 3 figures, 17 tables.

Bailey, W.J.; Pankaskie, P.J.; Langstaff, D.C.; Gilbert, E.R.; Rising, K.H.; Schreiber, R.E.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Type B plutonium transport package development that uses metallic filaments and composite materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new package was developed for transporting Pu and U quantities that are currently carried in DOT-6M packages. It uses double containment with threaded closures and elastomeric seals. A composite overpack of metallic wire mesh and ceramic or quartz cloth insulation is provided for protection in accidents. Two prototypes were subjected to dynamic crush tests. A thermal computer model was developed and benchmarked by test results to predict package behavior in fires. The material performed isotropically in a global fashion. A Type B Pu transport package can be developed for DOE Pu shipments for less than $5000 if manufactured in quantity. 5 figs, 6 refs. (DLC)

Pierce, J.D.; Moya, J.L.; McClure, J.D.; Hohnstreiter, G.F. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Golliher, K.G. (USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, NM (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Use of burnup credit for transportation and storage  

SciTech Connect

Burnup credit is the application of the effects of fuel burnup to nuclear criticality design. When burnup credit is considered in the design of storage facilities and transportation casks for spent fuel, the objectives are to reduce the requirements for storage space and to increase the payload of casks with acceptable nuclear criticality safety margins. The spent-fuel carrying capacities of previous-generation transport casks have been limited primarily by requirements to remove heat and/or to provide shielding. Shielding and heat transfer requirements for casks designed to transport older spent fuel with longer decay times are reduced significantly. Thus a considerable weight margin is available to the designer for increasing the payload capacity. One method to achieve an increase in capacity is to reduce fuel assembly spacing. The amount of reduction in assembly spacing is limited by criticality and fuel support structural concerns. The optimum fuel assembly spacing provides the maximum cask loading within a basket that has adequate criticality control and sufficient structural integrity for regulatory accident scenarios. The incorporation of burnup credit in cask designs could result in considerable benefits in the transport of spent fuel. The acceptance of burnup credit for the design of transport casks depends on the resolution of system safety issues and the uncertainties that affect the determination of criticality safety margins. The remainder of this report will examine these issues and the integrated approach under way to resolve them. 20 refs., 2 figs.

Sanders, T.L.; Ewing, R.I. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Lake, W.H. (USDOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

WHEN MODEL MEETS REALITY A REVIEW OF SPAR LEVEL 2 MODEL AGAINST FUKUSHIMA ACCIDENT  

SciTech Connect

The Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models are a set of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) models used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to evaluate the risk of operations at U.S. nuclear power plants and provide inputs to risk informed regulatory process. A small number of SPAR Level 2 models have been developed mostly for feasibility study purpose. They extend the Level 1 models to include containment systems, group plant damage states, and model containment phenomenology and accident progression in containment event trees. A severe earthquake and tsunami hit the eastern coast of Japan in March 2011 and caused significant damages on the reactors in Fukushima Daiichi site. Station blackout (SBO), core damage, containment damage, hydrogen explosion, and intensive radioactivity release, which have been previous analyzed and assumed as postulated accident progression in PRA models, now occurred with various degrees in the multi-units Fukushima Daiichi site. This paper reviews and compares a typical BWR SPAR Level 2 model with the real accident progressions and sequences occurred in Fukushima Daiichi Units 1, 2, and 3. It shows that the SPAR Level 2 model is a robust PRA model that could very reasonably describe the accident progression for a real and complicated nuclear accident in the world. On the other hand, the comparison shows that the SPAR model could be enhanced by incorporating some accident characteristics for better representation of severe accident progression.

Zhegang Ma

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Analysis of Kuosheng Station Blackout Accident Using MELCOR 1.8.4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MELCOR code, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, is a fully integrated, relatively fast-running code that models the progression of severe accidents in commercial light water nuclear power plants (NPPs).A specific station blackout (SBO) accident for Kuosheng (BWR-6) NPP is simulated using the MELCOR 1.8.4 code. The MELCOR input deck for Kuosheng NPP is established based on Kuosheng NPP design data and the MELCOR users' guides. The initial steady-state conditions are generated with a developed self-initialization algorithm. The main severe accident phenomena and the fission product release fractions associated with the SBO accident were simulated. The predicted results are plausible and as expected in light of current understanding of severe accident phenomena. The uncertainty of this analysis is briefly discussed. The important features of the MELCOR 1.8.4 are described. The estimated results provide useful information for the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of Kuosheng NPP. This tool will be applied to the PRA, the severe accident analysis, and the severe accident management study of Kuosheng NPP in the near future.

Wang, S.-J.; Chien, C.-S.; Wang, T.-C.; Chiang, K.-S

2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Hazards and accident analyses, an integrated approach, for the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an integrated approach to perform hazards and accident analyses for the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A comprehensive hazards analysis methodology was developed that extends the scope of the preliminary/process hazard analysis methods described in the AIChE Guidelines for Hazard Evaluations. Results fro the semi-quantitative approach constitute a full spectrum of hazards. For each accident scenario identified, there is a binning assigned for the event likelihood and consequence severity. In addition, each accident scenario is analyzed for four possible sectors (workers, on-site personnel, public, and environment). A screening process was developed to link the hazard analysis to the accident analysis. Specifically the 840 accident scenarios were screened down to about 15 accident scenarios for a more through deterministic analysis to define the operational safety envelope. The mechanics of the screening process in the selection of final scenarios for each representative accident category, i.e., fire, explosion, criticality, and spill, is described.

Pan, P.Y.; Goen, L.K.; Letellier, B.C.; Sasser, M.K.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

August 2003, Columbia Accident Investigation Report Volume I. Chapter 5-8  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 7 9 7 R e p o r t V o l u m e I A u g u s t 2 0 0 3 Part Two Why The Accident Occurred Many accident investigations do not go far enough. They identify the technical cause of the accident, and then connect it to a variant of "operator error" - the line worker who forgot to insert the bolt, the engineer who miscalculated the stress, or the manager who made the wrong decision. But this is sel-

428

Study on the Accidental Rupture of Hot Leg or Surge Line in SBO Accident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The postulated total station blackout accident (SBO) of PWR NPP with 600 MWe in China is analyzed as the base case using SCDAP/RELAP5 code. Then the hot leg or surge line are assumed to rupture before the lower head of Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) ruptures, and the progressions are analyzed in detail comparing with the base case. The results show that the accidental rupture of hot leg or surge line will greatly influence the progression of accident. The probability of hot leg or surge line rupture in intentional depressurization is also studied in this paper, which provides a suggestion to the development of Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMG). (authors)

Kun Zhang; Xuewu Cao [Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Transportation | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation From modeling and simulation programs to advanced electric powertrains, engines, biofuels, lubricants, and batteries, Argonne's transportation research is vital to the development of next-generation vehicles. Revolutionary advances in transportation are critical to reducing our nation's petroleum consumption and the environmental impact of our vehicles. Some of the most exciting new vehicle technologies are being ushered along by research conducted at Argonne National Laboratory. Our Transportation Technology R&D Center (TTRDC) brings together scientists and engineers from many disciplines across the laboratory to work with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), automakers and other industrial partners. Our goal is to put new transportation technologies on the road that improve

430

Transportation Services | Staff Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Services Transportation Services The BNL Transportation Office, located at 20 Brookhaven Avenue, Building 400A, is available to assist BNL employees, guests and visitors with transportation needs in support of Laboratory programs. The hours of operation are 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM Monday through Friday. To contact the Transportation Office call (631) 344-2535. Stony Brook Parking Passes The Transportation Office has a limited number of parking passes for the three (3) parking garages at Stony Brook University. The passes are available to and are intended for use by BNL employees/scientific staff on official business only. Passes may be used at the Administration, University Hospital and Health Services Center garages on the Stony Brook campus when visiting SBU on official business.

431

Transportation technology at Sandia  

SciTech Connect

Industrial and military activities in the US produce large amounts of hazardous mixed waste, which includes both radioactive and toxic substances. The already overburdened environment is faced with the task of safely disposing of these complex wastes. A very important aspect of this effort is the safe and economical transportation of radioactive and toxic chemical wastes to projected repositories. Movement of wastes to the repository sites is accomplished by a combination of truck, rail, ship, and air. The DOE directs transportation activities including cask development technology for use in single or multimode transport. Sandia National Laboratories` Transportation Technology programs provide the technology and know-how to support DOE in achieving safe, efficient, and economical packaging and transportation of nuclear and other hazardous waste materials. This brochure describes the Transportation Technology programs and the specialized techniques and capabilities they offer to prospective users.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

432

Feasibility studies on the use of TRUPACT-1 for on-site transportation of DOE LLW  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the authors propose using TRUPACT-I, with modifications to its storage system, to facilitate on-site transportation of US Department of Energy (DOE) low-level waste (LLW). TRUPACT-I was designed as a type-B contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste transportation system for use in Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-related operations and was subjected to the required type-B container accident tests, which it successfully passed. Thus, from a safety standpoint, TRUPACT-1 is provided with double containment, impact limitation, and fire-retardant capabilities. Furthermore, because TRUPACT-1 was developed to transport CH-TRU waste, which is characterized by a higher total activity, larger decay heat, and higher dose rate than LLW, it would be overqualified for the requirements of LLW transportation.

Hills, C.R.; Banjac, V.; Heger, A.S. (Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

DOE FEMA Videos | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RESPONSE TO A TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL This training video and user guide was designed to supplement the MERRTT program and has been produced as...

434

First Responder Initial Response Procedure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this response flow chart is to provide first responders with guidance for response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material.

435

Update Sustainable Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on the significant impacts and breadth of transportation science research at ORNL and new directions to achieve efficient, clean, and sustainable mobility. Ron's talk attracted...

436

Transportation Storage Interface  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Transportation: Technical Needs 13 * High priority degradation areas: * Stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel canister body and welds * Degradation of cask bolts *...

437

Rail Coal Transportation Rates  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

figure data Figure 7 shows the percent change in average real rates for those state-to-state ... Estimated transportation rates for coal delivered to electric ...

438

Sustainable Transportation (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in transportation technologies, alternative fuels, and fuel cell technologies.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Defects and Transport I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 8, 2012 ... Secondary Transport Phenomena in Ceramic Membranes under ... the specific case of mixed proton/oxygen vacancy/electronic conduction in a...

440

Transport in PEMFC Stacks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information September 30 th 2009 Washington, DC 1 Transport in PEMFC Stacks Cortney Mittelsteadt Bryn McPheeters This...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Sustainability and Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pdf/Hughes_D_NatGas_Boston_2006. pdf> Idaho.2005. Idaho Bicycle and Pedestrian Program.Boise, Idaho: Idaho Transportation Department [cited 13

Gilbert, Richard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Boulder Area Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST does not endorse or guarantee the quality or services provided by these businesses. All Denver/Boulder area transportation companies. ...

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

443

Argonne Transportation Current News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

one-stop shop for news, photographs and other interesting reference information on transportation research. Current News Read current news and research highlights. Archives: 2011...

444

Argonne Transportation - Podolski Award  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientists Receives Award for Contributions in Intelligent Transportation Systems Tentner Receives ITS Miwest Award Adrian Tentner receives the first Chapter Service Award from ITS...

445

Aluminum in Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Aluminum in Transportation: Case Study of the Development of a ... The unit was entirely redesigned using aluminum and based on the future

446

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be competitive, but the quantity of waste oils is minisculeoils are currently being used as biodiesel transport fuel in limited quantities and

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Transportation | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SHARE Transportation Research ORNL researcher Jim Szybist uses a variable valve-train engine to evaluate different types of fuels, including ethanol blends, and their...

448

Transportation Energy Futures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSPORTATION ment of Oil Shale Technology. Washing- ton,interest and investments in oil shale, ethanol, coal liquidsbiomass materials, coal, oil shale, tar sands, natural gas,

Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Options for Liquid Biofuels Development in Ireland. SEI, 562006: Outlook for advanced biofuels. Energy Policy, 34(17),40 pp. IEA, 2004c: Biofuels for Transport: An International

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Feature - Argonne involved with proposed Green Fuels Depot in Naperville  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

involved in Naperville's proposed Green Fuels Depot involved in Naperville's proposed Green Fuels Depot Naperville's proposed Green Fuels Depot The proposed Green Fuels Depot would produce renewable fuels for Naperville's vehicle fleet. Using grass clippings to power next-generation vehicles - now that's green transportation. This is one of the ideas being considered at Naperville's newly proposed Green Fuels Depot. The project, which will require $4 million in funding to get started, would bring together Argonne National Laboratory, the city of Naperville, Packer Engineering and the College of DuPage for an innovative plan to produce renewable energy. "It's a golden opportunity for Argonne to be associated with one of our neighboring communities in promoting new technologies that we have pioneered here at the laboratory," said Glenn Keller, manager of vehicle

451

Accident Performance of Light Water Reactor Cladding Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During a loss of coolant accident as experienced at Fukushima, inadequate cooling of the reactor core forces component temperatures ever higher where they must withstand aggressive chemical environments. Conventional zirconium cladding alloys will readily oxidize in the presence of water vapor at elevated temperatures, rapidly degrading and likely failing. A cladding breach removes the critical barrier between actinides and fission products and the coolant, greatly increasing the probability of the release of radioactivity in the event of a containment failure. These factors have driven renewed international interest in both study and improvement of the materials used in commercial light water reactors. Characterization of a candidate cladding alloy or oxidation mitigation technique requires understanding of both the oxidation kinetics and hydrogen production as a function of temperature and atmosphere conditions. Researchers in the MST division supported by the DOE-NE Fuel Cycle Research and Development program are working to evaluate and quantify these parameters across a wide range of proposed cladding materials. The primary instrument employed is a simultaneous thermal analyzer (STA) equipped with a specialized water vapor furnace capable of maintaining temperatures above 1200 C in a range of atmospheres and water vapor contents. The STA utilizes thermogravimetric analysis and a coupled mass spectrometer to measure in situ oxidation and hydrogen production of candidate materials. This capability is unprecedented in study of materials under consideration for reactor cladding use, and is currently being expanded to investigate proposed coating techniques as well as the effect of coating defects on corrosion resistance.

Nelson, Andrew T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

452

Source terms for analysis of accidents at a high level waste repository  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes an approach to identifying source terms from possible accidents during the preclosure phase of a high-level nuclear waste repository. A review of the literature on repository safety analyses indicated that source term estimation is in a preliminary stage, largely based on judgement-based scoping analyses. The approach developed here was to partition the accident space into domains defined by certain threshold values of temperature and impact energy density which may arise in potential accidents and specify release fractions of various radionuclides, present in the waste form, in each domain. Along with a more quantitative understanding of accident phenomenology, this approach should help in achieving a clearer perspective on scenarios important to preclosure safety assessments of geologic repositories. 18 refs., 3 tabs.

Mubayi, V.; Davis, R.E.; Youngblood, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Human error and general aviation accidents: A comprehensive, fine-grained analysis using HFACS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS) is a theoretically based tool for investigating and analyzing human error associated with accidents and incidents. Previous research performed at both at the University of Illinois and the Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) have been highly successful and have shown that HFACS can be reliably used to analyze the underlying human causes of both commercial and general aviation (GA) accidents. these analyses have helped identify general trends in the types of human factors issues and aircrew errors that have contributed to civil aviation accidents. The next step is to identify the exact nature of the human errors identified. The purpose of this research effort, therefore, was to address these questions by performing a fine-grained HFACS analysis of the individual human causal factors associated with GA accidents and to assist in the generation of intervention programs. This report details those findings and offers an approach for developing interventions to address them.

Douglas A. Wiegmann; Albert Boquet; Cristy Detwiler; Kali Holcomb; Troy Faaborg; Douglas A. Wiegmann, Ph.D., Ph.D.; Albert Boquet, Ph.D.; Cristy Detwiler; Kali Holcomb; Troy Faaborg

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

ACCIDENT ANALYSES & CONTROL OPTIONS IN SUPPORT OF THE SLUDGE WATER SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the accident analyses and nuclear safety control options for use in Revision 7 of HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, ''K Basins Safety Analysis Report'' and Revision 4 of HNF-SD-SNF-TSR-001, ''Technical Safety Requirements - 100 KE and 100 KW Fuel Storage Basins''. These documents will define the authorization basis for Sludge Water System (SWS) operations. This report follows the guidance of DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports'', for calculating onsite and offsite consequences. The accident analysis summary is shown in Table ES-1 below. While this document describes and discusses potential control options to either mitigate or prevent the accidents discussed herein, it should be made clear that the final control selection for any accident is determined and presented in HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062.

WILLIAMS, J.C.

2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

A methodology for analyzing precursors to earthquake-initiated and fire-initiated accident sequences  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work to develop a methodology for analyzing precursors to both earthquake-initiated and fire-initiated accidents at commercial nuclear power plants. Currently, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsors a large ongoing project, the Accident Sequence Precursor project, to analyze the safety significance of other types of accident precursors, such as those arising from internally-initiated transients and pipe breaks, but earthquakes and fires are not within the current scope. The results of this project are that: (1) an overall step-by-step methodology has been developed for precursors to both fire-initiated and seismic-initiated potential accidents; (2) some stylized case-study examples are provided to demonstrate how the fully-developed methodology works in practice, and (3) a generic seismic-fragility date base for equipment is provided for use in seismic-precursors analyses. 44 refs., 23 figs., 16 tabs.

Budnitz, R.J.; Lambert, H.E.; Apostolakis, G. [and others] and others

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Effect of helium injection on diffusion dominated air ingress accidents in pebble bed reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary objective of this thesis was to validate the sustained counter air diffusion (SCAD) method at preventing natural circulation onset in diffusion dominated air ingress accidents. The analysis presented in this ...

Yurko, Joseph Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

K Basins floor sludge retrieval system knockout pot basket fuel burn accident  

SciTech Connect

The K Basins Sludge Retrieval System Preliminary Hazard Analysis Report (HNF-2676) identified and categorized a series of potential accidents associated with K Basins Sludge Retrieval System design and operation. The fuel burn accident was of concern with respect to the potential release of contamination resulting from a runaway chemical reaction of the uranium fuel in a knockout pot basket suspended in the air. The unmitigated radiological dose to an offsite receptor from this fuel burn accident is calculated to be much less than the offsite risk evaluation guidelines for anticipated events. However, because of potential radiation exposure to the facility worker, this accident is precluded with a safety significant lifting device that will prevent the monorail hoist from lifting the knockout pot basket out of the K Basin water pool.

HUNT, J.W.

1998-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

458

LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Training | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Training < LEDSGP‎ | Transportation Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Transportation Toolkit Home Tools Training Contacts Training for Low Emission Development Strategies in Transportation The LEDS GP Transport Working Group provides technical training and resources in the form of webinars, e-learning, live/recorded presentation videos, presentation files, and other knowledge exchange formats relevant to low emission development strategies in the transport sector. Below are links to relevant online training/learning sites. To suggest additional

459

LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Key Actions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Key Actions < LEDSGP‎ | Transportation Toolkit(Redirected from Transportation Toolkit/Key Actions) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Transportation Toolkit Home Tools Training Contacts Key Actions for Low-Emission Development in Transportation Although no single approach or fixed process exists for low emission development strategies (LEDS), the following key actions are necessary steps for implementing LEDS in the transportation sector. Undertaking these actions requires flexibility to adapt to dynamic societal conditions in a

460

2006 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2006 Transportation Tomorrow Survey Data Presentation #12;2006 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO City of Hamilton City of Kawartha Lakes City of Guelph City of Brantford

Toronto, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transportation accident involving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.